WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave spectra measured

  1. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  2. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd 3+ lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho 3+ was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb 3+ to Yb 3+ was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar + laser, Kr + laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc

  3. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two-frequency scatterometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  4. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two frequency scatterometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  5. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  6. Measurement of lower-hybrid-driven current profile by Abel inversion of electron-cyclotron wave transmission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidone, I.; Giruzzi, G.; Caron, X.; Meyer, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A method for measuring the radial profile of the lower-hybrid-driven current in a low-density tokamak plasma using electron-cyclotron wave attenuation is discussed. This diagnostic scheme is reminiscent of the transmission interferometry approach, commonly used in tokamaks to measure the plasma density, but now the wave amplitude instead of the phase is measured. Wave attenuation of the ordinary mode at ω p much-lt ω c along vertical chords is measured; at these frequencies, the waves are absorbed by the superthermal tail sustained by lower-hybrid waves and the local wave absorption coefficient is proportional to the noninductive current density. The radial profile of this current is obtained from Abel inversion. An application to the Tore Supra tokamak is presented

  7. Measurement of Near-Surface Salinity, Temperature and Directional Wave Spectra using a Novel Wave-Following, Lagrangian Surface Contact Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Results from a surface contact drifter buoy which measures near-surface conductivity ( 10 cm depth), sea state characteristics and near-surface water temperature ( 2 cm depth) are described. This light (righting. It has a small above-surface profile and low windage, resulting in near-Lagrangian drift characteristics. It is autonomous, with low power requirements and solar panel battery recharging. Onboard sensors include an inductive toroidal conductivity probe for salinity measurement, a nine-degrees-of-freedom motion package for derivation of directional wave spectra and a thermocouple for water temperature measurement. Data retrieval for expendable, ocean-going operation uses an onboard Argos transmitter. Scientific results as well as data processing algorithms are presented from laboratory and field experiments which support qualification of buoy platform measurements. These include sensor calibration experiments, longer-term dock-side biofouling experiments during 2013-2014 and a series of short-duration ocean deployments in the Gulf Stream in 2014. In addition, a treatment method will be described which appears to minimize the effects of biofouling on the inductive conductivity probe when in coastal surface waters. Due to its low cost and ease of deployment, scores, perhaps hundreds of these novel instruments could be deployed from ships or aircraft during process studies or to provide surface validation for satellite-based measurements, particularly in high precipitation regions.

  8. Multiscale climate emulator of multimodal wave spectra: MUSCLE-spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Ana; Hegermiller, Christie A.; Antolinez, Jose A. A.; Camus, Paula; Vitousek, Sean; Ruggiero, Peter; Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Tomás, Antonio; Mendez, Fernando J.

    2017-02-01

    Characterization of multimodal directional wave spectra is important for many offshore and coastal applications, such as marine forecasting, coastal hazard assessment, and design of offshore wave energy farms and coastal structures. However, the multivariate and multiscale nature of wave climate variability makes this complex problem tractable using computationally expensive numerical models. So far, the skill of statistical-downscaling model-based parametric (unimodal) wave conditions is limited in large ocean basins such as the Pacific. The recent availability of long-term directional spectral data from buoys and wave hindcast models allows for development of stochastic models that include multimodal sea-state parameters. This work introduces a statistical downscaling framework based on weather types to predict multimodal wave spectra (e.g., significant wave height, mean wave period, and mean wave direction from different storm systems, including sea and swells) from large-scale atmospheric pressure fields. For each weather type, variables of interest are modeled using the categorical distribution for the sea-state type, the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution for wave height and wave period, a multivariate Gaussian copula for the interdependence between variables, and a Markov chain model for the chronology of daily weather types. We apply the model to the southern California coast, where local seas and swells from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute to the multimodal wave spectrum. This work allows attribution of particular extreme multimodal wave events to specific atmospheric conditions, expanding knowledge of time-dependent, climate-driven offshore and coastal sea-state conditions that have a significant influence on local nearshore processes, coastal morphology, and flood hazards.

  9. Bayesian Estimation of Wave Spectra – Proper Formulation of ABIC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2007-01-01

    It is possible to estimate on-site wave spectra using measured ship responses applied to Bayesian Modelling based on two prior information: the wave spectrum must be smooth both directional-wise and frequency-wise. This paper introduces two hyperparameters into Bayesian Modelling and, hence, a pr...

  10. The Global Signature of Ocean Wave Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portilla-Yandún, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    A global atlas of ocean wave spectra is developed and presented. The development is based on a new technique for deriving wave spectral statistics, which is applied to the extensive ERA-Interim database from European Centre of Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Spectral statistics is based on the idea of long-term wave systems, which are unique and distinct at every geographical point. The identification of those wave systems allows their separation from the overall spectrum using the partition technique. Their further characterization is made using standard integrated parameters, which turn out much more meaningful when applied to the individual components than to the total spectrum. The parameters developed include the density distribution of spectral partitions, which is the main descriptor; the identified wave systems; the individual distribution of the characteristic frequencies, directions, wave height, wave age, seasonal variability of wind and waves; return periods derived from extreme value analysis; and crossing-sea probabilities. This information is made available in web format for public use at http://www.modemat.epn.edu.ec/#/nereo. It is found that wave spectral statistics offers the possibility to synthesize data while providing a direct and comprehensive view of the local and regional wave conditions.

  11. The physical basis for estimating wave-energy spectra with the radar ocean-wave spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Frederick C.

    1987-01-01

    The derivation of the reflectivity modulation spectrum of the sea surface for near-nadir-viewing microwave radars using geometrical optics is described. The equations required for the derivation are presented. The derived reflectivity modulation spectrum provides data on the physical basis of the radar ocean-wave spectrometer measurements of ocean-wave directional spectra.

  12. Energetic Proton Spectra Measured by the Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Danny; Shi, Run; Engebretson, Mark J.; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Mitchell, Donald G.

    2017-10-01

    We test the hypothesis that pitch angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can limit ring current proton fluxes. For two chosen magnetic storms, during 17-20 March 2013 and 17-20 March 2015, we measure proton energy spectra in the region 3 ≤ L ≤ 6 using the RBSPICE-B instrument on the Van Allen Probes. The most intense proton spectra are observed to occur during the recovery periods of the respective storms. Using proton precipitation data from the POES (NOAA and MetOp) spacecraft, we deduce that EMIC wave action was prevalent at the times and L-shell locations of the most intense proton spectra. We calculate limiting ring current proton energy spectra from recently developed theory. Comparisons between the observed proton energy spectra and the theoretical limiting spectra show reasonable agreement. We conclude that the measurements of the most intense proton spectra are consistent with self-limiting by EMIC wave scattering.

  13. Stochastic generation of continuous wave spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trulsen, J.; Dysthe, K. B.; Pécseli, Hans

    1983-01-01

    Wave packets of electromagnetic or Langmuir waves trapped in a well between oscillating reflectors are considered. An equation for the temporal evolution of the probability distribution for the carrier wave number is derived, and solved analytically in terms of moments in the limits of long...

  14. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide ⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bteich, S.B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R.A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Context More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152 - 308 GHz and analyzed using Watson’s A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. PMID:27738349

  15. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bteich, S. B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-07-01

    Context. More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims: The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods: The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152-308 GHz and analyzed using Watson's A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results: The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00009.SV. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA), and NINS (Japan) with NRC (Canada), NSC, and ASIAA (Taiwan), and KASI (Republic of

  16. Turbulent spectra from three drift-wave interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Horton, W.

    1982-02-01

    Hydrodynamic equations for the drift-wave instability containing the rvec E x rvec B convective nonlinearity are used to show that the three wave interactions lead to temporal chaos with broad-band frequency spectra in the saturated state. 7 refs., 2 figs

  17. Spatial structure of directional wave spectra in hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Osuna, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The spatial structure of the wave field during hurricane conditions is studied using the National Data Buoy Center directional wave buoy data set from the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. The buoy information, comprising the directional wave spectra during the passage of several hurricanes, was referenced to the center of the hurricane using the path of the hurricane, the propagation velocity, and the radius of the maximum winds. The directional wave spectra were partitioned into their main components to quantify the energy corresponding to the observed wave systems and to distinguish between wind-sea and swell. The findings are consistent with those found using remote sensing data (e.g., Scanning Radar Altimeter data). Based on the previous work, the highest waves are found in the right forward quadrant of the hurricane, where the spectral shape tends to become uni-modal, in the vicinity of the region of maximum winds. More complex spectral shapes are observed in distant regions at the front of and in the rear quadrants of the hurricane, where there is a tendency of the spectra to become bi- and tri-modal. The dominant waves generally propagate at significant angles to the wind direction, except in the regions next to the maximum winds of the right quadrants. Evidence of waves generated by concentric eyewalls associated with secondary maximum winds was also found. The frequency spectra display some of the characteristics of the JONSWAP spectrum adjusted by Young (J Geophys Res 111:8020, 2006); however, at the spectral peak, the similarity with the Pierson-Moskowitz spectrum is clear. These results establish the basis for the use in assessing the ability of numerical models to simulate the wave field in hurricanes.

  18. Thermoluminescence spectra measured with a Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haschberger, P.

    1991-01-01

    A Michelson interferometer was redesigned to prove its capabilities in the measurement of short-lived, low-intensity thermoluminescence spectra. Interferograms are collected during heating up the thermoluminescent probe in a heater plate. A personal computer controls the data acquisition and processes the Fourier transform. As the results show, even a comparatively simple and limited setup leads to relevant and reproducible spectra. (author)

  19. Flow angle dependent photoacoustic Doppler power spectra under intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic Doppler (PAD power spectra showing an evident Doppler shift represent the major characteristics of the continuous wave-excited or burst wave-excited versions of PAD flow measurements. In this paper, the flow angle dependences of the PAD power spectra are investigated using an experiment setup that was established based on intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation. The setup has an overall configuration that is similar to a previously reported configuration, but is more sophisticated in that it accurately aligns the laser illumination with the ultrasound detection process, and in that it picks up the correct sample position. In the analysis of the power spectra data, we find that the background power spectra can be extracted by combining the output signals from the two channels of the lock-in amplifier, which is very useful for identification of the PAD power spectra. The power spectra are presented and analyzed in opposite flow directions, at different flow speeds, and at different flow angles. The power spectra at a 90° flow angle show the unique properties of symmetrical shapes due to PAD broadening. For the other flow angles, the smoothed power spectra clearly show a flow angle cosine relationship.

  20. Scalings, spectra, and statistics of strong wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    A two-component model of strongly nonlinear wave turbulence is developed for a broad class of systems in which high-frequency electrostatic waves interact with low-frequency sound-like waves. In this model coherent nonlinear wave packets form and collapse amid a sea of incoherent background waves. It is shown that three classes of turbulence exist, typified by Langmuir, lower-hybrid, and upper-hybrid turbulence. Balance between power input to incoherent waves, and dissipation at the end of collapse determines power-law scalings of turbulent electrostatic energy density, density fluctuations, length and time scales. Knowledge of the evolution of collapsing packets enables probability distributions of the magnitudes of electric fields and density fluctuations to be calculated, yielding power-law dependences. Wavenumber spectra of collapsing waves and associated density fluctuations are also calculated and shown to have power-law forms. Applications to Langmuir, lower-hybrid, and upper-hybrid waves are discussed. In the Langmuir case the results agree with earlier theory and simulations, with one exception, which is consistent only with earlier simulations. In the lower-hybrid and upper-hybrid cases, the results are consistent with the few simulations to date. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  1. Directional Wave Spectra Observed During Intense Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, C. O.; Potter, H.; Lund, B.; Tamura, H.; Graber, H. C.

    2018-02-01

    Two deep-sea moorings were deployed 780 km off the coast of southern Taiwan for 4-5 months during the 2010 typhoon season. Directional wave spectra, wind speed and direction, and momentum fluxes were recorded on two Extreme Air-Sea Interaction buoys during the close passage of Severe Tropical Storm Dianmu and three tropical cyclones (TCs): Typhoon Fanapi, Super Typhoon Megi, and Typhoon Chaba. Conditions sampled include significant wave heights up to 11 m and wind speeds up to 26 m s-1. Details varied for large-scale spectral structure in frequency and direction but were mostly bimodal. The modes were generally composed of a swell system emanating from the most intense storm region and local wind-seas. The peak systems were consistently young, meaning actively forced by winds, when the storms were close. During the peaks of the most intense passages—Chaba at the northern mooring and Megi at the southern—the bimodal seas coalesced. During Chaba, the swell and wind-sea coupling directed the high frequency waves and the wind stress away from the wind direction. A spectral wave model was able reproduce many of the macrofeatures of the directional spectra.

  2. Microdosimetric spectra measurements of JANUS neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, I.R.; Williamson, F.S.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron radiation from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory is being used with increasing frequency for major biological experiments. The fast neutron spectrum has a Kerma-weighted mean energy of 0.8 MeV and low gamma-ray contamination. In 1984 the JANUS fission converter plate of highly enriched uranium was replaced by one made of low-enriched uranium. We recorded microdosimetric spectra at several different positions in the high-flux irradiation room of JANUS before the change of the converter plate. Each set of measurements consisted of spectra taken at three different site diameters (0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 ..mu..m) and in both ''attenuator up'' and ''attenuator down'' configurations. At two conventional dosimetry reference positions, two sets of measurements were recorded. At three biological reference positions, measurements simulating several biological irradiation conditions, were taken. The dose rate at each position was estimated and compared with dose rates obtained previously by conventional dosimetry. Comparison of the different measurements showed no major change in spectra as a function of position or irradiation condition. First results from similar sets of measurements recorded after the installment of the new converter plate indicate no major change in the spectra. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Microdosimetric spectra measurements of JANUS neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, I.R.; Williamson, F.S.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron radiation from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory is being used with increasing frequency for major biological experiments. The fast neutron spectrum has a Kerma-weighted mean energy of 0.8 MeV and low gamma-ray contamination. In 1984 the JANUS fission converter plate of highly enriched uranium was replaced by one made of low-enriched uranium. We recorded microdosimetric spectra at several different positions in the high-flux irradiation room of JANUS before the change of the converter plate. Each set of measurements consisted of spectra taken at three different site diameters (0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 μm) and in both ''attenuator up'' and ''attenuator down'' configurations. At two conventional dosimetry reference positions, two sets of measurements were recorded. At three biological reference positions, measurements simulating several biological irradiation conditions, were taken. The dose rate at each position was estimated and compared with dose rates obtained previously by conventional dosimetry. Comparison of the different measurements showed no major change in spectra as a function of position or irradiation condition. First results from similar sets of measurements recorded after the installment of the new converter plate indicate no major change in the spectra. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Focusing Leaky Waves: A Class of Electromagnetic Localized Waves with Complex Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuscaldo, Walter; Comite, Davide; Boesso, Alessandro; Baccarelli, Paolo; Burghignoli, Paolo; Galli, Alessandro

    2018-05-01

    Localized waves, i.e., the wide class of limited-diffraction, limited-dispersion solutions to the wave equation are generally characterized by real wave numbers. We consider the role played by localized waves with generally complex "leaky" wave numbers. First, the impact of the imaginary part of the wave number (i.e., the leakage constant) on the diffractive (spatial broadening) features of monochromatic localized solutions (i.e., beams) is rigorously evaluated. Then general conditions are derived to show that only a restricted class of spectra (either real or complex) allows for generating a causal localized wave. It turns out that backward leaky waves fall into this category. On this ground, several criteria for the systematic design of wideband radiators, namely, periodic radial waveguides based on backward leaky waves, are established in the framework of leaky-wave theory. An effective design method is proposed to minimize the frequency dispersion of the proposed class of devices and the impact of the "leakage" on the dispersive (temporal broadening) features of polychromatic localized solutions (i.e., pulses) is accounted for. Numerical results corroborate the concept, clearly highlighting the advantages and limitations of the leaky-wave approach for the generation of localized pulses at millimeter-wave frequencies, where energy focusing is in high demand in modern applications.

  5. Wave-Number Spectra and Intermittency in the Terrestrial Foreshock Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Y.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Treumann, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    Wave-number spectra of magnetic field fluctuations are directly determined in the terrestrial foreshock region (upstream of a quasiparallel collisionless shock wave) using four-point Cluster spacecraft measurements. The spectral curve is characterized by three ranges reminiscent of turbulence: energy injection, inertial, and dissipation range. The spectral index for the inertial range spectrum is close to Kolmogorov's slope, -5/3. On the other hand, the fluctuations are highly anisotropic and intermittent perpendicular to the mean magnetic field direction. These results suggest that the foreshock is in a weakly turbulent and intermittent state in which parallel propagating Alfven waves interact with one another, resulting in the phase coherence or the intermittency

  6. Spectral wave analysis at the mesopause from SCIAMACHY airglow data compared to SABER temperature spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ern

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Space-time spectral analysis of satellite data is an important method to derive a synoptic picture of the atmosphere from measurements sampled asynoptically by satellite instruments. In addition, it serves as a powerful tool to identify and separate different wave modes in the atmospheric data. In our work we present space-time spectral analyses of chemical heating rates derived from Scanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY hydroxyl nightglow emission measurements onboard Envisat for the years 2002–2006 at mesopause heights. Since SCIAMACHY nightglow hydroxyl emission measurements are restricted to the ascending (nighttime part of the satellite orbit, our analysis also includes temperature spectra derived from 15 μm CO2 emissions measured by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER instrument. SABER offers better temporal and spatial coverage (daytime and night-time values of temperature and a more regular sampling grid. Therefore SABER spectra also contain information about higher frequency waves. Comparison of SCIAMACHY and SABER results shows that SCIAMACHY, in spite of its observational restrictions, provides valuable information on most of the wave modes present in the mesopause region. The main differences between wave spectra obtained from these sensors can be attributed to the differences in their sampling patterns.

  7. Spectral wave analysis at the mesopause from SCIAMACHY airglow data compared to SABER temperature spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ern

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Space-time spectral analysis of satellite data is an important method to derive a synoptic picture of the atmosphere from measurements sampled asynoptically by satellite instruments. In addition, it serves as a powerful tool to identify and separate different wave modes in the atmospheric data. In our work we present space-time spectral analyses of chemical heating rates derived from Scanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY hydroxyl nightglow emission measurements onboard Envisat for the years 2002–2006 at mesopause heights.

    Since SCIAMACHY nightglow hydroxyl emission measurements are restricted to the ascending (nighttime part of the satellite orbit, our analysis also includes temperature spectra derived from 15 μm CO2 emissions measured by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER instrument. SABER offers better temporal and spatial coverage (daytime and night-time values of temperature and a more regular sampling grid. Therefore SABER spectra also contain information about higher frequency waves.

    Comparison of SCIAMACHY and SABER results shows that SCIAMACHY, in spite of its observational restrictions, provides valuable information on most of the wave modes present in the mesopause region. The main differences between wave spectra obtained from these sensors can be attributed to the differences in their sampling patterns.

  8. Long-term MST radar observations of vertical wave number spectra of gravity waves in the tropical troposphere over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E: comparison with model spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vijaya Bhaskara Rao

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential utility of Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST radar measurements of zonal, meridional and vertical winds for divulging the gravity wave vertical wave number spectra is discussed. The data collected during the years 1995–2004 are used to obtain the mean vertical wave number spectra of gravity wave kinetic energy in the tropical troposphere over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E. First, the climatology of 3-dimensional wind components is developed using ten years of radar observations, for the first time, over this latitude. This climatology brought out the salient features of background tropospheric winds over Gadanki. Further, using the second order polynomial fit as background, the day-to-day wind anomalies are estimated. These wind anomalies in the 4–14 km height regions are used to estimate the profiles of zonal, meridional and vertical kinetic energy per unit mass, which are then used to estimate the height profile of total kinetic energy. Finally, the height profiles of total kinetic energy are subjected to Fourier analysis to obtain the monthly mean vertical wave number spectra of gravity wave kinetic energy. The monthly mean vertical wave number spectra are then compared with a saturation spectrum predicted by gravity wave saturation theory. A slope of 5/3 is used for the model gravity wave spectrum estimation. In general, the agreement is good during all the months. However, it is noticed that the model spectrum overestimates the PSD at lower vertical wave numbers and underestimates it at higher vertical wave numbers, which is consistently observed during all the months. The observed discrepancies are attributed to the differences in the slopes of theoretical and observed gravity wave spectra. The slopes of the observed vertical wave number spectra are estimated and compared with the model spectrum slope, which are in good agreement. The estimated slopes of the observed monthly vertical wave number spectra are in the

  9. Field verification of ADCP surface gravity wave elevation spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Peters, H.C.; Schroevers, M.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can measure orbital velocities induced by surface gravity waves, yet the ADCP estimates of these velocities are subject to a relatively high noise level. The present paper introduces a linear filtration technique to significantly reduce the influence of

  10. Synthetic seismograms - II. Synthesis of amplitude spectra and seismograms of P waves from underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banghar, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    As a part of programme of seismic detection of underground nuclear explosions, step by step variations in the amplitude spectra and waveforms of P wave signal, as it propagates from source to receiver region, are investigated. Influences on the amplitude spectra and waveforms of teleseismic p waves due to : (1) variation in the shape of reduced displacement potential, (2) variation of mantle Q values, (3) change in depth, (4) various yields, (5) spalling, and (6) variation of crustal structure at source as well as at receiver are studied. The results show that for a yield of 85 kilotons, the time structure of seismograms is nearly same for four types of reduced displacement potentials considered here. The duration of waveforms is affected both by crustal structure at source as well as due to spalling. In general, effect of receiver crust on seismograms is found to be minor. Synthesized and observed P wave seismograms for Longshot, Milrow and Cannikin underground nuclear explosions are computed at various seismometer array stations of the UKAEA. Computed seismograms compare well with the recorded ones. It is seen that: (1) overburden P wave velocity inferred from seismograms is less as compared to its value obtained from on-site measurements, and (2) the source function, the source crust transfer function, the mantle transfer function and the spalling function are the most important factors that influence shaping of spectra and seismograms. (M.G.B.)

  11. Influence of hurricane wind field in the structure of directional wave spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Osuna, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Extensive field measurements of wind waves in deep waters in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, have been analyzed to describe the spatial structure of directional wave spectra during hurricane conditions. Following Esquivel-Trava et al. (2015) this analysis was made for minor hurricanes (categories 1 and 2) and major hurricanes (categories 3, 4 and 5). In both cases the directionality of the energy wave spectrum is similar in all quadrants. Some differences are observed however, and they are associated with the presence and the shape of swell energy in each quadrant. Three numerical experiments using the spectral wave prediction model SWAN were carried out to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the directional and frequency distributions of hurricane wave energy. The aim of the experiments is to evaluate the effect of the translation speed of the hurricane and the presence of concentric eye walls, on both the wave growth process and the shape of the directional wave spectrum. The HRD wind field of Hurricane Dean on August 20 at 7:30 was propagated at two different velocities (5 and 10 m/s). An idealized concentric eye wall (a Gaussian function that evolve in time along a path in the form of an Archimedean spiral) was imposed to the wind field. The white-capping formulation of Westhuysen et al. (2007) was selected. The wave model represents fairly well the directionality of the energy and the shape of the directional spectra in the hurricane domain. The model results indicate that the forward movement of the storm influences the development of the waves, consistent with field observations. This work has been supported by CONACYT scholarship 164510 and projects RugDisMar (155793), CB-2011-01-168173 and the Department of Physical Oceanography of CICESE. References Esquivel-Trava, B., Ocampo-Torres, F. J., & Osuna, P. (2015). Spatial structure of directional wave spectra in hurricanes. Ocean Dynam., 65(1), 65-76. doi:10.1007/s10236-014-0791-9 Van der

  12. Directional wave measurements and modelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.; Bhat, S.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    Some of the results obtained from analysis of the monsoon directional wave data measured over 4 years in shallow waters off the west coast of India are presented. The directional spectrum computed from the time series data seems to indicate...

  13. Wave-number spectra and intermittency in the terrestrial foreshock region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Y; Glassmeier, K-H; Treumann, R A

    2006-11-10

    Wave-number spectra of magnetic field fluctuations are directly determined in the terrestrial foreshock region (upstream of a quasiparallel collisionless shock wave) using four-point Cluster spacecraft measurements. The spectral curve is characterized by three ranges reminiscent of turbulence: energy injection, inertial, and dissipation range. The spectral index for the inertial range spectrum is close to Kolmogorov's slope, -5/3. On the other hand, the fluctuations are highly anisotropic and intermittent perpendicular to the mean magnetic field direction. These results suggest that the foreshock is in a weakly turbulent and intermittent state in which parallel propagating Alfvén waves interact with one another, resulting in the phase coherence or the intermittency.

  14. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  15. Effect of detector size and position on measured vibration spectra of strings and rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipcsei, S.; Kiss, S.; Por, G.

    1993-04-01

    Weight functions of string and rod vibrations are described by standing and travelling wave models. The effects of detector size and position on the measured vibration spectra was investigated, and the main characteristics of the transfer function were calculated by a simple standing wave model. The theoretical results were compared with data from laboratory rod vibration experiments, and with pressure fluctuation spectra obtained at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant. In addition, some fundamental physical consequences can be made using the theory of superposition of travelling waves and their reflection on clamped rod ends. (R.P.) 5 refs.; 10 figs

  16. Time-of-flight neutron spectra measurements in Zenith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, F R; Coates, M S; Diment, K M; Durrani, S A; Gayther, D B; Poole, M J; Reed, D L

    1962-01-15

    Neutron spectra in the second core loading of ZENITH have been measured using a neutron chopper. Spectra at two positions in the reactore core were obtained over a range of temperatures extending to 650 deg C.

  17. Indirect measurements of X-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainardi, R.T.

    2006-01-01

    To the effects of measuring the spectral distribution of the radiation emitted by the x-ray tubes and electron accelerators, numerous procedures that are grouped in two big categories exist at the present time: direct and indirect methods. The first ones use high resolution detectors that should be positioned, together with the appropriate collimator, in the direction of the x ray beam. The user should be an expert in the use and correction of the obtained data by the different effects that affect the detector operation such as efficiency and resolution in terms of the energy of the detected radiation. The indirect procedures, although its are more simple to use, its also require a considerable space along the beam to position the ionization chamber and the necessary absorbents to construct by this way the denominated attenuation curve. We will analyze the operation principle of the indirect methods and a new proposal in which such important novelties are introduced as the beam dispersion to avoid to measure along the main beam and that of determination of the attenuation curve in simultaneous form. By this way, with a single shot of the tube, the attenuation curve is measured, being necessary at most a shot of additional calibration to know the relative response of the detectors used in the experimental array. The physical processes involved in the obtaining of an attenuation curve are very well well-known and this it finishes it can be theoretically calculated if the analytic form of the spectrum is supposed well-known. Finally, we will see a spectra reconstruction example with the Kramers parametric form and comparisons with numeric simulations carried out with broadly validated programs as well as the possibility of the use of solid state dosemeters in the obtention of the attenuation curve. (Author)

  18. Measuring Transmission Spectra from the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Andres; Espinoza, Nestor; Eyheramendy, Susana

    2015-08-01

    Transmission spectroscopy allows study of the atmospheres of exoplanets without the need of spatially resolving them from their parent stars and is one of the most valuable follow-up possibilities offered by transiting systems. The measurement of a transmission spectrum, i.e. the apparent planetary size in units in the stellar radius as a function of wavelength, is conceptually simple, but the expected features that need to be discerned are on the order of one part in a thousand or less, and need to be extracted against a background of (potentially correlated) noise and systematic effects with amplitudes greatly exceeding that of the sought signal. In this talk I will describe how we have tackled the estimation of transmission spectra in a ground based survey we are carrying out with IMACS at Las Campanas Observatory, the Arizona-CfA-Catolica Exoplanet Spectroscopy Survey. Our treatment assumes an additive model consisting of the signal, common systematics and one of a set of stochastic processes with different memory characteristics for the noise. Common systematics are estimated from comparison stars using principal component analysis and the model parameter posterior distributions are estimated using MCMC. Model comparison is used to let the data select the model with the most appropriate noise component. I will illustrate the performance of our approach, and discuss possible avenues of improvement. I will also illustrate the importance of potential biases arising from our incomplete knowledge of stellar properties. In particular, I will show that limb darkening assumptions can limit the accuracy of our estimates of planetary radii above the achievable precisions in regimes currently being probed.

  19. Directional wave spectra off southeast coast of Tamil Nadu

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.; Gowthaman, R.

    directional spreading. A well established way to describe the energy content in an irregular wind generated surface wave assumes superposition of linear waves and the two dimensional energy spectrum can be conveniently expressed as a product of the one...

  20. Comparative study on spreading function for directional wave spectra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.S.; Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.

    -dimensional wave energy S(f) and the directional spreading function D(f, theta). This paper reviews various spreading functions proposed in the past for estimating the directional wave energy and presents their application to the Indian wave condition. It is found...

  1. Gravity wave spectra in the lower stratosphere diagnosed from project loon balloon trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Jensen, E.; Podglajen, A.; Coy, L.; Lodha, C.; Candido, S.; Carver, R.

    2017-08-01

    Project Loon has been launching superpressure balloons since January 2013 to provide worldwide Internet coverage. These balloons typically fly between 18 and 21 km and provide measurements of winds and pressure fluctuations in the lower stratosphere. We divide 1560 Loon flights into 3405 two-day segments for gravity wave analysis. We derive the kinetic energy spectrum from the horizontal balloon motion and estimate the temperature perturbation spectrum (proportional to the potential energy spectrum) from the pressure variations. We fit the temperature (and kinetic energy) data to the functional form T'2 = T'o2[ω/ωο)α, where ω is the wave frequency, ωο is daily frequency, T'o is the base temperature amplitude, and α is the spectral slope. Both the kinetic energy and temperature spectra show -1.9 ± 0.2 power-law dependence in the intrinsic frequency window 3-50 cycles/day. The temperature spectrum slope is weakly anticorrelated with the base temperature amplitude. We also find that the wave base temperature distribution is highly skewed. The tropical modal temperature is 0.77 K. The highest amplitude waves occur over the mountainous regions, the tropics, and the high southern latitudes. Temperature amplitudes show little height variation over our 18-21 km domain. Our results are consistent with other limited superpressure balloon analyses. The modal temperature is higher than the temperature currently used in high-frequency gravity wave parameterizations.

  2. Measurement and interpretation of plutonium spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, J.; Fred, M.S.; Carnall, W.T.; Crosswhite, H.M.; Crosswhite, H.

    1982-01-01

    The atomic spectroscopic data available for plutonium are among the rickest of any in the periodic system. They include high-resolution grating and Fourier-transform spectra as well as extensive Zeeman and isotope-shift studies. We summarize the present status of the term analysis and cite the configurations that have been identified. A least-squares adjustment of a parametric Hamiltonian for configurations of both Pu I and Pu II has shown that almost all of the expected low levels are now known. The use of a model Hamiltonian applicable to both lanthanide and actinide atomic species has been applied to the low configurations of Pu I and Pu II making use of trends predicted by ab initio calculations. This same model has been used to describe the energy levels of Pu 3+ in LaCl 3 , and an extension has permitted preliminary calculations of the spectra of other valence states

  3. Surface wave statistics and spectra for Valiathura coastlines, SW coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Asharaf, T.T.M.; Nair, R.P.; Sanjana, M.C.; Muraleedharan, G.; Kurup, P.G.

    Sciences Vol. 30, March , 2001, pp 9-17 Surface wave statistics and spectra for Valiathura coastline, SW coast of India T T Mohamed Asharaf National Institute of Oceanography, Regional Centre, Cochin, 682 014, India and Ratish P Nair, M.... 2D), the prominent direction was MOHAMED ASHARAF et al. : WAVE STATISTICS AND SPECTRA 11 Fig. 2Direction surface plots of January-June INDIAN J. MAR. SCI., VOL 30, MARCH 2001 12 Fig. 2  (Contd) ... Direction surface...

  4. TE Wave Measurement and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sikora, John P; Sonnad, Kiran G; Alesini, David; De Santis, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In the TE wave method, microwaves are coupled into the beam-pipe and the effect of the electron cloud on these microwaves is measured. An electron cloud (EC) density can then be calculated from this measurement. There are two analysis methods currently in use. The first treats the microwaves as being transmitted from one point to another in the accelerator. The second more recent method, treats the beam-pipe as a resonant cavity. This paper will summarize the reasons for adopting the resonant TE wave analysis as well as give examples from CESRTA and DA{\\Phi}NE of resonant beam-pipe. The results of bead-pull bench measurements will show some possible standing wave patterns, including a cutoff mode (evanescent) where the field decreases exponentially with distance from the drive point. We will outline other recent developments in the TE wave method including VORPAL simulations of microwave resonances, as well as the simulation of transmission in the presence of both an electron cloud and magnetic fields.

  5. The effect of instanton-induced interaction on P-wave meson spectra ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    possible to reproduce the observed spectra as the tensor and spin-orbit terms of. OGEP are attractive, and hence naturally triplet states masses will be lower than the corresponding singlet states. Hence, to reproduce the full P-wave spectra it is essential to include the hyperfine interaction term of III to have a consistent. 76.

  6. Wave measurement in severe ocean currents

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Diwan, S.G.; Suryavanshi, A.K.; Nayak, B.U.

    The measurement of ocean waves has been of particular interest, as wave data and understanding of wave phenomena are essential to ocean engineering, coastal engineering and to many marine operations. The National Institute of Oceanography, Goa...

  7. Real time wave measurements and wave hindcasting in deep waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Mandal, S.; SanilKumar, V.; Nayak, B.U.

    Deep water waves off Karwar (lat. 14~'45.1'N, long. 73~'34.8'E) at 75 m water depth pertaining to peak monsoon period have been measured using a Datawell waverider buoy. Measured wave data show that the significant wave height (Hs) predominantly...

  8. Estimation of waves and ship responses using onboard measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Najmeh

    This thesis focuses on estimation of waves and ship responses using ship-board measurements. This is useful for development of operational safety and performance efficiency in connection with the broader concept of onboard decision support systems. Estimation of sea state is studied using a set...... of measured ship responses, a parametric description of directional wave spectra (a generalised JONSWAP model) and the transfer functions of the ship responses. The difference between the spectral moments of the measured ship responses and the corresponding theoretically calculated moments formulates a cost...... information. The model is tested on simulated data based on known unimodal and bimodal wave scenarios. The wave parameters in the output are then compared with the true wave parameters. In addition to the numerical experiments, two sets of full-scale measurements from container ships are analysed. Herein...

  9. Evaluation of plasma-wave spectral density from cross-power spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, D.B.; Harker, K.J.

    1975-01-01

    The plasma-wave spectral density is evaluated by performing a spatial Fourier transform on experimental cross-power spectra of ion acoustic waves. The cross-power spectra are recorded on analog magnetic tape, converted to digital form, transferred to digital magnetic tape, and Fourier transformed on a digital computer. The important effects of sampling, finite data strings, and data smoothing on the end results are discussed and illustrated. The results indicate the usefulness of the spectral density method for the study of nonlinear wave phenomena. (auth)

  10. Coordinated observations of electron energy spectra and electrostatic cyclotron waves during diffuse auroras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, D.; Perraut, S.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Aparicio, B.; Bosqued, J.M.; Rodgers, D.

    1986-01-01

    An auroral precipitation event lasting several hours in the dusk sector on June 2, 1982 is studied in conjunction with three instruments: the EISCAT European Incoherent Scatter radar based in Scandinavia, the GEOS-2 European geostationary spacecraft, and the ARCAD-3 French-Soviet polar spacecraft. Electron energy spectra between about 1 and 10 keV, computed from EISCAT measurements, were in agreement, during a diffuse aurora period, with direct observations onboard ARCAD-3, and also with the plasma sheet component (3-10 keV) measured onboard GEOS-2 and available at large pitch-angles. This last comparison suggested the quasi-isotropy of equatorial electron fluxes. The electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves, also observed onboard GEOS-2, were not found to be intense enough to cause by themselves the strong pitch-angle diffusion of electrons of a few keV

  11. Nearshore Processes, Currents and Directional Wave Spectra Monitoring Using Coherent and Non-coherent Imaging Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trizna, D.; Hathaway, K.

    2007-05-01

    Two new radar systems have been developed for real-time measurement of near-shore processes, and results are presented for measurements of ocean wave spectra, near-shore sand bar structure, and ocean currents. The first is a non-coherent radar based on a modified version of the Sitex radar family, with a data acquisition system designed around an ISR digital receiver card. The card operates in a PC computer with inputs from a Sitex radar modified for extraction of analogue signals for digitization. Using a 9' antenna and 25 kW transmit power system, data were collected during 2007 at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (FRF), Duck, NC during winter and spring of 2007. The directional wave spectrum measurements made are based on using a sequence of 64 to 640 antenna rotations to form a snapshot series of radar images of propagating waves. A square window is extracted from each image, typically 64 x 64 pixels at 3-m resolution. Then ten sets of 64 windows are submitted to a three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform process to generate radar image spectra in the frequency-wavenumber space. The relation between the radar image spectral intensity and wave spectral intensity derived from the FRF pressure gauge array was used for a test set of data, in order to establish a modulation transfer function (MTF) for each frequency component. For 640 rotations, 10 of such spectra are averaged for improved statistics. The wave spectrum so generated was compared for extended data sets beyond those used to establish the MTF, and those results are presented here. Some differences between the radar and pressure sensor data that are observed are found to be due to the influence of the wind field, as the radar echo image weakens for light winds. A model is developed to account for such an effect to improve the radar estimate of the directional wave spectrum. The radar ocean wave imagery is severely influenced only by extremely heavy rain-fall rates, so that

  12. Estimation of directional sea wave spectra from radar images. A Mediterranean Sea case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsini, G.; Grasso, R.; Manara, G.; Monorchio, A.

    2001-01-01

    An inversion technique for estimating sea wave directional spectra from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is applied to a set of ERS-1 data relevant to selected Mediterranean areas. The approach followed is based on the analytical definition of the transform which maps the sea wave spectrum onto the corresponding SAR image spectrum. The solution of the inverse problem is determined through a numerical procedure which minimises a proper functional. A suitable iterative scheme is adopted, involving the use of the above transform. Although widely applied to the ocean case, the method has not been yet extensively tested widely applied to the ocean case, the method has not been yet extensively tested in smaller scale basins, as for instance the Mediterranean sea. The results obtained demonstrate the effectiveness of the numerical procedure discussed for retrieving the sea wave spectrum from SAR images. This work provides new experimental data relevant to the Mediterranean Sea, discusses the results obtained by the above inversion technique and compares them with buoy derived sea truth measurements

  13. Excitation spectra and wave functions of quasiparticle bound states in bilayer Rashba superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashi, Yoichi, E-mail: higashiyoichi@ms.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Nagai, Yuki [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 178-4-4, Wakashiba, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0871 (Japan); Yoshida, Tomohiro [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Kato, Masaru [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Yanase, Youichi [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We focus on the pair-density wave state in bilayer Rashba superconductors. • The zero energy Bogoliubov wave functions are localized at the edge and vortex core. • We investigate the excitation spectra of edge and vortex bound states. - Abstract: We study the excitation spectra and the wave functions of quasiparticle bound states at a vortex and an edge in bilayer Rashba superconductors under a magnetic field. In particular, we focus on the quasiparticle states at the zero energy in the pair-density wave state in a topologically non-trivial phase. We numerically demonstrate that the quasiparticle wave functions with zero energy are localized at both the edge and the vortex core if the magnetic field exceeds the critical value.

  14. Kolmogorov spectra of long wavelength ion-drift waves in dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishchenko, O.G.; Pokhotelov, O.A.; Sagdeev, R.Z.; Pavlenko, V.P.; Stenflo, L.; Shukla, P.K.; Zolotukhin, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    Weakly turbulent Kolmogorov spectra of ion-drift waves in dusty plasmas with an arbitrary ratio between the ion-drift and the Shukla-Varma frequencies are investigated. It is shown that in the long wavelength limit, when the contribution to the wave dispersion associated with the inhomogeneity of the dust component is larger than that related to the plasma inhomogeneity, the wave dispersion and the matrix interaction element coincide with those for the Rossby or the electron-drift waves described by the Charney or Hasegawa-Mima equations with an accuracy of unessential numerical coefficients. It is found that the weakly turbulent spectra related to the conservation of the wave energy are local and thus the energy flux is directed towards smaller spatial scales

  15. Spallation neutron spectra measured at Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyard, J.L.; Bouyer, P.; Brochard, F.; Duchazeaubeneix, J.C.; Durand, J.M.; Leray, S.; Milleret, G.; Plouin, F.; Uematsu, M.; Whittal, D.M.; Martinez, E.; Beau, M.; Boue, F.; Crespin, S.; Drake, D.; Frehaut, J.; Lochard, J.P.; Patin, Y.; Petibon, E.; Legrain, R.; Terrien, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Good knowledge of spallation reactions is necessary to design accelerator-based transmutation systems. An extensive program has begun at Saturne to measure energy and angular distributions of neutrons produced by incident protons or deuterons of up to 2 GeV on several thin targets. Our measurements will extend the available data to higher energies than the present limit of 800 MeV enabling improvements to the codes which are sometimes in poor agreement with the data. (Authors). 7 refs., 7 figs

  16. Time series analysis of continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar wind measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Mikkelsen, Torben; Mann, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra simultaneou......The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra...

  17. Multi-spectra Cosmic Ray Flux Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaochun; Dayananda, Mathes

    2010-02-01

    The Earth's upper atmosphere is constantly bombarded by rain of charged particles known as primary cosmic rays. These primary cosmic rays will collide with the atmospheric molecules and create extensive secondary particles which shower downward to the surface of the Earth. In recent years, a few studies have been done regarding to the applications of the cosmic ray measurements and the correlations between the Earth's climate conditions and the cosmic ray fluxes [1,2,3]. Most of the particles, which reach to the surface of the Earth, are muons together with a small percentage of electrons, gammas, neutrons, etc. At Georgia State University, multiple cosmic ray particle detectors have been constructed to measure the fluxes and energy distributions of the secondary cosmic ray particles. In this presentation, we will briefly describe these prototype detectors and show the preliminary test results. Reference: [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, Nature, Vol.422, 277 (2003). [2] L.V. Egorova, V. Ya Vovk, O.A. Troshichev, Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics 62, 955-966 (2000). [3] Henrik Svensmark, Phy. Rev. Lett. 81, 5027 (1998). )

  18. Neutron spectra measuring by magnetless hadron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayukov, Yu.D.; Buklej, A.E.; Gavrilov, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    The energy resolution, efficiency and background conditions of neutron recording in inclusive nuclear reactions by a magnetless hadron spectrometer (MHS) in the 8-300 MeV energy range. The scheme of apparatus lay-out for measuring neutron recording efficiency is shown. For recording colliding particles with the 3 GeV/c momentum four beam scintillation counters, the latter of which of 30x40 mm dimensions and 1 mm thickness defines the working beam range in the target centre, are used. Targets of the 80 mm diameter made of C and Pb (2.08 g/cm 2 and 3.04 g/cm 2 thickness, respectively) are located at the 45 deg angle in respect to the beam direction. Secondary particles escaping at the 90 deg angle are recorded by two telescopes of the scintillation counters. For neutron and γ quanta recording the special scintillation detector of the 20 cm thickness encircled by an anticoincidence counter is used. The neutron recording efficiency is determined on the basis of comparison of the neutron production differential cross sections of the π +- 12 C 6 → nX reactions and of proton production in isotopically symmetric reactions π +- 12 C 6 → pX. The experimental data are in good agreement with the calculation data [ru

  19. Drag Coefficient Comparisons Between Observed and Model Simulated Directional Wave Spectra Under Hurricane Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    the Wave Model (WAM; Hasselmann t al., 1988 ), and Simulating Waves Nearshore ( SWAN ; Booij et al., 999...of the circle represents the maximum wind speed of the hurricane. The black lines in the vicinity of the hurricane track represent the aircraft...contour maps and black contour lines for the model spec- ra at the same location. Then, the model spectra energy exceeds RA pk are plotted as

  20. A Comparison Of GADRAS Simulated And Measured Gamma Ray Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffcoat, R.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray radiation detection systems are continuously being developed and improved for detecting the presence of radioactive material and for identifying isotopes present. Gamma-ray spectra, from many different isotopes and in different types and thicknesses of attenuation material and matrixes, are needed to evaluate the performance of these devices. Recently, a test and evaluation exercise was performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory that required a large number of gamma-ray spectra. Simulated spectra were used for a major portion of the testing in order to provide a pool of data large enough for the results to be statistically significant. The test data set was comprised of two types of data, measured and simulated. The measured data were acquired with a hand-held Radioisotope Identification Device (RIID) and simulated spectra were created using Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS, Mitchell and Mattingly, Sandia National Laboratory). GADRAS uses a one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculation to simulate gamma-ray spectra. The measured and simulated spectra have been analyzed and compared. This paper will discuss the results of the comparison and offer explanations for spectral differences.

  1. Coherent Wave Measurement Buoy Arrays to Support Wave Energy Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, F.; Chang, G.; Jones, C.; Janssen, T. T.; Barney, P.; Roberts, J.

    2016-02-01

    Wave energy is the most abundant form of hydrokinetic energy in the United States and wave energy converters (WECs) are being developed to extract the maximum possible power from the prevailing wave climate. However, maximum wave energy capture is currently limited by the narrow banded frequency response of WECs as well as extended protective shutdown requirements during periods of large waves. These limitations must be overcome in order to maximize energy extraction, thus significantly decreasing the cost of wave energy and making it a viable energy source. Techno-economic studies of several WEC devices have shown significant potential to improve wave energy capture efficiency through operational control strategies that incorporate real-time information about local surface wave motions. Integral Consulting Inc., with ARPA-E support, is partnering with Sandia National Laboratories and Spoondrift LLC to develop a coherent array of wave-measuring devices to relay and enable the prediction of wave-resolved surface dynamics at a WEC location ahead of real time. This capability will provide necessary information to optimize power production of WECs through control strategies, thereby allowing for a single WEC design to perform more effectively across a wide range of wave environments. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000514.

  2. Slip heterogeneity, body-wave spectra, and directivity of earthquake ruptures

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, P.; Herrero, A.

    1994-01-01

    We present a broadband kinematic model based on a self-similar k-square distribution of the coseismic slip, with an instantaneous rise-time and a constant rupture velocity. The phase of the slip spectrum at high wave number is random. This model generates an ?-squared body-wave radiation, and a particular directivity factor C2d scaling the amplitude of the body-wave spectra, where Cd is the standard directivity factor. Considering the source models with a propagating pulse and a finite rise-t...

  3. Application of the generalized multi structural (GMS) wave function to photoelectron spectra and electron scattering processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, M.A.C. do

    1992-01-01

    A Generalized Multi Structural (GMS) wave function is presented which combines the advantages of the SCF-MO and VB models, preserving the classical chemical structures but optimizing the orbitals in a self-consistent way. This wave function is particularly suitable to treat situations where the description of the molecular state requires localized wave functions. It also provides a very convenient way of treating the electron correlation problem, avoiding large CI expansions. The final wave functions are much more compact and easier to interpret than the ones obtained by the conventional methods, using orthogonal orbitals. Applications of the GMS wave function to the study of the photoelectron spectra of the trans-glyoxal molecule and to electron impact excitation processes in the nitrogen molecule are presented as an illustration of the method. (author)

  4. Status of measurements of fission neutron spectra of Minor Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drapchinsky, L.; Shiryaev, B. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The report considers experimental and theoretical works on studying the energy spectra of prompt neutrons emitted in spontaneous fission and neutron induced fission of Minor Actinides. It is noted that neutron spectra investigations were done for only a small number of such nuclei, most measurements, except those of Cf-252, having been carried out long ago by obsolete methods and imperfectapparatus. The works have no detailed description of experiments, analysis of errors, detailed numerical information about results of experiments. A conclusion is made that the available data do not come up to modern requirements. It is necessary to make new measurements of fission prompt neutron spectra of transuranium nuclides important for the objectives of working out a conception of minor actinides transmutation by means of special reactors. (author)

  5. A multichannel analyzer computer system for simultaneously measuring 64 spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yuheng; Wan Yuqing; Zhang Jiahong; Li Li; Chen Guozhu

    2000-01-01

    The author introduces a multichannel analyzer computer system for simultaneously measuring 64 spectra with 64 coded independent inputs. The system is developed for a double chopper neutron scattering time-of-flight spectrometer. The system structure, coding method, operating principle and performances are presented. The system can also be used for other nuclear physics experiments which need multichannel analyzer with independent coded inputs

  6. Wind Profiles and Wave Spectra for Potential Wind Farms in South China Sea. Part II: Wave Spectrum Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the commercialization of offshore wind energy in China, the South China Sea has been identified as ideal for constructing offshore wind farms, especially for farms consisting of floating wind turbines over deep waters. Since the wind profiles and wave spectra are somewhat primitive for the design of an offshore wind turbine, engineering models describing the wind and wave characteristics in the South China Sea area are necessary for the offshore wind energy exploitation given the meteorological, hydrological, and geographical differences between the South China Sea and the North/Norwegian Sea, where the commonly used wind profile and wave spectrum models were designated. In the present study; a series of numerical simulations were conducted to reveal the wave characteristics in the South China Sea under both typhoon and non-typhoon conditions. By analyzing the simulation results; the applicability of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP spectrum model; in terms of characterizing the wind-induced wave fields in the South China Sea; was discussed. In detail; the key parameters of the JONSWAP spectrum model; such as the Phillips constant; spectral width parameter; peak-enhancement factor, and high frequency tail decay; were investigated in the context of finding suitable values.

  7. Measurement of fast neutron spectra. 1-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Itsuro

    1976-01-01

    The present status of the techniques for the measurement of fast neutron spectra is reviewed with particular attention to the recent activities in Japan. The first section of this report defines the energy range of fast neutrons, and various techniques are classified into four groups. In the following sections, recent development in each group is reviewed. The first part is the integral method represented mainly by the activation method. The variation of this method is shortly reviewed, and some results of the spectrum measurement for JRR-4 (a thermal research reactor) and YAYOI (a fast neutron source reactor) are presented together with the results of computed spectra. The second part is the method of proton recoil. The improvement of a proportional counter by Ichimori is shortly reviewed. The use of liquid scintillator is also discussed together with the experimental and computational results of YAYOI benchmark spectra of fast neutrons transmitted through the layers of iron. The utilization of n-α or n-p reaction as a sandwitch counter is discussed in the third part. Measured and calculated spectra in the FCA (a fast critical assembly) core are presented as examples. The method of time-of-flight is discussed in the fourth part. Recent developments in Japan such as the method with a double-scintillation counter are shortly presented together with its block diagram. (Aoki, K.)

  8. Unraveling Climatic Wind and Wave Trends in the Red Sea Using Wave Spectra Partitioning

    KAUST Repository

    Langodan, Sabique

    2017-12-27

    The wind and wave climatology of the Red Sea is derived from a validated 30-year high-resolution model simulation. After describing the relevant features of the basin, the main wind and wave systems are identified by using an innovative spectral partition technique to explain their genesis and characteristics. In the northern part of the sea, wind and waves of the same intensity are present throughout the year, while the central and southern zones are characterized by a marked seasonality. The partition technique allows the association of a general decrease in the energy of the different wave systems with a specific weather pattern. The most intense decrease is found in the northern storms, which are associated with meteorological pulses from the Mediterranean Sea.

  9. Unraveling Climatic Wind and Wave Trends in the Red Sea Using Wave Spectra Partitioning

    KAUST Repository

    Langodan, Sabique; Cavaleri, Luigi; Pomaro, Angela; Portilla, Jesus; Abualnaja, Yasser; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    The wind and wave climatology of the Red Sea is derived from a validated 30-year high-resolution model simulation. After describing the relevant features of the basin, the main wind and wave systems are identified by using an innovative spectral partition technique to explain their genesis and characteristics. In the northern part of the sea, wind and waves of the same intensity are present throughout the year, while the central and southern zones are characterized by a marked seasonality. The partition technique allows the association of a general decrease in the energy of the different wave systems with a specific weather pattern. The most intense decrease is found in the northern storms, which are associated with meteorological pulses from the Mediterranean Sea.

  10. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglieri, Robert, E-mail: robert.maglieri@mail.mcgill.ca; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H4A 3J1 (Canada); Licea, Angel [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  11. Renormalization-group decimation technique for spectra, wave-functions and density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiecko, C.; Roman, E.

    1983-09-01

    The Renormalization Group decimation technique is very useful for problems described by 1-d nearest neighbour tight-binding model with or without translational invariance. We show how spectra, wave-functions and density of states can be calculated with little numerical work from the renormalized coefficients upon iteration. The results of this new procedure are verified using the model of Soukoulis and Economou. (author)

  12. Dynamic selection of ship responses for estimation of on-site directional wave spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent; Storhaug, Gaute

    2012-01-01

    -estimate of the wave spectrum is suggested. The selection method needs to be robust for what reason a parameterised uni-directional, two-parameter wave spectrum is treated. The parameters included are the zero up-crossing period, the significant wave height and the main wave direction relative to the ship’s heading...... with the best overall agreement are selected for the actual estimation of the directional wave spectrum. The transfer functions for the ship responses can be determined using different computational methods such as striptheory, 3D panel codes, closed form expressions or model tests. The uncertainty associated......Knowledge of the wave environment in which a ship is operating is crucial for most on-board decision support systems. Previous research has shown that the directional wave spectrum can be estimated by the use of measured global ship responses and a set of transfer functions determined...

  13. Long-term wave measurements in a climate change perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomaro, Angela; Bertotti, Luciana; Cavaleri, Luigi; Lionello, Piero; Portilla-Yandun, Jesus

    2017-04-01

    At present multi-decadal time series of wave data needed for climate studies are generally provided by long term model simulations (hindcasts) covering the area of interest. Examples, among many, at different scales are wave hindcasts adopting the wind fields of the ERA-Interim reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, Reading, U.K.) at the global level and by regional re-analysis as for the Mediterranean Sea (Lionello and Sanna, 2006). Valuable as they are, these estimates are necessarily affected by the approximations involved, the more so because of the problems encountered within modelling processes in small basins using coarse resolution wind fields (Cavaleri and Bertotti, 2004). On the contrary, multi-decadal observed time series are rare. They have the evident advantage of somehow representing the real evolution of the waves, without the shortcomings associated with the limitation of models in reproducing the actual processes and the real variability within the wave fields. Obviously, observed wave time series are not exempt of problems. They represent a very local information, hence their use to describe the wave evolution at large scale is sometimes arguable and, in general, it needs the support of model simulations assessing to which extent the local value is representative of a large scale evolution. Local effects may prevent the identification of trends that are indeed present at large scale. Moreover, a regular maintenance, accurate monitoring and metadata information are crucial issues when considering the reliability of a time series for climate applications. Of course, where available, especially if for several decades, measured data are of great value for a number of reasons and can be valuable clues to delve further into the physics of the processes of interest, especially if considering that waves, as an integrated product of the local climate, if available in an area sensitive to even limited changes of the

  14. PAMELA measurements of the boron and carbon spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, N; Adriani, O; Bongi, M; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Bruno, A; Boezio, M; Bonvicini, V; Carbone, R; Bogomolov, E A; Bottai, S; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Castellini, G

    2015-01-01

    The satellite-borne PAMELA experiment is aimed at precision measurements of the charged light component of the cosmic-ray spectrum, with a particular focus on antimatter. It consists of a magnetic spectrometer, a time-of-flight system, an electromagnetic calorimeter with a tail catcher scintillating layer, an anticoincidence system and a neutron detector. PAMELA has measured the absolute fluxes of boron and carbon and the B/C ratio, which plays a central role in galactic propagation studies in order to derive the injection spectra at sources from measurements at Earth. In this paper, the data analysis techniques and the final results are presented. (paper)

  15. Spreadsheet analysis of gamma spectra for nuclear material measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosby, W.R.; Pace, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    A widely available commercial spreadsheet package for personal computers is used to calculate gamma spectra peak areas using both region of interest and peak fitting methods. The gamma peak areas obtained are used for uranium enrichment assays and for isotopic analyses of mixtures of transuranics. The use of spreadsheet software with an internal processing language allows automation of routine analysis procedures increasing ease of use and reducing processing errors while providing great flexibility in addressing unusual measurement problems. 4 refs., 9 figs

  16. X-ray measurements on wood - spectra measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Signe Kamp; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Gerward, Leif

    The report concerns simultaneous non-destructive measurements of water content and density of wood. Theoretically, this should be possible using a x-ray equipment newly build at BKM, and this work is an attempt to use the equipment for assessing water content and density of wood samples under...... laboratory conditions. A number of wood samples with different densities are placed at different relative humidities from 0.5 to 97 %RH. When equilibrium is obtained the samples are measured with the x-ray equipment such that 10 points are measured in the sample followed by measurements outside the sample...... (free-scanning). In this way 100 points are measured for each wood sample. This produces information about moisture content and density of the samples as water and wood attenuations of the x-rays are different for the different energy levels contained in the x-rays. The "real" density and moisture...

  17. Aspirated capacitor measurements of air conductivity and ion mobility spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aplin, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of ions in atmospheric air are used to investigate atmospheric electricity and particulate pollution. Commonly studied ion parameters are (1) air conductivity, related to the total ion number concentration, and (2) the ion mobility spectrum, which varies with atmospheric composition. The physical principles of air ion instrumentation are long established. A recent development is the computerized aspirated capacitor, which measures ions from (a) the current of charged particles at a sensing electrode, and (b) the rate of charge exchange with an electrode at a known initial potential, relaxing to a lower potential. As the voltage decays, only ions of higher and higher mobility are collected by the central electrode and contribute to the further decay of the voltage. This enables extension of the classical theory to calculate ion mobility spectra by inverting voltage decay time series. In indoor air, ion mobility spectra determined from both the voltage decay inversion, and an established voltage switching technique, were compared and shown to be of similar shape. Air conductivities calculated by integration were: 5.3±2.5 and 2.7±1.1 fSm -1 , respectively, with conductivity determined to be 3 fSm -1 by direct measurement at a constant voltage. Applications of the relaxation potential inversion method include air ion mobility spectrum retrieval from historical data, and computation of ion mobility spectra in planetary atmospheres

  18. Measurement of periodically varying ECE spectra using a Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, L.; Rodriguez, L.; Talvard, M.

    1987-01-01

    In some tokamak experiments the ECE spectrum is periodically varying. If the modulation frequency is small enough (less than 10 Hz) the plasma can be considered as quasi-stationary during the typical scan time of most of the Michelson interferometers. It is possible to measure simply ECE spectra at different times of the oscillation. We present here a technique which allows to measure smaller fluctuations at larger frequencies. However the analysis requires a large number of periods of oscillation at constant frequency and a scanning mirror moving at constant velocity

  19. Influence of hurricane wind field in the structure of directional wave spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; García-Nava, Hector; Osuna, Pedro; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    Three numerical experiments using the spectral wave prediction model SWAN were carried out to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the directional and frequency distributions of hurricane wave energy. One particular objective is to evaluate the effect of the translation speed of the hurricane and the presence of concentric eye walls, on both the wave growth process and the shape of the directional wave spectrum. The HRD wind field of Hurricane Dean on August 20 at 7:30 was propagated at two different velocities (5 and 10 m/s). An idealized concentric eye wall (a Gaussian function that evolve in time along a path in the form of an Archimedean spiral) was imposed to the wind field. The white-capping formulation of Westhuysen et al. (2007) was selected. The wave model represents fairly well the directionality of the energy and the shape of the directional spectra in the hurricane domain. The model results indicate that the forward movement of the storm influences the development of the waves, consistent with field observations. Additionally the same experiments were carried out using the Wave Watch III model with the source terms formulation proposed by Ardhuin et al., 2010, with the aim of making comparisons between the physical processes that represent each formulation, and the latest results will be addressed. References Ardhuin, F., Rogers, E., Babanin, A. V., Filipot, J.-F., Magne, R., Roland, A., van der Westhuysen, A., et al. (2010). Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 40(9), 1917-1941. doi:10.1175/2010JPO4324.1 Van der Westhuysen, A. J., Zijlema, M., & Battjes, J. A. (2007). Nonlinear saturation-based whitecapping dissipation in SWAN for deep and shallow water. Coast. Eng., 54(2), 151-170. doi:10.1016/j.coastaleng.2006.08.006

  20. Measurements of Wave Power in Wave Energy Converter Effectiveness Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berins J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the technical solution of alternative budget measuring equipment of the water surface gravity wave oscillation and the theoretical justification of the calculated oscillation power. This solution combines technologies such as lasers, WEB-camera image digital processing, interpolation of defined function at irregular intervals, volatility of discrete Fourier transformation for calculating the spectrum.

  1. Measurements of Wave Power in Wave Energy Converter Effectiveness Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berins, J.; Berins, J.; Kalnacs, A.

    2017-08-01

    The article is devoted to the technical solution of alternative budget measuring equipment of the water surface gravity wave oscillation and the theoretical justification of the calculated oscillation power. This solution combines technologies such as lasers, WEB-camera image digital processing, interpolation of defined function at irregular intervals, volatility of discrete Fourier transformation for calculating the spectrum.

  2. Use of the SF-8 detection spectrophotometer for measuring absorption spectra of molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlin, V.P.; Barbanel', Yu.A.

    1975-01-01

    Three versions of the use of the SF-8 spectrophotometer for high-temperature measurements are described: 1) based on the standard optical scheme at temperatures of up to 400 0 C; 2) based on a modified one-wave scheme; 3) based on a modified twin-wave scheme. The external heater used in the schemes 2 and 3 ensures that measurements can be performed at temperatures of up to 1000 0 C. In order to obtain the spectra of thin-layer samples vessels with an insert are used. For operation of the spectrophotometer according to the schemes 2 and 3 te heater may in principle be replaced by a cryostat or some other external device

  3. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - Status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R. C.; Noda, S.; Nelson, R. O.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taiebb, J.; Laurent, B.; Belier, G.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 239 Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 0.7 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date are summarized in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including measurements of fission neutrons below 0.7 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV. (authors)

  4. Activation method for measuring the neutron spectra parameters. Computer software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, B.V.; Ionov, V.S.; Konyaev, S.I.; Marin, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    The description of mathematical statement of a task for definition the spectral characteristics of neutron fields with use developed in RRC KI unified activation detectors (UKD) is resulted. The method of processing of results offered by authors activation measurements and calculation of the parameters used for an estimation of the neutron spectra characteristics is discussed. Features of processing of the experimental data received at measurements of activation with using UKD are considered. Activation detectors UKD contain a little bit specially the picked up isotopes giving at irradiation peaks scale of activity in the common spectrum scale of activity. Computing processing of results of the measurements is applied on definition of spectrum parameters for nuclear reactor installations with thermal and close to such power spectrum of neutrons. The example of the data processing, the measurements received at carrying out at RRC KI research reactor F-1 is resulted [ru

  5. Challenges in noise removal from Doppler spectra acquired by a continuous-wave lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelou, Nikolas; Foroughi Abari, Farzad; Mann, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    are presented. A method for determining the background noise spectrum without interrupting the transmission of the laser beam is described. Moreover, the dependency between the determination of the threshold of a Doppler spectrum with low signal-to-noise ratios and the characteristics of the wind flow......This paper is focused on the required post processing of Doppler spectra, acquired from a continuous-wave coherent lidar at high sampling rates (400 Hz) and under rapid scanning of the laser beam. In particular, the necessary steps followed for extracting the wind speed from such Doppler spectra...... are investigated and a systematic approach for removing the noise is outlined. The suggested post processing procedures are applied to two sample time series acquired by a short-range WindScanner during one second each....

  6. Measurements of {sup 237}Np secondary neutron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornilov, N.V.

    1997-03-01

    The activities carried out during the first year of the project are summarized. The main problems for Np spectra measurements arise from high intrinsic gamma-ray activity of the sample and admixture of the oxygen and iron nuclei. The inelastically scattered neutrons and the fission neutrons spectra for {sup 237}Np were measured by time-of-flight spectrometer of the IPPE at incident neutron energies {approx_equal}1.5 MeV, and {approx_equal}0.5 MeV. A solid tritium target and a Li-metallic target were used as neutron sources. The neutron scattering on C sample (C(n,n) standard reaction) was measured to normalize the Np data. The experimental data should be simulated by Monte Carlo method to correct the experimental data for oxygen and iron admixture as well as for multiple scattering of the neutrons in the sample. Therefore the response function of the spectrometer, and the neutron energy distribution from the source were investigated in detail. (author)

  7. A singularity extraction technique for computation of antenna aperture fields from singular plane wave spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, Cecilia; Breinbjerg, Olav; Frandsen, Aksel

    2008-01-01

    An effective technique for extracting the singularity of plane wave spectra in the computation of antenna aperture fields is proposed. The singular spectrum is first factorized into a product of a finite function and a singular function. The finite function is inverse Fourier transformed...... numerically using the Inverse Fast Fourier Transform, while the singular function is inverse Fourier transformed analytically, using the Weyl-identity, and the two resulting spatial functions are then convolved to produce the antenna aperture field. This article formulates the theory of the singularity...

  8. Electromagnetic fluctuation spectra of collective oscillations in magnetized Maxwellian plasmas for parallel wave vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-05-01

    The general electromagnetic fluctuation theory for magnetized plasmas is used to calculate the steady-state wave number spectra and total electromagnetic field strength of low-frequency collective weakly damped eigenmodes with parallel wavevectors in a Maxwellian electron-proton plasma. These result from the equilibrium of spontaneous emission and collisionless damping, and they represent the minimum electromagnetic fluctuations guaranteed in quiet thermal space plasmas, including the interstellar and interplanetary medium. Depending on the plasma beta, the ratio of |δB |/B0 can be as high as 10-12 .

  9. Indirect measure of X-rays spectra using TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonzi, E. V.; Mainardi, R. T.

    2011-10-01

    A methodology of indirect measure of X-rays spectra, emitted by conventional tubes, was developed recently and its feasibility verified in the first place by Monte Carlo simulations. For that case is intended to measure, by means of plastic scintillators, attenuation curves of dispersed beams previously. In this work were carried out measurements of attenuation curves with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) to verify the kindness of the indirect measure method. The attenuation curve was also measured using an ionization chamber brand Capintec (model 192) with the purpose of making a comparison. The results of the attenuation curve measured with both dosimeters present a good resolution inside the statistical fluctuations and the spectral reconstruction using diverse parametric functions is carried out in a quick and simple way with excellent resolutions in the functional form. For this reconstruction method are of fundamental importance the following properties of the used dosimeter: in the first place the repetition of the measures, property that could check; in second place the precision of the measured data and lastly the dosimeter response, this is, the increase of the thermoluminescent signal before an increase of the photons flow of X-rays. This parameter is the gradient of the curve thermoluminescent signal versus the dose imparted to the dosimeter. The measures were realized with a generator of X-rays brand Kevex provided of a conventional tube with tungsten anti cathode that polarizes with high tension to a maximum value of 50 kV and current of 0.5 ma. (Author)

  10. Neutron dose and energy spectra measurements at Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Soldat, K.L.; Haggard, D.L.; Faust, L.G.; Tomeraasen, P.L.

    1987-08-01

    Because some workers have a high potential for significant neutron exposure, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to verify the accuracy of neutron dosimetry at the plant. Energy spectrum and neutron dose measurements were made at the SRP calibrations laboratory and at several other locations. The energy spectra measurements were made using multisphere or Bonner sphere spectrometers, 3 He spectrometers, and NE-213 liquid scintillator spectrometers. Neutron dose equivalent determinations were made using these instruments and others specifically designed to determine dose equivalent, such as the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Survey instruments, such as the Eberline PNR-4, and the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo and track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also used. The TEPC, subjectively judged to provide the most accurate estimation of true dose equivalent, was used as the reference for comparison with other devices. 29 refs., 43 figs., 13 tabs

  11. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, Robert C.; Noda, Shusaku; Nelson, Ronald O.; O' Donnell, John M.; Devlin, Matt; Chatillon, Audrey; Granier, Thierry; Taieb, Julien; Laurent, Benoit; Belier, Gilbert; Becker, John A.; Wu, Ching-Yen

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 239 Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  12. Time series analysis of continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar wind measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeholm, M; Mikkelsen, T; Mann, J; Enevoldsen, K; Courtney, M

    2008-01-01

    The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 μm continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra simultaneously obtained from a mast-mounted sonic anemometer at 78 meters height at the test station for large wind turbines at Hoevsoere in Western Jutland, Denmark is presented for the first time

  13. Measurements of proton energy spectra using a radiochromic film stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkins, T. M.; Steidle, Jessica; Ellison, D. M.; Steidle, Jeffrey; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Fiksel, G.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The energy spectrum of protons accelerated from the rear-side of a thin foil illuminated with ultra-intense laser light from the OMEGA EP laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) was measured using a stack of radiochromic film (RCF). The film stack consisted of four layers of Gafchromic HD-V2 film and four layers of Gafchromic MD-V2-55 film. Aluminum foils of various thicknesses were placed between each piece of RCF in the stack. This arrangement allowed protons with energies of 30 MeV to reach the back layer of RCF in the stack. The stack was placed in the detector plane of a Thomson parabola ion energy (TPIE) spectrometer. Each piece of film in the stack was scanned using a commercially available flat-bed scanner (Epson 10000XL). The resulting optical density was converted into proton fluence using an absolute calibration of the RCF obtained at the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerator laboratory. In these calibration measurements, the sensitivity of the radiochromic film was measured using monoenergetic protons produced by the accelerator. Details of the analysis procedure and the resulting proton energy spectra will be presented. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  14. Online wave estimation using vessel motion measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H. Brodtkorb, Astrid; Nielsen, Ulrik D.; J. Sørensen, Asgeir

    2018-01-01

    parameters and motion transfer functions are required as input. Apart from this the method is signal-based, with no assumptions on the wave spectrum shape, and as a result it is computationally efficient. The algorithm is implemented in a dynamic positioning (DP)control system, and tested through simulations......In this paper, a computationally efficient online sea state estimation algorithm isproposed for estimation of the on site sea state. The algorithm finds the wave spectrum estimate from motion measurements in heave, roll and pitch by iteratively solving a set of linear equations. The main vessel...

  15. Optimal spatial filtering and transfer function for SAR ocean wave spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, R. C.; Tilley, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    The impulse response of the SAR system is not a delta function and the spectra represent the product of the underlying image spectrum with the transform of the impulse response which must be removed. A digitally computed spectrum of SEASAT imagery of the Atlantic Ocean east of Cape Hatteras was smoothed with a 5 x 5 convolution filter and the trend was sampled in a direction normal to the predominant wave direction. This yielded a transform of a noise-like process. The smoothed value of this trend is the transform of the impulse response. This trend is fit with either a second- or fourth-order polynomial which is then used to correct the entire spectrum. A 16 x 16 smoothing of the spectrum shows the presence of two distinct swells. Correction of the effects of speckle is effected by the subtraction of a bias from the spectrum.

  16. Spectroscopic Measurements of Impurity Spectra on the EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Jia; Li Yingying; Shi Yuejiang; Wang Fudi; Zhang Wei; Lv Bo; Huang Juan; Wan Baonian; Zhou Qian

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) and visible impurity spectra (200∼750 nm) are commonly used to study plasma and wall interactions in magnetic fusion plasmas. Two optical multi-channel analysis (OMA) systems have been installed for the UV-visible spectrum measurement on EAST. These two OMA systems are both equipped with the Czerny-Turner (C-T) type spectrometer. The upper vacuum vessel and inner divertor baffle can be viewed simultaneously through two optical lenses. The OMA1 system is mainly used for multi-impurity lines radiation measurement. A 280 nm wavelength range can be covered by a 300 mm focal length spectrometer equipped with a 300 grooves/mm grating. The Dα/Hα line shapes can be resolved by the OMA2 system. The focal length is 750 mm. The spectral resolution can be up to 0.01 nm using a 1800 grooves/mm grating. The impurity behaviour and hydrogen ratio evolution after boroniztion, lithium coating, and siliconization are compared. Lithium coating has shown beneficial effects on the reduction of edge recycling and low Z impurity (C, O) influx. The impurity expelling effect of the divertor configuration is also briefly discussed through multi-channels observation of OMA1 system. (magnetically confined plasma)

  17. Study of probe-sample distance for biomedical spectra measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fiber-based optical spectroscopy has been widely used for biomedical applications. However, the effect of probe-sample distance on the collection efficiency has not been well investigated. Method In this paper, we presented a theoretical model to maximize the illumination and collection efficiency in designing fiber optic probes for biomedical spectra measurement. This model was in general applicable to probes with single or multiple fibers at an arbitrary incident angle. In order to demonstrate the theory, a fluorescence spectrometer was used to measure the fluorescence of human finger skin at various probe-sample distances. The fluorescence spectrum and the total fluorescence intensity were recorded. Results The theoretical results show that for single fiber probes, contact measurement always provides the best results. While for multi-fiber probes, there is an optimal probe distance. When a 400- μm excitation fiber is used to deliver the light to the skin and another six 400- μm fibers surrounding the excitation fiber are used to collect the fluorescence signal, the experimental results show that human finger skin has very strong fluorescence between 475 nm and 700 nm under 450 nm excitation. The fluorescence intensity is heavily dependent on the probe-sample distance and there is an optimal probe distance. Conclusions We investigated a number of probe-sample configurations and found that contact measurement could be the primary choice for single-fiber probes, but was very inefficient for multi-fiber probes. There was an optimal probe-sample distance for multi-fiber probes. By carefully choosing the probe-sample distance, the collection efficiency could be enhanced by 5-10 times. Our experiments demonstrated that the experimental results of the probe-sample distance dependence of collection efficiency in multi-fiber probes were in general agreement with our theory.

  18. Relation between fine structure of energy spectra for pulsating aurora electrons and frequency spectra of whistler mode chorus waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miyoshi, Y.; Saito, S.; Seki, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Kataoka, R.; Asamura, K.; Katoh, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Sakanoi, T.; Hirahara, M.; Oyama, S.; Kurita, S.; Santolík, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 9 (2015), s. 7728-7736 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12231 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : pulsating aurora * chorus waves * wave-particle interactions * computer simulation * Reimei satellite Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.318, year: 2015 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015JA021562/full

  19. Radar cross section measurements using terahertz waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-01-01

    Radar cross sections at terahertz frequencies are measured on scale models of aircrafts. A time domain broadband THz system generates freely propagating THz pulses measured with sub-picosecond time resolution. The THz radiation is generated using fs laser pulses by optical rectification...... in order to measure realistic radar cross sections. RCS polar and azimuthal angle plots of F-16 and F-35 are presented....... in a lithium niobate crystal with application of the tilted wave front method, resulting in high electric field THz pulses with a broad band spectrum from 100 GHz up to 4 THz. The corresponding wave lengths are two orders of magnitude smaller than normal radars and we therefore use scale models of size 5-10 cm...

  20. Quantum chemical approach for positron annihilation spectra of atoms and molecules beyond plane-wave approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikabata, Yasuhiro; Aiba, Risa; Iwanade, Toru; Nishizawa, Hiroaki; Wang, Feng; Nakai, Hiromi

    2018-05-01

    We report theoretical calculations of positron-electron annihilation spectra of noble gas atoms and small molecules using the nuclear orbital plus molecular orbital method. Instead of a nuclear wavefunction, the positronic wavefunction is obtained as the solution of the coupled Hartree-Fock or Kohn-Sham equation for a positron and the electrons. The molecular field is included in the positronic Fock operator, which allows an appropriate treatment of the positron-molecule repulsion. The present treatment succeeds in reproducing the Doppler shift, i.e., full width at half maximum (FWHM) of experimentally measured annihilation (γ-ray) spectra for molecules with a mean absolute error less than 10%. The numerical results indicate that the interpretation of the FWHM in terms of a specific molecular orbital is not appropriate.

  1. Benefits of up-wave measurements in linear short-term wave forecasting for wave energy applications

    OpenAIRE

    Paparella, Francesco; Monk, Kieran; Winands, Victor; Lopes, Miguel; Conley, Daniel; Ringwood, John

    2014-01-01

    The real-time control of wave energy converters requires the prediction of the wave elevation at the location of the device in order to maximize the power extracted from the waves. One possibility is to predict the future wave elevation by combining its past history with the spatial information coming from a sensor which measures the free surface elevation upwave of the wave energy converter. As an application example, the paper focuses on the prediction of the wave eleva...

  2. The device for measuring amplitude spectra of ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyak, Yu.V.; Nebesnyj, A.F.

    1996-01-01

    The front-end electronic device for measuring of amplitude spectra of ionizing radiation have been made. The device have connection interface with the ionizing radiation detector, the pulse former, adapter, memory, electron ray tube with diode, supply unit and the regime setting unit of the work of electron ray tube. There are linear transmission scheme, level discriminator, pulse series - channel code converter, dividing capacitor in the device. Dynode of electron ray tube has been made in the form of rack or pads installed in the line parallel to axis of vertical scanning and electrically joined with each other. The distance between next tooth of rack or pads is Δy≥0,5 d, where d - diameter of focused electron beam of electron ray tube. The output of pulse former is joined with level discriminator and the first entrance of linear transmission scheme. The output of linear transmission scheme is joined with the entrance of pulse delay scheme, and the second entrance is joined with the first output of level discriminator. The output of pulse delay scheme is joined with Y-deflecting plate of electron ray tube. The first and the second entrance of pulse series - channel code converter are joined correspondingly with the output of adapter and the second output of level discriminator, and its output - with the entrance of memory unit. The first pin of loading resistor is joined through dividing capacitor with the entrance of adapter, its second pin - with the anode output nearest to dynode of electron ray tube. (E.V.Kh.)

  3. Stationary spectra of short-wave convective and magnetostatic fluctuations in a finite-pressure plasma and anomalous heat conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakulenko, M.O.

    1992-01-01

    Within the general renormalized statistical approach, the low-frequency short-wave stationary spectra of potential and magnetic perturbations in a finite-pressure plasma, are obtained. Anomalous heat conductivity considerably enhances due to non-linear interaction between magnetic excitations. 11 refs. (author)

  4. Mechanical Strain Measurement from Coda Wave Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzola, J.; Schmittbuhl, J.; Zigone, D.; Masson, F.; Magnenet, V.

    2017-12-01

    Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI) aims at tracking small changes in solid materials like rocks where elastic waves are diffusing. They are intensively sampling the medium, making the technique much more sensitive than those relying on direct wave arrivals. Application of CWI to ambient seismic noise has found a large range of applications over the past years like for multiscale imaging but also for monitoring complex structures such as regional faults or reservoirs (Lehujeur et al., 2015). Physically, observed changes are typically interpreted as small variations of seismic velocities. However, this interpretation remains questionable. Here, a specific focus is put on the influence of the elastic deformation of the medium on CWI measurements. The goal of the present work is to show from a direct numerical and experimental modeling that deformation signal also exists in CWI measurements which might provide new outcomes for the technique.For this purpose, we model seismic wave propagation within a diffusive medium using a spectral element approach (SPECFEM2D) during an elastic deformation of the medium. The mechanical behavior is obtained from a finite element approach (Code ASTER) keeping the mesh grid of the sample constant during the whole procedure to limit numerical artifacts. The CWI of the late wave arrivals in the synthetic seismograms is performed using both a stretching technique in the time domain and a frequency cross-correlation method. Both show that the elastic deformation of the scatters is fully correlated with time shifts of the CWI differently from an acoustoelastic effect. As an illustration, the modeled sample is chosen as an effective medium aiming to mechanically and acoustically reproduce a typical granitic reservoir rock.Our numerical approach is compared to experimental results where multi-scattering of an acoustic wave through a perforated loaded Au4G (Dural) plate is performed at laboratory scale. Experimental and numerical results of the

  5. Mass spectra and wave functions of meson systems and the covariant oscillator quark model as an expansion basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Ryuichi; Ishida, Shin; Wada, Hiroaki; Yamada, Kenji; Sekiguchi, Motoo

    1999-01-01

    We examine mass spectra and wave functions of the nn-bar, cc-bar and bb-bar meson systems within the framework of the covariant oscillator quark model with the boosted LS-coupling scheme. We solve nonperturbatively an eigenvalue problem for the squared-mass operator, which incorporates the four-dimensional color-Coulomb-type interaction, by taking a set of covariant oscillator wave functions as an expansion basis. We obtain mass spectra of these meson systems, which reproduce quite well their experimental behavior. The resultant manifestly covariant wave functions, which are applicable to analyses of various reaction phenomena, are given. Our results seem to suggest that the present model may be considered effectively as a covariant version of the nonrelativistic linear-plus-Coulomb potential quark model. (author)

  6. Wave directional spectrum from array measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A; Sarma, Y; Menon, H.B.

    Using the method of Esteva (1976, 1977), whcih assumes that at the frequency band the waves approach from just a single "mean" wave direction, wave direction has been consistently, accurately and unambiguously evaluated as a function of frequency...

  7. Measurement of light-cone wave functions by diffractive dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asheri, D. [Tel Aviv Univ., School of Physics and Astronomy, Sackler Faculty of Exact Science (Israel)

    2005-07-01

    The measurement of the pion light-cone wave function is revisited and results for the Gegenbauer coefficients are presented. Measurements of the photon electromagnetic and hadronic wave functions are described and results are presented. (authors)

  8. Overtopping Measurements on the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the methods used to estimate (calculated from some indirect measurements) the overtopping of the wave energy converter Wave Dragon placed in a real sea environment. The wave energy converter in quistion is the 237-tonne heavy Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype. Comparisons...

  9. Shock wave overtake measurements on cesium iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The luminosity of the shock front for CsI makes it an ideal material for which to measure directly sound velocities along the Hugoniot using shock wave overtake methods. In these measurements, the occurrence of melting along the Hugoniot is marked by a discontinuous decrease in the measured sound velocity. In addition, CsI is isoelectronic with xenon and is expected to begin to show metallic behavior along the Hugoniot near 0.9 Mbar. The directly-determined sound velocities and corresponding elastic moduli would be expected to be more sensitive to this transition than either Hugoniot equations of state or optical pyrometry experiments. This paper presents a brief description of the present experiments and results

  10. Experimental measurements of lower-hybrid wave propagation in the Versator II tokamak using microwave scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, R.; Chen, K.; Bekefi, G.; Bonoli, P.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Mayberry, M.; Porkolab, M.; Villasenor, J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of 139 GHz microwave scattering experiments has been performed on the Versator II tokamak (B. Richards, Ph.D. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1981) to study the propagation of externally launched 0.8 GHz lower-hybrid waves. During lower-hybrid current drive, the launched waves are found to follow a highly directional resonance cone in the outer portion of the plasma. Wave power is also detected near the center of the plasma, and evidence of wave absorption is seen. Scattering of lower-hybrid waves in k space by density fluctuations appears to be a weak effect, although measurable frequency broadening by density fluctuations is found, Δω/ω=3x10 -4 . In the detectable range (2.5 parallel parallel spectra inferred from the scattering measurements are quite similar above and below the current drive density limit. Numerical modeling of these experiments using ray tracing is also presented

  11. Fast simulated annealing inversion of surface waves on pavement using phase-velocity spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryden, N.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    The conventional inversion of surface waves depends on modal identification of measured dispersion curves, which can be ambiguous. It is possible to avoid mode-number identification and extraction by inverting the complete phase-velocity spectrum obtained from a multichannel record. We use the fast simulated annealing (FSA) global search algorithm to minimize the difference between the measured phase-velocity spectrum and that calculated from a theoretical layer model, including the field setup geometry. Results show that this algorithm can help one avoid getting trapped in local minima while searching for the best-matching layer model. The entire procedure is demonstrated on synthetic and field data for asphalt pavement. The viscoelastic properties of the top asphalt layer are taken into account, and the inverted asphalt stiffness as a function of frequency compares well with laboratory tests on core samples. The thickness and shear-wave velocity of the deeper embedded layers are resolved within 10% deviation from those values measured separately during pavement construction. The proposed method may be equally applicable to normal soil site investigation and in the field of ultrasonic testing of materials. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  12. A solution of nonlinear equation for the gravity wave spectra from Adomian decomposition method: a first approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gledson Goulart

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the equation for the gravity wave spectra in mean atmosphere is analytically solved without linearization by the Adomian decomposition method. As a consequence, the nonlinear nature of problem is preserved and the errors found in the results are only due to the parameterization. The results, with the parameterization applied in the simulations, indicate that the linear solution of the equation is a good approximation only for heights shorter than ten kilometers, because the linearization the equation leads to a solution that does not correctly describe the kinetic energy spectra.

  13. Measurements of fast neutron spectra in iron, uranium and sodium-iron assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappler, F.; Pieroni, N.; Rusch, D.; Schmidt, A.; Wattecamps, E.; Werle, H.

    1979-01-01

    Spectrum measurements were performed at the fast subcritical facility SUAK to test nuclear data and computer codes used in fast reactor calculations. In order to obtain a specific and quantitative interpretation of discrepancies between measured and calculated spectrum, homogeneous assemblies consisting of single materials were investigated. The leakage spectrum of iron and uranium cylinders was measured by time-of-flight and proportional counters. Time-dependent leakage spectra were measured by a NE 213 liquid scintillator. It was demonstrated that the investigation of time-dependent spectra is a sensitive test of inelastic scattering cross section data. The effect of an interface on fast neutron spectra was also investigated by measuring space dependent spectra across a sodium-iron interface. The measured spectra of these assemblies are suitable for testing the adequacy of computational approximations and cross section data. (author)

  14. SimLabel: a graphical user interface to simulate continuous wave EPR spectra from site-directed spin labeling experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, E; Le Breton, N; Martinho, M; Mileo, E; Belle, V

    2017-08-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) combined with continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (cw EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique to reveal, at the residue level, structural transitions in proteins. SDSL-EPR is based on the selective grafting of a paramagnetic label on the protein under study, followed by cw EPR analysis. To extract valuable quantitative information from SDSL-EPR spectra and thus give reliable interpretation on biological system dynamics, numerical simulations of the spectra are required. Such spectral simulations can be carried out by coding in MATLAB using functions from the EasySpin toolbox. For non-expert users of MATLAB, this could be a complex task or even impede the use of such simulation tool. We developed a graphical user interface called SimLabel dedicated to run cw EPR spectra simulations particularly coming from SDSL-EPR experiments. Simlabel provides an intuitive way to visualize, simulate, and fit such cw EPR spectra. An example of SDSL-EPR spectra simulation concerning the study of an intrinsically disordered region undergoing a local induced folding is described and discussed. We believe that this new tool will help the users to rapidly obtain reliable simulated spectra and hence facilitate the interpretation of their results. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Blast-wave analysis of strange particle $m_{T}$ spectra in Pb-Pb collisions at the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Giuseppe E

    2005-01-01

    The transverse mass spectra of high statistics, high purity samples of K/sup 0//sub S/, Lambda , Xi and Omega particles produced in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS energy have been studied in the framework of the blast-wave model. The dependence of the freezeout parameters on particle species and event centrality is discussed. Results at 40 A GeV/c are presented here for the first time.

  16. A novel measuring method for arbitrary optical vortex by three spiral spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Bo [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guo, Lana [School of Electronics and Information, Guangdong Polytechnic Normal University, Guangzhou 510665 (China); Yue, Chengfeng [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, Zhilie, E-mail: tangzhl@scnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2017-02-26

    In this letter, the topological charge of non-integer vortices determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra is theoretically demonstrated for the first time. Based on the conclusion, a novel method to measure non-integer vortices is presented. This method is applicable not only to arbitrary non-integer vortex but also to arbitrary integer vortex. - Highlights: • Different non-integer vortices cannot have three spiral spectra is demonstrated. • Relationship between the non-integer topological charge and the spiral spectra is presented. • Topological charge of non-integer vortices can be determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra.

  17. Neutron spectra determination methods using the measured reaction rates in SAPIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondars, Kh.Ya.; Lapenas, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Mathematical basis of algorithms is given for methods of neutron spectra restoration in accordance with the measured reaction rates of the activation detectors included into the information-determination system SAIPS aimed at generalization of the most popular home and foreign neutron spectra determination methods as well as the establishment of their mutual relations. The following neutron spectra determination methods are described: SAND-II, CRYSTAL BALL, WINDOWS, SPECTRA, RESP, JUL; polynominal and directed divergence methods. The algorithms have been realized on the ES computer

  18. Main-ion temperature and plasma rotation measurements based on scattering of electron cyclotron heating waves in ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Stejner; Rasmussen, Jesper; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate measurements of spectra of O-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) waves scattered collectively from microscopic plasma fluctuations in ASDEX Upgrade discharges with an ITER-like ECRH scenario. The measured spectra are shown to allow determination of the main ion...... temperature and plasma rotation velocity. This demonstrates that ECRH systems can be exploited for diagnostic purposes alongside their primary heating purpose in a reactor relevant scenario....

  19. Moessbauer spectra studied of spin-wave excitation for amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhigao

    1992-01-01

    The average hyperfine fields of amorphous Fe 70 Co 20 Zr 10 , Fe 80 Co 10 Zr 10 and Fe 86 Co 4 -Zr 10 alloys at different temperature were measured by the Moessbauer technique. According to Bloch's T 3/2 relation, spin-wave excitations of above amorphous alloys were studied and their B 3/2 values were found to be 0.40 +- 0.02, 0.45 +- 0.02 and 0.88 +- 0.04, respectively. Comparing the B 3/2 values of crystals, a-Fe-(Co, Ni)-ME, a-Fe-(Cr, Mn, W)-ME and a-Fe-B or TM-Zr invar alloys, the obvious difference among them was observed. Above results can be explained well by the exchange coupling fluctuation and the disorder of spatial arrangement. In this work, the difference between the stiffness coefficients obtained from the inelastic neutron scattering and the magnetization measurements for amorphous Invar alloys was also explained

  20. Measurement of the bremsstrahlung spectra generated from thick ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with those predicted by Monte-Carlo (MC) calculations using PENELOPE code. A close ... done on bremsstrahlung cross-section measurements and many theories have been given for ..... This probability is expected to be maximum for elastic.

  1. Wave spectra, meteorological, and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the Santa Barbara Channel project from 1984-03-13 (NODC Accession 8500085)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave spectra, meteorological, and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 13 March 1984. Data were collected by the Science Applications, Inc. - Raleigh...

  2. Time-of-flight techniques applied to neutron spectra measurements in fast subcritical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotival, Michel

    1975-04-01

    Time-of-flight measurements on Uranium-Graphite assemblies were performed using the BCMN linear accelerator. Methods to provide scalar spectra averaged over a core cell from these experimental results are described [fr

  3. Analog measurement of delayed antiproton annihilation time spectra in a high intensity pulsed antiproton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niestroj, A.; Hayano, R.S.; Ishikawa, T.; Tamura, H.; Torii, H.A.; Morita, N.; Yamazaki, T.; Sugai, I.; Nakayoshi, K.; Horvath, D.; Eades, J.; Widmann, E.

    1996-01-01

    An analog detection system has been developed to measure delayed antiproton annihilation time spectra for laser resonance spectroscopy of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms using the high-intensity pulsed beam of antiprotons from LEAR at CERN. (orig.)

  4. Contribution of recently measured nuclear data to reactor antineutrino energy spectra predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallot M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to summarize the actual problematic of reactor antineutrino energy spectra in the frame of fundamental and applied neutrino physics. Nuclear physics is an important ingredient of reactor antineutrino experiments. These experiments are motivated by neutrino oscillations, i.e. the measure of the θ13 mixing angle. In 2011, after a new computation of the reactor antineutrino energy spectra, based on the conversion of integral data of the beta spectra from 235U, and 239;241Pu, a deficit of reactor antineutrinos measured by short baseline experiments was pointed out. This is called the “reactor anomaly”, a new puzzle in the neutrino physics area. Since then, numerous new experimental neutrino projects have emerged. In parallel, computations of the antineutrino spectra independant from the ILL data would be desirable. One possibility is the use of the summation method, summing all the contributions of the fission product beta decay branches that can be found in nuclear databases. Studies have shown that in order to obtain reliable summation antineutrino energy spectra, new nuclear physics measurements of selected fission product beta decay properties are required. In these proceedings, we will present the computation methods of reactor antineutrino energy spectra and the impact of recent beta decay measurements on summation method spectra. The link of these nuclear physics studies with short baseline line oscillation search will be drawn and new neutrino physics projects at research reactors will be briefly presented.

  5. Measurements of bubble size spectra within leads in the Arctic summer pack ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Norris

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The first measurements of bubble size spectra within the near-surface waters of open leads in the central Arctic pack ice were obtained during the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS in August 2008 at 87–87.6° N, 1–11° W. A significant number of small bubbles (30–100 μm diameter were present, with concentration decreasing rapidly with size from 100–560 μm; no bubbles larger than 560 μm were observed. The bubbles were present both during periods of low wind speed (U<6 m s−1 and when ice covered the surface of the lead. The low wind and short open-water fetch precludes production of bubbles by wave breaking suggesting that the bubbles are generated by processes below the surface. When the surface water was open to the atmosphere bubble concentrations increased with increasing heat loss to the atmosphere. The presence of substantial numbers of bubbles is significant because the bursting of bubbles at the surface provides a mechanism for the generation of aerosol and the ejection of biological material from the ocean into the atmosphere. Such a transfer has previously been proposed as a potential climate feedback linking marine biology and Arctic cloud properties.

  6. In-situ measurements of wave electric fields in the equatorial electrojet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfaff, R.F.; Kelley, M.C.; Fejer, B.G.; Maynard, N.C.; Baker, K.D.

    1982-01-01

    Electric field wave measurements have been performed on two sounding rockets in the equatorial ionosphere. During a daytime flight from Chilca, Peru, intense electrostatic waves were detected on the upward directed electron density gradient. During a nighttime flight from Kwajalein Atoll, similar waves were detected on a downward directed gradient. These results are in agreement with a gradient drift instability explanation of the generation of the waves. The wave amplitudes were as high as 5 mV/m implying perturbation drifts comparable to the driving drift velocities. Power spectra from the turbulent region show a peak at long wavelengths, followed by a nearly flat spectral region before breaking into a power law form with negative index of 3.6--3.7 for lambda< or =30 m. Similarities between the spectra of the two flights suggest that the fundamental processes of the instabilities are the same in the day and nighttime conditions. The rocket data are consistent with radar results presented in a companion paper which show coherent, kilometer scale waves present in the electrojet

  7. The Dynamic Method for Time-of-Flight Measurement of Thermal Neutron Spectra from Pulsed Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepelyshev, Yu.N.; Tulaev, A.B.; Bobrakov, V.F.

    1994-01-01

    The time-of-flight method for a measurement of thermal neutron spectra in the pulsed neutron sources with high efficiency of neutron registration, more than 10 5 times higher in comparison with traditional one, is described. The main problems connected with the electric current technique for time-of-flight spectra measurement are examined. The methodical errors, problems of a special neutron detector design and other questions are discussed. Some experimental results, spectra from surfaces of the water and solid methane moderators, obtained in the pulsed reactor IBR-2 (Dubna, Russia) are presented. 4 refs., 5 figs

  8. Measurements of impurity spectra using UV/visible spectroscopic system in a GAMMA 10 plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matama, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Kubota, Y.; Cho, T.

    2006-01-01

    Impurity spectra have been measured and identified using a newly designed ultraviolet and visible (UV/visible) spectroscopic system in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10. It is constructed using two spectrometers to obtain an entire wavelength range of UV/visible impurity spectra with a high wavelength resolution in one plasma shot. We successfully obtained the emission intensities of the radiation spectra in detail and information on the time-varying population densities of the impurities. We evaluate radiation loss from the GAMMA 10 plasma in the UV/visible range; further we estimate the electron density and temperature after applying the measured spectral intensity to a collisional-radiative model

  9. The dynamic method for time-of-flight measurement of thermal neutron spectra from pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepyolyshev, Yu.N.; Chuklyaev, S.V.; Tulaev, A.B.; Bobrakov, V.F.

    1995-01-01

    A time-of-flight method for measurement of thermal neutron spectra in pulsed neutron sources with an efficiency more than 10 5 times higher than the standard method is described. The main problems associated with the electric current technique for time-of-flight spectra measurement are examined. The methodical errors, problems of special neutron detector design and other questions are discussed. Some experimental results for spectra from the surfaces of water and solid methane moderators obtained at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor (Dubna, Russia) are presented. (orig.)

  10. Fourier Transform and Photoacoustic Absorption Spectra of Ethylene within 6035 6210 cm-1: Comparative Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitanov, V.A.; Solodov, A.M.; Petrova, T.M.; Ponomarev, Y.N.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of ethylene absorption spectra with Fourier Transform (FT) and Photoacoustic (PA) spectrometers within 6035-6210 cm -1 are described. The methodology used for building the frequency scale for both spectrometers is presented. The methane absorption spectrum, included into the HITRAN database, was used in both cases to calibrate the frequency scale. Ethylene absorption spectra were obtained with the two recording methods; a coincidence of the measured line center positions was obtained with an accuracy of 0.0005 cm -1

  11. Determination of fast neutron spectra from dosimetric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiebig, R.

    1986-01-01

    For the evaluation of integrated dose rate measurements the following methods are described: the spectral indices method, the curve fitting method, and the ''optimum fit'' method with a number of simplification for this. Their efficiency and their restrictions are discussed. A proposal is made for combining these methods in a suitable way. (orig.) [de

  12. Multicomponent activation detector measurements of reactor neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, J.; Aarnio, P. A.; Routti, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Information on the neutron flux is required in many applications of research reactors, such as activation analysis or radiation damage measurements. Flux spectrum measurements are commonly carried out with activation foils. The reaction types used are threshold reactions in the fast energy region, resonance reactions in the intermediate region and neutron capture reactions with l/v-cross section in the thermal region. It has been shown that it is possible to combine several detector elements into homogeneous multicomponent detectors. The activities of all detector reaction products can be determined with a single gamma spectrum measurement. The multicomponent principle sets some restrictions on the choice of detector reactions, for example, each product nuclide may be produced in one reaction only. Separate multicomponent threshold and resonance detectors were designed for the fast and intermediate regions, respectively. The detectors were fabricated in polyethylene irradiation capsules or quartz glass ampoules, and they were irradiated in a cadmium cover. The detectors were succesfully used in the irradiation ring and in the core of a Triga reactor. The intermediate and fast neutron spectrum was unfolded with the least-squares unfolding program LOUHI. According to the preliminary results multicomponent activation detectors might constitute a convenient means for carrying out routine neutron spectrum measurements in research reactors. (orig.)

  13. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Tobin, S.J.; Favalli, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Hu, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) (Sweden); Trellue, H.; Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-11

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 134}Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  14. Coastal wave measurements during passage of tropical storm Amy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    Aerial photographic and laser profilometer data of waves generated by tropical storm Amy are presented. The data mission consisted primarily of two legs, one in the direction of the wind waves, and the second along the direction of swell propagation, using Jennette's Pier at Nags Head, North Carolina, as a focal point. At flight time, Amy's center was 512 nmi from shore and had maximum winds of 60 knots. The storm's history is presented, along with a satellite photograph, showing the extent of the storm on the day of the flight. Flight ground tracks are presented along with sample aerial photographs of the wave conditions showing approximate wavelength and direction. Sample wave energy spectra are presented both from the laser profilometer onboard the aircraft, and from the Corps of Engineers Research Center (CERC) shore gauge at Nags Head, North Carolina.

  15. Direct measurement of the plasma response to electrostatic ion waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarfaty, M.; DeSouza-Machado, S.; Skiff, F.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma wave-wave and wave-particle interactions are studied in a linear magnetized plasma. The relatively quiet plasma is produced by an argon gas-discharge. The plasma density is n e ≅ 10 9 cm -3 and the electron/ion temperatures are T e ≅ 5eV and T i = 0.05eV. A grid and a four ring antenna, both mounted on a scanning carriage, are used to launch electrostatic ion waves in the plasma. Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements of both the linear and the nonlinear plasma response to the wave fields are presented. The Vlasov-Poisson equations are used to explain the measured zero, first and second order terms of the ion distribution function in the presence of wave fields. In addition to the broadening (heating) of the ion distribution as the authors increase the wave amplitudes, induced plasma flows are observed both along and across the magnetic field

  16. Measurements of the HEU and LEU in-core spectra at the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehe, D K [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); King, J S; Lee, J C; Martin, W R [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1985-07-01

    The Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) at the University of Michigan has been serving as the test site for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel whole-core demonstration. As part of the experimental program, the differential neutron spectrum has been measured in a high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and an LEU core. The HEU and LEU spectra were determined by unfolding the measured activities of foils that were irradiated in the reactor. When the HEU and LEU spectra are compared from meV to 10 MeV, significant differences between the two spectra are apparent below 10 eV. These are probably caused by the additional {sup 238}U resonance absorption in the LEU fuel. No measurable difference occurs in the shape of the spectra above MeV. (author)

  17. New Interpretations of Measured Antihydrogen Velocities and Field Ionization Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, T.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Gabrielse, G.

    2006-01-01

    We present extensive Monte Carlo simulations, showing that cold antihydrogen (H) atoms are produced when antiprotons (p) are gently heated in the side wells of a nested Penning trap. The observed H with high energies, that had seemed to indicate otherwise, are instead explained by a surprisingly effective charge-exchange mechanism. We shed light on the previously measured field-ionization spectrum, and reproduce both the characteristic low-field power law as well as the enhanced H production at higher fields. The latter feature is shown to arise from H atoms too deeply bound to be described as guiding center atoms, atoms with internally chaotic motion

  18. Numerical simulation of wind wave surface profiles with tuned phase spectra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    It is known that the phases of the individual harmonic components in a linear narrow band wave spectrum are uniformly random. It has been suggested by some workers that some sort of phase coupling and `locking' between the different spectral...

  19. Measurement of spectra for intra-oral X-ray beams using biological materials as attenuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenóbio, Madelon A.F.; Nogueira-Tavares, Maria S.; Zenóbio, Elton G.; Squair, Peterson Lima; Santos, Marcus A.P.; Silva, Teógenes A. da

    2011-01-01

    In diagnostic radiology, the radiation interaction probability in matter is a strong function of the X-ray energy. The knowledge of the X-ray energy spectral distribution allows optimizing the radiographic imaging system in order to obtain high quality images with as low as reasonably achievable patient doses. In this study, transmitted X-ray spectra through dentin and enamel that are existing materials in intra-oral radiology were experimentally determined in an X-ray equipment with 40–70 kV variable range. Dentin and enamel samples with 0.4–3.8 and 0.6–2.6 mm thick were used as attenuators. X-ray transmitted spectra were measured with XR-100T model CdTe detector and half-value layers (HVL) were determined. Characteristics of both dentin and enamel transmitted spectra showed that they have differences in the penetration power in matter and in the spectrum distribution. The results will be useful for phantom developments based on dentin and enamel for image quality control in dental radiology. - Highlights: ► The X-ray energy spectral distribution, optimize the radiographic imaging system. Transmitted X-ray spectra through dentin and enamel were experimentally determined. X-ray transmitted spectra were measured (XR-100T model CdTe detector). The transmitted spectra showed differences in the penetration power and spectrum distribution. Dentin and enamel transmitted spectra will be useful for phantom developments.

  20. Study of the peak shape in alpha spectra measured by liquid scintillation

    CERN Document Server

    Vera-Tome, F; Martin-Sanchez, A

    2002-01-01

    Liquid-scintillation counting allows the measurement of alpha and beta activities jointly or only of the alpha-emitting nuclides in a sample. Although the resolution of the alpha spectra is poorer than that attained with semiconductor detectors, it is still an attractive alternative. We describe here attempts to fit a peak shape to experimental liquid-scintillation alpha spectra and discuss the parameters affecting this shape, such as the PSA (pulse-shape analyser) level, vial type, shaking the sample, etc. Spectral analysis has been applied for complex alpha spectra.

  1. Measurement and calculation of characteristic prompt gamma ray spectra emitted during proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polf, J C; Peterson, S; Beddar, S [M D Anderson Cancer Center, Univeristy of Texas, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Spiridon, A; Trache, L [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)], E-mail: jcpolf@mdanderson.org

    2009-11-21

    In this paper, we present results of initial measurements and calculations of prompt gamma ray spectra (produced by proton-nucleus interactions) emitted from tissue equivalent phantoms during irradiations with proton beams. Measurements of prompt gamma ray spectra were made using a high-purity germanium detector shielded either with lead (passive shielding), or a Compton suppression system (active shielding). Calculations of the spectra were performed using a model of both the passive and active shielding experimental setups developed using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. From the measured spectra it was shown that it is possible to distinguish the characteristic emission lines from the major elemental constituent atoms (C, O, Ca) in the irradiated phantoms during delivery of proton doses similar to those delivered during patient treatment. Also, the Monte Carlo spectra were found to be in very good agreement with the measured spectra providing an initial validation of our model for use in further studies of prompt gamma ray emission during proton therapy. (note)

  2. Excitation spectra of an effective d-wave model for cuprate superconductivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamaguchi, M; Ohta, Y; Eder, R

    An exact-diagonalization technique on finite-size clusters is used to study the ground states and some excitation spectra of the two-dimensional effective Fermi-liquid model derived from numerical studies of the t-J model. We show that there is actually a reasonable range of parameter values where

  3. Measurement and analysis of leakage neutron energy spectra around the Kinki University Reactor, UTR-KINKI

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, Y; Sagawa, H; Tsujimoto, T

    2002-01-01

    The highly sensitive cylindrical multi-moderator type neutron spectrometer was constructed for measurement of low level environmental neutrons. This neutron spectrometer was applied for the determination of leakage neutron energy spectra around the Kinki University Reactor. The analysis of the leakage neutron energy spectra was performed by MCNP Monte Carlo code. From the obtained results, the agreement between the MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values is fairly good, which indicates the MCNP model is correctly simulating the UTR-KINKI.

  4. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30 0 close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables

  5. Measurement of time-dependent fast neutron energy spectra in a depleted uranium assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittlestone, S.

    1980-10-01

    Time-dependent neutron energy spectra in the range 0.6 to 6.4 MeV have been measured in a depleted uranium assembly. By selecting windows in the time range 0.9 to 82 ns after the beam pulse, it was possible to observe the change of the neutron energy distributions from spectra of predominantly 4 to 6 MeV neutrons to spectra composed almost entirely of fission neutrons. The measured spectra were compared to a Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment using the ENDF/B-IV data file. At times and energies at which the calculation predicted a fission spectrum, the experiment agreed with the calculation, confirming the accuracy of the neutron spectroscopy system. However, the presence of discrepancies at other times and energies suggested that there are significant inconsistencies in the inelastic cross sections in the 1 to 6 MeV range. The time response generated concurrently with the energy spectra was compared to the Monte Carlo calculation. From this comparison, and from examination of time spectra measured by other workers using 235 U and 237 Np fission detectors, it would appear that there are discrepancies in the ENDF/B-IV cross sections below 1 MeV. The predicted decay rates were too low below and too high above 0.8 MeV

  6. Lagrangian modelling of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar wave measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouques, Sebastien

    2005-07-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the estimation of the ocean wave spectrum from synthetic aperture radar imaging and the modelling of ocean surface waves using the Lagrangian formalism. The first part gives a short overview of the theories of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) whereas the second part consists of five independent publications. The first two articles investigate the influence of the radar backscatter model on the SAR imaging of ocean waves. In Article I, Monte Carlo simulations of SAR images of the ocean surface are carried out using a nonlinear backscatter model that include both specular reflection and Bragg scattering and the results are compared to simulations from the classical Hasselmann integral transform (Hasselmann and Hasselmann, 1991). It is shown that nonlinearities in the backscatter model strongly influence the imaging of range-travelling waves and that the former can suppress the range-splitting effect (Bruning et al., 1988). Furthermore, in Article II a database of Envisat-ASAR Wave Mode products co-located with directional wave spectra from the numerical model WAM and which contains range-travelling wave cases only, is set up. The WAM spectra are used as input to several ocean-to-SAR integral transforms, with various real aperture radar (RAR) models and the obtained SAR image cross-spectra are compared to the Envisat-ASAR observations. A first result is that the use of a linear backscatter model leads to a high proportion of non-physical negative backscatter values in the RAR image, as suggested by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2001). Then, a comparison between the observed SAR cross-spectra and the ones simulated through Hasselmann's integral transform reveals that only twenty percents of the observations show a range-splitting effect as strong as in the simulations. A much better agreement is obtained when using the integral transform by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2003), which is based on a nonlinear hackscatter model

  7. Analysis of Measured and Simulated Supraglottal Acoustic Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, Rubén; Evdokimova, Vera V; Evgrafova, Karina V; Godino-Llorente, Juan I; Skrelin, Pavel A

    2016-09-01

    To date, although much attention has been paid to the estimation and modeling of the voice source (ie, the glottal airflow volume velocity), the measurement and characterization of the supraglottal pressure wave have been much less studied. Some previous results have unveiled that the supraglottal pressure wave has some spectral resonances similar to those of the voice pressure wave. This makes the supraglottal wave partially intelligible. Although the explanation for such effect seems to be clearly related to the reflected pressure wave traveling upstream along the vocal tract, the influence that nonlinear source-filter interaction has on it is not as clear. This article provides an insight into this issue by comparing the acoustic analyses of measured and simulated supraglottal and voice waves. Simulations have been performed using a high-dimensional discrete vocal fold model. Results of such comparative analysis indicate that spectral resonances in the supraglottal wave are mainly caused by the regressive pressure wave that travels upstream along the vocal tract and not by source-tract interaction. On the contrary and according to simulation results, source-tract interaction has a role in the loss of intelligibility that happens in the supraglottal wave with respect to the voice wave. This loss of intelligibility mainly corresponds to spectral differences for frequencies above 1500 Hz. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The physical basis for estimating wave energy spectra from SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyzenga, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Ocean surface waves are imaged by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) through a combination of the effects of changes in the surface slope, surface roughness, and surface motion. Over a limited range of conditions, each of these effects can be described in terms of a linear modulation-transfer function. In such cases, the wave-height spectrum can be estimated in a straightforward manner from the SAR image-intensity spectrum. The range of conditions over which this assumption of linearity is valid is investigated using a numerical simulation model, and the implications of various departures from linearity are discussed.

  9. Energy spectra and wave function of trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential as an effective quantum chromodynamics potential in D-dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deta, U. A., E-mail: utamaalan@yahoo.co.id [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department of Post Graduate Program, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Indonesia and Physics Department, State University of Surabaya, Jl. Ketintang, Surabaya 60231 (Indonesia); Suparmi,; Cari,; Husein, A. S.; Yuliani, H.; Khaled, I. K. A.; Luqman, H.; Supriyanto [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department of Post Graduate Program, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    The Energy Spectra and Wave Function of Schrodinger equation in D-Dimensions for trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential were investigated analytically using Nikiforov-Uvarov method. This potential captures the essential traits of the quark-gluon dynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics. The approximate energy spectra are given in the close form and the corresponding approximate wave function for arbitrary l-state (l ≠ 0) in D-dimensions are formulated in the form of differential polynomials. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The existence of extra dimensions (centrifugal factor) and this potential increase the energy spectra of system.

  10. Measurements of the Ultraviolet Fluorescence Cross Sections and Spectra of Bacillus Anthracis Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, J.R.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of the ultraviolet autofluorescence spectra and absolute cross sections of the Bacillus anthracis (Ba) simulants Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Bacillus cereus (Bc) were measured. Fluorescence spectra and cross sections of pine pollen (Pina echinata) were measured for comparison. Both dried vegetative cells and spores separated from the sporulated vegetative material were studied. The spectra were obtained by suspending a small number (<10) of particles in air in our Single Particle Spectroscopy Apparatus (SPSA), illuminating the particles with light from a spectrally filtered arc lamp, and measuring the fluorescence spectra of the particles. The illumination was 280 nm (20 nm FWHM) and the fluorescence spectra was measured between 300 and 450 nm. The fluorescence cross section of vegetative Bg peaks at 320 nm with a maximum cross section of 5 X 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle while the Bg spore fluorescence peaks at 310 nm with peak fluorescence of 8 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Pine pollen particles showed a higher fluorescence peaking at 355 nm with a cross section of 1.7 X 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Integrated cross sections ranged from 3.0 X 10{sup -13} for the Bg spores through 2.25 X 10{sup -12} (cm{sup 2}/sr-particle) for the vegetative cells.

  11. Measurements of bremsstrahlung spectra of Lanzhou ECR Ion Source No. 3 (LECR3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, H.Y.; Zhao, H.W.; Ma, X.W.; Zhang, S.F.; Feng, W.T.; Zhu, X.L.; Zhang, Z.M.; He, W.; Sun, L.T.; Feng, Y.C.; Cao, Y.; Li, J.Y.; Li, X.X.; Wang, H.; Ma, B.H.

    2006-01-01

    In order to diagnose the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma, electron bremsstrahlung spectra were measured by a HPGe detector on Lanzhou ECR Ion Source No. 3 at IMP. The ion source was operated with argon under various working conditions, including different microwave power, mixing gas, extraction high voltage (HV), and so on. Some of the measured spectra are presented in this article. The dependence of energetic electron population on mixing gas and extraction HV is also described. Additionally, we are looking forward to further measurements on SECRAL (Superconducting ECR Ion Source with Advanced design at Lanzhou)

  12. Application of simulated standard spectra in natural radioactivity measurements using gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayani, K.; Pant, A.D.; Bhosle, Nitin; Anilkumar, S.; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma ray spectrometry is one of the well known analytical techniques for environmental radioactivity measurements. Gamma spectrometer based on NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors is very popular since it offers high efficiency, low cost and case in handling. The poor energy resolution of the NaI(TI) detector is the major disadvantage making tile analysis of complex gamma ray spectra difficult. Least square method or the full spectrum analysis method is widely used for the analysis of complex spectra from scintillation detectors. The main requirement of this method is that the individual standard spectra of all nuclides expected in the complex spectrum in the same measurement geometry must be available. It is not always possible and feasible to have all the standards of nuclides in the desired geometry. A methodology based on the use of simulated standard spectra generated by Monte Carlo technique was proposed for analysis of complex spectra of nuclides. In the present work, for the analysis of 238 U, 233 Th and 40 K in soil samples, the same methodology was applied by using the simulated standard spectra in soil matrix. The details of the simulation method and results analysis of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K in environmental samples are discussed in this paper

  13. Measurement of thermal neutron spectra using LINAC in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    The exact grasp of thermal neutron spectra in a core region is very important for obtaining accurate thermal neutron group constants in the calculation for the nuclear design of a reactor core. For the accurate grasp of thermal neutron spectra, the capability of thermal neutron spectra to describe the moderator cross-sections for thermal neutron scattering is a key factor. Accordingly, 0 deg angular thermal neutron spectra were measured by the time of flight (TOF) method using the JAERI LINAC as a pulsed neutron source, for light water system added with Cd and In, high temperature graphite system added with boron, and light water-natural uranium heterogeneous multiplication system among the reactor moderators of light water or graphite systems. First, the equations to give the time of flight and neutron flux by TOF method were analyzed, and several corrections were investigated, such as those for detector efficiency, background, the transmission coefficient of air and the Al window of a flight tube, mean emission time of neutrons, and the distortion effect of re-entrant hole on thermal neutron spectra. Then, the experimental system, results and calculation were reported for the experiments on the above three moderator systems. Finally, the measurement of fast neutron spectra in natural uranium system and that of the efficiency of a 6 Li glass scintillator detector are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Measurement of X-ray spectra by PIN photodiode: comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Paulo R.; Furquim, Tania A.C.; Herdade, Silvio B.

    1996-01-01

    Two different approaches for the evaluation of diagnostic X-ray spectra are presented : one based on a semiempirical model and other based on measurements using a silicon PIN photodiode. Measured and calculated values using typical kVp and filter combinations are compared

  15. Neutron spectra measurements and neutron flux monitoring for radiation damage purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmera, B.; Petr, J.; Racek, J.; Rumler, C.; Turzik, Z.; Franc, L.; Holman, M.; Hogel, J.; Kovarik, K.; Marik, P.; Vespalec, R.; Albert, D.; Hansen, V.; Vogel, W.

    1979-09-01

    Neutron spectra were measured for the TR-0, WWR-S and SR-0 experimental reactors using the recoil proton method, 6 Li spectrometry, scintillation spectrometry and activation detectors in a variety of conditions. Neutron fluence was also measured and calculated. (M.S.)

  16. Correlation of quality measurements to visible-near infrared spectra of pasteurized egg

    Science.gov (United States)

    A twelve week study was conducted on the egg albumen from both pasteurized and non-pasteurized shell eggs using visible-near infrared spectroscopy. Correlation of the chemical changes detected in the spectra to the measurement of Haugh units (measure of interior egg quality) was carried out using ch...

  17. Chemometric correlation of shelf life, quality measurements, and visible-near infrared spectra of pasteurized eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    A twelve week study was conducted on the egg albumen from both pasteurized and non-pasteurized shell eggs using visible-near infrared spectroscopy. Correlation of the chemical changes detected in the spectra to the measurement of Haugh units (measure of interior egg quality) was carried out using pr...

  18. 2D fluorescence spectra measurement of six kinds of bioagents simulants by short range Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanpedro, Man

    2018-02-01

    Pantoea agglomerans (Pan), Staphylococcus aureus (Sta), Bacillus globigii (BG) and Escherichia coli (EH), these four kinds of bioagents simulants of were cultured and then their growth curves were measured, the generation time was 0.99h, 0.835h, 1.07h and 1.909h, respectively. A small short range fluorescence lidar working at wavelengths of 266nm and 355nm was designed and used to measure the two-dimensional fluorescence spectra of bioagents simulants in the amino acid segment and NADH segment, respectively. In a controllable fluorescence measurement chamber, the two-dimensional fluorescence spectra of vegetative liquid bacterial aerosols as well as BSA and OVA, two protein toxinic simulants were measured with a resolution of 4nm. The two-dimensional fluorescence spectral shape of Pan, Sta, EH and BG, BSA and OVA were consistent with the standard fluorescent component tryptophan in the amino acid band with FWHM of 60nm, but the central wavelength of the fluorescence spectra of these simulants blue/purple shifted obviously as affected by the external biochemical environment, concentration and ratio of different bacterial internal fluorophores, so the energy level between the excited state and the ground state of the fluorescence molecule increased. Differently, weak NADH fluorescence spectra with 100nm FWHM inside the four vegetative bacteria aerosols were detected, but Rayleigh scattering, Raman scattering contribution of water, nitrogen in the fluorescence spectra could not be effectively extracted. The second - order derivative fluorescence spectra of four simulants showed that the high - order processing and recognition of the fluorescence spectra was feasible.

  19. Measurements of the vertical correlation in turbulence under broken waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus; Deigaard, Rolf; Sutherland, James

    1998-01-01

    Turbulence measurements have been carried out in the surf zone of a wave flume. The purpose of the measurements is to determine the length scale of the turbulence generated by the wave breaking. The length scale of the turbulence is estimated on basis of the correlation between simultaneous measu...... measurements of the vertical turbulent fluctuations, taken at different levels above the bed, (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  20. Grain size measurements by ultrasonic Rayleigh surface waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanichamy, P.; Jayakumar, T.

    1996-01-01

    The use of Rayleigh surface waves to determine average grain size nondestructively in an austenitic stainless steel AISI type 316 stainless is discussed. Two commercial type 4MHz frequency surface wave transducers, one as transmitter and the other as receiver were employed for the measurement of surface wave amplitudes. Relative amplitudes of the Rayleigh surface waves were correlated with the metallographically obtained grain sizes. Results indicate that surface/sub-surface average grain sizes of AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel can be estimated with a confidence level of more than 80% in the grain size range 30-170 μm. (author)

  1. Time-of-flight spectrometer for the measurement of gamma correlated neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriashin, A.V.; Devkin, B.V.; Lychagin, A.A.; Minko, J.V.; Mironov, A.N.; Nesterenko, V.S.; Sztaricskai, T.; Petoe, G.; Vasvary, L.

    1986-01-01

    A time-of-flight spectrometer for the measurement of gamma correlated neutron spectra from (n,xnγ) reactions is described. The operation and the main parameters are discussed. The resolution in the neutron channel is 2.2 ns/m at the 150 keV neutron energy threshold. A simultaneous measurement of the time-of-flight and amplitude distributions makes it possible to study gamma correlated neutron spectra as well as the prompt gamma spectra in coincidence with selected energy neutrons. In order to test the spectrometer, measurements of the neutron spectrum in coincidence with the 846 keV gamma line of 56 Fe were carried out at an incident neutron energy of 14.1 MeV. (Auth.)

  2. Time-of-flight spectrometer for the measurement of gamma correlated neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryashin, A.V.; Devlein, B.V.; Lychagin, A.A.; Minko, Y.V.; Mironov, A.N.; Nesterenko, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    A time-of-flight spectrometer for the measurement of gamma correlated neutron spectra form (n,xnγ) reactions is described. The operation and the main parameters are discussed. The resolution in the neutron channel is 2.2 ns/m at the 150 keV neutron energy threshold. A simultaneous measurement of the time-of-flight and amplitude distributions makes it possible to study gamma correlated neutron spectra as well as the prompt gamma spectra in coincidence with selected energy neutrons. In order to test the spectrometer, measurements of the neutron spectrum in coincidence with the 846 keV gamma line of 56 Fe were carried out at an incident neutron energy of 14.1 MeV. (author). 3 figs., 6 refs

  3. Measurements of energy spectra of fast electrons from PF-1000 in the upstream and downstream directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, R.; Czaus, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Malinowski, K.; Zebrowski, J. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Sadowski, M.J. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Karpinski, L.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM), 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Kubes, P. [Czech Technical University (CVUT), 166-27 Prague, (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    The paper describes measurements of energy spectra of electrons emitted in the upstream direction along the symmetry-axis of the PF-1000 facility, operated with the deuterium filling at 21 kV, 290 kJ. The measurements were performed with a magnetic analyzer. The same analyzer was used to measure also electron beams emitted in along the symmetry-axis in the downstream direction. The recorded spectra showed that the electron-beams emitted in the upstream direction have energies in the range from about 40 keV to about 800 keV, while those in the downstream direction have energies in the range from about 60 keV to about 200 keV. These spectra confirm that in the PF (Plasma Focus) plasma column there appear strong local fields accelerating charged particles in different directions. This document is composed of a paper and a poster. (authors)

  4. Three-wave electron vortex lattices for measuring nanofields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C; Boothroyd, C B; Chang, S L Y; Dunin-Borkowski, R E

    2015-01-01

    It is demonstrated how an electron-optical arrangement consisting of two electron biprisms can be used to generate three-wave vortex lattices with effective lattice spacings between 0.1 and 1 nm. The presence of vortices in these lattices was verified by using a third biprism to perform direct phase measurements via off-axis electron holography. The use of three-wave lattices for nanoscale electromagnetic field measurements via vortex interferometry is discussed, including the accuracy of vortex position measurements and the interpretation of three-wave vortex lattices in the presence of partial spatial coherence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Distributions of freak wave heights measured in the North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stansell, P.

    2004-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of some of the largest waves occurring during 793 h of surface elevation measurements collected during 14 severe storms in the North Sea. This data contains 104 freak waves. It is found that the probability of occurrence of freak waves is only weekly dependent on the significant wave height, significant wave steepness and spectral bandwidth. The probability does show a slightly stronger dependency on the skew and kurtosis of the surface elevation data, but on removing the contribution to these measures from the presence of the freakwaves themselves, this dependency largely disappears. Distributions of extreme waves are modelled by fitting Generalised Pareto distributions, and extreme value distributions and return periods are given for freak waves in terms of the empirical fitted parameters. It is shown by comparison with these fits that both the Rayleigh distribution and the fit of Nerzic and Prevosto severely under-predict the probability of occurrence of extreme waves. For the most extreme freak wave in our data, the Rayleigh distribution over-predicts the return period by about 300 times when compared to the fitted model. (author)

  6. Satellite Atmospheric Sounder IRFS-2 1. Analysis of Outgoing Radiation Spectra Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, A. V.; Timofeyev, Yu. M.; Virolainen, Ya. A.; Uspensky, A. B.; Zavelevich, F. S.; Golovin, Yu. M.; Kozlov, D. A.; Rublev, A. N.; Kukharsky, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The outgoing radiation spectra measured by the IRFS-2 spectrometer onboard Meteor-M no. 2 satellite have been analyzed. Some statistical parameters of more than 106 spectra measured in spring in 2015 have been calculated. The radiation brightness temperature varied from ˜300 K (surface temperature) up to ˜210 K (tropopause temperature). The quite high variability of the longwave measured radiation has been demonstrated. The signal-to-noise ratio distinctively decreases in the shortwave region (higher than 1300 cm-1). Intercomparisons of IR sounders IRFS-2 with IASI and CrIS spectra showed that the discrepancies in the average spectra and their variability do not exceed measurement errors in the spectral region 660-1300 cm-1. A comparison of specially chosen pairs of the simultaneously measured spectra showed that the differences between IRFS-2 and European instruments in the region of the 15-μm CO2 band and the transparency windows 8-12 μm are less than 1 mW/(m2 sr cm-1) and no more than the differences between the two IASI instruments (-A and -B). The differences between measured and simulated spectra are less than 1 mW/(m2 sr cm-1) in the mean part of CO2 band. However, starting from 720 cm-1, values appear that reach 2-4 mW/(m2 sr cm-1). This is caused by the absence of precise information about the surface temperature. Further investigations into the possible reasons for the observed disagreements are required in order to improve both the method of initial processing and the radiative model of the atmosphere.

  7. On possible contribution of standing wave like spacer dynamics in polymer liquid crystals to quasi-elastic cold neutron scattering spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jecl, R.; Cvikl, B.

    1998-01-01

    The quasi-elastic cold neutron incoherent scattering law, QNS, for the assumed case of transversal standing wave type of motion of the linear chain a spacer-of the polyacrylate polymer liquid crystal, based upon the random walk of the particle between two perfectly potential barriers, is derived. The spacer protons are taken to vibrate (within the stationary plane) transversely to the line joining the oxygen atoms in a way where they are all simultaneously displaced in the same direction with amplitudes of the standing wave fundamental mode of the vibration excited. The calculated relevant incoherent scattering law is found to be a non-distinct function of the scattering vector Q, in the sense that the postulated dynamical effect of the spacer protons causes the peak value of the calculated incoherent scattering law, S(Q,ω), to remain constant throughout the experimentally accessible range of the scattering vector Q. It appears that, when the experimental resolution broadening effects is taken into account, the contribution of the postulated dynamical behavior to the measured QNS spectra might be small, particularly so, if dome additional motion of the scatters is present, and consequently the standing wave like spacer dynamics in polymer liquid crystals will be very difficult to be identified uniquely in the quasielastic neutron scattering experiments.(author)

  8. Feasibility study of direct spectra measurements for Thomson scattered signals for KSTAR fusion-grade plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K.-R.; Kim, K.-h.; Kwak, S.; Svensson, J.; Lee, J.; Ghim, Y.-c.

    2017-11-01

    Feasibility study of direct spectra measurements of Thomson scattered photons for fusion-grade plasmas is performed based on a forward model of the KSTAR Thomson scattering system. Expected spectra in the forward model are calculated based on Selden function including the relativistic polarization correction. Noise in the signal is modeled with photon noise and Gaussian electrical noise. Electron temperature and density are inferred using Bayesian probability theory. Based on bias error, full width at half maximum and entropy of posterior distributions, spectral measurements are found to be feasible. Comparisons between spectrometer-based and polychromator-based Thomson scattering systems are performed with varying quantum efficiency and electrical noise levels.

  9. Measurement of neutron spectra for photonuclear reaction with linearly polarized photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirihara Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectra of neutrons produced by a photonuclear reaction from a 197Au target were measured using 16.95 MeV linearly and circularly polarized photon beams at NewSUBARU-BL01 using a time-of-flight method. The difference in the neutron spectra between the cases of a linearly and circularly polarized photon was measured. The difference in the neutron yield increased with the neutron energy and was approximately threefold at the maximum neutron energy. In a direction perpendicular to that of the linear polarization, the neutron yields decreased as the neutron energy increased.

  10. Calculated /alpha/-induced thick target neutron yields and spectra, with comparison to measured data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.B.; Bozoian, M.; Perry, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    One component of the neutron source associated with the decay of actinide nuclides in many environments is due to the interaction of decay /alpha/ particles in (/alpha/,n) reactions on low Z nuclides. Measurements of (/alpha/,n) thick target neutron yields and associated neutron spectra have been made for only a few combinations of /alpha/ energy and target nuclide or mixtures of actinide and target nuclides. Calculations of thick target neutron yields and spectra with the SOURCES code require /alpha/-energy-dependent cross sections for (/alpha/,n) reactions, as well as branching fractions leading to the energetically possible levels of the product nuclides. A library of these data has been accumulated for target nuclides of Z /le/ 15 using that available from measurements and from recent GNASH code calculations. SOURCES, assuming neutrons to be emitted isotopically in the center-of-mass system, uses libraries of /alpha/ stopping cross sections, (/alpha/,n) reaction cross reactions, product nuclide level branching fractions, and actinide decay /alpha/ spectra to calculate thick target (/alpha/,n) yields and neutron spectra for homogeneous combinations of nuclides. The code also calculates the thick target yield and angle intergrated neutron spectrum produced by /alpha/-particle beams on targets of homogeneous mixtures of nuclides. Illustrative calculated results are given and comparisons are made with measured thick target yields and spectra. 50 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  11. The effect of broad-band Alfven-cyclotron waves spectra on the preferential heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Y. G. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Vinas, A. F. [Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-06-13

    In anticipation of results from inner heliospheric missions such as the Solar Orbiter and the Solar Probe we present the results from 1.5D hybrid simulations to study the role of magnetic fluctuations for the heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind. We consider the effects of nonlinear Alfven-cyclotron waves at different frequency regimes. Monochromatic nonlinear Alfven-alpha-cyclotron waves are known to preferentially heat and accelerate He{sup ++} ions in collisionless low beta plasma. In this study we demonstrate that these effects are preserved when higherfrequency monochromatic and broad-band spectra of Alfven-proton-cyclotron waves are considered. Comparison between several nonlinear monochromatic waves shows that the ion temperatures, anisotropies and relative drift are quantitatively affected by the shift in frequency. Including a broad-band wave-spectrum results in a significant reduction of both the parallel and the perpendicular temperature components for the He{sup ++} ions, whereas the proton heating is barely influenced, with the parallel proton temperature only slightly enhanced. The differential streaming is strongly affected by the available wave power in the resonant daughter ion-acoustic waves. Therefore for the same initial wave energy, the relative drift is significantly reduced in the case of initial wave-spectra in comparison to the simulations with monochromatic waves.

  12. ASPI experiment: measurements of fields and waves on board the INTERBALL-1 spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Klimov

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available The plasma-wave experiment ASPI (analysis of spectra of plasma waves and instabilities on board the INTERBALL spacecraft is a combined wave diagnostics experiment. It performs measurements of the DC and AC magnetic field vector by flux-gate and search-coil sensors, the DC and AC electric field vector by Langmuir double probes and the plasma current by Langmuir split probe. Preliminary data analysis shows the low noise levels of the sensors and the compatibility of new data with the results of previous missions. During several months of in-orbit operation a rich collection of data was acquired, examples of which at the magnetopause and plasma sheet are presented in second part of the paper.

  13. Quasi-real-time photon pulse duration measurement by analysis of FEL radiation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Robin, E-mail: robin.engel@uni-oldenburg.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany); Düsterer, Stefan; Brenner, Günter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Teubner, Ulrich [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Considering the second-order spectral correlation function of SASE-FEL radiation allows a real-time observation of the photon pulse duration during spectra acquisition. For photon diagnostics at free-electron lasers (FELs), the determination of the photon pulse duration is an important challenge and a complex task. This is especially true for SASE FELs with strongly fluctuating pulse parameters. However, most techniques require an extensive experimental setup, data acquisition and evaluation time, limiting the usability in all-day operation. In contrast, the presented work uses an existing approach based on the analysis of statistical properties of measured SASE FEL spectra and implements it as a software tool, integrated in FLASH’s data acquisition system. This allows the calculation of the average pulse durations from a set of measured spectral distributions with only seconds of delay, whenever high-resolution spectra are recorded.

  14. An inexpensive instrument for measuring wave exposure and water velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figurski, J.D.; Malone, D.; Lacy, J.R.; Denny, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean waves drive a wide variety of nearshore physical processes, structuring entire ecosystems through their direct and indirect effects on the settlement, behavior, and survivorship of marine organisms. However, wave exposure remains difficult and expensive to measure. Here, we report on an inexpensive and easily constructed instrument for measuring wave-induced water velocities. The underwater relative swell kinetics instrument (URSKI) is a subsurface float tethered by a short (<1 m) line to the seafloor. Contained within the float is an accelerometer that records the tilt of the float in response to passing waves. During two field trials totaling 358 h, we confirmed the accuracy and precision of URSKI measurements through comparison to velocities measured by an in situ acoustic Doppler velocimeter and those predicted by a standard swell model, and we evaluated how the dimensions of the devices, its buoyancy, and sampling frequency can be modified for use in a variety of environments.

  15. Validation of Standing Wave Liner Impedance Measurement Method, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hersh Acoustical Engineering, Inc. proposes to establish the feasibility and practicality of using the Standing Wave Method (SWM) to measure the impedance of...

  16. Measurements of time dependent energy spectra of neutrons in a small graphite assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Shigeyasu; Aizawa, Otohiko; Takahashi, Akito; Sumita, Kenji.

    1975-01-01

    The time-dependent energy spectra of neutrons have been measured in a small 30x30x30 cm 3 graphite assembly by means of the linac-chopper method, with a view to establishing experimental evidence that there is no asymptotic spectrum in such a small assembly, and in order to study the non-asymptotic behavior of neutrons. The arrangement of a polyethylene pre-moderator adjacent to the assembly made the measurements possible with the improvement obtained thereby of the neutron counting statistics. It was indicated from calculation that the presence of the pre-moderator had little effect - at least above the Bragg cut-off energy - on the evolution in time of the energy spectra of neutrons in the graphite assembly. The experimental results indicated very probable disappearance of asymptotic spectra, and revealed significant enhancement of trapping at Bragg energies with the lapse of time. This is consistent with the results of pulsed neutron experiments in small assemblies conducted by Takahashi et al., and falls in line with de Saussure's approximation. The spectra in the graphite assembly showed significant space dependence, the spectra becoming harder with increasing distance from the pre-moderator. This hardening may be attributed to the relatively faster propagation of higher energy neutrons. (auth.)

  17. Measurements of Wiener spectra of laser printer in a computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Syuichi; Ueda, Katsuhiko; Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Ohtsuka, Akiyoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Morishita, Junji; Fujikawa, Tsuyoshi.

    1992-01-01

    Sources of noise in a computed radiography (CR) were investigated by measuring three different Wiener spectra: 1) laser printer Wiener spectra including CR film, 2) Wiener spectrum of CR film (single emulsion), and 3) overall Wiener spectra. To measure the noise contributed by the laser printer, 'image data' (i.e., image having a constant pixel value) were produced on a personal computer and were sent to the laser printer in the CR system. The noise level of laser printer was comparable to that of the CR film at low spatial frequencies ( 4 cycle/mm) was higher than that of the film. Laser printer Wiener spectra obtained in the perpendicular direction relative to the laser beam scanning direction were comparable at low spatial frequencies, but greater at high spatial frequencies, to those obtained in the parallel direction. And a spectral peak around 10 cycle/mm was obtained in the Wiener spectrum in the perpendicular direction. The peak is caused mainly by a banding artifact. Overall Wiener spectra in the parallel and perpendicular directions show the same tendency as those of the laser printer, but the noise level of the overall Wiener spectrum was increased mainly by X-ray quantum mottle at low spatial frequencies. In conclusion, the noise of laser printer greatly increases the overall Wiener spectrum at high spatial frequencies. (author)

  18. Using Ultrasonic Lamb Waves To Measure Moduli Of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of broad-band ultrasonic Lamb waves in plate specimens of ceramic-matrix/fiber and metal-matrix/fiber composite materials used to determine moduli of elasticity of materials. In one class of potential applications of concept, Lamb-wave responses of specimens measured and analyzed at various stages of thermal and/or mechanical processing to determine effects of processing, without having to dissect specimens. In another class, structural components having shapes supporting propagation of Lamb waves monitored ultrasonically to identify signs of deterioration and impending failure.

  19. Characterization of the Caliban and Prospero Critical Assemblies Neutron Spectra for Integral Measurements Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Jacquet, X.; Cartier, J.

    2014-04-01

    Caliban and Prospero are two highly enriched uranium metallic core reactors operated on the CEA Center of Valduc. These critical assemblies are suitable for integral experiments, such as fission yields measurements or perturbation measurements, which have been carried out recently on the Caliban reactor. Different unfolding methods, based on activation foils and fission chambers measurements, are used to characterize the reactor spectra and especially the Caliban spectrum, which is very close to a pure fission spectrum.

  20. Effects of diffraction and target finite size on coherent transition radiation spectra in bunch length measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellano, M.; Cianchi, A.; Verzilov, V.A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati; Orlandi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy)]|[Rome Univ., Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    Effects of diffraction and the size of the target on TR in the context of CTR-based bunch length measurements are studied on the basis of Kirchhoff diffraction theory. Spectra of TR from the finite-size target for several schemes of measurements are calculated in the far-infrared region showing strong distortion at low frequencies. Influence of the effect on the accuracy of bunch length measurements is estimated.

  1. Physical measurements of breaking wave impact on a floating wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Martyn R.; Greaves, Deborah M.; Raby, Alison

    2013-04-01

    Marine energy converter must both efficiently extract energy in small to moderate seas and also successfully survive storms and potential collisions. Extreme loads on devices are therefore an important consideration in their design process. X-MED is a SuperGen UKCMER project and is a collaboration between the Universities of Manchester, Edinburgh and Plymouth and the Scottish Association for Marine Sciences. Its objective is to extend the knowledge of extreme loads due to waves, currents, flotsam and mammal impacts. Plymouth Universities contribution to the X-MED project involves measuring the loading and response of a taut moored floating body due to steep and breaking wave impacts, in both long crested and directional sea states. These measurements are then to be reproduced in STAR-CCM+, a commercial volume of fluid CFD solver, so as to develop techniques to predict the wave loading on wave energy converters. The measurements presented here were conducted in Plymouth Universities newly opened COAST laboratories 35m long, 15.5m wide and 3m deep ocean basin. A 0.5m diameter taut moored hemispherical buoy was used to represent a floating wave energy device or support structure. The changes in the buoys 6 degree of freedom motion and mooring loads are presented due to focused breaking wave impacts, with the breaking point of the wave changed relative to the buoy.

  2. Spectral measurements of howardites in support of the interpretation of the Dawn VIR spectra at Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, S.; Ammannito, E.; Di Iorio, T.; De Sanctis, M.; Mittlefehldt, D.

    2014-07-01

    The howardites, eucrites, and diogenites constitute a suite of meteorite lithologies (HED) known to be related to asteroid Vesta [1]. Howardites are physical mixtures of eucrites and diogenites. Howardites are divided in two subtypes: regolithic howardites are actually linked to the true regolith, while fragmental howardites are simple polymict breccias [2]. Mapping of Vesta's surface, as obtained with data from Visible and Infrared mapping Spectrometer (VIR) on Dawn [3,4], showed that it is mainly howarditic, with few regions of diogenite-rich and eucrite-rich terrains [5, 6]. In order to map quantitatively the distribution of lithologic types on Vesta, we are carrying on a study of a set of well-characterized howardites [7]. Spectra were measured on sample powders sieved to 75 μ m in the laboratories of the Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (IAPS-INAF) in Rome (Italy) and Brown University, in Providence (USA). Here we report about the measurements done at IAPS-INAF. The spectra of 33 samples have been acquired with the S.LAB setup, consisting in the FieldSpec Pro spectrometer (range 0.35-2.5 μ m, spatial resolution 0.5 cm^2) coupled with a goniometer (incidence i=30°, emission e=0°) [8]. Some representative spectra of the measured howardites are shown in the figure. The spectra are characterized by the two broad Fe^{2+} absorption bands near 1 and 2 μ m (BI and BII) indicative of pyroxenes. Band parameters relative to BI and BII have been calculated using the algorithm developed to process VIR spectra [4]. This enables us to compare laboratory data directly with the VIR results. Other weaker absorptions also characterize some spectra: the 0.5 μ m feature (Mn^{2+} or Cr^{3+}) and the 1.2 μ m feature possibly due to Fe^{2+} in plagioclases. The PRA04401 sample is characterized by a pyroxene-carbonaceous matter mixture [7].

  3. Transmission properties of barite mortar using X-ray spectra measured with Cd Te detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J. C.; Mariano, L.; Costa, P. R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao Travessa R. 187, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tomal, A., E-mail: josilene@usp.br [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, Campus Samambaia, 74001-970 Goiania (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Current methods for calculating X-ray shielding barriers do not take into account spectral distribution of the beam transmitted by the protective material. This consideration is important in dose estimations for radiation workers and general public in diagnostic radiology facilities. The aim of the present study was to estimate barite mortar attenuation curves using X-ray spectra weighted by a workload distribution. These curves were described in units of ambient dose equivalent (H (10)), since it is the radiation quantity adopted by IAEA for dose assessment in medical environment. Attenuation curves were determined using the optimized model for shielding evaluation presented by Costa and Caldas (2002). Workload distribution presented by Simpkin (1996), measured primary spectra and mass attenuation coefficients of barite mortar were used as input data in this model. X-ray beams in diagnostic energy range were generated by an industrial X-ray tube with 3 mm of aluminum additional filtration. Primary experimental spectra were measured by a Cd Te detector and corrected by the response function of detector by means of a stripping procedure. Air kerma measurements were performed using an ionization chamber for normalization purpose of the spectra. The corrected spectra presented good agreement with spectra generated by a semi-empirical model. The variation of the ambient dose equivalent as a function of barite mortar thickness was calculated. Using these data, it was estimated the optimized thickness of protective barrier needed for shielding a particular area in an X-ray imaging facility. The results obtained for primary protective barriers exhibit qualitative agreement with those presented in literature. (Author)

  4. Measurement of fast neutron spectra inside reactors with a Li{sup 6} semiconductor counter spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajdacic, V S; Lalovic, B I; Petrovic, B P [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1963-12-15

    The possibility of using the Li{sup 6} semiconductor counter spectrometer for measuring fast neutron spectra inside reactors has been investigated in details and some solutions of the difficulties associated with the high interference of thermal neutrons in well-moderated reactors are suggested and checked experimentally (author)

  5. Selection/extraction of spectral regions for autofluorescence spectra measured in the oral cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skurichina, M; Paclik, P; Duin, RPW; de Veld, D; Sterenborg, HJCM; Witjes, MJH; Roodenburg, JLN; Fred, A; Caelli, T; Duin, RPW; Campilho, A; DeRidder, D

    2004-01-01

    Recently a number of successful algorithms to select/extract discriminative spectral regions was introduced. These methods may be more beneficial than the standard feature selection/extraction methods for spectral classification. In this paper, on the example of autofluorescence spectra measured in

  6. Measurements of Overtopping Flow Time Series on the Wave Dragon, Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2009-01-01

    A study of overtopping flow series on the Wave Dragon prototype, a low crested device designed to maximise flow, in a real sea, is presented. This study aims to fill the gap in the literature on time series of flow overtopping low crested structures. By comparing to a simulated flow the character......A study of overtopping flow series on the Wave Dragon prototype, a low crested device designed to maximise flow, in a real sea, is presented. This study aims to fill the gap in the literature on time series of flow overtopping low crested structures. By comparing to a simulated flow...... the characteristics of the overtopping flow are discussed and the simulation algorithm is tested. Measured data is shown from a storm build up in October 2006, from theWave Dragon prototype situated in an inland sea in Northern Denmark. This wave energy converter extracts energy from the waves, by funnelling them...

  7. Numerical and Experimental Identification of Seven-Wire Strand Tensions Using Scale Energy Entropy Spectra of Ultrasonic Guided Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Qian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of tension in multiwire strands is a key issue to ensure structural safety and durability of prestressed concrete structures, cable-stayed bridges, and hoist elevators. This paper proposes a method to identify strand tensions based on scale energy entropy spectra of ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs. A numerical method was first developed to simulate UGW propagation in a seven-wire strand, employing the wavelet transform to extract UGW time-frequency energy distributions for different loadings. Mode separation and frequency band loss of L(0,1 were then found for increasing tension, and UGW scale energy entropy spectra were extracted to establish a tension identification index. A good linear relationship was found between the proposed identification index and tensile force, and effects of propagation distance and propagation path were analyzed. Finally, UGWs propagation was examined experimentally for a long seven-wire strand to investigate attenuation and long distance propagation. Numerical and experimental results verified that the proposed method not only can effectively identify strand tensions but can also adapt to long distance tests for practical engineering.

  8. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, D.M.; Burns, K.; Campbell, L.W.; Greenfield, B.; Kos, M.S., E-mail: markskos@gmail.com; Orrell, J.L.; Schram, M.; VanDevender, B.; Wood, L.S.; Wootan, D.W.

    2015-03-11

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  9. Measurement and analysis of γ-spectra in the research of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenxin; Sun Tongyu

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of γ-ray spectra and method of data analysis are described for the research of nuclear chemistry. Gamma-ray spectra are collected as a function of time and are analysed by the computer codes GAMA33 or LEONE. Decay curves are constructed by selection of characteristic γ-ray using the computer code SORT. The analysis of half-life and identification of nuclides are performed with the interactive computer code TAU85 and Tektronix graphics terminal. Nuclear reaction cross-sections are calculated on weighted average of all the observed γ-rays for each nuclide after duplicate or erroneous identifications are screened

  10. Measurement of gamma-ray multiplicity spectra and the alpha value for {sup 235}U resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigor` ev, Yu V [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Georgiev, G P; Stanchik, Kh [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1997-06-01

    Gamma spectra from 1 to 12 multiplicity were measured on th 500 m flight path of the IBR-30 reactor using a 16-section 32 L NaI(Tl) crystal scintillation detector able to hold 2 metallic samples of 90% {sup 235}U and 10% {sup 238}U 0.00137 atoms/b and 0.00411 atoms/b thick. Multiplicity spectra were obtained for resolved resonances in the E = 1-150 eV energy region. They were used to determine the value of {alpha} = {sigma}{sub {gamma}}/{sigma}{sub f} for 165 resonances of {sup 235}U. (author). 6 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab.

  11. Measurement of spectra and neutron fluxes on artificial earth satellites from the Cosmos series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkin, V. Y.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Novikova, M. R.; Potapov, Y. V.; Skvortsov, S. S.; Smirennyy, L. N.

    1975-01-01

    In 1966-1967 measurements were carried out at the altitudes of 200 to 400 km to determine the spectra and fluxes of fast neutrons inside the hermetically sealed artificial earth satellites of the Cosmos series. The detectors used were nuclear emulsions of the B9 and BR types and an emulsion of the P9 type, filled with Li and P. Spectra and fluxes of neutrons in the range of energies from thermal energies to 10 MeV are presented. Neutron doses are also estimated.

  12. Measurement and modeling of wind waves at the northern coast of Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henrique G. M. Alves

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional measurements of wind-wave spectra made during the year of 1996 are used in a preliminary investigation of the wind-wave climate and its transformation at the São Francisco do Sul island, northern coast of the Santa Catarina state. Four major sea states and associated meteorological conditions are identified through analyses of joint distributions of observed wave parameters. Transformations of these main sea-state patterns due to refraction and shoaling are investigated through a numerical modeling approach that allows the reconstruction of the wave field within extensive coastal areas, using single point measurements of the wave spectrum in shallow waters. Cross-validation of measured and reconstructed spectra at the study site yield consistent results, suggesting that the proposed methodology works well for the São Francisco do Sul coast.Medições do espectro direcional de ondas geradas pelo vento realizadas em 1996 são utilizadas em uma investigação preliminar do clima de ondas no litoral norte de Santa Catarina, Brasil. Quatro estados de mar predominantes são identificados, em conjunto com os padrões meteorológicos associados a sua ocorrência, através de análises estatísticas. As transformações desses quatro estados de mar devido a refraçâo e empinamento são investigadas através de modelos numéricos, que permitem obter estimativas do campo de ondas em áreas extensas a partir de medições pontuais feitas em águas rasas. Comparações entre espectros medidos e modelados produzem resultados consistentes, sugerindo que a metodologia proposta é válida para a costa de São Francisco do Sul.

  13. A method to reproduce alpha-particle spectra measured with semiconductor detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timón, A Fernández; Vargas, M Jurado; Sánchez, A Martín

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed to reproduce alpha-particle spectra measured with silicon detectors, combining analytical and computer simulation techniques. The procedure includes the use of the Monte Carlo method to simulate the tracks of alpha-particles within the source and in the detector entrance window. The alpha-particle spectrum is finally obtained by the convolution of this simulated distribution and the theoretical distributions representing the contributions of the alpha-particle spectrometer to the spectrum. Experimental spectra from (233)U and (241)Am sources were compared with the predictions given by the proposed procedure, showing good agreement. The proposed method can be an important aid for the analysis and deconvolution of complex alpha-particle spectra. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of neutron spectra in varied environments by the foil-activation method with arbitrary trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.G.; Vehar, D.W.

    1987-12-01

    Neutron spectra have been measured by the foil-activation method in 13 different environments in and around the Sandia Pulsed Reactor, the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor, and the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor. The spectra were obtained by using the SANDII code in a manner that was not dependent on the initial trial. This altered technique is better suited for the determination of spectra in environments that are difficult to predict by calculation, and it tends to reveal features that may be biased out by the use of standard trial-dependent methods. For some of the configurations, studies have also been made of how well the solution is determined in each energy region. The experimental methods and the techniques used in the analyses are thoroughly explained. 34 refs., 51 figs., 40 tabs

  15. Analysis of γ spectra in airborne radioactivity measurements using multiple linear regressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Min; Shi Quanlin; Zhang Jiamei

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the net peak counts calculating of nuclide 137 Cs at 662 keV of γ spectra in airborne radioactivity measurements using multiple linear regressions. Mathematic model is founded by analyzing every factor that has contribution to Cs peak counts in spectra, and multiple linear regression function is established. Calculating process adopts stepwise regression, and the indistinctive factors are eliminated by F check. The regression results and its uncertainty are calculated using Least Square Estimation, then the Cs peak net counts and its uncertainty can be gotten. The analysis results for experimental spectrum are displayed. The influence of energy shift and energy resolution on the analyzing result is discussed. In comparison with the stripping spectra method, multiple linear regression method needn't stripping radios, and the calculating result has relation with the counts in Cs peak only, and the calculating uncertainty is reduced. (authors)

  16. Influence of probe pressure on diffuse reflectance spectra of human skin measured in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Alexey P.; Bykov, Alexander V.; Meglinski, Igor V.

    2017-11-01

    Mechanical pressure superficially applied on the human skin surface by a fiber-optic probe influences the spatial distribution of blood within the cutaneous tissues. Upon gradual load of weight on the probe, a stepwise increase in the skin reflectance spectra is observed. The decrease in the load follows the similar inverse staircase-like tendency. The observed stepwise reflectance spectra changes are due to, respectively, sequential extrusion of blood from the topical cutaneous vascular beds and their filling afterward. The obtained results are confirmed by Monte Carlo modeling. This implies that pressure-induced influence during the human skin diffuse reflectance spectra measurements in vivo should be taken into consideration, in particular, in the rapidly developing area of wearable gadgets for real-time monitoring of various human body parameters.

  17. Technique for measurements of plane waves of uniaxial strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The measurement of plane waves in uniaxial strain, in which large surface areas are loaded and the measurements are restricted to a central region that is not influenced by lateral boundaries, is discussed. Measuring techniques are covered and instruments are discussed

  18. Measurements using optic and RF waves

    CERN Document Server

    De Fornel, Frederique

    2013-01-01

    Scientific and technical knowledge for measurements in modern electromagnetism must be vast as our electromagnetic environment covers all frequencies and wavelengths. These measurements must be applied to fields as varied as nanotechnologies, telecommunications, meteorology, geolocalization, radioastronomy, health, biology, etc. In order to cover the multiple facets of the topic, this book sweeps the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from several hertz to terahertz; considers distances ranging from nanometers to light-years in optics; before extending towards the various measurement techniques

  19. gamma-ray spectra measurements for long cooled MOX spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Kiyonobu; Kobayashi, Iwao

    1993-09-01

    Gamma-ray spectra of spent fuels have important informations in the estimation of burnup rate, concentration of fission products, cooling time and etc. which are required in the fuel loading control of reactors and special nuclear materials accountancy from the view point of safe guard. Although, some available data are given about uranium dioxide fuels, few data are given about uranium and plutonium dioxide mixtures (MOX fuels). Especially, there is few data about MOX fuels which are irradiated in thermal reactors and cooled more than ten years. Gamma-ray spectra are measured for PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel rods (IFA-159, IFA-160) which are irradiated at HBWR in Norway up to 9,420 and 5,340MWd/t respectively. Gamma-ray spectra had been measured about the two fuels ten years ago at the spent fuel pond of Japan Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). The objectives of this measurement is to know how decayed the gamma-ray spectra in these ten years and some fission products are there which are effective to estimate burnup rate of spent MOX fuels. (author)

  20. Measurement of D-T neutron penetration probability spectra for iron ball shell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Shaojie

    1998-06-01

    The D-T neutron penetration probability spectra are measured for iron ball shell systems of the series of samples used in the experiments, and the penetration curves are presented. As the detector is near to samples, the measured results being approximately corrected are compared with those in the literature, and it is shown that the former is compatible with the latter in the range of the experimental error

  1. Measurements and calculations of neutron spectra and neutron dose distribution in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palfalvi, J.

    1984-11-01

    The measurement and calculation of the radiation field around and in a phantom, with regard to the neutron component and the contaminating gamma radiation, are essential for radiation protection and radiotherapy purposes. The final report includes the development of the simple detector system, automized detector measuring facilities and a computerized evaluating system. The results of the depth dose and neutron spectra experiments and calculations in a human phantom are given

  2. Pseudo-real-time low-pass filter in ECG, self-adjustable to the frequency spectra of the waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Ivaylo; Neycheva, Tatyana; Schmid, Ramun; Stoyanov, Todor; Abächerli, Roger

    2017-09-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) acquisition is often accompanied by high-frequency electromyographic (EMG) noise. The noise is difficult to be filtered, due to considerable overlapping of its frequency spectrum to the frequency spectrum of the ECG. Today, filters must conform to the new guidelines (2007) for low-pass filtering in ECG with cutoffs of 150 Hz for adolescents and adults, and to 250 Hz for children. We are suggesting a pseudo-real-time low-pass filter, self-adjustable to the frequency spectra of the ECG waves. The filter is based on the approximation procedure of Savitzky-Golay with dynamic change in the cutoff frequency. The filter is implemented pseudo-real-time (real-time with a certain delay). An additional option is the automatic on/off triggering, depending on the presence/absence of EMG noise. The analysis of the proposed filter shows that the low-frequency components of the ECG (low-power P- and T-waves, PQ-, ST- and TP-segments) are filtered with a cutoff of 14 Hz, the high-power P- and T-waves are filtered with a cutoff frequency in the range of 20-30 Hz, and the high-frequency QRS complexes are filtered with cutoff frequency of higher than 100 Hz. The suggested dynamic filter satisfies the conflicting requirements for a strong suppression of EMG noise and at the same time a maximal preservation of the ECG high-frequency components.

  3. Thickness Measurement of Surface Attachment on Plate with Lamb Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xianglong; Zhang, Yinghong; Wen, Lichao; He, Yehu

    2017-12-01

    Aiming at the thickness detection of the plate surface attachment, a nondestructive testing method based on the Lamb wave is presented. This method utilizes Lamb wave propagation characteristics of signals in a bi-layer medium to measure the surface attachment plate thickness. Propagation of Lamb wave in bi-layer elastic is modeled and analyzed. The two-dimensional simulation model of electromagnetic ultrasonic plate - scale is established. The simulation is conducted by software COMSOL for simulation analysis under different boiler scale thickness wave form curve. Through this study, the thickness of the attached material can be judged by analyzing the characteristics of the received signal when the thickness of the surface of the plate is measured.

  4. Determining clinical photon beam spectra from measured depth dose with the Cimmino algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, P.; Altschuler, M.D.; Bjaerngard, B.E.; Kassaee, A.; McDonough, J.

    2000-01-01

    A method to determine the spectrum of a clinical photon beam from measured depth-dose data is described. At shallow depths, where the range of Compton-generated electrons increases rapidly with photon energy, the depth dose provides the information to discriminate the spectral contributions. To minimize the influence of contaminating electrons, small (6x6cm2 ) fields were used. The measured depth dose is represented as a linear combination of basis functions, namely the depth doses of monoenergetic photon beams derived by Monte Carlo simulations. The weights of the basis functions were obtained with the Cimmino feasibility algorithm, which examines in each iteration the discrepancy between predicted and measured depth dose. For 6 and 15 MV photon beams of a clinical accelerator, the depth dose obtained from the derived spectral weights was within about 1% of the measured depth dose at all depths. Because the problem is ill conditioned, solutions for the spectrum can fluctuate with energy. Physically realistic smooth spectra for these photon beams appeared when a small margin (about ±1%) was attributed to the measured depth dose. The maximum energy of both derived spectra agreed with the measured energy of the electrons striking the target to within 1 MeV. The use of a feasibility method on minimally relaxed constraints provides realistic spectra quickly and interactively. (author)

  5. A multichannel magnetic β-ray spectrometer for rapid measurements of electron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariya, Komyo; Morikawa, Kaoru.

    1989-01-01

    In order to make the magnetic β-ray spectrometer suitable for rapid measurements of electron spectra with short-lived nuclides, twelve small GM counters have been arrayed along the focal plane of a 180deg focusing flat type design. All the signal pulses from each one of these detectors are mixed together onto a single cable. By means of multichannel PHA, each pulse can be traced back to the specific detector which sent it out. In order to avoid time consuming evacuation procedures, the sample source is placed outside a thin window of the preevacuated analyzer chamber. By the use of this multichannel spectrometer a β-ray spectrum with maximum energy up to about 10 MeV can be measured within 1 min or so. Electron spectra measured with 113m In, 119m In and 144 Pr source are shown. (author)

  6. Energy spectra and charge composition of galactic cosmic rays measured in ATIC-2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatsepin, V.I.; Bat'kov, K.E.; Bashindzhagyan, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    The ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) balloon experiment is intended for measuring the energy spectra of the galactic cosmic rays with the individual resolution by the charge from protons to iron within the energy range from 50 GeV up to 100 TeV. The silicon detector matrix, making it possible to solve on the inverse current by means of the detector charge high segmentation, was applied for the first time in the high-energy cosmic rays for the charge measurement. The ATIC completed two successful flights in the Antarctica since 28.12.2000 up to 13.01.2001 (the ATIC-1 test flight) and since 29.12.2002 up to 18.01.2003 (the ATIC-2 scientific flight). The current state of the analysis of the spectra, measured in the ATIC-2 scientific flight, are presented in this work and the obtained results are compared with the model forecasts results [ru

  7. The measurement of neutron and neutron induced photon spectra in fusion reactor related assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Unholzer, S; Klein, H; Seidel, K

    2002-01-01

    The spectral neutron and photon fluence (or flux) measured outside and inside of assemblies related to fusion reactor constructions are basic quantities of fusion neutronics. The comparison of measured spectra with the results of MCNP neutron and photon transport calculations allows a crucial test of evaluated nuclear data as generally used in fusion applications to be carried out. The experiments concern mixed neutron/photon fields with about the same intensity of the two components. An NE-213 scintillation spectrometer, well described by response matrices for both neutrons and photons, is used as proton-recoil and Compton spectrometer. The experiments described here in more detail address the background problematic of two applications, an iron benchmark experiment with an ns-pulsed neutron source and a deep penetration mock-up experiment for the investigation of the ITER in-board shield system. The measured spectral neutron and photon fluences are compared with spectra calculated with the MCNP code on the b...

  8. A measurement of cosmic-ray LET-spectra using a microprocessor supported microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, J.; Heinrich, W.

    1982-01-01

    A microprocessor supported semi-automatic system for measurements of nuclear tracks in plastic detectors is presented. It consists of a microscope and a stepping motor driven stage. A Motorola microprocessor MC 6800 controls the measurement. It accepts the co-ordinates of the stage as well as the position of the focus and computes cone length and dip angle from the three-dimensional co-ordinates. LET-spectra were measured from two cellulose nitrate foils of the Biostack III experiment flown with the Apollo-Soyus-Test-Project in 1975. One of these foils was shielded by 3 g/cm 2 and the other one by 15 g/cm 2 . The two spectra show no statistically significant decrease of intensity. (author)

  9. Accurate calibration of waveform data measured by the Plasma Wave Experiment on board the ARASE satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, M.; Katoh, Y.; Hikishima, M.; Kasahara, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Kojima, H.; Ozaki, M.; Yagitani, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) is installed on board the ARASE satellite to measure the electric field in the frequency range from DC to 10 MHz, and the magnetic field in the frequency range from a few Hz to 100 kHz using two dipole wire-probe antennas (WPT) and three magnetic search coils (MSC), respectively. In particular, the Waveform Capture (WFC), one of the receivers of the PWE, can detect electromagnetic field waveform in the frequency range from a few Hz to 20 kHz. The Software-type Wave Particle Interaction Analyzer (S-WPIA) is installed on the ARASE satellite to measure the energy exchange between plasma waves and particles. Since S-WPIA uses the waveform data measured by WFC to calculate the relative phase angle between the wave magnetic field and velocity of energetic electrons, the high-accuracy is required to calibration of both amplitude and phase of the waveform data. Generally, the calibration procedure of the signal passed through a receiver consists of three steps; the transformation into spectra, the calibration by the transfer function of a receiver, and the inverse transformation of the calibrated spectra into the time domain. Practically, in order to reduce the side robe effect, a raw data is filtered by a window function in the time domain before applying Fourier transform. However, for the case that a first order differential coefficient of the phase transfer function of the system is not negligible, the phase of the window function convoluted into the calibrated spectra is shifted differently at each frequency, resulting in a discontinuity in the time domain of the calibrated waveform data. To eliminate the effect of the phase shift of a window function, we suggest several methods to calibrate a waveform data accurately and carry out simulations assuming simple sinusoidal waves as an input signal and using transfer functions of WPT, MSC, and WFC obtained in pre-flight tests. In consequence, we conclude that the following two methods can

  10. Fast Wave Transmission Measurements on Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, J.; Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Takase, Y.; Wukitch, S. J.

    1997-11-01

    Data are presented from an array of single-turn loop probes newly installed on the inner wall of C-Mod, directly opposite one of the two fast-wave antennas. The 8-loop array extends 32^circ in the toroidal direction at the midplane and can distinguish electromagnetic from electrostatic modes. Data are acquired by 1GHz digitizer, spectrum analyzer, and RF detector circuit. Phase measurements during different heating scenarios show evidence of both standing and travelling waves. The measurement of toroidal mode number N_tor (conserved under the assumption of axisymmetry) is used to guide the toroidal full-wave code TORIC(Brambilla, M., IPP Report 5/66, February 1996). Amplitude measurements show modulation both by Type III ELMs and sawteeth; the observed sawtooth modulation may be interpreted as due to changes in central absorption. The amplitude of tildeB_tor measured at the inner wall is compared to the prediction of TORIC.

  11. Deconvolving the wedge: maximum-likelihood power spectra via spherical-wave visibility modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A.; Mertens, F. G.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2018-03-01

    Direct detection of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) via the red-shifted 21-cm line will have unprecedented implications on the study of structure formation in the infant Universe. To fulfil this promise, current and future 21-cm experiments need to detect this weak EoR signal in the presence of foregrounds that are several orders of magnitude larger. This requires extreme noise control and improved wide-field high dynamic-range imaging techniques. We propose a new imaging method based on a maximum likelihood framework which solves for the interferometric equation directly on the sphere, or equivalently in the uvw-domain. The method uses the one-to-one relation between spherical waves and spherical harmonics (SpH). It consistently handles signals from the entire sky, and does not require a w-term correction. The SpH coefficients represent the sky-brightness distribution and the visibilities in the uvw-domain, and provide a direct estimate of the spatial power spectrum. Using these spectrally smooth SpH coefficients, bright foregrounds can be removed from the signal, including their side-lobe noise, which is one of the limiting factors in high dynamics-range wide-field imaging. Chromatic effects causing the so-called `wedge' are effectively eliminated (i.e. deconvolved) in the cylindrical (k⊥, k∥) power spectrum, compared to a power spectrum computed directly from the images of the foreground visibilities where the wedge is clearly present. We illustrate our method using simulated Low-Frequency Array observations, finding an excellent reconstruction of the input EoR signal with minimal bias.

  12. Electric field vector measurements in a surface ionization wave discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M; Adamovich, Igor V; Lempert, Walter R; Böhm, Patrick S; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the results of time-resolved electric field vector measurements in a short pulse duration (60 ns full width at half maximum), surface ionization wave discharge in hydrogen using a picosecond four-wave mixing technique. Electric field vector components are measured separately, using pump and Stokes beams linearly polarized in the horizontal and vertical planes, and a polarizer placed in front of the infrared detector. The time-resolved electric field vector is measured at three different locations across the discharge gap, and for three different heights above the alumina ceramic dielectric surface, ∼100, 600, and 1100 μm (total of nine different locations). The results show that after breakdown, the discharge develops as an ionization wave propagating along the dielectric surface at an average speed of 1 mm ns −1 . The surface ionization wave forms near the high voltage electrode, close to the dielectric surface (∼100 μm). The wave front is characterized by significant overshoot of both vertical and horizontal electric field vector components. Behind the wave front, the vertical field component is rapidly reduced. As the wave propagates along the dielectric surface, it also extends further away from the dielectric surface, up to ∼1 mm near the grounded electrode. The horizontal field component behind the wave front remains quite significant, to sustain the electron current toward the high voltage electrode. After the wave reaches the grounded electrode, the horizontal field component experiences a secondary rise in the quasi-dc discharge, where it sustains the current along the near-surface plasma sheet. The measurement results indicate presence of a cathode layer formed near the grounded electrode with significant cathode voltage fall, ≈3 kV, due to high current density in the discharge. The peak reduced electric field in the surface ionization wave is 85–95 Td, consistent with dc breakdown field estimated from the Paschen

  13. The Measurement and Interpretation of Surface Wave Group Arrival Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, G.; Kane, D.; Morrow, J.; Zhou, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2005-12-01

    We have recently developed an efficient technique for measuring the relative group arrival times of surface waves by using cross-correlation and cluster analysis of waveform envelope functions. Applying the analysis to minor arc Love and Rayleigh waves in the frequency band 7 to 35 mHz for all events over magnitude 5.5 results in a dataset of over 200,000 measurements at each frequency for long period Rayleigh waves (frequency less than 25 mHz) and about 100,000 measurements at the shorter periods. Analysis of transverse components results in about half as many Love wave measurements. Simple ray theory inversions of the relative arrival times for apparent group velocity produce maps which are accurate representations of the data (often over 90% variance reduction of the relative arrival times) and which show features strongly correlated with tectonics and crustal thickness. The apparent group velocity variations can be extremely large: 30% velocity variations for 20 mHz Rayleigh waves and 40% variations for 30 mHz Rayleigh waves and can have abrupt lateral changes. This raises the concern that non-ray theory effects could be important. Indeed, a recent analysis by Dahlen and Zhou (personal communication) suggests that the group arrival times should be a functions of both the group velocity AND the phase velocity. The simplest way to test the interpretation of the measurements is to perform the analysis on synthetic seismograms computed for a realistic model of the Earth. Here, we use the SEM with a model which incorporates realistic crust and mantle structure. We are currently computing synthetics for a suite of roughly 1000 events recorded globally that extend to a period of 18 seconds. We shall present the results of applying both ray-based and finite frequency inversions to the synthetic data as well as evaluating the effects of off path propagation at short periods using surface wave ray tracing.

  14. A New Ka-Band Scanning Radar Facility: Polarimetric and Doppler Spectra Measurements of Snow Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oue, M.; Kollias, P.; Luke, E. P.; Mead, J.

    2017-12-01

    Polarimetric radar analyses offer the capability of identification of ice hydrometeor species as well as their spatial distributions. In addition to polarimetric parameter observations, Doppler spectra measurements offer unique insights into ice particle properties according to particle fall velocities. In particular, millimeter-wavelength radar Doppler spectra can reveal supercooled liquid cloud droplets embedded in ice precipitation clouds. A Ka-band scanning polarimetric radar, named KASPR, was installed in an observation facility at Stony Brook University, located 22 km west of the KOKX NEXRAD radar at Upton, NY. The KASPR can measure Doppler spectra and full polarimetric variables, including radar reflectivity, differential reflectivity (ZDR), differential phase (φDP), specific differential phase (KDP), correlation coefficient (ρhv), and linear depolarization ratio (LDR). The facility also includes a micro-rain radar and a microwave radiometer capable of measuring reflectivity profiles and integrated liquid water path, respectively. The instruments collected initial datasets during two snowstorm events and two snow shower events in March 2017. The radar scan strategy was a combination of PPI scans at 4 elevation angles (10, 20, 45, and 60°) and RHI scans in polarimetry mode, and zenith pointing with Doppler spectra collection. During the snowstorm events the radar observed relatively larger ZDR (1-1.5 dB) and enhanced KDP (1-2 ° km-1) at heights corresponding to a plate/dendrite crystal growth regime. The Doppler spectra showed that slower-falling particles ( 1 m s-1). The weakly increased ZDR could be produced by large, faster falling particles such as quasi-spherical aggregates, while the enhanced KDP could be produced by highly-oriented oblate, slowly-falling particles. Below 2 km altitude, measurements of dual wavelength ratio (DWR) based on Ka and S-band reflectivities from the KASPR and NEXRAD radars were available. Larger DWR (>10 dB) suggested

  15. Measuring sea surface height with a GNSS-Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Maqueda, Miguel Angel; Penna, Nigel T.; Foden, Peter R.; Martin, Ian; Cipollini, Paolo; Williams, Simon D.; Pugh, Jeff P.

    2017-04-01

    A GNSS-Wave Glider is a novel technique to measure sea surface height autonomously using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It consists of an unmanned surface vehicle manufactured by Liquid Robotics, a Wave Glider, and a geodetic-grade GNSS antenna-receiver system, with the antenna installed on a mast on the vehicle's deck. The Wave Glider uses the differential wave motion through the water column for propulsion, thus guaranteeing an, in principle, indefinite autonomy. Solar energy is collected to power all on-board instrumentation, including the GNSS system. The GNSS-Wave Glider was first tested in Loch Ness in 2013, demonstrating that the technology is capable of mapping geoid heights within the loch with an accuracy of a few centimetres. The trial in Loch Ness did not conclusively confirm the reliability of the technique because, during the tests, the state of the water surface was much more benign than would normally be expect in the open ocean. We now report on a first deployment of a GNSS-Wave Glider in the North Sea. The deployment took place in August 2016 and lasted thirteen days, during which the vehicle covered a distance of about 350 nautical miles in the north western North Sea off Great Britain. During the experiment, the GNSS-Wave Glider experienced sea states between 1 (0-0.1 m wave heights) and 5 (2.5-4 m wave heights). The GNSS-Wave Glider data, recorded at 5 Hz frequency, were analysed using a post-processed kinematic GPS-GLONASS precise point positioning (PPP) approach, which were quality controlled using double difference GPS kinematic processing with respect to onshore reference stations. Filtered with a 900 s moving-average window, the PPP heights reveal geoid patterns in the survey area that are very similar to the EGM2008 geoid model, thus demonstrating the potential use of a GNSS-Wave Glider for marine geoid determination. The residual of subtracting the modelled or measured marine geoid from the PPP signal combines information

  16. Modeling of aircraft exhaust emissions and infrared spectra for remote measurement of nitrogen oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Beier

    Full Text Available Infrared (IR molecular spectroscopy is proposed to perform remote measurements of NOx concentrations in the exhaust plume and wake of aircraft. The computer model NIRATAM is applied to simulate the physical and chemical properties of the exhaust plume and to generate low resolution IR spectra and synthetical thermal images of the aircraft in its natural surroundings. High-resolution IR spectra of the plume, including atmospheric absorption and emission, are simulated using the molecular line-by-line radiation model FASCODE2. Simulated IR spectra of a Boeing 747-400 at cruising altitude for different axial and radial positions in the jet region of the exhaust plume are presented. A number of spectral lines of NO can be identified that can be discriminated from lines of other exhaust gases and the natural atmospheric background in the region around 5.2 µm. These lines can be used to determine NO concentration profiles in the plume. The possibility of measuring nitrogen dioxide NO2 is also discussed briefly, although measurements turn out to be substantially less likely than those of NO. This feasibility study compiles fundamental data for the optical and radiometric design of an airborne Fourier transform spectrometer and the preparation of in-flight measurements for monitoring of aircraft pollutants.

  17. Modeling of aircraft exhaust emissions and infrared spectra for remote measurement of nitrogen oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Beier

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Infrared (IR molecular spectroscopy is proposed to perform remote measurements of NOx concentrations in the exhaust plume and wake of aircraft. The computer model NIRATAM is applied to simulate the physical and chemical properties of the exhaust plume and to generate low resolution IR spectra and synthetical thermal images of the aircraft in its natural surroundings. High-resolution IR spectra of the plume, including atmospheric absorption and emission, are simulated using the molecular line-by-line radiation model FASCODE2. Simulated IR spectra of a Boeing 747-400 at cruising altitude for different axial and radial positions in the jet region of the exhaust plume are presented. A number of spectral lines of NO can be identified that can be discriminated from lines of other exhaust gases and the natural atmospheric background in the region around 5.2 µm. These lines can be used to determine NO concentration profiles in the plume. The possibility of measuring nitrogen dioxide NO2 is also discussed briefly, although measurements turn out to be substantially less likely than those of NO. This feasibility study compiles fundamental data for the optical and radiometric design of an airborne Fourier transform spectrometer and the preparation of in-flight measurements for monitoring of aircraft pollutants.

  18. Measurements of radiated elastic wave energy from dynamic tensile cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fracture-velocity, microstructure, and fracture-energy barriers in elastic wave radiation during a dynamic fracture was investigated in experiments in which dynamic tensile cracks of two fracture cofigurations of double cantilever beam geometry were propagating in glass samples. The first, referred to as primary fracture, consisted of fractures of intact glass specimens; the second configuration, referred to as secondary fracture, consisted of a refracture of primary fracture specimens which were rebonded with an intermittent pattern of adhesive to produce variations in fracture surface energy along the crack path. For primary fracture cases, measurable elastic waves were generated in 31 percent of the 16 fracture events observed; the condition for radiation of measurable waves appears to be a local abrupt change in the fracture path direction, such as occurs when the fracture intersects a surface flaw. For secondary fractures, 100 percent of events showed measurable elastic waves; in these fractures, the ratio of radiated elastic wave energy in the measured component to fracture surface energy was 10 times greater than for primary fracture.

  19. Diagnostic x-ray spectra measurements using a silicon surface barrier detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, R.; Laitano, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    A silicon surface barrier detector having a low efficiency for x-ray is used to analyse diagnostic x-ray spectra. This characteristic is advantageous in overcoming experimental problems caused by high fluence rates typical of diagnostic x-ray beams. The pulse height distribution obtained with silicon surface barrier detectors is very different from the true photon spectra because of the presence of escaped Compton photons and the fact that detection efficiency falls abruptly when photon energy increases. A detailed analysis of the spurious effects involved in detection is made by a Monte Carlo method. A stripping procedure is described for implementation on a personal computer. The validity of this method is tested by comparison with experimental results obtained with a Ge detector. The spectra obtained with the Si detector are in fairly good agreement with the analogous spectra measured with a Ge detector. The advantages of using Si as opposed to Ge detectors in x-ray spectrometry are: its simplicity of use, its greater economy for use in routine diagnostic x-ray spectroscopy and the possibility that the stripping procedure can be implemented on a personal computer. (author)

  20. The MeV spectra of gamma-ray bursts measured with COMPTEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, A.S.; Kippen, R.M.; McConnell, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    The past decade has produced a wealth of observational data on the energy spectra of prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts. Most of the data cover the energy range from a few to several hundred KeV. One set of higher energy observations comes from the Imaging Compton Telescope COMPTEL on the Compton Observatory, which measured in the energy range from 0.75 to 30 MeV. We analyzed the full 9.2 years COMPTEL data to reveal the significant detection of 44 gamma-ray bursts. We present preliminary results obtained in the process of preparing a final catalog of the spectral analysis of these events. In addiction, we compare the COMPTEL spectra to simultaneous BATSE measurements for purposes of cross-calibration

  1. D-D neutron energy-spectra measurements in Alcator C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappas, D.S.; Wysocki, F.J.; Furnstahl, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    Measurements of energy spectra of neutrons produced during high density (anti n/sub e/ > 2 x 10 14 cm -3 ) deuterium discharges have been performed using a proton-recoil (NE 213) spectrometer. A two foot section of light pipe (coupling the scintillator and photomultiplier) was used to extend the scintillator into a diagnostic viewing port to maximize the neutron detection efficiency while not imposing excessive magnetic shielding requirements. A derivative unfolding technique was used to deduce the energy spectra. The results showed a well defined peak at 2.5 MeV which was consistent with earlier neutron flux measurements on Alcator C that indicated the neutrons were of thermonuclear origin

  2. Scaling of turbulence spectra measured in strong shear flow near the Earth’s surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben Krogh; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Within the lowest kilometer of the Earth's atmosphere, in the so-called atmospheric boundary layer, winds are often gusty and turbulent. Nearest to the ground, the turbulence is predominately generated by mechanical wall-bounded wind shear, whereas at higher altitudes turbulent mixing of heat...... subrange with a distinct inverse-linear power law for turbulence in a strongly sheared high-Reynolds number wall-bounded flow, as is encountered in the lowest sheared part of the atmospheric boundary layer, also known as the eddy surface layer. This paper presents observations of spectra measured...... and moisture also play a role. The variance (square of the standard deviation) of the fluctuation around the mean wind speed is a measure of the kinetic energy content of the turbulence. This kinetic energy can be resolved into the spectral distributions, or spectra, as functions of eddy size, wavenumber...

  3. Magellan radio occultation measurements of atmospheric waves on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, David P.; Jenkins, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radio occultation experiments were conducted at Venus on three consecutive orbits of the Magellan spacecraft in October 1991. Each occultation occurred over the same topography (67 deg N, 127 deg E) and at the same local time (22 hr 5 min), but the data are sensitive to zonal variations because the atmosphere rotates significantly during one orbit. Through comparisons between observations and predictions of standard wave theory, we have demonstrated that small-scale oscillations in retrieved temperature profiles as well as scintillations in received signal intensity are caused by a spectrum of vertically propagating internal gravity waves. There is a strong similarity between the intensity scintillations observed here and previous measurements, which pertain to a wide range of locations and experiment dates. This implies that the same basic phenomenon underlies all the observations and hence that gravity waves are a persistent, global feature of Venus' atmosphere. We obtained a fairly complete characterization of a gravity wave that appears above the middle cloud in temperature measurements on all three orbits. The amplitude and vertical wavelength are about 4 K and 2.5 km respectively, at 65 km. A model for radiative damping implies that the wave intrinsic frequency is approximately 2 x 10(exp 4) rad/sec, the corresponding ratio between horizontal and vertical wavelengths is approximately 100. The wave is nearly stationary relative to the surface or the Sun. Radiative attenuation limits the wave amplitude at altitudes above approximately 65 km, leading to wave drag on the mean zonal winds of about +0.4 m/sec per day (eastward). The sign, magnitude, and location of this forcing suggest a possible role in explaining the decrease with height in the zonal wind speed that is believed to occur above the cloud tops. Temperature oscillations with larger vertical wavelengths (5-10 km) were also observed on all three orbits, but we are able unable to interpret these

  4. Measurement of fast assembly spectra using time-of-flight method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duquesne, Henry; Rotival, Michel; Schmitt, Andre; Allard, Christian; De Keyser, Albert; Hortsmann, Henri

    1975-07-01

    Measurement of neutron spectra made in fast subcritical assemblies HUG 3 and PHUG 3 (uranium-graphite and plutonium-graphite) utilizing time-of-flight techniques are described. The matrix were excited by the pulsed neutron source from the BCMN Linac beam impinging on a target of natural uranium. Details of the experimental procedure, safety studies, detector calibration and data reduction are given [fr

  5. Interpreting coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectra measured with multimode Nd:YAG pump lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrow, R.L.; Rahn, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    We report comparisons of coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements using single-axial-and multiaxial-mode Nd:YAG lasers. Our results demonstrate the validity of a recently proposed convolution expression for unresolved CARS spectra. The results also support the use of a relative delay of several coherence lengths between pump-beam paths for reducing the effects of pump-field statistics on the CARS spectral profile

  6. Proceedings of the symposium on measurements of neutron energy spectra using recoil proton proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urabe, Itsumasa

    1986-01-01

    This is a report of the symposium on measurements of neutron energy spectra using recoil proton proportional counters held at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University on January 27 in 1986. An energy resolution, wall effects of response functions, n · γ discrimination methods and other fundamental properties of recoil proton counters are discussed for a new development of an application of this counter. (author)

  7. Measurement of positron spectra after heavy ion collisions with special weighting of the data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weik, F.

    1981-01-01

    The measurement of positron spectra of the supercritical 238 U - 238 U system is described, at which the 1ssub(sigma)-level should dip into the negative energy continuum. For the comparison the measurement of the subcritical 238 U - 208 Pb and the nuclear system 238 U - 108 Pd are used. All measurements were performed at 5.9 MeV/A. For the detection of the positrons a solenoid transport system with 2 Si(Li) diodes as energy determining elements and with 4 NaI crystals for the identification by the 511 keV annihilation radiation in coincidence were used. The electronics, the data acquisition on the base of a process computer with coupling to an IBM computer and the analysis are extensively described. To this belongs also an unfolding procedure of a model response function for positron and gamma spectra. The unfolded positron spectra were corrected under assumption of E1-Conversion coefficients to the nuclear contribution which were fitted to the 238 U - 108 Pd system. The positron spectrum of the supercritical 238 U - 238 U shows no evident indication which may lead to the conclusion of a dipping of the 1ssub(sigma) level. (orig.) [de

  8. Subwavelength position measurements with running-wave driving fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evers, Joerg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Qamar, Sajid [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-08-15

    Subwavelength position measurement of quantum particles is discussed. Our setup is based on a closed-loop driving-field configuration, which enforces a sensitivity of the particle dynamics to the phases of the applied fields. Thus, running wave fields are sufficient, avoiding limitations associated with standing-wave-based localization schemes. Reversing the directions of the driving laser fields switches between different magnification levels for the position determination. This allows us to optimize the localization, and at the same time eliminates the need for additional classical measurements common to all previous localization schemes based on spatial periodicity.

  9. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The other waves may be the upward propagating gravity waves or waves resulting from the interaction of inter-mode tidal oscillations, interaction of tidal waves with planetary waves and gravity waves. Some times, the second harmonic wave has higher vertical velocity than the corresponding fundamental wave. Application ...

  10. Scaling of turbulence spectra measured in strong shear flow near the Earth’s surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Larsen, S. E.; Jørgensen, H. E.; Astrup, P.; Larsén, X. G.

    2017-12-01

    Within the lowest kilometer of the Earth’s atmosphere, in the so-called atmospheric boundary layer, winds are often gusty and turbulent. Nearest to the ground, the turbulence is predominately generated by mechanical wall-bounded wind shear, whereas at higher altitudes turbulent mixing of heat and moisture also play a role. The variance (square of the standard deviation) of the fluctuation around the mean wind speed is a measure of the kinetic energy content of the turbulence. This kinetic energy can be resolved into the spectral distributions, or spectra, as functions of eddy size, wavenumber, or frequency. Spectra are derived from Fourier transforms of wind records as functions of space or time corresponding to wavenumber and frequency spectra, respectively. Atmospheric spectra often exhibit different subranges that can be distinguished and scaled by the physical parameters responsible for: (1) their generation; (2) the cascade of energy across the spectrum from large- to small-scale; and (3) the eventual decay of turbulence into heat owing to viscosity effects on the Kolmogorov microscale, in which the eddy size is only a fraction of a millimeter. This paper addresses atmospheric turbulence spectra in the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer—the so-called surface layer—where the wind shear is strong owing to the nonslip condition at the ground. Theoretical results dating back to Tchen’s early work in 1953 ‘on the spectrum of energy in turbulent shear flow’ led Tchen to predict a shear production subrange with a distinct inverse-linear power law for turbulence in a strongly sheared high-Reynolds number wall-bounded flow, as is encountered in the lowest sheared part of the atmospheric boundary layer, also known as the eddy surface layer. This paper presents observations of spectra measured in a meteorological mast at Høvsøre, Denmark, that support Tchen’s prediction of a shear production subrange following a distinct power law of degree -1

  11. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2014-11-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, the organic carbon concentration is measured using thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) from quartz fiber filters. Here, methods are presented whereby Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters are used to accurately predict TOR OC. Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filters. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites sampled during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to artifact-corrected TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date which leads to precise and accurate OC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, all μg m-3 values based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by OC mass and by OM / OC which reflects the organic composition of the particulate matter and is obtained from organic functional group composition; this division also leads to precise and accurate OC predictions. Low OC concentrations have higher bias and normalized error due to TOR analytical errors and artifact correction errors, not due to the range of OC mass of the samples in the calibration set. However, samples with low OC mass can be used to predict samples with high OC mass indicating that the

  12. Measurement of neutron spectra through composed material block bombarded with D-T neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, T.H. [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. BOX 919-213, Mian yang 621900 (China)], E-mail: zhutonghua@yahoo.com.cn; Liu, R.; Lu, X.X.; Jiang, L.; Wen, Z.W.; Wang, M.; Lin, J.F. [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. BOX 919-213, Mian yang 621900 (China)

    2009-12-15

    A 2-dimensional composed material assembly made of the iron and hydric block has been established. The neutron spectra from the assembly bombarded with 14-MeV neutrons at neutron generator have been obtained using the proton recoil technique with a stillbene detector. The detector positions were selected at the 60 deg., 120 deg., 180 deg. on the surface of the iron spherical shell. The background neutron spectra consisted of background and room return radiation were subtracted with combination of methods of experimental shielding and MCNP calculation. The uncertainty of results was 6.3-7.4%. The experiment results were analyzed and simulated by MCNP code and two data library. The difference is integral neutron flux (background neutron subtracted) of measured results greater than calculations with maximum of 21.2% in the range of 1-16 MeV.

  13. Comparison of methods for H*(10) calculation from measured LaBr3(Ce) detector spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, A; Cornejo, N; Camp, A

    2018-07-01

    The Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC) and the Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT) have evaluated methods based on stripping, conversion coefficients and Maximum Likelihood Estimation using Expectation Maximization (ML-EM) in calculating the H*(10) rates from photon pulse-height spectra acquired with a spectrometric LaBr 3 (Ce)(1.5″ × 1.5″) detector. There is a good agreement between results of the different H*(10) rate calculation methods using the spectra measured at the UPC secondary standard calibration laboratory in Barcelona. From the outdoor study at ESMERALDA station in Madrid, it can be concluded that the analysed methods provide results quite similar to those obtained with the reference RSS ionization chamber. In addition, the spectrometric detectors can also facilitate radionuclide identification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of microwave spectra from a high-density toroidal discharge with current-driven turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Andel, H.W.H.

    1978-03-01

    Microwave radiation measurements in the region ωsub(pi) >ωsub(ce)) tokamak with turbulent skin heating show evidence of a Cerenkov beam-plasma instability during the first few microseconds of the heating pulse. It is proposed that the instability is caused by the interaction of populations of freely accelerated electrons with the bulk of the plasma, and corresponds to the unstable propagation of oblique whistlers along group-velocity resonance cones. Measured microwave spectra and their interpretation are presented. (Auth.)

  15. Measurement of charge and energy spectra of heavy nuclei aboard Cosmos-936 artificial Earth satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashin, S.A.; Marennyy, A.M.; Gertsen, G.P.

    1982-07-01

    Charge and energy spectra of heavy charged particles were measured. Measurements were performed by a package of dielectric track detectors mounted behind the shield of 60-80 kg m to the minus second power thick. The charge of nuclei was determined from the complete track length. A group of 1915 tracks of nuclei with Z 6 in the energy range 100-450 MeV/nuclon were identified. The differential charge spectrum of nuclei with 6 Z 28 and the energy spectrum of nuclei of the iron group were built

  16. First Measurements of High Frequency Cross-Spectra from a Pair of Large Michelson Interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Aaron S.; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig; Kamai, Brittany; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S.; Richardson, Jonathan; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Raymond; Waldman, Samuel; Weiss, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are reported of high frequency cross-spectra of signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of co-located 39 m, high power Michelson interferometers. The instrument obtains differential position sensitivity to cross-correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending to the 3.8 MHz inverse light crossing time of the apparatus. A model of universal exotic spatial shear correlations that matches the Planck scale holographic information bound of space-time position states is excluded to 4.6{\\sigma} significance.

  17. On a comprehensive evaluation of Moessbauer hyperfine spectra measured on different types of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraken, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) nowadays have a wide variety of applications that are mostly based on the fact that MNPs below a critical size consist of only a single magnetic domain. The big magnetic moments of these MNPs may fluctuate, driven by thermal excitations and controlled by magnetic anisotropies and interparticle interactions. Successful applications go along with a good control of the properties of the MNPs, which requires detailed knowledge about the preparation process and a proper characterization. These are the main topics this thesis deals with. First, the characterization of the MNPs using Moessbauer spectroscopy is discussed. Despite it is a standard method in research on iron-based MNPs, most publications only present a qualitative discussion of measurements, since available analysis models for dynamic hyperfine spectra are not capable of a satisfying description. Here, a modified version of an established model is presented, which proved to be applicable to the majority of hyperfine spectra and allows deriving detailed microscopic information about magnetic fluctuations on nanoscale. This model is succesfully used, to study the preparation of MNPs with the so-called non-aqueous sol-gel method (a cooperation with the Institut fuer Partikeltechnik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig). In the last part of the thesis, a model is developed that describes the Moessbauer spectra of magnetically fluctuating iron clusters in different non-magnetic metallic matrices (silver and ytterbium). This part is based on a cooperation with the Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. The results of this thesis present possibilities for a detailed quantitative analysis of the magnetic dynamics derived from Moessbauer spectra measured on iron-based MNPs and nanoscale clusters.

  18. Scanning laser vibrometer measurement of guided waves in rails

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Guided wave based inspection and monitoring systems for railway tracks operate at frequencies where as many as 40 modes of propagation may exist. During the development of such systems it is advantageous to be able to measure the amplitude...

  19. Doppler Frequency Shift in Ocean Wave Measurements: Frequency Downshift of a Fixed Spectral Wave Number Component by Advection of Wave Orbital Velocity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hwang, Paul

    2006-01-01

    ... at he expected intrinsic frequency in the frequency spectrum measured by a stationary probe. The advection of the wave number component by the orbital current of background waves produces a net downshift in the encounter frequency...

  20. High-speed measurement of firearm primer blast waves

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael; Daviscourt, Joshua; Eng, Jonathan; Courtney, Amy

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a method and results for direct high-speed measurements of firearm primer blast waves employing a high-speed pressure transducer located at the muzzle to record the blast pressure wave produced by primer ignition. Key findings are: 1) Most of the lead styphnate based primer models tested show 5.2-11.3% standard deviation in the magnitudes of their peak pressure. 2) In contrast, lead-free diazodinitrophenol (DDNP) based primers had standard deviations of the peak blast p...

  1. Optical wave microphone measurement during laser ablation of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsugi, Fumiaki, E-mail: mitsugi@cs.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Ide, Ryota; Ikegami, Tomoaki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Nakamiya, Toshiyuki; Sonoda, Yoshito [Graduate School of Industrial Engineering, Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto, 862-8652 (Japan)

    2012-10-30

    Pulsed laser irradiation is used for surface treatment of a solid and ablation for particle formation in gas, liquid or supercritical phase media. When a pulsed laser is used to irradiate a solid, spatial refractive index variations (including photothermal expansion, shockwaves and particles) occur, which vary depending on the energy density of the pulsed laser. We focused on this phenomenon and applied an unique method for detection of refractive index variation using an optical wave microphone based on Fraunhofer diffraction. In this research, we analyzed the waveforms and frequencies of refractive index variations caused by pulsed laser irradiation of silicon in air and measured with an optical wave microphone.

  2. Measurements of beat wave accelerated electrons in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.H.

    1992-06-01

    Electrons are accelerated by large amplitude electron plasma waves driven by counter-propagating microwaves with a difference frequency approximately equal to the electron plasma frequency. Energetic electrons are observed only when the phase velocity of the wave is in the range 3v e ph e (v ph was varied 2v e ph e ), where v e is the electron thermal velocity, (kT e /m e ) 1/2 . As the phase velocity increases, fewer electrons are accelerated to higher velocities. The measured current contained in these accelerated electrons has the power dependence predicted by theory, but the magnitude is lower than predicted

  3. Origin of the waves in ‘A case-study of mesoscale spectra of wind and temperature, observed and simulated’: Lee waves from the Norwegian mountains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    2012-01-01

    their initiation and ending, propagation, spatial orientation and wavelength, are consistent among the different data sources. This evidence and the key wave parameters derived from the WRF simulation, including the Scorer parameter and wave tilt, all suggest that the waves are lee waves generated by uplift from...

  4. Measurements on wave propagation characteristics of spiraling electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A.; Getty, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of cyclotron-harmonic waves propagating on a neutralized spiraling electron beam immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field are studied experimentally. The experimental setup consisted of a vacuum system, an electron-gun corkscrew assembly which produces a 110-eV beam with the desired delta-function velocity distribution, a measurement region where a microwave signal is injected onto the beam to measure wavelengths, and a velocity analyzer for measuring the axial electron velocity. Results of wavelength measurements made at beam currents of 0.15, 1.0, and 2.0 mA are compared with calculated values, and undesirable effects produced by increasing the beam current are discussed. It is concluded that a suitable electron beam for studies of cyclotron-harmonic waves can be generated by the corkscrew device.

  5. Neutron reference spectra measurements with the Bonner multi-spheres spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos Junior, Roberto Mendonca de

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims to define a procedure to use the Bonner Multisphere Spectrometer with a 6 LiI(Eu) detector in order to determine of neutron spectra. It was measured 238 PuBe spectra and same of reference ( 241 AmBe, 252 Cf e 252 Cf+D 2 O) published in ISO 8529-1 (2001) Norm. The data were processed by a computer program (BUNKI), which presents the results in neutrons energy fluency. Each input parameter of the program was studied in order to establish their influence in the adjustment result. The environment dose equivalent rate obtained placing the detector 1 m from the 241 AmBe source was 122 ± 4 μSv/h with 7% of uncertainty and 95% of confidence level. The procedure established in this work was tested with the 238 PuBe spectrum, obtaining an environment dose equivalent rate of 286 ± 9 μSv/h, 8% lower than the value measured experimentally used as reference. Through this procedure will be possible to measure neutron spectra in different work places where neutrons sources are used. Knowing these spectra, it will be possible to evaluate which area monitors, are more suitable, as well as, to study better the response of individual neutron monitors, as for instance, to obtain a conversion coefficient more appropriate to the albedo dosimeter used in different work places. As the measurements need a long time to be accomplished, the work optimization is fundamental to reduce the exposing time of the Bonner spectrometer operator. For this reason, an important parameter examined in this paper was the possibility of reducing the number of spheres used during the measurement without changing the final result. Considering the radiation protection standards, this parameter has a huge importance when the measurements are performed in work places where the neutron fluency and gamma rate offer risks to the operator's health, as for instance, in nuclear centrals. Studying this parameter, it was possible to conclude that removing the 20,32 cm diameter sphere it will be

  6. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  7. Measurement of charged particle spectra at the LHC at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2094899

    The measurement of charged particle spectra is performed for centre-of-mass energy \\sqrt(s) = 13 TeV in experiment ATLAS. It is an inclusive measurement aiming at fast comparison of particle activity between data and theoretical model. Data are acquired with minimal model dependence avoiding unnecessary bias. Various efficiencies and fractions are determined in order to correct reconstructed spectra of tracks in the Inner Detector to distributions of primary particles. Correction of certain distributions involves more sophisticated methods, such as Bayesian unfolding. The corrected distributions are compared to Monte Carlo generators - Pythia 8 (A2 and Monash tunes), Herwig++, EPOS and QGSJET. Though no generator describes measured data perfectly, in many cases the differences are within few percent. The measured average number of charged particles per unit of pseudorapidity is 2.876 ± 0.001922(stat.) ± 0.03526(syst.) and is found to be in a good agreement with EPOS generator. Apart from the analysis, an in...

  8. Proton energy spectra during ground level enhancements as measured by EPHIN aboard SOHO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heber, Bernd; Kuehl, Patrick; Klassen, Andreas; Dresing, Nina [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Gomez-Herrero, Raul [Universidad de Alcala (Spain)

    2016-07-01

    Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) are solar energetic particle (SEP) events that are recorded by ground-based instrumentation. The energy of the particles is so high that they produce secondary particles in the Earth's atmosphere, i.e. protons and neutrons, which are detected as sudden increases in cosmic ray intensities measured by e.g. neutron monitors. Since the launch of SOHO in December 1995 the neutron monitor network recorded 16 GLEs. The Electron Proton Helium INstrument on board SOHO has been designed to measure protons and helium up to 53 MeV/nucleon as well as electrons up to 8.3 MeV. Above these energies, particles penetrate all detector elements and thus, a separation between different particle species becomes more complicated. Recently we developed a method that allows deriving the energy spectrum for penetrating protons up to more than 1 GeV. In this contribution we present the proton energy spectra and time profiles of above mentioned GLEs and compare them to previous measurements. Although there are differences of up to a factor two the overall shape of the energy spectra agree surprisingly well. Thus it has been demonstrated that EPHIN measurements are a valuable tool for understanding GLE.

  9. Directional Ocean Wave Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    thle The basin is also equipped with a 50-rn-wide hydraulic Wasesc~an-menasured spec\\trum., Pitch ndroll motions AA C D Figure 5. Results of Tydeman...LDescnption and Mfodetling of IVieraonal Seas. Danish Hydraulic Institute rnd Danish Maritime Institute. Copenhagen, pp. 0-5-1 V-5-17 (1984). ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...iins oý 1 eak k II V. I" a t’A1101` icnt the large circles with inrscribed crssesý. lihe grL)wrd fracks Radar (kcaiw VOac~eoicc s.ha~k,,in, this on

  10. Development of SMM wave laser scattering apparatus for the measurements of waves and turbulences in the tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, T.; Hamada, Y.; Yamashita, T.; Ikeda, M.; Nakamura, M.

    1980-01-01

    The SMM wave laser scattering apparatus has been developed for the measurement of the waves and turbulences in the plasma. This apparatus will help greatly to clarify the physics of RF heating of the tokamak plasma. The present status of main parts of the apparatus, the SMM wave laser and the Schottky barrier diode mixer for the heterodyne receiver, are described. (author)

  11. Strong Measurements Give a Better Direct Measurement of the Quantum Wave Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Dequal, Daniele

    2016-01-29

    Weak measurements have thus far been considered instrumental in the so-called direct measurement of the quantum wave function [4J. S. Lundeen, Nature (London) 474, 188 (2011).]. Here we show that a direct measurement of the wave function can be obtained by using measurements of arbitrary strength. In particular, in the case of strong measurements, i.e., those in which the coupling between the system and the measuring apparatus is maximum, we compared the precision and the accuracy of the two methods, by showing that strong measurements outperform weak measurements in both for arbitrary quantum states in most cases. We also give the exact expression of the difference between the original and reconstructed wave function obtained by the weak measurement approach; this will allow one to define the range of applicability of such a method.

  12. Determining the Absorbance Spectra of Photochromic Materials From Measured Spectrophotometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, John D.

    1998-01-01

    If a two-state photochromic material is optically bleached, the absorbance spectrum data measured by a spectrophotometer is in general comprised of components from both the ground state and the upper state. Under general conditions, it may be difficult to extract the actual upper state spectrum from the spectrum of the bleached material. A simple algorithm is presented here for the recovery of the pure absorbance spectra of the upper state of a material such as bacteriorhodopsin, given single wavelength bleaching illumination, steady-state conditions, and accurate knowledge of phototransition rates and thermal decay rates.

  13. An automatic controlled apparatus of target chamber for atomic spectra and level lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Mengchun; Yang Zhihu

    1998-01-01

    An automatically controlled apparatus of target chamber was made to measure spectra of the excited atoms and lifetime of the excited levels. The hardware is composed of nine parts including a computer and a step-motor, while the software consists of three branch programs. The maximum movable distance of target position is 65 cm with a step-length of 8.3 μm and a precision of +- 18 μm per 2 mm. On account of simple structure and double protection, the apparatus exhibits flexibility and reliability in years service

  14. Measurement of day and night neutrino energy spectra at SNO and constraints on neutrino mixing parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Q.R.; Bullard, T.V.; Cox, G.A.; Duba, C.A.; Formaggio, J.A.; Germani, J.V.; Hamian, A.A.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Howe, M.; Kazkaz, K.; Manor, J.; Meijer Drees, R.; Orrell, J.L.; Schaffer, K.K.; Smith, M.W.E.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Allen, R.C.; Buehler, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has measured day and night solar neutrino energy spectra and rates. For charged current events, assuming an undistorted 8 B spectrum, the night minus day rate is 14.0%±6.3% +1.5 -1.4 % of the average rate. If the total flux of active neutrinos is additionally constrained to have no asymmetry, the ν e asymmetry is found to be 7.0%±4.9% +1.3 -1.2 % . A global solar neutrino analysis in terms of matter-enhanced oscillations of two active flavors strongly favors the large mixing angle solution

  15. Measurement of discrete energy-level spectra in individual chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Bolotin, Kirill I; Shi, Su-Fei

    2008-01-01

    We form single-electron transistors from individual chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles, 5-15 nm in diameter, with monolayers of organic molecules serving as tunnel barriers. These devices allow us to measure the discrete electronic energy levels of individual gold nanoparticles that are......, by virtue of chemical synthesis, well-defined in their composition, size and shape. We show that the nanoparticles are nonmagnetic and have spectra in good accord with random-matrix-theory predictions taking into account strong spin-orbit coupling....

  16. A new approach for measuring power spectra and reconstructing time series in active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min

    2018-05-01

    We provide a new approach to measure power spectra and reconstruct time series in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) based on the fact that the Fourier transform of AGN stochastic variations is a series of complex Gaussian random variables. The approach parametrizes a stochastic series in frequency domain and transforms it back to time domain to fit the observed data. The parameters and their uncertainties are derived in a Bayesian framework, which also allows us to compare the relative merits of different power spectral density models. The well-developed fast Fourier transform algorithm together with parallel computation enables an acceptable time complexity for the approach.

  17. Calculational analysis of errors for various models of an experiment on measuring leakage neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsenko, A.A.; Androsenko, P.A.; Deeva, V.V.; Prokof'eva, Z.A.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis is made for the effect of mathematical model accuracy of the system concerned on the calculation results using the BRAND program system. Consideration is given to the impact of the following factors: accuracy of neutron source energy-angular characteristics description, various degrees of system geometry approximation, adequacy of Monte-Carlo method estimation to a real physical neutron detector. The calculation results analysis is made on the basis of the experiments on leakage neutron spectra measurement in spherical lead assemblies with the 14 MeV-neutron source in the centre. 4 refs.; 2 figs.; 10 tabs

  18. Measurements of very forward particles production spectra at LHC: the LHCf experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, Eugenio; Bonechi, Lorenzo; Bongi, Massimo; Castellini, Guido; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Haguenauer, Maurice; Itow, Yoshitaka; Iwata, Taiki; Kasahara, Katsuaki; Makino, Yuya; Masuda, Kimiaki; Matsubayashi, Eri; Menjo, Hiroaki; Muraki, Yasushi; Papini, Paolo; Ricciarini, Sergio; Sako, Takashi; Suzuki, Takuya; Tamura, Tadahisa; Tiberio, Alessio; Torii, Shoji; Tricomi, Alessia; Turner, W C; Ueno, Mana; Zhou, Qi Dong

    2017-01-01

    Thanks to two small sampling calorimeters installed in the LHC tunnel at ±140 m from IP1, the LHC forward (LHCf) experiment is able to detect neutral particles produced by high energy proton-ion collisions in the very forward region (pseudo-rapidity η > 8.4). The main aim of LHCf is to provide precise measurements of the production spectra relative to these particles, in order to tune hadronic interaction models used by ground-based cosmic rays experiments. In this paper we will present the current status of the LHCf experiment, regarding in particular collected data and analysis results, as well as future prospects

  19. Study of the continuum in heavy ion inelastic spectra by light particle coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpaci, J.A.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Chomaz, P.; Frascaria, N.; Garron, J.P.; Roynette, J.C.; Suomijarvi, T.; Van der Woude, A.; Alamanos, N.; Fernandez, B.; Gillibert, A.; Van der Woude, A.; Lepine, A.

    1990-01-01

    The continuum in heavy ion inelastic spectra contains, in addition to the excitation of target nucleus states, contributions from pick-up break-up and knock out reactions. In the case of the 40 Ca + 40 Ca collision at 50 MeV/N these contributions are separated and their relative importance assessed by the measurement of light charged particles in coincidence with the inelastically scattered fragments. The pick-up break-up contribution is found to make up less than half of the cross section at high excitation energies, conversely, the knock out process is important

  20. Measuring thermal neutron spectra of RIEN-1 reactor with a chopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus Vilar, G. de.

    1977-03-01

    The setting up of a time-of-flight spectrometer (Fermi Chopper) and its use in measurements of thermal neutron spectra in the irradiation channels of the Argonaut Reactor(Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Brazil), is described. These distributions are obtained using a multichannel analyser with the necessary corrections being made for counting losses in the analyser, dectector efficiency experimental resolution and chopper transmission function. The results obtained show that the thermal neutron flux emerging from the canal J-9 can be approximately described by a Maxwellian distribution with and associated characteristic temperature fo 430+-30 0 K [pt

  1. Recovery of Stokes waves from velocity measurements on an axis of symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matioc, Bogdan-Vasile

    2015-01-01

    We provide a new method to recover the profile of Stokes waves, and more generally of waves with smooth vorticity, from measurements of the horizontal velocity component on a vertical axis of symmetry of the wave surface. Although we consider periodic waves only, the extension to solitary waves is straightforward. (paper)

  2. Quasi-periodic Schroedinger operators in one dimension, absolutely continuous spectra, Bloch waves, and integrable Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chierchia, L.

    1986-01-01

    In the first chapter, the eigenvalue problem for a periodic Schroedinger operator, Lf = (-d 2 /dx 2 + v)f = Ef, is viewed as a two-dimensional Hamiltonian system which is integrable in the sense of Arnold and Liouville. With the aid of the Floquet-BLoch theory, it is shown that such a system is conjugate to two harmonic oscillators with frequencies α and omega, being the rotation number for L and 2π/omega the period of the potential v. This picture is generalized in the second chapter, to quasi periodic Schroedinger operators, L/sub epsilon/, with highly irrational frequencies (omega 1 , ..., omega/sub d/), which are a small perturbation of periodic operators. In the last chapter, the absolutely continuous spectrum σ/sub ac/ of a general quasi-periodic Schroedinger operators is considered. The Radon-Nikodym derivatives (with respect to Lebesgue measure) of the spectral measures are computed in terms of special independent eigensolutions existing for almost ever E in σ/sub ac/. Finally, it is shown that weak Bloch waves always exist for almost ever E in σ/sub ac/ and the question of the existence of genuine Bloch waves is turned into a regularity problem for a certain nonlinear partial differential equation on a d-dimensional torus

  3. Method of measuring neutron spectra in JMTR exclusively used for irradiation and their evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi

    1983-01-01

    In the core of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor, about 60 capsules are irradiated. These are the material capsules for irradiating reactor materials, the fuel capsules for irradiating reactor fuel, the RI capsules for producing radioisotopes and so on. In the irradiation experiment using a reactor, the information on the neutron fluence is indispensable, and the neutron fluence in the irradiated specimen part is evaluated with a dosimeter or the nuclear calculation for the core of the JMTR. At the time of irradiating reactor materials, the dosimeter Fe-54 (n,p) Mn-54 is generally used for evaluating the neutron fluence more than 1 MeV. In the case of fuel irradiation, the thermal neutron fluence is evaluated with the dosimeter Co-59 (n,γ) Co-60. It is important to examine in detail neutron spectra by both calculation and experiment in the reactors exclusively used for irradiation such as the JMTR. The neutron irradiation field in the JMTR, neutron spectrum measuring experiment, the neutron flux monitors for standardizing data, the measurement of X-ray and gamma ray, neutron guess spectrum, the compilation of neutron cross section for SAND 2, and the unfolding of neutron spectra are reported. The degree of agreement of the neutron fluence more than 1 MeV by measurement and calculation was +- 10 to 20 %. (Kako, I.)

  4. Wave spectral shapes in the coastal waters based on measured data off Karwar on the Western coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, M.A.; SanilKumar, V.

    of the wave spectrum is within the range of -4 to -3 during the monsoon period, the Donelan spectrum shows a better fit for the high-frequency part of the wave spectra in monsoon months compared to other months....

  5. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-10-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive and nondestructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FT-IR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed: one developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a uniform distribution of Low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the Low EC calibration to Low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produce predictions for Low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), no bias (0.00 μg m-3, a

  6. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-06-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure tested and developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed, one which is developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a~uniform distribution of low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the low EC calibration to low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produces predictions for low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), no

  7. Alpha-particle energy spectra measured at forward angles in heavy-ion-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borcea, C.; Cierlic, E.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.

    1980-01-01

    Energy spectra have been measured for α-particles emitted in the bombardment of 159 Tb, 181 Ta, 197 Au, and 232 Th nuclei by 20 Ne, 22 Ne, and 40 Ar projectiles. The reaction products emitted in the angular range (0+-2)deg relative to the beam direction were analyzed using a magnetic spectrometer and detected by means of a semiconductor ΔE-E telescope. It was found that in all cases the experimentally measured maximum α-particle energy almost amounts to the maximum possible value calculated from the reaction energy balance for a two-body exit channel. A correlation was found between the measured absolute cross section in different target-projectile combinations and the α-particle binding energy in the target nuclei. On the basis of the obtained results a conclusion has been drawn that the α-particles are emitted in the early stage of the reaction

  8. Measurement and analysis of fast neutron spectra in reactor materials by time-of-flight method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Shuhei; Kimura, Itsuro; Kobayashi, Shohei; Yamamoto, Shuji; Nishihara, Hiroshi.

    1982-01-01

    The LINAC-TOF experiments have been done to measure the neutron energy spectra in the assemblies of reactor materials. The sample materials to be measured were iron, stainless steel, aluminum, nickel, zirconium, thorium, lithium, and so on. The shapes of assemblies were piles (rectangular parallelopiped, sphere, and polyhedron) and slab. A photoneutron target was set at the center of the pile assemblies. Each assembly has an electron injection hole and a re-entrant hole. In case of a slab, a photo neutron target was placed at the outside of the slab. Neutrons were generated by using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC). The length of the flight path was 20 m. The neutron detectors were a Li-6 glass scintillator and a B-10 vaseline-NaI(Tl) scintillator. The spatial distributions of neutrons in the piles were measured by the foil activation method. The neutron transport calculation was performed, and the evaluation of group constants was made. (Kato, T.)

  9. An Analysis of Fundamental Mode Surface Wave Amplitude Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardong, L.; Ferreira, A. M.; van Heijst, H. J.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic tomography is a powerful tool to decipher the Earth's interior structure at various scales. Traveltimes of seismic waves are widely used to build velocity models, whereas amplitudes are still only seldomly accounted for. This mainly results from our limited ability to separate the various physical effects responsible for observed amplitude variations, such as focussing/defocussing, scattering and source effects. We present new measurements from 50 global earthquakes of fundamental-mode Rayleigh and Love wave amplitude anomalies measured in the period range 35-275 seconds using two different schemes: (i) a standard time-domain amplitude power ratio technique; and (ii) a mode-branch stripping scheme. For minor-arc data, we observe amplitude anomalies with respect to PREM in the range of 0-4, for which the two measurement techniques show a very good overall agreement. We present here a statistical analysis and comparison of these datasets, as well as comparisons with theoretical calculations for a variety of 3-D Earth models. We assess the geographical coherency of the measurements, and investigate the impact of source, path and receiver effects on surface wave amplitudes, as well as their variations with frequency in a wider range than previously studied.

  10. Low power RF measurements of travelling wave type linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Sivananda; Wanmode, Yashwant; Bhisikar, A.; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2015-01-01

    RRCAT is engaged in the development of travelling wave (TW) type linear accelerator for irradiation of industrial and agricultural products. TW accelerator designed for 2π/3 mode to operate at frequency of 2856 MHz. It consists of input coupler, buncher cells, regular cells and output coupler. Low power measurement of this structure includes measurement of resonant frequency of the cells for different resonant modes and quality factor, tuning of input-output coupler and measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field in the structure. Steele's non-resonant perturbation technique has been used for measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field in the structure. Kyhl's method has been used for the tuning of input-output coupler. Computer based automated bead pull set-up has been developed for measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field profile in the structure. All the codes are written in Python for interfacing of Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) , stepper motor with computer. These codes also automate the measurement process. This paper describes the test set- up for measurement and results of measurement of travelling wave type linear accelerating structure. (author)

  11. Particle transport in 3He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Tsurutani

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths lW - P are calculated using the measured wave intensities, polarizations, and k directions. The values of lW - P are found to be ~ 5 times less than the value of lHe , the latter derived from He intensity and anisotropy time profiles. It is demonstrated by computer simulation that scattering rates through a 90° pitch angle are lower than that of other pitch angles, and that this is a possible explanation for the discrepancy between the lW - P and lHe values. At this time the scattering mechanism(s is unknown. We suggest a means where a direct comparison between the two l values could be made. Computer simulations indicate that although scattering through 90° is lower, it still occurs. Possibilities are either large pitch angle scattering through resonant interactions, or particle mirroring off of field compression regions. The largest solar proton events are analyzed to investigate the possibilities of local wave generation at 1 AU. In accordance with the results of a previous calculation (Gary et al., 1985 of beam stability, proton beams at 1 AU are found to be marginally stable. No evidence for substantial wave amplitude was found. Locally generated waves, if present, were less than 10-3 nT 2 Hz-1 at the leading

  12. Particle transport in 3He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hada

    Full Text Available Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths lW - P are calculated using the measured wave intensities, polarizations, and k directions. The values of lW - P are found to be ~ 5 times less than the value of lHe , the latter derived from He intensity and anisotropy time profiles. It is demonstrated by computer simulation that scattering rates through a 90° pitch angle are lower than that of other pitch angles, and that this is a possible explanation for the discrepancy between the lW - P and lHe values. At this time the scattering mechanism(s is unknown. We suggest a means where a direct comparison between the two l values could be made. Computer simulations indicate that although scattering through 90° is lower, it still occurs. Possibilities are either large pitch angle scattering through resonant interactions, or particle mirroring off of field compression regions. The largest solar proton events are analyzed to investigate the possibilities of local wave generation at 1 AU. In accordance with the results of a previous calculation (Gary et al., 1985 of beam stability, proton beams at 1 AU are found to be marginally stable. No evidence for substantial wave amplitude was found. Locally generated waves, if present, were less than 10-3 nT 2 Hz-1 at the leading

  13. Invariant measures for stochastic nonlinear beam and wave equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzezniak, Z.; Ondreját, Martin; Seidler, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 260, č. 5 (2016), s. 4157-4179 ISSN 0022-0396 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0752 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : stochastic partial differential equation * stochastic beam equation * stochastic wave equation * invariant measure Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.988, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/SI/ondrejat-0453412.pdf

  14. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also

  15. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L. Danilishin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  16. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilishin, Stefan L; Khalili, Farid Ya

    2012-01-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  17. Measurement and analysis of angular neutron spectra in a manganese pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, S.; Hayashi, S.A.; Kimura, I.; Kobayashi, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Mori, T.; Nishihara, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Nakagawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    The energy and angular distribution of neutrons in a Mn pile were measured by the linac time-of-flight method. A cylindrical Pb target for the production of photoneutrons was placed at the center of the pile. The experimental results were compared with the theoretical calculations using the group constants from the nuclear data files, JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV. Good agreement can be seen in the general shapes between calculated and measured angular spectra in three decades of energy range form a few keV to a few MeV. As far as can be concluded from the intercomparison, the neutron cross section data for Mn in ENDF/B-IV may be applicable to reactor design: however, several improvements for its resonance parameters can be recommended. A little more improvements are recommended for that in JENDL-2 from this intercomparison. (orig.) [de

  18. Atomic Emission Spectra Diagnosis and Electron Density Measurement of Semiconductor Bridge (SCB) Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Hongyan; Zhu Shunguan; Zhang Lin; Wan Xiaoxia; Li Yan; Shen Ruiqi

    2010-01-01

    Emission spectra of a semiconductor bridge (SCB) plasma in a visible range was studied in air. The electron density was measured in a conventional way from the broadening of the A1 I 394.4 nm Stark width. Based on the Saha equation, a system for recording the intensity of Si I 390.5 nm and Si II 413.1 nm was designed. With this technique, the SCB plasma electron density was measured well and accurately. Moreover, the electron density distribution Vs time was acquired from one SCB discharge. The individual result from the broadening of the Al I 394.4 nm Stark width and Saha equation was all in the range of 10 15 cm -3 to 10 16 cm -3 . Finally the presumption of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) condition was validated.

  19. Spatial aliasing and distortion of energy distribution in the wave vector domain under multi-spacecraft measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aliasing is a general problem in the analysis of any measurements that make sampling at discrete points. Sampling in the spatial domain results in a periodic pattern of spectra in the wave vector domain. This effect is called spatial aliasing, and it is of particular importance for multi-spacecraft measurements in space. We first present the theoretical background of aliasing problems in the frequency domain and generalize it to the wave vector domain, and then present model calculations of spatial aliasing. The model calculations are performed for various configurations of the reciprocal vectors and energy spectra or distribution that are placed at different positions in the wave vector domain, and exhibit two effects on aliasing. One is weak aliasing, in which the true spectrum is distorted because of non-uniform aliasing contributions in the Brillouin zone. It is demonstrated that the energy distribution becomes elongated in the shortest reciprocal lattice vector direction in the wave vector domain. The other effect is strong aliasing, in which aliases have a significant contribution in the Brillouin zone and the energy distribution shows a false peak. These results give a caveat in multi-spacecraft data analysis in that spectral anisotropy obtained by a measurement has in general two origins: (1 natural and physical origins like anisotropy imposed by a mean magnetic field or a flow direction; and (2 aliasing effects that are imposed by the configuration of the measurement array (or the set of reciprocal vectors. This manuscript also discusses a possible method to estimate aliasing contributions in the Brillouin zone based on the measured spectrum and to correct the spectra for aliasing.

  20. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  1. First LHCf measurement of photon spectra at pseudorapidity >8.8 in LHC 7TeV pp collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    As the first analysis, LHCf derived energy spectra of single photons at pseudorapidity ranges of 8.8 to 9.0 and 10.9 to infinity. Detail analysis procedure and comparison of the energy spectra between LHCf measurements and MC predictions using major interaction models are presented. A brief summary of recent UHECR observations and a preliminary work of the impact of LHCf measurements to the UHECR interpretation will be also presented.

  2. Rock properties influencing impedance spectra (IS) studied by lab measurements on porous model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkmann, J.; Klitzsch, N.; Mohnke, O. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Applied Geophysics and Geothermal Energy; Schleifer, N. [Wintershall Holding GmbH, Barnstorf (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    The wetting condition of reservoir rocks is a crucial parameter for the estimation of reservoir characteristics like permeability and saturation with residual oil or water. Since standard methods are often costly, at least in terms of time, we aim at assessing wettability of reservoir rocks using impedance spectroscopy (IS), a frequency dependent measurement of complex electric resistivity. This approach is promising, because IS is sensitive to the electrochemical properties of the inner surface of rocks which, on the other hand, are decisively influencing wettability. Unfortunately, there is large number of rock parameters - besides wettability - influencing the impedance spectra often not exactly known for natural rock samples. Therefore, we study model systems to improve the understanding of the underlying mechanisms and to quantify the influencing parameters. The model systems consist of sintered porous silica beads of different sizes leading to samples with different pore sizes. The main advantage of these samples compared to natural rocks is their well-defined and uniform mineralogical composition and thus their uniform electrochemical surface property. In order to distinguish pore geometry and fluid electrochemistry effects on the IS properties we measured the IS response of the fully water saturated model systems in a wide frequency range - from 1 mHz to 35 MHz - to capture different often overlapping polarization processes. With these measurements we study the influence of pore or grain size, fluid conductivity, and wettability (contact angle) on the impedance spectra. The influence of wettability was studied by modifying the originally hydrophilic inner surface into a hydrophobic state. The wettability change was verified by contact angle measurements. As results, we find pore size dependent relaxation times and salinity dependent chargeabilities for the hydrophilic samples in the low frequency range (< 10 kHz), whereas for the hydrophobic samples

  3. Reflective measurement of water concentration using millimeter wave illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shijun; Bennett, David; Taylor, Zachary; Bajwa, Neha; Tewari, Priyamvada; Maccabi, Ashkan; Culjat, Martin; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-04-01

    THz and millimeter wave technology have shown the potential to become a valuable medical imaging tool because of its sensitivity to water and safe, non-ionizing photon energy. Using the high dielectric constant of water in these frequency bands, reflectionmode THz sensing systems can be employed to measure water content in a target with high sensitivity. This phenomenology may lead to the development of clinical systems to measure the hydration state of biological targets. Such measurements may be useful in fast and convenient diagnosis of conditions whose symptoms can be characterized by changes in water concentration such as skin burns, dehydration, or chemical exposure. To explore millimeter wave sensitivity to hydration, a reflectometry system is constructed to make water concentration measurements at 100 GHz, and the minimum detectable water concentration difference is measured. This system employs a 100 GHz Gunn diode source and Golay cell detector to perform point reflectivity measurements of a wetted polypropylene towel as it dries on a mass balance. A noise limited, minimum detectable concentration difference of less than 0.5% by mass can be detected in water concentrations ranging from 70% to 80%. This sensitivity is sufficient to detect hydration changes caused by many diseases and pathologies and may be useful in the future as a diagnostic tool for the assessment of burns and other surface pathologies.

  4. Model and measurements of linear mixing in thermal IR ground leaving radiance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balick, Lee; Clodius, William; Jeffery, Christopher; Theiler, James; McCabe, Matthew; Gillespie, Alan; Mushkin, Amit; Danilina, Iryna

    2007-10-01

    Hyperspectral thermal IR remote sensing is an effective tool for the detection and identification of gas plumes and solid materials. Virtually all remotely sensed thermal IR pixels are mixtures of different materials and temperatures. As sensors improve and hyperspectral thermal IR remote sensing becomes more quantitative, the concept of homogeneous pixels becomes inadequate. The contributions of the constituents to the pixel spectral ground leaving radiance are weighted by their spectral emissivities and their temperature, or more correctly, temperature distributions, because real pixels are rarely thermally homogeneous. Planck's Law defines a relationship between temperature and radiance that is strongly wavelength dependent, even for blackbodies. Spectral ground leaving radiance (GLR) from mixed pixels is temperature and wavelength dependent and the relationship between observed radiance spectra from mixed pixels and library emissivity spectra of mixtures of 'pure' materials is indirect. A simple model of linear mixing of subpixel radiance as a function of material type, the temperature distribution of each material and the abundance of the material within a pixel is presented. The model indicates that, qualitatively and given normal environmental temperature variability, spectral features remain observable in mixtures as long as the material occupies more than roughly 10% of the pixel. Field measurements of known targets made on the ground and by an airborne sensor are presented here and serve as a reality check on the model. Target spectral GLR from mixtures as a function of temperature distribution and abundance within the pixel at day and night are presented and compare well qualitatively with model output.

  5. Shock Induced Melting in Aluminum: Wave Profile Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabildas, Lalit C.; Furnish, Michael D.; Reinhart, William D.

    1999-06-23

    We have developed launch capabilities that can propel macroscopic plates to hypervelocities (8 to 16 km/s). This capability has been used to determine the first time-resolved wave profile measurements using velocity interferometry techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that alu- minum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa with complete loss of strength in the shocked state. Results of these experiments are discussed and compared with the results of lower pressure experi- ments conducted at lower impact velocities.

  6. Laser vibrometer measurement of guided wave modes in rail track

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available ) in the laboratory and on an operational rail track (with S-4 60-SAR profile) and example results are presented in this section. The measurements 5 were performed using a Polytec PSV-400-M2-20 high frequency scanning vibrometer 6 equipped with the VD-09 velocity...Hz on operational rail track and to identify the modes that are capable of 16 propagating large distances. 17 18 KEYWORDS: Semi-analytical finite element method; modes of guided wave 19 propagation; laser vibrometer measurement; rail track 20 PACs...

  7. Gravitational waves from pulsars with measured braking index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jose C.N. de; Coelho, Jaziel G.; Costa, Cesar A. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisao de Astrofisica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    We study the putative emission of gravitational waves (GWs) in particular for pulsars with measured braking index. We show that the appropriate combination of both GW emission and magnetic dipole brakes can naturally explain the measured braking index, when the surface magnetic field and the angle between the magnetic dipole and rotation axes are time dependent. Then we discuss the detectability of these very pulsars by aLIGO and the Einstein Telescope. We call attention to the realistic possibility that aLIGO can detect the GWs generated by at least some of these pulsars, such as Vela, for example. (orig.)

  8. Modelling of SH- and P-SV-wave fields and seismic microzonation based on response spectra for Talchir basin, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, W.K.; Yanger Walling, M.; Vaccari, F.; Tripathy, T.; Panza, G.F.

    2008-02-01

    The P-SV- and SH-wave field in the Talchir basin is simulated along eight profiles: four profiles strike across the basin and the other four are along the basin. The hybrid method, which combines two computational techniques, modal Summation and finite differences, is used to produce multiphase synthetic seismograms. An M = 6 earthquake is considered, with hypocenter along the North Orissa Boundary Fault (NOBF) at a depth of 5 km and with the focal mechanisms parameters: dip = 90 deg., strike = 160 deg. and rake = 180 deg. The peak acceleration (AMAX) along each profile is determined considering the maximum acceleration obtained at the horizontal components. The response spectra ratio (RSR) as a function of frequency is computed for the eight profiles and the higher amplification is seen to increase in correspondence with the thicker sedimentary cover, especially for the radial component. Higher site amplification for all the profiles is observed in the frequency range from 0.5 to 1.4 Hz. To validate the obtained site-effects, the sources, for the profiles across the basin, are placed near to the southern end of the profile and the site amplifications are recomputed. Even if the spatial distribution of AMAX is mainly controlled by the epicentral distance, i.e. the geometrical spreading prevails on local soil effects, the RSR shows a pattern that can be easily correlated with the local site conditions. The RSR at the intersection of the profiles is dependent not only upon the local lithology and sediment thickness but also upon the epicentral distance. The Talchir basin is classified into three zones based on the RSR values: low RSR zone (1.0 - 1.9), intermediate RSR zone (2.0 - 2.8) and high RSR zone (2.9 - 5.2). The PGA estimated for the bedrock model by Bhatia et al. (1999) for the study region is around 0.05 to 0.10 g while the Indian seismic zonation map estimated it to be in the range from 0.1 to 0.2g. In the present study, that considers the effects of

  9. Extracting Earth's Elastic Wave Response from Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel; Larose, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Recent research has shown that noise can be turned from a nuisance into a useful seismic source. In seismology and other fields in science and engineering, the estimation of the system response from noise measurements has proven to be a powerful technique. To convey the essence of the method, we first treat the simplest case of a homogeneous medium to show how noise measurements can be used to estimate waves that propagate between sensors. We provide an overview of physics research—dating back more than 100 years—showing that random field fluctuations contain information about the system response. This principle has found extensive use in surface-wave seismology but can also be applied to the estimation of body waves. Because noise provides continuous illumination of the subsurface, the extracted response is ideally suited for time-lapse monitoring. We present examples of time-lapse monitoring as applied to the softening of soil after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, the detection of a precursor to a landslide, and temporal changes in the lunar soil.

  10. Measurement of keV-neutron capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra of Er isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harun-Ar-Rashid, A.K.M.; Igashira, Masayuki; Ohsaki, Toshiro

    2000-01-01

    Neutron capture cross sections and capture γ-ray spectra of 166,167, 168 Er were measured in the energy region of 10 to 550 keV. The measurements were performed with a pulsed 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be neutron source and a large anti-Compton NaI(Tl) γ-ray spectrometer. A pulse-height weighting technique and the standard capture cross sections of gold were used to derive the capture cross sections. The errors of the derived cross sections were about 5%. The present results were compared with other measurements and evaluations. The observed capture γ-ray pulse-height spectra were unfolded to obtain the corresponding γ-ray spectra. An anomalous shoulder was observed around 3 MeV in each of the capture γ-ray spectra. (author)

  11. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  12. Correlating the vibrational spectra of structurally related molecules: A spectroscopic measure of similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yunwen; Zou, Wenli; Cremer, Dieter; Kraka, Elfi

    2018-03-05

    Using catastrophe theory and the concept of a mutation path, an algorithm is developed that leads to the direct correlation of the normal vibrational modes of two structurally related molecules. The mutation path is defined by weighted incremental changes in mass and geometry of the molecules in question, which are successively applied to mutate a molecule into a structurally related molecule and thus continuously converting their normal vibrational spectra from one into the other. Correlation diagrams are generated that accurately relate the normal vibrational modes to each other by utilizing mode-mode overlap criteria and resolving allowed and avoided crossings of vibrational eigenstates. The limitations of normal mode correlation, however, foster the correlation of local vibrational modes, which offer a novel vibrational measure of similarity. It will be shown how this will open new avenues for chemical studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Electron spectra over discrete auroras as measured by the Substorm-GEOS rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandahl, I.; Eliasson, L.; Lundin, R.

    1980-01-01

    Results from the first two Substorm-GEOS rockets are presented. These rockets, as well as the third one, were launched from ESRANGE on January 27, 1979 into different substorm phases. The first rocket went into an active pre-breakup evening arc and the second one into a breakup close to magnetic midnight. Electron spectra of downcoming particles measured by a narrow energy bandwidth detector show very narrow energy peaks as soon as the integral energy fluxes are high. These peaks always show populations of two different characteristic energies above the peak energy. One of the populations has properties similar to those found in the boundary layer plasma and the other one seems to be of plasma sheet origin. The plasma sheet like population is also seen where there are no signs of energy peaks, for example equatorward of the arc. The boundary layer plasma is exclusively connected with the signatures of acceleration. (Auth.)

  14. Spectral broadening measurement of the lower hybrid waves during long pulse operation in Tore Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger-By, G.; Decampy, J.; Antar, G. Y.; Goniche, M.; Ekedahl, A.; Delpech, L.; Leroux, F.; Tore Supra Team

    2014-02-01

    On many tokamaks (C-Mod, EAST, FTU, JET, HT-7, TS), a decrease in current drive efficiency of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves is observed in high electron density plasmas. The cause of this behaviour is believed to be: Parametric Instabilities (PI) and Scattering from Density Fluctuations (SDF). For the ITER LH system, our knowledge must be improved to avoid such effects and to maintain the LH current drive efficiency at high density. The ITPA IOS group coordinates this effort [1] and all experimental data are essential to validate the numerical codes in progress. Usually the broadening of the LH wave frequency spectrum is measured by a probe located in the plasma edge. For this study, the frequency spectrum of a reflected power signal from the LH antenna was used. In addition, the spectrum measurements are compared with the density fluctuations observed on RF probes located at the antenna mouth. Several plasma currents (0.6 to 1.4 MA) and densities up to 5.2 × 1019 m-3 have been realised on Tore Supra (TS) long pulses and with high injected RF power, up to 5.4 MW-30s. This allowed using a spectrum analyser to make several measurements during the plasma pulse. The side lobe amplitude, shifted by 20-30MHz with respect to the main peak, grows with increasing density. Furthermore, for an increase of plasma current at the same density, the spectra broaden and become asymmetric. Some parametric dependencies are shown in this paper.

  15. Measurements of electromagnetic waves in Phaedrus-B: Bench-mark test of ANTENA wave field calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrator, T.; Meassick, S.; Browning, J.; Majeski, R.; Ferron, J.R.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the predictions of a numerical code (ANTENA) and the data of wave field measurements in the Phaedrus-B tandem mirror are consistent (±25%) for right-handed (B-vector - ) wave fields and less so (±40%) for left-handed (B-vector + ) wave fields in the plasma core, and that they disagree for B-vector + fields near the column edge. Shorting out or reduction of the wave azimuthal electric fields by limiters is the probable cause of this discrepancy. The ICRF fluctuating wave B-vector fields are shown as |B-vector| contour maps in the r-z plane, where the B-vector + data peak at a smaller radius than predicted. The waves are characterized by different dominant axial wave numbers for the left- and right-handed circularly polarized fields. (author). 28 refs, 20 figs, 1 tab

  16. Microwave measurements of the spectra and molecular structure for phthalic anhydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Sun, Ming; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2014-05-01

    The microwave rotational spectrum for phthalic anhydride (PhA) has been measured in the 4-14 GHz microwave region using a pulsed-beam Fourier transform (PBFT) Flygare-Balle type microwave spectrometer. Initially, the molecular structure was calculated using Gaussian 09 suite with mp2/6-311++G** basis and the calculations were used in predicting spectra for the measured isotopologues. The experimental rotational transition frequencies were measured and used to calculate the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. The rotational constants for the normal isotopologue, four unique 13C substituted isotopologues and two 18O isotologues, were used in a least squares fit to determine nearly all structural parameters for this molecule. Since no substitutions were made at hydrogen sites, the calculated positions of the hydrogen atoms relative to the bonded carbon atoms were used in the structure determination. The rotational constants for the parent isotopologue were determined to be A = 1801.7622(9) MHz, B = 1191.71816(26) MHz, C = 717.44614(28) MHz. Small values for the centrifugal distortion constants were obtained; DJ = 0.0127 kHz, DJK = 0.0652 kHz, and DK = -0.099 kHz, indicating a fairly rigid structure. The structure of PhA is planar with a negative inertial defect of Δ = -0.154 amu Å2. Structural parameters from the mp2 and DFT calculations are in quite good agreement with measured parameters.

  17. Measurements and calculations of integral capture cross-sections of structural materials in fast reactor spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, S.; Brunson, G.; Gmuer, K.; Jermann, M.; McCombie, C.; Richmond, R.; Schmocker, U.

    1979-01-01

    This paper relates the checking of integral data of steel and iron in fast reactor lattices. The fully-rodded GCFR benchmark lattice of the zero-energy reactor PROTEUS was successively modified by replacing the PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel rods by steel-18/8 or steel-37 (iron) rods. The neutron spectra of the modified lattices in fact have median energies close to that of a typical LMFBR. The replacement of fuel by the structural material of interest was such that in each case the value of k(infinity) was reduced to near-unity. This allowed the measurement of the lattice-k(infinity) by the null-reactivity technique. In addition, the principal reaction rates (namely U238 capture and fission, relative to Pu239 fission) and the neutron spectrum were measured. These directly measured integral data which are particularly sensitive to the steel cross-sections can be used for the checking and systematic adjustment of data sets. The results may also be analysed so as to derive specific values for the integral capture cross-sections of steel and iron. Neutron balance equations were set-up for each of the lattices using the measured k(infinity) and reaction rates

  18. Measurement of prompt fission gamma-ray spectra in fast neutron-induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laborie, J.M.; Belier, G.; Taieb, J.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of prompt fission gamma-ray emission has been of major interest in reactor physics for a few years. Since very few experimental spectra were ever published until now, new measurements would be also valuable to improve our understanding of the fission process. An experimental method is currently being developed to measure the prompt fission gamma-ray spectrum from some tens keV up to 10 MeV at least. The mean multiplicity and total energy could be deduced. In this method, the gamma-rays are measured with a bismuth germanate (BGO) detector which has the advantage to present a high P/T ratio and a high efficiency compared to other gamma-ray detectors. The prompt fission neutrons are rejected by the time of flight technique between the BGO detector and a fission trigger given by a fission chamber or a scintillating active target. Energy and efficiency calibration of the BGO detector were carried out up to 10.76 MeV by means of the Al-27(p, gamma) reaction. First prompt fission gamma-ray spectrum measurements performed for the spontaneous fission of Cf-252 and for 1.7 and 15.6 MeV neutron-induced fission of U-238 at the CEA, DAM, DIF Van de Graaff accelerator, will be presented. (authors)

  19. Current direction, wind wave spectra, and CTD data from moored current meter and CTD casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1982-09-15 to 1983-09-15 (NODC Accession 8500148)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, wind wave spectra, and CTD data were collected using moored current meter and CTD casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 3, 1982 to September...

  20. Physical, meteorological, wave spectra, and other data from CTD casts and current meters aboard NOAA Ship McARTHUR in the Columbia River (Wash./Oregon) from 1981-05-06 to 1981-11-25 (NODC Accession 8300033)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, wave spectra, and other data were collected from CTD casts and current meters from NOAA Ship McARTHUR and other platforms in the Columbia...

  1. Current direction, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, benthic organisms, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 18 October 1977 to 01 May 1979 (NODC Accession 7900270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, zooplankton, benthic organisms, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the...

  2. Bacteriology, wind wave spectra, and benthic organism data from moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-02-01 to 1979-05-03 (NODC Accession 7900247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteriology, wind wave spectra, and benthic organism data were collected using moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from February 1, 1978...

  3. Current direction, benthic organisms, wind wave spectra, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-01-12 to 1980-06-01 (NODC Accession 8000465)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, benthic organisms, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments from the CAPT JACK and...

  4. Current direction, wind wave spectra, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-10-11 to 1980-03-19 (NODC Accession 8000368)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments from the CAPT JACK and EXCELLENCE in the...

  5. Current direction, phytoplankton, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1981-02-07 to 1982-11-01 (NODC Accession 8300055)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, phytoplankton, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of...

  6. Wind wave spectra and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1979-09-22 to 1980-05-01 (NODC Accession 8000462)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind wave spectra and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from September 22, 1979 to May 1, 1980....

  7. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1978-06-28 to 1978-12-31 (NODC Accession 7900128)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from June 28, 1978 to December 31,...

  8. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1977-12-22 to 1978-07-01 (NODC Accession 7900123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 22, 1977 to October...

  9. Wave spectra, meteorological, and other data from NOAA Ship FERREL and other platforms from the Chesapeake Bay from 1983-03-14 to 1983-11-22 (NODC Accession 8500124)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave spectra, meteorological, and other data were collected from NOAA Ship FERREL and other platforms in the Chesapeake Bay. Data were collected by the National...

  10. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1977-02-02 to 1979-01-31 (NODC Accession 7900144)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, salinity, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from February 2, 1978 to January 31,...

  11. Current direction, wind wave spectra, phytoplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1977-09-24 to 1981-05-31 (NODC Accession 8100612)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, wind wave spectra, phytoplankton, temperature, salinity, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  12. Current direction, wind wave spectra, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1977-09-24 to 1981-08-31 (NODC Accession 8100681)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in...

  13. Measurement of deuteron spectra and elliptic flow in Pb-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 2.76 TeV at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India); Adamova, D. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rez u Prahy (Czech Republic). Nuclear Physics Inst.; Adolfsson, J. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Experimental High Energy Physics; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration; and others

    2017-10-15

    The transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra and elliptic flow coefficient (v{sub 2}) of deuterons and anti-deuterons at mid-rapidity (vertical stroke y vertical stroke < 0.5) are measured with the ALICE detector at the LHC in Pb-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 2.76 TeV. The measurement of the p{sub T} spectra of (anti-)deuterons is done up to 8 GeV/c in 0-10% centrality class and up to 6 GeV/c in 10-20% and 20-40% centrality classes. The v{sub 2} is measured in the 0.8 < p{sub T} < 5 GeV/c interval and in six different centrality intervals (0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40 and 40-50%) using the scalar product technique. Measured π{sup ±}, K{sup ±} and p+ p transverse-momentum spectra and v{sub 2} are used to predict the deuteron p{sub T} spectra and v{sub 2} within the Blast-Wave model. The predictions are able to reproduce the v{sub 2} coefficient in the measured p{sub T} range and the transverse-momentum spectra for p{sub T} > 1.8 GeV/c within the experimental uncertainties. The measurement of the coalescence parameter B{sub 2} is performed, showing a p{sub T} dependence in contrast with the simplest coalescence model, which fails to reproduce also the measured v{sub 2} coefficient. In addition, the coalescence parameter B{sub 2} and the elliptic flow coefficient in the 20-40% centrality interval are compared with the AMPT model which is able, in its version without string melting, to reproduce the measured v{sub 2}(p{sub T}) and the B{sub 2}(p{sub T}) trend. (orig.)

  14. The wave vane - A device to measure the breaker angle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.; Anand, N.M.

    directional wave gauge at a considerable cost. For economic and practical considerations, visual measurements on the breaker height, the breaker period and the breaker angle are generally made in the LEO pro- gramme. The breaker height is recorded... of the fins. Flag masts are fixed on either end of the arms. The whole assembly thus revolves around the spindle resting on the sleeve. WORKING PRINCIPLE The flag masts, two on the revolving arms and one on the top of the spindle lie always in a straight...

  15. Activation Doppler Measurements on U 238 and U 235 in Some Fast Reactor Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiren, L I; Gustafsson, I

    1968-03-15

    Measurements of the Doppler effect in U-238 capture and U-235 fission have been made by means of the activation technique in three different neutron spectra in the fast critical assembly FR0. The experiments involved the irradiation of thin uranium metal foils or oxide disks, which were heated in a small oven located at the core centre. The measurements on U-238 were extended to 1780 deg K and on U-235 to 1470 deg K. A core region surrounding the oven was homogenized in order to facilitate the interpretation of results. The reaction rates in the uranium samples were detected by gamma counting. The experimental method was checked with regard to systematic errors by irradiations in a thermal spectrum. The data obtained for U-238 capture were corrected for the effect of neutron collisions in the oven wall, and were extrapolated to zero sample thickness. In the softest spectrum (core 5) a Doppler effect (relative increase in capture rate) of 0.260 {+-} 0.018 was obtained on heating from 343 to 1780 deg K, and in the hardest spectrum (core 3) the corresponding value was 0.030 {+-} 0.003. An appreciable Doppler effect in U-235 fission was obtained only in the softest spectrum, in which the measured increase in fission rate on heating from 320 to 1470 deg K was 0.007 {+-} 0.003.

  16. Downwelling Far-Infrared Radiance Spectra Measured by FIRST at Cerro Toco, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, J. C.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Cageao, R.; Kratz, D. P.; Latvakoski, H.; Johnson, D. G.; Mlawer, E. J.; Turner, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument is a Fourier transform spectrometer developed by NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the Space Dynamics Laboratory and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. FIRST was initially developed for measuring the far-infrared portion of Earth's longwave spectrum as a balloon borne instrument and later was reconfigured to operate as a ground-based instrument. In its current ground-based configuration FIRST was deployed at 17500 ft on Cerro Toco, a mountain in the Atacama Desert of Chile, from August to October, 2009. There the integrated precipitable water (IPW) was as low as 0.02 cm. FIRST measurements from days with IPW between 0.024 and 0.035 cm during the campaign are presented here between 200 cm-1 and 800 cm-1. Significant spectral development in the far-IR is observed over the entire 200 cm-1 to 800 cm-1 band. Water vapor and temperature profiles from radiosonde and GVRP measurements are used as inputs to the AER Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) utilizing the AER v3.2 line parameter database. Uncertainties in both the measured and modeled radiances are accounted for in this study. The residual LBLRTM - FIRST is calculated to assess agreement between the measured and modeled spectra. Measured and model radiances generally agree to within the combined uncertainties for wavenumbers greater than 360 cm-1. At wavenumbers less than 360 cm-1 persistent troughs in the residual are present outside of the combined uncertainties. These features are present on different days and at different water vapor amounts. Possible solutions for these features are discussed.

  17. Experimental Measurement of Wave Field Variations around Wave Energy Converter Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    O'Boyle, Louise; Elsäßer, Björn; Whittaker, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    Wave energy converters (WECs) inherently extract energy from incident waves. For wave energy to become a significant power provider in the future, large farms of WECs will be required. This scale of energy extraction will increase the potential for changes in the local wave field and coastal environment. Assessment of these effects is necessary to inform decisions on the layout of wave farms for optimum power output and minimum environmental impact, as well as on potential site selection. An ...

  18. Experimental Measurement of Wave Field Variations around Wave Energy Converter Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise O’Boyle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wave energy converters (WECs inherently extract energy from incident waves. For wave energy to become a significant power provider in the future, large farms of WECs will be required. This scale of energy extraction will increase the potential for changes in the local wave field and coastal environment. Assessment of these effects is necessary to inform decisions on the layout of wave farms for optimum power output and minimum environmental impact, as well as on potential site selection. An experimental campaign to map, at high resolution, the wave field variation around arrays of 5 oscillating water column WECs and a methodology for extracting scattered and radiated waves is presented. The results highlight the importance of accounting for the full extent of the WEC behavior when assessing impacts on the wave field. The effect of radiated waves on the wave field is not immediately apparent when considering changes to the entire wave spectrum, nor when observing changes in wave climate due to scattered and radiated waves superimposed together. The results show that radiated waves may account for up to 50% of the effects on wave climate in the near field in particular operating conditions.

  19. Marvel Analysis of the Measured High-resolution Rovibronic Spectra of TiO

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKemmish, Laura K.; Masseron, Thomas; Sheppard, Samuel; Sandeman, Elizabeth; Schofield, Zak; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Császár, Attila G.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Sousa-Silva, Clara

    2017-02-01

    Accurate, experimental rovibronic energy levels, with associated labels and uncertainties, are reported for 11 low-lying electronic states of the diatomic {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}} molecule, determined using the Marvel (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) algorithm. All levels are based on lines corresponding to critically reviewed and validated high-resolution experimental spectra taken from 24 literature sources. The transition data are in the 2-22,160 cm-1 region. Out of the 49,679 measured transitions, 43,885 are triplet-triplet, 5710 are singlet-singlet, and 84 are triplet-singlet transitions. A careful analysis of the resulting experimental spectroscopic network (SN) allows 48,590 transitions to be validated. The transitions determine 93 vibrational band origins of {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}}, including 71 triplet and 22 singlet ones. There are 276 (73) triplet-triplet (singlet-singlet) band-heads derived from Marvel experimental energies, 123(38) of which have never been assigned in low- or high-resolution experiments. The highest J value, where J stands for the total angular momentum, for which an energy level is validated is 163. The number of experimentally derived triplet and singlet {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}} rovibrational energy levels is 8682 and 1882, respectively. The lists of validated lines and levels for {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}} are deposited in the supporting information to this paper.

  20. Automaton for spectra measurement of charged particles detected in nuclear photoemulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauehr, R.; Krzhemenek, Ya.; Piskorzh, Sh.; Svoboda, Z.; Shkaba, V.

    1978-01-01

    The electronic equipment is described for measuring the spectra of charged particles detected in nuclear photoemulsions. With regard to function, the electronic equipment may be classified as follows: unit for analog processing of signals, logic for track recognition and device for controlling and recording measurement results. The analog processing unit incorporates eight identical channels, each of which consists of a flexible light pipe, a photomultiplier, an amplifier, an amplitude analyzer, and a marker. Eight memory shift registers forming a data field are used for determining the presence of a track in an emulsion area being analyzed. The following track recognition criteria are used: (a) trace image in a logical form forms a continuous path in the register field; (b) the length of the continuous image should constitute at least five channels; and (c) tracks longer than five channels are recorded only once. The scanning plates of 700 mm long takes three hours. Accuracy of determination of the longitudinal coordinate is 25 μm

  1. The LANL/LLNL Program to Measure Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Robert; Wu, Ching Yen; Lee, Hye Young; Taddeucci, Terry; Mosby, Shea; O'Donnell, John; Fotiades, Nikolaos; Devlin, Mattew; Ullmann, John; Nelson, Ronald; Wender, Stephen; White, Morgan; Solomon, Clell; Neudecker, Denise; Talou, Patrick; Rising, Michael; Bucher, Brian; Buckner, Matthew; Henderson, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Accurate data on the spectrum of neutrons emitted in neutron-induced fission are needed for applications and for a better understanding of the fission process. At LANSCE we have made important progress in understanding systematic uncertainties and in obtaining data for 235U on the low-energy part of the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS), a particularly difficult region because down-scattered neutrons go in this direction. We use a double time-of-flight technique to determine energies of incoming and outgoing neutrons. With data acquisition via waveform digitizers, accidental coincidences between fission chamber and neutron detector are measured to high statistical accuracy and then subtracted from measured events. Monte Carlo simulations with high performance computers have proven to be essential in the design to minimize neutron scattering and in calculating detector response. Results from one of three approaches to analyzing the data will be presented. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration and Office of Nuclear Physics.

  2. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  3. High-effective position time spectrometer in actual measurements of low intensity region of electron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babenkov, M.I.; Zhdanov, V.S.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic position-time spectrometer was proposed in previous work, where not only electron coordinates in focal plane are measured by position sensitive detector (PSD) but places of their birth in beta source plane of a large area are fixed using another PSD, situated behind it, by quick effects, accompanying radioactive decay. PSD on the basis of macro-channel plates are used. It is succeeded in position-time spectrometer to combine beta sources of a large area with multichannel registration for a wide energy interval, that efficiency of measurements was two orders of magnitude increase d in comparison magnetic apparatus having PSD only in focal plane. Owing to two detectors' switching on coincidence the relation effect/background in increased minimum on two orders of magnitude in comparison with the same apparatus. At some complication of mathematical analysis it was obtained, that high characteristics of position-time spectrometer are kept during the use the magnetic field, providing double focusing. Owning to this focusing the gain the efficiency of measurements will make one more order of magnitude. Presented high-effective position-time spectrometer is supposed to use in the measurements of low-intensity region of electron spectra, which are important for development of fundamental physics. This is the first of all estimation of electron anti-neutrino mass by the form of beta spectrum of tritium in the region of boundary energy. Recently here there was problem of non physical negative values. This problem can be solved by using in measurement of different in principle high-effective spectrometers, which possess improved background properties. A position-time spectrometers belongs to these apparatus, which provides the best background conditions at very large effectiveness of the measurements of tritium beta spectrum in the region of boundary energy with acceptable high resolution. An important advantage of position-time spectrometer is the possibility of

  4. Broadband Mm-Wave OFDM Communications in Doubly Selective Channel: Performance Evaluation Using Measured Mm-Wave Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Fan, Wei; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the performance of the broadband millimeter-wave (mm-wave) OFDM system in the presence of phase noise (PN) of phase-locked loop based oscillator and delay spread of measured mm-wave channel. It is shown, using Akaike's information criterion, that the channel tap...... coefficients of the broadband mm-wave channel do not follow Gaussian distribution due to the broad bandwidth. It is also shown that, given a cyclic prefix (CP) length for a certain delay spread, an effective PN mitigation scheme enables a PN corrupted OFDM system to function with small subcarrier spacing and...

  5. Spectral and partial-wave decomposition of time-dependent wave functions on a grid: Photoelectron spectra of H and H2+ in electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Kjeldsen, T. K.; Madsen, L. B.

    2007-01-01

    We present a method for spectral (bound and continuum) and partial-wave analysis of a three-dimensional time-dependent wave function, defined on a grid, without projecting onto the field-free eigenstates of the system. The method consists of propagating the time-dependent Schroedinger equation to obtain its autocorrelation function C(t)= after the end of the interaction, at time T, of the system with an external time-dependent field. The Fourier spectrum of this correlation function is directly related to the expansion coefficients of the wave function on the field-free bound and continuum energy eigenstates of the system. By expanding on a spherical harmonics basis we show how to calculate the contribution of the various partial waves to the total photoelectron energy spectrum

  6. MARVEL analysis of the measured high-resolution spectra of 14NH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Derzi, Afaf R.; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Császár, Attila G.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate, experimental rotational–vibrational energy levels and line positions, with associated labels and uncertainties, are reported for the ground electronic state of the symmetric-top 14 NH 3 molecule. All levels and lines are based on critically reviewed and validated high-resolution experimental spectra taken from 56 literature sources. The transition data are in the 0.7–17 000 cm −1 region, with a large gap between 7000 and 15 000 cm −1 . The MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational–Vibrational Energy Levels) algorithm is used to determine the energy levels. Out of the 29 450 measured transitions 10 041 and 18 947 belong to ortho- and para- 14 NH 3 , respectively. A careful analysis of the related experimental spectroscopic network (SN) allows 28 530 of the measured transitions to be validated, 18 178 of these are unique, while 462 transitions belong to floating components. Despite the large number of spectroscopic measurements published over the last 80 years, the transitions determine only 30 vibrational band origins of 14 NH 3 , 8 for ortho- and 22 for para- 14 NH 3 . The highest J value, where J stands for the rotational quantum number, for which an energy level is validated is 31. The number of experimental-quality ortho- and para- 14 NH 3 rovibrational energy levels is 1724 and 3237, respectively. The MARVEL energy levels are checked against ones in the BYTe first-principles database, determined previously. The lists of validated lines and levels for 14 NH 3 are deposited in the Supporting Information to this paper. Combination of the MARVEL energy levels with first-principles absorption intensities yields a huge number of experimental-quality rovibrational lines, which should prove to be useful for the understanding of future complex high-resolution spectroscopy on 14 NH 3 ; these lines are also deposited in the Supporting Information to this paper

  7. MARVEL analysis of the measured high-resolution spectra of 14NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Derzi, Afaf R.; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Császár, Attila G.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate, experimental rotational-vibrational energy levels and line positions, with associated labels and uncertainties, are reported for the ground electronic state of the symmetric-top 14NH3 molecule. All levels and lines are based on critically reviewed and validated high-resolution experimental spectra taken from 56 literature sources. The transition data are in the 0.7-17 000 cm-1 region, with a large gap between 7000 and 15 000 cm-1. The MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) algorithm is used to determine the energy levels. Out of the 29 450 measured transitions 10 041 and 18 947 belong to ortho- and para-14NH3, respectively. A careful analysis of the related experimental spectroscopic network (SN) allows 28 530 of the measured transitions to be validated, 18 178 of these are unique, while 462 transitions belong to floating components. Despite the large number of spectroscopic measurements published over the last 80 years, the transitions determine only 30 vibrational band origins of 14NH3, 8 for ortho- and 22 for para-14NH3. The highest J value, where J stands for the rotational quantum number, for which an energy level is validated is 31. The number of experimental-quality ortho- and para-14NH3 rovibrational energy levels is 1724 and 3237, respectively. The MARVEL energy levels are checked against ones in the BYTe first-principles database, determined previously. The lists of validated lines and levels for 14NH3 are deposited in the Supporting Information to this paper. Combination of the MARVEL energy levels with first-principles absorption intensities yields a huge number of experimental-quality rovibrational lines, which should prove to be useful for the understanding of future complex high-resolution spectroscopy on 14NH3; these lines are also deposited in the Supporting Information to this paper.

  8. Wave energy in white dwarf atmospheres. I - Magnetohydrodynamic energy spectra for homogeneous DB and layered DA stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musielak, Zdzislaw E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiative damping of acoustic and MHD waves that propagate through white dwarf photospheric layers is studied, and other damping processes that may be important for the propagation of the MHD waves are calculated. The amount of energy remaining after the damping processes have occurred in different types of waves is estimated. The results show that lower acoustic fluxes should be expected in layered DA and homogeneous DB white dwarfs than had previously been estimated. Acoustic emission manifests itself in an enhancement of the quadrupole term, but this term may become comparable to or even lower than the dipole term for cool white dwarfs. Energy carried by the acoustic waves is significantly dissipated in deep photospheric layers, mainly because of radiative damping. Acoustically heated corona cannot exist around DA and DB white dwarfs in a range T(eff) = 10,000-30,000 K and for log g = 7 and 8. However, relatively hot and massive white dwarfs could be exceptions.

  9. Indirect measurements of X-ray spectra; Mediciones indirectas de espectros de rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, R.T. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, X5000HUA Cordoba (Argentina)

    2006-07-01

    To the effects of measuring the spectral distribution of the radiation emitted by the x-ray tubes and electron accelerators, numerous procedures that are grouped in two big categories exist at the present time: direct and indirect methods. The first ones use high resolution detectors that should be positioned, together with the appropriate collimator, in the direction of the x ray beam. The user should be an expert in the use and correction of the obtained data by the different effects that affect the detector operation such as efficiency and resolution in terms of the energy of the detected radiation. The indirect procedures, although its are more simple to use, its also require a considerable space along the beam to position the ionization chamber and the necessary absorbents to construct by this way the denominated attenuation curve. We will analyze the operation principle of the indirect methods and a new proposal in which such important novelties are introduced as the beam dispersion to avoid to measure along the main beam and that of determination of the attenuation curve in simultaneous form. By this way, with a single shot of the tube, the attenuation curve is measured, being necessary at most a shot of additional calibration to know the relative response of the detectors used in the experimental array. The physical processes involved in the obtaining of an attenuation curve are very well well-known and this it finishes it can be theoretically calculated if the analytic form of the spectrum is supposed well-known. Finally, we will see a spectra reconstruction example with the Kramers parametric form and comparisons with numeric simulations carried out with broadly validated programs as well as the possibility of the use of solid state dosemeters in the obtention of the attenuation curve. (Author)

  10. Measurement and analysis of neutron flux spectra in a neutronics mock-up of the HCLL test blanket module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klix, A.; Batistoni, P.; Boettger, R.; Lebrun-Grandie, D.; Fischer, U.; Henniger, J.; Leichtle, D.; Villari, R.

    2010-01-01

    Fast neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra and time-of-arrival spectra of slow neutrons have been measured in a neutronics mock-up of the European Helium-Cooled Lithium-Lead Test Blanket Module with the aim to validate nuclear cross-section data. The mock-up was irradiated with fusion peak neutrons from the DT neutron generator of the Technical University of Dresden. A well characterized cylindrical NE-213 scintillator was inserted into two positions in the LiPb/EUROFER assembly. Pulse height spectra from neutrons and gamma-rays were recorded from the NE-213 output. The spectra were then unfolded with experimentally obtained response matrices of the NE-213 detector. Time-of-arrival spectra of slow neutrons were measured with a 3 He counter placed in the mock-up, and the neutron generator was operated in pulsed mode. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNP code and nuclear cross-section data from the JEFF-3.1.1 and FENDL-2.1 libraries were performed and the results are compared with the experimental results. A good agreement of measurement and calculation was found with some deviations in certain energy intervals.

  11. Differential flux measurement of atmospheric pion, muon, electron and positron energy spectra at balloon altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C.; Brunetti, M.T.; Codino, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Papini, P.; Massimo Brancaccio, F.; Finetti, N. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Researc, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ. Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.

    1995-09-01

    The fluxes of atmospheric electrons, positrons, positive and negative muons and negative pions have been determined using the NMSU Wizard-MASS2 balloons-borne instrument. The instrument was launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, (geomagnetic cut-off about 4.5 GV/c) on september 23, 1991. The flight lasted 9.8 hours and remained above 100.000 ft. Muons and negative pions were observed and their momenta were determined. Since these particles are not a part of the primary component, the measurement of their fluxes provides information regarding production and propagation of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Similarly, observations of electrons and positrons well below the geomagnetic cut-off provides insight into electromagnetic cascade processes in the upper atmosphere. In addition, the determination of the energy spectra of rare particles such as positrons can be used for background subtraction for cosmic ray experiments gathering data below a few g/cm{sup 2} of overlying atmosphere.

  12. Comparison between measured and predicted turbulence frequency spectra in ITG and TEM regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrin, J.; Arnichand, H.; Bernardo, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Garbet, X.; Jenko, F.; Hacquin, S.; Pueschel, M. J.; Sabot, R.

    2017-06-01

    The observation of distinct peaks in tokamak core reflectometry measurements—named quasi-coherent-modes (QCMs)—are identified as a signature of trapped-electron-mode (TEM) turbulence (Arnichand et al 2016 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 58 014037). This phenomenon is investigated with detailed linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations using the Gene code. A Tore-Supra density scan is studied, which traverses through a linear (LOC) to saturated (SOC) ohmic confinement transition. The LOC and SOC phases are both simulated separately. In the LOC phase, where QCMs are observed, TEMs are robustly predicted unstable in linear studies. In the later SOC phase, where QCMs are no longer observed, ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) modes are identified. In nonlinear simulations, in the ITG (SOC) phase, a broadband spectrum is seen. In the TEM (LOC) phase, a clear emergence of a peak at the TEM frequencies is seen. This is due to reduced nonlinear frequency broadening of the underlying linear modes in the TEM regime compared with the ITG regime. A synthetic diagnostic of the nonlinearly simulated frequency spectra reproduces the features observed in the reflectometry measurements. These results support the identification of core QCMs as an experimental marker for TEM turbulence.

  13. Directional wave measurements off Navinal, Gulf of Kachchh, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; KrishnaKumar, V.; Suryanarayana, A.; Antony, M.K.; Swamy, G.N.

    .54 m respectively. Though large wave heights of the order of 3 to 4m exist elsewhere along the west coast of India during these seasons, Navinal seems to be a less wave active zone because of its geographical location. Maximum wave energy is centred...

  14. Downwelling Far-Infrared Emission Spectra Measured By First at Cerro Toco, Chile and Table Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, J. C.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Cageao, R.; Kratz, D. P.; Johnson, D. G.; Mlawer, E. J.; Turner, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument is a Fourier transform spectrometer developed to measure the important far-infrared spectrum between 100 and 650 cm-1. Presented here are measurements made by FIRST during two successful deployments in a ground-based configuration to measure downwelling longwave radiation at Earth's surface. The initial deployment was to Cerro Toco, Chile, where FIRST operated from August to October, 2009 as part of the Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC-II) campaign. After recalibration, FIRST was deployed to the Table Mountain Facility from September through October, 2012. Spectra observed at each location are substantially different, due in large part to the order of magnitude difference in integrated precipitable water vapor (0.3 cm at Table Mountain, 0.03 cm at Cerro Toco). Dry days for both campaigns are chosen for analysis - 09/24/2009 and 10/19/2012. Also available during both deployments are coincident radiosonde temperature and water vapor vertical profiles which are used as inputs a line-by-line radiative transfer program. Comparisons between measured and modeled spectra are presented over the 200 to 800 cm-1 range. An extensive error analysis of both the measured and modeled spectra is presented. In general, the differences between the measured and modeled spectra are within their combined uncertainties.

  15. Wave reflections from breakwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, William S.

    1994-01-01

    A new method is presented for estimating the reflection of a random, multi-directional sea from a coastal structure. The technique is applicable to an array of wave gauges of arbitrary geometry deployed seaward of the reflector. An expansion for small oblique wave incidence angles is used to derive an approximate relationship between measured array cross-spectra and a small number of parameters that describe the incident wave properties and the reflectivity of the structure. Model tests with ...

  16. Production spectra of zero-degree neutral particles measured by the LHCf experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberio A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, latest published physics results from p-p and p-Pb collisions (at √s = 7, 2.76 TeV and sNN = 5.02 TeV, respectively compared with Monte Carlo predictions of DPMJET, EPOS, PYTHIA, QGSJET and SIBYLL event generators will be presented. In particular, the inclusive energy spectra of neutrons in p-p collisions and the transverse and longitudinal momentum spectra of neutral pions for different pseudo-rapidity ranges in p-p and p-Pb collisions will be shown; then, test of Feynman scaling hypothesis using neutral pion spectra will be discussed. Preliminary results of photon inclusive energy spectra in p-p collisions at √s = 13 TeV will be also presented.

  17. New Measurement of Singly Ionized Selenium Spectra by High Resolution Fourier Transform and Grating Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hala, Noman; Nave, G.; Kramida, A.; Ahmad, T.; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.

    2015-05-01

    We report new measurements of singly ionised selenium, an element of the iron group detected in nearly twice as many planetary nebulae as any other trans-iron element. We use the NIST 2 m UV/Vis/IR and FT700 UV/Vis Fourier transform spectrometers over the wavelength range of 2000 Å-2.5 μm, supplemented in the lower wavelength region 300-2400 Å with grating spectra taken on a 3-m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph. The analysis of Se II is being extended, covering the wide spectral region from UV to IR. From our investigation, we found serious inconsistency and incompleteness in the previously published results, where several levels were reported without any designation. The analysis is being revised and extended with the help of semiempirical quasi-relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations, starting with the 4s24p3- [4s24p2(4d +5d +5s +6s) +4s4p4] transition array. Out of fifty-two previously reported levels, we rejected thirteen and found several new level values. With the new measurements, we expect to observe transitions between 4s24p2(4d +5s) and 4s24p2(5p +4f), lying in the visible and IR region. A complete interpretation of the level system of both parities will be assisted by least squares fitted parametric calculations. In all, we have already classified about 450 observed lines involving 89 energy levels.

  18. A comparison of measured wind park load histories with the WISPER and WISPERX load spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, N. D.

    1995-01-01

    The blade-loading histories from two adjacent Micon 65/13 wind turbines are compared with the variable-amplitude test-loading histories known as the WISPER and WISPERX spectra. These standardized loading sequences were developed from blade flapwise load histories taken from nine different horizontal-axis wind turbines operating under a wide range of conditions in Europe. The subject turbines covered a broad spectrum of rotor diameters, materials, and operating environments. The final loading sequences were developed as a joint effort of thirteen different European organizations. The goal was to develop a meaningful loading standard for horizontal-axis wind turbine blades that represents common interaction effects seen in service. In 1990, NREL made extensive load measurements on two adjacent Micon 65/13 wind turbines in simultaneous operation in the very turbulent environment of a large wind park. Further, before and during the collection of the loads data, comprehensive measurements of the statistics of the turbulent environment were obtained at both the turbines under test and at two other locations within the park. The trend to larger but lighter wind turbine structures has made an understanding of the expected lifetime loading history of paramount importance. Experience in the US has shown that the turbulence-induced loads associated with multi-row wind parks in general are much more severe than for turbines operating individually or within widely spaced environments. Multi-row wind parks are much more common in the US than in Europe. In this paper we report on our results in applying the methodology utilized to develop the WISPER and WISPERX standardized loading sequences using the available data from the Micon turbines. While the intended purpose of the WISPER sequences were not to represent a specific operating environment, we believe the exercise is useful, especially when a turbine design is likely to be installed in a multi-row wind park.

  19. Comparison of Microwave Backscatter Measurements and Small-scale Surface Wave Measurements Made from the Dutch Ocean Research Tower "Noordwijk"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeij, P.; Halsema, D. van; Oost, W.A.; Calkoen, C.J.; Vogelzang, J.; Waas, S.; Jaehne, B.

    1991-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the interaction between microwaves and water waves the VIERS-l project started in 1986 with the preparation of two wind/wave tank experiments and an ocean tower experiment. In February 1988, combined measurements of microwave backscatter, wind, waves and gas exchange

  20. Primordial gravitational waves measurements and anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yu Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Searching for the signal of primordial gravitational waves in the B-modes (BB power spectrum is one of the key scientific aims of the cosmic microwave background (CMB polarization experiments. However, this could be easily contaminated by several foreground issues, such as the interstellar dust grains and the galactic cyclotron electrons. In this paper we study another mechanism, the cosmic birefringence, which can be introduced by a CPT-violating interaction between CMB photons and an external scalar field. Such kind of interaction could give rise to the rotation of the linear polarization state of CMB photons, and consequently induce the CMB BB power spectrum, which could mimic the signal of primordial gravitational waves at large scales. With the recently released polarization data of BICEP2 and the joint analysis data of BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck, we perform a global fitting analysis on constraining the tensor-to-scalar ratio r by considering the polarization rotation angle [α(nˆ] which can be separated into a background isotropic part [α¯] and a small anisotropic part [Δα(nˆ]. Since the data of BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments have already been corrected by using the “self-calibration” method, here we mainly focus on the effects from the anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation angle. We find that including Δα(nˆ in the analysis could slightly weaken the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, when using current CMB polarization measurements. We also simulate the mock CMB data with the BICEP3-like sensitivity. Very interestingly, we find that if the effects of the anisotropic polarization rotation angle could not be taken into account properly in the analysis, the constraints on r will be dramatically biased. This implies that we need to break the degeneracy between the anisotropies of the CMB polarization rotation angle and the CMB primordial tensor perturbations, in order to measure the signal of primordial

  1. Detection of undistorted continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra with non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) of the magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Hyde, James S.

    2011-01-01

    A continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum is typically displayed as the first harmonic response to the application of 100 kHz magnetic field modulation, which is used to enhance sensitivity by reducing the level of 1/f noise. However, magnetic field modulation of any amplitude causes spectral broadening and sacrifices EPR spectral intensity by at least a factor of two. In the work presented here, a CW rapid-scan spectroscopic technique that avoids these compromises and also provides a means of avoiding 1/f noise is developed. This technique, termed non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR, consists of repetitively sweeping the polarizing magnetic field in a linear manner over a spectral fragment with a small coil at a repetition rate that is sufficiently high that receiver noise, microwave phase noise, and environmental microphonics, each of which has 1/f characteristics, are overcome. Nevertheless, the rate of sweep is sufficiently slow that adiabatic responses are avoided and the spin system is always close to thermal equilibrium. The repetitively acquired spectra from the spectral fragment are averaged. Under these conditions, undistorted pure absorption spectra are obtained without broadening or loss of signal intensity. A digital filter such as a moving average is applied to remove high frequency noise, which is approximately equivalent in bandwidth to use of an integrating time constant in conventional field modulation with lock-in detection. Nitroxide spectra at L- and X-band are presented. PMID:21741868

  2. Measurement of longitudinal and rayleigh wave velocities by advanced one-sided technique in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Song, Won Joon; Popovics, J. S.; Achenbach, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    A new procedure for the advanced one-sided measurement of longitudinal wave and surface wave velocities in concrete is presented in this paper. Stress waves are generated in a consistent fashion with a DC solenoid. Two piezoelectric accelerometers are mounted on the surface of a specimen as receivers. Stress waves propagate along the surface of the specimen and are detected by the receivers. In order to reduce the large incoherent noise levels of the signals, signals are collected and manipulated by a computer program for each velocity measurement. For a known distance between the two receivers and using the measured flight times, the velocities of the longitudinal wave and the surface wave are measured. The velocities of the longitudinal wave determined by this method are compared with those measured by conventional methods on concrete, PMMA and steel.

  3. Preliminary measurements with a 4 K gravitational wave antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boughn, S.P.; McAshan, M.S.; Paik, H.J.; Taber, R.C.; Fairbank, W.M.; Giffard, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    The behavior of a small resonant gravitational wave antenna cooled to 4 K has been measured. This antenna is the prototype for a much larger system designed to be cooled eventually below 10 mK. Noise levels have been observed in the fundamental mechanical mode of the antenna corresponding to temperatures below 50 K. The antenna is a 680 kg cylindrical bar of aluminum clad with a layer of 0.38 mm thick niobium-titanium. It is levitated on a magnetic field of 0.2 T provided by a set of curved superconducting coils. The helium tank is suspended by low resonant-frequency springs and acoustic isolation stacks constructed of alternate layers of rubber and iron. This suspension is mechanically independent of the rest of the cryostat. Measurements have shown that the magnetic levitation stage provides a further vibration attenuation in excess of 50 dB at the frequency of the antenna mode. When levitated at an exchange gas pressure of 0.01 Pa the energy decay time for the fundamental bar mode at 1312 Hz has been measured to be 40 s. This corresponds to a Q of 3.3 x 10 5 . For the experiments to be described the bar carries at one end an acceleration transducer, operating in a non-resonant mode. (Auth.)

  4. Time-resolved measurement of global synchronization in the dust acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. D.

    2014-10-01

    A spatially and temporally resolved measurement of the synchronization of the naturally occurring dust acoustic wave to an external drive and the relaxation from the driven wave mode back to the naturally occuring wave mode is presented. This measurement provides a time-resolved measurement of the synchronization of the self-excited dust acoustic wave with an external drive and the return to the self-excited mode. It is observed that the wave synchronizes to the external drive in a distinct time-dependent fashion, while there is an immediate loss of synchronization when the external modulation is discontinued.

  5. Deconvolution of 238,239,240Pu conversion electron spectra measured with a silicon drift detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommé, S.; Marouli, M.; Paepen, J.

    2018-01-01

    Internal conversion electron (ICE) spectra of thin 238,239,240Pu sources, measured with a windowless Peltier-cooled silicon drift detector (SDD), were deconvoluted and relative ICE intensities were derived from the fitted peak areas. Corrections were made for energy dependence of the full...

  6. Find - a computer program for peak search in gamma-ray spectra measured with Ge (Li) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, L.

    1988-01-01

    The program FIND is a FORTRAN IV computer code for peak search in spectra measured with Ge(Li) detectors. The program gives the position and estimates energy and relative significance for every peak found in the spectrum. The search in done by calculating a negative smoothed second difference of the experimental spectrum, as suggested by Phillips and Marlow (1). (author) [pt

  7. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study.

  8. Wave Induced Stresses Measured at the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corona, L.; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the wave induced loading on the overtopping based wave energy converter Wave Dragon. Focus is put on the junction between the main body and the reflector, also called the "shoulder part", where large cross sectional forces and bending moments acts. There are two main objectives...... for this paper, first to verify the FEM results obtained by Niras, Danish society in charge of the finite element modelling and structural design, and then to make a first experimental fatigue analysis of a particular part of the Wave Dragon. This last part shall be considered as an exercise for the further work...

  9. Simulation of angle-resolved photoemission spectra by approximating the final state by a plane wave: From graphene to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puschnig, Peter, E-mail: peter.puschnig@uni-graz.at; Lüftner, Daniel

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Computational study on angular dependent photoemission spectroscopy. • Graphene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. • Plane wave final state approximation accounts for experimental findings. - Abstract: We present a computational study on the angular-resolved photoemission spectra (ARPES) from a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and graphene. Our theoretical approach is based on ab-initio density functional theory and the one-step model where we greatly simplify the evaluation of the matrix element by assuming a plane wave for the final state. Before comparing our ARPES simulations with available experimental data, we discuss how typical approximations for the exchange-correlation energy affect orbital energies. In particular, we show that by employing a hybrid functional, considerable improvement can be obtained over semi-local functionals in terms of band widths and relative energies of π and σ states. Our ARPES simulations for graphene show that the plane wave final state approximation provides indeed an excellent description when compared to experimental band maps and constant binding energy maps. Furthermore, our ARPES simulations for a number of polycyclic aromatic molecules from the oligo-acene, oligo-phenylene, phen-anthrene families as well as for disc-shaped molecules nicely illustrate the evolution of the electronic structure from molecules with increasing size towards graphene.

  10. Spectral broadening measurement of the lower hybrid waves during long pulse operation in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger-By, G.; Decampy, J.; Goniche, M.; Ekedahl, A.; Delpech, L.; Leroux, F. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Antar, G. Y. [American University of Beirut, Riad el-Solh, Beirut 1107-2020 (Lebanon); Collaboration: Tore Supra Team

    2014-02-12

    On many tokamaks (C-Mod, EAST, FTU, JET, HT-7, TS), a decrease in current drive efficiency of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves is observed in high electron density plasmas. The cause of this behaviour is believed to be: Parametric Instabilities (PI) and Scattering from Density Fluctuations (SDF). For the ITER LH system, our knowledge must be improved to avoid such effects and to maintain the LH current drive efficiency at high density. The ITPA IOS group coordinates this effort [1] and all experimental data are essential to validate the numerical codes in progress. Usually the broadening of the LH wave frequency spectrum is measured by a probe located in the plasma edge. For this study, the frequency spectrum of a reflected power signal from the LH antenna was used. In addition, the spectrum measurements are compared with the density fluctuations observed on RF probes located at the antenna mouth. Several plasma currents (0.6 to 1.4 MA) and densities up to 5.2 × 10{sup 19} m−3 have been realised on Tore Supra (TS) long pulses and with high injected RF power, up to 5.4 MW-30s. This allowed using a spectrum analyser to make several measurements during the plasma pulse. The side lobe amplitude, shifted by 20-30MHz with respect to the main peak, grows with increasing density. Furthermore, for an increase of plasma current at the same density, the spectra broaden and become asymmetric. Some parametric dependencies are shown in this paper.

  11. The application of n-γ discrimination in 252Cf spontaneous neutron TOF spectra measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Haojun; Zhang Yi; Li Jiansheng; Jin Yu; Wang Jie; Li Chunyuan

    2004-01-01

    The BC501 scintillator is used as a fast neutron detector. The effect that the pulse rise time method was used to discriminate γ from 252 Cf spontaneous neutron TOF spectra is studied in the experiment. A pulse rise time separation spectra of γ and 252 Cf spontaneous neuron upon 1 MeV is obtained, the n-γ separation function reaches to 4.6. When the result of pulse rise time separation coincides with the time-of-flight spectra in which the neutron energy is upon 0.5 MeV, 0.8 MeV and 1.0 MeV, comparing with the anticoincidence, γ was eliminated 99.90% at least. (authors)

  12. Comparison of X-band radar backscatter measurements with area extended wave slope measurements made in a large wind wave tank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halsema, D. van; Jaehne, B.; Oost, W.A.; Calkoen, C.J.; Snoeij, P.

    1989-01-01

    Combined measurements of microwave backscatter, wind, waves, and gas exchange have been carried out in the large Delft Hydraulics wind/wave tank. This experiment was the first of a series of experiments in the VIERS-1 project. In this project, a number of Dutch and one German laboratory cooperate to

  13. Applying coda envelope measurements to local and regional waveforms for stable estimates of magnitude, source spectra and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, R.; Mayeda, K.; Rodgers, A.; Walter, W.

    1999-01-01

    Magnitude estimation forms an integral part in any seismic monitoring endeavor. For monitoring compliance of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, regional seismic discriminants are often functions of magnitude such as m(sub b):M(sub 0) high-to-low spectral ratios, and nuclear yield estimation. For small-to-moderate magnitude events that cannot be studied by a large regional or global network of stations, there is a need for stable magnitudes that can be obtained from as few as one station. To date, magnitudes based on coda envelopes are by far the most stable because of the coda's averaging properties. Unlike conventional magnitudes which utilize the direct phases such as P (P(sub n), P(sub g)) or S (S(sub n), L(sub g)), or M(sub g), a coda envelope magnitude is not as sensitive to the undesirable effects of source radiation pattern, 3-D path heterogeneity, and constructive/destructive interference near the recording site. The stability of the coda comes from a time-domain measurement made over a large portion of the seismogram thereby averaging over the scattered wavefield. This approach has been applied to earthquakes in the western United States where it was found that a single-station coda magnitude was approximately equivalent to an average over a 64 station network which used only the direct waves such as L(sub g) (Mayeda and Walter, JGR, 1996). In this paper we describe in detail our calibration procedure starting with a broadband recording, correlation with independent moment estimates, formation of narrowband envelopes, coda envelope fitting with synthetics, and finally the resultant moment-rate spectra. Our procedure accounts for all propagation, site, and S-to-coda transfer function effects. The resultant coda-derived moment-rate spectra are then used to estimate seismic moment (M(sub o)), narrowband magnitudes such as m(sub b) or M(sub L), and total seismic energy. For the eastern Mediterranean region a preliminary study was completed for

  14. Doppler limited rotational transitions of OH and SH radicals measured by continuous-wave terahertz photomixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliet, Sophie; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Guinet, Mickaël; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gaël; Bocquet, Robin; Cuisset, Arnaud

    2011-12-01

    A continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) source generated by photomixing has been employed to detect and quantify radicals produced in a cold plasma probing their spin-rotation transitions. Due to their dual interest for both atmospherists and astrophysicists, the hydroxyl OH and the mercapto SH radicals have been chosen. The photomixing technique which can access the largest range of THz frequencies of any known coherent source, allowed to resolve the Doppler-limited hyperfine transitions of OH in the 2.5 THz frequency region. Line profile analysis of the hyperfine components demonstrated that OH radicals have been detected in this region at a ppm level at a temperature close to 490 K. The hyperfine structure of SH has been resolved for the first time above 1 THz. Ten new frequency transitions have been measured in the 1.3-2.6 THz frequency range using the CW-THz synthesizer based on a frequency comb. With relative uncertainties better than 10 -7, the CW-THz frequencies measured in this study are now competitive with those measured by other instruments such as frequency multiplication chains or FT-FIR spectrometers and are now capable to improve the predictions of the complete high-resolution spectra of these radicals collected in the atmospheric and astrophysical spectroscopic databases. versioncorrigeeAC 2011-07-18 17:32 2011 Arnaud Cuisset.

  15. Quantum analysis of the direct measurement of light waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldanha, Pablo L

    2014-01-01

    In a beautiful experiment performed about a decade ago, Goulielmakis et al (2004 Science 305 1267–69) made a direct measurement of the electric field of light waves. However, they used a laser source to produce the light field, whose quantum state has a null expectation value for the electric field operator, so how was it possible to measure this electric field? Here we present a quantum treatment for the f:2f interferometer used to calibrate the carrier–envelope phase of the light pulses in the experiment. We show how the special nonlinear features of the f:2f interferometer can change the quantum state of the electromagnetic field inside the laser cavity to a state with a definite oscillating electric field, explaining how the ‘classical’ electromagnetic field emerges in the experiment. We discuss that this experiment was, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of an absolute coherent superposition of different photon number states in the optical regime. (paper)

  16. Measurements of spatially resolved high resolution spectra of laser-produced plasmas. FY 83 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, U.

    1984-01-01

    A high resolution grazing incidence spectrograph, provided by the Naval Research Laboratory and the Goddard Space Flight Center, has been installed on the Omega laser facility of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. This 3 meter instrument, with a 1200 lines/mm grating blazed at 2 0 35', has produced extremely high quality spectra in the wavelength region 10 A to 100 A. Spectra have been obtained from glass microballoon targets that are coated with a variety of high-Z materials. Transitions from the Na-like and Ne-like ionization stages of Fe, Ni, Cu, and Kr have been identified

  17. Improved Holistic Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Single- and Multi-Offset Data: Joint Inversion of Rayleigh-Wave Particle Motion and Vertical- and Radial-Component Velocity Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Moro, Giancarlo; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.; Al-Arifi, Nassir S.

    2018-01-01

    Rayleigh waves often propagate according to complex mode excitation so that the proper identification and separation of specific modes can be quite difficult or, in some cases, just impossible. Furthermore, the analysis of a single component (i.e., an inversion procedure based on just one objective function) necessarily prevents solving the problems related to the non-uniqueness of the solution. To overcome these issues and define a holistic analysis of Rayleigh waves, we implemented a procedure to acquire data that are useful to define and efficiently invert the three objective functions defined from the three following "objects": the velocity spectra of the vertical- and radial-components and the Rayleigh-wave particle motion (RPM) frequency-offset data. Two possible implementations are presented. In the first case we consider classical multi-offset (and multi-component) data, while in a second possible approach we exploit the data recorded by a single three-component geophone at a fixed offset from the source. Given the simple field procedures, the method could be particularly useful for the unambiguous geotechnical exploration of large areas, where more complex acquisition procedures, based on the joint acquisition of Rayleigh and Love waves, would not be economically viable. After illustrating the different kinds of data acquisition and the data processing, the results of the proposed methodology are illustrated in a case study. Finally, a series of theoretical and practical aspects are discussed to clarify some issues involved in the overall procedure (data acquisition and processing).

  18. On the instability of wave-fields with JONSWAP spectra to inhomogeneous disturbances, and the consequent long-time evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribal, A.; Stiassnie, M.; Babanin, A.; Young, I.

    2012-04-01

    The instability of two-dimensional wave-fields and its subsequent evolution in time are studied by means of the Alber equation for narrow-banded random surface-waves in deep water subject to inhomogeneous disturbances. A linear partial differential equation (PDE) is obtained after applying an inhomogeneous disturbance to the Alber's equation and based on the solution of this PDE, the instability of the ocean wave surface is studied for a JONSWAP spectrum, which is a realistic ocean spectrum with variable directional spreading and steepness. The steepness of the JONSWAP spectrum depends on γ and α which are the peak-enhancement factor and energy scale of the spectrum respectively and it is found that instability depends on the directional spreading, α and γ. Specifically, if the instability stops due to the directional spreading, increase of the steepness by increasing α or γ can reactivate it. This result is in qualitative agreement with the recent large-scale experiment and new theoretical results. In the instability area of α-γ plane, a long-time evolution has been simulated by integrating Alber's equation numerically and recurrent evolution is obtained which is the stochastic counterpart of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam recurrence obtained for the cubic Schrödinger equation.

  19. Analysis of multidimensional measurements of electromagnetic waves in the Earth's magnetosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Pechal, Radim

    2011-01-01

    Title: Analysis of multidimensional measurements of electromagnetic waves in the Earth's magnetosphere Author: Radim Pechal Department: Department of Surface and Plasma Science Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Lubomír Přech, Dr. Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: The thesis introduces into basic knowledge of waves in plasma, especially waves in the Earth's magnetosphere. There are mentioned some space projects focused on chorus waves. The second part of this thesis is a la...

  20. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E) during the period 2004–2007 are analyzed to study the dominant waves present in the 80–100 km altitude region of the atmosphere. The nocturnal intensity variations of different airglow emissions are observed using scanning temperature controlled filter photometers. Waves having period lying between 2 and 12 hours ...

  1. Wave and plasma measurements and GPS diagnostics of the main ionospheric trough as a hybrid method used for Space Weather purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rothkaehl

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The region of the main ionospheric trough is a unique region of the ionosphere, where different types of waves and instabilities can be generated. This region of the ionosphere acts like a lens, focusing a variety of indicators from the equator of plasmapause and local ionospheric plasma. This paper reports the results of monitoring the mid-latitude trough structure, dynamics and wave activity. For these purposes, the data gathered by the currently-operating DEMETER satellite and past diagnostics located on IK-19, Apex, and MAGION-3 spacecraft, as well as TEC measurements were used. A global-time varying picture of the ionospheric trough was reconstructed using the sequence of wave spectra registered and plasma measurements in the top-side ionosphere. The authors present the wave activity from ULF frequency band to the HF frequency detected inside the trough region and discuss its properties during geomagnetic disturbances. It is thought that broadband emissions are correlated with low frequency radiation, which is excited by the wave-particle interaction in the equatorial plasmapause and moves to the ionosphere along the geomagnetic field line. In the ionosphere, the suprathermal electrons can interact with these electrostatic waves and excite electron acoustic waves or HF longitudinal plasma waves.

    Furthermore, the electron density trough can provide useful data on the magnetosphere ionosphere dynamics and morphology and, in consequence, can be used for Space Weather purposes.

  2. Wave and plasma measurements and GPS diagnostics of the main ionospheric trough as a hybrid method used for Space Weather purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rothkaehl

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The region of the main ionospheric trough is a unique region of the ionosphere, where different types of waves and instabilities can be generated. This region of the ionosphere acts like a lens, focusing a variety of indicators from the equator of plasmapause and local ionospheric plasma. This paper reports the results of monitoring the mid-latitude trough structure, dynamics and wave activity. For these purposes, the data gathered by the currently-operating DEMETER satellite and past diagnostics located on IK-19, Apex, and MAGION-3 spacecraft, as well as TEC measurements were used. A global-time varying picture of the ionospheric trough was reconstructed using the sequence of wave spectra registered and plasma measurements in the top-side ionosphere. The authors present the wave activity from ULF frequency band to the HF frequency detected inside the trough region and discuss its properties during geomagnetic disturbances. It is thought that broadband emissions are correlated with low frequency radiation, which is excited by the wave-particle interaction in the equatorial plasmapause and moves to the ionosphere along the geomagnetic field line. In the ionosphere, the suprathermal electrons can interact with these electrostatic waves and excite electron acoustic waves or HF longitudinal plasma waves. Furthermore, the electron density trough can provide useful data on the magnetosphere ionosphere dynamics and morphology and, in consequence, can be used for Space Weather purposes.

  3. Measurements of LET Spectra of the JINR Phasotron Radiotherapy Proton Beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubančák, Ján; Molokanov, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, č. 6 (2013), s. 90-92 ISSN 1562-6016 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08002 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : LET spectra * proton beam Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.102, year: 2013 http:// vant .kipt.kharkov.ua/ARTICLE/ VANT _2013_6/article_2013_6_90.pdf

  4. Modeling and measurements of XRD spectra of extended solids under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batyrev, I. G.; Coleman, S. P.; Stavrou, E.; Zaug, J. M.; Ciezak-Jenkins, J. A.

    2017-06-01

    We present results of evolutionary simulations based on density functional calculations of various extended solids: N-Si and N-H using variable and fixed concentration methods of USPEX. Predicted from the evolutionary simulations structures were analyzed in terms of thermo-dynamical stability and agreement with experimental X-ray diffraction spectra. Stability of the predicted system was estimated from convex-hull plots. X-ray diffraction spectra were calculated using a virtual diffraction algorithm which computes kinematic diffraction intensity in three-dimensional reciprocal space before being reduced to a two-theta line profile. Calculations of thousands of XRD spectra were used to search for a structure of extended solids at certain pressures with best fits to experimental data according to experimental XRD peak position, peak intensity and theoretically calculated enthalpy. Comparison of Raman and IR spectra calculated for best fitted structures with available experimental data shows reasonable agreement for certain vibration modes. Part of this work was performed by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. We thank the Joint DoD / DOE Munitions Technology Development Program, the HE C-II research program at LLNL and Advanced Light Source, supported by BES DOE, Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH112.

  5. Data and software for calculating neutron spectra from measured reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzonis, M.A.; Bonbars, Kh.Ya.

    1981-01-01

    The information system SAIPS is presented, which allows the automated calculation of neutron spectra and the use of cross section libraries on EC type computers. The following programmes can be applied: SAND II, WINDOWS, CRYSTAL BALL, RFSP JUEL, etc. The system includes both cross section libraries established by means of the code mentioned and libraries recommended by several laboratories. (author)

  6. Spectra of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoso, Budi; Arumbinang, Haryono.

    1981-01-01

    Emission spectra of alkali atoms has been determined by using spectrometer at the ultraviolet to infra red waves range. The spectra emission can be obtained by absorption spectrophotometric analysis. Comparative evaluations between experimental data and data handbook obtained by spark method were also presented. (author tr.)

  7. Correction of measured charged-particle spectra for energy losses in the target - A comparison of three methods

    CERN Document Server

    Soederberg, J; Alm-Carlsson, G; Olsson, N

    2002-01-01

    The experimental facility, MEDLEY, at the The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, has been constructed to measure neutron-induced charged-particle production cross-sections for (n, xp), (n, xd), (n, xt), (n, x sup 3 He) and (n, x alpha) reactions at neutron energies up to 100 MeV. Corrections for the energy loss of the charged particles in the target are needed in these measurements, as well as for loss of particles. Different approaches have been used in the literature to solve this problem. In this work, a stripping method is developed, which is compared with other methods developed by Rezentes et al. and Slypen et al. The results obtained using the three codes are similar and they could all be used for correction of experimental charged-particle spectra. Statistical fluctuations in the measured spectra cause problems independent of the applied technique, but the way to handle it differs in the three codes.

  8. Neutron and gamma-ray spectra measurement on the model of the KS-150 reactor radial shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, M.; Hogel, J.; Marik, J.; Kovarik, K.; Franc, L.; Vespalec, R.

    1977-01-01

    A shortened model of the peripheral region of the KS-150 reactor core consisting of two rows of fuel elements and a reflector was constructed from the peripheral fuel elements of the KS-150 reactor core in an experiment on the TR-0 reactor. The mockup of the thermal shield (10 cm of steel), the pressure vessel (15 cm of steel) and the inner wall of the water biological shielding (2 cm of steel) of the KS-150 reactor were erected outside the TR-0 vessel. Fast neutron and gamma spectra were measured with a stilbene crystal scintillation spectrometer. The resonance neutron spectra were measured with 197 Au, 63 Cu and 23 Na resonance activation detectors. Fast neutron spectra inside the reactor were measured with a 10 mm diameter by 10 mm thick stilbene crystal spectrometer, outside the reactor with a 10 mm diameter by 10 mm thick and a 20 mm diameter by 20 mm thick stilbene crystal spectrometer. Neutron spectra in the energy regions of 1 eV to 3 keV and 0.6 MeV to 0.8 MeV were obtained on the core periphery, on the reflector half-thickness and in front of and behind the reactor thermal shield. Gamma spectra were obtained in front of and behind the thermal shield. It was found that the attenuation of neutron fluxes by the reflector and the thermal shield increased with increasing energy while gamma radiation attenuation decreased with increasing energy. It was not possible to obtain the neutron spectrum in the 10 to 600 keV energy range because suitable detection instrumentation was not available. (J.P.)

  9. Measurements of Waves in a Wind-wave Tank Under Steady and Time-varying Wind Forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadsky, Andrey; Shemer, Lev

    2018-02-13

    This manuscript describes an experimental procedure that allows obtaining diverse quantitative information on temporal and spatial evolution of water waves excited by time-dependent and steady wind forcing. Capacitance-type wave gauge and Laser Slope Gauge (LSG) are used to measure instantaneous water surface elevation and two components of the instantaneous surface slope at a number of locations along the test section of a wind-wave facility. The computer-controlled blower provides airflow over the water in the tank whose rate can vary in time. In the present experiments, the wind speed in the test section initially increases quickly from rest to the set value. It is then kept constant for the prescribed duration; finally, the airflow is shut down. At the beginning of each experimental run, the water surface is calm and there is no wind. Operation of the blower is initiated simultaneously with the acquisition of data provided by all sensors by a computer; data acquisition continues until the waves in the tank fully decay. Multiple independent runs performed under identical forcing conditions allow determining statistically reliable ensemble-averaged characteristic parameters that quantitatively describe wind-waves' variation in time for the initial development stage as a function of fetch. The procedure also allows characterizing the spatial evolution of the wave field under steady wind forcing, as well as decay of waves in time, once the wind is shut down, as a function of fetch.

  10. Helicon wave field measurements in Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneses, Juan Francisco; Piotrowicz, Pawel; Goulding, Richard; Caughman, John; Showers, Missy; Kafle, Nischal; Rapp, Juergen; Campbell, Ian; Proto-MPEX Team

    2016-10-01

    A high density Deuterium discharge (ne 5e19 m-3, Te 4 eV) has been recently observed in ProtoMPEX (Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment). The discharge (100 kW, 13.56 MHz, D2, 700 G at the source, 1e4 G at the Target) begins with a low density plasma with hollow Te profile and transitions in about 100 ms to a high density mode with flat Te profile. It is believed that the transition to the high density mode is produced by a ``helicon resonance'' as evidenced by the centrally-peaked power deposition profile observed with IR imaging on a 2 mm thick metallic target plate. In this work, we present b-dot probe measurements of the radial helicon wavefields 30 cm downstream of the antenna during both the low and high density modes. In addition, we compare the experimental results with full wave simulations. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Velocity ratio measurement using the frequency of gyro backward wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggli, P.; Tran, M.Q.; Tran, T.M.

    1990-10-01

    The operating diagram of a low quality factor, 8GHz TE 01 0 gyrotron exhibits oscillations between 6.8 and 7.3GHz. These oscillations are identified as the backward wave component of the TE 21 0 traveling mode. As the resonance condition of this mode depends on the average parallel velocity [ > of the beam electrons (ω BW ≅Ω C /γ - k [ [ >), the measurement of ω BW for given Ω C and γ, is used as a diagnostic for the beam electrons velocity ratio α= / [ >. The values of α, deduced from ω BW through the linear dispersion relation for the electron cyclotron instability in an infinite waveguide, are unrealistic. A non-linear simulation code gives α values which are in very good agreement with the ones predicted by a particle trajectory code (+10% to +20%). We find numerically that the particles' velocity dispersion in vperpendicular and v [ increases ω BW . This effect explains part of the discrepancy between the values of α inferred from ω BW without velocity dispersion and the expected values. (author) 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  12. First 3D measurements of temperature fluctuations induced by gravity wave with the infrared limb imager GLORIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisch, Isabell; Preusse, Peter; Ungermann, Jörn; Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Riese, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) are one of the most important coupling mechanisms in the atmosphere. They couple different compartments of the atmosphere. The GW-LCYCLE (Gravity Wave Life Cycle) project aims on studying the excitation, propagation, and dissipation of gravity waves. An aircraft campaign has been performed in winter 2015/2016, during which the first 3D tomographic measurements of GWs were performed with the infrared limb imager GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere). GLORIA combines a classical Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a 2D detector array. The capability to image the atmosphere and thereby take several thousand spectra simultaneously improves the spatial sampling compared to conventional limb sounders by an order of magnitude. Furthermore GLORIA is able to pan the horizontal viewing direction and therefore measure the same volume of air under different angles. Due to these properties tomographic methods can be used to derive 3D temperature and tracer fields with spatial resolutions of better than 30km x 30km x 250m from measurements taken during circular flight patterns. Temperature distributions measured during a strong GW event on the 25.01.2016 during the GW-LCycle campaign over Iceland will be presented and analyzed for gravity waves. The three dimensional nature of the GLORIA measurements allows for the determination of the gravity wave momentum flux, including its horizontal direction. The calculated momentum fluxes rank this event under one of the strongest 1% observed in that latitude range in January 2016. The three dimensional wave vectors determined from the GLORIA measurements can be used for a ray tracing study with the Gravity wave Regional Or Global RAy Tracer (GROGRAT). Here 1D ray tracing, meaning solely vertical column propagation, as used by standard parameterizations in numerical weather prediction and climate models is compared to 4D ray tracing (spatially three dimensional with time varying

  13. Measurements of the power spectrum and dispersion relation of self-excited dust acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosenko, V.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Kim, S.-H.; Heinrich, J.; Merlino, R. L.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-12-01

    The spectrum of spontaneously excited dust acoustic waves was measured. The waves were observed with high temporal resolution using a fast video camera operating at 1000 frames per second. The experimental system was a suspension of micron-size kaolin particles in the anode region of a dc discharge in argon. Wave activity was found at frequencies as high as 450 Hz. At high wave numbers, the wave dispersion relation was acoustic-like (frequency proportional to wave number). At low wave numbers, the wave frequency did not tend to zero, but reached a cutoff frequency instead. The cutoff value declined with distance from the anode. We ascribe the observed cutoff to the particle confinement in this region.

  14. Broadband Mm-Wave OFDM Communications in Doubly Selective Channel: Performance Evaluation Using Measured Mm-Wave Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Fan, Wei; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2018-01-01

    coefficients of the broadband mm-wave channel do not follow Gaussian distribution due to the broad bandwidth. It is also shown that, given a cyclic prefix (CP) length for a certain delay spread, an effective PN mitigation scheme enables a PN corrupted OFDM system to function with small subcarrier spacing and......In this work, we evaluate the performance of the broadband millimeter-wave (mm-wave) OFDM system in the presence of phase noise (PN) of phase-locked loop based oscillator and delay spread of measured mm-wave channel. It is shown, using Akaike's information criterion, that the channel tap......, therefore, small CP overhead, with only slight degradation of the error rate performance....

  15. A comparison of telescopic and Phobos-2 ISM spectra of Mars in the short-wave near-infrared (0.76-1.02 microns)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James F., III; Mustard, John F.

    1993-01-01

    Recent analyses of near-IR (0.76-3.16 microns) Mars surface reflectance spectra obtained by the Phobos-2 ISM instrument during early 1989 have revealed the presence of substantial variability in surface spectral properties. Strong absorption features seen in the 0.85-1.05 micron region are up to 10-15 percent deep relative to the local continuum and have been interpreted as evidence of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) bearing minerals (pyroxenes and iron oxides, respectively). Though these observed band depths are comparable to those seen in laboratory reflectance spectra, they are up to three times larger than most previously reported band depths for Mars spectra at these wavelengths. Six regions of variable albedo and geologic setting were identified where ISM and 1988 opposition telescopic coverage either overlapped physically or sampled the same surface geologic unit. The areal sizes and positions of the regions measured telescopically were compiled by Bell et al. ISM pixels falling within these spots were averaged to produce a spatially convolved spectrum that simulates what would have been seen telescopically. To facilitate comparisons of absorption band positions and relative strengths, the convolved ISM data and the 1988 telescopic spectra were scaled to unity at 0.81 microns and are presented. The data have also been convolved to equivalent band pass normalized reflectances in the region of spectral overlap. A scatter diagram of telescopic vs. ISM reflectances is shown. The results from the investigation are discussed.

  16. The use of difference spectra with a filtered rolling average background in mobile gamma spectrometry measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cresswell, A.J.; Sanderson, D.C.W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of difference spectra, with a filtering of a rolling average background, as a variation of the more common rainbow plots to aid in the visual identification of radiation anomalies in mobile gamma spectrometry systems is presented. This method requires minimal assumptions about the radiation environment, and is not computationally intensive. Some case studies are presented to illustrate the method. It is shown that difference spectra produced in this manner can improve signal to background, estimate shielding or mass depth using scattered spectral components, and locate point sources. This approach could be a useful addition to the methods available for locating point sources and mapping dispersed activity in real time. Further possible developments of the procedure utilising more intelligent filters and spatial averaging of the background are identified.

  17. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra for Tungsten with D-T neutrons and validation of evaluated nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Chen, Z.; Nie, Y.; Wada, R.; Ruan, X.; Han, R.; Liu, X.; Lin, W.; Liu, J.; Shi, F.; Ren, P.; Tian, G.; Luo, F.; Ren, J.; Bao, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluated data for Tungsten are validated by integral experiment. • Leakage neutron spectra from the irradiation of D-T neutrons on Tungsten are measured at 60° and 120° by using a time-of-flight method. • The measured results are compared to the MCNP-4C calculated ones with evaluated data of the different libraries. - Abstract: Integral neutronics experiments have been investigated at Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP, CAS) in order to validate evaluated nuclear data related to the design of Chinese Initiative Accelerator Driven Systems (CIADS). In the present paper, the accuracy of evaluated nuclear data for Tungsten has been examined by comparing measured leakage neutron spectra with calculated ones. Leakage neutron spectra from the irradiation of D-T neutrons on Tungsten slab sample were experimentally measured at 60° and 120° by using a time-of-flight method. Theoretical calculations are carried out by Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with evaluated nuclear data of the ADS-2.0, ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. From the comparisons, it is found that the calculations with ADS-2.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 give good agreements with the experiments in the whole energy regions at 60°, while a large discrepancy is observed at 120° in the elastic scattering peak, caused by a slight difference in the oscillation pattern of the elastic angular distribution at angles larger than 20°. However, the calculated spectra using data from ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries showed larger discrepancies with the measured ones, especially around 8.5–13.5 MeV. Further studies are presented for these disagreements

  18. Comparison of integral values for measured and calculated fast neutron spectra in lithium fluoride piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    The tritium production density, kerma heat production density, dose and certain integral values of scalar neutron spectra in bare and graphite-reflected lithium-fluoride piles irradiated with D-T neutrons were evaluated from the pulse height distribution of a miniature NE213 neutron spectrometer with UFO data processing code, and compared with the values calculated with MORSE-CV Monte Carlo code. (author). 8 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  19. Measurement and Simulation of Spontaneous Raman Scattering Spectra in High-Pressure, Fuel-Rich H2-Air Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2003-01-01

    Rotational vibrational spontaneous Raman spectra (SRS) of H2, N2, and H2O have been measured in H2-air flames at pressures up to 30 atm as a first stem towards establishing a comprehensive Raman spectral database for temperatures and species in high-pressure combustion. A newly developed high-pressure burner facility provides steady, reproducible flames with a high degree of flow precision. We have obtained an initial set of measurements that indicate the spectra are of sufficient quality in terms of spectral resolution, wavelength coverage, and signal-to-noise ratio for use in future reference standards. The fully resolved Stokes and anti-Stokes shifted SRS spectra were collected in the visible wavelength range (400-700 nm) using pulse-stretched 532 nm excitation and a non-intensified CCD spectrograph with a high-speed shutter. Reasonable temperatures were determined via the intensity distribution of rotational H2 lines at stoichiometry and fuel-rich conditions. Theoretical Raman spectra of H2 were computed using a semi-classical harmonic-oscillator model with recent pressure broadening data and were compared with experimental results. The data and simulation indicated that high-J rotational lines of H2 might interfere with the N2 vibrational Q-branch lines, and this could lead to errors in N2-Raman thermometry based on the line-fitting method. From a comparison of N2 Q-branch spectra in lean H2 low-pressure (1.2 atm) and high-pressure (30 atm) flames, we found no significant line-narrowing or -broadening effects at the current spectrometer resolution of 0.04 nm.

  20. Applicability of coda wave interferometry technique for measurement of acoustoelastic effect of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sung Woo [Dept. of Safety Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, we examined the applicability of coda wave interferometry (CWI) technique, which was developed to characterize seismic waves, to detect and evaluate change in the velocity of ultrasonic waves in concrete due to acoustoelastic effect. Ultrasonic wave measurements and compressive loading tests were conducted on a concrete specimen. The measured wave signals were processed with CWI to detect and evaluate the relative velocity change with respect to the stress state of the specimen. A phase change due to the acoustoelastic effect of concrete was clearly detected in the late-arriving coda wave. This shows that the relative velocity change of ultrasonic waves in concrete due to the acoustoelastic effect can be evaluated successfully and precisely using CWI.

  1. Applicability of coda wave interferometry technique for measurement of acoustoelastic effect of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Sung Woo [Dept. of of Safety Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we examined the applicability of coda wave interferometry (CWI) technique, which was developed to characterize seismic waves, to detect and evaluate change in the velocity of ultrasonic waves in concrete due to acoustoelastic effect. Ultrasonic wave measurements and compressive loading tests were conducted on a concrete specimen. The measured wave signals were processed with CWI to detect and evaluate the relative velocity change with respect to the stress state of the specimen. A phase change due to the acoustoelastic effect of concrete was clearly detected in the late-arriving coda wave. This shows that the relative velocity change of ultrasonic waves in concrete due to the acoustoelastic effect can be evaluated successfully and precisely using CWI.

  2. Direct measurement technique for shock wave velocity with irradiation drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Feng; Peng Xiaoshi; Liu Shenye; Jiang Xiaohua; Ding Yongkun

    2011-01-01

    According to the ionization mechanism of transparent material under super high pressure, the direct diagnosis method of shock wave has been analyzed. With the Drude free electron model, the reflectivity difference of shock wave front under different pressures was analyzed. The blank effect in the detector was studied, which is caused by the X-ray ionization of transparent material, after analyzing the reflectivity data in space-time scale. The experiment shows that the beginning point and duration of blank effect are consistent with the start point and duration of laser pulse, respectively. And the reflectivity of shock wave front is about 35% when the shock velocity is 32 km/s. The reason and solution for blank effect was presented. The formula to calculate the shock wave velocity in transparent material was also deduced and verified. (authors)

  3. Plasma wave amplitude measurement created by guided laser wakefield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojda, Franck

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of an intense laser pulse of short duration with a plasma produces a plasma wave with large amplitude in its wake, which is associated with a longitudinal electric field. It can be used to accelerate relativistic electrons injected into the wave to energies in the GeV range over distances of the order of a few centimeters, short compared to acceleration lengths in conventional accelerators. The control of the electron beam characteristics during the acceleration process is fundamental for achieving a usable laser-plasma acceleration stage. The main result of this thesis is the creation and characterization of a plasma wave in a weakly nonlinear regime over a length of several centimeters. Capillary tubes are used to guide the laser beam over these distances, while maintaining a large enough intensity (∼ 10 17 W/cm 2 ). The guided laser beam ionizes the gas in the tube and creates the plasma wave. A diagnostic based on the modification of the laser pulse spectrum was used to determine the amplitude of the plasma wave along the tube. The amplitude of the plasma wave was studied as a function of gas filling pressure, length of the capillary and laser energy. Experimental results are compared; they are in excellent agreement with analytical results and modeling. They show that the electric field associated with the plasma wave is between 1 and 10 GV/m over a length of up to 8 cm. This work has demonstrated the ability to create a controlled plasma wave in a weakly nonlinear regime. (author)

  4. Radar Measurements of Ocean Surface Waves using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-30

    Golinval, 2002, Physical interpretation of the proper orthogonal modes using the singular value decomposition, Journal of Sound and Vibration, 249...complex and contain contributions from the environment (e.g., wind, waves, currents) as well as artifacts associated with electromagnetic (EM) (wave...Although there is no physical basis/ interpretation inherent to the method because it is purely a mathematical tool, there has been an increasing

  5. Measurement of the Multi-TeV Gamma-Ray Flare Spectra of Markarian 421 and Markarian 501

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krennrich, F.; Biller, S.D.; Bond, I.H.; Boyle, P.J.; Bradbury, S.M.; Breslin, A.C.; Buckley, J.H.; Burdett, A.M.; Gordo, J.B.; Carter-Lewis, D.A.; Catanese, M.; Cawley, M.F.; Fegan, D.J.; Finley, J.P.; Gaidos, J.A.; Hall, T.; Hillas, A.M.; Lamb, R.C.; Lessard, R.W.; Masterson, C.; McEnery, J.E.; Mohanty, G.; Moriarty, P.

    1999-01-01

    The energy spectrum of Markarian 421 in flaring states has been measured from 0.3 to 10 TeV using both small and large zenith angle observations with the Whipple Observatory 10 m imaging telescope. The large zenith angle technique is useful for extending spectra to high energies, and the extraction of spectra with this technique is discussed. The resulting spectrum of Markarian 421 is fitted reasonably well by a simple power law: J(E)=E -2.54±0.03±0.10 photons m -1 s -1 TeV -1 , where the first set of errors is statistical and the second set is systematic. This is in contrast to our recently reported spectrum of Markarian 501, which over a similar energy range has substantial curvature. The differences in TeV energy spectra of gamma-ray blazars reflect both the physics of the gamma-ray production mechanism and possibly differential absorption effects at the source or in the intergalactic medium. Since Markarian 421 and Markarian 501 have almost the same redshift (0.031 and 0.033, respectively), the difference in their energy spectra must be intrinsic to the sources and not due to intergalactic absorption, assuming the intergalactic infrared background is uniform. copyright copyright 1999. The American Astronomical Society

  6. Spatial-Resolved Measurement and Analysis of Extreme-Ultraviolet Emission Spectra from Laser-Produced Al Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Shi-Quan; Su Mao-Gen; Sun Dui-Xiong; Min Qi; Dong Chen-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet emission from laser-produced Al plasma is experimentally and theoretically investigated. Spatial-evolution emission spectra are measured by using the spatio-temporally resolved laser produced plasma technique. Based on the assumptions of a normalized Boltzmann distribution among the excited states and a steady-state collisional-radiative model, we succeed in reproducing the spectra at different detection positions, which are in good agreement with experiments. The decay curves about the electron temperature and electron density, as well as the fractions of individual Al ions and average ionization stage with increasing the detection distance are obtained by comparison with the experimental measurements. These parameters are critical points for deeply understanding the expanding and cooling of laser produced plasmas in vacuum. (paper)

  7. Derivation of the radial profile of ion temperature from the measured energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K; Hiraki, N; Toi, K; Itoh, S

    1980-01-01

    In the TRIAM-1 tokamak the energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed by scanning the neutral energy analyzer vertically. The measured ion temperature obtained from the only energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by the neoclassical transport theory because of reflection (backscattering) of neutrals at the wall. The actual ion temperature profile is derived from all observed energy spectra by the numerical code in which a wall-reflection effect of neutrals and an impermeability of plasma are taken into account. The reflection coefficient is adjusted so that the calculated ion temperature profile should be the best fit for the ion temperatures measured by the Doppler broadening of the visible lines He II 4686 A and H-alpha at the relevant radial positions.

  8. Derivation of the radial profile of ion temperature from the 'measured' energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Toi, Kazuo; Itoh, Satoshi

    1980-01-01

    In the TRIAM-1 tokamak the energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed by scanning the neutral energy analyzer vertically. The ''measured'' ion temperature obtained from only energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by the neoclassical transport theory because of reflection (backscattering) of neutrals at the wall. The ''actual'' ion temperature profile is derived from all observed energy spectra by using the numerical code in which a wall-reflection effect of neutrals and an impermeability of plasma are taken into account. In this numerical analysis, the reflection coefficient is adjusted so that the above calculated ion temperature profile should be best fit for the ion temperatures measured by the Doppler broadening of the visible lines HeII 4686 A and H sub(α) at the relevant radial positions. (author)

  9. Derivation of the radial profile of ion temperature from the 'measured' energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K; Hiraki, N; Toi, K; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-07-01

    In the TRIAM-1 tokamak the energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed by scanning the neutral energy analyzer vertically. The ''measured'' ion temperature obtained from only energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by the neoclassical transport theory because of reflection (backscattering) of neutrals at the wall. The ''actual'' ion temperature profile is derived from all observed energy spectra by using the numerical code in which a wall-reflection effect of neutrals and an impermeability of plasma are taken into account. In this numerical analysis, the reflection coefficient is adjusted so that the above calculated ion temperature profile should be best fit for the ion temperatures measured by the Doppler broadening of the visible lines HeII 4686 A and H sub(..cap alpha..) at the relevant radial positions.

  10. Backscatter spectra measurements of the two beams on the same cone on Shenguang-III laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Weiyi; Yang, Dong; Xu, Tao; Liu, Yonggang; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Li, Yulong; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Xiangming; Mei, Yu; Yan, Yadong; He, Junhua; Li, Zhichao; Li, Sanwei; Jiang, Xiaohua; Guo, Liang; Xie, Xufei; Pan, Kaiqiang; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Zhang, Baohan; Ding, Yongkun

    2018-01-01

    In laser driven hohlraums, laser beams on the same incident cone may have different beam and plasma conditions, causing beam-to-beam backscatter difference and subsequent azimuthal variations in the x-ray drive on the capsule. To elucidate the large variation of backscatter proportion from beam to beam in some gas-filled hohlraum shots on Shenguang-III, two 28.5° beams have been measured with the Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) time-resolved spectra. A bifurcated fiber is used to sample two beams and then coupled to a spectrometer and streak camera combination to reduce the cost. The SRS spectra, characterized by a broad wavelength, were further corrected considering the temporal distortion and intensity modulation caused by components along the light path. This measurement will improve the understanding of the beam propagation inside the hohlraum and related laser plasma instabilities.

  11. SPECTRA OF MAGNETIC FLUCTUATIONS AND RELATIVISTIC PARTICLES PRODUCED BY A NONRESONANT WAVE INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, Andrey E.; Ellison, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2009-01-01

    We model strong forward shocks in young supernova remnants with efficient particle acceleration where a nonresonant instability driven by the cosmic ray current amplifies magnetic turbulence in the shock precursor. Particle injection, magnetic field amplification (MFA), and the nonlinear feedback of particles and fields on the bulk flow are derived consistently. The shock structure depends critically on the efficiency of turbulence cascading. If cascading is suppressed, MFA is strong, the shock precursor is stratified, and the turbulence spectrum contains several discrete peaks. These peaks, as well as the amount of MFA, should influence synchrotron X-rays, allowing observational tests of cascading and other assumptions intrinsic to the nonlinear model of nonresonant wave growth.

  12. Portable instrument for measuring neutron energy spectra and neutron dose in a mixed n-γ field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, C. J.; Silberberg, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A portable high-speed neutron spectrometer consists of an organic scintillator, a true zero-crossing pulse shape discriminator, a 1 MHZ conversion-rate multichannel analyzer, an 8-bit microcomputer, and appropriate displays. The device can be used to measure neutron energy spectra and kerma rate in intense n- gamma radiation fields in which the neutron energy is from 5 to 15 MEV

  13. Measured Neutron Spectra and Dose Equivalents From a Mevion Single-Room, Passively Scattered Proton System Used for Craniospinal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, Rebecca M., E-mail: rhowell@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Burgett, Eric A.; Isaacs, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho (United States); Price Hedrick, Samantha G.; Reilly, Michael P.; Rankine, Leith J.; Grantham, Kevin K.; Perkins, Stephanie; Klein, Eric E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To measure, in the setting of typical passively scattered proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) treatment, the secondary neutron spectra, and use these spectra to calculate dose equivalents for both internal and external neutrons delivered via a Mevion single-room compact proton system. Methods and Materials: Secondary neutron spectra were measured using extended-range Bonner spheres for whole brain, upper spine, and lower spine proton fields. The detector used can discriminate neutrons over the entire range of the energy spectrum encountered in proton therapy. To separately assess internally and externally generated neutrons, each of the fields was delivered with and without a phantom. Average neutron energy, total neutron fluence, and ambient dose equivalent [H* (10)] were calculated for each spectrum. Neutron dose equivalents as a function of depth were estimated by applying published neutron depth–dose data to in-air H* (10) values. Results: For CSI fields, neutron spectra were similar, with a high-energy direct neutron peak, an evaporation peak, a thermal peak, and an intermediate continuum between the evaporation and thermal peaks. Neutrons in the evaporation peak made the largest contribution to dose equivalent. Internal neutrons had a very low to negligible contribution to dose equivalent compared with external neutrons, largely attributed to the measurement location being far outside the primary proton beam. Average energies ranged from 8.6 to 14.5 MeV, whereas fluences ranged from 6.91 × 10{sup 6} to 1.04 × 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}/Gy, and H* (10) ranged from 2.27 to 3.92 mSv/Gy. Conclusions: For CSI treatments delivered with a Mevion single-gantry proton therapy system, we found measured neutron dose was consistent with dose equivalents reported for CSI with other proton beamlines.

  14. Fast neutron and gamma-ray spectra measurements with a NE-213 spectrometer in the FNG Copper Benchmark Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klix, Axel; Angelone, Maurizio; Fischer, Ulrich; Pillon, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fast neutron and gamma-ray spectra were measured in a copper assembly irradiated with DT neutrons. • The results were compared with MCNP calculations. • Primary aim was to provide experimental data for checking and validation of nuclear data evaluations of copper. - Abstract: A neutronics benchmark experiment on a pure Copper assembly was performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator. The work aimed at testing of recent nuclear data libraries. This paper focuses on the measurement of fast neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra in the Copper assembly under DT neutron irradiation in two selected positions with a spectrometer based on the organic liquid scintillator NE-213. The measurement results were compared with Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations using MCNP and nuclear data from the JEFF-3.1.1 library. Calculations have been done with Cu data from JEFF-3.1.1, JEFF-3.2, FENDL-3 and ENDF/B-7.0. Discrepancies appear in the intermediate neutron energy range between experiment and calculation. Large discrepancies were observed in the gamma-ray spectra calculated with JEFF-3.2.

  15. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from silicon carbide cylinders with D–T neutrons and validation of evaluated nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, F.; Han, R.; Nie, Y.; Chen, Z.; Zhang, S.; Shi, F.; Lin, W.; Ren, P.; Tian, G.; Sun, Q.; Gou, B.; Ruan, X.; Ren, J.; Ye, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluated data for SiC are validated by a high precision benchmark experiment. • Leakage neutron spectra from SiC cylinders are measured at 60° and 120° using time-of-flight method. • The experimental results are compared with the MCNP-4C calculations with ENDF-BVII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. • The SiC evaluated nuclear data from CENDL-3.1 library was checked for the first time and proved to be reliable. - Abstract: Benchmarking of evaluated nuclear data libraries was performed for 14 MeV neutrons on silicon carbide samples. The experiments were carried out by using the benchmark experimental facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The leakage neutron spectra from SiC (Φ13 cm × 20 cm) at 60° and 120° and SiC (Φ13 cm × 2 cm) at 60° were measured by the TOF method. The measured spectra are well reproduced by MCNP-4C calculations with the CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 evaluated nuclear data libraries, except 5–8 MeV range for 20 cm thickness. The discrepancies are mostly considered as caused by the improper evaluation of the angular distribution and secondary neutron energy distribution of the elastic scattering and inelastic scattering in evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  16. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from silicon carbide cylinders with D–T neutrons and validation of evaluated nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, F. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Han, R. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Data, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Nie, Y. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Data, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Chen, Z., E-mail: zqchen@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, S. [College of Physics Electronic Information, Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao 028000 (China); Shi, F.; Lin, W.; Ren, P.; Tian, G.; Sun, Q.; Gou, B. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Ruan, X.; Ren, J. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Data, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Ye, M. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Evaluated data for SiC are validated by a high precision benchmark experiment. • Leakage neutron spectra from SiC cylinders are measured at 60° and 120° using time-of-flight method. • The experimental results are compared with the MCNP-4C calculations with ENDF-BVII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. • The SiC evaluated nuclear data from CENDL-3.1 library was checked for the first time and proved to be reliable. - Abstract: Benchmarking of evaluated nuclear data libraries was performed for 14 MeV neutrons on silicon carbide samples. The experiments were carried out by using the benchmark experimental facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The leakage neutron spectra from SiC (Φ13 cm × 20 cm) at 60° and 120° and SiC (Φ13 cm × 2 cm) at 60° were measured by the TOF method. The measured spectra are well reproduced by MCNP-4C calculations with the CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 evaluated nuclear data libraries, except 5–8 MeV range for 20 cm thickness. The discrepancies are mostly considered as caused by the improper evaluation of the angular distribution and secondary neutron energy distribution of the elastic scattering and inelastic scattering in evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  17. A setup for simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and light scattering signals: Watching amyloid fibrils grow from intact proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang; Maurer, Jürgen; Roth, Andreas; Vogel, Vitali; Winter, Ernst; Mäntele, Werner, E-mail: maentele@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de [Institut für Biophysik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Max-von Laue-Straße 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    A setup for the simultaneous measurement of mid-infrared spectra and static light scattering is described that can be used for the analysis of the formation of nanoscale and microscopic aggregates from smaller molecules to biopolymers. It can be easily integrated into sample chambers of infrared spectrometers or combined with laser beams from tunable infrared lasers. Here, its use for the analysis of the formation of amyloid fibrils from intact proteins is demonstrated. The formation of amyloid fibrils or plaques from proteins is a widespread and pathogenetic relevant process, and a number of diseases are caused and correlated with the deposition of amyloid fibrils in cells and tissues. The molecular mechanisms of these transformations, however, are still unclear. We report here the simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and static light scattering for the analysis of fibril formation from egg-white lysozyme. The transformation of the native form into non-native forms rich in β-sheet structure is measured by analysis of the amide I spectral region in the infrared spectra, which is sensitive for local structures. At the same time, light scattering signals at forward direction as well as the forward/backward ratio, which are sensitive for the number of scattering centers and their approximate sizes, respectively, are collected for the analysis of fibril growth. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters as well as mechanistic information are deduced from the combination of the two complementary techniques.

  18. A setup for simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and light scattering signals: Watching amyloid fibrils grow from intact proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Maurer, Jürgen; Roth, Andreas; Vogel, Vitali; Winter, Ernst; Mäntele, Werner

    2014-08-01

    A setup for the simultaneous measurement of mid-infrared spectra and static light scattering is described that can be used for the analysis of the formation of nanoscale and microscopic aggregates from smaller molecules to biopolymers. It can be easily integrated into sample chambers of infrared spectrometers or combined with laser beams from tunable infrared lasers. Here, its use for the analysis of the formation of amyloid fibrils from intact proteins is demonstrated. The formation of amyloid fibrils or plaques from proteins is a widespread and pathogenetic relevant process, and a number of diseases are caused and correlated with the deposition of amyloid fibrils in cells and tissues. The molecular mechanisms of these transformations, however, are still unclear. We report here the simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and static light scattering for the analysis of fibril formation from egg-white lysozyme. The transformation of the native form into non-native forms rich in β-sheet structure is measured by analysis of the amide I spectral region in the infrared spectra, which is sensitive for local structures. At the same time, light scattering signals at forward direction as well as the forward/backward ratio, which are sensitive for the number of scattering centers and their approximate sizes, respectively, are collected for the analysis of fibril growth. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters as well as mechanistic information are deduced from the combination of the two complementary techniques.

  19. Fast neutron and gamma-ray spectra measurements with a NE-213 spectrometer in the FNG Copper Benchmark Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klix, Axel, E-mail: axel.klix@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Angelone, Maurizio [ENEA Dipartimento Fusione e Tecnologie per la Sicurezza Nucleare, C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Fischer, Ulrich [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pillon, Mario [ENEA Dipartimento Fusione e Tecnologie per la Sicurezza Nucleare, C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Fast neutron and gamma-ray spectra were measured in a copper assembly irradiated with DT neutrons. • The results were compared with MCNP calculations. • Primary aim was to provide experimental data for checking and validation of nuclear data evaluations of copper. - Abstract: A neutronics benchmark experiment on a pure Copper assembly was performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator. The work aimed at testing of recent nuclear data libraries. This paper focuses on the measurement of fast neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra in the Copper assembly under DT neutron irradiation in two selected positions with a spectrometer based on the organic liquid scintillator NE-213. The measurement results were compared with Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations using MCNP and nuclear data from the JEFF-3.1.1 library. Calculations have been done with Cu data from JEFF-3.1.1, JEFF-3.2, FENDL-3 and ENDF/B-7.0. Discrepancies appear in the intermediate neutron energy range between experiment and calculation. Large discrepancies were observed in the gamma-ray spectra calculated with JEFF-3.2.

  20. Development of fiber optic sensors at TNO for explosion and shock wave measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Bouma, R.H.B.; Meer, B.J. van der; Prinse, W.C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Fiber Optic sensors are found to be very suitable for explosion and shock wave measurements because they are immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). In the past few years, TNO has developed a number of sensor systems for explosion and shock wave measurements in which the optical fiber is a

  1. Quantifying Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Environment Using Measurements From A Small Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE PROPAGATION ENVIRONMENT USING MEASUREMENTS FROM A SMALL BUOY by Andrew E. Sweeney June 2017 Thesis Advisor: Qing Wang...TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE QUANTIFYING ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE PROPAGATION ENVIRONMENT USING MEASUREMENTS FROM A...the Coupled Air Sea Processes and Electromagnetic (EM) ducting Research (CASPER), to understand air-sea interaction processes and their representation

  2. Walkie-Talkie Measurements for the Speed of Radio Waves in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, Andra; Tunyagi, Arthur; Neda, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    A handheld emitter-receiver device suitable for the direct estimation of the velocity of radio waves in air is presented. The velocity of radio waves is measured using the direct time-of-flight method, without the need for any tedious and precise settings. The results for two measurement series are reported. Both sets of results give an estimate…

  3. Measurement of crosstalk contamination in dual isotope imaging by means of energy spectra and images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Akihiro; Tsuji, Akinori; Ohyama, Yoichi; Nabeshima, Mitsuko; Kira, Tomohiro; Nakashima, Rumi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Matsumoto, Masanori.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the value of crosstalk contamination ratio (CTR) by analyzing energy spectra and scintigraphic images using a phantom and three radionuclides of 201 Tl, 99m Tc and 123 I. A 2 cm x 2 cm plate source filled with single radionuclide was placed in a water tank and its depth changed from 0 cm to 10 cm. Energy spectra and planar images were obtained using a gamma camera with either a low-energy (150 keV) or a medium-energy (200 keV) collimator. The value of CTR was calculated for two combinations : 1) 201 Tl and 99m Tc and 2) 201 Tl and 123 I. The energy window width at a photopeak was 20% for each radionuclide. The data were analyzed in two regions: a region where primary photons were mainly included in (region 1, 2 cm x 2 cm) and a region where both primary and scattered photons were included in (region 2, 10 cm x 10 cm). The results from analyses of the images showed that the CTR of Tl/Tc and Tl/I (0.064-0.101) were almost equal to those of Tc/Tl and I/Tl (0.056-0.148) for the region 1, but the CTR of Tl/Tc and Tl/I (0.212-0.381) were 2 times greater than those of Tc/Tl and I/Tl (0.092-0.172) for the region 2. Furthermore, these results showed good agreement between the CTR by energy spectra and those by images. For imaging with 123 I the medium-energy collimator had less blur than the low-energy collimator, in particular for the smaller source-to-collimator distance. In conclusion, the crosstalk contamination in dual-isotope study affects quantification of two radionuclides' activities. Our results are useful to evaluate images acquired using the dual-isotope technique and develop a new correction method for such crosstalk contamination by analyzing the energy spectra and images obtained. (author)

  4. Testing chirality of primordial gravitational waves with Planck and future CMB data: no hope from angular power spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerbino, Martina [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Gruppuso, Alessandro [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Natoli, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra and INFN, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Shiraishi, Maresuke [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Chiba, 277-8583 (Japan); Melchiorri, Alessandro, E-mail: martina.gerbino@fysik.su.se, E-mail: gruppuso@iasfbo.inaf.it, E-mail: paolo.natoli@gmail.com, E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@ipmu.jp, E-mail: alessandro.melchiorri@roma1.infn.it [Physics Department and INFN, Università di Roma ' La Sapienza' , P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy)

    2016-07-01

    We use the 2015 Planck likelihood in combination with the Bicep2/Keck likelihood (BKP and BK14) to constrain the chirality, χ, of primordial gravitational waves in a scale-invariant scenario. In this framework, the parameter χ enters theory always coupled to the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r , e.g. in combination of the form χ ⋅ r . Thus, the capability to detect χ critically depends on the value of r . We find that with present data sets χ is de facto unconstrained. We also provide forecasts for χ from future CMB experiments, including COrE+, exploring several fiducial values of r . We find that the current limit on r is tight enough to disfavor a neat detection of χ. For example, in the unlikely case in which r ∼0.1(0.05), the maximal chirality case, i.e. χ = ±1, could be detected with a significance of ∼2.5(1.5)σ at best. We conclude that the two-point statistics at the basis of CMB likelihood functions is currently unable to constrain chirality and may only provide weak limits on χ in the most optimistic scenarios. Hence, it is crucial to investigate the use of other observables, e.g. provided by higher order statistics, to constrain these kinds of parity violating theories with the CMB.

  5. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2014-01-01

    We present the first measurement of a local fast-ion 2D velocity distribution function f(v‖, v⊥). To this end, we heated a plasma in ASDEX Upgrade by neutral beam injection and measured spectra of fast-ion Dα (FIDA) light from the plasma centre in three views simultaneously. The measured spectra ...... can measure spectra in up to seven views simultaneously in the next ASDEX Upgrade campaign which would further improve measurements of f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion.......We present the first measurement of a local fast-ion 2D velocity distribution function f(v‖, v⊥). To this end, we heated a plasma in ASDEX Upgrade by neutral beam injection and measured spectra of fast-ion Dα (FIDA) light from the plasma centre in three views simultaneously. The measured spectra...... agree very well with synthetic spectra calculated from a TRANSP/NUBEAM simulation. Based on the measured FIDA spectra alone, we infer f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion. Salient features of our measurement of f(v‖, v⊥) agree reasonably well with the simulation: the measured as well as the simulated f...

  6. Some Remarks on the Accuracy of Wave Resistance Determination From Wave Measurements along a Parallel Cut

    OpenAIRE

    Moriconi, Alessandro; Lalli, Francesco; Di Felice, Fabio; Esposito, Pier Giorgio; Piscopia, Rodolfo

    1998-01-01

    In the present work some of the main error sources in the wave pattern resistance determination were investigated. The experimental data obtained at the Italian Ship Model Basin (longitudinal wave profiles generated by the steady motion of the Series 60 model and a hard chine Catamaran) were analyzed. It was found that, within the range of Froude numbers tested (.225 ≤ Fr ≤ .345 for the Series 60 and .5 ≤ Fr ≤ 1 for the Catamaran) two sources of uncertainty play a sign...

  7. Vibrational spectra of nanowires measured using laser doppler vibrometry and STM studies of epitaxial graphene : an LDRD fellowship report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, Laura Butler

    2009-09-01

    A few of the many applications for nanowires are high-aspect ratio conductive atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tips, force and mass sensors, and high-frequency resonators. Reliable estimates for the elastic modulus of nanowires and the quality factor of their oscillations are of interest to help enable these applications. Furthermore, a real-time, non-destructive technique to measure the vibrational spectra of nanowires will help enable sensor applications based on nanowires and the use of nanowires as AFM cantilevers (rather than as tips for AFM cantilevers). Laser Doppler vibrometry is used to measure the vibration spectra of individual cantilevered nanowires, specifically multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and silver gallium nanoneedles. Since the entire vibration spectrum is measured with high frequency resolution (100 Hz for a 10 MHz frequency scan), the resonant frequencies and quality factors of the nanowires are accurately determined. Using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, the elastic modulus and spring constant can be calculated from the resonance frequencies of the oscillation spectrum and the dimensions of the nanowires, which are obtained from parallel SEM studies. Because the diameters of the nanowires studied are smaller than the wavelength of the vibrometer's laser, Mie scattering is used to estimate the lower diameter limit for nanowires whose vibration can be measured in this way. The techniques developed in this thesis can be used to measure the vibrational spectra of any suspended nanowire with high frequency resolution Two different nanowires were measured - MWNTs and Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles. Measurements of the thermal vibration spectra of MWNTs under ambient conditions showed that the elastic modulus, E, of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) MWNTs is 37 {+-} 26 GPa, well within the range of E previously reported for CVD-grown MWNTs. Since the Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles have a greater optical scattering efficiency than

  8. Using the analysis of stress waves to build research for experimentation on ultrasonic film measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shi-Shing; Wu, John H.

    1993-09-01

    After the 2th world war, although the application of ultrasonic wave in industries is becoming more and more popular. But due to the restriction of the precise equivelent , experimental method and the support of the basic theoremsetc. Ultrasonic wave is not applied in precise measurement. Nowadays due to many conditions - the improvement in the production technic, the precise of the equivelent, causes to increase the application of ultrasonic wave. But it's still limited due to the lack of measurement and analysis theorem. In this paper, first we caculate translation of the stress wave (elastic wave) in material for the free surface of material by a normal impulse load. as the theorem analysis base in real application. It is applied to an experiment of film measurement. We can find the partical motion in material and the arriving time of wave front. Then we can estimate the thickness of layers and can prove the actual condition with the result of experiment. This resarch is not only in the theoretical investigation but also in setting overall the measurement system, and excutes the following three experiments: the thickness measurement of two layers, the thickness measurement of film material. the thickness measurement of air propagation. About the data processing, we relied on the frequency analysis to evalute the time difference of two overlapped ultrasonic wave signal. in the meanwhile. we also designed several computer programs to assist the sonic wave identification and signal analysis.

  9. Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodenhofer, K,; Gopel, W.; Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-12-09

    To probe directly the analyte/film interactions that characterize molecular recognition in gas sensors, we recorded changes to the in-situ surface vibrational spectra of specifically fictionalized surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices concurrently with analyte exposure and SAW measurement of the extent of sorption. Fourier-lmnsform infrared external- reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) were collected from operating 97-MH2 SAW delay lines during exposure to a range of analytes as they interacted with thin-film coatings previously shown to be selective: cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for Lewis bases such as pyridine and organophosphonates, and phthalocyanines for aromatic compounds. In most cases where specific chemical interactions-metal coordination, "cage" compound inclusion, or z stacking-were expected, analyte dosing caused distinctive changes in the IR spectr~ together with anomalously large SAW sensor responses. In contrast, control experiments involving the physisorption of the same analytes by conventional organic polymers did not cause similar changes in the IR spectra, and the SAW responses were smaller. For a given conventional polymer, the partition coefficients (or SAW sensor signals) roughly followed the analyte fraction of saturation vapor pressure. These SAW/FTIR results support earlier conclusions derived from thickness-shear mode resonator data.

  10. Low Energy Particle Oscillations and Correlations with Hydromagnetic Waves in the Jovian Magnetosphere: Ulysses Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, N.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. G.

    1996-01-01

    We report on measurements of energetic particle modulations observed by the HI-SCALE instrument aboard the Ulysses Spacecraft that were associated with the only hydromagnetic wave event measured inside the Jovian magnetosphere by the Ulysses magnetometer investigation.

  11. Measurement and analysis of double-differential neutron emission spectra in (P,N) and (α,N) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, K.; Mehta, M.K.

    1988-05-01

    The second IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting on Measurement and Analysis of Double-Differential Neutron Emission Spectra in (p,n) and (α,n) Reactions was convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna during 8-10 February, 1988. The main objectives of the Co-ordinated Research Project for which this meeting was held are (i) to extract systematic information about nuclear level densities as a function of excitation energy by analysing the neutron emission spectra from (p,n) and (α,n) reactions on properly selected targets and bombarding energy range, and (ii) to parametrize this information into appropriate phenomenological models to enable reliable extrapolation for general use of level density information in basic and applied nuclear physics related problems. Detailed conclusions and recommendations, together with a summary of the programme during 1988/1989 are attached in the Appendices

  12. Results of neutron dose measurements at the Rossendorf research reactors taking the actual neutron spectra into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimpler, A.; Kneschke, H.

    1985-01-01

    Based on a systematic evaluation of area dose studies at the beginning of the seventies, no individual routine neutron monitoring has been performed at the Rossendorf research reactors. To check this decision, a limited number of persons has been monitored with solid-state nuclear track detectors for several years. The dosemeters were calibrated on the basis of neutron spectra determined at the working places by means of the Bonner sphere method. Intermediate neutrons with a 1/E/sup α/ Fermi distribution were dominating. The fraction of fast neutrons was practically negligible. The obtained spectra, radiation, field quantities and results of individual dose measurements are presented. The dosemeter most appropriate for such neutron fields would be a 12-inch Bonner sphere rem counter. As the mean annual neutron exposure of research workers at the reactor amounted to only 2% of the maximum permissible dose, individual routine monitoring will, also in the future, not be neccessary. (author)

  13. System for Monitoring, Determining, and Reporting Directional Spectra of Ocean Surface Waves in Near Realtime from a Moored Buoy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A moored buoy floating at the ocean surface and anchored to the seafloor precisely measures acceleration, pitch, roll, and Earth's magnetic flux field of the buoy...

  14. Aortic pulse wave velocity measurement in systemic sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sebastiani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic sclerosis (SSc is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and widespread microangiopathy. However, a macrovascular damage could be also associated. Aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV is known to be a reliable indicator of arterial stiffness and a useful prognostic predictor of cardiovascular events. Moreover, aPWV may be easily measured by non-invasive, user-friendly tool. Aim of our study was to evaluate aPWV alterations in a series of SSc patients. Methods. The aPWV was evaluated in 35 consecutive female SSc patients and 26 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. aPWV alterations were correlated with cardiopulmonary involvement. Results. A significant increase of aPWV was observed in SSc patients compared to controls (9.4±3.2 m/s vs 7.3±1 m/s; P=0.002. In particular, 14/35 (40% SSc patients and only 1/26 (4% controls (P=0.0009 showed increased aPWV (>9 m/s cut-off value. Moreover, echocardiography evaluation showed an increased prevalence of right atrial and ventricular dilatation (atrial volume: 23.6±6.2 mL vs 20.3±4.3 mL, P=0.026; ventricular diameter 19.5±4.9 mm vs 15.9±1.6 mm; P=0.001 associated to higher values of pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PAPs in SSc patients (31.5±10.4 mmHg vs 21.6±2.9 mmHg; P50 years old. Furthermore, altered aPWV was more frequently associated with limited cutaneous pattern, longer disease duration (≥5 years, and/or presence of anticentromere antibody (ACA. Conclusions. A significantly higher prevalence of abnormally increased aPWV was evidenced in SSc patients compared to healthy controls. The possibility of more pronounced and diffuse vascular damage in a particular SSc subset (ACA-positive subjects with limited cutaneous scleroderma and longer disease duration might be raised.

  15. The measurement of the total electron content applied to the observation of medium scale gravity wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, L.; Bertin, F.; Testud, J.

    1976-01-01

    The interpretation of the measurements of the integrated electron content in terms of gravity wave requires (1) a gravity wave model at thermospheric altitudes; (2) a gravity wave-ionization interaction model in the F-region of the ionosphere; and (3) a computing program for the resulting perturbation on the integrated electron content between the satellite and the earth station used. The gravity wave model considered in this paper takes into account the dissipative effects (viscosity, thermal conduction) which become very importanr above 250 km altitude and the effect of the base wind which is capable of affecting deeply the propagation of the waves of medium scale. Starting with this model, the domains of frequencies and the wavelength of atmospheric waves which may exist in the upper atmosphere are considered. The interaction of such waves and the ionization is examined. The theoretical results give information particularly on the selectivity of the ionospheric response to the wave passage. The deduced selectivity of the models appears to be smaller than that given by other authors who used simplified gravity wave models. The method for computing the perturbation of the of the integrated electron content introduced by the wave passage is given for a geostationary satellite. Computational results are presented for application to the case of medium scale gravity waves. (author)

  16. Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael; Greve, Sara; Blicher, Marie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood...... pressure and previously published equations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ePWV could predict CV events independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and/or cfPWV. DESIGN AND METHOD: cfPWV was measured and ePWV calculated in 2366 apparently healthy subjects from four age...

  17. Wave attenuation model for dephasing and measurement of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analysis of previous models to simulate inelastic scattering in such systems is presented and a relatively new model based on wave attenuation is introduced. The problem of Aharonov–Bohm (AB) oscillations in conductance of a mesoscopic ring is studied. We show that the conductance is symmetric under flux reversal ...

  18. Experimental measurements of Helicon wave coupling in KSTAR plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. J.; Wi, H. H.; Wang, S. J.; Park, S. Y.; Jeong, J. H.; Han, J. W.; Kwak, J. G.; Oh, Y. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chun, M. H.; Yu, I. H. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    KSTAR tokamak can be a good platform to test this current drive concept because it has adequate machine parameters. Furthermore, KSTAR will have high electron beta plasmas in near future with additional ECH power. In 2015 KSTAR experiments, low-power traveling wave antenna has been designed, fabricated and installed for helicon wave coupling tests in KSTAT plasmas. In 2016 KSTAR campaign, 200 kW klystron power will be combined using three coaxial hybrid couplers and three dummy loads. High power RF will be fed into the traveling wave antenna with two coaxial feeders through two dual disk windows and 6 inch coaxial transmission line system. Current status and plan for high power helicon wave current drive system in KSTAR will be presented. Mock-up TWA antenna installed at the KSTAR reveals high couplings in both L- and H-mode plasmas. The coupling can be easily controlled by radial outer gap without degradation of plasma confinement or local gas puffing with slight decrease of plasma confinement.

  19. Evaluation of bispectrum in the wave number domain based on multi-point measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an estimator of the bispectrum, a measure of three-wave couplings. It is evaluated directly in the wave number domain using a limited number of detectors. The ability of the bispectrum estimator is examined numerically and then it is applied to fluctuations of magnetic field and electron density in the terrestrial foreshock region observed by the four Cluster spacecraft, which indicates the presence of a three-wave coupling in space plasma.

  20. [De-noising and measurement of pulse wave velocity of the wavelet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baohua; Zhu, Honglian; Ren, Xiaohua

    2011-02-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a vital index of the cardiovascular pathology, so that the accurate measurement of PWV can be of benefit for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The noise in the measure system of pulse wave signal, rounding error and selection of the recording site all cause errors in the measure result. In this paper, with wavelet transformation to eliminate the noise and to raise the precision, and with the choice of the point whose slope was maximum as the recording site of the reconstructing pulse wave, the measuring system accuracy was improved.

  1. ‘Postage-stamp PIV’: small velocity fields at 400 kHz for turbulence spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell W.; Spitzer, Seth M.

    2018-03-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry recently has been demonstrated in high-speed flows using a pulse-burst laser at repetition rates reaching 50 kHz. Turbulent behavior can be measured at still higher frequencies if the field of view is greatly reduced and lower laser pulse energy is accepted. Current technology allows image acquisition at 400 kHz for sequences exceeding 4000 frames but for an array of only 128  ×  120 pixels, giving the moniker of ‘postage-stamp PIV’. The technique has been tested far downstream of a supersonic jet exhausting into a transonic crossflow. Two-component measurements appear valid until 120 kHz, at which point a noise floor emerges whose magnitude is dependent on the reduction of peak locking. Stereoscopic measurement offers three-component data for turbulent kinetic energy spectra, but exhibits a reduced signal bandwidth and higher noise in the out-of-plane component due to the oblique camera images. The resulting spectra reveal two regions exhibiting power-law dependence describing the turbulent decay. The frequency response of the present measurement configuration exceeds nearly all previous velocimetry measurements in high speed flow.

  2. Measurement and Analysis of Neutron Leakage Spectra from Pb and LBE Cylinders with D-T Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Size; Gan, Leting; Li, Taosheng; Han, Yuncheng; Liu, Chao; Jiang, Jieqiong; Wu, Yican

    2017-09-01

    For validating the current evaluated neutron data libraries, neutron leakage spectra from lead and lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) cylinders have been measured using an intense D-T pulsed neutron source with time-of-flight (TOF) method by Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology (INEST), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The measured leakage spectra have been compared with the calculated ones using Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program for Nuclear and Radiation Process (SuperMC) with the evaluated pointwise data of lead and bismuth processed from ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries. This work shows that calculations of the three libraries are all generally consistent with the lead experimental result. For LBE experiment, the JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 calculations both agree well with the measurement. However, the result of ENDF/B-VII.1 fails to fit with the measured data, especially in the energy range of 5.5 and 7 MeV with difference more than 80%. Through sensitivity analysis with partial cross sections of 209Bi in ENDF/B-VII.1 and JEFF, the difference between the measurement and the ENDF/B-VII.1 calculation in LBE experiment is found due to the neutron data of 209Bi.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of quantum yield ratio and absorption ratio between acceptor and donor by linearly unmixing excitation-emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Lin, F; DU, M; Qu, W; Mai, Z; Qu, J; Chen, T

    2018-02-13

    Quantum yield ratio (Q A /Q D ) and absorption ratio (K A /K D ) in all excitation wavelengths used between acceptor and donor are indispensable to quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurement based on linearly unmixing excitation-emission spectra (ExEm-spFRET). We here describe an approach to simultaneously measure Q A /Q D and K A /K D values by linearly unmixing the excitation-emission spectra of at least two different donor-acceptor tandem constructs with unknown FRET efficiency. To measure the Q A /Q D and K A /K D values of Venus (V) to Cerulean (C), we used a wide-field fluorescence microscope to image living HepG2 cells separately expressing each of four different C-V tandem constructs at different emission wavelengths with 435 nm and 470 nm excitation respectively to obtain the corresponding excitation-emission spectrum (S DA ). Every S DA was linearly unmixed into the contributions (weights) of three excitation-emission spectra of donor (W D ) and acceptor (W A ) as well as donor-acceptor sensitisation (W S ). Plot of W S /W D versus W A /W D for the four C-V plasmids from at least 40 cells indicated a linear relationship with 1.865 of absolute intercept (Q A /Q D ) and 0.273 of the reciprocal of slope (K A /K D ), which was validated by quantitative FRET measurements adopting 1.865 of Q A /Q D and 0.273 of K A /K D for C32V, C5V, CVC and VCV constructs respectively in living HepG2 cells. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Copper L X-ray spectra measured by a high resolution ion-induced X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryohei; Hamaguchi, Dai; Kageyama, Hiroyoshi [Kyoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan); and others

    1997-03-01

    High resolution L X-ray emission spectra of Cu have been measured by 0.75 MeV/u H, He, and F, 0.73 MeV/u Ar, 0.64 MeV/u Si, and 0.073 MeV/u Si ion impacts with a crystal spectrometer. The X-ray transition energies in the Cu target for L{iota}, L{eta}, L{alpha}{sub 1,2}, L{beta}{sub 1}, and L{beta}{sub 3,4} diagram lines induced by light ion impacts are determined, which are in good agreement with those given in the reference. The difference in L X-ray emission spectra produced by H, He, F, Si, and Ar ions are considered and the L{alpha}{sub 1,2} and L{beta}{sub 1} emission spectra are compared with the calculated ones based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. (author)

  5. Deconvolution of Thermal Emissivity Spectra of Mercury to their Endmember Counterparts measured in Simulated Mercury Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharajan, I.; D'Amore, M.; Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Hiesinger, H.

    2017-12-01

    The Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (MERTIS) payload of ESA/JAXA Bepicolombo mission to Mercury will map the thermal emissivity at wavelength range of 7-14 μm and spatial resolution of 500 m/pixel [1]. Mercury was also imaged at the same wavelength range using the Boston University's Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI) mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii with the minimum spatial coverage of 400-600km/spectra which blends all rocks, minerals, and soil types [2]. Therefore, the study [2] used quantitative deconvolution algorithm developed by [3] for spectral unmixing of this composite thermal emissivity spectrum from telescope to their respective areal fractions of endmember spectra; however, the thermal emissivity of endmembers used in [2] is the inverted reflectance measurements (Kirchhoff's law) of various samples measured at room temperature and pressure. Over a decade, the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) at the Institute of Planetary Research (PF) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) facilitates the thermal emissivity measurements under controlled and simulated surface conditions of Mercury by taking emissivity measurements at varying temperatures from 100-500°C under vacuum conditions supporting MERTIS payload. The measured thermal emissivity endmember spectral library therefore includes major silicates such as bytownite, anorthoclase, synthetic glass, olivine, enstatite, nepheline basanite, rocks like komatiite, tektite, Johnson Space Center lunar simulant (1A), and synthetic powdered sulfides which includes MgS, FeS, CaS, CrS, TiS, NaS, and MnS. Using such specialized endmember spectral library created under Mercury's conditions significantly increases the accuracy of the deconvolution model results. In this study, we revisited the available telescope spectra and redeveloped the algorithm by [3] by only choosing the endmember spectral library created at PSL for unbiased model

  6. Electron Bernstein Wave Coupling and Emission Measurements on NSTX

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taylor, G.; Diem, S.J.; Caughman, J.; Efthimion, P.; Harvey, R.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Philips, C.K.; Preinhaelter, Josef; Urban, Jakub

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 7 (2006), s. 177 ISSN 0003-0503. [Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics/48th./. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania , 30.10.2006-3.11.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Conversion * Emission * Tokamaks * Electron Bernstein waves * Simulation * MAST * NSTX Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.aps.org/meet/DPP06/baps/all_DPP06.pdf

  7. Thermal Electron Bernstein Wave Emission Measurements on NST

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Diem, S.J.; Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Philips, C.K.; Caughman, J.; Wilgen, J.B.; Harvey, R.W.; Preinhaelter, Josef; Urban, Jakub

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 7 (2006), s. 134 ISSN 0003-0503. [Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics/48th./. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania , 30.10.2006-3.11.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Conversion * Emission * Tokamaks * Electron Bernstein waves * Simulation * MAST * NSTX Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.aps.org/meet/DPP06/baps/all_DPP06.pdf

  8. Shear-wave splitting measurements – Problems and solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vecsey, Luděk; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Babuška, Vladislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 462, č. 1-4 (2008), s. 178-196 ISSN 0040-1951 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300120605; GA AV ČR IAA3012405; GA AV ČR IAA300120709 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : seismic anisotropy * shear-wave splitting * comparison of cross- correlation * eigenvalue * transverse minimization methods Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.677, year: 2008

  9. S-wave velocity measurements along levees in New Orleans using passive surface wave methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Craig, M. S.; Gostic, A.

    2017-12-01

    In order to develop non-invasive methods for levee inspection, geophysical investigations were carried out at four sites along levees in the New Orleans area: 17th Street Canal, London Avenue Canal, Marrero Levee, and Industrial Canal. Three of the four sites sustained damage from Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and have since been rebuilt. The geophysical methods used include active and passive surface wave methods, and capacitively coupled resistivity. This paper summarizes the acquisition and analysis of the 1D and 2D passive surface wave data. Twelve wireless seismic data acquisition units with 2 Hz vertical component geophones were used to record data. Each unit includes a GPS receiver so that all units can be synchronized over any distance without cables. The 1D passive method used L shaped arrays of three different sizes with geophone spacing ranging from 5 to 340 m. Ten minutes to one hour of ambient noise was recorded with each array, and total data acquisition took approximately two hours at each site. The 2D method used a linear array with a geophone spacing of 5m. Four geophones were moved forward every 10 minutes along 400 1000 m length lines. Data acquisition took several hours for each line. Recorded ambient noise was processed using the spatial autocorrelation method and clear dispersion curves were obtained at all sites (Figure 1a). Minimum frequencies ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 Hz and maximum frequencies ranged from 10 to 30 Hz depending on the site. Non-linear inversion was performed and 1D and 2D S-wave velocity models were obtained. The 1D method penetrated to depths ranging from 200 to 500 m depending on the site (Figure 1b). The 2D method penetrated to a depth of 40 60 m and provided 400 1000 m cross sections along the levees (Figure 2). The interpretation focused on identifying zones beneath the levees or canal walls having low S-wave velocities corresponding to saturated, unconsolidated sands, or low-rigidity clays. Resultant S-wave velocity profiles

  10. Convergence of repeated quantum nondemolition measurements and wave-function collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Michel; Bernard, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on quantum trapped fields, we give a rigorous proof that repeated indirect quantum nondemolition (QND) measurements converge to the collapse of the wave function as predicted by the postulates of quantum mechanics for direct measurements. We also relate the rate of convergence toward the collapsed wave function to the relative entropy of each indirect measurement, a result which makes contact with information theory.

  11. Ground penetrating radar antenna measurements based on plane-wave expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of the system consisting of the ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna and the air-soil interface is measured using a loop buried in the soil. The plane-wave spectrum is used to determine various parameters characterizing the radiation of the GPR antenna...

  12. Velocity flow field and water level measurements in shoaling and breaking water waves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mukaro, R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on the laboratory investigations of breaking water waves. Measurements of the water levels and instantaneous fluid velocities were conducted in water waves breaking on a sloping beach within a glass flume. Instantaneous water...

  13. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D- 3 He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D- 3 He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of ∼50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  14. Residual stress measurement with focused acoustic waves and direct comparison with X-ray diffraction stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathish, Shamachary; Moran, Thomas J.; Martin, Richard W.; Reibel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The technique of measuring small changes in acoustic wave velocity due to external or internal stress has been used for quantitative determination of residual stress in materials during the last decade. Application of similar methodology with focused acoustic waves leads to residual stress measurement with spatial resolution of a few millimeters to a few microns. The high spatial resolution residual stress measurement required development of new methodologies in both the design of acoustic lenses and the instrumentation for acoustic wave velocity determination. This paper presents two new methodologies developed for the measurement of residual stress with spatial resolution of a few millimeters. The design of new type of acoustic lens for achieving higher spatial resolution in residual stress measurement is introduced. Development of instrumentation for high precision local surface wave velocity measurement will be presented. Residual stresses measured around a crack tip in a sample of Ti-6A1-4V using a focused beam will be compared with X-ray diffraction measurements performed on the same region of the sample. Results of residual stress measurements along a direction perpendicular to the electron beam weld in a sample of Ti-6A1-4V, determined using focused acoustic waves and X-ray diffraction technique, are also presented. The spatial resolution and penetration depth of X-rays and focused acoustic beams with reference to residual stress measurements are discussed

  15. PIV measurements of velocities and accelerations under breaking waves on a slope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested, Malene Hovgaard; Carstensen, Stefan; Christensen, Erik Damgaard

    2017-01-01

    waves. In this study, we have investigated the wave kinematics under steep and breaking waves on a laboratory beach with a slope of 1/25. The velocity field was measured by use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) at a sample rate of 96Hz. The high sample rate allowed for the accelerations...... to be determined directly from the sampled velocities. It was found that both velocities and accelerations differ from the ones predicted from common wave theories such as streamfunction theory. This was especially evident at the top part of the wave close to the surface. This was not surprising, since...... the breaking event is a highly non-linear process. The results presented here may facilitate computations of the impact force on offshore structures and furthermore be used for validation of CFD models while altogether shedding light on the mechanisms behind breaking waves....

  16. Measurement of energy spectra of charged particles emitted after the absorption of stopped negative pions in carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechtersheimer, G.

    1978-06-01

    The energy spectra of charged particles (p,d,t, 3 He, 4 He and Li-nuclei) emitted after the absorption of stopped negative pions in carbon targets of different thickness (1.227, 0.307, 0.0202 g/cm 2 ) have been measured from the experimental threshold energy of about 0.5 MeV up to the kinematical limit of about 100 MeV. The experiments have been carried out at the biomedical pion channel πE3 of the Swiss Institute of Nuclear Research (SIN). (orig.) [de

  17. Measurements of Neutron Spectra Produced from a Thick Iron Target Bombarded with 1.5-GeV Protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Iga, Kiminori; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Kitsuki, Hirohiko; Ishibashi, Kenji; Maehata, Keisuke; Arima, Hidehiko; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Numajiri, Masaharu

    2005-01-01

    For validation of calculation codes that are employed in the design of accelerator facilities, spectra of neutrons produced from a thick iron target bombarded with 1.5-GeV protons were measured. The calculated results with NMTC/JAM were compared with the present experimental results. It is found that the NMTC/JAM generally shows good agreement with experiment. Furthermore, the calculation gives good agreement with the experiment for the energy region 20 to 80 MeV for iron, whereas the NMTC/JAM gives 50% of the experimental data for the heavy-nuclides such as lead and tungsten

  18. Measurements of neutron spectra produced from a thick iron target bombarded with 1.5 GeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Takada, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    For validation of calculation codes which are employed in the design of accelerator facilities, spectra of neutrons produced from a thick iron target bombarded with 1.5-GeV protons were measured. The calculated results with NMTC/JAM were compared with the present experimental results. It is found the NMTC/JAM generally shows in good agreement with experiment. Furthermore, the calculation gives good agreement with the experiment for the energy region 20-80 MeV, whereas the NMTC/JAM gives 50% of the experimental data for the heavy nuclide target such as lead and tungsten target. (author)

  19. Contiguous polarisation spectra of the Earth from 300-850 nm measured by GOME-2 onboard MetOp-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilstra, L. G.; Lang, R.; Munro, R.; Aben, I.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present the first contiguous high-resolution spectra of the Earth's polarisation observed by a satellite instrument. The measurements of the Stokes fraction Q/I are performed by the spectrometer GOME-2 onboard the MetOp-A satellite. Polarisation measurements by GOME-2 are performed by onboard polarisation measurement devices (PMDs) and the high-resolution measurements discussed in this paper are taken in the special "PMD RAW" mode of operation. The spectral resolution of these PMD RAW polarisation measurements varies from 3 nm in the ultraviolet (UV) to 35 nm in the near-infrared wavelength range. We first compare measurements of the polarisation from cloud-free scenes with radiative transfer calculations for a number of cases. We find good agreement but also a spectral discrepancy at 800 nm, which we attribute to remaining imperfections in the calibration key data. Secondly, we study the polarisation of scenes with special scattering geometries that normally lead to near-zero Q/I. The GOME-2 polarisation spectra indeed show this behaviour and confirm the existence of the small discrepancy found earlier. Thirdly, we study the Earth polarisation for a variety of scenes. This provides a blueprint of Q/I over land and sea surfaces for various degrees of cloud cover. Fourthly, we compare the spectral dependence of measurements of Q/I in the UV with the generalised distribution function that was proposed in the past (Schutgens and Stammes, 2002) to describe the shape of the UV polarisation spectrum. The GOME-2 data confirm that these functions match the spectral behaviour captured by the GOME-2 PMD RAW mode.

  20. Contiguous polarisation spectra of the Earth from 300 to 850 nm measured by GOME-2 onboard MetOp-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilstra, L. G.; Lang, R.; Munro, R.; Aben, I.; Stammes, P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we present the first contiguous high-resolution spectra of the Earth's polarisation observed by a satellite instrument. The measurements of the Stokes fraction Q/I are performed by the spectrometer GOME-2 onboard the MetOp-A satellite. Polarisation measurements by GOME-2 are performed by onboard polarisation measurement devices (PMDs) and the high-resolution measurements discussed in this paper are taken in the special "PMD RAW" mode of operation. The spectral resolution of these PMD RAW polarisation measurements varies from 3 nm in the ultraviolet (UV) to 35 nm in the near-infrared wavelength range. We first compare measurements of the polarisation from cloud-free scenes with radiative transfer calculations for a number of cases. We find good agreement but also a spectral discrepancy at 800 nm, which we attribute to remaining imperfections in the calibration key data. Secondly, we study the polarisation of scenes with special scattering geometries that normally lead to near-zero Q/I. The GOME-2 polarisation spectra indeed show this behaviour and confirm the existence of the small discrepancy found earlier. Thirdly, we study the Earth polarisation for a variety of scenes. This provides a blueprint of Q/I over land and sea surfaces for various degrees of cloud cover. Fourthly, we compare the spectral dependence of measurements of Q/I in the UV with the generalised distribution function proposed by Schutgens and Stammes (2002) to describe the shape of the UV polarisation spectrum. The GOME-2 data confirm that these functions match the spectral behaviour captured by the GOME-2 PMD RAW mode.

  1. Using GPS TEC measurements to probe ionospheric spatial spectra at mid-latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, E. H.; Parker, P. A.; Light, M. E.; Carrano, C. S.; Debchoudhury, S.; Haaser, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    The physics of how random ionospheric structure causes signal degradation is well understood as weak forward scattering through an effective diffraction grating created by plasma irregularities in the ionosphere. However, the spatial scale spectrum of those irregularities required for input into scintillation models and models of traveling ionospheric disturbances is poorly characterized, particularly at the kilometer to tens of kilometer scale lengths important for very-high-frequency (VHF) scintillation prediction. Furthermore, the majority of characterization studies have been performed in low-latitude or high-latitude regions where geomagnetic activity dominates the physical processes. At mid-latitudes, tropospheric and geomagnetic phenomena compete in disturbing the ionosphere, and it is not well understood how these multiple sources affect the drivers that influence the spatial spectrum. In this study, we are interested in mid-latitude electron density irregularities on the order of 10s of kilometers that would affect VHF signals. Data from the GPS networks Japan GEONET and the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO, UNAVCO) in the western United States were analyzed for this study. Japan GEONET is a dense network of GPS receivers (station spacing of tens of km), with fairly evenly spaced positions over all of Japan. The PBO, on the other hand, has several pockets of extremely dense coverage (station spacing within a few km), but is less dense on average. We analyze a day with a large solar storm (2015/03/17, St. Patrick's Day Storm) to allow high scintillation potential at mid-latitudes, a day with low geomagnetic activity and low thunderstorm activity (2016/01/31), and a day with low geomagnetic activity and high thunderstorm activity (2015/08/02). We then perform two-dimensional spatial analyses on the TEC data from these two networks on scale lengths of 20 to 200 km to infer the spatial scale spectra.

  2. Prospects for Measuring Abundances of >20 Elements with Low-resolution Stellar Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Cargile, Phillip [Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rix, Hans-Walter [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the evolution of the Milky Way calls for the precise abundance determination of many elements in many stars. A common perception is that deriving more than a few elemental abundances ([Fe/H], [ α /Fe], perhaps [C/H], [N/H]) requires medium-to-high spectral resolution, R ≳ 10,000, mostly to overcome the effects of line blending. In a recent work, we presented an efficient and practical way to model the full stellar spectrum, even when fitting a large number of stellar labels simultaneously. In this paper, we quantify to what precision the abundances of many different elements can be recovered, as a function of spectroscopic resolution and wavelength range. In the limit of perfect spectral models and spectral normalization, we show that the precision of elemental abundances is nearly independent of resolution, for a fixed exposure time and number of detector pixels; low-resolution spectra simply afford much higher S/N per pixel and generally larger wavelength range in a single setting. We also show that estimates of most stellar labels are not strongly correlated with one another once R ≳ 1000. Modest errors in the line-spread function, as well as small radial velocity errors, do not affect these conclusions, and data-driven models indicate that spectral (continuum) normalization can be achieved well enough in practice. These results, to be confirmed with an analysis of observed low-resolution data, open up new possibilities for the design of large spectroscopic stellar surveys and for the reanalysis of archival low-resolution data sets.

  3. Indirect measure of X-rays spectra using TLDs; Medicion indirecta de espectros de rayos X utilizando TLDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonzi, E. V.; Mainardi, R. T. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Av. Haya de la Torre y Av. Medina Allende s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, X5016LEA Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-10-15

    A methodology of indirect measure of X-rays spectra, emitted by conventional tubes, was developed recently and its feasibility verified in the first place by Monte Carlo simulations. For that case is intended to measure, by means of plastic scintillators, attenuation curves of dispersed beams previously. In this work were carried out measurements of attenuation curves with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) to verify the kindness of the indirect measure method. The attenuation curve was also measured using an ionization chamber brand Capintec (model 192) with the purpose of making a comparison. The results of the attenuation curve measured with both dosimeters present a good resolution inside the statistical fluctuations and the spectral reconstruction using diverse parametric functions is carried out in a quick and simple way with excellent resolutions in the functional form. For this reconstruction method are of fundamental importance the following properties of the used dosimeter: in the first place the repetition of the measures, property that could check; in second place the precision of the measured data and lastly the dosimeter response, this is, the increase of the thermoluminescent signal before an increase of the photons flow of X-rays. This parameter is the gradient of the curve thermoluminescent signal versus the dose imparted to the dosimeter. The measures were realized with a generator of X-rays brand Kevex provided of a conventional tube with tungsten anti cathode that polarizes with high tension to a maximum value of 50 kV and current of 0.5 ma. (Author)

  4. Theory of fidelity measure in degenerate four-wave mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochove, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    Phase-conjugate beam fidelity is studied in degenerate four-wave mixing with spatially varying pump beams. The analysis includes the effects of probe depletion, diffracting non-linear phase variation focussing, and finally that of losses. Relatively simple algebraic expressions are found for the phase conjugate reflectivity for the cases of collinear and near-collinear beam gemetries. It is found that by focussing the probe beam into the mixing medium, the fraction of energy in the phase conjugate beam which was transferred to other modes, may typically be reduced by one order of magnitude. (Author) [pt

  5. Measurement and modelling of bed shear induced by solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.

    kleiner reibung. Z. Math. Phys., 56: 1- 37. Burbidge, D. and Cummins, P., 2007. Assessing the threat to western australia from tsunami generated by earthquakes along the sunda arc. Natural Hazards, 43(3): 319-331. Christian, J.T., Taylor, P.K., Yen, J....E. and Bernard, E.N., 2006. Tsunami science before and beyond boxing day 2004. Philosophical Transactions - A Math Physics Engineering Science, 364(1845): 2231-2265. Tadepalli, S. and Synolakis, C.E., 1994. The run-up of n-waves on sloping beaches...

  6. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, W.C.; Mahoney, M.J.; Jacobson, A.R.; Knowles, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities. 10 references

  7. Cluster multispacecraft measurement of spatial scales of foreshock Langmuir waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, Jan; Santolík, Ondřej; Dudok de Wit, T.; Pickett, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 114, A02 (2009), A02213/1-A02213/11 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA301120601; GA AV ČR IAA300420602; GA AV ČR IAA300420702 Grant - others:Czech Science Foundation(CZ) 20508P129; NASA (US) NNX07AI24G Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : kinetic waves and instabilities * solar wind * multi-spacecraft methods Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.082, year: 2009

  8. Evaluation of wave power by integrating numerical models and measures at the Port of Civitavecchia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladini de Mendoza, Francesco; Bonamano, Simone; Carli, Filippo Maria; Marcelli, Marco; Danelli, Andrea; Peviani, Maximo Aurelio; Burgio, Calogero

    2015-01-01

    An assessment of the available wave power at regional and local scale was carried out. Two hot spots of higher wave power level were identified and characterized along the coastline of northern Latium Region, near the 'Torre Valdaliga' power plant and in proximity of Civitavecchia’s breakwater, where the presence of a harbour and an electric power plant allows wave energy exploitation. The evaluation process was implemented through measurements, and numerical model assessment and validation. The integration of wave gauges measurements with numerical simulations made it possible to estimate the wave power on the extended area near shore. A down scaling process allowed to proceed from regional to local scale providing increased resolution thanks to highly detailed bathymetry.

  9. Measurements of millimeter wave radar transmission and backscatter during dusty infrared test 2, dirt 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petito, F. C.; Wentworth, E. W.

    1980-05-01

    Recently there has been much interest expressed to determine the ability of millimeter wave radar to perform target acquisition during degraded visibility conditions. In this regard, one of the primary issues of concern has been the potential of high-explosive artillery barrages to obscure the battlefield from millimeter wave radar systems. To address this issue 95 GHz millimeter wave radar measurements were conducted during the Dusty Infrared Test 2 (DIRT 2). This test was held at White Sands Missile Range, NM, 18-28 July 1979. Millimeter wave transmission and backscatter measurements were performed during singular live firings and static detonations of 155 mm and 105 mm high-explosive artillery rounds in addition to static detonations of C-4 explosives. A brief description of the millimeter wave portion of the test and instrumentation is given. The data along with some preliminary conclusions are presented.

  10. Prospects for ion temperature measurements in JET by Thomson scattering of submillimetre waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitbourn, L.B.

    1975-03-01

    The Thomson scattering of submillimeter waves is envisaged as a possible means for measuring the ion temperature of the JET plasma. The present discussion is principally concerned with the practical limitations imposed to the method by the availability of high power pulsed sources and sensitive detectors and noise due to plasma emission at submillimeter wavelengths (bremsstrahlung and electron cyclotron emission). Coherent scattering from plasma wave (e.g. ion acoustic waves and electron drift waves) with millimeter and submillimeter waves are considered briefly. Further suitable development of lasers and heterodyne detectors would make such measurements possible. A pulsed HCN laser associated with a detectors with a lower heterodyne noise equivalent power could then be used to advantage. For scattering with CH 3 F laser the NEP of a Josephson junction would be adequate because a relatively high level of plasma emission is expected at 496 μm [fr

  11. Improved Micro Rain Radar snow measurements using Doppler spectra post-processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maahn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Micro Rain Radar 2 (MRR is a compact Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW system that operates at 24 GHz. The MRR is a low-cost, portable radar system that requires minimum supervision in the field. As such, the MRR is a frequently used radar system for conducting precipitation research. Current MRR drawbacks are the lack of a sophisticated post-processing algorithm to improve its sensitivity (currently at +3 dBz, spurious artefacts concerning radar receiver noise and the lack of high quality Doppler radar moments. Here we propose an improved processing method which is especially suited for snow observations and provides reliable values of effective reflectivity, Doppler velocity and spectral width. The proposed method is freely available on the web and features a noise removal based on recognition of the most significant peak. A dynamic dealiasing routine allows observations even if the Nyquist velocity range is exceeded. Collocated observations over 115 days of a MRR and a pulsed 35.2 GHz MIRA35 cloud radar show a very high agreement for the proposed method for snow, if reflectivities are larger than −5 dBz. The overall sensitivity is increased to −14 and −8 dBz, depending on range. The proposed method exploits the full potential of MRR's hardware and substantially enhances the use of Micro Rain Radar for studies of solid precipitation.

  12. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  13. Directional spectrum of ocean waves from array measurements using phase/time/path difference methods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.

    Wave direction has for the first time been consistently, accurately and unambiguously evaluated from array measurements using the phase/time/path difference (PTPD) methods of Esteva in case of polygonal arrays and Borgman in case of linear arrays...

  14. Video measurements of fluid velocities and water levels in breaking waves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cost-effective measurement of the velocity flow fields in breaking water waves, using particle and correlation image velocimetry, is described. The fluid velocities are estimated by tracking the motion of neutrally buoyant particles and aeration...

  15. Laboratory Measurements of Mass Specific Absorption Spectra for Suites of Black Carbon-like, Biomass Burning and Mineral Dust Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radney, J.; Zangmeister, C.

    2017-12-01

    Light-absorbing atmospheric aerosols can be grouped into three categories: black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC) or mineral dust (MD). In many cases, the absorption of these species is best quantified using a mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) since the particles are in the Rayleigh regime (BC) or optically thin (BrC and MD); notably, MAC values are both traceable to the SI and transferrable between photoacoustic spectroscopy and filter-based absorption measurements. Here, we present laboratory measurements of MAC for all three light-absorbing aerosol classes. Particles were size- and mass-selected using a differential mobility analyzer and aerosol particle mass analyzer, respectively, with absorption coefficients (αabs) and number concentrations (N) being measured by a broadband photoacoustic spectrometer and condensation particle counter, respectively. This suite of instrumentation allows for direct quantification of MAC from the measured parameters (MAC = αabs/Nmp). Further, the measurements contained > 8 data points spanning λ = 405 nm to 840 nm allowing for spectral curvatures (i.e. the Absorption Angstrom Exponent or AAE) to be fit from many data points versus the more common 2-point interpolations. For the carbonaceous, BC-like aerosols - five samples generated from flames, spark discharge soot (i.e. fullerene soot), graphene, reduced graphene oxide (rGO), and fullerene (C60) - we found: 1) measured MAC ranged between 2.4 m2 g-1 and 8.6 m2 g-1 at λ = 550 nm, 2) most AAEs ranged between 0.5 and 1.3; C60 AAE was 7.5 ± 0.9 and 3) MAC spectra were dependent on fuel type and formation conditions. For BrC particles generated from smoldering combustion of 3 hardwood (Oak, Hickory and Mesquite) and 3 softwood species (Western redcedar, Blue spruce and Baldcypress), we found: 1) median MAC values ranged from 1.4 x 10-2 m2 g-1 to 7.9 x 10-2 m2 g-1 at λ = 550 nm, 2) AAE values ranged between 3.5 and 6.2, and 3) Oak, Western redcedar and Blue spruce

  16. MARVEL analysis of the measured high-resolution rovibrational spectra of C2H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Katy L.; Joseph, Megan; Franklin, Jack; Choudhury, Naail; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Császár, Attila G.; Gaspard, Glenda; Oguoko, Patari; Kelly, Adam; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Sousa-Silva, Clara

    2018-01-01

    Rotation-vibration energy levels are determined for the electronic ground state of the acetylene molecule, 12C2H2, using the Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels (MARVEL) technique. 37,813 measured transitions from 61 publications are considered. The distinct components of the spectroscopic network linking ortho and para states of the molecule are considered separately. The 20,717 ortho and 17,096 para transitions measured experimentally are used to determine 6013 ortho and 5200 para energy levels. The MARVEL results are compared with alternative compilations based on the use of effective Hamiltonians.

  17. Measurements of Cross Sections and Charged Pion Spectra in Proton-Carbon Interactions at 31 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N; Andrieu, B; Anticic, T; Antoniou, N; Argyriades, J; Asryan, A G; Baatar, B; Blondel, A; Blumer, J; Bogusz, M; Boldizsar, L; Bravar, A; Brooks, W; Brzychczyk, J; Bubak, A; Bunyatov, S A; Busygina, O; Cetner, T; Choi, K -U; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Czopowicz, T; Davis, N; Diakonos, F; Di Luise, S; Dominik, W; Dumarchez, J; Engel, R; Ereditato, A; Esposito, L S; Feofilov, G A; Fodor, Z; Ferrero, A; Fulop, A; Garrido, X; Gazdzicki, M; Golubeva, M; Grebieszkow, K; Grzeszczuk, A; Guber, F; Hakobyan, H; Hasegawa, T; Igolkin, S; Ivanov, A S; Ivanov, Y; Ivashkin, A; Kadija, K; Kapoyannis, A; Katrynska, N N; Kielczewska, D; Kikola, D; Kim, J -H; Kirejczyk, M; Kisiel, J; Kobayashi, T; Kochebina, O; Kolesnikov, V I; Kolev, D; Kondratiev, V P; Korzenev, A; Kowalski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kurepin, A; Lacey, R; Lagoda, J; Laszlo, A; Lyubushkin, V V; Mackowiak, M; Majka, Z; Malakhov, A I; Marchionni, A; Marcinek, A; Maris, I; Marin, V; Matulewicz, T; Matveev, V; Melkumov, G L; Meregaglia, A; Messina, M; Mrowczynski, St; Murphy, S; Nakadaira, T; Naumenko, P A; Nishikawa, K; Palczewski, T; Palla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Peryt, W; Petukhov, O; Planeta, R.; Pluta, J; Popov, B A; Posiadala, M; Pu lawski, S; Rauch, W; Ravonel, M; Renfordt, R; Robert, A; Rohrich, D; Rondio, E; Rossi, B; Roth, M; Rubbia, A; Rybczynski, M; Sadovsky, A; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Seyboth, P; Shibata, M; Sissakian, A N; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M.; Sorin, A S; Staszel, P; Stefanek, G; Stepaniak, J; Strabel, C; Strobele, H; Susa, T; Szaik, P; Szuba, M; Tada, M; Taranenko, A; Tsenov, R; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Vassiliou, M; Vechernin, V V; Vesztergombi, G; Wilczek, A; lodarczyk, Z W; Wojtaszek, A; Yi, J -G; Yoo, I -K; Zipper, W

    2011-01-01

    Interaction cross sections and charged pion spectra in p+C interactions at 31 GeV/c were measured with the large acceptance NA61/SHINE spectrometer at the CERN SPS. These data are required to improve predictions of the neutrino flux for the T2K long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in Japan. A set of data collected during the first NA61/SHINE run in 2007 with an isotropic graphite target with a thickness of 4% of a nuclear interaction length was used for the analysis. The measured p+C inelastic and production cross sections are 257.2 +- 1.9 +- 8.9 mb and 229.3 +- 1.9 +- 9.0 mb, respectively. Inclusive production cross sections for negatively and positively charged pions are presented as a function of laboratory momentum in 10 intervals of the laboratory polar angle covering the range from 0 up to 420 mrad. The spectra are compared with predictions of several hadron production models.

  18. Sheet flow measurements on a surf-zone sandbar under shoaling and breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieras, R.; Puleo, J. A.; Cox, D. T.; Anderson, D. L.; Kim, Y.; Hsu, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    A large-scale experiment to quantify sheet flow processes over a sandbar under varying levels of wave steepness was conducted in the wave flume at Oregon State University's O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory. A fixed profile was constructed with concrete slabs anchored to the flume side walls, with the exception of the sandbar crest, where a steel pit was installed and filled with well-sorted sediment (d50 0.17 mm). This hybrid approach allowed for the isolation of small-scale bed response to large-scale wave forcing over the sandbar, where an array of sensors was positioned to measure hydrodynamic forcing and sediment response. Near-bed ( 0.08 m3/m3) were approximated using Conductivity Concentration Profilers. Test conditions consisted of a regular wave train with incident wave heights for individual runs ranging from 0.4 m to 0.6 m and incident wave periods from 5 s to 9 s, encompassing a variety of skewed and asymmetric wave shapes across the shoaling and breaking regimes. Ensemble-averaged sediment concentration profiles exhibit considerable variation across the different conditions. The largest variation in sheet layer thickness occurs beneath the wave crest, ranging from 30 grain diameters for 5 sec, 0.4 m waves, up to 80 grain diameters for 7 sec, 0.6 m waves. Furthermore, the initiation and duration of sheet flow relative to the wave period differs for each condition set. It is likely that more than one mechanism plays a role in determining the aforementioned sheet layer characteristics. In the present work, we focus on the relative magnitude and phase of the near-bed flow acceleration and shear stress in determining the characteristics of the sheet layer.

  19. Simulation and Measurements of Small Arms Blast Wave Overpressure in the Process of Designing a Silencer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristov Nebojša

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulation and measurements of muzzle blast overpressure and its physical manifestations are studied in this paper. The use of a silencer can have a great influence on the overpressure intensity. A silencer is regarded as an acoustic transducer and a waveguide. Wave equations for an acoustic dotted source of directed effect are used for physical interpretation of overpressure as an acoustic phenomenon. Decomposition approach has proven to be suitable to describe the formation of the output wave of the wave transducer. Electroacoustic analogies are used for simulations. A measurement chain was used to compare the simulation results with the experimental ones.

  20. A unified approach to deconvolution radiation spectra measured by radiochromic films

    CERN Document Server

    Stancic, V; Ljubenov, V

    2002-01-01

    A method for the evaluation of energy distribution of a radiation source on the basis of measured space distribution of deposited energy is proposed. The measured data were obtained by using radiochromic films. Mathematical modeling is defined as a Fredholm integral equation inversion problem. Negative solutions were treated as an additional condition expressed through undefined energy group boundaries, caused by virtue of the physical phenomenon of statistical uncertainty. Examples are given of the electron source and neutron radiation field.

  1. An optimal ross filter system for soft X-ray spectra measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Tianxuan; Zheng Zhijian; Sun Kexu; Jiang Shaoen

    2000-01-01

    A broadband Ross filter spectrometer is described for measuring soft X-ray radiation (0.1∼1.5 keV) emitted from laser plasma. It consists of a number of channels, each representing a Ross filter pair in conjunction with Al cathode X-ray diodes. An optimal channel has flat response within the sensitivity band, and minimal response outside it. The effect of some uncertainties on the accuracy of measurements is calculated

  2. Power performance measurements on Wave Star in Nissum Bredning. Final report; Wave energy converter; Effektmaalinger paa Wave Star i Nissum Bredning. Afsluttende rapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigaard, P.; Lykke Andersen, T.

    2009-04-15

    The Wave Star test machine in Nissum Bredning was put in continuous operation on 24 July 2006. Over the past 2 1/2 years the produced power was measured continuously and with only minor interruptions. The measurements cover operation for all seasons in a very changeable climate. There is thus gaining operational experience under different wave conditions. In the period the machine has been running with a simple form of control and Power Take Off system (PTO), which form the background for effect measurements with the existing control strategy. Calculations have shown that the use of more advanced forms of control can increase the efficiency of Wave Star significantly. New control systems are therefore still under development with the primary objective to increase performance from the wave energy plant. To test and develop the methods, a new mini-hydraulic station with associated second generation PTO was developed and constructed for testing in Nissum Bredning. The mini-hydraulic station is coupled to a single float, while the other machine's 39 floats are still connected to the existing PTO system. As the existing PTO system can be applied to the 39 floats simultaneously with the new PTO used on 1 float, effect can be measured on the two systems simultaneously. The first tentative experiments with the new second generation PTO seem very promising. During the first measurements made in March 2009 the new system achieved an average yield of 3.1 times the average output from a float on the existing machine. In the coming period more experiments will be performed with the mini-hydraulic station to test the new PTO in various sea conditions. Since the mini-hydraulic station can simulate various forms of control, they also will be tested under real wave conditions in Nissum Bredning. The effect optimization should continue to be subject to a greater targeted effort, as improvements in this area can increase energy production and thus reduce the kWh cost of energy

  3. Direct Measurement of the Mode O Turbulent Boundary Layer Wall Pressure and Wall Shear Stress Spectra Using Air-Backed and Oil-Filled Multichannel Wavenumber Filters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peloquin, Mark

    1999-01-01

    ..., thin cylinder in an axial flow field. These measurements, processed as wavenumber-frequency spectra, were made with a multichannel array composed of an air-backed cylinder structure and a 32-channel aperture of PVDF film sensors having...

  4. Charge exchange recombination in X-ray spectra of He-like argon measured at the tokamak TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlummer, Tobias

    2014-06-16

    Charge exchange recombination between ions and atomic hydrogen is an important atomic process in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Besides radiative cooling of the plasma edge, charge exchange causes modifications of the ionization balance and the population densities of excited ion states. The central goal of this work is to investigate the influence of charge exchange on X-ray spectra measured at the tokamak TEXTOR. A new 2D X-ray spectrometer developed for future use at the stellarator W7-X was recently installed at TEXTOR. The spectrometer is optimized for measuring the K{sub α}-spectrum of He-like argon (1s2l - 1s{sup 2}) at wavelengths close to 4 Aa. K{sub α}-spectroscopy on He-like impurity ions is an established diagnostic for electron and ion temperature measurements in fusion plasmas. Still, up to now the observed intensity ratios of the K{sub α}-lines and their associated satellites are not fully understood. They show significant deviations from the predictions made by basic corona models. In the past charge exchange with the neutral particle background and radial impurity transport have been discussed as likely explanations. Yet a detailed description of the experimental spectra still has not been achieved. To reconstruct the 2D K{sub α}-spectra measured at TEXTOR the radial argon ion distribution is modeled using an impurity transport code. The model accounts for charge exchange and transport on basis of given radial profiles of the neutral particle density n{sub 0}(r) and the diffusion coefficient D {sub perpendicular} {sub to} (r). The theoretical spectrum is then constructed based on the processes relevant for line emission. Within an iterative procedure n{sub 0}(r) and D {sub perpendicular} {sub to} (r) are varied until consistency between the theoretical and the experimental spectra is achieved. It is shown that the 2D K{sub α}-spectra allow a clear distinction of charge exchange and transport effects, ensuring unique solutions for n

  5. Quantifying K, U and Th contents of marine sediments using shipboard natural gamma radiation spectra measured on DV JOIDES Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleeschouwer, David; Dunlea, Ann G.; Auer, Gerald; Anderson, Chloe H.; Brumsack, Hans; de Loach, Aaron; Gurnis, Michael C.; Huh, Youngsook; Ishiwa, Takeshige; Jang, Kwangchul; Kominz, Michelle A.; März, Christian; Schnetger, Bernhard; Murray, Richard W.; Pälike, Heiko; Expedition 356 shipboard scientists, IODP

    2017-04-01

    During International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) expeditions, shipboard-generated data provide the first insights into the cored sequences. The natural gamma radiation (NGR) of the recovered material, for example, is routinely measured on the ocean drilling research vessel DV JOIDES Resolution. At present, only total NGR counts are readily available as shipboard data, although full NGR spectra (counts as a function of gamma-ray energy level) are produced and archived. These spectra contain unexploited information, as one can estimate the sedimentary contents of potassium (K), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) from the characteristic gamma-ray energies of isotopes in the 40K, 232Th, and 238U radioactive decay series. Dunlea et al. [2013] quantified K, Th and U contents in sediment from the South Pacific Gyre by integrating counts over specific energy levels of the NGR spectrum. However, the algorithm used in their study is unavailable to the wider scientific community due to commercial proprietary reasons. Here, we present a new MATLAB algorithm for the quantification of NGR spectra that is transparent and accessible to future NGR users. We demonstrate the algorithm's performance by comparing its results to shore-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-emission spectrometry (ICP-ES), and quantitative wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses. Samples for these comparisons come from eleven sites (U1341, U1343, U1366-U1369, U1414, U1428-U1430, U1463) cored in two oceans during five expeditions. In short, our algorithm rapidly produces detailed high-quality information on sediment properties during IODP expeditions at no extra cost. Dunlea, A. G., R. W. Murray, R. N. Harris, M. A. Vasiliev, H. Evans, A. J. Spivack, and S. D'Hondt (2013), Assessment and use of NGR instrumentation on the JOIDES Resolution to quantify U, Th, and K concentrations in marine sediment, Scientific Drilling, 15, 57-63.

  6. A measurement of the absolute energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays during the 1976-77 solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrickson, J. H.; Parnell, T. A.; Austin, R. W.; Selig, W. J.; Gregory, J. C.

    An instrument designed to measure elemental cosmic ray abundances from boron to nickel in the energy region 0.5-2.0 GeV/nucl was flown on a high altitude balloon from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on 30 September through 1 October 1976 at an average atmospheric depth of about 5 g/sq cm. Differential energy spectra of B, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe, extrapolated to the top of the atmosphere, were measured. The float altitude exposure of 17 h ended near Alpena, Michigan. The flight trajectory maintained a north easterly heading out of Sioux Falls traversing the upper midwest region between 84 and 97 deg west longitude while remaining between 43.5 and 45 deg north latitude. The maximum vertical cut-off for this flight path was 1.77 GV or 0.35 GeV/nucl.

  7. A measurement of the absolute energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays during the 1976-77 solar minimum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrickson, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Austin, R.W.; Selig, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    An instrument designed to measure elemental cosmic ray abundances from boron to nickel in the energy region 0.5-2.0 GeV nucl -1 was flown on a high altitude balloon from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on 30 September through 1 October 1976 at an average atmospheric depth of ∼5 g cm -2 . Differential energy spectra of B, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe, extrapolated to the top of the atmosphere, were measured. The float altitude exposure of 17 h ended near Alpena, Michigan. The flight trajectory maintained a north easterly heading out of Sioux Falls traversing the upper mid-west region between 84 o and 97 o west longitude while remaining between 43.5 o and 45 o north latitude. The maximum vertical cut-off for this flight path was 1.77 GV or 0.35 GeV nucl -1 . (author)

  8. Influence of neutron scattering and source extent on the measurement of neutron energy spectra at ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, K.; Baetzner, R.; Roos, M.; Robouch, B.V.; Ingrosso, L.; Wurz, H.

    1987-08-01

    The problem of nuclear emulsion measurements at ASDEX is considered. Besides the application of the VINIA-3DAMC software, this needs a description of the plasma neutron source, a model of the ASDEX structure, and calculation of the response of the nuclear emulsion to the incoming spectral neutron fluence. The latter is essential for comparing the numerical results with measurements at ASDEX. To treat this part, the NEPMC software was developed. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the feasibility, reliability and usefulness of the method. Therefore simplified treatments for the ASDEX model, the plasma neutron source and the track statistics in the NEPMC software were used. Such calculations are of interest not only for nuclear emulsion measurements as well as any other neutron diagnostics, but also for all problems of neutron shielding for other diagnostics. (orig./GG)

  9. Quantification of aluminium-27 NMR spectra of high-surface-area oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, R.M.; Schramm, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the quantitation of 27 Al NMR spectra. It is showns that the so called 'invisible' aluminium atoms seen by recent workers are completely consistent with known continuous wave NMR studies of the 27 Al NMR spectra of high surface area aluminium oxides. The use of pulsed NMR techniques further complicate the quantitative measurement of 27 Al NMR spectra, especially when high resolution NMR spectrometers are used for this purpose. Methods are described which allow both the estimation of aluminium not seen by continuous wave techniques and the amounts of the NMR spectra lost in pulsed work. (author). 24 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Wave Shape and Impact Pressure Measurements at a Rock Coast Cliff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, S. J.; Rosser, N. J.; Brain, M.; Vann Jones, E. C.

    2016-02-01

    Rock coast research focuses largely on wave behaviour across beaches and shore platforms but rarely considers direct wave interaction with cliffs. Hydraulic action is one of the most important drivers of erosion along rock coasts. The magnitude of wave impact pressure has been shown by numerical and laboratory studies to be related to the wave shape. In deep water, a structure is only subjected to the hydrostatic pressure due to the oscillating clapotis. Dynamic pressures, related to the wave celerity, are exerted in shallower water when the wave is breaking at the point of impact; very high magnitude, short duration shock pressures are theorised to occur when the approaching wavefront is vertical. As such, wave shape may directly influence the potential of the impact to weaken rock and cause erosion. Measurements of impact pressure at coastal cliffs are limited, and the occurrence and influence of this phenomenon is currently poorly constrained. To address this, we have undertaken a field monitoring study on the magnitude and vertical distribution of wave impact pressures at the rocky, macro-tidal coastline of Staithes, North Yorkshire, UK. A series of piezo-resistive pressure transducers and a camera were installed at the base of the cliff during low tide. Transducers were deployed vertically up the cliff face and aligned shore-normal to capture the variation in static and dynamic pressure with height during a full spring tidal cycle. Five minute bursts of 5 kHz pressure readings and 4 Hz wave imaging were sampled every 30 minutes for six hours during high tide. Pressure measurements were then compensated for temperature and combined with wave imaging to produce a pressure time series and qualitative wave shape category for each wave impact. Results indicate the presence of a non-linear relationship between pressure impact magnitude, the occurrence of shock pressures, wave shape and tidal stage, and suggest that breaker type on impact (and controls thereof) may

  11. A novel technique to measure intensity fluctuations in EUV images and to detect coronal sound waves nearby active regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenborg, G.; Marsch, E.; Vourlidas, A.; Howard, R.; Baldwin, K.

    2011-02-01

    Context. In the past years, evidence for the existence of outward-moving (Doppler blue-shifted) plasma and slow-mode magneto-acoustic propagating waves in various magnetic field structures (loops in particular) in the solar corona has been found in ultraviolet images and spectra. Yet their origin and possible connection to and importance for the mass and energy supply to the corona and solar wind is still unclear. There has been increasing interest in this problem thanks to the high-resolution observations available from the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imagers on the Solar TErrestrial RElationships Observatory (STEREO) and the EUV spectrometer on the Hinode mission. Aims: Flows and waves exist in the corona, and their signatures appear in EUV imaging observations but are extremely difficult to analyse quantitatively because of their weak intensity. Hence, such information is currently available mostly from spectroscopic observations that are restricted in their spatial and temporal coverage. To understand the nature and origin of these fluctuations, imaging observations are essential. Here, we present measurements of the speed of intensity fluctuations observed along apparently open field lines with the Extreme UltraViolet Imagers (EUVI) onboard the STEREO mission. One aim of our paper is to demonstrate that we can make reliable kinematic measurements from these EUV images, thereby complementing and extending the spectroscopic measurements and opening up the full corona for such an analysis. Another aim is to examine the assumptions that lead to flow versus wave interpretation for these fluctuations. Methods: We have developed a novel image-processing method by fusing well established techniques for the kinematic analysis of coronal mass ejections (CME) with standard wavelet analysis. The power of our method lies with its ability to recover weak intensity fluctuations along individual magnetic structures at any orientation , anywhere within the full solar disk , and

  12. Measurement of deuteron spectra and elliptic flow in Pb–Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV at the LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acharya, S.; Adamová, D.; Adolfsson, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Alba, J. L. B.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altenkamper, L.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andreou, D.; Andrews, H. A.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anson, C. D.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Anwar, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.C.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barioglio, L.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boca, G.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonomi, G.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Bratrud, L.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Broker, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buhler, P.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Capon, A. A.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A R; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cerello, P.; Chandra, S.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, Sukhee; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Chowdhury, T.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Concas, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Costanza, S.; Crkovská, J.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Conti, C.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Souza, R. Derradi; Degenhardt, H. F.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Doremalen, L. V. V.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Duggal, A. K.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eulisse, G.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabbietti, L.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; De Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garg, K.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; Germain, M.; Ghosh, J.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Greiner, L. C.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosa, F.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Guzman, I. B.; Haake, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Haque, M. R.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hassan, H.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hills, C.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hohlweger, B.; Horak, D.; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Hughes, C.W.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Iga Buitron, S. A.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Isakov, V.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacak, B.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jaelani, S.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H S Y; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jercic, M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karczmarczyk, P.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L.D.; Keil, M.; Ketzer, B.; Khabanova, Z.; Khan, P.M.; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Khatun, A.; Khuntia, A.; Kielbowicz, M. M.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D.-S.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.L.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kundu, Seema; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lai, Y. S.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lavicka, R.; Lazaridis, L.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Strunz-Lehner, Christine; Lehrbach, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lim, B.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lindsay, S. W.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Litichevskyi, V.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Llope, W. J.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Loncar, P.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lupi, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Malinina, L.; Mal’Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, Alicia; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martinez, J. A. L.; Martínez, Isabel M.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Masson, E.; Mastroserio, A.; Mathis, A. M.; Matyja, A.; mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzilli, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Mhlanga, S.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mihaylov, D. L.; Mihaylov, D. L.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Münning, K.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Myers, C. J.; Myrcha, J. W.; Naik, B.; Nair, Rajiv; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Narayan, A.; Naru, M. U.; Natal Da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Negrao De Oliveira, R. A.; Nellen, L.; Nesbo, S. V.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nobuhiro, A.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Ohlson, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pacik, V.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Palni, P.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Panebianco, S.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Pathak, S. P.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, X.; Pereira, L. G.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Pezzi, R. P.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pliquett, F.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L M; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Poppenborg, H.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pozdniakov, V.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Rana, D. B.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Ratza, V.; Ravasenga, I.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Rokita, P. S.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosas, E. D.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Rotondi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rueda, O. V.; Rui, R.; Rumyantsev, B.; Rustamov, A.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Saha, S. K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sandoval, A.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Sas, M. H.P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Scheid, H. S.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, M. O.; Schmidt, M.; Schmidt, N. V.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sett, P.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shahoyan, R.; Shaikh, W.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q. Y.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J.M.; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stocco, D.; Storetvedt, M. M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A P; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S.; Szabo, A.; Szarka, I.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thakur, D.; Thakur, J. S.; Thomas, D.; Thoresen, F.; Tieulent, R.; Tikhonov, A.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; tripathy, S.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Tropp, Linda; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Umaka, E. N.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vázquez Doce, O.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Vértesi, R.; Vickovic, L.; Vigolo, S.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Voscek, D.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Wagner, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wenzel, S. C.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Willems, G. A.; Williams, M. C S; Willsher, E.; Windelband, B.; Witt, W. E.; Yalcin, S.; Yamakawa, K.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I. K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zmeskal, J.; Zou, Shui

    2017-01-01

    The transverse momentum (pT) spectra and elliptic flow coefficient (v2) of deuterons and anti-deuterons at mid-rapidity (| y| < 0.5) are measured with the ALICE detector at the LHC in Pb–Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV. The measurement of the pT spectra of (anti-)deuterons is done up to 8 GeV/c in

  13. Measurements of the parallel wavenumber of lower hybrid waves in the scrape-off layer of a high-density tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, S. G.; Wallace, G. M.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Brunner, D.; Faust, I.; LaBombard, B. L.; Wukitch, S.; Shinya, T.; Takase, Y.

    2016-01-01

    In lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments on tokamaks, the parallel wavenumber of lower hybrid waves is an important physics parameter that governs the wave propagation and absorption physics. However, this parameter has not been experimentally well-characterized in the present-day high density tokamaks, despite the advances in the wave physics modeling. In this paper, we present the first measurement of the dominant parallel wavenumber of lower hybrid waves in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak with an array of magnetic loop probes. The electric field strength measured with the probe in typical C-Mod plasmas is about one-fifth of that of the electric field at the mouth of the grill antenna. The amplitude and phase responses of the measured signals on the applied power spectrum are consistent with the expected wave energy propagation. At higher density, the observed k || increases for the fixed launched k || , and the wave amplitude decreases rapidly. This decrease is correlated with the loss of LHCD efficiency at high density, suggesting the presence of loss mechanisms. Evidence of the spectral broadening mechanisms is observed in the frequency spectra. However, no clear modifications in the dominant k || are observed in the spectrally broadened wave components, as compared to the measured k || at the applied frequency. It could be due to (1) the probe being in the SOL and (2) the limited k || resolution of the diagnostic. Future experiments are planned to investigate the roles of the observed spectral broadening mechanisms on the LH density limit problem in the strong single pass damping regime.

  14. Noncontact measurement of guided ultrasonic wave scattering for fatigue crack characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, P.

    2013-04-01

    Fatigue cracks can develop in aerospace structures at locations of stress concentration such as fasteners. For the safe operation of the aircraft fatigue cracks need to be detected before reaching a critical length. Guided ultrasonic waves offer an efficient method for the detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in large aerospace structures. Noncontact excitation of guided waves was achieved using electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT). The transducers were developed for the specific excitation of the A0 Lamb mode. Based on the induced eddy currents in the plate a simple theoretical model was developed and reasonably good agreement with the measurements was achieved. However, the detection sensitivity for fatigue cracks depends on the location and orientation of the crack relative to the measurement locations. Crack-like defects have a directionality pattern of the scattered field depending on the angle of the incident wave relative to the defect orientation and on the ratio of the characteristic defect size to wavelength. The detailed angular dependency of the guided wave field scattered at crack-like defects in plate structures has been measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Good agreement with 3D Finite Element simulation predictions was achieved for machined part-through and through-thickness notches. The amplitude of the scattered wave was quantified for a variation of angle of the incident wave relative to the defect orientation and the defect depth. These results provide the basis for the defect characterization in aerospace structures using guided wave sensors.

  15. Stochastic Parameter Estimation of Non-Linear Systems Using Only Higher Order Spectra of the Measured Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasta, M.; Roberts, J. B.

    1998-06-01

    Methods for using fourth order spectral quantities to estimate the unknown parameters in non-linear, randomly excited dynamic systems are developed. Attention is focused on the case where only the response is measurable and the excitation is unmeasurable and known only in terms of a stochastic process model. The approach is illustrated through application to a non-linear oscillator with both non-linear damping and stiffness and with excitation modelled as a stationary Gaussian white noise process. The methods have applications in studies of the response of structures to random environmental loads, such as wind and ocean wave forces.

  16. Measurement of charged particle spectra in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia)] [and others; Collaboration: H1 Collaboration

    2013-01-15

    Charged particle production in deep-inelastic ep scattering is measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The kinematic range of the analysis covers low photon virtualities, 5measured as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}{sup *}) and transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup *}) in the range 0<{eta}{sup *}<5 and 0

  17. Measurement of charged particle spectra in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexa, C.; Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Kleinwort, C.; Kraemer, M.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T. [Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Boudry, V.; Specka, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Pandurovic, M. [University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Brandt, G. [Oxford University, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Orsay (France); Buniatyan, A.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Lubimov, V.; Rostovtsev, A.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E. [CINVESTAV, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Ceccopieri, F.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Staykova, Z.; Mechelen, P.Van [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerpen (Belgium); Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Cvach, J.; Hladky and grave, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Daum, K.; Meyer, H. [Universitaet Wuppertal, Fachbereich C, Wuppertal (Germany); Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C. [Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM, Marseille (France); Dodonov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Dossanov, A. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L. [CE-Saclay, CEA, DSM/Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferencei, J. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Experimental Physics, Kosice (Slovakia); Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Grab, C. [ETH, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Henderson, R.C.W. [University of Lancaster, Department of Physics, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R. [CINVESTAV IPN, Departamento de Fisica, Mexico City (Mexico); Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Joensson, L. [University of Lund, Physics Department, Lund (Sweden); Jung, H. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerpen (Belgium); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kogler, R.; Nowak, K. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D. [Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Martyn, H.U. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [University of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (Montenegro); Soloviev, Y. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stella, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Roma Tre (Italy); INFN Roma 3, Roma (Italy); Sykora, T. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerpen (Belgium); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Tsakov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Wegener, D. [TU Dortmund, Institut fuer Physik, Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: The H1 Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    Charged particle production in deep-inelastic ep scattering is measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The kinematic range of the analysis covers low photon virtualities, 5 < Q{sup 2} < 100 GeV{sup 2}, and small values of Bjorken-x, 10{sup -4} < x < 10{sup -2}. The analysis is performed in the hadronic centre-of-mass system. The charged particle densities are measured as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}{sup *}) and transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup *}) in the range 0<{eta}{sup *} < 5 and 0

  18. Measurement of Charged Particle Spectra in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Alexa, C.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kramer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2013-04-20

    Charged particle production in deep-inelastic ep scattering is measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The kinematic range of the analysis covers low photon virtualities, 5 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2, and small values of Bjorken-x, 10^{-4} < x < 10^{-2}. The analysis is performed in the hadronic centre-of-mass system. The charged particle densities are measured as a function of pseudorapidity (eta^*) and transverse momentum (p_T^*) in the range 0< \\eta^* < 5 and 0< p_T^* < 10$ GeV differentially in x and Q^2. The data are compared to predictions from different Monte Carlo generators implementing various options for hadronisation and parton evolutions.

  19. Thermal neutron spectra measurements in IEAR-1 Reactor, by using a crystal spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulfaro, R.; Figueiredo Neto, A.M.; Stasiulevicius, E.; Vinhas, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal neutron spectrum of the IEN Argonauta reactor has been measured in the wavelength from 0.7 to 1.9A, using a neutron crystal spectrometer. An aluminium single crystal, in transmission, was used as monochromator. The aluminium crystal reflectivity employed in the analysis of the data was calculated for the first five permitted orders. An effective absorption coefficient of the crystal was used to perform the calculations instead of the macroscopic cross section of the element

  20. Monte Carlo calculations and measurements of spectra from a C-14 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, J.

    1996-05-01

    To perform Monte Carlo simulations it is necessary to model the physical geometries i.e., the source and detector geometry. However, a complete model of the physical geometry may not be possible or may result in a very low calculation efficiency. Substituting the complete source model with a simplified model is one way of increasing the calculation efficiency. In this report, the study of a simplified model of a 14 C source is described. Results of Monte Carlo calculations with the EGS4 code are compared with measurements with a β spectrometer consisting of two coaxial Si detectors, and a low-energy photon spectrometer being a Si(Li) detector. Calculations and measurements show generally good agreement. However, the difference (a factor of 4) between calculated and measured response to electrons for the Si(Li) detector indicates that this detector has a dead layer about 12 μm thick instead of 0.2 μm as reported by the manufacturer. The efficiency of the calculations is increased by a factor of 10, when the complete source model is replaced by the simplified source model. This reduces the calculation time of detector responses to a few days instead of weeks on the NRC SGI R4400 computers. Good agreement between measured and calculated data also verifies that the MC code EGS4 is a reliable and useful tool for simulating coupled electron and photon transport for particles with energies down to a few keV. (au) 3 tabs., 15 ills., 11 refs

  1. Improving the spectral measurement accuracy based on temperature distribution and spectra-temperature relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Feng, Jinchao; Liu, Pengyu; Sun, Zhonghua; Li, Gang; Jia, Kebin

    2018-05-01

    Temperature is usually considered as a fluctuation in near-infrared spectral measurement. Chemometric methods were extensively studied to correct the effect of temperature variations. However, temperature can be considered as a constructive parameter that provides detailed chemical information when systematically changed during the measurement. Our group has researched the relationship between temperature-induced spectral variation (TSVC) and normalized squared temperature. In this study, we focused on the influence of temperature distribution in calibration set. Multi-temperature calibration set selection (MTCS) method was proposed to improve the prediction accuracy by considering the temperature distribution of calibration samples. Furthermore, double-temperature calibration set selection (DTCS) method was proposed based on MTCS method and the relationship between TSVC and normalized squared temperature. We compare the prediction performance of PLS models based on random sampling method and proposed methods. The results from experimental studies showed that the prediction performance was improved by using proposed methods. Therefore, MTCS method and DTCS method will be the alternative methods to improve prediction accuracy in near-infrared spectral measurement.

  2. Multichannel heterodyne radiometers with fast-scanning backward-wave oscillators for ECE measurement on HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.Y.; Poznyak, V.I.; Ploskirev, G.; Kalupin, D.; Wan, Y.X.; Xie, J.K.; Luo, J.R.; Li, J.G.; Gao, X.; Wan, B.N.; Zhang, X.D.; Wang, K.J.; Kuang, G.L.

    2001-01-01

    Two sets of fast-scanning heterodyne radiometer receiver systems employing backward-wave oscillators (BWOs) in 78-118 and 118-178 GHz were developed and installed for electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements on HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The double sideband (DSB) radiometer in 78-118 GHz measures 16 ECE frequency points with a scanning time period of 0.65 ms. The other radiometer in 118-178 GHz consists of one independent channel of DSB heterodyne receiver with intermediate frequency (IF) of 100-500 MHz and two channels of single sideband (SSB) heterodyne receiver that are sensitive to upper sideband and lower sideband individually; the IF frequency of the SSB channels are 1.5 GHz around the local oscillator frequencies with 1 GHz bandwidth. By employing a novel design, this unique radiometer measures 3 ECE frequency points at each of the 16 local oscillator frequency points in 118-178 GHz, and the full band can be swept in 0.65 ms period, thus the radiometer measures 48 ECE frequency points in 0.65 ms in principle. Each of the local oscillators' frequency points can be preset by program to meet specific physics interests. Horizontal view of ECE was installed to measure electron temperature profiles; vertically viewing optics along a perpendicular chord was also installed to study nonthermal ECE spectra. Preliminary measurement results were presented during ohmic and pellet injection plasmas

  3. Rocket measurements of relativistic electrons: New features in fluxes, spectra and pitch angle distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrero, F.A.; Baker, D.N.; Goldberg, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report new features of precipitating relativistic electron fluxes measured on a spinning sounding rocket payload at midday between altitudes of 70 and 130 km in the auroral region (Poker Flat, Alaska, 65.1 degree N, 147.5 degree W, and L = 5.5). The sounding rocket (NASA 33.059) was launched at 21:29 UT on May 13, 1990 during a relativistic electron enhancement event of modest intensity. Electron fluxes were measured for a total of about 210 seconds at energies from 0.1 to 3.8 MeV, while pitch angle was sampled from 0 degree to 90 degree every spin cycle. Flux levels during the initial 90 seconds were about 5 to 8 times higher than in the next 120 seconds, revealing a time scale of more than 100 seconds for large amplitude intensity variations. A shorter time scale appeared for downward electron bursts lasting 10 to 20 seconds. Electrons with energies below about 0.2 MeV showed isotropic pitch angle distributions during most of the first 90 seconds of data, while at higher energies the electrons had highest fluxes near the mirroring angle (90 degree); when they occurred, the noted downward bursts were seen at all energies. Data obtained during the second half of the flight showed little variation in the shape of the pitch angle distribution for energies greater than 0.5 MeV; the flux at 90 degree was about 100 times the flux at 0 degree. They have compared the low altitude fluxes with those measured at geostationary orbit (L = 6.6), and find that the low altitude fluxes are much higher than expected from a simple mapping of a pancake distribution at high altitudes (at the equator). Energy deposition of this modest event is estimated to increase rapidly above 45 km, already exceeding the cosmic ray background at 45 km

  4. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-05-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  5. Measurements of environmental gamma-ray spectra using a multi-element TL dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Sadaaki; Boetter-Jensen, L.; Nielsen, S.P.

    1986-12-01

    A method to estimate the energy distribution and dose of environmental gamma radiation was developed using a multielement TL dosemeter. Experimentally obtained energy responses from a multi-element TL dosemeter with different kinds of filters were used to calculate the energy distribution and related dose by the SAND-II computer code. The code was originally developed to estimate the neutron flux using a multiple foil activation method. Measurements were made at several locations with the multi-element TL dosemeter and comparisons were made with results from a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and a high-pressure ionization chamber. (author)

  6. New development for the reverse time of flight analysis of spectra measured using Fourier Diffractometer Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Maayouf, R M A

    2002-01-01

    The present work introduces a new design to replace the (Finnish make) reverse time of flight (RTOF) analyzer used for the Fourier diffractometer facilities. The new design applies a data acquisition system, a special interface card and software program installed in a PC computer, to perform the cross-correlation functions between signals received from the chopper-decoder and detector. It has been found from test measurements performed with the Cairo Fourier diffractometer facility (CFDF) and the similar high resolution one at JINR (Dubna-Russia) that the new design can successfully replace the Finnish make RTOF analyzer.

  7. Freezing optical rogue waves by Zeno dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayındır, Cihan; Ozaydin, Fatih

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the Zeno dynamics of the optical rogue waves. Considering their usage in modeling rogue wave dynamics, we analyze the Zeno dynamics of the Akhmediev breathers, Peregrine and Akhmediev-Peregrine soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We show that frequent measurements of the wave inhibits its movement in the observation domain for each of these solutions. We analyze the spectra of the rogue waves under Zeno dynamics. We also analyze the effect of observation frequency on the rogue wave profile and on the probability of lingering of the wave in the observation domain. Our results can find potential applications in optics including nonlinear phenomena.

  8. Alfven waves in the auroral ionosphere: A numerical model compared with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, D.J.; Kelley, M.C.; Vickrey, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The authors solve a linear numerical model of Alfven waves reflecting from the high-latitude ionosphere, both to better understanding the role of the ionosphere in the magnetosphere/ionosphere coupling process and to compare model results with in situ measurements. They use the model to compute the frequency-dependent amplitude and phase relations between the meridional electric and the zonal magnetic fields due to Alfven waves. These relations are compared with measurements taken by an auroral sounding rocket flow in the morningside oval and by the HILAT satellite traversing the oval at local noon. The sounding rocket's trajectory was mostly parallel to the auroral oval, and is measured enhanced fluctuating field energy in regions of electron precipitation. The rocket-measured phase data are in excellent agreement with the Alfven wave model, and the relation between the modeled and the measured by HILAT are related by the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity Σ p , indicating that the measured field fluctuations were due mainly to structured field-aligned current systems. A reason for the relative lack of Alfven wave energy in the HILAT measurements could be the fact that the satellite traveled mostly perpendicular to the oval and therefore quickly traversed narrow regions of electron precipitation and associated wave activity

  9. Design of a Continuous Blood Pressure Measurement System Based on Pulse Wave and ECG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Qiang; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhuang-Zhuang; Deng, Gen-Qiang; Wang, Huihui; Mavromoustakis, Constandinos X; Song, Houbing; Ming, Zhong

    2018-01-01

    With increasingly fierce competition for jobs, the pressures on people have risen in recent years, leading to lifestyle and diet disorders that result in significantly higher risks of cardiovascular disease. Hypertension is one of the common chronic cardiovascular diseases; however, mainstream blood pressure measurement devices are relatively heavy. When multiple measurements are required, the user experience and the measurement results may be unsatisfactory. In this paper, we describe the design of a signal collection module that collects pulse waves and electrocardiograph (ECG) signals. The collected signals are input into a signal processing module to filter the noise and amplify the useful physiological signals. Then, we use a wavelet transform to eliminate baseline drift noise and detect the feature points of the pulse waves and ECG signals. We propose the concept of detecting the wave shape associated with an instance, an approach that minimizes the impact of atypical pulse waves on blood pressure measurements. Finally, we propose an improved method for measuring blood pressure based on pulse wave velocity that improves the accuracy of blood pressure measurements by 58%. Moreover, the results meet the american medical instrument promotion association standards, which demonstrate the feasibility of our measurement system.

  10. Measurements of the neutral particle spectra on Mars by MSL/RAD from 2015-11-15 to 2016-01-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Hassler, Donald M.; Köhler, Jan; Ehresmann, Bent; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Brinza, David E.

    2017-08-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity, has been measuring the energetic charged and neutral particles and the radiation dose rate on the surface of Mars since the landing of the rover in August 2012. In contrast to charged particles, neutral particles (neutrons and γ-rays) are measured indirectly: the energy deposition spectra produced by neutral particles are complex convolutions of the incident particle spectra with the detector response functions. An inversion technique has been developed and applied to jointly unfold the deposited energy spectra measured in two scintillators of different types (CsI for high γ detection efficiency, and plastic for neutrons) to obtain the neutron and γ-ray spectra. This result is important for determining the biological impact of the Martian surface radiation contributed by neutrons, which interact with materials differently from the charged particles. These first in-situ measurements on Mars provide (1) an important reference for assessing the radiation-associated health risks for future manned missions to the red planet and (2) an experimental input for validating the particle transport codes used to model the radiation environments within spacecraft or on the surface of planets. Here we present neutral particle spectra as well as the corresponding dose and dose equivalent rates derived from RAD measurement during a period (November 15, 2015 to January 15, 2016) for which the surface particle spectra have been simulated via different transport models.

  11. Measurements of the neutron energy spectra in the core of IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Fernando Prat Goncalves

    2006-01-01

    This work presents the neutron spectrum measurements in the Reactor IPEN/MB-01 using very thin activation detectors in the metallic form, in reactor core, in moderator region. An articulated device allows that the foils are inserted in the central position of reactor core, ensuring that all the foils are irradiated in the same position. The activation detectors of different materials such Au 197 , Mg 24 , Ti 4 '8, In 115 , Sc 45 and others, were selected to cover a large range of neutron spectrum. After the irradiation, the activation detectors were submitted to a spectrometry gamma by using a system of counting with high purity Germanium, to obtain the saturation activity per target nuclide. The saturation activity is one of the main data of input of unfolding code SANDBP, that through an iterative adjustment, modify the spectrum that better agree with the dataset of code input, composition mainly for measure reaction rate per target nuclide and a initial input spectrum, calculated for Hammer-Technion code, supplying a solution spectrum. (author)

  12. Bias of shear wave elasticity measurements in thin layer samples and a simple correction strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jianqiang; Xu, Hao; Qiang, Bo; Giambini, Hugo; Kinnick, Randall; An, Kai-Nan; Chen, Shigao; Luo, Zongping

    2016-01-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an emerging technique for measuring biological tissue stiffness. However, the application of SWE in thin layer tissues is limited by bias due to the influence of geometry on measured shear wave speed. In this study, we investigated the bias of Young's modulus measured by SWE in thin layer gelatin-agar phantoms, and compared the result with finite element method and Lamb wave model simulation. The result indicated that the Young's modulus measured by SWE decreased continuously when the sample thickness decreased, and this effect was more significant for smaller thickness. We proposed a new empirical formula which can conveniently correct the bias without the need of using complicated mathematical modeling. In summary, we confirmed the nonlinear relation between thickness and Young's modulus measured by SWE in thin layer samples, and offered a simple and practical correction strategy which is convenient for clinicians to use.

  13. Autocorrelation spectra of an air-fluidized granular system measured by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasic, S.; Stepisnik, J.; Mohoric, A.; Sersa, I.; Planinsic, G.

    2006-09-01

    A novel insight into the dynamics of a fluidized granular system is given by a nuclear magnetic resonance method that yields the spin-echo attenuation proportional to the spectrum of the grain positional fluctuation. Measurements of the air-fluidized oil-filled spheres and mustard seeds at different degrees of fluidization and grain volume fractions provide the velocity autocorrelation that differs from the commonly anticipated exponential Enskog decay. An empiric formula, which corresponds to the model of grain caging at collisions with adjacent beads, fits well to the experimental data. Its parameters are the characteristic collision time, the free path between collisions and the cage-breaking rate or the diffusion-like constant, which decreases with increasing grain volume fraction. Mean-squared displacements calculated from the correlation spectrum clearly show transitions from ballistic, through sub-diffusion and into diffusion regimes of grain motion.

  14. Sub-keV, subnanosecond measurements of x-ray spectra from laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornblum, H.N.; Koppel, L.N.; Slivinsky, V.W.; Glaros, S.S.; Ahlstrom, H.G.; Larsen, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    As part of the effort to extend our x-ray diagnostic capabilities, we have made x-ray spectral measurements of laser-produced plasmas for photon energies down to 100 eV with a time response of 0.5 nsec. Fast, windowless x-ray diodes were used in conjunction with critical angle reflecting mirrors and thin filters for energy definition for two channels, 300 to 600 eV and 800 to 1300 eV. A third channel, using only an x-ray diode and filter, provided spectral information in the 100 to 300 eV region. Results from exploding pusher targets will be presented and compared with those of other diagnostic techniques and Lasnex calculations. Future expansion and modifications of the present system will be discussed

  15. Measurements of size and composition of particles in polar stratospheric clouds from infrared solar absorption spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinne, S.; Toon, O.B.; Toon, G.C.; Farmer, C.B.; Browell, E.V.; McCormick, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The attenuation of solar radiation between 1.8- and 15-μm wavelength was measured with the airborne Jet Propulsion Laboratory Mark IV interferometer during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Expedition in 1987. The measurements not only provide information about the abundance of stratospheric gases, but also about the optical depths of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) at wavelengths of negligible gas absorption. The spectral dependence of the PSC optical depth contains information about PSC particle size and particle composition. Thirty-three PSC cases were analyzed and categorized into two types. Type I clouds contain particles with radii of about 0.5 μm and nitric acid concentrations greater than 40%. Type II clouds contain particles composed of water ice with radii of 6 μm and larger. Cloud altitudes were determined from 1.064-μm backscattering observations of the airborne Langley DIAL lidar system. Based on the PSC geometrical thickness, both mass and particle density were estimated. Type I clouds typically had visible wavelength optical depths of about 0.008, mass densities of about 20 ppb, and about 2 particles/cm 3 . The observed type II clouds had optical depths of about 0.03, mass densities of about 400 ppb mass, and about 0.03 particles/cm 3 . The detected PSC type I clouds extended to altitudes of 21 km and were nearly in the ozone-depleted region of the polar stratosphere. The observed type II cases during September were predominantly found at altitudes below 15 km

  16. A brute-force spectral approach for wave estimation using measured vessel motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik D.; Brodtkorb, Astrid H.; Sørensen, Asgeir J.

    2018-01-01

    , and the procedure is simple in its mathematical formulation. The actual formulation is extending another recent work by including vessel advance speed and short-crested seas. Due to its simplicity, the procedure is computationally efficient, providing wave spectrum estimates in the order of a few seconds......The article introduces a spectral procedure for sea state estimation based on measurements of motion responses of a ship in a short-crested seaway. The procedure relies fundamentally on the wave buoy analogy, but the wave spectrum estimate is obtained in a direct - brute-force - approach......, and the estimation procedure will therefore be appealing to applications related to realtime, onboard control and decision support systems for safe and efficient marine operations. The procedure's performance is evaluated by use of numerical simulation of motion measurements, and it is shown that accurate wave...

  17. A Study on Parametric Wave Estimation Based on Measured Ship Motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Iseki, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The paper studies parametric wave estimation based on the ‘wave buoy analogy’, and data and results obtained from the training ship Shioji-maru are compared with estimates of the sea states obtained from other measurements and observations. Furthermore, the estimating characteristics of the param......The paper studies parametric wave estimation based on the ‘wave buoy analogy’, and data and results obtained from the training ship Shioji-maru are compared with estimates of the sea states obtained from other measurements and observations. Furthermore, the estimating characteristics...... of the parametric model are discussed by considering the results of a similar estimation concept based on Bayesian modelling. The purpose of the latter comparison is not to favour the one estimation approach to the other but rather to highlight some of the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches....

  18. Application of advanced one sided stress wave velocity measurement in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Song, Won Joon; Popovices, J. S.; Achenbach, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    It is of interest to reliably measure the velocity of stress waves in concrete. At present, reliable measurement is not possible for dispersive and attenuating materials such as concrete when access to only one surface of the structure is available, such as in the case of pavement structures. In this paper, a new method for one-sided stress wave velocity determination in concrete is applied to investigate the effects of composition, age and moisture content. This method uses a controlled impact as a stress wave source and two sensitive receivers mounted on the same surface as the impact sites. The novel aspect of the technique is the data collection system which automatically determines the arrival of the generated longitudinal and surface wave arrivals. A conventional ultrasonic through transmission method is used to compare with the results determined by the one-sided method.

  19. Activation method for measuring the reaction rates and studying the neutron spectra parameters, based on using the unified composition detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidov, A.M.; Dikarev, V.S.; Efimov, B.V.; Ionov, V.S.; Marin, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    The method proposed for estimation of parameters thermal and epithermal parts of energy distribution of neutrons is described. The method based on application of activation measuring with use of unified composition detectors (UCD) and samples of fuel. The method is applicable for definition of neutron spectrum parameters and velocities of division in fuel of nuclear installations. Theoretical bases and the description of a method, expedients of manufacturing and calibration for the detectors, the experimental data, carried out in RRC KI are given and processing of experimental data, and also. The parametric model of a spectrum constructed on the basis of Westcott's formalism is described. The parameter of stiffness is entered and its role for temperature of neutron gas, spectral coefficients of isotopes of detectors, the transition area thermal and epithermal parts of neutron spectra is observationally appreciated. It is offered to confirm the found results by calculations with use of MCU Monte Carlo code [ru

  20. Measurement of characteristic to total spectrum ratio of tungsten X-ray spectra for the validation of the modified Tbc model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez G, A. H.; Costa, P. R.; Tomal, A.

    2014-08-01

    Primary X-ray spectra were measured in the range of 80 to 150 kV in order to validate a computer program based on a semiempirical model for X-ray spectra evaluation(tbc and mod). The ratio between the characteristic lines and total spectrum was considered for comparing the simulated results and experimental data. The raw spectra measured by the Cd Te detector were corrected by the detector efficiency, Compton effects and characteristic Cd and Te X-rays escape peaks, using a software specifically developed. The software Origin 8.5.1 was used to calculate the spectra and characteristic peaks areas. The obtained result shows that the experimental spectra have higher effective energy than the simulated spectra computed with tbc and mod software. The behavior of the ratio between the characteristic lines and total spectrum for simulated data presents discrepancy with the experimental result. Computed results are in good agreement with theoretical data published by Green, for spectra obtained with 3.04 mm of additional aluminum filtration. The difference of characteristic to total spectrum ratio between experimental and simulated data increases with the tube voltage. (Author)