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Sample records for wave short wavelength

  1. Nonlinear propagation of short wavelength drift-Alfven waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    Making use of a kinetic ion and a hydrodynamic electron description together with the Maxwell equation, the authors derive a set of nonlinear equations which governs the dynamics of short wavelength ion drift-Alfven waves. It is shown that the nonlinear drift-Alfven waves can propagate as two...

  2. Tunable Short-Wavelength Spin-Wave Emission and Confinement in Anisotropy-Modulated Multiferroic Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, Sampo J.; Brandl, Florian; Franke, Kévin J. A.; Grundler, Dirk; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2017-07-01

    We report on the generation and confinement of short-wavelength spin waves in a continuous film with periodically modulated magnetic anisotropy. The concept, which is demonstrated for strain-coupled Co40Fe40B20/BaTiO3 heterostructures, relies on abrupt rotation of magnetic anisotropy at the boundaries of magnetic stripe domains. In combination with an external bias field, this modulation of magnetic anisotropy produces a lateral variation of the effective magnetic field, leading to local spin-wave excitation when irradiated by a microwave magnetic field. In domains with small effective field, spin waves are perfectly confined by the spin gap in neighboring domains. In contrast, standing spin waves in domains with large effective field radiate into neighboring domains. Using micromagnetic simulation, we show that the wavelength of emitted spin waves is tunable from a few micrometers down to about 100 nm by rotation of the bias field. Importantly, the orientation of the wave front remains fixed. We also demonstrate that dynamic fluctuations of the effective magnetic field produce exchange-dominated spin waves at single-anisotropy boundaries. The multiferroic heterostructures presented here enable the use of global excitation fields from a microwave antenna to emit tunable spin waves from a nanometer-wide line source at well-defined locations of a continuous ferromagnetic film.

  3. A broadband LED source in visible to short-wave-infrared wavelengths for spectral tumor diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Daiyu; van Dongen, Anne Marie; Boerekamp, Jack; Spoor, Sandra; Lucassen, Gerald; Schleipen, Jean

    2017-06-01

    Various tumor types exhibit the spectral fingerprints in the absorption and reflection spectra in visible and especially in near- to short-wave-infrared wavelength ranges. For the purpose of spectral tumor diagnostics by means of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, we developed a broadband light emitting diode (LED) source consisting of a blue LED for optical excitation, Lu3Al5O12:Ce3+,Cr3+ luminescent garnet for visible to near infrared emissions, and Bismuth doped GeO2 luminescent glass for near-infrared to short-wave infrared emissions. It emits broad-band light emissions continuously in 470-1600 nm with a spectral gap at 900-1000 nm. In comparison to the currently available broadband light sources like halogen lamps, high-pressure discharge lamps and super continuum lasers, the light sources of this paper has significant advantages for spectral tissue diagnostics in high-spectral stability, improved light coupling to optical fibers, potential in low light source cost and enabling battery-drive.

  4. Short wavelength FELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  5. A two-stage photonic crystal fiber / silicon photonic wire short-wave infrared wavelength converter/amplifier based on a 1064 nm pump source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyken, B; Leo, F; Mussot, A; Kudlinski, A; Roelkens, G

    2015-05-18

    We demonstrate a two-stage wavelength converter that uses compact near-infrared sources to amplify and convert short-wave infrared signals. The first stage consists of a photonic crystal fiber wavelength converter pumped by a Q-switched 1064 nm pump source, while the second stage consists of a silicon photonic wire waveguide wavelength converter. The system enables on-chip amplification and conversion of up to 30 dB . We demonstrate amplification in a broad wavelength range around 2344 nm using temporally long pulses (>300ps).

  6. Short wavelength free electron lasers in 1998

    OpenAIRE

    Colson, W.B.

    1999-01-01

    A table is presented that describes the characteristics of 58 short wavelength free electron lasers, operating and proposed, around the world. The author is grateful for support of this work by the Naval Postgraduate School and the Directed Energy Weapons Group, SPAWAR, U.S. Navy.

  7. Far-field measurements of short-wavelength surface plasmons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Yochai; Gjonaj, Bergin; David, Asaf; Dolev, Shimon; Shterman, Doron; Bartal, Guy, E-mail: guy@ee.technion.ac.il [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-03-23

    We present direct far-field measurements of short-wavelength surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) by conventional optics means. Plasmonic wavelength as short as 231 nm was observed for 532 nm illumination on a Ag−Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} platform, demonstrating the capability to characterize SPPs well below the optical diffraction limit. This is done by scaling a sub-wavelength interferometric pattern to a far-field resolvable periodicity. These subwavelength patterns are obtained by coupling light into counter-propagating SPP waves to create a standing-wave pattern of half the SPP wavelength periodicity. Such patterns are mapped by a scattering slit, tilted at an angle so as to increase the periodicity of the intensity pattern along it to more than the free-space wavelength, making it resolvable by diffraction limited optics. The simplicity of the method as well as its large dynamic range of measurable wavelengths make it an optimal technique to characterize the properties of plasmonic devices and high-index dielectric waveguides, to improve their design accuracy and enhance their functionality.

  8. Silicon-integrated short-wavelength hybrid-cavity VCSEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Emanuel P; Kumari, Sulakshna; Westbergh, Petter; Gustavsson, Johan S; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Larsson, Anders

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate a short-wavelength hybrid-cavity vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) heterogeneously integrated on silicon. A GaAs-based "half-VCSEL" has been attached to a dielectric distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) on a silicon wafer using ultra-thin divinylsiloxane-bis-benzocyclobutene (DVS-BCB) adhesive bonding, thereby creating a cavity with the standing-wave optical field extending over the silicon- and GaAs-based parts of the cavity. A 9 µm oxide aperture diameter VCSEL with a threshold current of 1.2 mA produces 1.6 mW optical output power at 6.0 mA bias current with a wavelength of ~845 nm.

  9. Newnes short wave listening handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pritchard, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Short Wave Listening Handbook is a guide for starting up in short wave listening (SWL). The book is comprised of 15 chapters that discuss the basics and fundamental concepts of short wave radio listening. The coverage of the text includes electrical principles; types of signals that can be heard in the radio spectrum; and using computers in SWL. The book also covers SWL equipment, such as receivers, converters, and circuits. The text will be of great use to individuals who want to get into short wave listening.

  10. Short Wave upwelling Radiative Flux (SWupRF) within NIR range for the selected greenhouse wavelength bands of O2, H2O, CO2 and CH4 by Argus 1000 along with GENSPECT line by line radiative transfer model

    CERN Document Server

    Siddiqui, Rehan; Salem, Naif Al; Quine, Brendan M

    2016-01-01

    This new study develops an algorithm for Short Wave upwelling Radiative Flux (SWupRF) for the spectral variations within near infrared (NIR) from 1100 to 1700 nm wavelength band based on remote sensing data set of Argus 1000 micro-spectrometer observations. We calculate the SWupRF by investigating the total radiative flux due to O2, H2O, CO2 and CH4 and also by the individual gas within the selected wavelength bands of interest. A GENSPECT synthetic line by line radiative transfer model is applied to perform radiative transfer simulations to calculate the radiative flux by varying surface albedo, mixing ratios of the selected greenhouse gases, surface temperature, solar sun and zenith angles with different latitude and longitude of the instrument. Finally, the SWupRFsyn estimated from GENSPECT was compared with SWupRFobs from Argus 1000 over a period of four years (2009 and 2013) covering all seasons. We calculate and compare both the synthetic and real measured observed data set. The synthetic model gives SW...

  11. Observing with the ISO Short-Wavelength Spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deGraauw, T; Haser, LN; Beintema, DA; Roelfsema, PR; vanAgthoven, H; Barl, L; Bauer, OH; Bekenkamp, HEG; Boonstra, AJ; Boxhoorn, DR; Cote, J; deGroene, P; vanDijkhuizen, C; Evers, J; Feuchtgruber, H; Frericks, M; Genzel, R; Haerendel, G; Heras, AM; vanderHucht, KA; vanderHulst, T; Huygen, R; Jacobs, H; Jakob, G; Kamperman, T; Katterloher, RO; Kester, DJM; Kunze, D; Kussendrager, D; Lahuis, F; Lamers, HJGLM; Leech, K; vanderLei, S; vanderLinden, R; Luinge, W; Lutz, D; Melzner, F; Morris, PW; vanNguyen, D; Ploeger, G; Price, S; Salama, A; Schaeidt, SG; Sijm, N; Smoorenburg, C; Spakman, J; Spoon, H; Steinmayer, M; Stoecker, J; Valentijn, EA; Vandenbussche, B; Visser, H; Waelkens, C; Waters, LBFM; Wensink, J; Wesselius, PR; Wiezorrek, E; Wieprecht, E; Wijnbergen, JJ; Wildeman, KJ; Young, E

    1996-01-01

    The Short-Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) is one of the four instruments on-board ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), launched on November 17, 1995. The spectrometer covers the wavelength range of 2.38 to 4.2 mu m with a spectral resolution ranging from 1000 to 2000. By inserting Fabry-Perot

  12. Short-wavelength plasma turbulence and temperature anisotropy instabilities: recent computational progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, S. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plasma turbulence consists of an ensemble of enhanced, broadband electromagnetic fluctuations, typically driven by multi-wave interactions which transfer energy in wavevector space via non- linear cascade processes. Temperature anisotropy instabilities in collisionless plasmas are driven by quasi-linear wave–particle interactions which transfer particle kinetic energy to field fluctuation energy; the resulting enhanced fluctuations are typically narrowband in wavevector magnitude and direction. Whatever their sources, short-wavelength fluctuations are those at which charged particle kinetic, that is, velocity-space, properties are important; these are generally wavelengths of the order of or shorter than the ion inertial length or the thermal ion gyroradius. The purpose of this review is to summarize and interpret recent computational results concerning short-wavelength plasma turbulence, short-wavelength temperature anisotropy instabilities and relationships between the two phenomena. PMID:25848081

  13. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  14. Propagation of Rayleigh surface waves with small wavelengths in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    MS received 23 November 2001. Abstract. This paper investigates Rayleigh waves, propagating on the surface of a visco-elastic solid under the linear theory of nonlocal elasticity. Dispersion relations are obtained. It is observed that the waves are dispersive in nature for small wavelengths. Numerical calculations and ...

  15. Transmission of electromagnetic waves through sub-wavelength channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2010-02-15

    We propose a method of tunneling electromagnetic (EM) waves through a channel with sub-wavelength cross section. By filling the channel with high-epsilon isotropic material and implementing two matching layers with uniaxial metamterial substrates, the guided waves can go through the narrow channel without being cut off, as if it has just passed through the original empty waveguide. Both the magnitude and phase information of the EM fields can be effectively restored after passing this channel, regardless of the polarization of the incoming wave. The performance of this sub-wavelength channel, which is designed with coordinate transformation methodology, is studied theoretically and numerically.

  16. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The photometric calibration of the ISO Short Wavelength Spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaeidt, S. G.; Morris, P. W.; Salama, A.; Vandenbussche, B.; Beintema, D. A.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Heras, A. M.; Lahuis, F.; Leech, K.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Valentijn, E. A.; Bauer, O. H.; van der Bliek, N. S.; Cohen, M.; de Graauw, T.; Haser, L. N.; van der Hucht, K. A.; Huygen, E.; Katterloher, R. O.; Kessler, M. F.; Koornneef, J.; Luinge, W.; Lutz, D.; Planck, M.; Spoon, H.; Waelkens, C.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Wieprecht, E.; Wildeman, K. J.; Young, E.; Zaal, P.

    1996-01-01

    We give an overview of the photometric calibration of the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) through the Performance Verification phase. The basic strategy for deriving absolute flux densities from detector output for the grating and Fabry-Perot sections of SWS is reviewed, and the results are

  18. Short Wavelength Seeding through Compression for Fee Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-03-29

    In this paper, we propose a seeding scheme that compresses an initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space of an electron beam by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C , where Cis the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Using two lasers as energy chirpers, such a modulation compression scheme can generate kilo-Ampershort wavelength current modulation with significant bunching factor from an initial a few tens Amper current. This compression scheme can also be used togenerate a prebunched single atto-second short wavelength current modulation and prebunched two color, two atto-second modulations.

  19. Stability of drift-wave eigenmodes with arbitrary radial wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.C.; Chen, L.; Nevins, W.M.

    1979-05-01

    A general theory for the stability of collisionless drift-wave eigenmodes in sheared slab magnetic fields is developed using the S-matrix technique. The eigenmodes are described with the integral formulation which fully takes into account the nonlocal effects of finite ion gyro-orbits. The universal eigenmode is then shown to be absolutely stable for arbitrary radial wavelengths.

  20. Transmission of electromagnetic waves through sub-wavelength channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method of tunneling electromagnetic (EM) waves through a channel with sub-wavelength cross section. By filling the channel with high-ε isotropic material and implementing two matching layers with uniaxial metamterial substrates, the guided waves can go through the narrow channel...... without being cut off, as if it has just passed through the original empty waveguide. Both the magnitude and phase information of the EM fields can be effectively restored after passing this channel, regardless of the polarization of the incoming wave. The performance of this subwavelength channel, which...

  1. Massively sub-wavelength guiding of electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, I R; Tremain, B; Dockrey, J A; Hibbins, A P

    2014-12-16

    Recently a new form of ultra-thin flexible waveguide consisting of a conducting comb-like structure with a thickness of the order of 1/600(th) of the operating wavelength was presented. However, whilst the thickness of the guide was massively sub-wavelength, the remaining dimensions (the height and period of the comb) were much longer. In this paper we propose, and experimentally verify, that a modified guiding geometry consisting of a chain of ultra-thin conducting spirals allows guiding of electromagnetic waves with wavelengths that are many times (40+) longer than any characteristic dimension of the guide, enabling super-sub-wavelength guiding and localisation of electromagnetic energy.

  2. Seismic metasurfaces: Sub-wavelength resonators and Rayleigh wave interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Colquitt, D J; Craster, R V; Roux, P; Guenneau, S R L

    2016-01-01

    We consider the canonical problem of an array of rods, which act as resonators, placed on an elastic substrate; the substrate being either a thin elastic plate or an elastic half-space. In both cases the flexural plate, or Rayleigh surface, waves in the substrate interact with the resonators to create interesting effects such as effective band-gaps for surface waves or filters that transform surface waves into bulk waves; these effects have parallels in the field of optics where such sub-wavelength resonators create metamaterials, and metasurfaces, in the bulk and at the surface respectively. Here we carefully analyse this canonical problem by extracting the dispersion relations analytically thereby examining the influence of both the flexural and compressional resonances on the propagating wave. For an array of resonators atop an elastic half-space we augment the analysis with numerical simulations. Amongst other effects, we demonstrate the striking effect of a dispersion curve that transitions from Rayleigh...

  3. Alerting effects of short-wavelength (blue) and long-wavelength (red) lights in the afternoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Levent; Figueiro, Mariana G

    2013-05-27

    Light has an acute effect on neuroendocrine responses, performance, and alertness. Most studies to date have linked the alerting effects of light to its ability to suppress melatonin, which is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength light. Recent studies, however, have shown alerting effects of white or narrowband short-wavelength lights during daytime, when melatonin levels are low. While the use of light at night to promote alertness is well understood, it is important to develop an understanding of how light impacts alertness during the daytime, especially during the post-lunch hours. The aim of the current study was to investigate how 48-minute exposures to short-wavelength (blue) light (40 lux, 18.9 microWatts/cm(2) λ(max) = 470 nanometers [nm]) or long-wavelength (red) light (40 lux, 18.9 microWatts/cm(2) λ(max) = 630 nm) close to the post-lunch dip hours affect electroencephalogram measures in participants with regular sleep schedules. Power in the alpha, alpha theta, and theta ranges was significantly lower (plight than after they remained in darkness. Exposure to blue light reduced alpha and alpha theta power compared to darkness, but these differences did not reach statistical significance (p>0.05). The present results extend those performed during the nighttime, and demonstrate that light can be used to increase alertness in the afternoon, close to the post-lunch dip hours. These results also suggest that acute melatonin suppression is not needed to elicit an alerting effect in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Short-wavelength magnetic recording new methods and analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Ruigrok, JJM

    2013-01-01

    Short-wavelength magnetic recording presents a series of practical solutions to a wide range of problems in the field of magnetic recording. It features many new and original results, all derived from fundamental principles as a result of up-to-date research.A special section is devoted to the playback process, including the calculations of head efficiency and head impedance, derived from new theorems.Features include:A simple and fast method for measuring efficiency; a simple method for the accurate separation of the read and write behaviour of magnetic heads; a new concept - the bandpass hea

  5. Self Referencing Heterodyne Transient Grating Spectroscopy with Short Wavelength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Grilj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Heterodyning by a phase stable reference electric field is a well known technique to amplify weak nonlinear signals. For short wavelength, the generation of a reference field in front of the sample is challenging because of a lack of suitable beamsplitters. Here, we use a permanent grating which matches the line spacing of the transient grating for the creation of a phase stable reference field. The relative phase among the two can be changed by a relative translation of the permanent and transient gratings in direction orthogonal to the grating lines. We demonstrate the technique for a transient grating on a VO2 thin film and observe constructive as well as destructive interference signals.

  6. First Results of Recovery of Short Wavelength Gravity Field Signals from CryoSat-2 Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseng, Lars; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    altimetry: Factor of 20 improvements in along track resolution. Along-track footprint length that does not vary with wave height (sea state). Improved precision in sea surface height measurements / sea surface slope measurements. These improvements are studied with respect to retrieval of short wavelength...... geophysical signal related to mainly bathymetric features. The combination of upward continuation from the sea bottom and smoothing the altimeter observations resulted in the best recovery of geophysical signal for simulated 5-Hz DD observations. The first validation of these theoretical modeling results...

  7. Short wave diathermy for small spontaneous pneumothorax

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Y.; Li, J; Liu, Y.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of small spontaneous pneumothorax can involve observation, tube thoracostomy, and surgery. This study evaluated the use of short wave diathermy as a method of accelerating the resolution of small pneumothoraces. METHODS: Twenty two patients with pneumothoraces of less than 30% by volume were randomly allocated to receive short wave diathermy for 25 minutes each day (n = 11) or observation with bed rest (n = 11). Chest radiographs were taken until the pneumothor...

  8. Short wave breaking effects on low frequency waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daly, C.; Roelvink, J.A.; Van Dongeren, A.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; McCall, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of short wave breaking on low frequency waves is investigated using two breaker formulations implemented in a time-dependent numerical model (XBeach): (1) an advective-deterministic approach (ADA) and (2) the probabilistic breaker formulation of Roelvink (1993). Previous research has

  9. Interferometry on small quantum systems at short wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usenko, Sergey

    2017-01-15

    The present work concentrates on prototypical studies of light-induced correlated many-body dynamics in complex systems. In its course a reflective split-and-delay unit (SDU) for phase-resolved one-color pump-probe experiments with gas phase samples using VUV-XUV laser pulses was built. The collinear propagation of pump and probe pulses is ensured by the special geometry of the SDU and allows to perform phase-resolved (coherent) autocorrelation measurements. The control of the pump-probe delay with attosecond precision is established by a specially developed diagnostic tool based on an in-vacuum white light interferometer that allows to monitor the relative displacement of the SDU reflectors with nanometer resolution. Phase-resolved (interferometric) pump-probe experiments with developed SDU require spatially-resolved imaging of the ionization volume. For this an electron-ion coincidence spectrometer was built. The spectrometer enables coincident detection of photoionization products using velocity map imaging (VMI) technique for electrons and VMI or spatial imaging for ions. In first experiments using the developed SDU and the spectrometer in the ion spatial-imaging mode linear field autocorrelation of free-electron laser pulses at the central wavelength of 38 nm was recorded. A further focus of the work were energy- and time-resolved resonant two-photon ionization experiments using short tunable UV laser pulses on C{sub 60} fullerene. The experiments demonstrated that dipole-selective excitation on a timescale faster than the characteristic intramolecular energy dissipation limits the number of accessible excitation pathways and thus results in a narrow resonance. Time-dependent one-color pump-probe study showed that nonadiabatic (vibron) coupling is the dominant energy dissipation mechanism for high-lying electronic excited states in C{sub 60}.

  10. Europa Composition Using Visible to Short Wavelength Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Dalton, J. B.; Green, R. O.; Hibbits, K.; McCord, T.; Murchie, S.; Piccioni, G.; Tosi, F.

    2010-10-01

    One of the major goals of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) is to understand the chemistry of Europa's inorganic and organic materials. Europa's surface material composition is controlled by the original materials forming Europa and by their differentiation and chemical alterations. Material is probably still being transported to the surface by active processes in the interior. At the surface, the material is exposed to the effects of vacuum and temperature, irradiated by solar UV, and bombarded by material entrained in Jupiter's magnetic field. The materials on the surface and their distributions are evidence of the processes operating, both endogenic and exogenic. These processes include effects of a subsurface liquid ocean and its chemistry; the mechanisms of material emplacement from below; and photolysis and radiolysis. Visible to Short Wavelength Infrared (VSWIR) spectroscopy is a well-understood technique for mapping key inorganic, organic, and volatile compositions on remote surfaces such as Europa. Key spectral absorption features have been detected in both the icy and the non-icy Europa materials and many important constituents of the surface have been identified or proposed (e.g. hydrated salts, sulfuric acid hydrate, organics, CO2, H2O2, SO2). The determination of planetary surface composition from remote infrared spectroscopy depends upon adequate signal-to-noise, spectral resolution, and spatial scale to distinguish the diagnostic spectral features of the compounds of interest. For icy satellites, laboratory reference spectra obtained at the temperatures of the target bodies are also required. We have compared diagnostic spectral features in cryogenic laboratory spectra of hydrated salts relevant to Europa in order to optimize detection of these materials under realistic mission conditions. Effects of spectral resolution, signal to noise ratio, and areal mixtures are explored to determine the impacts on detection. This work was carried out at the Jet

  11. Multi-wavelength, all-solid-state, continuous wave mode locked picosecond Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Eduardo; Pask, Helen M; Esposito, Elric; McConnell, Gail; Spence, David J

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the operation of a cascaded continuous wave (CW) mode-locked Raman oscillator. The output pulses were compressed from 28 ps at 532 nm down to 6.5 ps at 559 nm (first Stokes) and 5.5 ps at 589 nm (second Stokes). The maximum output was 2.5 W at 559 nm and 1.4 W at 589 nm with slope efficiencies up to 52%. This technique allows simple and efficient generation of short-pulse radiation to the cascaded Stokes wavelengths, extending the mode-locked operation of Raman lasers to a wider range of visible wavelengths between 500 - 650 nm based on standard inexpensive picosecond Nd:YAG oscillators.

  12. Ultra-short wavelength operation in Thulium-doped silica fiber laser with bidirectional pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xusheng; Guo, Haitao; Yan, Zhijun; Wang, Hushan; Xu, Yantao; Lu, Min; Wang, Yishan; Peng, Bo

    2017-02-01

    An ultra-short wavelength operation of Tm-doped all fiber laser based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) was developed. A bi-directional pump configuration for the ultra-short wavelength operation was designed and investigated for the first time. the laser yielded 3.15W of continuous-wave output at 1706.75nm with a narrow-linewidth of 50pm and a maximum slope efficiency of 42.1%. The dependencies of the slope efficiencies and pump threshold of the laser versus the length of active fiber and reflectivity of the output mirror (FBG) were investigated in detail. An experimental comparative study between two Thulium-doped fiber lasers (TDFLs) with two different pumping configuration(forward unidirectional pumping and bidirectional pumping) was presented. It is indisputable that the development of 1.7μm silicate fiber lasers with Watt-level output power open up a number of heart-stirring and tempting application windows.

  13. Short-wavelength infrared laser activates the auditory neurons: comparing the effect of 980 vs. 810 nm wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lan; Wang, Jingxuan; Wei, Ying; Lu, Jianren; Xu, Anting; Xia, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Research on auditory neural triggering by optical stimulus has been developed as an emerging technique to elicit the auditory neural response, which may provide an alternative method to the cochlear implants. However, most previous studies have been focused on using longer-wavelength near-infrared (>1800 nm) laser. The effect comparison of different laser wavelengths in short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) range on the auditory neural stimulation has not been previously explored. In this study, the pulsed 980- and 810-nm SWIR lasers were applied as optical stimuli to irradiate the auditory neurons in the cochlea of five deafened guinea pigs and the neural response under the two laser wavelengths was compared by recording the evoked optical auditory brainstem responses (OABRs). In addition, the effect of radiant exposure, laser pulse width, and threshold with the two laser wavelengths was further investigated and compared. The one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze those data. Results showed that the OABR amplitude with the 980-nm laser is higher than the amplitude with the 810-nm laser under the same radiant exposure from 10 to 102 mJ/cm(2). And the laser stimulation of 980 nm wavelength has lower threshold radiant exposure than the 810 nm wavelength at varied pulse duration in 20-500 μs range. Moreover, the 810-nm laser has a wider optimized pulse duration range than the 980-nm laser for the auditory neural stimulation.

  14. Cameras Reveal Elements in the Short Wave Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Goodrich ISR Systems Inc. (formerly Sensors Unlimited Inc.), based out of Princeton, New Jersey, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Marshall Space Flight Center, Kennedy Space Center, Goddard Space Flight Center, Ames Research Center, Stennis Space Center, and Langley Research Center to assist in advancing and refining indium gallium arsenide imaging technology. Used on the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission in 2009 for imaging the short wave infrared wavelengths, the technology has dozens of applications in military, security and surveillance, machine vision, medical, spectroscopy, semiconductor inspection, instrumentation, thermography, and telecommunications.

  15. Detection of Short-Waved Spin Waves in Individual Microscopic Spin-Wave Waveguides Using the Inverse Spin Hall Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brächer, T; Fabre, M; Meyer, T; Fischer, T; Auffret, S; Boulle, O; Ebels, U; Pirro, P; Gaudin, G

    2017-12-13

    The miniaturization of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices becomes increasingly difficult due to fundamental limitations and the increase of leakage currents. Large research efforts are devoted to find alternative concepts that allow for a larger data-density and lower power consumption than conventional semiconductor approaches. Spin waves have been identified as a potential technology that can complement and outperform CMOS in complex logic applications, profiting from the fact that these waves enable wave computing on the nanoscale. The practical application of spin waves, however, requires the demonstration of scalable, CMOS compatible spin-wave detection schemes in material systems compatible with standard spintronics as well as semiconductor circuitry. Here, we report on the wave-vector independent detection of short-waved spin waves with wavelengths down to 150 nm by the inverse spin Hall effect in spin-wave waveguides made from ultrathin Ta/Co 8 Fe 72 B 20 /MgO. These findings open up the path for miniaturized scalable interconnects between spin waves and CMOS and the use of ultrathin films made from standard spintronic materials in magnonics.

  16. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    OpenAIRE

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiatio...

  17. Short-crested waves in the surf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhangping; Dalrymple, Robert A.; Xu, Munan; Garnier, Roland; Derakhti, Morteza

    2017-05-01

    This study investigates short-crested waves in the surf zone by using the mesh-free Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model, GPUSPH. The short-crested waves are created by generating intersecting wave trains in a numerical wave basin with a beach. We first validate the numerical model for short-crested waves by comparison with large-scale laboratory measurements. Then short-crested wave breaking over a planar beach is studied comprehensively. We observe rip currents as discussed in Dalrymple (1975) and undertow created by synchronous intersecting waves. The wave breaking of the short-crested wavefield created by the nonlinear superposition of intersecting waves and wave-current interaction result in the formation of isolated breakers at the ends of breaking wave crests. Wave amplitude diffraction at these isolated breakers gives rise to an increase in the alongshore wave number in the inner surf zone. Moreover, 3-D vortices and multiple circulation cells with a rotation frequency much lower than the incident wave frequency are observed across the outer surf zone to the beach. Finally, we investigate vertical vorticity generation under short-crested wave breaking and find that breaking of short-crested waves generates vorticity as pointed out by Peregrine (1998). Vorticity generation is not only observed under short-crested waves with a limited number of wave components but also under directional wave spectra.

  18. Studying the multi-wavelength signals from short GRBs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowlinson, A.

    2013-01-01

    Since the first host galaxies and afterglows of short GRBs were identified, they have remained very difficult to study: their multiwavelenth afterglows are notoriously faint and host galaxy identification often relies upon minimalising a chance alignment probability. Despite these observational

  19. Short wavelength abedo, contrasts and micro-organisms on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay; Słowik, Grzegorgz; Ansari, Arif; Smith, David; Mogul, Rakesh; Vaishampayan, Parag

    2017-04-01

    The decrease in the amount of sunlight reflected by Venus at wavelengths below 500 nm, and the presence of contrast features prominent at ultraviolet wavelengths (270 - 410 nm) are two properties of the Venus clouds that despite numerous attempts, remain unexplained. Additional uncertainties include why the contrasts exist at all, and why the substance responsible for the contrasts does not appear well mixed. Nearly a century after the ultraviolet contrasts were discovered using Earth-based photographs, the substance or mechanisms responsible for the lower albedo and contrast patterns are still unknown. Many physical and chemical explanations have been proposed, but none of the hypotheses explain decrease of albedo below 500 nm, the spectral dependence of contrasts, and plausible mechanisms for presence or transport of those substances - transport from surface if the absorber is a condensation nuclei or transformations if in dissolved form due to photochemistry and the observed rapid changes in the contrasts. Considering the ultraviolet absorption shown by some terrestrial microorganisms, we speculate whether airborne bacteria (indigenous or introduced through meteoritic impact debris transported from Earth) could explain the mysterious contrast or the absorption cloud features on Venus. Plumes of cloud-borne aeroplankton, analogous to phytoplankton in Earth's oceans which are in dense enough concentrations to be observed from space, may have evolved on Venus when the planet had liquid water on its early surface, eventually migrating to a habitable zone in the clouds 50-70 km above the inhospitably hot surface today.

  20. Sexual dimorphism of short-wavelength photoreceptors in the small white butterfly, Pieris rapae crucivora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arikawa, K; Wakakuwa, M; Qiu, XD; Kurasawa, M; Stavenga, DG; Qiu, Xudong

    2005-01-01

    The eyes of the female small white butterfly, Pieris rapae crucivora, are furnished with three classes of short-wavelength photoreceptors, with sensitivity peaks in the ultraviolet (UV) (lambda(max) = 360 nm), violet (V) (lambda max = 425 nm), and blue (B) (lambda(max) = 453 nm) wavelength range.

  1. Standard achromatic perimetry, short wavelength automated perimetry, and frequency doubling technology for detection of glaucoma damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soliman, Mohamed A. E.; de Jong, Leo A. M. S.; Ismaeil, Al-Araby A.; van den Berg, Thomas J. T. P.; de Smet, Marc D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Reevaluation of the relationship between short wavelength automated perimetry (SWAP), standard achromatic perimetry (SAP), and frequency doubling technology (FDT) in glaucoma and ocular hypertensive patients and in glaucoma suspects. Design: Prospective comparative observational study.

  2. High power continuous-wave dual-wavelength alexandrite laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Shirin; Major, Arkady

    2017-10-01

    A high power dual-wavelength alexandrite (Cr:BeAl2O4) laser using a single plate birefringent filter (BRF) was demonstrated. Using a 6 mm thick BRF, dual-wavelength output at 745.2 nm and 756.2 nm (5.9 THz of frequency difference) with 850 mW of average output power was achieved as well as with 16.8% optical-to-optical and 24.2% slope efficiency. The tunability of dual-wavelength separation was also demonstrated by employing the 4 mm and 2 mm thick BRFs with similar output powers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a dual-wavelength alexandrite laser.

  3. Nonlinear theory of short-wavelength free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, H. P.

    1995-11-01

    The nonlinear evolution of free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers is studied for infrared and shorter wavelengths. The configuration of interest consists in the propagation of an energetic electron beam through a drift tube in the presence of a periodic wiggler magnetic field with planar symmetry. A three-dimensional formulation is derived in which the electromagnetic field is represented as an expansion of Gaussian optical modes. Since the wiggler model is characterized by planar symmetry, the Gauss-Hermite modes are used for this purpose. A set of nonlinear differential equations is derived for the evolution of the amplitude and phase of each mode, and they are solved simultaneously in conjunction with the three-dimensional Lorentz force equations for an ensemble of electrons in the presence of the magneto-static wiggler, self-electric and self-magnetic fields due to the charge and current distributions of the beam, and the electromagnetic fields. It is important to note that no wiggler average is used in the integration of the electron trajectories. This permits the self-consistent modeling of effects associated with (1) the injection of the beam into the wiggler, (2) emittance growth due to inhomogeneities in the wiggler and radiation fields as well as due to the self-fields, (3) the effect of wiggler imperfections, and (4) betatron oscillations. The optical guiding of the radiation field is implicitly included in the formulation. This approach has important practical advantages in analyzing FELs, since it is necessary only to characterize the beam upon injection into the wiggler, and the subsequent evolution is treated self-consistently. Numerical simulations are performed for two examples corresponding to an infrared FEL at wavelengths near 3.5 μm, and an x-ray FEL operating in the neighborhood of 1.4 Å wavelengths corresponding to the proposed linear coherent light source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Results for both cases indicate that

  4. Polarization Insensitive Wavelength Conversion Based on Four-Wave Mixing in a Silicon Nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Hu, Hao; Peucheret, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, polarization-insensitive wavelength conversion of a 10 Gb/s NRZ-OOK data signal based on four-wave mixing in a silicon nanowire with bit-error rate measurements.......We experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, polarization-insensitive wavelength conversion of a 10 Gb/s NRZ-OOK data signal based on four-wave mixing in a silicon nanowire with bit-error rate measurements....

  5. Dispersion free control of hydroelastic waves down to sub-wavelength scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Lucie; Fermigier, Marc; Fort, Emmanuel; Eddi, Antonin

    2017-11-01

    Hydroelastic surface waves propagate at the surface of water covered by a thin elastic sheet and can be directly measured with accurate space and time resolution. We present an experimental approach using hydroelastic waves that allows us to control waves down to the sub-wavelength scale. We tune the wave dispersion relation by varying locally the properties of the elastic cover and we introduce a local index contrast. This index contrast is independent of the frequency leading to a dispersion-free Snell-Descartes law for hydroelastic waves. We then show experimental evidence of broadband focusing, reflection and refraction of the waves. We also investigate the limits of diffraction through the example of a macroscopic analog to optical nanojets, revealing that any sub-wavelength configuration gives access to new features for surface waves.

  6. Mode-selective wavelength conversion based on four-wave mixing in a multimode silicon waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Xu, Jing; Ou, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    to phase mismatch. A two-mode division multiplexing circuit with tapered directional coupler based (de)multiplexers and a multimode waveguide is designed and fabricated for this application. Experimental results show clear eye-diagrams and moderate power penalties for the wavelength conversion of both......We propose and demonstrate all-optical mode-selective wavelength conversion in a silicon waveguide. The mode-selective wavelength conversion relies on strong four-wave mixing when pump and signal light are on the same spatial mode, while weak four-wave mixing is obtained between different modes due...... modes....

  7. Wavelength of ocean waves and surf beat at duck from array measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Menon, H.B.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Jog, P.D.; Almeida, A.M.

    Wavelength of ocean waves and surf beat (infra gravity waves) has for the first time been computed as a function of frequency from different combinations of non-collinear 3-gauge arrays. Data at the 15-gauge polygonal array at 8 m depth at Duck...

  8. Recovery Of Short Wavelength Geophysical Signals With Future Delay-Doppler Altimeters (Cryosat Ii And Sentinel Type)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2010-01-01

    altimetry: Factor of 20 improvements in along track resolution. An along-track footprint length that does not vary with wave height (sea state). Twice the precision in sea surface height measurements / sea surface slope measurements. These improvements are studied with respect to retrieval of short...... wavelength geophysical signal related to mainly bathymetric features. The combination of upward continuation from the sea bottom and smoothing the altimeter observations resulted in the best recovery of geophysical signal for simulated 5-Hz DD observations. Simulations carried out in this investigation...

  9. Continuous-wave optical parametric oscillation tunable up to 8 μm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Ingo; Fürst, Josef Urban; Hanka, Kevin; Buse, Karsten

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate the first cw OPO emitting mid-infrared light at wavelengths up to 8 μm. This device is based on a 3.5-mm-diameter whispering gallery resonator made of silver gallium selenide (AgGaSe2) pumped by a compact distributed feedback laser diode emitting light at 1.57 μm wavelength. Phase-matching is achieved for a c-cut resonator disk pumped with extraordinarily polarized light at this wavelength. The oscillation thresholds are in the mW region, while the output power ranges from 10 to 800 μW. Wavelength tuning is achieved via changing the radial mode number of the pump wave and by changing the resonator temperature. Simulations predict that whispering gallery OPOs based on AgGaSe2 with diameters around 2 mm can generate idler waves exceeding 10 μm wavelength.

  10. On seeing yellow: the case for, and against, short-wavelength light-absorbing intraocular lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2012-07-01

    The normal human crystalline lens absorbs UV and short-wavelength visible electromagnetic radiation. Early intraocular lenses (IOLs) permitted the transmission of such radiation to the retina following cataract extraction. Experimental studies of the absorption profile of the crystalline lens and animal studies demonstrating the deleterious effects of short-wavelength radiation on the retina led to the development of UV-absorbing, and later, short-wavelength light-absorbing (SLA) IOLs. Short-wavelength light-absorbing IOLs were designed to mimic the absorption properties of the normal crystalline lens by absorbing some short-wavelength light in addition to UV radiation; however, debate continues regarding the relative merits of such lenses over UV-absorbing IOLs. Advocates of SLA IOLs suggest that they may theoretically offer increased photoprotection and decreased glare sensitivity and draw on in vitro, animal, and limited clinical studies that infer possible benefits. Detractors suggest that there is no direct evidence supporting a role for SLA IOLs in preventing retinal dysfunction in humans and suggest that they may have negative effects on color perception, scotopic vision, and circadian rhythms. This article examines the theoretical and empirical evidence for, and against, such lenses.

  11. New Insight into Short-Wavelength Solar Wind Fluctuations from Vlasov Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraoui, Fouad; Belmont, G.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of solar wind (SW) turbulence below the proton gyroscale is a topic that is being investigated extensively nowadays, both theoretically and observationally. Although recent observations gave evidence of the dominance of kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) at sub-ion scales with omega omega (sub ci)) is more relevant. Here, we study key properties of the short-wavelength plasma modes under limited, but realistic, SW conditions, Typically Beta(sub i) approx. > Beta (sub e) 1 and for high oblique angles of propagation 80 deg theory, we discuss the relevance of each plasma mode (fast, Bernstein, KAW, whistler) in carrying the energy cascade down to electron scales. We show, in particular, that the shear Alfven mode (known in the magnetohydrodynamic limit) extends at scales kappa rho (sub i) approx. > 1 to frequencies either larger or smaller than omega (sub ci), depending on the anisotropy kappa (parallel )/ kappa(perpendicular). This extension into small scales is more readily called whistler (omega > omega (sub ci)) or KAW (omega < omega (sub ci)) although the mode is essentially the same. This contrasts with the well-accepted idea that the whistler branch always develops as a continuation at high frequencies of the fast magnetosonic mode. We show, furthermore, that the whistler branch is more damped than the KAW one, which makes the latter the more relevant candidate to carry the energy cascade down to electron scales. We discuss how these new findings may facilitate resolution of the controversy concerning the nature of the small-scale turbulence, and we discuss the implications for present and future spacecraft wave measurements in the SW.

  12. A cure for the blues: opsin duplication and subfunctionalization for short-wavelength sensitivity in jewel beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Nathan P; Plimpton, Rebecca L; Sharkey, Camilla R; Suvorov, Anton; Lelito, Jonathan P; Willardson, Barry M; Bybee, Seth M

    2016-05-18

    Arthropods have received much attention as a model for studying opsin evolution in invertebrates. Yet, relatively few studies have investigated the diversity of opsin proteins that underlie spectral sensitivity of the visual pigments within the diverse beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera). Previous work has demonstrated that beetles appear to lack the short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) opsin class that typically confers sensitivity to the "blue" region of the light spectrum. However, this is contrary to established physiological data in a number of Coleoptera. To explore potential adaptations at the molecular level that may compensate for the loss of the SWS opsin, we carried out an exploration of the opsin proteins within a group of beetles (Buprestidae) where short-wave sensitivity has been demonstrated. RNA-seq data were generated to identify opsin proteins from nine taxa comprising six buprestid species (including three male/female pairs) across four subfamilies. Structural analyses of recovered opsins were conducted and compared to opsin sequences in other insects across the main opsin classes-ultraviolet, short-wavelength, and long-wavelength. All nine buprestids were found to express two opsin copies in each of the ultraviolet and long-wavelength classes, contrary to the single copies recovered in all other molecular studies of adult beetle opsin expression. No SWS opsin class was recovered. Furthermore, the male Agrilus planipennis (emerald ash borer-EAB) expressed a third LWS opsin at low levels that is presumed to be a larval copy. Subsequent homology and structural analyses identified multiple amino acid substitutions in the UVS and LWS copies that could confer short-wavelength sensitivity. This work is the first to compare expressed opsin genes against known electrophysiological data that demonstrate multiple peak sensitivities in Coleoptera. We report the first instance of opsin duplication in adult beetles, which occurs in both the UVS and LWS opsin classes

  13. Conditional Second Order Short-crested Water Waves Applied to Extreme Wave Episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2005-01-01

    A derivation of the mean second order short-crested wave pattern and associated wave kinematics, conditional on a given magnitude of the wave crest, is presented. The analysis is based on the second order Sharma and Dean finite water wave theory. A comparison with a measured extreme wave profile...

  14. Permittivity of water at millimeter wave-lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, M. D.

    1976-01-01

    Work performed on the permittivity of seawater and ice at 100 GHz was described. Measurements on water covered the temperature range from 0 to 50 C, while the measurements on ice were taken near - 10 C. In addition, a small number of measurements were made on the reflectivity of absorber materials used in a previous program on research in millimeter wave techniques. Normal incidence reflectivity was measured, and the result was used to obtain the index of refraction. For the case of normal incidence, reflectivity at a fixed temperature was reproducible to 1% for values near 40%. For reflectivity measurements on ice, the lack of attenuation leads to reflection from the back surface of the sample; this complication was circumvented by using a wedge shaped sample and freezing the water in a container lined with absorber material.

  15. Multi-wavelength Observations of Solar Acoustic Waves Near Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsue, Teresa; Pesnell, Dean; Hill, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Active region areas on the Sun are abundant with a variety of waves that are both acoustically helioseismic and magnetohydrodynamic in nature. The occurrence of a solar flare can disrupt these waves, through MHD mode-mixing or scattering by the excitation of these waves. We take a multi-wavelength observational approach to understand the source of theses waves by studying active regions where flaring activity occurs. Our approach is to search for signals within a time series of images using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm, by producing multi-frequency power map movies. We study active regions both spatially and temporally and correlate this method over multiple wavelengths using data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. By surveying the active regions on multiple wavelengths we are able to observe the behavior of these waves within the Solar atmosphere, from the photosphere up through the corona. We are able to detect enhancements of power around active regions, which could be acoustic power halos and of an MHD-wave propagating outward by the flaring event. We are in the initial stages of this study understanding the behaviors of these waves and could one day contribute to understanding the mechanism responsible for their formation; that has not yet been explained.

  16. Comparison of Near-Infrared and Short-Wavelength Autofluorescence in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    OpenAIRE

    Duncker, Tobias; Tabacaru, Mirela R; Lee, Winston; Tsang, Stephen H.; Sparrow, Janet R.; Greenstein, Vivienne C.

    2013-01-01

    Short wavelength autofluorescence (SW-AF) and near-infrared autofluorescence (NIR-AF) are both useful for monitoring disease progression in retinitis pigmentosa. NIR-AF may have advantages clinically and could unveil a process that precedes the formation of fluorophores that emit the SW-AF signal.

  17. Shear wavelength estimation based on inverse filtering and multiple-point shear wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazaki, Tomoaki; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Elastography provides important diagnostic information because tissue elasticity is related to pathological conditions. For example, in a mammary gland, higher grade malignancies yield harder tumors. Estimating shear wave speed enables the quantification of tissue elasticity imaging using time-of-flight. However, time-of-flight measurement is based on an assumption about the propagation direction of a shear wave which is highly affected by reflection and refraction, and thus might cause an artifact. An alternative elasticity estimation approach based on shear wavelength was proposed and applied to passive configurations. To determine the elasticity of tissue more quickly and more accurately, we proposed a new method for shear wave elasticity imaging that combines the shear wavelength approach and inverse filtering with multiple shear wave sources induced by acoustic radiation force (ARF). The feasibility of the proposed method was verified using an elasticity phantom with a hard inclusion.

  18. Social, Economic and Health Impacts of WaveLength's Work with Loneliness and Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, A

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the findings of qualitative research into the social, economic and health impacts of WaveLength’s work on loneliness and social isolation. WaveLength is a charitable organisation which provides access to media technology for people who are lonely or socially isolated and living in poverty. This research was an exploratory qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. The overarching aim of the research was to understand the ways and means through which media technol...

  19. Ion Acoustic Waves in the Presence of Electron Plasma Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave.......Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave....

  20. Continuous-wave Optically Pumped Lasing of Hybrid Perovskite VCSEL at Green Wavelength

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2017-05-08

    We demonstrate the lasing of a perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser at green wavelengths, which operates under continuous-wave optical pumping at room-temperature by embedding hybrid perovskite between dielectric mirrors deposited at low-temperature.

  1. 320 Gbit/s DQPSK all-optical wavelength conversion using four wave mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galili, Michael; Huettl, B.; Schmidt-Langhorst, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate wavelength conversion of 320 Gbit/s DQPSK and 160 Gbit/s DPSK data signals by four wave mixing in highly nonlinear fibre. Error free operation is shown for conversion of both DPSK and DQPSK...

  2. Mode-Selective Wavelength Conversion Based on Four-Wave Mixing in a Multimode Silicon Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Xu, Jing; Ou, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    We report all-optical mode-selective wavelength conversion based on four-wave mixing in a multimode Si waveguide. A two-mode division multiplexing circuit using tapered directional coupler based (de)multiplexers is used for the application. Experimental results show clear eye-diagrams and moderate...... power penalties for the conversion of both modes....

  3. Attenuation of short wavelengths alters sleep and the ipRGC pupil response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrin, Lisa A; Abbott, Kaleb S; Queener, Hope M

    2017-07-01

    Exposure to increasing amounts of artificial light during the night may contribute to the high prevalence of reported sleep dysfunction. Release of the sleep hormone melatonin is mediated by the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). This study sought to investigate whether melatonin level and sleep quality can be modulated by decreasing night-time input to the ipRGCs. Subjects (ages 17-42, n = 21) wore short wavelength-blocking glasses prior to bedtime for 2 weeks. The ipRGC-mediated post illumination pupil response was measured before and after the experimental period. Stimulation was presented with a ganzfeld stimulator, including one-second and five-seconds of long and short wavelength light, and the pupil was imaged with an infrared camera. Pupil diameter was measured before, during and for 60 s following stimulation, and the six-second and 30 s post illumination pupil response and area under the curve following light offset were determined. Subjects wore an actigraph device for objective measurements of activity, light exposure, and sleep. Saliva samples were collected to assess melatonin content. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was administered to assess subjective sleep quality. Subjects wore the blue-blocking glasses 3:57 ± 1:03 h each night. After the experimental period, the pupil showed a slower redilation phase, resulting in a significantly increased 30 s post illumination pupil response to one-second short wavelength light, and decreased area under the curve for one and five-second short wavelength light, when measured at the same time of day as baseline. Night time melatonin increased from 16.1 ± 7.5 pg mL-1 to 25.5 ± 10.7 pg mL-1 (P sleep duration increased 24 min, from 408.7 ± 44.9 to 431.5 ± 42.9 min (P short wavelength-blocking glasses at night increased subjectively measured sleep quality and objectively measured melatonin levels and sleep duration, presumably as a result of

  4. Short-wavelength attenuated polychromatic white light during work at night : Limited melatonin suppression without substantial decline of alertness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Werken, Maan; Giménez, Marina C; de Vries, Bonnie; Beersma, Domien G M; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    Exposure to light at night increases alertness, but light at night (especially short-wavelength light) also disrupts nocturnal physiology. Such disruption is thought to underlie medical problems for which shiftworkers have increased risk. In 33 male subjects we investigated whether short-wavelength

  5. Near infrared spectroscopy for mastitis diagnosis: Two-dimensional correlation study in short wavelength region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsenkova, Roumiana; Murayama, Koichi; Kawano, Sumio; Wu, Yuqing; Toyoda, Kiyohiko; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2000-03-01

    We describe the application of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopic (2DCOS) technique for mastitic diagnosis. Seven average spectra in the short wavelength region (700-1100 nm) of mastitic levels separated from healthy to disease were subjected to 2DCOS analysis. Synchronous correlation map clearly showed water and fat bands. Asynchronous correlation map indicated the dynamical variations of milk constituents in milk occurred when a cow gets mastitis.

  6. High-power parametric conversion from near-infrared to short-wave infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billat, Adrien; Cordette, Steevy; Tseng, Yu-Pei; Kharitonov, Svyatoslav; Brès, Camille-Sophie

    2014-06-16

    We report the design of an all-fiber continuous wave Short-Wave Infrared source capable to output up to 700 mW of power at 1940 nm. The source is tunable over wavelength intervals comprised between 1850 nm and 2070 nm depending on its configuration. The output can be single or multimode while the optical signal to noise ratio ranges from 25 and 40 dB. The architecture is based on the integrated association of a fiber optical parametric amplifier and a Thulium doped fiber amplifier.

  7. Phase engineered wavelength conversion of ultra-short optical pulses in TI:PPLN waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babazadeh, Amin; Nouroozi, Rahman; Sohler, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    A phase engineered all-optical wavelength converter for ultra-short pulses (down to 140 fs) in a Ti-diffused, periodically poled lithium niobate (Ti:PPLN) waveguide is proposed. The phase engineering, due to the phase conjugation between signal and idler (converted signal) pulses which takes place in the cascaded second harmonic generation and difference frequency generation (cSHG/DFG) based wavelength conversion, already leads to shorter idler pulses. The proposed device consists of an unpoled (passive) waveguide section beside of the PPLN waveguide section in order to compensate pulse broadening and phase distortion of the idler pulses induced by the wavelength conversion (in the PPLN section). For example numerical analysis shows that a 140 fs input signal pulse is only broadened by 1.6% in a device with a combination of 20 mm and 6 mm long periodically poled and unpoled waveguide sections. Thus, cSHG/DFG based wavelength converters of a bandwidth of several Tbits/s can be designed.

  8. Superresolving Phase Measurement with Short-Wavelength NOON States by Quantum Frequency Up-Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Shi-Long; Liu, Shi-Kai; Li, Yin-Hai; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Guo, Guang-Can; Shi, Bao-Sen

    2017-06-01

    Precise measurements are the key to advances in all fields of science. Quantum entanglement shows higher sensitivity than that which is achievable by classical methods. Most physical quantities including position, displacement, distance, angle, and optical path length can be obtained by optical phase measurements. Reducing the photon wavelength of the interferometry can further enhance the optical-path-length sensitivity and imaging resolution. By quantum frequency up-conversion, we realize a short-wavelength two-photon number entangled state. Nearly perfect Hong-Ou-Mandel interference is achieved after both 1547-nm photons are up-converted to 525 nm. Optical phase measurement of the two-photon entanglement state yields a visibility greater than the threshold to surpass the standard quantum limit. A spectra change of the photon pair after being up-converted is observed and well explained. These results offer alternative ways for high-precision quantum metrology using a short-wavelength quantum entanglement number state and offer a potential all-optical spectra engineering technique for the photon pair source.

  9. Nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Y.; Rozenberg, S.; Halstuch, A.; Ishaaya, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study the nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents. Unlike the well-understood mixing of quasi-monochromatic waves, this configuration is highly non-intuitive due to the complex coupling between the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom of the interacting pulses. We illustrate the process intuitively with transitions between different branches of the dispersion curves and interpret it in terms of spectral exchange between the interacting pulses. We verify our interpretation with an example whereby a spectrally-narrow pulse “inherits” the wide spectrum of a pump pulse centered at a different wavelength, using exact numerical simulations, as well as a simplified coupled mode analysis and an asymptotic analytical solution. The latter also provides a simple and intuitive quantitative interpretation. The complex wave mixing process studied here may enable flexible spatio-temporal shaping of short pulses and is the starting point of the study of more complicated systems.

  10. Polarization attraction using counter-propagating waves in optical fiber at telecommunication wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitois, S; Fatome, J; Millot, G

    2008-04-28

    In this work, we report the experimental observation of a polarization attraction process which can occur in optical fibers at telecommunication wavelengths. More precisely, we have numerically and experimentally shown that a polarization attractor, based on the injection of two counter-propagating waves around 1.55microm into a 2-m long high nonlinear fiber, can transform any input polarization state into a unique well-defined output polarization state.

  11. Dual-wavelength, two-crystal, continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, G K; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2011-08-15

    We report a cw optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in a novel architecture comprising two nonlinear crystals in a single cavity, providing two independently tunable pairs of signal and idler wavelengths. Based on a singly resonant oscillator design, the device permits access to arbitrary signal and idler wavelength combinations within the parametric gain bandwidth and reflectivity of the OPO cavity mirrors. Using two identical 30 mm long MgO:sPPLT crystals in a compact four-mirror ring resonator pumped at 532 nm, we generate two pairs of signal and idler wavelengths with arbitrary tuning across 850-1430 nm, and demonstrate a frequency separation in the resonant signal waves down to 0.55 THz. Moreover, near wavelength-matched condition, coherent energy coupling between the resonant signal waves, results in reduced operation threshold and increased output power. A total output power >2.8 W with peak-to-peak power stability of 16% over 2 h is obtained. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  12. Short-wavelength free-electron laser sources and science: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, E. A.; Clarke, J. A.; Dunning, D. J.; Masciovecchio, C.; Milne, C. J.; Parmigiani, F.; Rugg, D.; Spence, J. C. H.; Thompson, N. R.; Ueda, K.; Vinko, S. M.; Wark, J. S.; Wurth, W.

    2017-11-01

    This review is focused on free-electron lasers (FELs) in the hard to soft x-ray regime. The aim is to provide newcomers to the area with insights into: the basic physics of FELs, the qualities of the radiation they produce, the challenges of transmitting that radiation to end users and the diversity of current scientific applications. Initial consideration is given to FEL theory in order to provide the foundation for discussion of FEL output properties and the technical challenges of short-wavelength FELs. This is followed by an overview of existing x-ray FEL facilities, future facilities and FEL frontiers. To provide a context for information in the above sections, a detailed comparison of the photon pulse characteristics of FEL sources with those of other sources of high brightness x-rays is made. A brief summary of FEL beamline design and photon diagnostics then precedes an overview of FEL scientific applications. Recent highlights are covered in sections on structural biology, atomic and molecular physics, photochemistry, non-linear spectroscopy, shock physics, solid density plasmas. A short industrial perspective is also included to emphasise potential in this area. Dedicated to John M J Madey (1943-2016) and Rodolfo Bonifacio (1940-2016) whose perception, drive and perseverance paved the way for the realisation and development of short-wavelength free-electron lasers.

  13. Implications of controlled short-wavelength light exposure for sleep in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Lesniak, Natalia Z; Rea, Mark S

    2011-09-08

    Environmental and physiological conditions make older adults more likely to lose synchronization to their local time and experience sleep disturbances. A regular, 24-hour light/dark cycle promotes synchronization. It is now well established that the circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light. The purpose of the present study was to measure dose effectiveness (amounts and durations) of short-wavelength (blue) light for stimulating the circadian systems of older adults. We investigated the impact of six corneal irradiances (0.7 to 72 μW/cm2) of 470-nm light on nocturnal melatonin production. Nine participants, each over 50 years of age completed a within-subjects study. Each week, participants were exposed to one of the six irradiances of 470-nm light for 90 minutes. A two-factor (6 corneal irradiances × 10 exposure durations), within-subjects analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted using the melatonin suppression levels. The ANOVA revealed a significant main effect of corneal irradiance (F5, 30 = 9.131, p exposure duration (F9, 54 = 5.731, p exposure whereas 0.7 μW/cm2 did not. Sleep disorders are common and a serious problem for millions of older adults. The present results showed that comfortable, precise and effective doses of light can be prescribed to older adults to reliably stimulate the circadian system that presumably would promote entrainment and, thus, regular sleep. Field studies on the impact of short-wavelength-light doses on sleep efficiency in older adults should be performed.

  14. Implications of controlled short-wavelength light exposure for sleep in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rea Mark S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental and physiological conditions make older adults more likely to lose synchronization to their local time and experience sleep disturbances. A regular, 24-hour light/dark cycle promotes synchronization. It is now well established that the circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue light. The purpose of the present study was to measure dose effectiveness (amounts and durations of short-wavelength (blue light for stimulating the circadian systems of older adults. We investigated the impact of six corneal irradiances (0.7 to 72 μW/cm2 of 470-nm light on nocturnal melatonin production. Nine participants, each over 50 years of age completed a within-subjects study. Each week, participants were exposed to one of the six irradiances of 470-nm light for 90 minutes. Findings A two-factor (6 corneal irradiances × 10 exposure durations, within-subjects analysis of variance (ANOVA was conducted using the melatonin suppression levels. The ANOVA revealed a significant main effect of corneal irradiance (F5, 30 = 9.131, p 9, 54 = 5.731, p 45,270 = 1.927, p 2 reliably suppressed melatonin after 90-minute exposure whereas 0.7 μW/cm2 did not. Conclusions Sleep disorders are common and a serious problem for millions of older adults. The present results showed that comfortable, precise and effective doses of light can be prescribed to older adults to reliably stimulate the circadian system that presumably would promote entrainment and, thus, regular sleep. Field studies on the impact of short-wavelength-light doses on sleep efficiency in older adults should be performed.

  15. Wheel-rail interaction at short-wave irregularities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, M.J.M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Short-wave irregularities in the wheel-rail interface are at the basis of track and vehicle damage and deterioration. On the short term, they result into high dynamic train-track interaction forces and a high energy input into the system that must be dissipated in the different system components or

  16. Investigating the contribution of short wavelengths in the alerting effect of bright light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasseville, Alexandre; Martin, Jeanne Sophie; Houle, Jérôme; Hébert, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Short-wavelengths can have an acute impact on alertness, which is allegedly due to their action on intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Classical photoreceptors cannot, however, be excluded at this point in time as contributors to the alerting effect of light. The objective of this study was to compare the alerting effect at night of a white LED light source while wearing blue-blockers or not, in order to establish the contribution of short-wavelengths. 20 participants stayed awake under dim light (light condition for 30 min starting at 3:00 h. Group A (5M/5F) was exposed to 500 μW/cm(2) of unfiltered LED light, while group B (4M/6F) was required to wear blue-blocking glasses, while exposed to 1500 μW/cm(2) from the same light device in order to achieve 500 μW/cm(2) at eye level (as measured behind the glasses). Subjective alertness, energy, mood and anxiety were assessed for both nights at 23:30 h, 01:30 h and 03:30 h using a visual analog scale (VAS). Subjective sleepiness was assessed with the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS). Subjects also performed the Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT-II) in order to assess objective alertness. Mixed model analysis was used to compare VAS, SSS and CPT-II parameters. No difference between group A and group B was observed for subjective alertness, energy, mood, anxiety and sleepiness, as well as CPT-II parameters. Subjective alertness (p light exposure on the second night independently of the light condition. The current study shows that when sleepiness is high, the alerting effect of light can still be triggered at night in the absence of short-wavelengths with a 30 minute light pulse of 500 μW/cm(2). This suggests that the underlying mechanism by which a brief polychromatic light exposure improves alertness is not solely due to short-wavelengths through intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

  17. Short-wavelength two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy of tryptophan with a photonic crystal fiber based light source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Palero (Jonathan); V.O. Boer (Vincent); J.C. Vijverberg (Jacob); H.C. Gerritsen (Hans); H.J.C.M. Sterenborg (Dick)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe report on a novel and simple light source for short-wavelength two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy based on the visible nonsolitonic radiation from a photonic crystal fiber. We demonstrate tunability of the light source by varying the wavelength and intensity of the

  18. Structured light generation by magnetic metamaterial half-wave plates at visible wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinwei; Luk, Ting S.; Gao, Jie; Yang, Xiaodong

    2017-12-01

    Metamaterial or metasurface unit cells functioning as half-wave plates play an essential role for realizing ideal Pancharatnam–Berry phase optical elements capable of tailoring light phase and polarization as desired. Complex light beam manipulation through these metamaterials or metasurfaces unveils new dimensions of light–matter interactions for many advances in diffraction engineering, beam shaping, structuring light, and holography. However, the realization of metamaterial or metasurface half-wave plates in visible spectrum range is still challenging mainly due to its specific requirements of strong phase anisotropy with amplitude isotropy in subwavelength scale. Here, we propose magnetic metamaterial structures which can simultaneously exploit the electric field and magnetic field of light for achieving the nanoscale half-wave plates at visible wavelength. We design and demonstrate the magnetic metamaterial half-wave plates in linear grating patterns with high polarization conversion purity in a deep subwavelength thickness. Then, we characterize the equivalent magnetic metamaterial half-wave plates in cylindrical coordinate as concentric-ring grating patterns, which act like an azimuthal half-wave plate and accordingly exhibit spatially inhomogeneous polarization and phase manipulations including spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion and vector beam generation. Our results show potentials for realizing on-chip beam converters, compact holograms, and many other metamaterial devices for structured light beam generation, polarization control, and wavefront manipulation.

  19. Short-Wavelength Light Sensitivity of Circadian, Pupillary, and Visual Awareness in Humans Lacking an Outer Retina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaidi, Farhan H; Hull, Joseph T; Peirson, Stuart N; Wulff, Katharina; Aeschbach, Daniel; Gooley, Joshua J; Brainard, George C; Gregory-Evans, Kevin; Rizzo, Joseph F; Czeisler, Charles A; Foster, Russell G; Moseley, Merrick J; Lockley, Steven W

    2007-01-01

    ...; one female, 87 yr old). In the male subject, we found that short-wavelength light preferentially suppressed melatonin, reset the circadian pacemaker, and directly enhanced alertness compared to 555 nm exposure, which is the...

  20. Directional short wind wave spectra derived from the sea surface photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulov, Vladimir; Yurovskaya, Maria; Chapron, Bertrand; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    New field measurements of 2-D wave number short wind wave spectra in the wavelength range from few millimeters to few decimeters are reported and discussed. The measurement method proposed by [Kosnik and Dulov, 2011] is based on stereophotography and image brightness contrast processing. The method strongly builds on the brightness cross-spectral analysis to reduce the noise within this short wave gravity and capillary range. Field measurements of wind wave spectra are still rare, and the reported data thus provide valuable information to bring new evidences on the 2-D spectral distribution of short wind waves in the wavelength range from decimeters to millimeters. As found, the folded spectra of decimeter waves are very weakly dependent on the wind speed and its direction. Wind speed and direction sensitivity only starts to appear in the short wavelength range, more precisely in the vicinity of the wave number 100 rad/m, where the wind exponent grows from 0.5 to 1.5-2.5 at 800 rad/m, and angular anisotropy parameter introduced by [Elfouhaily et al., 1997] amounts the value of 0.5. These aspects are consistent with other previously reported optical and radar data. For the latter, we solely extracted the polarization sensitivity to best isolate the contribution associated to the wave saturation spectrum around the Bragg resonant wave number. For the former, mean-squared slope statistics were used to assess the integrated shortscale directional spectral properties. As revealed, observed direction spectral distributions are significantly different from those previously suggested [Elfouhaily et al., 1997; Kudryavtsev et al., 2003, 2005]. On the basis of these new in situ measurements, we then propose to revise the semiempirical analytical model of short wind wave spectra developed by [Kudryavtsev et al., 2003, 2005]. In this model the key parameter is exponent n governing the nonlinear dissipation rate as D ~ Bn+1, where B is saturation spectrum. Accordingly, new

  1. Short wavelengths active bichromatic pulsed pyrometer for solids and liquids designed for measurements in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navello, L.; Lebedinsky, J.; Offret, J. P.; Serio, B.; Davin, T.; Bailly, Y.; Hervé, P.

    2015-05-01

    Optical passive methods for temperature measurements such as thermography or optical pyrometry are very interesting because they allow a non-intrusive measurement when the emissivity is known. The knowledge of this coefficient is critical for determining the actual temperature of a surface from the thermal radiation emitted in a wavelength band. The bichromatic pulsed pyrometer allows to overcome the knowledge of this parameter provided that precautions are taken in the choice of the values of wavelengths. When the object to be measured is placed in harsh environments, such passive optical methods are greatly disturbed by the presence of an optically absorbing medium. They are also distorted when the measured objects are located in very hot environments emitting intense disturbing radiation. In this study, we present an active bichromatic radiometric method for measuring the temperature of a surface in harsh environments. The method is based on a localized excitation by a modulated laser source in the infrared range. Detecting the temperature modulation, which is correlated with the excitation, is performed using a lock-in amplifier able to extract the signal embedded in a noise up to a million times superior. Working at short wavelengths (visible range and near infrared range) offers a large dynamic range and minimizes the error due to variations in emissivity with the wavelength. This system collects the radiation emitted by the object at a distance from a few meters up to dozens of meters depending on the configuration of the optical system. Both the principle and the design of the active bichromatic optical surface thermometer are presented and discussed. To demonstrate the method, results obtained on a molten ceramic stream are presented.

  2. Automated lipid-rich plaque detection with short wavelength infra-red OCT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokado, Aiko; Kubo, Takashi; Nishiguchi, Tsuyoshi; Katayama, Yosuke; Taruya, Akira; Ohta, Shingo; Kashiwagi, Manabu; Shimamura, Kunihiro; Kuroi, Akio; Kameyama, Takeyoshi; Shiono, Yasutsugu; Yamano, Takashi; Matsuo, Yoshiki; Kitabata, Hironori; Ino, Yasushi; Hozumi, Takeshi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Akasaka, Takashi

    2017-11-27

    Vulnerable coronary plaque is characterized by a large lipid core. Although commercially-available optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems use near-infrared light at 1300 nm wavelength, lipid shows characteristic absorption at 1700 nm. Therefore, we developed a novel, short wavelength infra-red, spectroscopic, spectral-domain OCT. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the accuracy of short wavelength (1700 nm) infra-red optical coherence tomography (SWIR-OCT) for identification of lipid tissue within coronary plaques. Twenty-three coronary arteries from 10 cadavers were imaged at physiological pressure with 2.7 Fr SWIR-OCT catheter. When a blood-free image was observed, the SWIR-OCT imaging core was withdrawn at a rate of 20 mm/s using an automatic pullback device. SWIR-OCT images were acquired at 94 frames/s and digitally archived. SWIR-OCT generated grey-scale cross sectional images and colour tissue maps of all of the plaque by using a lipid analysis algorithm. After SWIR-OCT imaging, the arteries were pressure-fixed, sliced by cryostat and stained with Oil Red O, and then corresponding histology was collected in matched images. Regions of interest, selected from histology, were 117 lipidic and 34 fibrotic/calcified regions. SWIR-OCT showed high sensitivity (89%) and specificity (92%) for identifying lipid tissue within coronary plaques. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 97% and 74%, respectively. SWIR-OCT accurately identified lipid tissue in coronary autopsy specimens. This new technique may hold promise for identifying histopathological features of coronary plaque at risk for rupture.

  3. Lack of short-wavelength light during the school day delays dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) in middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Rea, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    Circadian timing affects sleep onset. Delayed sleep onset can reduce sleep duration in adolescents required to awake early for a fixed school schedule. The absence of short-wavelength ("blue") morning light, which helps entrain the circadian system, can hypothetically delay sleep onset and decrease sleep duration in adolescents. The goal of this study was to investigate whether removal of short-wavelength light during the morning hours delayed the onset of melatonin in young adults. Dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was measured in eleven 8th-grade students before and after wearing orange glasses, which removed short-wavelength light, for a five-day school week. DLMO was significantly delayed (30 minutes) after the five-day intervention, demonstrating that short-wavelength light exposure during the day can be important for advancing circadian rhythms in students. Lack of short-wavelength light in the morning has been shown to delay the circadian clock in controlled laboratory conditions. The results presented here are the first to show, outside laboratory conditions, that removal of short-wavelength light in the morning hours can delay DLMO in 8th-grade students. These field data, consistent with results from controlled laboratory studies, are directly relevant to lighting practice in schools.

  4. Near-infrared and short-wavelength autofluorescence in resolved central serous chorioretinopathy: association with outer retinal layer abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Kyoon; Kim, Seong-Woo; Oh, Jaeryung; Huh, Kuhl

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the correlation between changes in fundus autofluorescence (AF) measured using 2 different sources (near-infrared fundus autofluorescence from melanin and short-wavelength fundus autofluorescence from lipofuscin) with changes in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) and fluorescein angiography in resolved central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Retrospective, observational case study. A total of 91 eyes from 86 patients with a history of resolved CSC and abnormal AF imaging findings were included. In addition to AF, patients were assessed by means of SD OCT and fluorescein angiography. Outer retinal layer alterations in OCT images and abnormalities in fluorescein angiography were analyzed and correlated with the corresponding AF data. All eyes with abnormal near-infrared AF showed a hyperfluorescent angiography window defect in the corresponding area. There was a significant association between the OCT and short-wavelength AF findings. An abnormal short-wavelength AF signal was significantly associated with loss of the ellipsoid portion of the inner segments (EPIS, previously known as the junction between the inner and outer segments of the photoreceptors) on SD OCT (χ(2) test; P Near-infrared AF could not predict the status of EPIS without the short-wavelength AF image. Outer retinal layer changes in OCT images can be predicted by analyzing both short-wavelength AF and near-infrared AF images. Abnormal changes in the short-wavelength AF image were predictive of EPIS damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Broadband Polarization-Insensitive Wavelength Conversion Based on Non-Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing in a Silicon Nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Hu, Hao; Ji, Hua

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate broadband polarization-insensitive one-to-two wavelength conversion of a 10-Gb/s DPSK data signal based on non-degenerate four-wave mixing in a silicon nanowire with bit-error rate measurements.......We experimentally demonstrate broadband polarization-insensitive one-to-two wavelength conversion of a 10-Gb/s DPSK data signal based on non-degenerate four-wave mixing in a silicon nanowire with bit-error rate measurements....

  6. On-chip wavelength switch based on thermally tunable discrete four-wave mixing in a silicon waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Chen, Yaohui; Hu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    An on-chip wavelength switch is proposed based on discrete four-wave mixing in a silicon waveguide. Switching operation can be realized by thermal tuning the waveguide dispersion. We also discuss optimal dimension design concerning device performances.......An on-chip wavelength switch is proposed based on discrete four-wave mixing in a silicon waveguide. Switching operation can be realized by thermal tuning the waveguide dispersion. We also discuss optimal dimension design concerning device performances....

  7. Optimisation of 40 Gb/s wavelength converters based on four-wave mixing in a semiconductor optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, K.; Petersen, Martin Nordal; Herrera, J.

    2007-01-01

    The optimum operating powers and wavelengths for a 40 Gb/s wavelength converter based on four-wave mixing in a semiconductor 14 optical amplifier are inferred from experimental results. From these measurements, some general rules of thumb are derived for this kind of devices. Generally, the optimum...

  8. The development of InGaAs short wavelength infrared focal plane arrays with high performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Gong, Haimei; Fang, Jiaxiong; shao, Xiumei; Tang, Hengjing; Huang, Songlei; Li, Tao; Huang, Zhangcheng

    2017-01-01

    High performance, various specifications InGaAs focal plane arrays(FPAs) were studied in Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics (SITP). On the one hand, the typical linear 256 × 1, 512 × 1 and 1024 × 1 FPAs were obtained for response wavelengths from 0.9 μm to 1.7 μm. The typical 320 × 256 FPAs and special sizes 512 × 128, 512 × 256 FPAs for the near infrared multi-spectral imaging were studied. The performance of InGaAs FPAs from 0.9 μm to 1.7 μm has improved enormously. The average peak detectivity, the response non-uniformity and non-operable pixel of the FPAs are superior to 3 × 1012 cm Hz1/2/W, 5% and 1% at the room temperature. On the other hand, the development of the extended InGaAs FPAs was also focused in SITP. The dark current of InGaAs detectors with the response wavelength from 1.0 μm to 2.5 μm decreases to about 10 nA/cm2 at 200 K. The dark current mechanisms for extended InGaAs detectors were studied by P/A photodiodes. The special sizes 512 × 256 FPAs has been fabricated since 2011. The average peak detectivity, the response non-uniformity and non-operable pixel of the FPAs are superior to 5 × 1011 cm Hz1/2/W, 8% and 2% at 200 K. In order to verify the performance of FPAs, the short wavelength infrared lens was used to form optical imaging system. The buildings, water, trees are sharply imaged by 320 × 256 FPAs with 0.9-1.7 μm wavelength and 512 × 1 FPAs with 0.9-2.5 μm wavelength at about hundreds of meters distance as target at daylight.

  9. Daytime Exposure to Short- and Medium-Wavelength Light Did Not Improve Alertness and Neurobehavioral Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Ahuva Y; Sletten, Tracey L; Flynn-Evans, Erin E; Lockley, Steven W; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W

    2016-10-01

    While previous studies have demonstrated short-wavelength sensitivity to the acute alerting effects of light during the biological night, fewer studies have assessed the alerting effect of light during the daytime. This study assessed the wavelength-dependent sensitivity of the acute alerting effects of daytime light exposure following chronic sleep restriction in 60 young adults (29 men, 31 women; 22.5 ± 3.1 mean ± SD years). Participants were restricted to 5 h time in bed the night before laboratory admission and 3 h time in bed in the laboratory, aligned by wake time. Participants were randomized for exposure to 3 h total of either narrowband blue (λmax 458-480 nm, n = 23) or green light (λmax 551-555 nm, n = 25) of equal photon densities (2.8-8.4 × 10(13) photons/cm(2)/sec), beginning 3.25 h after waking, and compared with a darkness control (0 lux, n = 12). Subjective sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale), sustained attention (auditory Psychomotor Vigilance Task), mood (Profile of Mood States Bi-Polar form), working memory (2-back task), selective attention (Stroop task), and polysomnographic and ocular sleepiness measures (Optalert) were assessed prior to, during, and after light exposure. We found no significant effect of light wavelength on these measures, with the exception of a single mood subscale. Further research is needed to optimize the characteristics of lighting systems to induce alerting effects during the daytime, taking into account potential interactions between homeostatic sleep pressure, circadian phase, and light responsiveness. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Upconversion imaging using short-wave infrared picosecond pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathez, Morgan David; Rodrigo, Peter John; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, we present the first demonstration of short-wavelength infrared image upconversion that employs intense picosecond signal and pump beams. We use a fiber laser that emits a signal beam at 1877 nm and a pump beam at 1550 nm—both with a pulse width of 1 ps and a pulse...... by an improved model that considers the combined image blurring effect due to finite pump beam size, thick nonlinear crystal, and polychromatic infrared illumination....

  11. Combined sonochemical and short-wavelength UV degradation of hydrophobic perfluorinated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko; Kudo, Takahisa; Sankoda, Kenshi

    2017-11-01

    Perfluorochemicals (PFCs), which are common in the aquatic environment, are toxic substances that have high chemical and heat resistance because of their strong C-F bonds. We investigated the effect of ultrasonication and short-wavelength UV irradiation on the degradation of perfluorooctane, perfluoropropionic acid, and perfluorooctanoic acid, which are examples of hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and intermediate PFCs, respectively. The results confirmed that ultrasonication was more effective for decomposing hydrophobic PFCs and UV irradiation was more effective for decomposing hydrophilic PFCs. Therefore, defluorination of the degradation intermediates was improved by a combination of ultrasonication and UV irradiation. Our results can be applied to the decomposition treatment of PFCs that have various levels of water solubility in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Extraordinarily low evolutionary rates of short wavelength-sensitive opsin pseudogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Starmer, William T; Liu, Yang; Tada, Takashi; Britt, Lyle

    2014-01-15

    Aquatic organisms such as cichlids, coelacanths, seals, and cetaceans are active in UV-blue color environments, but many of them mysteriously lost their abilities to detect these colors. The loss of these functions is a consequence of the pseudogenization of their short wavelength-sensitive (SWS1) opsin genes without gene duplication. We show that the SWS1 gene (BdenS1ψ) of the deep-sea fish, pearleye (Benthalbella dentata), became a pseudogene in a similar fashion about 130 million years ago (Mya) yet it is still transcribed. The rates of nucleotide substitution (~1.4 × 10(-9)/site/year) of the pseudogenes of these aquatic species as well as some prosimian and bat species are much smaller than the previous estimates for the globin and immunoglobulin pseudogenes. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Internal structure of laser supported detonation waves by two-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Kohei; Hatai, Keigo; Kawamura, Koichi; Fukui, Akihiro; Fukuda, Akio; Wang, Bin; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-04-01

    Characteristics of the internal structure of the laser supported detonation (LSD) waves, such as the electron density ne and the electron temperature Te profiles behind the shock wave were measured using a two-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometer along with emission spectroscopy. A TEA CO2 laser with energy of 10 J/pulse produced explosive laser heating in atmospheric air. Results show that the peak values of ne and Te were, respectively, about 2 × 1024 m-3 and 30 000 K, during the LSD regime. The temporal variation of the laser absorption coefficient profile estimated from the measured properties reveals that the laser energy was absorbed perfectly in a thin layer behind the shock wave during the LSD regime, as predicted by Raizer's LSD model. However, the absorption layer was much thinner than a plasma layer, the situation of which was not considered in Raizer's model. The measured ne at the shock front was not zero while the LSD was supported, which implies that the precursor electrons exist ahead of the shock wave.

  14. Collision effects on propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves in a sub-wavelength plasma slab of partially ionized dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, LI; Zhibin, WANG; Qiuyue, NIE; Xiaogang, WANG; Fanrong, KONG; Zhenyu, WANG

    2018-01-01

    Intensive collisions between electrons and neutral particles in partially ionized plasmas generated in atmospheric/sub-atmospheric pressure environments can sufficiently affect the propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves, particularly in the sub-wavelength regime. To investigate the collisional effect in such plasmas, we introduce a simplified plasma slab model with a thickness on the order of the wavelength of the incident electromagnetic wave. The scattering matrix method (SMM) is applied to solve the wave equation in the plasma slab with significant nonuniformity. Results show that the collisions between the electrons and the neutral particles, as well as the incident angle and the plasma thickness, can disturb the transmission and reduce reflection significantly.

  15. Full-wave solution of short impulses in inhomogeneous plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 249–268. Full-wave solution of short impulses in inhomogeneous plasma. ORSOLYA E FERENCZ. Space Research Group, Eötvös University, Geophysical Department, H-1518, Budapest,. P.O. Box 32, Hungary ...... lightning, traveling through the ionosphere up to the magnetosphere (whistler pre- cursors).

  16. Dynamics of solitons in multicomponent long wave–short wave ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Long wave–short wave resonance interaction; Hirota's bilinearization method; bright and dark solitons; soliton collision. ... different areas of science and technology [1]. Particularly, higher-dimensional multicomponent systems admit various localized structures like solitons, vortex solitons, dromions, and so on. These multi-.

  17. Are short (blue) wavelengths necessary for light treatment of seasonal affective disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J L; Hilaire, M A St; Auger, R R; Glod, C A; Crow, S J; Rivera, A N; Salgado, S M Fuentes; Pullen, S J; Kaufman, T K; Selby, A J; Wolfe, D J

    2016-08-05

    Despite widely published speculation regarding a potential potency advantage of short-wavelength (blue-appearing) light for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) treatment, there have been few systematic studies. Those comparing short-wavelength to broad-wavelength (white) light under actual clinical conditions suggest equivalent effectiveness. This multicenter, parallel-group design trial was undertaken to compare the effects of light therapy on SAD using blue (~465 nm) versus blue-free (595-612 nm) LED lights. Fifty-six medication-free subjects aged 21-64 years who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for recurrent major depression with winter-type seasonal pattern were enrolled in this blinded study at five participating centers between January and March 2012. Thirty-five subjects met the criteria for randomization to 30 min of either blue (~465 nm) or blue-free (595-612 nm) daily morning light therapy. Twenty-nine subjects completed the study; three subjects withdrew due to treatment-related adverse events, including migraines, and three withdrew for non-study-related reasons. The primary effectiveness variable was depression score (SIGH-ADS) after six weeks of daily light treatment. Secondary effectiveness variables included quality-of-life (QoL) and suicidality ratings. Using an intent-to-treat analysis, mean depression scores were different at baseline for the blue group (29 ± 5 versus 26 ± 5, p = 0.05 blue versus blue-free, respectively), and the initial score was used as a covariate. Baseline scores were not significantly different between treatment groups among those who completed the study, and no significant differences in depression scores were observed after 6 weeks (mean ± SD scores at 6 weeks: 5.6 ± 6.1 versus 4.5 ± 5.3, p = 0.74, blue versus blue-free, respectively). In addition, the proportion of subjects who met remission criteria, defined as a depression score ≤8, was not significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.41); among the 29 subjects who

  18. TES arrays for the short wavelength band of the SAFARI instrument on SPICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosropanah, P.; Hijmering, R.; Ridder, M.; Gao, J. R.; Morozov, D.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Trappe, N.; O'Sullivan, C.; Murphy, A.; Griffin, D.; Goldie, D.; Glowacka, D.; Withington, S.; Jackson, B. D.; Audley, M. D.; de Lange, G.

    2012-09-01

    SPICA is an infra-red (IR) telescope with a cryogenically cooled mirror (~5K) with three instruments on board, one of which is SAFARI that is an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) with three bands covering the wavelength of 34-210 μm. We develop transition edge sensors (TES) array for short wavelength band (34-60 μm) of SAFARI. These are based on superconducting Ti/Au bilayer as TES bolometers with a Tc of about 105 mK and thin Ta film as IR absorbers on suspended silicon nitride (SiN) membranes. These membranes are supported by long and narrow SiN legs that act as weak thermal links between the TES and the bath. Previously an electrical noise equivalent power (NEP) of 4×10-19 W/√Hz was achieved for a single pixel of such detectors. As an intermediate step toward a full-size SAFARI array (43×43), we fabricated several 8×9 detector arrays. Here we describe the design and the outcome of the dark and optical tests of several of these devices. We achieved high yield (<93%) and high uniformity in terms of critical temperature (<5%) and normal resistance (7%) across the arrays. The measured dark NEPs are as low as 5×10-19 W/√Hz with a response time of about 1.4 ms at preferred operating bias point. The optical coupling is implemented using pyramidal horns array on the top and hemispherical cavity behind the chip that gives a measured total optical coupling efficiency of 30±7%.

  19. A fiber-laser-pumped four-wavelength continuous-wave mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Shang, Yaping; Li, Xiao; Xu, Xiaojun

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a four-wavelength continuous-wave mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator was demonstrated for the first time. The pump source was a home-built linearly polarized Yb-doped fiber laser and the maximum output power was 72.5 W. The pump source had three central wavelengths locating at 1060 nm, 1065 nm and 1080 nm. Four idler emissions with different wavelengths were generated which were 3132 nm, 3171 nm, 3310 nm and 3349 nm under the maximum pump power. The maximum idler output reached 8.7 W, indicating a 15% pump-to-idler slope efficiency. The signal wave generated in the experiment had two wavelengths which were 1595 nm and 1603 nm under the maximum pump power. It was analyzed that four nonlinear progresses occurred in the experiment, two of them being optical parametric oscillation and the rest two being intracavity difference frequency generation.

  20. Atmospheric Waves and Dynamics Beneath Jupiters Clouds from Radio Wavelength Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Simon, Amy; De Pater, Imke

    2017-01-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between approx. 0.5- 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiters atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of approx. 1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10 N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-m hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wave- length map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiters atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 m hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLAs upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric

  1. Heralded wave packet manipulation and storage of a frequency-converted pair photon at telecom wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroh, Tim; Ahlrichs, Andreas; Sprenger, Benjamin; Benson, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Future quantum networks require a hybrid platform of dissimilar quantum systems. Within the platform, joint quantum states have to be mediated either by single photons, photon pairs or entangled photon pairs. The photon wavelength has to lie within the telecommunication band to enable long-distance fibre transmission. In addition, the temporal shape of the photons needs to be tailored to efficiently match the involved quantum systems. Altogether, this requires the efficient coherent wavelength-conversion of arbitrarily shaped single-photon wave packets. Here, we demonstrate the heralded temporal filtering of single photons as well as the synchronisation of state manipulation and detection as key elements in a typical experiment, besides of delaying a photon in a long fibre. All three are realised by utilising commercial telecommunication fibre-optical components which will permit the transition of quantum networks from the lab to real-world applications. The combination of these renders a temporally filtering single-photon storage in a fast switchable fibre loop possible.

  2. Near-infrared and short-wavelength autofluorescence imaging in central serous chorioretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayata, A; Tatlipinar, S; Kar, T; Unal, M; Ersanli, D; Bilge, A H

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the results of short-wavelength (SW) and near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) in acute central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Twenty-six eyes of the 26 patients diagnosed with CSC (mean age 37.4 years) were included in this retrospective study. AF images were evaluated and compared with angiographic and ophthalmoscopic findings. Fluorescein angiography and AF imaging were performed using a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Focally decreased AF at the leakage site was seen in most of the cases with acute CSC (20 of 26 eyes in SW-AF; 20 of 20 eyes in NIR-AF). Twenty-four of the 26 cases had decreased SW-AF corresponding to the area of the serous retinal detachment, while 19 of the available 20 cases had decreased NIR-AF corresponding to the area of the serous retinal detachment. Increased granular AF corresponding to the extent of the former retinal detachment was seen earlier with SW-AF imaging, but disappeared later in the course of disease with NIR-AF imaging. AF imaging in CSC demonstrates different patterns according to the course of the disease, reflecting RPE and outer retinal changes. Combining two different methods of AF imaging could predict recent or former CSC episodes and may be a non-invasive technique for monitoring CSC and performing differential diagnosis.

  3. Can short-wavelength depleted bright light during single simulated night shifts prevent circadian phase shifts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regente, J; de Zeeuw, J; Bes, F; Nowozin, C; Appelhoff, S; Wahnschaffe, A; Münch, M; Kunz, D

    2017-05-01

    In single night shifts, extending habitual wake episodes leads to sleep deprivation induced decrements of performance during the shift and re-adaptation effects the next day. We investigated whether short-wavelength depleted (=filtered) bright light (FBL) during a simulated night shift would counteract such effects. Twenty-four participants underwent a simulated night shift in dim light (DL) and in FBL. Reaction times, subjective sleepiness and salivary melatonin concentrations were assessed during both nights. Daytime sleep was recorded after both simulated night shifts. During FBL, we found no melatonin suppression compared to DL, but slightly faster reaction times in the second half of the night. Daytime sleep was not statistically different between both lighting conditions (n = 24) and there was no significant phase shift after FBL (n = 11). To conclude, our results showed positive effects from FBL during simulated single night shifts which need to be further tested with larger groups, in more applied studies and compared to standard lighting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Short wavelength infrared optical windows for evaluation of benign and malignant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordillo, Diana C; Sordillo, Laura A; Sordillo, Peter P; Shi, Lingyan; Alfano, Robert R

    2017-04-01

    There are three short wavelength infrared (SWIR) optical windows outside the conventionally used first near-infrared (NIR) window (650 to 950 nm). They occur in the 1000- to 2500-nm range and may be considered second, third, and fourth NIR windows. The second (1100 to 1350 nm) and third windows (1600 to 1870 nm) are now being explored through label-free linear and multiphoton imaging. The fourth window (2100 to 2350 nm) has been mostly ignored because of water absorption and the absence of sensitive detectors and ultrafast lasers. With the advent of new technology, use of window IV is now possible. Absorption and scattering properties of light through breast and prostate cancer, bone, lipids, and intralipid solutions at these windows were investigated. We found that breast and prostate cancer and bone have longer total attenuation lengths at NIR windows III and IV, whereas fatty tissues and intralipid have longest lengths at windows II and III. Since collagen is the major chromophore at 2100 and 2350 nm, window IV could be especially valuable in evaluating cancers and boney tissues, whereas windows II and III may be more useful for tissues with high lipid content. SWIR windows may be utilized as additional optical tools for the evaluation of collagen in tissues.

  5. Determination of the Genetic Architecture Underlying Short Wavelength Sensitivity in Lake Malawi Cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandamuri, Sri Pratima; Dalton, Brian E; Carleton, Karen L

    2017-06-01

    African cichlids are an exemplary system to study organismal diversity and rapid speciation. Species differ in external morphology including jaw shape and body coloration, but also differ in sensory systems including vision. All cichlids have 7 cone opsin genes with species differing broadly in which opsins are expressed. The differential opsin expression results in closely related species with substantial differences in spectral sensitivity of their photoreceptors. In this work, we take a first step in determining the genetic basis of opsin expression in cichlids. Using a second generation cross between 2 species with different opsin expression patterns, we make a conservative estimate that short wavelength opsin expression is regulated by a few loci. Genetic mapping in 96 F2 hybrids provides clear evidence of a cis-regulatory region for SWS1 opsin that explains 34% of the variation in expression between the 2 species. Additionally, in situ hybridization has shown that SWS1 and SWS2B opsins are coexpressed in individual single cones in the retinas of F2 progeny. Results from this work will contribute to a better understanding of the genetic architecture underlying opsin expression. This knowledge will help answer long-standing questions about the evolutionary processes fundamental to opsin expression variation and how this contributes to adaptive cichlid divergence. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Stability of Cubipod Armoured Roundheads in Short Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Medina, Josep R.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a comparison of the stability of concrete cube armour and Cubipod armour in a breakwater roundhead with slope 1:1.5, exposed to both 2-D (long-crested) and 3-D (short-crested) waves. The model tests were performed at the Hydraulics and Coastal Engineering Laboratory at Aalborg...... University, Denmark. The model tests showed that Cubipod armour is more stable than cube armour when exposed to longer waves (steepness approx. 0.025) and has equal stability to cubes in shorter waves. The Cubipod armour layer contained due to its high porosity approximately 6-17% less concrete than the cube...... armour layer. Therefore, it was concluded that per used volume of concrete the Cubipods perform better than the cubes....

  7. A study of short wave instability on vortex filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong Yun [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The numerical stability and accuracy of the vortex method are studied. The effect of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver and of the time step on the numerical stability is analyzed. Various ODE solvers are compared and a best performer is chosen. A new constraint on the time step based on numerical stability is proposed and verified in numerical simulations. It is shown through numerical examples that empirical rules for selecting the spatial discretization obtained in simple test problems may not be extended to more general problems. The thin tube vortex filament method is applied to the problem of Widnall's instability on vortex rings. Numerical results different from previous calculations are presented and the source of the discrepancies is explained. The long time behavior of the unstable mode on thin vortex rings is simulated and analyzed. The short wave instability on vortex filaments is investigated both theoretically and numerically. It is shown that the short wave instability always occurs on co-rotating vortex filaments of fixed core structure. Furthermore when they are close to each other, vortex filaments produce short wave unstable modes which lead to wild stretching and folding. However, when the inter-filament distance is large in comparison with the core size of the filaments, unstable modes are bounded by a small fraction of the core size and the vortex filaments do not create hairpins nor wild stretching. These findings may explain the smooth behavior of the superfluid vortices. The formation of hairpin structures on numerical vortex filaments is investigated. It is shown that the formation of hairpin structures is independent of the ODE solver, of the time step and of other numerical parameters. The hairpin structures are primarily caused by short wave instability on co-rotating vortex filaments.

  8. Study of optical output couplers for submillimeter wavelength backward-wave oscillators (BWO's)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jerry D.; Stankiewicz, Norbert; Podany, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Several scaled experiments of optical output couplers for submillimeter backward-wave oscillators (BWOs). Various designs of planar antennas (Vivaldi horns) lens-feed systems (hyperhemispherical lens) were constructed and tested between 20 and 100 GHz using a spectrum analyzer. The lens system was also tested at 337 GHz using a CO2 pumped FIR laser. It is found that Vivaldi horns have unsatisfactory resonances, perhaps because the horns studied were relatively short. Several techniques to maximize and flatten the frequency response of these horns are presented. The results suggest that alternate coupling schemes are superior to Vivaldi horns.

  9. Atmospheric waves and dynamics beneath Jupiter's clouds from radio wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberías, Raúl; Simon, Amy; de Pater, Imke

    2017-08-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between ∼ 0.5 - 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiter's atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of ∼1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10°N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-μm hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wavelength map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiter's atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 μm hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLA's upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric dynamics

  10. Near-Infrared Autofluorescence: Its Relationship to Short-Wavelength Autofluorescence and Optical Coherence Tomography in Recessive Stargardt Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Greenstein, Vivienne C.; Schuman, Ari D.; Lee, Winston; Duncker, Tobias; Zernant, Jana; Allikmets, Rando; Hood, Donald C.; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods were used to compare hypoautofluorescent areas detected with near-infrared and short-wavelength autofluorescence to retinal thickness maps created from SD-OCT volume scans in Stargardt patients. Results were consistent with RPE cell loss occurring before photoreceptor cell loss.

  11. Modelling single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for high-intensity short-wavelength radiation sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loch, R.A.; Sobierajski, R.; Louis, Eric; Bosgra, J.; Bosgra, J.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for highintensity short-wavelength radiation sources are theoretically investigated, using a model developed on the basis of experimental data obtained at the FLASH and LCLS free electron lasers. We compare the radiation hardness of commonly

  12. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PULSED SHORT WAVE TREATMENT. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogaru Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed short waves are short electromagnetic waves emitted as intermittent trains with a fixed duration, separated by free intervals of variable duration. The biological effects of pulsed short waves could be explained according to most of the authors by an activation of cellular enzymatic reactions, a stimulation of energy metabolism, a stimulation of liver function, of adrenal gland function and of the reticulocyte system, changes in cell permeability, by an increase of peripheral blood flow through the enhancement of local vascularization. This research aimed to investigate the biological effects of exposure to pulsed short waves at different doses on the adrenal glands of experimental animals, by structural and ultrastructural studies. The study included 35 animals assigned to 4 groups. Group I included 10 experimental animals exposed to radiation at a dose of 1/80 impulses/sec, group II, 10 animals exposed to a dose of 4/400 impulses/sec, group III, 10 animals exposed to a dose of 6/600 impulses/sec, for 10 min/day, and the control group consisted of 5 unexposed animals. Structural and ultrastructural changes of adrenal glands induced by the dose of 4/400 impulses/sec, compared to the unexposed control group and the dose of 1/80 impulses/sec, include an intensification of protein synthesis processes, an enhancement of energy metabolism in providing the energy required for an increased production of hormones, an intensification of collagen fiber synthesis processes in the capsule, necessary for healing. It was demonstrated that this dose induced an intensification of hormone synthesis and secretion, a stimulation of adrenal function. At the dose of 6/600 cycles/sec, a slight diminution of hormone synthesis and secretion activity was found, which was not below the limits existing in the unexposed control group, but was comparable to group II. This dose is probably too strong for experimental animals, inducing them a state of stress. The

  13. Comparison of near-infrared and short-wavelength autofluorescence in retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Tobias; Tabacaru, Mirela R; Lee, Winston; Tsang, Stephen H; Sparrow, Janet R; Greenstein, Vivienne C

    2013-01-17

    To compare near-infrared autofluorescence (NIR-AF) and short-wavelength (SW) AF in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and assess their relationships to underlying retinal structure and visual function. SW-AF, NIR-AF, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images were acquired from 31 patients (31 eyes) with RP and registered to each other. Microperimetry was performed on a subset of 12 patients. For both SW-AF and NIR-AF images, three independent observers measured the area enclosed by the outer border of the hyperautofluorescent ring and the distance from the fovea to the outer and inner border of the ring. For SD-OCT images, the distance from the fovea to the location where the inner segment ellipsoid (ISe) band became undetectable was measured. All eyes had a hyperautofluorescent ring on both SW-AF and NIR-AF. The position of the outer border of the ring was similar for both modalities. On NIR-AF the signal outside the ring was lower than inside the ring, resulting in a high contrast between the two areas. Also, the inner border of the ring was closer to the fovea on NIR-AF than SW-AF, corresponding to a location on SD-OCT where the ISe band was at least partially intact. Visual sensitivity was relatively preserved within the ring, reduced across the ring, and markedly decreased or nonrecordable outside the ring. SW-AF and NIR-AF are both useful for monitoring disease progression in RP; however, NIR-AF may have advantages clinically and could unveil a process that precedes the formation of fluorophores that emit the SW-AF signal.

  14. Visualization of the optic fissure in short-wavelength autofluorescence images of the fundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Tobias; Greenberg, Jonathan P; Sparrow, Janet R; Smith, R Theodore; Quigley, Harry A; Delori, François C

    2012-09-28

    To document and explain the presence, inferior to the optic disc, of a distinct vertical boundary between two retinal areas of different short-wavelength autofluorescence (SW-AF) intensities. SW-AF images of the inferonasal region were acquired from 32 healthy subjects. Additionally, color, 488-nm reflectance (488-R), near-infrared reflectance (NIR-R), NIR autofluorescence (NIR-AF) images, and a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) image were obtained in selected subjects. Gray levels (GL) on both sides of the demarcation line were measured in SW-AF and 488-R at fixed distances from the disc center. A curved demarcation line inferior to the optic disc was observed on SW-AF images in 31/32 subjects. AF levels on the nasal side were 13% (±6%) lower than on the temporal side at 20° inferior to the disc center. The contrast between the nasal and the temporal areas was not significantly affected by age, sex, refractive error, race, or iris color. The demarcation line visible in SW-AF was also seen, though with reduced contrast, in approximately 80% of the 488-R images (lower reflectance on the nasal side) and 50% of color images. The boundary was not detected by NIR-R, NIR-AF, or by SD-OCT imaging. The location and the distinctness of the demarcation line may indicate a relationship to the closed embryonic optic fissure. The reduced SW-AF intensity and 488-R reflectance observed on the nasal side of this line may be attributable to lower lipofuscin and melanin content per unit area, possibly resulting from a difference in RPE cell shape.

  15. Waves in a short cable at low frequencies, or just hand-waving?

    CERN Document Server

    Kish, L B; Granqvist, C G; Smulko, J M

    2015-01-01

    We address the question of low-frequency signals in a short cable, which are often considered as waves in engineering calculations. Such an assumption violates several laws of physics, but exact calculations can be carried out via linear network theory.

  16. Note on the 2-component Analogue of 2-dimensional Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Interaction System

    OpenAIRE

    Maruno, Ken-ichi; Ohta, Yasuhiro; Oikawa, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    An integrable two-component analogue of the two-dimensional long wave-short wave resonance interaction (2c-2d-LSRI) system is studied. Wronskian solutions of 2c-2d-LSRI system are presented. A reduced case, which describes resonant interaction between an interfacial wave and two surface wave packets in a two layer fluid, is also discussed.

  17. Effect of finite ωτ on cyclotron-wave propagation in metals in the long-wavelength limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, J. B.; Gordon, R A

    1976-01-01

    Exact calculations of cyclotron-wave dispersion curves have been carried out for a degenerate free-electron metal including finite relaxation time effects. The calculated dispersion curves are shown to differ substantially from the experimental dispersion curves in the long-wavelength limit...

  18. Four-wave mixing parametric oscillation and frequency comb generation at visible wavelengths in a silica microbubble resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yong; Kasumie, Sho; Zhao, Guangming; Xu, Linhua; Ward, Jonathan; Yang, Lan; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-01-01

    Frequency comb generation in microresonators at visible wavelengths has found applications in a variety of areas such as metrology, sensing, and imaging. To achieve Kerr combs based on four-wave mixing in a microresonator, dispersion must be in the anomalous regime. In this work, we demonstrate dispersion engineering in a microbubble resonator (MBR) fabricated by a two-CO$_2$ laser beam technique. By decreasing the wall thickness of the MBR down to 1.4 $\\mu$m, the zero dispersion wavelength shifts to values shorter than 764 nm, making phase matching possible around 765 nm. With the optical \\textit{Q}-factor of the MBR modes being greater than $10^7$, four-wave mixing is observed at 765 nm for a pump power of 3 mW. By increasing the pump power, parametric oscillation is achieved, and a frequency comb with 14 comb lines is generated at visible wavelengths.

  19. Intense Interactions of Molecules with a Short-Wavelength Electromagnetic Radiation Field: II. Resonance Scattering of Radiation and Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegarkov, A. I.

    2001-07-01

    Within the framework of the nonadiabatic approach developed in the preceding paper, the resonance scattering, resonance Raman scattering, and resonance fluorescence are studied in detail for diatomic and triatomic molecules, and polyatomic symmetric and antisymmetric top molecules, which interact with the field of short-wavelength radiation with a wavelength λ ≥ Å and an intensity up to 1014 W/cm2. The coherent excitations of high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states are taken into account. Analytical expressions for calculating the tensors and cross sections of the above processes are derived.

  20. Cone signals for spectacle-lens compensation: differential responses to short and long wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Frances J; Wallman, Josh

    2008-09-01

    Chick eyes compensate for defocus imposed by spectacle lenses by making compensatory changes in eye length and choroidal thickness, a laboratory model of emmetropization. To investigate the roles of longitudinal chromatic aberration and of chromatic mechanisms in emmetropization, we examined the participation of different cone classes, and we compared the efficacy of lens compensation under monochromatic illumination with that under white light of the same illuminance to the chick eye. Chicks wore positive or negative 6D or 8D lenses on one eye for 3 days, under either blue (460 nm) or red (620 nm) light at 0.67 lux or under white light at 0.67 or 0.2 lux (all measures are corrected for chick photopic sensitivity). The illumination conditions were chosen to differentially stimulate either the short-wavelength and ultraviolet cones or the long-wavelength and double cones. Measurements are expressed as the relative change: the inter-ocular difference in the amount of change over the 3 days of lens wear. We find that under this low illumination the two components of lens compensation were differentially affected by the monochromatic illumination: in blue light lens compensation was mainly due to changes in eye length, whereas in red light lens compensation was mainly due to changes in choroidal thickness. In general, white light produced better lens compensation than monochromatic illumination. NEGATIVE LENSES: Under white light negative lenses caused an increase in eye length (60 microm) together with a decrease in choroidal thickness (-51 microm) relative to the fellow eye. Under blue light, although there was an increase in eye length (32 microm), there was no change in choroidal thickness (5 microm). In contrast, under red light there was a decrease in choroidal thickness (-62 microm) but no increase in eye length (8 microm). Relative ocular elongation was the same in white and monochromatic light. POSITIVE LENSES: Under white light positive lenses caused a

  1. All-optical wavelength multicasting with extinction ratio enhancement using pump-modulated four-wave mixing in a dispersion-flattened nonlinear photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chow, K.K.; Shu, Chester; Lin, Chinlon

    2006-01-01

    All optical wavelength multicasting at 4 x 10 Gb/s with extinction ratio enhancement has been demonstrated based on pump-modulated four-wave mixing in a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber. We show that the input signal wavelength can simultaneously convert to four different wavelengths, with a powe...

  2. Wavelength-tunable laser based on nonlinear dispersive-wave generation in a tapered optical waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a wavelength tunable laser comprising a first laser source configured to emit a first optical pulse having a pump wavelength, the first optical pulse being emitted in a first longitudinal direction. Furthermore, the wavelength tunable laser comprises...... a waveguide extending in the first longitudinal direction, the waveguide having longitudinally varying phase matching conditions, the waveguide being configured to generate a second optical pulse with a centre wavelength upon receiving the first optical pulse, wherein the wavelength tunable laser...

  3. [Measurement of Soil Total N Based on Portable Short Wave NIR Spectroscopy Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-liang; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    portable short wave near-infrared spectral technology to predict soil total nitrogen and wavelengths selection could be very useful to reduce redundancy of spectra.

  4. Short wavelength light filtering by the natural human lens and IOLs -- implications for entrainment of circadian rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Adam Elias; Lundeman, Jesper Holm; Kessel, Line

    2013-01-01

    Photoentrainment of circadian rhythm begins with the stimulation of melanopsin containing retinal ganglion cells that respond directly to blue light. With age, the human lens becomes a strong colour filter attenuating transmission of short wavelengths. The purpose of the study was to examine the ...... the effect the ageing human lens may have for the photoentrainment of circadian rhythm and to compare with intraocular implant lenses (IOLs) designed to block UV radiation, violet or blue light....

  5. Video rate nine-band multispectral short-wave infrared sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutteruf, Mary R; Yetzbacher, Michael K; DePrenger, Michael J; Novak, Kyle M; Miller, Corey A; Downes, Trijntje Valerie; Kanaev, Andrey V

    2014-05-01

    Short-wave infrared (SWIR) imaging sensors are increasingly being used in surveillance and reconnaissance systems due to the reduced scatter in haze and the spectral response of materials over this wavelength range. Typically SWIR images have been provided either as full motion video from framing panchromatic systems or as spectral data cubes from line-scanning hyperspectral or multispectral systems. Here, we describe and characterize a system that bridges this divide, providing nine-band spectral images at 30 Hz. The system integrates a custom array of filters onto a commercial SWIR InGaAs array. We measure the filter placement and spectral response. We demonstrate a simple simulation technique to facilitate optimization of band selection for future sensors.

  6. Generation of spin waves by a train of fs-laser pulses: a novel approach for tuning magnon wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savochkin, I V; Jäckl, M; Belotelov, V I; Akimov, I A; Kozhaev, M A; Sylgacheva, D A; Chernov, A I; Shaposhnikov, A N; Prokopov, A R; Berzhansky, V N; Yakovlev, D R; Zvezdin, A K; Bayer, M

    2017-07-18

    Currently spin waves are considered for computation and data processing as an alternative to charge currents. Generation of spin waves by ultrashort laser pulses provides several important advances with respect to conventional approaches using microwaves. In particular, focused laser spot works as a point source for spin waves and allows for directional control of spin waves and switching between their different types. For further progress in this direction it is important to manipulate with the spectrum of the optically generated spin waves. Here we tackle this problem by launching spin waves by a sequence of femtosecond laser pulses with pulse interval much shorter than the relaxation time of the magnetization oscillations. This leads to the cumulative phenomenon and allows us to generate magnons in a specific narrow range of wavenumbers. The wavelength of spin waves can be tuned from 15 μm to hundreds of microns by sweeping the external magnetic field by only 10 Oe or by slight variation of the pulse repetition rate. Our findings expand the capabilities of the optical spin pump-probe technique and provide a new method for the spin wave generation and control.

  7. Higher-order rogue waves with new spatial distributions for the (2 + 1) -dimensional two-component long-wave-short-wave resonance interaction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Wei; Gao, Yi-Tian; Sun, Yu-Hao; Shen, Yu-Jia; Su, Chuan-Qi

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a two-component (2 + 1) -dimensional long-wave-short-wave (LWSW) system with nonlinearity coefficients, which describes the nonlinear resonance interaction between two short waves and a long wave, is studied. Via the Hirota's bilinear method and Pfaffian, N -order rogue waves for the LWSW system are constructed. Furthermore, correction of the N -order rogue waves is proved directly via the Pfaffian, which is cumbersome or inaccessible in other methods. Results of the first- and second-order rogue waves are presented: 1) For the first-order rogue waves, the two short-wave components are bright, while the long-wave component is dark. The position of maximum amplitude of the rogue wave is analyzed. Evolution process for the first-order rogue wave is also presented and discussed. 2) Choosing different forms of the elements defined in the Pfaffian, we obtain some kinds of the second-order rogue waves with new spatial distributions: when the elements defined in Pfaffian are the same as the first-order rogue waves, we find that the second-order rogue waves for the two short-wave components are split into two first-order rogue waves and the two bumps coexist and interact with each other; when we change the combination of the elements in Pfaffian, we find that the second-order rogue waves for the two short-wave components are split into three and four first-order rogue waves. 3) N -order rogue waves for a general M -component LWSW system are constructed.

  8. Renormalization of Long Wavelength Spin Waves in the 2d Ferromagnet Rb2CrCl4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Hutchings, M. T.

    1980-01-01

    Rb2CrCl4 is a nearly 2d-ferromagnetic, optically transparent insulator isomorphous with K2CuF4. High resolution neutron scattering data for temperatures below Tc = 52.4 K of the low energy long wavelength spin waves are presented and a Hartree-Fock analysis yields Hamiltonian parameters and accou......Rb2CrCl4 is a nearly 2d-ferromagnetic, optically transparent insulator isomorphous with K2CuF4. High resolution neutron scattering data for temperatures below Tc = 52.4 K of the low energy long wavelength spin waves are presented and a Hartree-Fock analysis yields Hamiltonian parameters...... and accounts for the renormalization. No evidence of a Bose condensate is found. A spin canting angle θ ≈ 2° is predicted....

  9. Influence of the Wavelength Dependence of Birefringence in the Generation of Supercontinuum and Dispersive Wave in Fiber Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Acuna Herrera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we perform numerical analysis about the influence of the wavelength dependence of birefringence (WDB in the Supercontinuum (SC and dispersive wave (DW generation. We study different birefringence profiles such as constant, linear, and parabolic. We see that, for a linear and parabolic profile, the generation of SC practically does not change, while this does so when the constant value of the birefringence varies. Similar situation happens with the generation of dispersive waves. In addition, we observe that the broadband of the SC increases when the Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS is neglected for all WDB profiles.

  10. Short-wave diathermy: current clinical and safety practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Nora; Gormley, John; O'Hare, Neil

    2002-01-01

    Short-wave diathermy (SWD) is widely available, yet a comprehensive examination of current clinical practice remains absent from the literature. The present paper aims to assess clinical and safety issues in continuous (CSWD) and pulsed (PSWD) short-wave diathermy application and subsequently indicate areas for future research. A postal survey was carried out among 116 senior physiotherapists in 41 Irish hospital-based physiotherapy departments. The response rate to the study was 75%. Analysis found that PSWD was the preferred mode of treatment with 27% of respondents using it more than once daily. Respondents considered both modes of treatment indicated for a variety of conditions. CSWD was rated as an effective treatment for chronic osteoarthritis, polyarthritis, non-specific arthrosis and haematomas. PSWD was reported an effective modality for acute soft tissue injury, haematomas, acute osteoarthritis, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. Dose selection varied greatly but tended to be based on the type, nature and duration of the condition. Analysis of safety practices uncovered concerning findings. Although a high level of agreement was found on measures for patient safety, 30% of respondents reported that no measures for operator safety were taken and only five respondents stated they remained a specified distance from SWD equipment. Measures to ensure the safety of other personnel in the physiotherapy department were also lacking. Given the availability of SWD equipment and its apparent efficacy in certain conditions, future research should aim to establish this by means of controlled clinical trials. The findings on safety practices underline the urgent need for comprehensive guidelines to ensure the safety of operators, patients and the general public during SWD application.

  11. Is there an unknown risk for short-wavelength visible laser radiation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidenbach, Hans-Dieter; Beckmann, Dirk; Al Ghouz, Imene; Dollinger, Klaus [Fachhochschule Koeln (Germany). Forschungsbereich Medizintechnik und Nichtionisierende Strahlung; Ott, Guenter [Bundesanstalt fuer Arbeitsschutz und Arbeitsmedizin (BAuA), Dortmund (Germany); Brose, Martin [Berufsgenossenschaft Energie Textil Elektro Medienerzeugnisse (BG ETEM), Koeln (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    A specially designed test apparatus was used in the investigation on temporary blinding. During provisional tests, exposure had been carried out with different wavelengths, power settings and exposure durations. One subject familiar to the effects of temporary blinding experienced an unusual effect, which lasted a long period of time. Concerning that this effect is not known enough to be considered in safety regulations, make it important to publish this report. (orig.)

  12. Bi-wavelength operation of a short-pulse Ti:sapphire laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, M.R.X. de; Becker, P.C. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors have demonstrated a femtosecond mode locked Ti:sapphire laser that simultaneously generates synchronous and colinear near transform limited two color pulses. The two color operating was obtained from a single laser cavity and the separation between the two wavelengths can be tuned from 55 to 90 nm. This laser is ideally suited for the generation of femtosecond mid-infrared pulses by difference frequency mixing.

  13. Time-resolved microscopy using variable probe wavelengths for ultra-short pulse interaction (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Klaus; Kumkar, Malte; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan; Seyfarth, Brian

    2017-03-01

    Glass processing with ultrashort laser pulses allow for different material modifications, ranging from smooth refractive index changes which can be used for the generation of waveguides up to large disruptions due to accumulates stress for glass separation. These disruptions, generated by a dense electron plasma, are favored for glass dicing applications. To tailor the resulting material response a fundamental understanding of the laser/material interaction is of interest. Therefore, we analyze the spatio-temporal evolution of free carriers induced by ultrashort laser pulses using a pump-probe setup with high temporal and spatial resolution and various probe wavelengths. Single laser pulses with 1026nm wavelength, 6ps (FWHM) pulse duration and 200μJ pulse energy were applied to fused silica, Borofloat 33 and Gorilla glass. Electron densities around 1 x 1020cm-3 in the focal plane and 1 x 1019cm-3 in front of the focus are obtained, independent from the glass type used. The free carriers slowly decay within several ns, while the decay time depends on both the maximum electron densities reached and glass species. In this process a part of the excited electrons relax within several 10ps into a long-living stage where a transient effect is observed. Here, various probe wavelengths show differences in the recorded signal. A further carrier relaxation leads to permanent (stress, voids) and non-stable (color center) modifications crucial for precise glass dicing applications.

  14. Wavelength-agile high-power sources via four-wave mixing in higher-order fiber modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demas, J; Prabhakar, G; He, T; Ramachandran, S

    2017-04-03

    Frequency doubling of conventional fiber lasers in the near-infrared remains the most promising method for generating integrated high-peak-power lasers in the visible, while maintaining the benefits of a fiber geometry; but since the shortest wavelength power-scalable fiber laser sources are currently restricted to either the 10XX nm or 15XX nm wavelength ranges, accessing colors other than green or red remains a challenge with this schematic. Four-wave mixing using higher-order fiber modes allows for control of dispersion while maintaining large effective areas, thus enabling a power-scalable method to extend the bandwidth of near-infrared fiber lasers, and in turn, the bandwidth of potential high-power sources in the visible. Here, two parametric sources using the LP0,7 and LP0,6 modes of two step-index multi-mode fibers are presented. The output wavelengths for the sources are 880, 974, 1173, and 1347 nm with peak powers of 10.0, 16.2, 14.7, and 6.4 kW respectively, and ~300-ps pulse durations. The efficiencies of the sources are analyzed, along with a discussion of wavelength tuning and further power scaling, representing an advance in increasing the bandwidth of near-infrared lasers as a step towards high-peak-power sources at wavelengths across the visible spectrum.

  15. Intense Interactions of Molecules with a Short-Wavelength Electromagnetic Radiation Field: I. The Fundamentals of the Nonadiabatic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegarkov, A. I.

    2001-07-01

    The intense interactions between short-wavelength (SW) electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength λ ≥ 1 Å and intensity up to 1014 W/cm2 and simple and polyatomic molecules are studied with the coherent excitations of high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states taken into account. The Hamiltonian of a system "molecule + SW radiation" is obtained by using the methods of quantum electrodynamics. Conditions for the applicability of the dipole approximation to describe the interactions of molecules with radiation of the UV, VUV, XUV, and soft X-ray range are found. The fundamentals of the theory of resonance scattering of SW radiation from diatomic, triatomic, and symmetric-and asymmetric-top polyatomic molecules are outlined.

  16. Lunar calibration improvements for the short-wave infrared bands in Aqua and Terra MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Truman; Angal, Amit; Shrestha, Ashish; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2017-09-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the key sensors among a suite of remote sensing instruments on board the Terra and Aqua spacecrafts. Since the beginning of each mission, regularly scheduled lunar observations have been used in order to track the on-orbit gain changes of the reflective solar bands. However, for the short-wave infrared bands, 5-7 and 26, the measured signal is contaminated by both electronic crosstalk and an out-of-band response due to transmission through the MODIS filters at undesired wavelengths. These contaminating signals cause significant oscillations in the derived gain from lunar observations for these bands, which limits their use in determining the scan mirror response versus scan angle at these wavelengths. In this paper, we show a strategy for correcting the electronic crosstalk contamination using lunar observations, where the magnitude and the source of the contaminating signal is clear. For Aqua MODIS, we find that the magnitude of the electronic crosstalk contamination is small, and the lunar calibration remains relatively unaffected. For Terra MODIS, the contamination is more significant, and the electronic crosstalk correction shows a significant reduction in the oscillations of the lunar calibration results.

  17. Nearly-octave wavelength tuning of a continuous wave fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Yang, Xuezong; Pan, Weiwei; Cui, Shuzhen; Feng, Yan

    2017-02-01

    The wavelength tunability of conventional fiber lasers are limited by the bandwidth of gain spectrum and the tunability of feedback mechanism. Here a fiber laser which is continuously tunable from 1 to 1.9 μm is reported. It is a random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser, pumped by a tunable Yb doped fiber laser. The ultra-wide wavelength tunability is enabled by the unique property of random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser that both stimulated Raman scattering gain and Rayleigh scattering feedback are available at any wavelength. The dispersion property of the gain fiber is used to control the spectral purity of the laser output.

  18. Cylindrical vector beam generation in fiber with mode selectivity and wavelength tunability over broadband by acoustic flexural wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wending; Huang, Ligang; Wei, Keyan; Li, Peng; Jiang, Biqiang; Mao, Dong; Gao, Feng; Mei, Ting; Zhang, Guoquan; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-05-16

    Theoretical analysis and experimental demonstration are presented for the generation of cylindrical vector beams (CVBs) via mode conversion in fiber from HE11 mode to TM01 and TE01 modes, which have radial and azimuthal polarizations, respectively. Intermodal coupling is caused by an acoustic flexural wave applied on the fiber, whereas polarization control is necessary for the mode conversion, i.e. HE11x→TM01 and HE11y→TE01 for acoustic vibration along the x-axis. The frequency of the RF driving signal for actuating the acoustic wave is determined by the phase matching condition that the period of acoustic wave equals the beatlength of two coupled modes. With phase matching condition tunability, this approach can be used to generate different types of CVBs at the same wavelength over a broadband. Experimental demonstration was done in the visible and communication bands.

  19. GeSn/Ge quantum well photodetectors for short-wave infrared photodetection: experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Ho; Chang, Guo-En

    2017-05-01

    Group-IV GeSn material systems have recently considered as a new material for sensitive photodetection in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region. The introduction of Sn into Ge can effectively narrow the bandgap energies, thereby extending the absorption edges toward the longer wavelengths and enabling effective photodetection in SWIR region. Here we present an experimental and modeling study of GeSn/Ge quantum well (QW) photodetectors on silicon substrates for effective SRIW photodetection. Epitaxial growth of pseudomorphic GeSn/Ge QW structures was realized on Ge-buffered silicon substrates using low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy. Normal incident GeSn/Ge QW photodetectors were then fabricated and characterized. The optical responsivity experiments demonstrate that the photodetection cutoff wavelengths is extended to beyond 1800 nm, enabling effective photodetection in SWIR spectral region. We then develop theoretical models to calculate the composition-dependent strained electron band structures, oscillation strengths, and optical absorption spectra for the pseudomorphic GeSn/Ge QW structures. The results show that Ge1-xSnx well sandwiched by Ge barriers can achieve a critical type-I alignment at Γ point to provide necessary quantum confinement of carriers. With an increase in the Sn content, the band offsets between the GeSn well and Ge barreirs increases, thus enhancing the oscillation strengths of direct interband transitions. In addition, despite stronger quantum confinement with increasing Sn content, the absorption edge can be effectively shifted to longer wavelengths due to the direct bandgap reduction caused by Sn-alloying. These results suggest that GeSn/Ge QW photodetectors are promising for low-cost, high-performance SWIR photodetection applications.

  20. Propagation of short-period gravity waves at high-latitudes during the MaCWAVE winter campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, K.; Taylor, M. J.; Pautet, P.-D.; Fritts, D. C.; Mitchell, N.; Beldon, C.; Williams, B. P.; Singer, W.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2006-07-01

    As part of the MaCWAVE (Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending Vertically) winter campaign an all-sky monochromatic CCD imager has been used to investigate the properties of short-period mesospheric gravity waves at high northern latitudes. Sequential measurements of several nightglow emissions were made from Esrange, Sweden, during a limited period from 27-31 January 2003. Coincident wind measurements over the altitude range (~80-100 km) using two meteor radar systems located at Esrange and Andenes have been used to perform a novel investigation of the intrinsic properties of five distinct wave events observed during this period. Additional lidar and MSIS model temperature data have been used to investigate their nature (i.e. freely propagating or ducted). Four of these extensive wave events were found to be freely propagating with potential source regions to the north of Scandinavia. No evidence was found for strong orographic forcing by short-period waves in the airglow emission layers. The fifth event was most unusual exhibiting an extensive, but much smaller and variable wavelength pattern that appeared to be embedded in the background wind field. Coincident wind measurements indicated the presence of a strong shear suggesting this event was probably due to a large-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  1. Propagation of short-period gravity waves at high-latitudes during the MaCWAVE winter campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nielsen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of the MaCWAVE (Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending Vertically winter campaign an all-sky monochromatic CCD imager has been used to investigate the properties of short-period mesospheric gravity waves at high northern latitudes. Sequential measurements of several nightglow emissions were made from Esrange, Sweden, during a limited period from 27–31 January 2003. Coincident wind measurements over the altitude range (~80–100 km using two meteor radar systems located at Esrange and Andenes have been used to perform a novel investigation of the intrinsic properties of five distinct wave events observed during this period. Additional lidar and MSIS model temperature data have been used to investigate their nature (i.e. freely propagating or ducted. Four of these extensive wave events were found to be freely propagating with potential source regions to the north of Scandinavia. No evidence was found for strong orographic forcing by short-period waves in the airglow emission layers. The fifth event was most unusual exhibiting an extensive, but much smaller and variable wavelength pattern that appeared to be embedded in the background wind field. Coincident wind measurements indicated the presence of a strong shear suggesting this event was probably due to a large-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  2. Material processing with ultra-short pulse lasers working in 2μm wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisiat, B.; Gaponov, D.; Gečys, P.; Lavoute, L.; Silva, M.; Hideur, A.; Ducros, N.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2015-03-01

    New wavelengths of laser radiation are of interest for material processing. Results of application of the all-fiber ultrashort pulsed laser emitting in 2 µm range, manufactured by Novae, are presented. Average output power was 4.35 W in a single-spatial-mode beam centered at the 1950 nm wavelength. Pulses duration was 40 ps, and laser operated at 4.2 MHz pulse repetition rate. This performance corresponded to 25 kW of pulse peak power and almost 1 µJ in pulse energy. Material processing was performed using three different focusing lenses (100, 30 and 18 mm) and mechanical stages for the workpiece translation. 2 µm laser radiation is strongly absorbed by some polymers. Swelling of PMMA surface was observed for scanning speed above 5 mm/s using the average power of 3.45 W focused with the 30 mm lens. When scanning speed was reduced below 4 mm/s, ablation of PMMA took place. The swelling of PMMA is a consequence of its melting due to absorbed laser power. Therefore, experiments on butt welding of PMMA and overlapping welding of PMMA with other polymers were performed. Stable joint was achieved for the butt welding of two PMMA blocks with thickness of 5 mm. The laser was used to cut a Kapton film on a paper carrier with the same set-up as previous. The cut width depended on the cutting speed and focusing optics. A perfect cut with a width of 11 µm was achieved at the translation speed of 60 mm/s.

  3. Action spectrum for photobleaching of human lenses by short wavelength visible irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Larsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    transmission with increasing laser irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: For a 75 year old lens an effect corresponding to elimination of 15 years or more of optical ageing was obtained. This study of the spectral characteristics and intensity needed to bleach the human lens with single-photon laser effects found......One publication. The objective of the study was to characterize the single-photon photobleaching action spectrum of the aged human lens in vitro. METHODS: Ninety-one human donor lenses were irradiated with continuous wave laser light at 375, 405, 420, 445, 457 or 473 nm. Photobleaching was monitored...

  4. Pulsed short-wave diathermy effects on human fibroblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan; Lewis, Martyn; Mills, Pauline; Kielty, Cay

    2002-06-01

    To investigate the influence of pulsed short-wave diathermy (PSWD) on fibroblast and chondrocyte cell proliferation rates and to establish the influences of different dosages applied. Four single-blind trials. Laboratory, in vitro study. Human adult dermal fibroblast and chondrocyte cells were plated at known concentrations and incubated for 5 days. Exposure to PSWD, twice daily, on days 2, 3, and 4. After crystal violet staining (day 5), optical density (cell number) was determined spectrophotometrically. PSWD, given at mean power of 48W for 10 minutes, increased fibroblast proliferation compared with control groups (P<.001). There was a relationship between cell proliferation and the amount of energy given (P<0.001). The optimal mean power for proliferation was estimated to be 13.8W. While keeping mean power constant at 6W, altering pulse duration and pulse repetition rate dosage parameters did not have a significant effect on proliferation (P=.519). Chondrocyte proliferation also increased with PSWD exposure of 6W at 10 minutes duration (P=.015). In addition, treatment time was significantly associated with chondrocyte proliferation (P<.001). PSWD is associated with increased rates of fibroblast and chondrocyte proliferation in vitro, which is dose dependent. These results contribute to an understanding of the physiologic mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of PSWD. Copyright 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  5. Effect of Local Thermal Equilibrium Misbalance on Long-wavelength Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakariakov, V. M.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Kumar, S.; Moon, Y.-J.

    2017-11-01

    Evolution of slow magnetoacoustic waves guided by a cylindrical magnetic flux tube that represents a coronal loop or plume, is modeled accounting for the effects of finite gas pressure, weak nonlinearity, dissipation by thermal conduction and viscosity, and the misbalance between the cooling by optically thin radiation and unspecified heating of the plasma. An evolutionary equation of the Burgers–Malthus type is derived. It is shown that the cooling/heating misbalance, determined by the derivatives of the combined radiative cooling and heating function, with respect to the density, temperature, and magnetic field at the thermal equilibrium affect the wave rather strongly. This effect may either cause additional damping, or counteract it, or lead to the gradual amplification of the wave. In the latter case, the coronal plasma acts as an active medium for the slow magnetoacoustic waves. The effect of the cooling/heating misbalance could be important for coronal slow waves, and could be responsible for certain discrepancies between theoretical results and observations, in particular, the increased or decreased damping lengths and times, detection of the waves at certain heights only, and excitation of compressive oscillations. The results obtained open up a possibility for the diagnostics of the coronal heating function by slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  6. Probing Intrinsic Properties of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xilong; Messenger, Christopher; Heng, Ik Siong

    2017-11-01

    Progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts are thought to be neutron stars coalescing with their companion black hole or neutron star, which are one of the main gravitational wave sources. We have devised a Bayesian framework for combining gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave information that allows us to probe short gamma-ray burst luminosities. We show that combined short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave observations not only improve progenitor distance and inclination angle estimates, they also allow the isotropic luminosities of short gamma-ray bursts to be determined without the need for host galaxy or light-curve information. We characterize our approach by simulating 1000 joint short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave detections by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. We show that ˜90 % of the simulations have uncertainties on short gamma-ray burst isotropic luminosity estimates that are within a factor of two of the ideal scenario, where the distance is known exactly. Therefore, isotropic luminosities can be confidently determined for short gamma-ray bursts observed jointly with gravitational waves detected by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Planned enhancements to Advanced LIGO will extend its range and likely produce several joint detections of short gamma-ray bursts and gravitational waves. Third-generation gravitational wave detectors will allow for isotropic luminosity estimates for the majority of the short gamma-ray burst population within a redshift of z ˜1 .

  7. Characteristics of terahertz wave modulation using wavelength-selective photoexcitation in pentacene/Si and TIPS pentacene/Si bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Keun Yoo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the characteristics of the optical control of terahertz (THz wave transmission in photoexcited bilayers of pentacene/Si and 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl pentacene (TIPS pentacene/Si. The modulation efficiency is influenced significantly by the photoexcitation wavelength of the optical beams. Lower optical absorption of organic materials leads to higher modulation efficiency because the photocarriers excited on Si with a higher diffusion rate and mobility are far more instrumental in increasing the modulation than the excitons generated on the organic layers. Securing a sufficient depth for carrier diffusion on organic layers is also important for increasing the THz modulation efficiency. These findings may be useful for designing highly efficient and spectrally controllable THz wave modulators.

  8. Cryogenic optical mounting for short-wave infrared spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J.; Wood, T.; Bhatti, I.; Cañas, A.; Reddick, P.; van Wyk, P.; Bharadia, S.; Storey, T.; Potterton, T.; Rits, W.; Meijer, H.

    2014-07-01

    In order to measure atmospheric concentrations of carbon monoxide, methane, water and carbon dioxide from spaceborne platforms, Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR) immersed grating spectrometers are employed. Due to the need to minimise detector dark current and internal black body radiation from the spectrometer's own structure, these instruments are operated at cryogenic temperatures. ESA's Sentinel 5-Precursor is a small satellite science mission; the platform comprises the Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI), which includes a SWIR module. Optical mounts have been developed for the SWIR module which meet the requirements to cope with the differences in thermal expansion between the optical elements and their structural mounts over cryogenic temperature ranges, be robust against the mechanical environment during launch, and maintain optical alignment stability with a tight volume constraint. Throughout the design of the SWIR spectrometer, flexures were deployed to control deformations due to thermal expansion, the design of interfaces between materials of differing coefficient of thermal expansion was carefully managed, and the geometry of adhesive pads was tightly controlled. Optical mounting concepts were evaluated using finite element analysis (FEA). A breadboard programme was undertaken to verify these concepts. FEA and breadboard results were correlated to provide confidence in the design. The breadboard programme consisted of thermal cycling and pull-testing of adhesive joints, as well as environmental and optical testing of representative subsystems. Analysis and breadboarding demonstrated that the optical mounting design will survive the mechanical and thermal environments, and verified the stability of the optical alignment requirements. Novel optical mounting structures have been designed, analysed, assembled, tested and integrated into the optical assemblies of the TROPOMI SWIR spectrometer, creating a compact and robust state of the art instrument

  9. Localized measurement of short wavelength plasma fluctuations with the DIII-D phase contrast imaging diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, J R; Rost, J C; Porkolab, M

    2009-02-01

    A novel rotating mask system has been designed and implemented on the DIII-D phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic to produce the first spatially localized PCI measurements of a tokamak plasma. The localization technique makes use of the variation in the magnetic field component perpendicular to the viewing chord as a function of chord height. This new capability provides measurements in the range of 2wave numbers up to 40 cm(-1) to probe electron scale turbulence in the plasma core.

  10. Global smooth solutions in R3 to short wave-long wave interactions in magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Hermano; Jia, Junxiong; Pan, Ronghua

    2017-04-01

    We consider a Benney-type system modeling short wave-long wave interactions in compressible viscous fluids under the influence of a magnetic field. Accordingly, this large system now consists of the compressible MHD equations coupled with a nonlinear Schrödinger equation along particle paths. We study the global existence of smooth solutions to the Cauchy problem in R3 when the initial data are small smooth perturbations of an equilibrium state. An important point here is that, instead of the simpler case having zero as the equilibrium state for the magnetic field, we consider an arbitrary non-zero equilibrium state B bar for the magnetic field. This is motivated by applications, e.g., Earth's magnetic field, and the lack of invariance of the MHD system with respect to either translations or rotations of the magnetic field. The usual time decay investigation through spectral analysis in this non-zero equilibrium case meets serious difficulties, for the eigenvalues in the frequency space are no longer spherically symmetric. Instead, we employ a recently developed technique of energy estimates involving evolution in negative Besov spaces, and combine it with the particular interplay here between Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates.

  11. Evaluation of short wave therapy equipment based on brazilian standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Regina Gruber

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Short Wave Diathermy (SWD equipment is used in physiotherapy and applied therapeutically using radio frequency (RF radiation of 27.12 MHz. This article presents the results of a survey related to SWD, showing data about the equipment, conditions of use, visual inspection and analysis of accompanying documents, having as reference the requirements of the Brazilian standards NBR IEC 601-1 and NBR IEC 601-2-3. Electrical safety tests were also carried out for the equipment and the installation. The results showed that manufacturers do not completely follow the standards and there is a lack of knowledge of these standards by the physiotherapists. Electrical safety tests presented measured values of equipment leakage current within the limits of the standards, but installation presented fails. One can conclude that it is necessary a greater awareness by manufacturers and professionals regarding the standards including electrical safety in order to assure the correct use of SWD equipment.Equipamentos de diatermia por ondas curtas (DOC são utilizados em clínicas de fisioterapia e aplicados terapeuticamente, utilizando radiação de radiofreqüência (RF em 27,12 MHz. Este artigo apresenta os resultados de uma pesquisa diagnóstica para equipamentos de DOC mostrando dados relativos aos equipamentos, condições de uso, inspeção visual e análise dos documentos acompanhantes tendo como referência os requisitos descritos nas normas brasileiras NBR IEC 601-1 (geral e NBR IEC 601-2-3 (específica. Além disso, apresentam-se os resultados de testes de segurança elétrica efetuados nos equipamentos e nas instalações onde os mesmos são utilizados. Os resultados em geral mostraram que os fabricantes não seguem as normas para as especificações tanto do equipamento quanto do ambiente e dos documentos acompanhantes, e que há falta de conhecimento das normas por parte dos fisioterapeutas. Os testes de segurança elétrica envolvendo correntes de fuga

  12. Analysis of Overtopping Flow on Sea Dikes in Oblique and Short-Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2013-01-01

    in a shallow water basin at Aalborg University to cover the so far unknown 3D effects from oblique long-crested and short-crested waves. Based on results from the laboratory tests, expansions are proposed to the existing 2D formulae so as to cover oblique and short-crested waves. The wave obliquity is seen......Dike resilience against wave overtopping has gained more and more attention in recent years due to the effect of expected future climate changes. The overtopping flow velocities and flow depths on dikes have recently been studied in 2D small-scale experiments. This has led to semi...

  13. Scattered P'P' waves observed at short distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Paul S.; Rost, Sebastian; Shearer, Peter M.; Thomas, Christine

    2011-01-01

    We detect previously unreported 1 Hz scattered waves at epicentral distances between 30° and 50° and at times between 2300 and 2450 s after the earthquake origin. These waves likely result from off-azimuth scattering of PKPbc to PKPbc in the upper mantle and crust and provide a new tool for mapping variations in fine-scale (10 km) mantle heterogeneity. Array beams from the Large Aperture Seismic Array (LASA) clearly image the scattered energy gradually emerging from the noise and reaching its peak amplitude about 80 s later, and returning to the noise level after 150 s. Stacks of transverse versus radial slowness (ρt, ρr) show two peaks at about (2, -2) and (-2,-2) s/°, indicating the waves arrive along the major arc path (180° to 360°) and significantly off azimuth. We propose a mantle and surface PKPbc to PKPbc scattering mechanism for these observations because (1) it agrees with the initiation time and distinctive slowness signature of the scattered waves and (2) it follows a scattering path analogous to previously observed deep-mantle PK•KP scattering (Chang and Cleary, 1981). The observed upper-mantle scattered waves and PK•KP waves fit into a broader set of scattered waves that we call P′•d•P′, which can scatter from any depth, d, in the mantle.

  14. Short-Wave Near-Infrared Spectrometer for Alcohol Determination and Temperature Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingbo Fu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A multichannel short-wave near-infrared (SW-NIR spectrometer module based on charge-coupled device (CCD detection was designed. The design relied on a tungsten lamp enhanced by light emitting diodes, a fixed grating monochromator and a linear CCD array. The main advantages were high optical resolution and an optimized signal-to-noise ratio (0.24 nm and 500, resp. in the whole wavelength range of 650 to 1100 nm. An application to alcohol determination using partial least squares calibration and the temperature correction was presented. It was found that the direct transfer method had significant systematic prediction errors due to temperature effect. Generalized least squares weighting (GLSW method was utilized for temperature correction. After recalibration, the RMSEP found for the 25°C model was 0.53% v/v and errors of the same order of magnitude were obtained at other temperatures (15, 35 and 40°C. And an 2 better than 0.99 was achieved for each validation set. The possibility and accuracy of using the miniature SW-NIR spectrometer and GLSW transfer calibration method for alcohol determination at different temperatures were proven. And the analysis procedure was simple and fast, allowing a strict control of alcohol content in the wine industry.

  15. Short Wave Multipolar Antenna for Propagation by NVIS Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Igor; Martins, Maria João; Baptista, António; Gonçalves, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this papper is to design, build and test an antenna resonant at the frequencies of 4, 5, 6, and 7 MHz, in the high frequency band (HF). With this antenna we want to explore and use NVIS (Near Vertical Incidence Sky wave), which consists in using the ionosphere as a reflector layer of sky waves, that reach the ionosphere with angles near vertical incidence. When reflected, these waves achieve distances from dozens to hundreds of kilometers for the established communication. F...

  16. Investigation of concept of efficient short wavelength laser. Final technical report, April 1, 1977-July 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, L.G.; Krech, R.H.; Pugh, E.; Taylor, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of producing an efficient, short wavelength, storage laser for ICF driven applications by making use of certain state-specific reactions of exoergic azide compounds has been investigated. The ultraviolet (approx. 300 nm) photolysis of gaseous ClN/sub 3/ produced prompt emission in the red, which was attributed to the efficient formation of ClN(b/sup 1/..sigma../sup +/) with subsequent ClN(X reverse arrow b) fluorescence. Based on these results, a small-scale laser demonstration experiment was constructed using short duration Xe flash lamps as the photolytic source. The results of this latter experiment were negative. The most plausible explanation was that the flash lamps provided sufficient far-uv radiation to dissociate and/or ionize the ClN(b) produced in the primary photolytic step. In parallel, limited experiments were performed on the rapid pyrolysis of a solid, ionic azide, NaN/sub 3/, to produce gaseous N/sub 3/ radicals and subsequent production of triplet N/sub 2/ molecules.

  17. Continuous-wave lasing from InP/InGaAs nanoridges at telecommunication wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Si; Ng, Kar Wei; Lau, Kei May

    2017-11-01

    We report continuous-wave lasing from InP/InGaAs nanoridges grown on a patterned (001) Si substrate by aspect ratio trapping. Multi-InGaAs ridge quantum wells inside InP nanoridges are designed as active gain materials for emission in the 1500 nm band. The good crystalline quality and optical property of the InGaAs quantum wells are attested by transmission electron microscopy and microphotoluminescence measurements. After transfer of the InP/InGaAs nanoridges onto a SiO2/Si substrate, amplified Fabry-Perot resonant modes at room temperature and multi-mode lasing behavior in the 1400 nm band under continuous-wave optical pumping at 4.5 K are observed. This result thus marks an important step towards integrating InP/InGaAs nanolasers directly grown on microelectronic standard (001) Si substrates.

  18. 3 W narrow-linewidth ultra-short wavelength operation near 1707 nm in thulium-doped silica fiber laser with bidirectional pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xusheng; Guo, Haitao; Yan, Zhijun; Wang, Hushan; Xu, Yantao; Lu, Min; Wang, Yishan; Peng, Bo

    2017-04-01

    We have developed an ultra-short wavelength operation of all-fiber Tm-doped laser system, in which the laser system was structured in a FBGs based linear cavity with FBG associated bidirectional pump mechanism at 1550 nm. The laser yielded 3.15 W of continuous-wave output at 1706.75 nm with a narrow-linewidth of 50 pm. A high reflectivity FBG (HR-FBG) at 1550 nm was used to reflect the residual pump light and achieve the bidirectional pump mechanism. The maximum slope efficiency was improved from 23.2% without HR-FBG to 42.1% with HR-FBG at 1550 nm and the lowest pump threshold was reduced from 1.6 to 0.8 W accordingly. In the experiment, we have also investigated the dependencies of the slope efficiencies and pump threshold of the laser versus the length of active fiber and reflectivity of the output mirror (FBG) in detail. It is indisputable that the development of 1.7 μm silicate fiber lasers with Watt-level output power will open up a number of promising application windows.

  19. External excitation of a short-wavelength fluctuation in the Alcator C-Mod edge plasma and its relationship to the quasi-coherent modea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfinopoulos, T.; LaBombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Burke, W.; Davis, E.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Irby, J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Marmar, E.; Parkin, W.; Porkolab, M.; Terry, J.; Vieira, R.; Wolfe, S.

    2014-05-01

    A novel "Shoelace" antenna has been used to inductively excite a short-wavelength edge fluctuation in a tokamak boundary layer for the first time. The principal design parameters, k⊥=1.5±0.1 cm-1 and 45wave number and propagation direction as the QCM, and is resonant at the QCM frequency, suggest the antenna may couple to this mode, which we have shown elsewhere to be predominantly drift-mode-like [B. LaBombard et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056108 (2014)].

  20. Direct measurement of the wavelength of sound waves in the human skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Carmen L; Doman, Darrel A; Brown, Jeremy A; Bance, Manohar; Adamson, Robert B A

    2013-01-01

    The results of a study of the three-dimensional vibration of two dry human skulls in response to harmonic excitation are presented. The vibratory response exhibits three distinct types of motion across the range of audible frequencies. At low frequencies below 1000 Hz, whole-head quasi-rigid motion is seen. At the middle frequencies between 1000 and 6000 Hz, the motion exhibits a series of increasingly complex modal patterns. Above 6000 Hz, the response is wavelike and clear wavefronts can be distinguished in the vibration data. In this regime the relationship between wavelength and frequency is calculated and compared to a number of theories of skull vibration that have been proposed.

  1. Differential effect of long versus short wavelength light exposure on pupillary re-dilation in patients with outer retinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léon, Lorette; Crippa, Sylvain V; Borruat, François-Xavier; Kawasaki, Aki

    2012-01-01

    In patients with outer retinal degeneration, a differential pupil response to long wavelength (red) versus short wavelength (blue) light stimulation has been previously observed. The goal of this study was to quantify differences in the pupillary re-dilation following exposure to red versus blue light in patients with outer retinal disease and compare them with patients with optic neuropathy and with healthy subjects. Prospective comparative cohort study. Twenty-three patients with outer retinal disease, 13 patients with optic neuropathy and 14 normal subjects. Subjects were tested using continuous red and blue light stimulation at three intensities (1, 10 and 100 cd/m2) for 13 s per intensity. Pupillary re-dilation dynamics following the brightest intensity was analysed and compared between the three groups. The parameters of pupil re-dilation used in this study were: time to recover 90% of baseline size; mean pupil size at early and late phases of re-dilation; and differential re-dilation time for blue versus red light. Patients with outer retinal disease showed a pupil that tended to stay smaller after light termination and thus had a longer time to recovery. The differential re-dilation time was significantly greater in patients with outer retinal disease (median = 28.0 s, P blue light stimulation is present in patients with outer retinal disease but is not found in normal eyes or among patients with visual loss from optic neuropathy. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2011 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  2. Window model. Part 1. Short-wave solar radiation; Fenstermodell. Teil 1. Kurzwellige Solarstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, J. [Georg-Simon-Ohm-Fachhochschule Nuernberg (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Modern external walls and window sizes require detailed calculations. The first part of the contribution discusses short-wave solar radiation while the second part will go into thermal exchange processes. (orig.)

  3. Short term wave forecasting, using digital filters, for improved control of Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Frigaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    experimentally. Results are shown form measurements taken on the Wave Dragon prototype device, a floating overtopping device situated in Northern Denmark. In this case the method is able to accurately predict the surface elevation at the device 11.2 seconds before the measurement is made. This is sufficient......This paper presents a Digital Filter method for real time prediction of waves incident upon a Wave Energy device. The method transforms waves measured at a point ahead of the device, to expected waves incident on the device. The relationship between these incident waves and power capture is derived...

  4. Weakly nonlinear analysis of short-wave elliptical instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Savio B.; De Luca, Jayme

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional inviscid flows with elliptical streamlines have linearly unstable three-dimensional modes close to the center of the ellipse. The linear instability equilibrates in the presence of enough viscosity, yielding a continuous set of neutrally stable plane waves known as Craik-Criminale waves (CCWs). For initial disturbance in a discrete superposition of plane waves our weakly nonlinear analysis yields a cubic ordinary differential equation for the slow-time evolution of the neutrally stable plane-wave amplitudes. In the subcritical region we find that all solutions eventually vanish, while in the supercritical region the amplitudes either saturate or have exponential growth; the existence of a finite-time blowup at cubic order being unlikely. The saturation to a steady state is possible only for special initial conditions, and for generic initial conditions the amplitudes saturate to a chaotic state. In contrast, a single CCW with exponential growth is still unstable, but it loses stability to cycles of growth and decay among the plane waves.

  5. Sinusoidal Wave Estimation Using Photogrammetry and Short Video Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Rupnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work is to model the shape of the sinusoidal shape of regular water waves generated in a laboratory flume. The waves are traveling in time and render a smooth surface, with no white caps or foam. Two methods are proposed, treating the water as a diffuse and specular surface, respectively. In either case, the water is presumed to take the shape of a traveling sine wave, reducing the task of the 3D reconstruction to resolve the wave parameters. The first conceived method performs the modeling part purely in 3D space. Having triangulated the points in a separate phase via bundle adjustment, a sine wave is fitted into the data in a least squares manner. The second method presents a more complete approach for the entire calculation workflow beginning in the image space. The water is perceived as a specular surface, and the traveling specularities are the only observations visible to the  cameras, observations that are notably single image. The depth ambiguity is removed given additional constraints encoded within the law of reflection and the modeled parametric surface. The observation and constraint equations compose a single system of equations that is solved with the method of least squares adjustment. The devised approaches are validated against the data coming from a capacitive level sensor and on physical targets floating on the surface. The outcomes agree to a high degree.

  6. Performance of three- and five-stack achromatic half-wave plates at millimeter wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Tomotake; Hanany, Shaul; Ade, Peter; Johnson, Bradley R; Jones, Terry J; Jonnalagadda, Prashanth; Savini, Giorgio

    2009-07-01

    We study the performance of achromatic half-wave plates (AHWPs) as a function of the detection bandwidth of a power detector operating in the millimeter wave band and the spectral shape of the incident radiation. We focus particular attention on the extraction of the degree of incident polarization and its orientation angle from the intensity measured as a function of AHWP rotation angle, which we call the IVA (intensity versus angle). We describe the formalism to extract the two incident polarization parameters. We use this formalism to quantify the phase offset of the IVA and point to potential systematic errors in the extraction of this offset in cases where the incident spectrum is not sufficiently well known. We quantify the phase offset and modulation efficiency as a function of the relative angles between the plates in the stack and find that high modulation efficiency can be achieved with alignment accuracy of a few degrees. We present measurements of the spectral response of an AHWP made with five plates. The measurements predict a modulation efficiency that is higher than 98% for three bands centered at 150, 250, and 410 GHz.

  7. Saturation properties of four-wave mixing between short optical pulses in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Mecozzi, A.; Diez, S.

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. The authors report the first comparison between theory and experiment on the four wave mixing between trains of short pulses in semiconductor optical amplifiers. The theory is able to explain all qualitative features seen in the experiment.......Summary form only given. The authors report the first comparison between theory and experiment on the four wave mixing between trains of short pulses in semiconductor optical amplifiers. The theory is able to explain all qualitative features seen in the experiment....

  8. On Growth Rate of Wind Waves: Impact of Short-Scale Breaking Modulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    The wave generation model based on the rapid distortion concept significantly underestimates empirical values of the wave growth rate. As suggested before, inclusion of the aerodynamic roughness modulations effect on the amplitude of the slope-correlated surface pressure could potentially reconcile this model approach with observations. This study explores the role of short-scale breaking modulations to amplify the growth rate of modulating longer waves. As developed, airflow separations from...

  9. 3-D Effects Force Reduction of Short-Crested Non-Breaking Waves on Caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of wave short-crestedness on the horizontal wave force on a caisson is twofold. The one is the force reduction due to the reduction of point pressure on the caisson, named point-pressure reduction. The other is the force reduction due to the fact that the peak pressures do not occur si...

  10. A numerical study of lowest-order short-crested water wave instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents the first numerical simulations of the long-term evolution of doubly-periodic short-crested wave instabilities, which are the simplest cases involving the three-dimensional instability of genuinely three-dimensional progressive water waves. The simulated evolutions reveal...

  11. Numerical simulation of lowest-order short-crested wave instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.; Bingham, Harry

    2006-01-01

    A numerical study of doubly periodic deep-water short-crested wave instabilities, arising from various quartet resonant interactions, is conducted using a high-order Boussinesq-type model. The model is first verified through a series of simulations involving classical class I plane wave instabili......A numerical study of doubly periodic deep-water short-crested wave instabilities, arising from various quartet resonant interactions, is conducted using a high-order Boussinesq-type model. The model is first verified through a series of simulations involving classical class I plane wave...... filter promoting this behaviour in these cases. A series of class Ia short-crested wave instabilities, near the plane wave limit, are then considered, covering a wide range of incident wave steepness. A close match with theoretical growth rates is demonstrated near the inception. It is shown......-bands. At larger steepness, the evolution leads to a permanent downshift of both the mean and peak frequencies, driven in part by dissipation, effectively breaking the quasi-recurrence cycle. A single case involving a class Ib short-crested wave instability at relatively large steepness is also considered, which...

  12. Metal-mesh achromatic half-wave plate for use at submillimeter wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Giampaolo; Savini, Giorgio; Ade, Peter A R; Haynes, Vic

    2008-11-20

    A metal-mesh achromatic half-wave plate (HWP) has been designed, manufactured, and tested for potential use in millimeter and submillimeter astronomical instruments. The prototype device presented here is based on a 12-grid Shatrow [IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 43, 109 (1995)] recipe to operate over the frequency range of 120-180 GHz. Transmission line modeling and finite-element analysis [Ansoft HFSS website: http://www.ansoft.com/hfss/] were used to optimize the design geometrical parameters in terms of the device transmission, reflection, absorption, phase-shift, and cross-polarization as a function of frequency. The resulting prototype device was constructed and characterized using incoherent radiation from a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer to explore its frequency and polarization behavior. These measurements are shown to be in excellent agreement with the models. Lists of the achieved HWP performance characteristics are reported.

  13. Characterization of Low Noise TES Detectors Fabricated by D-RIE Process for SAFARI Short-Wavelength Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosropanah, P.; Suzuki, T.; Hijmering, R. A.; Ridder, M. L.; Lindeman, M. A.; Gao, J.-R.; Hoevers, H.

    2014-08-01

    SRON is developing TES detectors based on a superconducting Ti/Au bilayer on a suspended SiN membrane for the short-wavelength band of the SAFARI instrument on SPICA mission. We have recently replaced the wet KOH etching of the Si substrate by deep reactive ion etching. The new process enables us to fabricate the detectors on the substrate and release the membrane at the very last step. Therefore the production of SAFARI large arrays (4343) on thin SiN membrane (250 nm) is feasible. It also makes it possible to realize narrow supporting SiN legs of 1 m, which are needed to meet SAFARI NEP requirements. Here we report the current-voltage characteristics, noise performance and impedance measurement of these devices. The measured results are then compared with the distributed leg model that takes into account the thermal fluctuation noise due to the SiN legs. We measured a dark NEP of 0.7 aW/, which is 1.6 times higher than the theoretically expected phonon noise.

  14. Short-wavelength upconversion emissions in Ho3+/Yb3+ codoped glass ceramic and the optical thermometry behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Gao, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Longjiang; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2012-07-30

    Ho(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped glass ceramic was prepared by melt-quenching and subsequent thermal treatment. Under a 980 nm diode laser excitation, upconversion emissions from Ho(3+) ions centered at 540, 650, and 750 nm were greatly enhanced compared with those in the precursor glass. Especially, the short-wavelength upconversion emissions centered at 360, 385, 418, 445, and 485 nm were successfully obtained in the glass ceramic. An explanation for this phenomenon is given based on the fluorescence decay curve measurements. In addition, an optical temperature sensor based on the blue upconversion emissions from (5)F(2,3)/(3)K(8)→(5)I(8) and (5)F(1)/(5)G(6)→(5)I(8) transitions in Ho(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped glass ceramic has been developed. It was found that by using fluorescence intensity ratio technique, appreciable sensitivity for temperature measurement can be achieved by using the Ho(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped glass ceramic. This result makes the Ho(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped glass ceramic be a promising candidate for sensitive optical temperature sensor with high resolution and good accuracy.

  15. Short wavelength fluctuation effects on the magnetization in type I and low-kappa type II superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Mosqueira, J; Curras, S R; González, M T; Ramallo, M V; Ruibal, M; Torron, C; Vidal, F

    2003-01-01

    The effects on the magnetization of fluctuating Cooper pairs created above the superconducting transition by thermal agitation energy (the so-called fluctuation-induced diamagnetism, FD) have been measured in a clean type I superconductor (Pb) and in a clean low Ginzburg-Landau parameter (kappa) type II superconductor (Nb). These experiments extend the earlier measurements of Gollub, Beasley and Tinkham to both the high reduced temperature region (epsilon ident to ln (T/T sub C sub 0) approx> 0.1) and the high reduced magnetic field region (h ident to H/H sub C sub 2 (0) approx> 0.1). Our data show that in spite of FD being deeply affected in both superconductors by the presence of non-local electrodynamic effects, the superconducting fluctuations sharply vanish when epsilon or h become of the order of 0.5 and, respectively, 1. This short-wavelength behaviour at high reduced temperatures of the superconducting fluctuations is similar to that previously observed at high reduced temperatures in dirty low-T sub ...

  16. Relationship between short-wavelength automatic perimetry and Heidelberg retina tomograph parameters in eyes with ocular hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Pitsas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare and correlate optic nerve head parameters obtained byHeidelberg retina tomograph (HRT with short-wavelength automatic perimetry (SWAP indices in eyes with ocular hypertension (OHT.METHODS: One hundred and forty-six patients with OHT included in the present study. All subjects had reliable SWAP and HRT measurements performed within a 2wk period. The eyes were classified as normal/abnormal according to visual field criteria and Moorfields regression analysis (MRA. Correlations between visual field indices and HRT parameters were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient (r.RESULTS:Twenty-nine eyes (19.9% had SWAP defects. Twenty-nine eyes (19.9% were classified as abnormal according to global MRA. Six eyes (4.1% had abnormal global MRA and SWAP defects. The k statistic is 0.116 (P=0.12 indicating a very poor agreement between the methods. No statistical significant correlation between HRT and SWAP parameters was detected.CONCLUSION:SWAP defects may coexist with abnormalities of optic disc detected by HRT in eyes with OHT. In most eyes, however, the two methods detect different glaucoma properties.

  17. Intercomparison of Carbon Dioxide Products Retrieved from GOSAT Short-Wavelength Infrared Spectra for Three Years (2010–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjian Deng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparison of two CO2 datasets from the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES of Japan and the Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space (ACOS of NASA for three years (2010 to 2012. Both CO2 datasets are retrieved from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT short-wavelength infrared spectra over High gain surface land. In this three-year period, the yield of the NIES CO2 column averaged dry air mole fractions (XCO2 is about 71% of ACOS retrievals. The overall bias is 0.21 ± 1.85 ppm and −0.69 ± 2.13 ppm for ACOS and NIES XCO2, respectively, when compared with ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS observations from twelve Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON sites. The differences in XCO2 three-year means and seasonal means are within about 1 to 2 ppm. Strong consistency is obtained for the ACOS and NIES XCO2 monthly averages time series over different regions, with the greatest mean difference of ACOS to NIES monthly means over China (1.43 ± 0.60 ppm and the least over Brazil (−0.03 ± 0.64 ppm. The intercomparison between the two XCO2 datasets indicates that the ACOS XCO2 is globally higher than NIES by about 1 ppm and has smaller bias and better consistency than NIES data.

  18. On-chip near-wavelength diffraction gratings for surface electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezus, Evgeni A.; Podlipnov, Vladimir V.; Morozov, Andrey A.; Doskolovich, Leonid L.

    2017-05-01

    In the present work, on-chip dielectric diffraction gratings for steering the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) are theoretically, numerically and experimentally studied. The investigated plasmonic gratings consist of dielectric ridges located on the SPP propagation surface (on the metal surface). In contrast to Bragg gratings, at normal incidence the periodicity direction of the grating is perpendicular to the SPP propagation direction. The studied gratings are designed using a simple plane-wave grating model and rigorously simulated using the aperiodic Fourier modal method for numerical solution of Maxwell's equations. In particular, plasmonic grating-based beam splitter with subwavelength footprint in the propagation direction is presented. Along with the theoretical and numerical results, proof-of-concept experimental results are presented. The investigated grating-based plasmonic gratings were fabricated from resist on a silver film using electron beam lithography and characterized using the leakage radiation microscopy technique. The obtained experimental results are in good agreement with the performed numerical simulations. The proposed on-chip gratings may find application in the design of systems for optical information transmission and processing at the nanoscale.

  19. ANALYTICAL AND NUMERICAL RESEARCH OF WAVE LOADS ON A SHORT VERTICAL WALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantarzhi Igor' Grigor'evich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of wave loads on a relatively short wall is related to the issue of the general design of the structure at the stage of its construction, particularly, if the structure is build offshore. The physical nature of interaction between waves and vertical walls that have different lengths is the subject matter of this paper. It is assumed that the wall is absolutely rigid. The comparison of numerical test results and an analytical calculation based on a short wall model is made. As a result, wave forces identified through the employment of the above two models demonstrate their satisfactory convergence. The difference is substantial for longer walls, and it increases along with the increase of the wall length. The conclusion is that a short wall is exposed to the wave load that is not accompanied by any diffraction, therefore, a related method of design may be recommended. Numerical models may be considered as the universal ones.

  20. Stability of Low-Crested Breakwaters in Shallow Water Short Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten Mejlhede; Burcharth, Hans Falk

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents results of 3D laboratory experiments on low-crested breakwaters. Two typical structural layouts were tested at model scale in a wave basin at Aalborg University, Denmark, to identify and quantify the influence of various hydrodynamic conditions (obliquity of short crested waves......, wave hight and wave steepness) and structural geometries (crest width and freeboard) on the stability of low-crested breakwaters. Results are given in terms of recommendations for design guidelines for structure stability. Damage parameters for the trunk and the roundhead are proposed based on analysis...

  1. Short-period planetary-scale waves found in a Venus GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, M.; Sugimoto, N.; Ando, H.; Matsuda, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Short-period waves consistent with previous observations are found by using a Venus GCM. Preliminary results show that two kinds of waves with periods of about 5.5 and 7.5 Earth days are found at the cloud levels. At 68 km, vortical motions and disturbances with remarkable zonal winds are predominant at mid-latitudes and low-latitudes, respectively. The structure of the low-latitude disturbances are similar to that of the equatorial Kelvin wave. It seems that these two waves are synchronized with each other forming a planetary-scale structure symmetric about the equator.

  2. Short term wave forecasting, using digital filters, for improved control of Wave Energy Converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedd, J.; Frigaard, P. [Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University, Aalborg (Denmark)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a Digital Filter method for real time prediction of waves incident upon a Wave Energy device. The method transforms waves measured at a point ahead of the device, to expected waves incident on the device. The relationship between these incident waves and power capture is derived experimentally. Results are shown form measurements taken on the Wave Dragon prototype device, a floating overtopping device situated in Northern Denmark. In this case the method is able to accurately predict the surface elevation at the device 11.2 seconds before the measurement is made. This is sufficient to allow advanced control systems to be developed using this knowledge to significantly improve power capture.

  3. Short-wave infrared barriode detectors using InGaAsSb absorption material lattice matched to GaSb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, A. P.; Percy, B.; Marshall, A. R. J. [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Jain, M. [Amethyst Research Ltd., Kelvin Campus, West of Scotland Science Park, Glasgow G20 0SP (United Kingdom); Wicks, G.; Hossain, K. [Amethyst Research, Inc., 123 Case Circle, Ardmore, Oklahoma 73401 (United States); Golding, T. [Amethyst Research Ltd., Kelvin Campus, West of Scotland Science Park, Glasgow G20 0SP (United Kingdom); Amethyst Research, Inc., 123 Case Circle, Ardmore, Oklahoma 73401 (United States); McEwan, K.; Howle, C. [Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-18

    Short-wave infrared barriode detectors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. An absorption layer composition of In{sub 0.28}Ga{sub 0.72}As{sub 0.25}Sb{sub 0.75} allowed for lattice matching to GaSb and cut-off wavelengths of 2.9 μm at 250 K and 3.0 μm at room temperature. Arrhenius plots of the dark current density showed diffusion limited dark currents approaching those expected for optimized HgCdTe-based detectors. Specific detectivity figures of around 7×10{sup 10} Jones and 1×10{sup 10} Jones were calculated, for 240 K and room temperature, respectively. Significantly, these devices could support focal plane arrays working at higher operating temperatures.

  4. Detector with internal gain for short-wave infrared ranging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathipour, Vala; Mohseni, Hooman

    2017-09-01

    Abstarct.Highly sensitive photon detectors are regarded as the key enabling elements in many applications. Due to the low photon energy at the short-wave infrared (SWIR), photon detection and imaging at this band are very challenging. As such, many efforts in photon detector research are directed toward improving the performance of the photon detectors operating in this wavelength range. To solve these problems, we have developed an electron-injection (EI) technique. The significance of this detection mechanism is that it can provide both high efficiency and high sensitivity at room temperature, a condition that is very difficult to achieve in conventional SWIR detectors. An EI detector offers an overall system-level sensitivity enhancement due to a feedback stabilized internal avalanche-free gain. Devices exhibit an excess noise of unity, operate in linear mode, require bias voltage of a few volts, and have a cutoff wavelength of 1700 nm. We review the material system, operating principle, and development of EI detectors. The shortcomings of the first-generation devices were addressed in the second-generation detectors. Measurement on second-generation devices showed a high-speed response of ˜6 ns rise time, low jitter of less than 20 ps, high amplification of more than 2000 (at optical power levels larger than a few nW), unity excess noise factor, and low leakage current (amplified dark current ˜10 nA at a bias voltage of -3 V and at room temperature. These characteristics make EI detectors a good candidate for high-resolution flash light detection and ranging (LiDAR) applications with millimeter scale depth resolution at longer ranges compared with conventional p-i-n diodes. Based on our experimentally measured device characteristics, we compare the performance of the EI detector with commercially available linear mode InGaAs avalanche photodiode (APD) as well as a p-i-n diode using a theoretical model. Flash LiDAR images obtained by our model show that the EI

  5. QPSK-to-2×BPSK wavelength and modulation format conversion through phase-sensitive four-wave mixing in a highly nonlinear optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Ros, Francesco; Dalgaard, Kjeld; Lei, Lei

    2013-01-01

    A phase-sensitive four-wave mixing (FWM) scheme enabling the simultaneous conversion of the two orthogonal quadratures of an optical signal to different wavelengths is demonstrated for the first time under dynamic operation using a highly nonlinear optical fiber (HNLF) as the nonlinear medium...

  6. Theoretical Investigation of Peak-Delay Force Reduction for Caissons Exposed to Non-breaking Short-Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    In nature coastal structures are exposed to oblique short-crested waves. The effect of wave incident angle on total wave force on a long caisson are twofold. The one is the force reduction due to the reduction of instantaneous point pressure on the caisson, named point-pressure force reduction....... The other is the force reduction due to the fact that the peak pressures do not occur simultaneously along the caisson, named peak-delay force reduction. These two reduction effects can also be expected with short-crested waves, as the short-crestedness of waves means the spreading of wave energy over...... on the peak-delay force reduction of caissons exposed to non-breaking short-crested waves. Battjes (1982) has investigated theoretically the peak-delay force reduction of shortcrested waves with only one frequency component. Such a force reduction factor cannot be applied because in nature waves are composed...

  7. External excitation of a short-wavelength fluctuation in the Alcator C-Mod edge plasma and its relationship to the quasi-coherent mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golfinopoulos, T.; LaBombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Burke, W.; Davis, E.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Irby, J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Marmar, E.; Parkin, W.; Porkolab, M.; Terry, J.; Vieira, R.; Wolfe, S. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A novel “Shoelace” antenna has been used to inductively excite a short-wavelength edge fluctuation in a tokamak boundary layer for the first time. The principal design parameters, k{sub ⊥}=1.5±0.1 cm{sup −1} and 45wave number and propagation direction as the QCM, and is resonant at the QCM frequency, suggest the antenna may couple to this mode, which we have shown elsewhere to be predominantly drift-mode-like [B. LaBombard et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056108 (2014)].

  8. Flecks in Recessive Stargardt Disease: Short-Wavelength Autofluorescence, Near-Infrared Autofluorescence, and Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Janet R; Marsiglia, Marcela; Allikmets, Rando; Tsang, Stephen; Lee, Winston; Duncker, Tobias; Zernant, Jana

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the incongruous observation whereby flecks in recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1) can exhibit increased short-wavelength autofluorescence (SW-AF) that originates from retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) lipofuscin, while near-infrared AF (NIR-AF), emitted primarily from RPE melanin, is usually reduced or absent at fleck positions. Flecks in SW- and NIR-AF images and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans were studied in 19 STGD1 patients carrying disease-causing ABCA4 mutations. Fleck spatial distribution and progression were recorded in serial AF images. Flecks observed in SW-AF images typically colocalized with darkened foci in NIR-AF images; the NIR-AF profiles were larger. The decreased NIR-AF signal from flecks preceded apparent changes in SW-AF. Spatiotemporal changes in fleck distribution usually progressed centrifugally, but in one case centripetal expansion was observed. Flecks in SW-AF images corresponded to hyperreflective deposits that progressively traversed photoreceptor-attributable bands in SD-OCT images. Outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness negatively correlated with expansion of flecks from outer to inner retina. In the healthy retina, RPE lipofuscin fluorophores form in photoreceptor cells but are transferred to RPE; thus the SW-AF signal from photoreceptor cells is negligible. In STGD1, NIR-AF imaging reveals that flecks are predominantly hypofluorescent and larger and that NIR-AF darkening occurs prior to heightened SW-AF signal. These observations indicate that RPE cells associated with flecks in STGD1 are considerably changed or lost. Spectral-domain OCT findings are indicative of ongoing photoreceptor cell degeneration. The bright SW-AF signal of flecks likely originates from augmented lipofuscin formation in degenerating photoreceptor cells impaired by the failure of RPE.

  9. Near-infrared autofluorescence: its relationship to short-wavelength autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography in recessive stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Vivienne C; Schuman, Ari D; Lee, Winston; Duncker, Tobias; Zernant, Jana; Allikmets, Rando; Hood, Donald C; Sparrow, Janet R

    2015-05-01

    We compared hypoautofluorescent (hypoAF) areas detected with near-infrared (NIR-AF) and short-wavelength autofluorescence (SW-AF) in patients with recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1) to retinal structure using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The SD-OCT volume scans, and SW-AF and NIR-AF images were obtained from 15 eyes of 15 patients with STGD1 and registered to each other. Thickness maps of the total retina, receptor-plus layer (R+, from distal border of the RPE to outer plexiform/inner nuclear layer boundary), and outer segment-plus layer (OS+, from distal border of the RPE to ellipsoid zone [EZ] band) were created from SD-OCT scans. These were compared qualitatively and quantitatively to the hypoAF areas in SW-AF and NIR-AF images. All eyes showed a hypoAF area in the central macula and loss of the EZ band in SD-OCT scans. The hypoAF area was larger in NIR than SW-AF images and it exceeded the area of EZ band loss for 12 eyes. The thickness maps showed progressive thinning towards the central macula, with the OS+ layer showing the most extensive and severe thinning. The central hypoAF areas on NIR corresponded to the OS+ thinned areas, while the hypoAF areas on SW-AF corresponded to the R+ thinned areas. Since the larger hypoAF area on NIR-AF exceeded the region of EZ band loss, and corresponded to the OS+ thinned area, RPE cell loss occurred before photoreceptor cell loss. The NIR-AF imaging may be an effective tool for following progression and predicting loss of photoreceptors in STGD1.

  10. Comparison of XH2O Retrieved from GOSAT Short-Wavelength Infrared Spectra with Observations from the TCCON Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dupuy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the atmospheric distribution of water (H 2 O is crucial for global warming studies and climate change mitigation. In this context, reliable satellite data are extremely valuable for their global and continuous coverage, once their quality has been assessed. Short-wavelength infrared spectra are acquired by the Thermal And Near-infrared Sensor for carbon Observation-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS aboard the Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT. From these, column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor (XH 2 O have been retrieved at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES, Japan and are available as a Level 2 research product. We compare the NIES XH 2 O data, Version 02.21, with retrievals from the ground-based Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON, Version GGG2014. The datasets are in good overall agreement, with GOSAT data showing a slight global low bias of −3.1% ± 24.0%, good consistency over different locations (station bias of −1.53% ± 10.35% and reasonable correlation with TCCON (R = 0.89. We identified two potential sources of discrepancy between the NIES and TCCON retrievals over land. While the TCCON XH 2 O amounts can reach 6000–7000 ppm when the atmospheric water content is high, the correlated NIES values do not exceed 5500 ppm. This could be due to a dry bias of TANSO-FTS in situations of high humidity and aerosol content. We also determined that the GOSAT-TCCON differences directly depend on the altitude difference between the TANSO-FTS footprint and the TCCON site. Further analysis will account for these biases, but the NIES V02.21 XH 2 O product, after public release, can already be useful for water cycle studies.

  11. Near-Infrared Autofluorescence: Its Relationship to Short-Wavelength Autofluorescence and Optical Coherence Tomography in Recessive Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Vivienne C.; Schuman, Ari D.; Lee, Winston; Duncker, Tobias; Zernant, Jana; Allikmets, Rando; Hood, Donald C.; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We compared hypoautofluorescent (hypoAF) areas detected with near-infrared (NIR-AF) and short-wavelength autofluorescence (SW-AF) in patients with recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1) to retinal structure using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. The SD-OCT volume scans, and SW-AF and NIR-AF images were obtained from 15 eyes of 15 patients with STGD1 and registered to each other. Thickness maps of the total retina, receptor-plus layer (R+, from distal border of the RPE to outer plexiform/inner nuclear layer boundary), and outer segment-plus layer (OS+, from distal border of the RPE to ellipsoid zone [EZ] band) were created from SD-OCT scans. These were compared qualitatively and quantitatively to the hypoAF areas in SW-AF and NIR-AF images. Results. All eyes showed a hypoAF area in the central macula and loss of the EZ band in SD-OCT scans. The hypoAF area was larger in NIR than SW-AF images and it exceeded the area of EZ band loss for 12 eyes. The thickness maps showed progressive thinning towards the central macula, with the OS+ layer showing the most extensive and severe thinning. The central hypoAF areas on NIR corresponded to the OS+ thinned areas, while the hypoAF areas on SW-AF corresponded to the R+ thinned areas. Conclusions. Since the larger hypoAF area on NIR-AF exceeded the region of EZ band loss, and corresponded to the OS+ thinned area, RPE cell loss occurred before photoreceptor cell loss. The NIR-AF imaging may be an effective tool for following progression and predicting loss of photoreceptors in STGD1. PMID:26024107

  12. Flecks in Recessive Stargardt Disease: Short-Wavelength Autofluorescence, Near-Infrared Autofluorescence, and Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Janet R.; Marsiglia, Marcela; Allikmets, Rando; Tsang, Stephen; Lee, Winston; Duncker, Tobias; Zernant, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the incongruous observation whereby flecks in recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1) can exhibit increased short-wavelength autofluorescence (SW-AF) that originates from retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) lipofuscin, while near-infrared AF (NIR-AF), emitted primarily from RPE melanin, is usually reduced or absent at fleck positions. Methods Flecks in SW- and NIR-AF images and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans were studied in 19 STGD1 patients carrying disease-causing ABCA4 mutations. Fleck spatial distribution and progression were recorded in serial AF images. Results Flecks observed in SW-AF images typically colocalized with darkened foci in NIR-AF images; the NIR-AF profiles were larger. The decreased NIR-AF signal from flecks preceded apparent changes in SW-AF. Spatiotemporal changes in fleck distribution usually progressed centrifugally, but in one case centripetal expansion was observed. Flecks in SW-AF images corresponded to hyperreflective deposits that progressively traversed photoreceptor-attributable bands in SD-OCT images. Outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness negatively correlated with expansion of flecks from outer to inner retina. Conclusions In the healthy retina, RPE lipofuscin fluorophores form in photoreceptor cells but are transferred to RPE; thus the SW-AF signal from photoreceptor cells is negligible. In STGD1, NIR-AF imaging reveals that flecks are predominantly hypofluorescent and larger and that NIR-AF darkening occurs prior to heightened SW-AF signal. These observations indicate that RPE cells associated with flecks in STGD1 are considerably changed or lost. Spectral-domain OCT findings are indicative of ongoing photoreceptor cell degeneration. The bright SW-AF signal of flecks likely originates from augmented lipofuscin formation in degenerating photoreceptor cells impaired by the failure of RPE. PMID:26230768

  13. High-power continuous-wave dual-wavelength diode-pumped Yb:YAG slab amplifier with temperature-dependent effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yifang; Shen, Yijie; Xu, Liu; Zhou, Tangjian; Lin, Weiping; Gao, Qingsong; Wu, Yingchen

    2017-10-01

    A kilo-Watt-level continuous-wave dual-wavelength dual-end diode-pumped Yb:YAG slab amplifier is experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. A 1.18 kW seed with stable dual-wavelength operation at 1029.6 and 1031.5 nm can be amplified to the maximum output power of 6.56 kW. We also propose a numerical model to characterize the amplifier system including broad spectrum and temperature-dependent effects. The numerical results of power and spectra evolutions show great agreement with our experiment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the dual-wavelength laser with the highest average power, which has great potential in scaling the application scope of dual-wavelength lasers.

  14. Coherently combining short data segments for all-sky semi-coherent continuous gravitational wave searches

    CERN Document Server

    Goetz, Evan

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for coherently combining short data segments from gravitational-wave detectors to improve the sensitivity of semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves. All-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources are computationally limited. The semi-coherent approach reduces the computational cost by dividing the entire observation timespan into short segments to be analyzed coherently, then combined together incoherently. Semi-coherent analyses that attempt to improve sensitivity by coherently combining data from multiple detectors face a computational challenge in accounting for uncertainties in signal parameters. In this article, we lay out a technique to meet this challenge using summed Fourier transform coefficients. Applying this technique to one all-sky search algorithm called TwoSpect, we confirm that the sensitivity of all-sky, semi-coherent searches can be improved by coherently combining the short data segments. For misaligned detectors, however, thi...

  15. Effects of a chronic reduction of short-wavelength light input on melatonin and sleep patterns in humans: evidence for adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Marina C; Beersma, Domien G M; Bollen, Pauline; van der Linden, Matthijs L; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2014-06-01

    Light is an important environmental stimulus for the entrainment of the circadian clock and for increasing alertness. The intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells in the retina play an important role in transferring this light information to the circadian system and they are elicited in particular by short-wavelength light. Exposure to short wavelengths is reduced, for instance, in elderly people due to yellowing of the ocular lenses. This reduction may be involved in the disrupted circadian rhythms observed in aged subjects. Here, we tested the effects of reduced blue light exposure in young healthy subjects (n = 15) by using soft orange contact lenses (SOCL). We showed (as expected) that a reduction in the melatonin suppressing effect of light is observed when subjects wear the SOCL. However, after chronic exposure to reduced (short wavelength) light for two consecutive weeks we observed an increase in sensitivity of the melatonin suppression response. The response normalized as if it took place under a polychromatic light pulse. No differences were found in the dim light melatonin onset or in the amplitude of the melatonin rhythms after chronic reduced blue light exposure. The effects on sleep parameters were limited. Our results demonstrate that the non-visual light system of healthy young subjects is capable of adapting to changes in the spectral composition of environmental light exposure. The present results emphasize the importance of considering not only the short-term effects of changes in environmental light characteristics.

  16. Some observations on stray magnetic fields and power outputs from short-wave diathermy equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, R.W.M.; Dunscombe, P.B.

    1984-04-01

    Recent years have seen increasing interest in the possible hazards arising from the use of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation. Relatively large and potentially hazardous fields are to be found in the vicinity of short-wave and microwave equipment used in physiotherapy departments to produce therapeutic temperature rises. This note reports the results of measurements of the stray magnetic field and power output of a conventional short-wave diathermy unit when applied to tissue-equivalent phantoms. The dependence of these quantities on the variables, i.e. power setting of the unit, capacitor plate size, phantom size and phantom-capacitor plate separation, are discussed.

  17. Transverse plane wave analysis of short elliptical chamber mufflers: An analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimani, A.; Munjal, M. L.

    2011-03-01

    Short elliptical chamber mufflers are used often in the modern day automotive exhaust systems. The acoustic analysis of such short chamber mufflers is facilitated by considering a transverse plane wave propagation model along the major axis up to the low frequency limit. The one dimensional differential equation governing the transverse plane wave propagation in such short chambers is solved using the segmentation approaches which are inherently numerical schemes, wherein the transfer matrix relating the upstream state variables to the downstream variables is obtained. Analytical solution of the transverse plane wave model used to analyze such short chambers has not been reported in the literature so far. This present work is thus an attempt to fill up this lacuna, whereby Frobenius solution of the differential equation governing the transverse plane wave propagation is obtained. By taking a sufficient number of terms of the infinite series, an approximate analytical solution so obtained shows good convergence up to about 1300 Hz and also covers most of the range of muffler dimensions used in practice. The transmission loss (TL) performance of the muffler configurations computed by this analytical approach agrees excellently with that computed by the Matrizant approach used earlier by the authors, thereby offering a faster and more elegant alternate method to analyze short elliptical muffler configurations.

  18. High Density Schottky Barrier Infrared Charge-Coupled Device (IRCCD) Sensors For Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) Applications At Intermediate Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elabd, H.; Villani, T. S.; Tower, J. R.

    1982-11-01

    Monolithic 32 x 64 and 64 x 128 palladium silicide (Pd2Si) interline transfer IRCCDs sensitive in the 1-3.5 pm spectral band have been developed. This silicon imager exhibits a low response nonuniformity of typically 0.2-1.6% rms, and has been operated in the temperature range between 40-140K. Spectral response measurements of test Pd2Si p-type Si devices yield quantum efficiencies of 7.9% at 1.25 μm, 5.6% at 1.65 μm and 2.2% at 2.22 μm. Improvement in quantum efficiency is expected by optimizing the different structural parameters of the Pd2Si detectors. The spectral response of the Pd2Si detectors fit a modified Fowler emission model. The measured photo-electric barrier height for the Pd2Si detector is ≍0.34 eV and the measured quantum efficiency coefficient, C1, is 19%/eV. The dark current level of Pd2Si Schottky barrier focal plane arrays (FPAs) is sufficiently low to enable operation at intermediate tem-peratures at TV frame rates. Typical dark current level measured at 120K on the FPA is 2 nA/cm2. The Pd2Si Schottky barrier imaging technology has been developed for satellite sensing of earth resources. The operating temperature of the Pd2Si FPA is compatible with passive cooler performance. In addition, high density Pd2Si Schottky barrier FPAs are manufactured with high yield and therefore represent an economical approach to short wavelength IR imaging. A Pd2Si Schottky barrier image sensor for push-broom multispectral imaging in the 1.25, 1.65, and 2.22 μm bands is being studied. The sensor will have two line arrays (dual band capability) of 512 detectors each, with 30 μm center-to-center detector spacing. The device will be suitable for chip-to-chip abutment, thus providing the capability to produce large, multiple chip focal planes with contiguous, in-line sensors.

  19. Plane-wave scattering from half-wave dipole arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels E.

    1970-01-01

    A matrix equation for determination of plane-wave scattering from arrays of thin short-circuited dipoles of lengths about half a wavelength is derived. Numerical and experimental results are presented for linear, circular, and concentric circular arrays.......A matrix equation for determination of plane-wave scattering from arrays of thin short-circuited dipoles of lengths about half a wavelength is derived. Numerical and experimental results are presented for linear, circular, and concentric circular arrays....

  20. Passive millimeter-wave imaging at short and medium range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essen, H.; Fuchs, H.-H.; Nötel, D.; Klöppel, F.; Pergande, P.; Stanko, S.

    2005-11-01

    During recent year's research on radiometric signatures, non-imaging, of the exhaust jet of missiles and imaging, on small vehicles in critical background scenarios were conducted by the mmW/submmW-group at FGAN-FHR. The equipment used for these investigations was of low technological status using simple single channel radiometers on a scanning pedestal. Meanwhile components of improved performance are available on a cooperative basis with the Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (Fraunhofer-IAF). Using such components a considerable progress concerning the temperature resolution and image generation time could be achieved. Emphasis has been put on the development of a demonstrator for CWD applications and on an imaging system for medium range applications, up to 200 m. The short range demonstrator is a scanning system operating alternatively at 35 GHz or 94 GHz to detect hidden materials as explosives, guns, knifes beneath the clothing. The demonstrator uses a focal plane array approach using 4 channels in azimuth, while mechanical scanning is used for the elevation. The medium range demonstrator currently employs a single channel radiometer on a pedestal for elevation over azimuth scanning. To improve the image quality, methods have been implemented using a Lorentzian algorithm with Wiener filtering.

  1. A Comparative Experimental Study of Wave Forces on a Vertical Cylinder in Long-Crested and Short-Crested Seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Burcharth, Hans F.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study is carried out to investigate the wave forces on a slender cylinder. Special attention is given to the wave forces in the surface zone and correlation of forces along the cylinder. The experiments consider the effects of both long and short-crested irregular waves.......An experimental study is carried out to investigate the wave forces on a slender cylinder. Special attention is given to the wave forces in the surface zone and correlation of forces along the cylinder. The experiments consider the effects of both long and short-crested irregular waves....

  2. 3D laser printing by ultra-short laser pulses for micro-optical applications: towards telecom wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Meguya; Mizeikis, Vygantas; Morikawa, Junko; Magallanes, Hernando; Brasselet, Etienne; Varapnickas, Simonas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2017-08-01

    Three dimensional (3D) fast (laser oscillator is presented. Using sub-1 nJ pulse energies, optical vortex generators made of polymerised grating segments with an azimuthally changing orientation have been fabricated in SZ2080 resist; width of polymerised rods was 150 nm and period 0.6-1 μm. Detailed phase retardance analysis was carried out manually with Berek compensator (under a white light illumination) and using an equivalent principle by an automated Abrio implementation at 546 nm. Direct experimental measurements of retardance was required since the period of the grating was comparable (or larger) than the wavelength of visible light. By gold sputtering, transmissive optical vortex generators were turned into reflective ones with augmented retardance, Δn × h defined by the form birefringence, Δn, and the height h = 2d where d is the thickness of the polymerised structure. Retardance reached 315 nm as measured with Berek compensator at visible wavelengths. Birefringent phase delays of π (or λ/2 in wavelength) required for high purity vortex generators can be made based on the proposed approach. Optical vortex generators for telecom wavelengths with sub-wavelength patterns of azimuthally oriented gratings are amenable by direct laser polymerisation.

  3. Finite-amplitude regimes of the short-wave Marangoni-Benard convective instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinet, P.; Legros, J. C.; Kamotani, Y.; Dauby, P. C.; Lebon, G.

    1995-09-01

    A model of the infinite Prandtl number thermocapillary instability in layers of infinite depth is developed in the framework of the amplitude equations formalism. Making use of eigenfunctions at a given Marangoni number Ma as a basis for the nonlinear problem, rather than the neutral stability functions, it is shown that third-order equations may visibly be extrapolated rather far above the threshold. In particular, results are obtained about the wavelength selection problem between fastest growing modes (wave numbers around kmax~Ma1/2 for a zero free surface Biot number) and critical modes (kc-->0 and Mac-->0). Transient numerical integration of the equations reveals an unbounded growth of the mean wavelength, thus indicating the absence of an intrinsic wavelength for this physical system. This is explained in terms of the mean (horizontally averaged) temperature profile distortion by convection. The final steady state of this evolution (imposed wavelength) is then approximated analytically. Earlier results about the competition between rolls and hexagonal patterns are qualitatively recovered. These solutions are then investigated in the limit Ma-->∞, where power law relationships are derived for main convective quantities. In particular, a saturation behavior is obtained for a quantity (the bulk temperature decrease), which can be considered as a measure of the heat transport increase due to convection.

  4. "J waves" induced after short coupling intervals: a manifestations of latent depolarization abnormality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Nakayama, Masafumi; Sato, Masahito; Okabe, Masaaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Takatsuki, Seiji; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2017-04-24

    To confirm the presence of tachycardia-induced slur or notch in the terminal portion of the QRS complexes in a general patient population. A tachycardia-induced J wave was defined as a slur or notch in the terminal portion of the QRS complexes newly induced at short RR intervals during atrial premature contractions (APCs) or atrial electrical stimulation in the electrophysiological study (EPS). Twenty-three out of 2000 patients with general diseases were involved. All patients with aborted sudden cardiac death, ventricular fibrillation or a family history of sudden cardiac death were excluded. The mean age was 72 ± 9 years, and 11 patients were male (47.8%). When the RR interval was shortened from 821 ± 142 ms to 464 ± 52 ms in the conducted APCs (P waves became diagnostic (0.02 ± 0.03 mV to 0.20 ± 0.07 mV, P waves were confined to the inferior leads in 22 (95.7%) patients and were notched in 11 (47.8%) and slurred in 12 (52.2%) patients. The induction of J waves was accompanied by visible changes of the QRS morphology. When the post-APC RR interval was prolonged to 992 ± 305 ms (P = 0.0154 vs. baseline), the J waves were similar to baseline levels. During the EPS, J wave induction was confirmed during atrial stimulation. There were no characteristic clinical or ECG features in the patients with tachycardia-induced J waves. J waves can be newly induced by short RR intervals in a general patient population, and a conduction delay is the likely mechanism causing such J waves.

  5. All-sky search for short gravitational-wave bursts in the first Advanced LIGO run

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Belgin, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, H. -P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Alvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.C.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Galiana, A. Fernandez; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fong, H.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, R.G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kraemer, H.C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lovelace, G.; Luck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGrath Hoareau, C.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, F.A.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Castro-Perez, J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerner, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J.R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tippens, T.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Torya, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S.J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results from an all-sky search for short-duration gravitational waves in the data of the first run of the Advanced LIGO detectors between September 2015 and January 2016. The search algorithms use minimal assumptions on the signal morphology, so they are sensitive to a wide range of

  6. Simultaneous multichannel wavelength multicasting and XOR logic gate multicasting for three DPSK signals based on four-wave mixing in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jun; Lu, Guo-Wei; Sakamoto, Takahide; Akahane, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Wang, Danshi; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Hongxiang; Zhang, Min; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Ji, Yuefeng

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate simultaneous multichannel wavelength multicasting (MWM) and exclusive-OR logic gate multicasting (XOR-LGM) for three 10Gbps non-return-to-zero differential phase-shift-keying (NRZ-DPSK) signals in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA) by exploiting the four-wave mixing (FWM) process. No additional pump is needed in the scheme. Through the interaction of the input three 10Gbps DPSK signal lights in QD-SOA, each channel is successfully multicasted to three wavelengths (1-to-3 for each), totally 3-to-9 MWM, and at the same time, three-output XOR-LGM is obtained at three different wavelengths. All the new generated channels are with a power penalty less than 1.2dB at a BER of 10(-9). Degenerate and non-degenerate FWM components are fully used in the experiment for data and logic multicasting.

  7. Neutron Scattering Investigation of the Temperature Dependence of Long-Wavelength Spin Waves in Ferromagnetic Rb2CrCI4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, M T; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1981-01-01

    The long-wavelength spin waves in Rb2CrCl4, a nearly two-dimensional ferromagnet, have been investigated at several temperatures below Tc=52.4K using neutron inelastic scattering techniques. The data have been analysed in terms of a Hartree-Fock theory using matching-matrix elements to give...... correctly the effects of anisotropy. Values for the parameters in the spin Hamiltonian have been found, and the theory accounts well for the energy renormalisation of the spin waves and for the transition temperature and variation of magnetic moment with temperature. Due to weak uniaxial anisotropy terms...

  8. Visible, Very Near IR and Short Wave IR Hyperspectral Drone Imaging System for Agriculture and Natural Water Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, H.; Akujärvi, A.; Holmlund, C.; Ojanen, H.; Kaivosoja, J.; Nissinen, A.; Niemeläinen, O.

    2017-10-01

    The accurate determination of the quality parameters of crops requires a spectral range from 400 nm to 2500 nm (Kawamura et al., 2010, Thenkabail et al., 2002). Presently the hyperspectral imaging systems that cover this wavelength range consist of several separate hyperspectral imagers and the system weight is from 5 to 15 kg. In addition the cost of the Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) cameras is high (  50 k€). VTT has previously developed compact hyperspectral imagers for drones and Cubesats for Visible and Very near Infrared (VNIR) spectral ranges (Saari et al., 2013, Mannila et al., 2013, Näsilä et al., 2016). Recently VTT has started to develop a hyperspectral imaging system that will enable imaging simultaneously in the Visible, VNIR, and SWIR spectral bands. The system can be operated from a drone, on a camera stand, or attached to a tractor. The targeted main applications of the DroneKnowledge hyperspectral system are grass, peas, and cereals. In this paper the characteristics of the built system are shortly described. The system was used for spectral measurements of wheat, several grass species and pea plants fixed to the camera mount in the test fields in Southern Finland and in the green house. The wheat, grass and pea field measurements were also carried out using the system mounted on the tractor. The work is part of the Finnish nationally funded DroneKnowledge - Towards knowledge based export of small UAS remote sensing technology project.

  9. A Unified Directional Spectrum for Long and Short Wind-Driven Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfouhaily, T.; Chapron, B.; Katsaros, K.; Vandemark, D.

    1997-01-01

    Review of several recent ocean surface wave models finds that while comprehensive in many regards, these spectral models do not satisfy certain additional, but fundamental, criteria. We propose that these criteria include the ability to properly describe diverse fetch conditions and to provide agreement with in situ observations of Cox and Munk [1954] and Jiihne and Riemer [1990] and Hara et al. [1994] data in the high-wavenumber regime. Moreover, we find numerous analytically undesirable aspects such as discontinuities across wavenumber limits, nonphysical tuning or adjustment parameters, and noncentrosymmetric directional spreading functions. This paper describes a two-dimensional wavenumber spectrum valid over all wavenumbers and analytically amenable to usage in electromagnetic models. The two regime model is formulated based on the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) in the long-wave regime and on the work of Phillips [1985] and Kitaigorodskii [1973] at the high wavenumbers. The omnidirectional and wind-dependent spectrum is constructed to agree with past and recent observations including the criteria mentioned above. The key feature of this model is the similarity of description for the high- and low-wavenumber regimes; both forms are posed to stress that the air-sea interaction process of friction between wind and waves (i.e., generalized wave age, u/c) is occurring at all wavelengths simultaneously. This wave age parameterization is the unifying feature of the spectrum. The spectrum's directional spreading function is symmetric about the wind direction and has both wavenumber and wind speed dependence. A ratio method is described that enables comparison of this spreading function with previous noncentrosymmetric forms. Radar data are purposefully excluded from this spectral development. Finally, a test of the spectrum is made by deriving roughness length using the boundary layer model of Kitaigorodskii. Our inference of drag coefficient versus wind speed

  10. Dispersion-based short-time Fourier transform applied to dispersive wave analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin-Chul; Sun, Kyung Ho; Kim, Yoon Young

    2005-05-01

    Although time-frequency analysis is effective for characterizing dispersive wave signals, the time-frequency tilings of most conventional analysis methods do not take into account dispersion phenomena. An adaptive time-frequency analysis method is introduced whose time-frequency tiling is determined with respect to the wave dispersion characteristics. In the dispersion-based time-frequency tiling, each time-frequency atom is adaptively rotated in the time-frequency plane, depending on the local wave dispersion. Although this idea can be useful in various problems, its application to the analysis of dispersive wave signals has not been made. In this work, the adaptive time-frequency method was applied to the analysis of dispersive elastic waves measured in waveguide experiments and a theoretical investigation on its time-frequency resolution was presented. The time-frequency resolution of the proposed transform was then compared with that of the standard short-time Fourier transform to show its effectiveness in dealing with dispersive wave signals. In addition, to facilitate the adaptive time-frequency analysis of experimentally measured signals whose dispersion relations are not known, an iterative scheme for determining the relationships was developed. The validity of the present approach in dealing with dispersive waves was verified experimentally. .

  11. Experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the phase averaged performance characteristics of marine current turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luznik, L.; Lust, E.; Flack, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are few studies describing the interaction between marine current turbines and an overlying surface gravity wave field. In this work we present an experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the wave phase averaged performance characteristics of a marine current turbine model. Measurements are performed with a 1/25 scale (diameter D=0.8m) two bladed horizontal axis turbine towed in the large (116m long) towing tank at the U.S. Naval Academy equipped with a dual-flap, servo-controlled wave maker. Three regular waves with wavelengths of 15.8, 8.8 and 3.9m with wave heights adjusted such that all waveforms have the same energy input per unit width are produced by the wave maker and model turbine is towed into the waves at constant carriage speed of 1.68 m/s. This representing the case of waves travelling in the same direction as the mean current. Thrust and torque developed by the model turbine are measured using a dynamometer mounted in line with the turbine shaft. Shaft rotation speed and blade position are measured using in in-house designed shaft position indexing system. The tip speed ratio (TSR) is adjusted using a hysteresis brake which is attached to the output shaft. Free surface elevation and wave parameters are measured with two optical wave height sensors, one located in the turbine rotor plane and other one diameter upstream of the rotor. All instruments are synchronized in time and data is sampled at a rate of 700 Hz. All measured quantities are conditionally sampled as a function of the measured surface elevation and transformed to wave phase space using the Hilbert Transform. Phenomena observed in earlier experiments with the same turbine such as phase lag in the torque signal and an increase in thrust due to Stokes drift are examined and presented with the present data as well as spectral analysis of the torque and thrust data.

  12. The short-wave broadband communication device for transmission the analog narrowband signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreyev O.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of information via the radio channel always involves the selection of radio waves modulation and the frequency band occupied by the radio signal. For the narrowband analog signals, the transmission via the radio channels in areas with difficult terrain the short-wave range is widely used. The majority of radio stations use frequency modulation of the transmitter without any message encryption. This gives the opportunity to detect and intercept messages that are transmitted. The use of the voice scramblers allows to hide information that is transmitted via the communication channel, but it is impossible to hide the radiation of the transmitter. The article suggests the use of a broadband signal with a modulation which is not associated with the change of the frequency of the transmitter in accordance with information, which is transmitted. The calculations showed that the proposed communication system can operate in a common frequency band with existing narrowband means of the short-wave range not creating them the substantial interference. The calculated signal/noise ratio on the input of the radio signals monitoring receiver is almost two orders less than for existing narrowband means of the short-wave range.

  13. Possibility of rarefaction shock wave under short pulse laser ablation of solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, N M

    1999-10-01

    Attention is drawn to a phenomenon that may give a radically different explanation for the recent observations of the system of dark rings above a solid surface vaporized by a short laser pulse. If a substance is heated to near-critical temperature, the existence of the compression shock wave becomes impossible, whereas the rarefaction wave takes a form of shock. The rarefaction shock can be considered as an interface in the expanding near-critical substance to form Newton rings in time-resolved optical microscopy experiments. The qualitative picture of the laser-ablated material expansion in vacuum with the generation of the rarefaction shock is discussed.

  14. Short-crested waves in deep water: a numerical investigation of recent laboratory experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical study of quasi-steady, doubly-periodic monochromatic short-crested wave patterns in deep water is conducted using a high-order Boussinesq-type model. Simulations using linear wavemaker conditions in the nonlinear model are initially used to approximate conditions from recent laboratory...... inclusion of steady third-order components in the wave generation is shown to significantly reduce the modulations (and other unsteady features), further confirming the explanation. This numerical work makes apparent some previously unknown difficulties associated with the physical generation of even...

  15. Short waves-induced enhancement of proliferation of human chondrocytes: involvement of extracellular signal-regulated map-kinase (erk).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue-Long; Chan, Rai-Chi; Cheng, He-Hsiung; Huang, Chun-Jen; Lu, Yih-Chau; Chen, I-Shu; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Chang, Hong-Tai; Huang, Jong-Khing; Chen, Jin-Shyr; Ho, Chin-Man; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2007-07-01

    1. Short-wave diathermy (SWD) is a form of radiofrequency radiation that is used therapeutically by physiotherapists. The cellular mechanisms of SWD are unclear. The present study was performed to explore the effect of different conditions of short-wave exposure on the proliferation of cultured human chondrocytes. 2. Cells exposed to short waves once per day for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in proliferation by 42% compared with the control cells. In cells that were treated with short waves twice per day for seven consecutive days, or only once on Day 1 and then examined for proliferation on Day 7, cell proliferation was greater than the control cells by 40% and 30%, respectively. 3. Given the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in the proliferation of different cell types, efforts were extended to explore the role of three major types of MAPK; that is, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38. 4. It was found that the level of phosphorylated ERK (phospho-ERK 1 and ERK 2) increased significantly within 5-120 min following consecutive exposure to short waves for 7 days. Exposure to short waves failed to alter the intensity of phosphorylated JNK and p38 within 0-240 min. 5. Cells were exposed to short waves once for seven consecutive days in the presence of 0, 10 micromol/L, 20 micromol/L or 50 micromol/L PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor). PD98059 totally inhibited short waves-induced enhancement of proliferation without altering normal control viability. In the presence of short waves and PD98059, the cell viability was lower than the normal control. Together, the data suggest that short waves could increase proliferation in human chondrocytes through activation of the ERK pathway, which is also involved in maintaining normal cell proliferation under physiological conditions.

  16. 730-nm optical parametric conversion from near- to short-wave infrared band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boggio, J.M.C.; Windmiller, J.R.; Knutzen, M.

    2008-01-01

    A record 730 nm parametric conversion in silica fiber from the near-infrared to the short-wave infrared band is reported and analyzed. A parametric gain in excess of 30 dB was measured for a signal at 1300 nm (with corresponding idler at 2030 nm). This conversion was performed in a travelling sin...... single-pass one-pump parametric architecture and high efficiency is achieved by a combination of high peak power and a nonlinear fiber with a reduced fourth-order dispersion coefficient.......A record 730 nm parametric conversion in silica fiber from the near-infrared to the short-wave infrared band is reported and analyzed. A parametric gain in excess of 30 dB was measured for a signal at 1300 nm (with corresponding idler at 2030 nm). This conversion was performed in a travelling...

  17. ERBE and GEBA Short-Wave monthly mean surface radiance comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, J. R.; Kato, S.; Bedka, K. M.; Minnis, P.; Rose, F. G.; Rutan, D. A.; Shrestha, A. K.; Miller, W. F.; Fillmore, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    Using the NASA Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), downward short wave surface radiance measurements were processed for the year 1986. In this process, a new table lookup method was used for aerosols retrievals as well as MOA product based on MERRA database. New SSF product based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) was used for cloud property retrievals. In addition, a climatology dataset for surface albedo map retrievals was incorporated in this processing. ERBE surface radiances were produced for months April, July, October, and December of 1986. To validate this product, we use the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) dataset for the same months. GEBA database stores energy flux monthly means that have been measured at 1500 stations at the earth's surface. In this work, comparisons of monthly short wave radiance averages at the surface between ERBE and GEBA datasets are presented. Preliminary results show a good agreement between both datasets.

  18. On the short-term uncertainty in performance f a point absorber wave energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, Ryan Geoffrey [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Michelen, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Manuel, Lance [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Canning, Jarred [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Of interest, in this study, is the quantification of uncertainty in the performance of a two-body wave point absorber (Reference Model 3 or RM3), which serves as a wave energy converter (WEC). We demonstrate how simulation tools may be used to establish short-term relationships between any performance parameter of the WEC device and wave height in individual sea states. We demonstrate this methodology for two sea states. Efficient structural reliability methods, validated using more expensive Monte Carlo sampling, allow the estimation of uncertainty in performance of the device. Such methods, when combined with metocean data quantifying the likelihood of different sea states, can be useful in long-term studies and in reliability-based design.

  19. Chapter 4: Pulsating Wave Loads Section 4.3: 3D Effects Force Reduction of Short-Crested Non-Breaking Waves on Caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Liu, Zhou

    1999-01-01

    simultaneously along the caisson, named peak-delay reduction. Model test results indicate that the point-pressure reduction can be predicted by the Goda formula. Based on linear wave theory, Battjes (1982) presented a formula for the peak-delay force reduction of short-crested waves with only one frequency...... ion of peakdelay force reduction factor for oblique long-crested and short-crested non-breaking waves are derived analytically. Theoretical formula for the maximum non-dimensional horizontally turning moment around the center of the caisson by oblique regular waves is also presented. Finally the paper...... gives a summary of the model test results on the force reduction of non-breaking and breaking short-crested waves....

  20. Reactions of N/sub 2/(A/sup 3/SIGMA/sub u//sup +/) and candidates for short wavelength lasers, March 1, 1984-February 28, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setser, D.W.

    1987-12-07

    There are several potential schemes for efficiently generating high concentrations of the first electronically excited state of nitrogen, N/sub 2/(A/sup 3/..sigma../sub u//sup +/, 6.2 eV) by either chemical or electrical pumping. The goal of this proposal is to study ways of utilizing the energy of the N/sub 2/(A) molecules for developing efficient, short wavelength gas lasers. Such lasers are of potential interest for laser fusion. The authors report both excitation-transfer and dissociative excitation-transfer reactions of N/sub 2/(A) that yield electronically-excited diatomic molecules as products. 25 refs.

  1. A C- and L-band dual-wavelength erbium-doped fibre laser for assisting four-wave mixing self-stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueming; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Hongjun; Zou, Kuaisheng; Zhang, Tongyi; Lu, Keqing; Sun, Chuandong; Wang, Yishan; Ouyang, Xian; Chen, Guofu; Hou, Xun

    2006-06-01

    A kind of photonic 'Robin Hood' based on four-wave mixing is proposed and proved to be effective, theoretically and experimentally, in detail. Its applications for L-band dual-wavelength erbium-doped fibre (EDF) laser use are experimentally demonstrated at room temperature. The experimental results show that the conventional EDF cavity only induces a very unstable L-band laser, but the novel Robin Hood can effectively suppress the homogeneous gain in the erbium laser. By using suitable fibre Bragg gratings and stretching them, the proposed EDF laser can operate from ~1520 to ~1635 nm, so our dual-wavelength EDF laser can be used in lasing operation not only for the L band but also for the C band. The outstanding merits of our dual-wavelength laser are the flexible tuning and the ultrabroad spectral range of more than 115 nm. The experimental results show that the stability and uniformity of the proposed dual-wavelength laser in C-band operation are better than those for the same laser in L-band operation.

  2. All-sky search for short gravitational-wave bursts in the first Advanced LIGO run

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Ananyeva, A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Appert, S; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Avila-Alvarez, A; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Beer, C; Bejger, M; Belahcene, I; Belgin, M; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Billman, C R; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackman, J; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bohe, A; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calder'on; Callister, T A; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Canepa, M; Cannon, K C; Cao, H; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavagli`a, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, H -P; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Chmiel, T; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, A J K; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Cocchieri, C; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conti, L; Cooper, S J; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Covas, P B; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cullen, T J; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dasgupta, A; Costa, C F Da Silva; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Davis, D; Daw, E J; Day, B; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Del'eglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Devenson, J; Devine, R C; Dhurandhar, S; D'iaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; 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Lanza, R K; Lartaux-Vollard, A; Lasky, P D; Laxen, M; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lehmann, J; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Liu, J; Lockerbie, N A; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; L"uck, H; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macfoy, S; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; M'arka, S; M'arka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martynov, D V; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGrath, C; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McRae, T; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, A; Miller, B B; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Muniz, E A M; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Napier, K; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nelemans, G; Nelson, T J N; Neri, M; Nery, M; Neunzert, A; Newport, J M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Noack, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pace, A E; Page, J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perez, C J; Perreca, A; Perri, L M; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poe, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Pratt, J W W; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L G; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; P"urrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Qiu, S; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajan, C; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Rizzo, M; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosi'nska, D; Rowan, S; R"udiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Sakellariadou, M; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L M; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Scheuer, J; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Sch"onbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Schwalbe, S G; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Setyawati, Y; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T J; Shahriar, M S; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, B; Smith, J R; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Spencer, A P; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strigin, S E; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sunil, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepa'nczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; T'apai, M; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thrane, E; Tippens, T; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Toland, K; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Tornasi, Z; Torrie, C I; T"oyr"a, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifir`o, D; Trinastic, J; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Tso, R; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Varma, V; Vass, S; Vas'uth, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Venugopalan, G; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicer'e, A; Viets, A D; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Watchi, J; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whiting, B F; Whittle, C; Williams, D; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Woehler, J; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, D S; Wu, G; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M; zny, A Zadro; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, T; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, S J; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2016-01-01

    We present the results from an all-sky search for short-duration gravitational waves in the data of the first run of the Advanced LIGO detectors between September 2015 and January 2016. The search algorithms use minimal assumptions on the signal morphology, so they are sensitive to a wide range of sources emitting gravitational waves. The analyses target transient signals with duration ranging from milliseconds to seconds over the frequency band of 32 to 4096 Hz. The first observed gravitational-wave event, GW150914, has been detected with high confidence in this search; other known gravitational-wave events fall below the search's sensitivity. Besides GW150914, all of the search results are consistent with the expected rate of accidental noise coincidences. Finally, we estimate rate-density limits for a broad range of non-BBH transient gravitational-wave sources as a function of their gravitational radiation emission energy and their characteristic frequency. These rate-density upper-limits are stricter than...

  3. Room-temperature continuous-wave operation in the telecom wavelength range of GaSb-based lasers monolithically grown on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, A.; Cerutti, L.; Rodriguez, J. B.; Narcy, G.; Garreau, A.; Lelarge, F.; Tournié, E.

    2017-06-01

    We report on electrically pumped GaSb-based laser diodes monolithically grown on Si and operating in a continuous wave (cw) in the telecom wavelength range. The laser structures were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on 6°-off (001) substrates. The devices were processed in coplanar contact geometry. 100 μm × 1 mm laser diodes exhibited a threshold current density of 1 kA/cm-2 measured under pulsed operation at 20 °C. CW operation was achieved up to 35 °C with 10 μm × 1 mm diodes. The output power at 20 °C was around 3 mW/uncoated facet, and the cw emission wavelength 1.59 μm, in the C/L-band of telecom systems.

  4. SWIFT-Tyre: an accurate tyre model for ride and handling studies also at higher frequencies and short road wavelengths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, J.J.M. van; Pacejka, H.B.

    2000-01-01

    As is well known, Magic Formula tyre modelling (MF-Tyre is a part of ADAMS/Tire) allows an accurate and efficient description of tyre-road interaction forces required for any usual vehicle handling simulation. When it comes to modelling of tyre behaviour at higher frequencies and short road

  5. Short-Period Rayleigh Wave Dispersion Measurements across the Cape Verde Archipelago using Ambient Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, M. M.; Matias, L. M.; Nunes, J.; Teves-Costa, P.

    2010-12-01

    The Cape Verde archipelago consists of 10 islands and several islets located on the southwest flank of the Cape Verde Rise, 500 to 800 km west of Senegal, off the African coast. This is an elevated region of ocean floor approximately 1200 km wide and encompassing an area greater than 3 x 105 km2. The islands form a horseshoe-shaped chain with a general age progression from east to west. Under the umbrella of the CV-PLUME and COBO projects, a temporary pool of 39 BB seismometers has been continuously recording between November 2007 and September 2008. This deployment provided a dense coverage of the archipelago with an unprecedented resolution. Ambient noise tomography has proved to be an efficient tool to construct high resolution maps of lithospheric shallower structures. Firstly, they allow measurements at periods shorter than 20 sec, which are hard to obtain from earthquake surface waves. Secondly, being independent of the epicentre-station geometry, they are suitable on regions of low seismicity. Cross-correlation of about 10 months of ambient seismic noise recorded at the CV-PLUME temporary network allowed us to measure short-period Rayleigh waves on all interstation paths. These cross-correlograms enabled us to compute short-period surface-wave group-velocity measurements on interstation paths. We used these measurements to construct maps of Rayleigh-wave group-velocity lateral variations at different periods. The most striking feature on the obtained record-sections is the presence of a secondary Rayleigh wave train in both causal and anti-causal parts of the cross-correlograms obtained for the paths crossing the western edge of the “horseshoe”. This study was supported by projects “CV-PLUME: An investigation on the geometry and deep signature of the Cape Verde mantle plume” (PTDC/CTE-GIN/64330/2006) and “COBO: Cape Verdes Origin from Broadband Observations”, GDSS, GFZ-Potsdam.

  6. Orthogonal Phase Quadratures Conversion to Different Wavelengths Through Phase-Sensitive Four Wave Mixing in an Highly Nonlinear Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Ros, Francesco; Marco Calabrese, Pachito; Kang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Phase-sensitive processes exploiting FWM in an HNLF allow simultaneously converting two orthogonal quadratures of an optical signal to different wavelengths. Conversion efficiencies to two 90°-phase-shifted idlers exceeding 10dB of phase-sensitive extinction ratio are obtained experimentally....

  7. Reducing Short-Wavelength Blue Light in Dry Eye Patients with Unstable Tear Film Improves Performance on Tests of Visual Acuity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minako Kaido

    Full Text Available To investigate whether suppression of blue light can improve visual function in patients with short tear break up time (BUT dry eye (DE.Twenty-two patients with short BUT DE (10 men, 12 women; mean age, 32.4 ± 6.4 years; age range, 23-43 years and 18 healthy controls (10 men, 8 women; mean age, 30.1 ± 7.4 years; age range, 20-49 years underwent functional visual acuity (VA examinations with and without wearing eyeglasses with 50% blue light blocked lenses. The functional VA parameters were starting VA, functional VA, and visual maintenance ratio.The baseline mean values (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution, logMAR of functional VA and the visual maintenance ratio were significantly worse in the DE patients than in the controls (P 0.05. The DE patients had significant improvement in mean functional VA and visual maintenance ratio while wearing the glasses (P 0.05.Protecting the eyes from short-wavelength blue light may help to ameliorate visual impairment associated with tear instability in patients with DE. This finding represents a new concept, which is that the blue light exposure might be harmful to visual function in patients with short BUT DE.

  8. Final report for Fundamental study of long-short interfacial wave interactions with application for flow regime development

    CERN Document Server

    McCready, M

    2000-01-01

    The long waves that cause slugs almost always form more slowly than short waves, and linear stability always predicts that the growth rate for long waves is much less than that for short waves. However, at many conditions above neutral stability, long waves dominate the wave field. Three different studies were undertaken as part of the funded work: (1) linear interaction for unsteady flows; (2) wave evolution in oil-water channel flows; (3) retrograde stability and subcritical bifurcations. The oil-water system was used as a surrogate for gas-liquid systems because the gas phase is usually turbulent, and this complication is thus avoided although the phenomena involved are similar. The following overall conclusions about flow regime development were reached: (a) Oscillations in pressure and flow rate, due to interfacial waves or a malfunctioning pump, can cause significant growth rate changes in short waves within narrow FR-equency ranges, but probably do not have a large effect on long waves and thus regime ...

  9. VISIBLE, VERY NEAR IR AND SHORT WAVE IR HYPERSPECTRAL DRONE IMAGING SYSTEM FOR AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL WATER APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Saari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The accurate determination of the quality parameters of crops requires a spectral range from 400 nm to 2500 nm (Kawamura et al., 2010, Thenkabail et al., 2002. Presently the hyperspectral imaging systems that cover this wavelength range consist of several separate hyperspectral imagers and the system weight is from 5 to 15 kg. In addition the cost of the Short Wave Infrared (SWIR cameras is high (~ 50 k€. VTT has previously developed compact hyperspectral imagers for drones and Cubesats for Visible and Very near Infrared (VNIR spectral ranges (Saari et al., 2013, Mannila et al., 2013, Näsilä et al., 2016. Recently VTT has started to develop a hyperspectral imaging system that will enable imaging simultaneously in the Visible, VNIR, and SWIR spectral bands. The system can be operated from a drone, on a camera stand, or attached to a tractor. The targeted main applications of the DroneKnowledge hyperspectral system are grass, peas, and cereals. In this paper the characteristics of the built system are shortly described. The system was used for spectral measurements of wheat, several grass species and pea plants fixed to the camera mount in the test fields in Southern Finland and in the green house. The wheat, grass and pea field measurements were also carried out using the system mounted on the tractor. The work is part of the Finnish nationally funded DroneKnowledge – Towards knowledge based export of small UAS remote sensing technology project.

  10. Response characteristics of a long life type floating offshore airport in waves. 3rd Report. Response due to short waves and an attempt of active inclination control; Chojumyogata futaishiki kaijo kuko no harochu oto tokusei. Tanhachoiki no oto oyobi shisei seigyo no kokoromi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, T.; Ma, N.; Nishio, O.; Sato, N. [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Notice was given on response characteristics in a short wavelength range of a large floating structure for an offshore airport consisting of semi-submersible replaceable type units, and influence of unit lacking. An attempt was also made on performing restoration of inclination change during unit lacking and suppression of long-cycle variation in waves by using air pressure control. The result of a numerical calculation based on a three-dimensional singular point method may be summarized as follows: mass force added vertically on columns in short wavelength range differs in the outer edges and the central part; relatively uniform values are shown in the central part; and interactive interference is recognized in wave forces in the vertical direction, but the influence therefrom decreases as the wave length decreases. Calculations on vertical movements and bending moments in waves were performed by using a mode synthesizing method. The calculations used fluid force which was calculated based on the three-dimensional singular point method utilizing symmetry with respect to each condition for a complete model plus unit lacking and unit lacking plus inclination control. As a result of verifying the calculations by using an experiment, relatively good agreement was achieved in either case. A high-frequency vibration experiment made clear the characteristics of elastic response in the short-wave length range. 14 refs., 14 figs.

  11. Does one hour of bright or short-wavelength filtered tablet screenlight have a meaningful effect on adolescents' pre-bedtime alertness, sleep, and daytime functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Melanie; Sutherland, Cate; Bartel, Kate; Gradisar, Michael; Williamson, Paul; Lovato, Nicole; Micic, Gorica

    2014-05-01

    Electronic media use is prevalent among adolescent populations, as is the frequency of sleeplessness. One mechanism proposed for technology affecting adolescents' sleep is the alerting effects from bright screens. Two explanations are provided. First, screens emit significant amounts of short-wavelength light (i.e. blue), which produces acute alertness and alters sleep timing. Second, later chronotypes are hypothesised to be hypersensitive to evening light. This study analysed the pre-sleep alertness (GO/NOGO task speed, accuracy; subjective sleepiness), sleep (sleep diary, polysomnography), and morning functioning of 16 healthy adolescents (M = 17.4 ± 1.9 yrs, 56% f) who used a bright tablet screen (80 lux), dim screen (1 lux) and a filtered short-wavelength screen (f.lux; 50 lux) for 1 hr before their usual bedtime in a within-subjects protocol. Chronotype was analysed as a continuous between-subjects factor; however, no significant interactions occurred. Significant effects occurred between bright and dim screens for GO/NOGO speed and accuracy. However, the magnitude of these differences was small (e.g. GO/NOGO speed = 23 ms, accuracy = 13%), suggesting minimal clinical significance. No significant effects were found for sleep onset latency, slow-rolling eye movements, or the number of SWS and REM minutes in the first two sleep cycles. Future independent studies are needed to test short (1 hr) vs longer (>2 hrs) screen usage to provide evidence for safe-to-harmful levels of screenlight exposure before adolescents' usual bedtime.

  12. A novel radio over fiber system with DWDM mm-wave generation and wavelength reuse for upstream data connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Lei, Xiaoyan; Wen, Shuangchun; Yu, Jianguo

    2007-04-30

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel radio-over-fiber architecture using an electrical mixer and an optical intensity modulator based on double side-band modulation scheme to generate dense wavelength-division multiplexing (DWDM) optical millimeter for carrying downstream data and centralized lightwave for carrying upstream data. Since the remaining optical carriers with high power have been reused, the optical power is effectively utilized; therefore the system cost can be reduced.

  13. High frequency ion sound waves associated with Langmuir waves in type III radio burst source regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thejappa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Short wavelength ion sound waves (2-4kHz are detected in association with the Langmuir waves (~15-30kHz in the source regions of several local type III radio bursts. They are most probably not due to any resonant wave-wave interactions such as the electrostatic decay instability because their wavelengths are much shorter than those of Langmuir waves. The Langmuir waves occur as coherent field structures with peak intensities exceeding the Langmuir collapse thresholds. Their scale sizes are of the order of the wavelength of an ion sound wave. These Langmuir wave field characteristics indicate that the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are most probably generated during the thermalization of the burnt-out cavitons left behind by the Langmuir collapse. Moreover, the peak intensities of the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are comparable to the expected intensities of those ion sound waves radiated by the burnt-out cavitons. However, the speeds of the electron beams derived from the frequency drift of type III radio bursts are too slow to satisfy the needed adiabatic ion approximation. Therefore, some non-linear process such as the induced scattering on thermal ions most probably pumps the beam excited Langmuir waves towards the lower wavenumbers, where the adiabatic ion approximation is justified.

  14. The effect of a short wavelength mode on the evolution of a long wavelength perturbation driven by a strong blast wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M; Blue, B; Hansen, J F; Robey, H F; Drake, R P; Kuranz, C; Leibrandt, D R

    2004-03-16

    Shock-accelerated material interfaces are potentially unstable to both the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Shear that develops along with these instabilities in turn drives the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. When driven by strong shocks, the evolution and interaction of these instabilities is further complicated by compressibility effects. In this paper, we present a computational study of the formation of jets at strongly driven hydrodynamically unstable interfaces, and the interaction of these jets with one another and with developing spikes and bubbles. This provides a nonlinear spike-spike and spike-bubble interaction mechanism that can have a significant impact on the large-scale characteristics of the mixing layer. These interactions result in sensitivity to the initial perturbation spectrum, including the relative phases of the various modes, that persists long into the nonlinear phase of instability evolution. We describe implications for instability growth rates, the bubble merger process, and the degree of mix in the layer. Finally, we consider results from relevant deceleration RT experiments, performed on OMEGA, to demonstrate some of these effects.

  15. 730-nm optical parametric conversion from near- to short-wave infrared band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez Boggio, J M; Windmiller, J R; Knutzen, M; Jiang, R; Bres, C; Alic, N; Stossel, B; Rottwitt, K; Radic, S

    2008-04-14

    A record 730 nm parametric conversion in silica fiber from the near-infrared to the short-wave infrared band is reported and analyzed. A parametric gain in excess of 30 dB was measured for a signal at 1300 nm (with corresponding idler at 2030 nm). This conversion was performed in a travelling single-pass one-pump parametric architecture and high efficiency is achieved by a combination of high peak power and a nonlinear fiber with a reduced fourth-order dispersion coefficient.

  16. Developing a Short-Period, Fundamental-Mode Rayleigh-Wave Attenuation Model for Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    We are developing a 2D, short-period (12 - 22 s), fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave attenuation model for Asia. This model can be used to invert for a 3D attenuation model of the Earth's crust and upper mantle as well as to implement more accurate path corrections in regional surface-wave magnitude calculations. The prerequisite for developing a reliable Rayleigh-wave attenuation model is the availability of accurate fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave amplitude measurements. Fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave amplitudes could be contaminated by a variety of sources such as multipathing, focusing and defocusing, body wave, higher-mode surface wave, and other noise sources. These contaminations must be reduced to the largest extent possible. To achieve this, we designed a procedure by taking advantage of certain Rayleigh-wave characteristics, such as dispersion and elliptical particle motion, for accurate amplitude measurements. We first analyze the dispersion of the surface-wave data using a spectrogram. Based on the characteristics of the data dispersion, we design a phase-matched filter by using either a manually picked dispersion curve, or a group-velocity-model predicted dispersion curve, or the dispersion of the data, and apply the filter to the seismogram. Intelligent filtering of the seismogram and windowing of the resulting cross-correlation based on the spectrogram analysis and the comparison between the phase-match filtered data spectrum, the raw-data spectrum and the theoretical source spectrum effectively reduces amplitude contaminations and results in reliable amplitude measurements in many cases. We implemented these measuring techniques in a graphic-user-interface tool called Surface Wave Amplitude Measurement Tool (SWAMTOOL). Using the tool, we collected and processed waveform data for 200 earthquakes occurring throughout 2003-2006 inside and around Eurasia. The records from 135 broadband stations were used. After obtaining the Rayleigh-wave amplitude

  17. Performance of InGaAs short wave infrared avalanche photodetector for low flux imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anand; Pal, Ravinder

    2017-11-01

    Opto-electronic performance of the InGaAs/i-InGaAs/InP short wavelength infrared focal plane array suitable for high resolution imaging under low flux conditions and ranging is presented. More than 85% quantum efficiency is achieved in the optimized detector structure. Isotropic nature of the wet etching process poses a challenge in maintaining the required control in the small pitch high density detector array. Etching process is developed to achieve low dark current density of 1 nA/cm2 in the detector array with 25 µm pitch at 298 K. Noise equivalent photon performance less than one is achievable showing single photon detection capability. The reported photodiode with low photon flux is suitable for active cum passive imaging, optical information processing and quantum computing applications.

  18. Continuous Wave Spectroscopy with Diffusion Theory for Quantification of Optical Properties: Comparison Between Multi-distance and Multi-wavelength Data Fitting Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chi; Lin, Zhi-Fong; Nioka, Shoko; Chen, Li-Hsin; Tseng, Sheng-Hao; Chung, Pau-Choo

    Typically, continuous wave spectroscopy (CWS) can be used to accurately quantify biological tissue optical properties (μ a and μ s ') by employing the diffuse reflectance information acquired at multiple source-detector separations (multi-distance). On the other hand, sample optical properties can also be obtained by fitting multi-wavelength light reflectance acquired at a single source detector separation to the diffusion theory equation. To date, multi-wavelength and multi-distance methods have not yet been rigorously compared for their accuracy in quantification of the sample optical properties. In this investigation, we compared the accuracy of the two above-mentioned quantifying methods in the optical properties recovery. The liquid phantoms had μ a between 0.004 and 0.011 mm(-1) and μ s ' between 0.55 and 1.07 mm(-1) whose optical properties mimic the human breast. Multi-distance data and multi-wavelength data were fitted to the same diffusion equation for consistency. The difference between benchmark μ a and μ s ' and the fitted results, ΔError (ΔE) was used to evaluate the accuracy of the two methods. The results showed that either method yielded ΔE within 15-30 % when values were within certain limits to standard values applicable to μ s ' and μ a for human adipose tissue. Both methods showed no significant differences in ΔE values. Our results suggest that both multi-distance and multi-wavelength methods can yield similar reasonable optical properties in biological tissue with a proper calibration.

  19. Ultraintense short-wavelength emission from ZnO-sheathed MgO nanorods induced by subwavelength optical resonance cavity formation: verification of previous hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Changhyun; Kim, Hyunsu; Lee, Chongmu

    2012-03-01

    A recent paper reported that intense emissions with a range of wavelengths over a wide spectral range, from ultraviolet to infrared light, might be possible by sheathing MgO nanorods with a semiconducting material with an optimal sheath thickness. In addition, the paper hypothesized that an ultraintense short-wavelength emission could be obtained by sheathing MgO nanorods with a ~17 nm ZnO thin film in the paper. In this study, we found that the intensity ratio of the near-band edge emission to the deep level emission (I(NBE)/I(DL)) of the MgO-core/ZnO-shell nanorods with a mean shell layer thickness of 17 nm was as high as ~30, whereas the I(NBE)/I(DL) ratio of the bare-MgO nanorods was 0. This near-band edge emission intensity enhancement by sheathing the MgO nanorods with ZnO is by far more significant than that by sheathing the ZnO nanorods with other materials including MgO. This is because subwavelength optical resonance cavities form in the MgO-core/ZnO-shell nanorods with faceted surfaces, whereas they do not form in the ZnO-core/MgO (or other material)-shell nanorods with no faceted surfaces. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  20. An analysis of short pulse and dual frequency radar techniques for measuring ocean wave spectra from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning beam microwave radars were used to measure ocean wave directional spectra from satellites. In principle, surface wave spectral resolution in wave number can be obtained using either short pulse (SP) or dual frequency (DF) techniques; in either case, directional resolution obtains naturally as a consequence of a Bragg-like wave front matching. A four frequency moment characterization of backscatter from the near vertical using physical optics in the high frequency limit was applied to an analysis of the SP and DF measurement techniques. The intrinsic electromagnetic modulation spectrum was to the first order in wave steepness proportional to the large wave directional slope spectrum. Harmonic distortion was small and was a minimum near 10 deg incidence. NonGaussian wave statistics can have an effect comparable to that in the second order of scattering from a normally distributed sea surface. The SP technique is superior to the DF technique in terms of measurement signal to noise ratio and contrast ratio.

  1. Detailed gravimetric geoid confirmation of short wavelength features of sea surface topography detected by the Skylab S-193 altimeter in the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, J. G.; Vincent, S.; Mcclinton, A. T.; Chang, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed gravimetric geoid was computed for the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea area in support of the calibration and evaluation of the GEOS-C altimeter. This geoid, computed on a 15 ft. x 15 ft. grid was based upon a combination of surface gravity data with the GSFC GEM-6 satellite derived gravity data. A comparison of this gravimetric geoid with 10 passes of SKYLAB altimeter data is presented. The agreement of the two data types is quite good with the differences generally less than 2 meters. Sea surface manifestations of numerous short wavelength (approximately 100 km) oceanographic features are now indicated in the gravimetric geoid and are also confirmed by the altimetry data.

  2. Correlations among near-infrared and short-wavelength autofluorescence and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in recessive Stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Tobias; Marsiglia, Marcela; Lee, Winston; Zernant, Jana; Tsang, Stephen H; Allikmets, Rando; Greenstein, Vivienne C; Sparrow, Janet R

    2014-10-23

    Short-wavelength (SW) fundus autofluorescence (AF) is considered to originate from lipofuscin in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and near-infrared (NIR) AF from melanin. In patients with recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1), we correlated SW-AF and NIR-AF with structural information obtained by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Twenty-four STGD1 patients (45 eyes; age 8 to 61 years) carrying confirmed disease-associated ABCA4 mutations were studied prospectively. Short-wavelength AF, NIR-AF, and SD-OCT images were acquired. Five phenotypes were identified according to features of the central lesion and extent of fundus change. Central zones of reduced NIR-AF were typically larger than areas of diminished SW-AF and reduced NIR-AF usually approximated areas of ellipsoid zone (EZ) loss identified by SD-OCT (group 1; r, 0.93, P < 0.0001). In patients having a central lesion with overlapping parafoveal rings of increased NIR-AF and SW-AF (group 3), the extent of EZ loss was strongly correlated with the inner diameter of the NIR-AF ring (r, 0.89, P < 0.0001) and the eccentricity of the outer border of the NIR-AF ring was greater than that of the SW-AF ring. Lesion areas were more completely delineated in NIR-AF images than with SW-AF. In most cases, EZ loss was observed only at locations where NIR-AF was reduced or absent, indicating that RPE cell atrophy occurs in advance of photoreceptor cell degeneration. Because SW-AF was often increased within the central area of EZ disruption, degenerating photoreceptor cells may produce lipofuscin at accelerated levels. Consideration is given to mechanisms underlying hyper-NIR-AF in conjunction with increased SW-AF. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  3. Variety identification of brown sugar using short-wave near infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiqing; Wu, Di; He, Yong

    2007-11-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with the characteristics of high speed, non-destructiveness, high precision and reliable detection data, etc. is a pollution-free, rapid, quantitative and qualitative analysis method. A new approach for variety discrimination of brown sugars using short-wave NIR spectroscopy (800-1050nm) was developed in this work. The relationship between the absorbance spectra and brown sugar varieties was established. The spectral data were compressed by the principal component analysis (PCA). The resulting features can be visualized in principal component (PC) space, which can lead to discovery of structures correlative with the different class of spectral samples. It appears to provide a reasonable variety clustering of brown sugars. The 2-D PCs plot obtained using the first two PCs can be used for the pattern recognition. Least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) was applied to solve the multivariate calibration problems in a relatively fast way. The work has shown that short-wave NIR spectroscopy technique is available for the brand identification of brown sugar, and LS-SVM has the better identification ability than PLS when the calibration set is small.

  4. Short wavelength turbulence generated by shear in the quiescent H-mode edge on DIII–D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Dorris, J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    A region of turbulence with large radial wavenumber (k{sub r}ρ{sub s}>1) is found in the high-shear portion of the plasma edge in Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) on DIII–D using the Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic. At its peak outside the minimum of the E{sub r} well, the turbulence exhibits large amplitude n{sup ~}/n∼40%, with large radial wavenumber |k{sup ¯}{sub r}/k{sup ¯}{sub θ}|∼11 and short radial correlation length L{sub r}/ρ{sub i}∼0.2. The turbulence inside the E{sub r} well minimum is characterized by the opposite sign in radial wavenumber from that of turbulence outside the minimum, consistent with the expected effects of velocity shear. The PCI diagnostic provides a line-integrated measurement of density fluctuations, so data are taken during a scan of plasma position at constant parameters to allow the PCI to sample a range in k{sub r}/k{sub θ}. Analysis of the Doppler shift and plasma geometry allows the turbulence to be localized to a narrow region 3 mm inside the last closed flux surface, outside the minimum of the E{sub r} well. The turbulence amplitude and radial wavenumber and correlation length are determined by fitting the PCI results with a simple non-isotropic turbulence model with two regions of turbulence. These PCI observations, made in QH-mode, are qualitatively similar to those made in standard edge localized modes (ELM)-free H-mode and between ELMs, suggesting a similar role for large k{sub r} turbulence there.

  5. Short wavelength turbulence generated by shear in the quiescent H-mode edge on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Dorris, J.; Burrell, K. H.

    2014-06-01

    A region of turbulence with large radial wavenumber (krρs>1) is found in the high-shear portion of the plasma edge in Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) on DIII-D using the Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic. At its peak outside the minimum of the Er well, the turbulence exhibits large amplitude n ˜/n˜40%, with large radial wavenumber |k¯r/k¯θ|˜11 and short radial correlation length Lr/ρi˜0.2. The turbulence inside the Er well minimum is characterized by the opposite sign in radial wavenumber from that of turbulence outside the minimum, consistent with the expected effects of velocity shear. The PCI diagnostic provides a line-integrated measurement of density fluctuations, so data are taken during a scan of plasma position at constant parameters to allow the PCI to sample a range in kr/kθ. Analysis of the Doppler shift and plasma geometry allows the turbulence to be localized to a narrow region 3 mm inside the last closed flux surface, outside the minimum of the Er well. The turbulence amplitude and radial wavenumber and correlation length are determined by fitting the PCI results with a simple non-isotropic turbulence model with two regions of turbulence. These PCI observations, made in QH-mode, are qualitatively similar to those made in standard edge localized modes (ELM)-free H-mode and between ELMs, suggesting a similar role for large kr turbulence there.

  6. Long and short wavelengths of Indian Ocean geoid and gravity lows: Mid-to-upper mantle sources, rapid drift and seismicity of Kachchh and Shillong plateau, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, D. C.; Ravi Kumar, M.

    2012-10-01

    Spectral analysis of the Indian Ocean geoid low provides depth to the large wavelength sources as ˜1300, ˜700 and 340 km that are supported from the spectral analysis and the modeling of the corresponding large wavelength regional gravity anomaly with negative density contrasts at these levels. The three levels coincide with the sharp changes in the gradient of the seismic velocities related to the olivine-spinel transformation of successively increasing Fe/Mg ratio as depth increases, known as transition zones. The first two segments are supported from continuous wavelet transform analysis of the large wavelength component of the corresponding gravity field. The low density rocks in this section appear to be related to the subducted Indian/Tethyan lithosphere that roll back and drifted southwards after subduction as inferred from tomography experiments. The relatively short wavelength sources of the spectrum of the geoid data at depths of 162 and 85 km suggest sources along the lithosphere - asthenosphere boundary (LAB) under the Indian continent and surrounding oceans, respectively. A low viscosity zone has been envisaged below 660 km discontinuity that may correspond to the low density rocks in this section which is popularly referred to as graveyards of the subducted rocks under geoid lows. The subducted slab is hydrated due to dehydration from metamorphism that causes upwelling in the mid-to-upper mantle which is likely to set in baby plumes. Presence of fluid may transform part of olivine to serpentine further reducing the bulk density of rocks in this section. They would make this region buoyant that appears to be responsible for the Central Indian Ocean Deformation Zone with large scale folding, faulting, seismicity, and high heat flow. The same also appear to be responsible for the rapid drift of the Indian plate. Short wavelength component of the Indian Ocean geoid low reflects most of the surface/shallow tectonics of the region similar to the gravity

  7. Short Wavelength Electromagnetic Perturbations Excited Near the Solar Probe Plus Spacecraft in the Inner Heliosphere: 2.5D Hybrid Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2011-01-01

    A 2.5D numerical plasma model of the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft (SPPSC) is presented. These results should be interpreted as a basic plasma model derived from the SW-interaction with the spacecraft (SC), which could have consequences for both plasma wave and electron plasma measurements on board the SC in the inner heliosphere. Compression waves and electric field jumps with amplitudes of about 1.5 V/m and (12-18) V/m were also observed. A strong polarization electric field was also observed in the wing of the plasma wake. However, 2.5D hybrid modeling did not show excitation of whistler/Alfven waves in the upstream connected with the bidirectional current closure that was observed in short-time 3D modeling SPPSC and near a tether in the ionosphere. The observed strong electromagnetic perturbations may be a crucial point in the electromagnetic measurements planned for the future Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission. The results of modeling electromagnetic field perturbations in the SW due to shot noise in absence of SPPSC are also discussed.

  8. The Application of Laser Saturation to the Efficient Generation of Short WaveLength Radiation from Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    is poor, or the signal is weak , the emission recorded in each spectral interval is an average of several shots. When the results of such experiments...Stillbene 420 within our dye laser (Quanta-Ray PDL -1). The performance of this dye declines fairly rapidly, the laser output dropping by about 50% within 20...determining the EU-700 scanning grating (1180 lines/mm, f/6.8, 35-cm fo- radial density distribution. cal length) monochromator, and an RCA type 1 P28 photo

  9. Resonant excitation of coupled Rayleigh waves in a short and narrow fluid channel clad between two identical metal plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. García-Chocano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of ultrasonic waves through a slit between two water immersed brass plates is studied for sub-wavelength plate thicknesses and slit apertures. Extraordinary high absorption is observed at discrete frequencies corresponding to resonant excitation of Rayleigh waves on the both sides of the channel. The coupling of the Rayleigh waves occurs through the fluid and the corresponding contribution to the dispersion has been theoretically derived and also experimentally confirmed. Symmetric and anti-symmetric modes are predicted but only the symmetric mode resonances have been observed. It follows from the dispersion equation that the coupled Rayleigh waves cannot be excited in a channel with apertures less than the critical one. The calculated critical aperture is in a good agreement with the measured acoustic spectra. These findings could be applied to design a broadband absorptive metamaterial.

  10. Advances on Sensitive Electron-injection based Cameras for Low-Flux, Short-Wave-Infrared Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vala Fathipour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Short-wave infrared (SWIR photon detection has become an essential technology in the modern world. Sensitive SWIR detector arrays with high pixel density, low noise levels and high signal-to-noise-ratios are highly desirable for a variety of applications including biophotonics, light detection and ranging, optical tomography, and astronomical imaging. As such many efforts in infrared detector research are directed towards improving the performance of the photon detectors operating in this wavelength range.We review the history, principle of operation, present status and possible future developments of a sensitive SWIR detector technology, which has demonstrated to be one of the most promising paths to high pixel density focal plane arrays for low flux applications. The so-called electron-injection (EI detector was demonstrated for the first time (in 2007. It offers an overall system-level sensitivity enhancement compared to the p-i-n diode due to a stable internal avalanche-free gain. The amplification method is inherently low noise, and devices exhibit an excess noise of unity. The detector operates in linear-mode and requires only bias voltage of a few volts. The stable detector characteristics, makes formation of high yield large-format, and high pixel density focal plane arrays less challenging compared to other detector technologies such as avalanche photodetectors. Detector is based on the mature InP material system (InP/InAlAs/GaAsSb/InGaAs, and has a cutoff wavelength of 1700 nm. It takes advantage of a unique three-dimensional geometry and combines the efficiency of a large absorbing volume with the sensitivity of a low-dimensional switch (injector to sense and amplify signals. Current devices provide high-speed response ~ 5 ns rise time, and low jitter ~ 12 ps at room temperature. The internal dark current density is ~ 1 μA/cm2 at room temperature decreasing to 0.1 nA/cm2 at 160 K.EI detectors have been designed, fabricated, and

  11. Advances on Sensitive Electron-injection based Cameras for Low-Flux, Short-Wave-Infrared Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathipour, Vala; Bonakdar, Alireza; Mohseni, Hooman

    2016-08-01

    Short-wave infrared (SWIR) photon detection has become an essential technology in the modern world. Sensitive SWIR detector arrays with high pixel density, low noise levels and high signal-to-noise-ratios are highly desirable for a variety of applications including biophotonics, light detection and ranging, optical tomography, and astronomical imaging. As such many efforts in infrared detector research are directed towards improving the performance of the photon detectors operating in this wavelength range. We review the history, principle of operation, present status and possible future developments of a sensitive SWIR detector technology, which has demonstrated to be one of the most promising paths to high pixel density focal plane arrays for low flux applications. The so-called electron-injection (EI) detector was demonstrated for the first time (in 2007). It offers an overall system-level sensitivity enhancement compared to the p-i-n diode due to a stable internal avalanche-free gain. The amplification method is inherently low noise, and devices exhibit an excess noise of unity. The detector operates in linear-mode and requires only bias voltage of a few volts. The stable detector characteristics, makes formation of high yield large-format, and high pixel density focal plane arrays less challenging compared to other detector technologies such as avalanche photodetectors. Detector is based on the mature InP material system (InP/InAlAs/GaAsSb/InGaAs), and has a cutoff wavelength of 1700 nm. It takes advantage of a unique three-dimensional geometry and combines the efficiency of a large absorbing volume with the sensitivity of a low-dimensional switch (injector) to sense and amplify signals. Current devices provide high-speed response ~ 5 ns rise time, and low jitter ~ 12 ps at room temperature. The internal dark current density is ~ 1 μA/cm2 at room temperature decreasing to 0.1 nA/cm2 at 160 K. EI detectors have been designed, fabricated, and tested during two

  12. All-optical ultrafast wavelength and mode converter based on inter-modal four-wave mixing in few-mode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi; He, Xuan; Wang, Junyi; Pan, Zhongqi

    2015-08-01

    An ultrafast all-optical simultaneous wavelength and mode conversion scheme is purposed based on intermodal four-wave mixing (IM-FWM), with the capability of switching state of polarization (SOP) and mode degeneracy orientation (MDO) in few-mode fibers (FMF). The relation among the conversion efficiency, pump power and phase matching conditions is investigated in theory analysis and simulation. Using this scheme, cross-polarization modulation (XPolM) and cross-mode modulation (XMM) can be achieved, by in the best case up to 50% conversion efficiency. Furthermore, numerical results further indicate that the proposed configuration has the potential application for generating doughnut modes by the mixing of three characteristic spatial frequencies.

  13. Experimental study regarding the effects of pulsed short waves on nervous tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DOGARU Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed short waves are part of high frequency therapy and have through their biological effects, the good therapeutic results and the lack of side effects many indications in various disorders: rheumatologic, traumatologic, burns, neurological (nerve tissue regeneration, ischemic vascular accidents, vascular disorders. The experimental study consisted of the exposure of laboratory animals to the action of pulsed short waves in different doses and the monitoring of changes in the brain cellular and subcellular structure. The study included 35 Wistar rats, assigned to four groups, three groups of 10 animals and the control group of five non-irradiated animals. Group I was exposed to a dose of 1/80 cycles/sec, group II to 4/400 cycles/sec, and group III to 6/600 cycles/sec, for 10 minutes/day, for 15 days. After the rats were sacrificed, nervous tissue fragments were collected. These were adequately processed for their examination by optical and electron microscopy. At structural level, in the control group and the groups exposed to the dose of 1/80 cycles/sec, the neurons were normally structured. In group II, a slight increase of brain metabolic activity was seen, in group III there was a significant increase of brain metabolism, with better myelinated white matter axons, which suggests a better protection for the rapid conduction of nerve impulses to effectors. In group II, electron microscopy revealed similar aspects to those of the control group. A high ribosome density was found in the neuroplasm, which means an intense protein synthesis process. In group III, there was an intense protein synthesis activity, and a strong axon myelination in the white matter, resulting in a better protection for the transmission of nerve impulses. Conclusions: pulsed short waves caused brain changes depending on the dose. The analysis of electron microscopic images showed that irradiation at a dose of 6/600 cycles/sec induced an intense protein synthesis

  14. Heat distribution in the lower leg from pulsed short-wave diathermy and ultrasound treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, C L; Draper, D O; Knight, K L

    2000-01-01

    To compare tissue temperature rise and decay after 20-minute diathermy and ultrasound treatments. We inserted 3 26-gauge thermistor microprobes into the medial aspect of the anesthetized triceps surae muscle at a depth of 3 cm and spaced 5 cm apart. Eight subjects received the diathermy treatment first, followed by the ultrasound treatment. This sequence was reversed for the remaining 8 subjects. The diathermy was applied at a frequency of 27.12 MHz at the following settings: 800 bursts per second, 400-microsecond burst duration, 850-microsecond interburst interval, peak root mean square amplitude of 150 W per burst, and an average root mean square output of 48 W per burst. The ultrasound was delivered at a frequency of 1 MHz and an intensity of 1.5 W/cm(2) in the continuous mode for 20 minutes over an area of 40 times the effective radiating area. The study was performed in a ventilated research laboratory. Sixteen (11 men, 5 women) healthy subjects (mean age = 23.56 +/- 4.73 years) volunteered to participate in this study. We recorded baseline, final, and decay temperatures for each of the 3 sites. The average temperature increases over baseline temperature after pulsed short-wave diathermy were 3.02 degrees C +/- 1.02 degrees C in site 1, 4.58 degrees C +/- 0.87 degrees C in site 2, and 3.28 degrees C +/- 1.64 degrees C in site 3. The average temperature increases over baseline temperature after ultrasound were only 0.17 degrees C +/- 0.40 degrees C, 0.09 degrees C +/- 0.56 degrees C, and -0.43 degrees C +/- 0.41 degrees C in sites 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The temperature dropped only 1 degrees C in 7.65 +/- 4.96 minutes after pulsed short-wave diathermy. We conclude that pulsed short-wave diathermy was more effective than 1-MHz ultrasound in heating a large muscle mass and resulted in the muscles' retaining heat longer.

  15. Investigations on continuous-wave and passively Q-switched Nd:LuAG ceramic lasers at eye-safe wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Liu, Peng; Xu, Xiaodong; Yan, Dongyue; Li, Dongzhen; Xu, Jun

    2017-11-01

    We report comparative studies on diode-pumped eye-safe Nd:LuAG ceramic lasers at 1.4 μm spectral region in continuous-wave regime. Six differently doped samples have been used to experimentally determine the optimized laser results. A maximum output power of 1.78 W is achieved with simultaneous dual-wavelength laser emission at 1418 and 1442 nm, which is believed the highest output power of Nd:LuAG ceramic at this specific wavelength. Using a V3+:YAG as saturable absorber, passively Q-switched Nd:LuAG ceramic laser is also realized, for the first time to our knowledge, with maximum average output power of 0.58 W and pulse width of about 34 ns at pulse repetition rate of 11.91 kHz, which lead to pulse energy of 49.3 μJ and pulse peak power of 1.43 kW.

  16. Short wavelength fundus autofluorescence versus near-infrared fundus autofluorescence, with microperimetric correspondence, in patients with geographic atrophy due to age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotto, Elisabetta; Vujosevic, Stela; Melis, Riccardo; Convento, Enrica; Sportiello, Patrik; Alemany-Rubio, Ernesto; Segalina, Sara; Midena, Edoardo

    2011-08-01

    To compare standard short-wavelength fundus autofluorescence (SW-FAF) and near infrared-wavelength fundus autofluorescence (NIR-FAF) in detecting geographic atrophy (GA) secondary to age-related macular degeneration, and its retinal sensitivity impairment. Twenty-five consecutive patients (36 eyes) affected by GA were studied by means of fundus autofluorescence imaging, using both SW-FAF (excitation: 488 nm, emission >500 nm) and NIR-FAF (excitation: 787 nm, emission >800 nm). All patients underwent microperimetry to assess fixation characteristics and retinal sensitivity. In the extrafoveal region, the total hypoautofluorescent (hypo-FAF) area was significantly wider with NIR-FAF than with SW-FAF (8.03±6.68 mm(2) vs 7.37±6.34 mm(2) respectively; p=0.005). In the foveal area, the total hypo-FAF area was smaller with NIR-FAF than with SW-FAF (0.19±0.03 mm(2) versus 0.42±0.12 mm(2) respectively; p=0.008). Foveal sparing was larger at NIR-FAF compared with SW-FAF (p=0.021). In nine cases (25%) the site of fixation was hypoautofluorescent on SW-FAF, but normal on NIR-FAF with preserved retinal sensitivity. Standard SW-FAF may overestimate GA in the foveal area, correctly detected by NIR-FAF. In the extrafoveal area, SW-FAF may underestimate GA. Standard SW-FAF should be integrated with NIR FAF when detecting and following GA to avoid inconsistent results and misinterpretation, from both a morphological and functional perspective. Microperimetry helps to quantify retinal sensitivity in GA.

  17. Exposure to the operator and patient during short wave diathermy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuchly, M.A.; Repacholi, M.H.; Lecuyer, D.W.; Mann, R.D.

    1982-03-01

    Short-wave diathermy is one of the most popular treatment modalities used to relieve pain through localized heating. In Canada its use in hospitals is as frequent as that of ultrasonic therapy devices and about 10 times more popular than microwave diathermy. Intensities of the electric and magnetic fields around applicators of 7 different diathermy units were measured at the operator position and at various untreated areas of the patient during 11 treatment regimes using 5 types of applicators. Exposure to the operator in the normal operating position, behind the device console, usually does not exceed the limits recommended by the Canadian Federal Government. The intense fields around the applicators and the cables extend up to 0.5 m and are a source of potential overexposure to the operator.

  18. The binary progenitors of short and long GRBs and their gravitational-wave emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rueda J. A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We have sub-classified short and long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs into seven families according to the binary nature of their progenitors. Short GRBs are produced in mergers of neutron-star binaries (NS-NS or neutron star-black hole binaries (NS-BH. Long GRBs are produced via the induced gravitational collapse (IGC scenario occurring in a tight binary system composed of a carbon-oxygen core (COcore and a NS companion. The COcore explodes as type Ic supernova (SN leading to a hypercritical accretion process onto the NS: if the accretion is sufficiently high the NS reaches the critical mass and collapses forming a BH, otherwise a massive NS is formed. Therefore long GRBs can lead either to NS-BH or to NS-NS binaries depending on the entity of the accretion. We discuss for the above compact-object binaries: 1 the role of the NS structure and the nuclear equation of state; 2 the occurrence rates obtained from X and gamma-rays observations; 3 the predicted annual number of detections by the Advanced LIGO interferometer of their gravitational-wave emission.

  19. The binary progenitors of short and long GRBs and their gravitational-wave emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.; Rodriguez, J. F.; Muccino, M.; Aimuratov, Y.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Becerra, L.; Bianco, C. L.; Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.; Kovacevic, M.; Moradi, R.; Pisani, G. B.; Wang, Y.

    2018-01-01

    We have sub-classified short and long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) into seven families according to the binary nature of their progenitors. Short GRBs are produced in mergers of neutron-star binaries (NS-NS) or neutron star-black hole binaries (NS-BH). Long GRBs are produced via the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) scenario occurring in a tight binary system composed of a carbon-oxygen core (COcore) and a NS companion. The COcore explodes as type Ic supernova (SN) leading to a hypercritical accretion process onto the NS: if the accretion is sufficiently high the NS reaches the critical mass and collapses forming a BH, otherwise a massive NS is formed. Therefore long GRBs can lead either to NS-BH or to NS-NS binaries depending on the entity of the accretion. We discuss for the above compact-object binaries: 1) the role of the NS structure and the nuclear equation of state; 2) the occurrence rates obtained from X and gamma-rays observations; 3) the predicted annual number of detections by the Advanced LIGO interferometer of their gravitational-wave emission.

  20. Correcting transmission losses in short-wave infrared spatially offset Raman spectroscopy measurements to enable reduced fluorescence through-barrier detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R J; Lee, L; Shand, N C

    2017-09-25

    Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) is a proven technique for sub-surface detection. SORS is able to separate Raman signals from a container and its contents, thereby demonstrating application to through-barrier detection for defence and security. Whilst SORS has been demonstrated to reduce fluorescence from the barrier (or surface), fluorescence from the sample (or sub-surface) can still be problematic for some materials when using Raman excitation wavelengths typical in commercially available instrumentation (e.g. 785 nm). Previous work has demonstrated that short-wave infrared (SWIR) excited SORS (e.g. 1064 nm) can reduce fluorescence from the sample and barrier, thereby providing the potential to detect a wider range of materials through a wider range of barriers. In this paper we highlight an additional challenge for detection through some plastic container materials (e.g. high density polyethylene (HDPE) and other opaque plastics) that absorb and scatter both incident and Raman scattered photons in the SWIR band, leading to distortion of the resultant SORS spectrum. The existence of this effect and its impact is explored, along with a potential solution to overcome this challenge that uses multi-wavelength Raman excitation to avoid the detrimental HDPE absorption region.

  1. Matlab/Simulink Implementation of Wave-based Models for Microstrip Structures utilizing Short-circuited and Opened Stubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana P. Stošić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes modeling and analyzing procedures for microstrip filters based on use of one-dimensional wave digital approach. Different filter structures are observed. One filter is based on quarter-wave length short-circuited stubs and connecting transmission lines. The other one is based on cross-junction opened stubs. Frequency responses are obtained by direct analysis of the block-based networks formed in Simulink toolbox of MATLAB environment. This wave-based method allows an accurate and efficient analysis of different microwave structures.

  2. Search for Transient Gravitational Waves in Coincidence with Short-Duration Radio Transients During 2007-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Hughey, Brennan; Zanolin, Michele; Szczepanczyk, Marek; Gill, Kiranjyot; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present an archival search for transient gravitational-wave bursts in coincidence with 27 single-pulse triggers from Green Bank Telescope pulsar surveys, using the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory), Virgo (Variability of Solar Irradiance and Gravity Oscillations) and GEO (German-UK Interferometric Detector) interferometer network. We also discuss a check for gravitational-wave signals in coincidence with Parkes fast radio bursts using similar methods. Data analyzed in these searches were collected between 2007 and 2013. Possible sources of emission of both short-duration radio signals and transient gravitational-wave emission include star quakes on neutron stars, binary coalescence of neutron stars, and cosmic string cusps. While no evidence for gravitational-wave emission in coincidence with these radio transients was found, the current analysis serves as a prototype for similar future searches using more sensitive second-generation interferometers.

  3. Effects of an advanced sleep schedule and morning short wavelength light exposure on circadian phase in young adults with late sleep schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Katherine M; Carskadon, Mary A; Figueiro, Mariana G; Zhu, Yong; Rea, Mark S

    2011-08-01

    We examined the effects of an advanced sleep/wake schedule and morning short wavelength (blue) light in 25 adults (mean age±SD=21.8±3 years; 13 women) with late sleep schedules and subclinical features of delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). After a baseline week, participants kept individualized, fixed, advanced 7.5-h sleep schedules for 6days. Participants were randomly assigned to groups to receive "blue" (470nm, ∼225lux, n=12) or "dim" (<1lux, n=13) light for 1h after waking each day. Head-worn "Daysimeters" measured light exposure; actigraphs and sleep diaries confirmed schedule compliance. Salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), self-reported sleep, and mood were examined with 2×2 ANOVA. After 6days, both groups showed significant circadian phase advances, but morning blue light was not associated with larger phase shifts than dim-light exposure. The average DLMO advances (mean±SD) were 1.5±1.1h in the dim light group and 1.4±0.7h in the blue light group. Adherence to a fixed advanced sleep/wake schedule resulted in significant circadian phase shifts in young adults with subclinical DSPD with or without morning blue light exposure. Light/dark exposures associated with fixed early sleep schedules are sufficient to advance circadian phase in young adults. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lidar observations of vertical wavelengths, potential energy densities, and frequency spectra of stratospheric gravity waves from 2011 to 2015 at McMurdo (77.84° S, 166.69° E), Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Chen, C.; Chu, X.; Lu, X.; Fong, W.; Yu, Z.; Roberts, B. R.; Dörnbrack, A.; Smith, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Five years of atmospheric temperature data have been accumulated since the University of Colorado lidar group deployed an Fe Boltzmann lidar to Arrival Heights near McMurdo, Antarctica. Vertical wavelengths, periods, phase speeds, potential energy densities, and frequency spectra of gravity waves in the stratosphere (from 30 to 50 km) from 2011 to 2015 are investigated. Typical values for gravity wave vertical wavelength and period are 7.5 km and 5.5 h, respectively. However, they are all subjected to seasonal changes. Monthly means of vertical wavelength show a clear seasonal trend with considerably longer wavelengths in winter. Gravity wave potential energy densities (GWPEDs) obtained through temperature perturbations vary significantly from observation to observation; however, they do follow a seasonal trend with a winter maximum and a summer minimum. Efforts were made in order to reveal the mechanisms behind the observed signatures of stratospheric gravity waves. Background wind from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model and polar vortex position information from Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) are invoked. The increase in vertical wavelength in winter is linked to strong stratospheric westerlies due to the formation of polar vortex while the GWPED seasonal variations are connected to the changes of gravity wave sources and selective critical-level filtering. We did the first study of gravity wave frequency spectra in the Antarctica upper stratosphere. The slopes of power spectral density versus frequency range from 1.6 to 1.4 from 30 to 50 km, however, they change to 1.0 around 60 km.

  5. Simulations of short-crested harbour waves with variational Boussinesq modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adytia, D.

    2014-01-01

    Waves propagating from the deep ocean to the coast show large changes in wave height, wave length and direction. The challenge to simulate the essential wave characteristics is in particular to model the speed and nonlinear interaction correctly. All these physical phenomena are present, but hidden,

  6. Conditional Short-crested second order waves in shallow water and with superimposed current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2004-01-01

    For bottom-supported offshore structures like oil drilling rigs and oil production platforms, a deterministic design wave approach is often applied using a regular non-linear Stokes' wave. Thereby, the procedure accounts for non-linear effects in the wave loading but the randomness of the ocean...... approach as design waves is given....

  7. HAWASSI-AB Modelling and Simulation of Fully Dispersive Nonlinear Waves Above Bathymtery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurnia, Ruddy

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in the study of water waves is that the motion can exhibit qualitative differences at different scales such as deep water versus shallow water, long wavelength versus short wavelength, etc.. That leads to a restriction in the applicability of the existing wave models. This dissertation

  8. Hawassi-AB modelling and simulation of fully dispersive nonlinear waves above bathymetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurnia, Ruddy

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in the study of water waves is that the motion can exhibit qualitative differences at different scales such as deep water versus shallow water, long wavelength versus short wavelength, etc.. That leads to a restriction in the applicability of the existing wave models. This dissertation

  9. Short-term effects of a standardized glucose load on region-specific aortic pulse wave velocity assessed by MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Jacqueline T.; Tjeerdema, Nathanja; Hensen, Liselotte C. R.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Westenberg, Jos J. M.; de Roos, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the short-term effects of a standardized oral glucose load on regional aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) using two-directional in-plane velocity encoded MRI. Materials and Methods A randomized, controlled intervention was performed in 16 male subjects (mean +/- standard deviation:

  10. A Method for Determination of in Run-Up Front Velocities on Dikes in Oblique and Short-Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a physical model test study to improve description of run-up events on dikes in oblique long and short-crested waves in terms of flow depth, flow velocities and overtopping. The paper focus on the flow velocities and a new method is proposed for determining flow velocities...

  11. A novel method for surface defect inspection of optic cable with short-wave infrared illuminance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Ning; You, Bo; Xiao, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Intelligent on-line detection of cable quality is a crucial issue in optic cable factory, and defects on the surface of optic cable can dramatically depress cable grade. Manual inspection in optic cable quality cannot catch up with the development of optic cable industry due to its low detection efficiency and huge human cost. Therefore, real-time is highly demanded by industry in order to replace the subjective and repetitive process of manual inspection. For this reason, automatic cable defect inspection has been a trend. In this paper, a novel method for surface defect inspection of optic cable with short-wave infrared illuminance is presented. The special condition of short-wave infrared cannot only provide illumination compensation for the weak illumination environment, but also can avoid the problem of exposure when using visible light illuminance, which affects the accuracy of inspection algorithm. A series of image processing algorithms are set up to analyze cable image for the verification of real-time and veracity of the detection method. Unlike some existing detection algorithms which concentrate on the characteristics of defects with an active search way, the proposed method removes the non-defective areas of the image passively at the same time of image processing, which reduces a large amount of computation. OTSU algorithm is used to convert the gray image to the binary image. Furthermore, a threshold window is designed to eliminate the fake defects, and the threshold represents the considered minimum size of defects ε . Besides, a new regional suppression method is proposed to deal with the edge burrs of the cable, which shows the superior performance compared with that of Open-Close operation of mathematical morphological in the boundary processing. Experimental results of 10,000 samples show that the rates of miss detection and false detection are 2.35% and 0.78% respectively when ε equals to 0.5 mm, and the average processing period of one frame

  12. Use of analyte-modulated modal power distribution in multimode optical fibers for simultaneous single-wavelength evanescent-wave refractometry and spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potyrailo, R A; Ruddy, V P; Hieftje, G M

    1999-11-01

    A new method is described for the simultaneous determination of absorbance and refractive index of a sample medium. The method is based on measurement of the analyte-modulated modal power distribution (MPD) in a multimode waveguide. In turn, the MPD is quantified by the far-field spatial pattern and intensity of light, i.e., the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern (registered on a CCD camera), that emerges from a multimode optical fiber. Operationally, light that is sent down the fiber interacts with the surrounding analyte-containing medium by means of the evanescent wave at the fiber boundary. The light flux in the propagating beam and the internal reflection angles within the fiber are both affected by optical absorption connected with the analyte and by the refractive index of the analyte-containing medium. In turn, these angles are reflected in the angular divergence of the beam as it leaves the fiber. As a result, the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of that beam yields two parameters that can, together, be used to deduce refractive index and absorbance. This MPD based detection offers important advantages over traditional evanescent-wave detection strategies which rely on recording only the total transmitted optical power or its lost fraction. First, simultaneous determination of sample refractive index and absorbance is possible at a single probe wavelength. Second, the sensitivity of refractometric and absorption measurements can be controlled simply, either by adjusting the distance between the end face of the fiber and the CCD detector or by monitoring selected modal groups at the fiber output. As a demonstration of these capabilities, several weakly absorbing solutions were examined, with refractive indices in the range from 1.3330 to 1.4553 and with absorption coefficients in the range 0-16 cm-1. The new detection strategy is likely to be important in applications in which sample coloration varies and when it is necessary to compensate for variations in the

  13. Short (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telleman, Gerdien; den Hartog, Laurens

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This systematic review assessed the implant survival rate of short (<10 mm) dental implants installed in partially edentulous patients. A case report of a short implant in the posterior region have been added. Materials and methods: A search was conducted in the electronic databases of MEDLINE

  14. Measurement of thermal radiation using regular glass optics and short-wave infrared detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H W; Eppeldauer, G P

    2008-01-21

    The measurement of thermal radiation from ambient-temperature objects using short-wave infrared detectors and regular glass optics is described. The detectors are chosen to operate in the 2.0 microm to 2.5 microm atmospheric window. Selection of detectors with high shunt resistance along with the 4-stage thermo-electric cooling of the detectors to -85 degrees C results in detectivity, D*, of 4 x 10(13) cm Hz(1/2)/W which is near the background limited performance at 295 K. Furthermore, the use of regular-glass commercial optics to collect the thermal radiation results in diffraction-limited imaging. The use of a radiation thermometer constructed with these elements for the measurement of a blackbody from 20 degrees C to 50 degrees C results in noise-equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of thermal sensors also leads to lower sensitivity to the emissivity of the object in determining the temperature of the object. These elements are used to construct a calibrator for an infrared collimator, and such a system demonstrates noise-equivalent irradiances of thermal infrared detectors.

  15. Noise characteristics analysis of short wave infrared InGaAs focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunlei; Li, Xue; Yang, Bo; Huang, Songlei; Shao, Xiumei; Zhang, Yaguang; Gong, Haimei

    2017-09-01

    The increasing application of InGaAs short wave infrared (SWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) in low light level imaging requires ultra-low noise FPAs. This paper presents the theoretical analysis of FPA noise, and point out that both dark current and detector capacitance strongly affect the FPA noise. The impact of dark current and detector capacitance on FPA noise is compared in different situations. In order to obtain low noise performance FPAs, the demand for reducing detector capacitance is higher especially when pixel pitch is smaller, integration time is shorter, and integration capacitance is larger. Several InGaAs FPAs were measured and analyzed, the experiments' results could be well fitted to the calculated results. The study found that the major contributor of FPA noise is coupled noise with shorter integration time. The influence of detector capacitance on FPA noise is more significant than that of dark current. To investigate the effect of detector performance on FPA noise, two kinds of photodiodes with different concentration of the absorption layer were fabricated. The detectors' performance and noise characteristics were measured and analyzed, the results are consistent with that of theoretical analysis.

  16. Development and application of a quality control procedure for short-wave diathermy units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, N; O'Hare, N; Boyle, G; Gormley, J

    2003-01-01

    Short-wave diathermy (SWD) is a form of radiofrequency (RF) radiation, operating at 27.12 MHz, that is used therapeutically by physiotherapists. Although this form of therapy is widely available, the management of the equipment is not often addressed by either physiotherapists or by medical physics/clinical engineering. A quality control protocol for SWD units, examining power output and electrical and mechanical condition, was developed and applied to 20 units used in clinical practice. In addition, an environmental assessment of where the units were used was also included. Results showed that the power output was generally stable (coefficient of variation range 0-8.8%) and reproducible (coefficient of variation range 0-6.8%). When the outputs from 12 similar units were compared, it was found that the relationship between the units' intensity settings and power output measurements was non-linear. Two units with mechanical timers were found to have inaccuracies that could contribute, under a 'worst-case' scenario, to a dosage error of up to 45%. Environmental analysis found that all treatment plinths in use contained metal parts, which could constitute a fire hazard, and no department examined was equipped with an RF screened room, a facility that would ensure that other persons in the vicinity were not exposed to excessive stray radiation.

  17. Noise suppression algorithm of short-wave infrared star image for daytime star sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Wei, Xinguo; Li, Jian; Wang, Gangyi

    2017-09-01

    As an important development trend of star sensor technology, research on daytime star sensor technology can expand the applications of star sensor from spacecrafts to airborne vehicles. The biggest problem for daytime star sensor is the detection of dim stars from strong atmospheric background radiation. The use of short-wave infrared (SWIR) technology has been proven to be an effective approach to solve this problem. However, the SWIR star images inevitably contain stripe nonuniformity noise and defective pixels, which degrade the quality of the acquired images and affect the subsequent star spot extraction and star centroiding accuracy seriously. Because the characteristics of stripe nonuniformity and defective pixels in the SWIR star images change with time during a long term continuous operation, the method of one-time off-line calibration is not applicable. To solve this problem, an algorithm of noise suppression for SWIR star image is proposed. It firstly extracts non-background pixels by one-dimensional mean filtering. Then through one-dimensional feature point descriptor, which is used to distinguish the bright star spots pixels from defective pixels, various types of defective pixels are accurately detected. Finally, the method of moment matching is adopted to remove the stripe nonuniformity and the defective pixels are compensated effectively. The simulation experiments results indicates that the proposed algorithm can adaptively and effectively suppress the influence of stripe nonuniformity and defective pixels in SWIR star images and it is beneficial to obtain higher star centroiding accuracy.

  18. The Comparision of the Effectiveness of Short Wave Diathermy and Ultrasound in the Treatment of Gonarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Sarıfakıoğlu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the efficacy of ultrasound (US and short wave diathermy (SWD in the gonarthrosis patients. Materials and Methods: Patients who had been diagnosed gonarthrosis according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR classification criteria were included into the study. Patients who have undergone knee surgery, had trauma, had knee injection into the knee in the last six months, and had received physical therapy (PT in the past year were excluded from the study. Patients were divided into two groups (US group and SWD group. HP (20 min, US (1.5 w/cm2, continuous, TENS (20 min, exercise were administered to the first group. HP (20 min, SWD (15 min, TENS (20 min, exercise were implemented to the second group. PT was administered for five days a week, for 15 sessions in total. Visual analog scale (VAS and Western Ontario and MacMaster osteoarthritis index (WOMAC were used to assess function and pain before and after PT. Results: 132 patients were included into the study, 63 patients (47.7% were in SWD group, and 69 patients (52.3% were in US group. There were no statistically difference between the VAS, WOMAC values of the groups before and after PT. In both groups, VAS, WOMAC were scores statistically significantly decreased with treatment (all p<0.001. Conclusion: This study showed that both these PT modalities are effective in treating the gonarthrosis, but not superior to each other. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2014;20: 16-20

  19. PROSPECTS FOR JOINT GRAVITATIONAL WAVE AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, J.; Evans, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Harry, I. W.; Macdonald, E.; Macleod, D.; Sutton, P. J.; Williamson, A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-10

    We present a detailed evaluation of the expected rate of joint gravitational-wave (GW) and short gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations over the coming years. We begin by evaluating the improvement in distance sensitivity of the GW search that arises from using the GRB observation to restrict the time and sky location of the source. We argue that this gives a 25% increase in sensitivity when compared to an all-sky, all-time search, corresponding to more than double the number of detectable GW signals associated with GRBs. Using this, we present the expected rate of joint observations with the advanced LIGO and Virgo instruments, taking into account the expected evolution of the GW detector network. We show that in the early advanced GW detector observing runs, from 2015 to 2017, there is only a small chance of a joint observation. However, as the detectors approach their design sensitivities, there is a good chance of joint observations, provided wide field GRB satellites, such as Fermi and the Inter planetary Network, continue operation. The rate will also depend critically upon the nature of the progenitor, with neutron star-black hole systems observable to greater distances than double neutron star systems. The relative rate of binary mergers and GRBs will depend upon the jet opening angle of GRBs. Consequently, joint observations, as well as accurate measurement of both the GRB rate and binary merger rates, will allow for an improved estimation of the opening angle of GRBs.

  20. Reduction of radiofrequency exposure to the operator during short-wave diathermy treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotte, J

    1986-01-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields near short-wave diathermy equipment operating at a frequency of 27.12 MHz can expose the physical therapist to levels above those recommended in standards for radiofrequency exposure in Western countries. Electric and magnetic fields around air-gap, diplode, monode and circuplode applicators were mapped by the author. Large differences in stray field intensities were found for the various applicators. The air-gap electrodes caused the highest levels of unwanted radiation, and the circuplode caused the lowest levels. The use of the circuplode would normally ensure an operator exposure far below the levels in recommended standards. In order to reduce the exposure during the first few minutes of a treatment, when air-gap electrodes or diplode are used, the operator should stand at the end of the diathermy console opposite to the applicator and cables and not, as is often the case, at one side. It is recommended that manufacturers change the design of the diathermy console (a minor modification) in order to ensure this operating position.

  1. Novel Raman Parametric Hybrid L-Band Amplifier with Four-Wave Mixing Suppressed Pump for Terabits Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexed Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaganpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate improved performance of parametric amplifier cascaded with Raman amplifier for gain of 54.79 dB. We report amplification of L-band using 100 × 10 Gbps Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexed (DWDM system with 25 GHz channel spacing. The gain achieved is the highest reported so far with gain flatness of 3.38 dB without using any gain flattening technique. Hybrid modulated parametric pump is used for suppressing four-wave mixing (FWM around pump region, resulting in improvement of gain flatness by 2.42 dB. The peak to peak variation of gain is achieved less than 1.6 dB. DWDM system with 16-channel, 25 GHz spaced system has been analyzed thoroughly with hybrid modulated parametric pump amplified Raman-FOPA amplifier for gain flatness and improved performance in terms of BER and Q-factor.

  2. Analysis of Signal-to-Crosstalk Ratio Variations due to Four-Wave Mixing in Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing Systems Implemented with Standard Single-Mode Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sait Eser KARLIK

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, variation of the signal-to-crosstalk ratio (SXR due to effects of four-wave mixing (FWM has been analyzed on center channels of 5-, 7-, 9-channel dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM systems implemented with G.652 standard single-mode fibers (SSMFs for 12.5 GHz, 25 GHz, 50 GHz and 100 GHz equal channel spacing values. Center channels on such systems are the most severely impacted channels by FWM. Therefore, results obtained are the worst-case values for the DWDM system performance and important for system design. Simulations have been performed for systems using three different commercially available SMFs having different design parameter values for chromatic dispersion, dispersion slope, nonlinearity coefficient and attenuation coefficient which are all in the scope of the G.652 Recommendation of Telecommunication Standardization Sector of International Telecommunication Union (ITU-T for SSMFs. In those simulations, under the impact of FWM, variation of SXR with variations in input powers, channel spacings and link lengths have been observed. Simulation results display the combined effect of the optical fiber and system design parameters on FWM performance of DWDM systems and give important clues for not only long-haul but also access network implementations of DWDM systems.

  3. Search for Gravitational-Wave Inspiral Signals associated with Short Gamma-Ray Bursts during Ligo's Fifth and Virgo's First Science Run

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadie, J.; Bulten, H.J.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Li, T.G.F.; Rabeling, D.S.; van der Putten, S.

    2010-01-01

    Progenitor scenarios for short gamma-ray bursts (short GRBs) include coalescenses of two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole, which would necessarily be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves. We present a search for these known gravitational-wave signatures in temporal

  4. Conditional short-crested waves in shallow water and with superimposed current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2002-01-01

    For bottom-supported offshore structures like oil drilling rigs and oil production platforms, a deterministic design wave approach is often applied using a regular non-linear Stokes´ wave. Thereby, the procedure accounts for non-linear effects in the wave loading but the randomness of the ocean...

  5. Dual-wavelength phase-shifting digital holography selectively extracting wavelength information from wavelength-multiplexed holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Tatsuki; Mori, Ryota; Kikunaga, Shuhei; Arai, Yasuhiko; Takaki, Yasuhiro

    2015-06-15

    Dual-wavelength phase-shifting digital holography that selectively extracts wavelength information from five wavelength-multiplexed holograms is presented. Specific phase shifts for respective wavelengths are introduced to remove the crosstalk components and extract only the object wave at the desired wavelength from the holograms. Object waves in multiple wavelengths are selectively extracted by utilizing 2π ambiguity and the subtraction procedures based on phase-shifting interferometry. Numerical results show the validity of the proposed technique. The proposed technique is also experimentally demonstrated.

  6. A subpopulation of nearby, low luminosity, short gamma-ray bursts as triggers for subthreshold transient gravitational wave searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siellez, Karelle; LIGO

    2018-01-01

    Two years ago, LIGO opened the new area of gravitational wave astrophysics with the detection of the coalescence of two black holes. Neutron star mergers (either double neutron star or neutron star - black hole systems) will be the next key target for gravitational wave observatories such as Advanced-Virgo (AdV), Advanced-LIGO (aLIGO) and the future Einstein Telescope (ET). Those binary compact objects are also thought to be the progenitor of short Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB). A coincident detection of Gravitational Waves (GW) and the electromagnetic emission would extend the new window in astrophysics: the multimessager era.Using the most reliable sample of short GRB with known redshift, we have identified a new population of low luminous short GRBs at low redshift. This population was reproduced using realistic Monte Carlo simulations accounting for both GW and GRB selection effects. In this talk, we will discuss the properties of the progenitors that are supposed to produce this class of short GRBs. We will also present an estimation of the detection rate of such events, that could be seen both by a GRB satellite and AdV/aLIGO/ET. We will then present the offline refined analysis of LIGO, introducing the different method used to achieve this goal. We will discuss future aLIGO/AdV running.

  7. Mineral Mapping Using Simulated Worldview-3 Short-Wave-Infrared Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra L. Perry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available WorldView commercial imaging satellites comprise a constellation developed by DigitalGlobe Inc. (Longmont, CO, USA. Worldview-3 (WV-3, currently planned for launch in 2014, will have 8 spectral bands in the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR, and an additional 8 bands in the Short-Wave-Infrared (SWIR; the approximately 1.0–2.5 μm spectral range. WV-3 will be the first commercial system with both high spatial resolution and multispectral SWIR capability. Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS data collected at 3 m spatial resolution with 86 SWIR bands having 10 nm spectral resolution were used to simulate the new WV-3 SWIR data. AVIRIS data were converted to reflectance, geographically registered, and resized to the proposed 3.7 and 7.5 m spatial resolutions. WV-3 SWIR band pass functions were used to spectrally resample the data to the proposed 8 SWIR bands. Characteristic reflectance signatures extracted from the data for known mineral locations (endmembers were used to map spatial locations of specific minerals. The WV-3 results, when compared to spectral mapping using the full AVIRIS SWIR dataset, illustrate that the WV-3 spectral bands should permit identification and mapping of some key minerals, however, minerals with similar spectral features may be confused and will not be mapped with the same detail as using hyperspectral systems. The high spatial resolution should provide detailed mapping of complex alteration mineral patterns not achievable by current multispectral systems. The WV-3 simulation results are promising and indicate that this sensor will be a significant tool for geologic remote sensing.

  8. Temperature change in human muscle during and after pulsed short-wave diathermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, D O; Knight, K; Fujiwara, T; Castel, J C

    1999-01-01

    A time series design was used, with the dependent variable being gastrocnemius muscle temperature at a depth of 3 cm. To determine the rate of temperature rise and the rate of post-treatment temperature decline in skeletal muscle following the application of pulsed short-wave diathermy (PSWD). Data on PSWD rate and longevity of heating are 20 years old and outdated. With the recent introduction of advanced diathermy equipment, results of our study would provide clinicians with much needed information regarding treatment duration. A 23-gauge thermistor was inserted into the center of the medial head of the anesthetized gastrocnemius muscle, 3 cm below the skin's surface of 20 subjects. The PSWD (27.12 MHz frequency) was applied using the following parameters: 800 bursts per second; 400 microseconds burst duration; 850 microseconds interburst interval; with a peak root mean square (RMS) amplitude of 150 W per burst and an average RMS output of 48 W. Temperature changes were documented every 5 minutes during the treatment and additionally at 5 and 10 minutes following treatment. The average baseline and peak temperatures were 35.84 +/- 0.93 degrees C and 39.80 +/- 0.83 degrees C, respectively. Mean temperature increases were: 1.36 +/- 0.90 degrees C (5 min); 2.87 +/- 1.44 degrees C (10 min); 3.78 +/- 1.19 degrees C (15 min); 3.49 +/- 1.13 degrees C (20 min). After the treatment terminated, intramuscular temperature dropped 0.97 +/- 0.68 degree C in 5 minutes and 1.78 +/- 0.69 degrees C in 10 minutes. PSWD is an effective modality if temperature elevation of deep tissue over a large area is the clinical objective.

  9. Comparison of the efficacy of ketoprofen phonophoresis, ultrasound, and short-wave diathermy in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyaci, Ahmet; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Aridici, Rifat; Koca, Irfan

    2013-11-01

    The present study aimed to compare the efficacy of three different deep heating modalities: phonophoresis (PH), short-wave diathermy (SWD), and ultrasound (US), in knee osteoarthritis. Patients who consented to participate in the study were randomly divided into the following three groups. Group 1 (n = 33) received PH, Group 2 (n = 33) received US, and Group 3 (n = 35) received SWD. These deep heating therapies were applied by the same therapist. Each therapy began with 20-min hot pack application. Each of the three physical therapy modalities was applied 5 days a week for 2 weeks (a total of 10 sessions). The patients were evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS) at rest, 15-m walking time, and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) both before and after the treatment. Moreover, at the end of the treatment, both the physician and the patient made an overall evaluation, by rating the treatment efficacy. The results of the study showed that VAS, 15-m walking time, and WOMAC parameters were improved with all three deep heating modalities, and all the three modalities were effective. However, there was no significant difference between the three modalities in terms of efficacy. There was also no significant difference between the three groups in terms of post-treatment general evaluation of the physician and the patient. The present study is the first to suggest that choosing one of PH/US/SWD therapy options would provide effective results and none of them are superior to the others, and we believe that these findings will be a basis for further studies.

  10. Exploring Short Gamma-ray Bursts as Gravitational-wave Standard Sirens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissanke, Samaya; Holz, Daniel E.; Hughes, Scott A.; Dalal, Neal; Sievers, Jonathan L.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observations support the hypothesis that a large fraction of "short-hard" gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) are associated with the inspiral and merger of compact binaries. Since gravitational-wave (GW) measurements of well-localized inspiraling binaries can measure absolute source distances, simultaneous observation of a binary's GWs and SHB would allow us to directly and independently determine both the binary's luminosity distance and its redshift. Such a "standard siren" (the GW analog of a standard candle) would provide an excellent probe of the nearby (z <~ 0.3) universe's expansion, independent of the cosmological distance ladder, thereby complementing other standard candles. Previous work explored this idea using a simplified formalism to study measurement by advanced GW detector networks, incorporating a high signal-to-noise ratio limit to describe the probability distribution for measured parameters. In this paper, we eliminate this simplification, constructing distributions with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. We assume that each SHB observation gives source sky position and time of coalescence, and we take non-spinning binary neutron star and black hole-neutron star coalescences as plausible SHB progenitors. We examine how well parameters (particularly distance) can be measured from GW observations of SHBs by a range of ground-based detector networks. We find that earlier estimates overstate how well distances can be measured, even at fairly large signal-to-noise ratio. The fundamental limitation to determining distance proves to be a degeneracy between distance and source inclination. Overcoming this limitation requires that we either break this degeneracy, or measure enough sources to broadly sample the inclination distribution.

  11. Range of wavelengths possible to estimate phase velocities of surface waves in microtremors; Bido tansaho ni okeru suitei kanona bidochu no hyomenha iso sokudo no hacho han`i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakoshi, K.; Okada, H.; Ling, S. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    To specify the maximum wavelength of the phase velocities that can be estimated by the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method or F-K method in microtremor exploration, investigations were conducted using numerical simulation. In view of feasibility, an equilateral triangle array was employed, the maximum radius of the array having 7 observation points being 0.10km. The dispersion curve of the Rayleigh wave basic mode was calculated from an underground structure model. White noise was used as the incident wave, and, in case the waves came in from multiple directions, a different phase spectrum was assigned to each direction. In searching for the maximum wave length of phase velocities that could be estimated, a limit was imposed upon estimation, and it was prescribed that the wavelength be the limit if the difference between the theoretical value and estimated phase velocity was 5% or higher. As the result, it was found that it is possible to estimate the phase velocity when the wavelength is up to approximately 10 times longer than the array maximum radius in the SPAC method, and up to approximately 5 times longer in case of the F-K method. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Ion Acoustic Waves in the Presence of Langmuir Oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1976-01-01

    The dielectric function for long-wavelength, low-frequency ion acoustic waves in the presence of short-wavelength, high-frequency electron oscillations is presented, where the ions are described by the collision-free Vlasov equation. The effect of the electron oscillations can be appropriately de...

  13. Wave-induced collisions of thin floating disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiew, L. J.; Bennetts, L. G.; Meylan, M. H.; Thomas, G. A.; French, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    Collisions between two thin floating disks forced by regular water waves are studied for a range of wave amplitudes and lengths, using laboratory wave basin experiments and a mathematical model. Three collision regimes are identified from the experiments in terms of collision frequency and strength, and the collisions are shown to be caused by drift for short incident wavelengths and relative surge motion between the disks for longer incident waves. The model is based on slope-sliding theory for the wave-induced disk motions and rigid-body collisions. It is shown to predict collision frequencies and velocities accurately for intermediate-long incident wavelengths. Incorporating drift and wave scattering forces into the model is shown to capture the collision behaviours for short incident wavelengths.

  14. On the origin of medium-period ionospheric waves and their possible modelling: a short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zolesi

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the concept of ionospheric waves with periods from about 15 min to about 4 h as one of the acoustic-gravity wave-induced phenomena. The existence of these medium-period ionospheric waves in the various ionospheric layers is supported by the results of a data analysis which has shown remarkable characteristics in occurrence and direction of the waves with a period not longer than about 2 h. The explanation offered is based on the assumption that a unique phenomenon capable to launch acoustic-gravity waves related to such ionospheric waves is the sudden change in physical conditions of the atmosphere due to the passage of the solar terminator.

  15. Effect of short-wave diathermy on mobility and radiological stage of the knee in the development of experimental osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanharanta, H

    1982-04-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of short-wave diathermy on joint mobility and radiographic changes during the development of osteoarthritis. An experimental model for osteoarthritis was developed by periodic immobilization of rabbit knees. Nine rabbits was given short wave diathermy in the same knee 55 times for 5 minutes with a power of 50 W for 11 weeks. An identically immobilized group of 17 rabbits was used as control. The most significant effect on the mobility of the treated knee was the development of extension deficiency. This limitation developed within a week and was permanent. A smaller effect was found on flexion mobility. Flexion deficiency decreased at the end of the immobilization period and increased during remobilization, though at the end of the experiment there were no differences compared with the control. Radiographic changes were similar during the development of osteoarthritis in treated and non-treated groups.

  16. A Case Study of Short-term Wave Forecasting Based on FIR Filter: Optimization of the Power Production for the Wavestar Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferri, Francesco; Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Frigaard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Short-term wave forecasting plays a crucial role for the control of a wave energy converter (WEC), in order to increase the energy harvest from the waves, as well as to increase its life time. In the paper it is shown how the surface elevation of the waves and the force acting on the WEC can...... be predicted using FIR filter. The predictors have been validated in laboratory with unidirectional regular and irregular waves. Here a single point absorber, (1:20) scale of the Wavestar device, is used. The results show that it is possible to predict wave and forces acting on the device using a properly...

  17. Mid-frequency sound propagation through internal waves at short range with synoptic oceanographic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouseff, Daniel; Tang, Dajun; Williams, Kevin L; Wang, Zhongkang; Moum, James N

    2008-09-01

    Preliminary results are presented from an analysis of mid-frequency acoustic transmission data collected at range 550 m during the Shallow Water 2006 Experiment. The acoustic data were collected on a vertical array immediately before, during, and after the passage of a nonlinear internal wave on 18 August, 2006. Using oceanographic data collected at a nearby location, a plane-wave model for the nonlinear internal wave's position as a function of time is developed. Experimental results show a new acoustic path is generated as the internal wave passes above the acoustic source.

  18. Exploring binary-neutron-star-merger scenario of short-gamma-ray bursts by gravitational-wave observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2010-04-09

    We elucidate the feature of gravitational waves (GWs) from a binary-neutron-star merger collapsing to a black hole by general relativistic simulation. We show that GW spectrum imprints the coalescence dynamics, formation process of disk, equation of state for neutron stars, total masses, and mass ratio. A formation mechanism of the central engine of short-gamma-ray bursts, which are likely to be composed of a black hole and surrounding disk, therefore could be constrained by GW observation.

  19. INFLUENCE OF THE SHORT-WAVE DIATHERMY UPON GLYCEMIA IN THE PATIENTS WITH THE INSULIN-INDEPENDENT DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaviša Djurdjevic

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In 18 patients with NIDDM diabetes on the oral hypoglycemic therapy there has been a short-wave diathermy (KTD applied upon the Head pancreas zones for 10 minutes and in 10 days series. The values of glycemia before KTD were X+SD=9,72+0,25 mmol/1 while on the tenth day they amounted to X+SD=7,28+0,32 mmol/1 thus recording a significant drop

  20. INFLUENCE OF THE SHORT-WAVE DIATHERMY UPON GLYCEMIA IN THE PATIENTS WITH THE INSULIN-INDEPENDENT DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Slaviša Djurdjevic

    2002-01-01

    In 18 patients with NIDDM diabetes on the oral hypoglycemic therapy there has been a short-wave diathermy (KTD) applied upon the Head pancreas zones for 10 minutes and in 10 days series. The values of glycemia before KTD were X+SD=9,72+0,25 mmol/1 while on the tenth day they amounted to X+SD=7,28+0,32 mmol/1 thus recording a significant drop

  1. Effects of short-wave therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiming; Zhang, Chi; Gao, Chengfei; Zhu, Siyi; Yang, Lijie; Wei, Quan; He, Chengqi

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of short-wave therapy with sham or no intervention for the management of patients with knee osteoarthritis. We searched the following databases from their inception up to 26 October 2016: MEDLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, CINAHL and OpenGrey. Studies included randomized controlled trials compared with a sham or no intervention in patients with knee osteoarthritis. The results were calculated via standardized mean difference (SMD) and risk ratio for continuous variables outcomes as well as dichotomous variables, respectively. Heterogeneity was explored by the I2 test and inverse-variance random effects analysis was applied to all studies. Eight trials (542 patients) met the inclusion criteria. The effect of short-wave therapy on pain was found positive (SMD, -0.53; 95% CI, -0.84 to -0.21). The pain subgroup showed that patients received pulse modality achieved clinical improvement (SMD, -0.83; 95% CI, -1.14 to -0.52) and the pain scale in female patients decreased (SMD, -0.53; 95% CI, -0.98 to -0.08). In terms of extensor strength, short-wave therapy was superior to the control group ( p physical function (SMD, -0.16; 95% CI, -0.36 to 0.05). For adverse effects, there was no significant difference between the treatment and control group. Short-wave therapy is beneficial for relieving pain caused by knee osteoarthritis (the pulse modality seems superior to the continuous modality), and knee extensor muscle combining with isokinetic strength. Function is not improved.

  2. Multi-wavelength picosecond BaWO4 Raman laser with long and short Raman shifts and 12-fold pulse shortening down to 3 ps at 1227 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, M.; Jelínek, M., Jr.; Vyhlídal, D.; Kubeček, V.; Ivleva, L. I.; Zverev, P. G.; Smetanin, S. N.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the generation of three (1179, 1227, and 1323 nm) Stokes components of stimulated Raman scattering with long (925 cm-1 ) and short (332 cm-1 ) Raman shifts in an all-solid-state, synchronously pumped, extra-cavity Raman laser based on a BaWO4 crystal excited by a quasi-continuous, 36 ps, diode side-pumped Nd:GdVO4 laser generating at the wavelength of 1063 nm. We achieved the strongest 12-fold pulse shortening down to 3 ps at the 925 cm-1   +  332 cm-1 shifted 1227 nm wavelength due to a shorter dephasing time (wider linewidth) of the short-shift 332 cm-1 Raman line, resulting in a peak power of 2.5 kW.

  3. Single-electron transport driven by surface acoustic waves: Moving quantum dots versus short barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utko, Pawel; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Lindelof, Poul Erik

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the response of the acoustoelectric-current driven by a surface-acoustic wave through a quantum point contact in the closed-channel regime. Under proper conditions, the current develops plateaus at integer multiples of ef when the frequency f of the surface-acoustic wave...... or the gate voltage V-g of the point contact is varied. A pronounced 1.1 MHz beat period of the current indicates that the interference of the surface-acoustic wave with reflected waves matters. This is supported by the results obtained after a second independent beam of surface-acoustic wave was added...... to an additional quantization mechanism, independent from those described in the standard model of 'moving quantum dots....

  4. Experimental Study of Wave Forces on Vertical Circular Cylinders in Long and Short Crested Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgedal, Michael

    The three-dimensional structure of ocean waves is generally ignored in favour of two-dimensional waves, which are easier to handle from a theoretical and computational point of view. For design fixed structures where horizontal in-line and resultant wave forces are important, this is normally...... cylinder in the near-surface-zone are investigated and suggestions for the force coefficients Cd, Cm and C1 in this region presented. The approximately 100 physical experiments have been condueted using a newly designed 2nd generation smooth circular cylinder with diameter, D = 0.0635 m and instrumented...... on the safe side, as the directional spreading of the wave field Ieads to reduced horizontal velocities and acceleration; in the fluid and hence a reduction of the resultant and in-line wave forces on the structure. The directional spreading of the horizontal velocity field generally causes an increase...

  5. Short-Wave Diathermy Pretreatment and Inflammatory Myokine Response After High-Intensity Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardiman, John P; Moodie, Nicole; Siedlik, Jacob A; Kudrna, Rebecca A; Graham, Zachary; Gallagher, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Various modalities have been used to pretreat skeletal muscle to attenuate inflammation. To determine the effects of short-wave diathermy (SWD) preheating treatment on inflammation and stress markers after eccentric exercise. Controlled laboratory study. University laboratory setting. Fifteen male (age = 22 ± 4.9 years, height = 179.75 ± 9.56 cm, mass = 82.22 ± 12.67 kg) college-aged students. Seven participants were selected randomly to receive 40 minutes of SWD heat treatment (HT), and 8 participants served as the control (CON) group and rested without SWD. Both groups completed 7 sets of 10 repetitions of a high-intensity eccentric exercise protocol (EEP) at 120% of the 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) leg extension. We biopsied muscles on days 1, 3 (24 hours post-EEP), and 4 (48 hours post-EEP) and collected blood samples on days 1, 2 (4 hours post-EEP), 3, and 4. We determined 1-RM on day 2 (24 hours post-SWD) and measured 1-RM on days 3 and 4. We analyzed the muscle samples for interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α, and heat shock protein 70 and the blood for serum creatine kinase. We found a group × time interaction for intramuscular IL-6 levels after SWD (F2,26 = 7.13, P = .003). The IL-6 decreased in HT (F1,6 = 17.8, P = .006), whereas CON showed no change (P > .05). We found a group × time interaction for tumor necrosis factor α levels (F2,26 = 3.71, P = .04), which increased in CON (F2,14 = 7.16, P = .007), but saw no changes for HT (P > .05). No group × time interactions were noted for 1-RM, heat shock protein 70, or creatine kinase (P > .05). The SWD preheating treatment provided a treatment effect for intramuscular inflammatory myokines induced through high-intensity eccentric exercise but did not affect other factors associated with intense exercise and inflammation.

  6. Near-field short correlation in optical waves transmitted through random media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emiliani, V.; Intonti, F.; caza, M.; Wiersma, D.S.; Colocci, M.; Aliev, F.; Lagendijk, Aart

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional near-field images of light transmitted through a disordered dielectric structure have been measured for two probe wavelengths. From these data, the 2D spatial dependence of the intensity correlation function, C(¿R¿), has been extracted. We observe that the spatial dependence of C is

  7. Off-axis emission of short γ-ray bursts and the detectability of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave-detected binary mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzati, Davide; Deich, Alex; Morsony, Brian J.; Workman, Jared C.

    2017-10-01

    We present calculations of the wide angle emission of short-duration gamma-ray bursts from compact binary merger progenitors. Such events are expected to be localized by their gravitational wave emission, fairly irrespective of the orientation of the angular momentum vector of the system, along which the gamma-ray burst outflow is expected to propagate. We show that both the prompt and afterglow emission are dim and challenging to detect for observers lying outside the cone within which the relativistic outflow is propagating. If the jet initially propagates through a baryon contaminated region surrounding the merger site, however, a hot cocoon forms around it. The cocoon subsequently expands quasi-isotropically producing its own prompt emission and external shock powered afterglow. We show that the cocoon prompt emission is detectable by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We also show that the cocoon afterglow peaks a few hours to a few days after the burst and is detectable for up to a few weeks at all wavelengths. The timing and brightness of the transient are however uncertain due to their dependence on unknown quantities such as the density of the ambient medium surrounding the merger site, the cocoon energy and the cocoon Lorentz factor. For a significant fraction of the gravitationally detected neutron-star-binary mergers, the cocoon afterglow could possibly be the only identifiable electromagnetic counterpart, at least at radio and X-ray frequencies.

  8. Spectral characteristics of clay minerals in the 2.5 - 14 µm wavelength region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yitagesu, F.A.; Meer, F.D. van der; Werff, H.M.A. van der; Hecker, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Identification and quantification of clay minerals, particularly those that are responsible for susceptibility of soils to expansion and shrinkage, is a constant focus of research in geotechnical engineering. The visible, near infrared and short wave infrared wavelength regions are well explored.

  9. Irregularity and lack of p-waves in short tachycardia episodes predict atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Linda S B; Persson, Anders P; Wollmer, Per; Juul-Möller, Steen; Juhlin, Tord; Engström, Gunnar

    2018-02-12

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is defined as an irregular supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) without p-waves, with a duration >30s. It is not known whether AF characteristics in shorter SVT episodes predict AF and stroke. To determine if irregularity and lack of p-waves, alone or in combination, at short SVT episodes increased the risk of incident AF and ischemic stroke. The population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer study includes 24hECG screening of 377 AF-free individuals (mean age 64.5 years, 43% men) who were prospectively followed for >13 years. There were 65 AF events and 25 ischemic stroke events during follow-up. Subjects with an SVT episode ≥5 beats were identified and the longest SVT episode was assessed for irregularity and lack of p-waves. The association between SVT classification and AF and stroke was assessed using multivariable adjusted Cox regression. Incidence of AF increased with increasing abnormality of the SVTs. The risk-factor adjusted hazards ratio (HR) for AF was 4.95 (95%CI 2.06-11.9, pSVT episodes without p-waves (HR 14.2 (95%CI 3.76-57.6, pSVT episodes at detected at 24hECG screening are associated with incident AF and ischemic stroke. Short irregular SVTs without p-waves likely represent early stages of AF or atrial myopathy. 24hECG could identify subjects suitable for primary prevention efforts. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Prediction and measurement of the electromagnetic environment of high-power medium-wave and short-wave broadcast antennas in far field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhanghong; Wang, Qun; Ji, Zhijiang; Shi, Meiwu; Hou, Guoyan; Tan, Danjun; Wang, Pengqi; Qiu, Xianbo

    2014-12-01

    With the increasing city size, high-power electromagnetic radiation devices such as high-power medium-wave (MW) and short-wave (SW) antennas have been inevitably getting closer and closer to buildings, which resulted in the pollution of indoor electromagnetic radiation becoming worsened. To avoid such radiation exceeding the exposure limits by national standards, it is necessary to predict and survey the electromagnetic radiation by MW and SW antennas before constructing the buildings. In this paper, a modified prediction method for the far-field electromagnetic radiation is proposed and successfully applied to predict the electromagnetic environment of an area close to a group of typical high-power MW and SW wave antennas. Different from currently used simplified prediction method defined in the Radiation Protection Management Guidelines (H J/T 10. 3-1996), the new method in this article makes use of more information such as antennas' patterns to predict the electromagnetic environment. Therefore, it improves the prediction accuracy significantly by the new feature of resolution at different directions. At the end of this article, a comparison between the prediction data and the measured results is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed new method. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Equatorial wave activity during 2007 over Gadanki, a tropical station

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    by equatorial Kelvin waves observed over the Galapagos;. Geophys. Res. Lett. 28 3143–3146. Holton J R and Lindzen R S 1972 An updated theory for the quasi-biennial oscillation; J. Atmos. Sci. 29 1076–. 1080. Holton J R, Alexander M J and Boehm M T 2001 Evi- dence for short vertical wavelength Kelvin waves in.

  12. Rapid calculation of the compression wave generated by a train entering a tunnel with a vented hood: Short hoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, M. S.; Winslow, A.; Iida, M.; Fukuda, T.

    2008-03-01

    A numerical procedure for the rapid prediction of the compression wave generated by a high-speed train entering a tunnel was presented and validated by Howe et al. [Rapid calculation of the compression wave generated by a train entering a tunnel with a vented hood, Journal of Sound and Vibration 297 (2006) 267-292]. The method was devised to deal principally with compression wave generation in long hoods typically of length ˜10 times the tunnel height and 'vented' by means of a series of windows distributed along the hood walls. Hoods of this kind will be needed to control wave generation by newer trains operating at speeds U exceeding about 350 km/h. In this paper experimental results are presented and compared with predictions in order to extend the range of applicability of the numerical method of Howe et al. (2006) to include short hoods with lengths as small as just twice the tunnel height (the situation for most hoods currently deployed on the Japanese Shinkansen) and for U as large as 400 km/h.

  13. Thermally induced transparency for short spin wave pulses in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez Romero, Cesar Leonardo; Kolokoltsev, Oleg; Gomez Arista, Ivan; Qureshi, Naser; Monsiváis Galindo, Guillermo; Vargas Hernández, Hesiquio

    2014-03-01

    The compensation of spin wave propagation losses plays a very important role in the development of novel magnonic devices. Up to now, however, most of the known amplification methods present relative narrow frequency bandwidths due to their resonant nature. In this work, we present compensation of the propagation losses or pseudo-amplification of travelling spin waves by tailoring the bias magnetic field profile. The thermally-induced non-uniform profile of the magnetization introduced on an Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) thin film by a localized spot of a cw argon-ion laser creates the conditions to observe the complete compensation of the spin wave propagation losses. The spin wave evolution was mapped with a time and spaced resolved inductive magneto-dynamic prove system. The experiment was carried out using a uniform sample of single-crystal YIG film grown on a gallium-gadolinium garnet (GGG) substrate. The 2mm-wide, 20mm-long and 6microns-thick YIG strip was saturated with an external magnetic field enabling the set up for the propagation of magneto-static surface waves. This work was supported by the UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT IA100413.

  14. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in children: Results and short-term complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Lima, João Paulo; Duarte, Ricardo Jordão; Cristofani, Lílian Maria; Srougi, Miguel

    2007-08-01

    The introduction of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy represented an important evolution in urinary tract lithiasis management. The aim of this study is to describe the results of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for the treatment of urinary tract lithiasis in children, focusing on the index of elimination of the calculi and the complications occurring during the procedure and during the following three months. From September 1991 to July 2002, 135 children between one and 12 years, suffering from urinary tract lithiasis underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. A retrospective analysis of these patients was carried out. One hundred and ninety-five calculi ranging in size from 5.0 mm to 20.0 mm were treated, out of which 147 were found in the kidneys and 48 in the ureter. Urinary tract dilation was presented by 30% of the children at the time of the procedure. After extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy 75.8% of the calculi were eliminated: 64.1% were stone-free and 11.7% had pain. In children, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy proved to be able to eliminate 75.8% of the treated calculi and 83.7% of the patients presented a complete or partial response. Complications were observed in 23.7% of patients, and pain was the most frequent symptom.

  15. The Density-wave Theory and Spiral Structures by Looking at Spiral Arms through a Multi-wavelength StudyHamed Pour-Imani1,2, Daniel Kennefick1,2, Julia Kennefick1,2, Mohamed Shameer Abdeen1,2, Eric Monson1,2, Douglas W. Shields1,2, B. L. Davis31Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA2Arkansas Center for Space & Planetary Sciences, Univ. of Arkans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour-Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Shameer Abdeen, Mohammad; Monson, Erick; Shields, Douglas William; Davis, Benjamin L.

    2018-01-01

    The density-wave theory of spiral structure, though first proposed as long ago as the mid-1960s by C.C. Lin and F. Shu, continues to be challenged by rival theories, such as the manifold theory. One test between these theories which has been proposed is that the pitch angle of spiral arms for galaxies should vary with the wavelength of the image in the density-wave theory, but not in the manifold theory. The reason is that stars are born in the density wave but move out of it as they age. In this study, we combined large sample size with a wide range of wavelengths to investigate this issue. For each galaxy, we used wavelength FUV151nm, U-band, H-alpha, optical wavelength B-band and infrared 3.6 and 8.0μm. We measured the pitch angle with the 2DFFT and Spirality codes (Davis et al. 2012; Shields et al. 2015). We find that the B-band and 3.6μm images have smaller pitch angles than the infrared 8.0μm image in all cases, in agreement with the prediction of the density-wave theory. We also find that the pitch angle at FUV and H-alpha are close to the measurements made at 8.0μm. The Far-ultraviolet wavelength at 151nm shows very young, very bright UV stars still in the star-forming region (they are so bright as to be visible there and so short-lived that they never move out of it). We find that for both sets of measurements (2dFFT and Spirality) the 8.0μm, H-alpha and ultraviolet images agree in their pitch angle measurements, suggesting that they are, in fact, sensitive to the same region. By contrast, the 3.6μm and B-band images are uniformly tighter in pitch angle measurements than these wavelengths, suggesting that the density-wave picture is correct.

  16. Short-wave contributions in the storm surge associated with Xynthia, February 2010, western France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, X.; Li, K.; Roland, A.; Breilf, J. F.; Chaumillon, E.

    2012-04-01

    This study aims to hindcast and analyze the storm surge caused by Xynthia, a mid-latitude storm that severely hit the central part of the Bay of Biscay on the 27-28th of February 2010. This storm surge locally exceeded 1.5 m and peaked at the same time as a high spring tide (Bertin et al., 2012). A new storm surge modeling system was applied, based on the unstructured-grid circulation model SELFE (Zhang and Batista, 2008) and the spectral wave model WWM II (Roland et al., 2008). These two models are fully coupled and parallelized and share the same grid and domain decomposition. The modelling system was implemented over the North-East Atlantic Ocean and the space was discretized using an unstructured grid with a resolution ranging from 30 km in Deep Ocean to 25 m in near shore zones. Such a fine resolution was required to properly represent the surf zone. The modelling system resulted in tidal and wave predictions with errors of the order of 2 and 15%, respectively. The storm surge associated with Xynthia was also well predicted along the Bay of Biscay, with root mean square errors of the order of 0.10 m. Numerical experiments were then performed to analyze the physical processes controlling the development of the storm surge and revealed firstly that the wind caused most of the water level anomaly through an Ekman setup process. The comparison between a wave-dependant and a quadratic parameterization to compute wind stress showed that the storm surge was strongly amplified by the presence of steep and young wind-waves, related to their rapid development in the restricted fetch of the Bay of Biscay. The gradient of wave radiation stress contributed to the whole storm surge by about 0.05 to 0.10 m at the available tide gages. Nevertheless, these gages were located in sheltered harbors and modeling results showed that wave-induced setup locally exceeded 0.5 m in areas more exposed to ocean waves. The unstructured grid is currently being extended inland to simulate

  17. Bit rate and pulse width dependence of four-wave mixing of short optical pulses in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diez, S.; Mecozzi, A.; Mørk, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the saturation properties of four-wave mixing of short optical pulses in a semiconductor optical amplifier. By varying the gain of the optical amplifier, we find a strong dependence of both conversion efficiency and signal-to-background ratio on pulse width and bit rate....... In particular, the signal-to-background ratio can be optimized for a specific amplifier gain. This behavior, which is coherently described in experiment and theory, is attributed to the dynamics of the amplified spontaneous emission, which is the main source of noise in a semiconductor optical amplifier....

  18. Large-scale Vortex Generation and Evolution in Short-crested Isolated Wave Breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhti, M.; Kirby, J. T., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Peregrine (1999), in discussing the effect of localization of wave energy dissipation as a generation mechanism for vorticity at the scale of individual waves, spurred a wave of study of vorticity dynamics and mixing processes in the wave-driven ocean. In deep water, the limited depth of penetration of breaking effects leads to the conceptual forcing of a "smoke-ring" resulting from the localized cross-section of impulsive forcing (Pizzo and Melville, 2013). In shallow water, depth limitations favor the generation of a quasi-two-dimensional field of vertical vortex structures, with a resulting inverse cascade of energy to low wavenumbers and the evolution of flows such as transient rip currents (Johnson and Pattiaratchi, 2006). In this study, we are examining a more detailed picture of the vorticity field evolving during a localized breaking event, with particular interest in the span from deep water to shallow water, with special attention to the transition from weak to strong bottom control. Using an LES/VOF model (Derakhti and Kirby, 2014), we examine the evolution of coherent vortex structures whose initial scales are determined by the width of the breaking region, and are much larger than the locally-controlled reverse horseshoe structures seen in typical studies of along-crest uniform breaking. We study the persistence of three-dimensionality of these structures and their contribution to the development of depth-integrated vertical vorticity, and comment on the suitability of 2D or quasi-3D models to represent nearshore flow fields.

  19. High-Resolution Numerical Modeling of Short-Crested Waves through Mangrove Pneumatophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachec, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    The Sonneratia caseolaris mangrove system is an intricate system of tree trunks, roots, and pneumatophores that can impact hydrodynamics and sediment transport patterns. A recent field program collected point measurements of waves, velocities, and water levels within a fringing mangrove system located along Cu Lao Dung Island within the Mekong Delta system, Vietnam. Although these field results provide detailed temporal hydrodynamics, they have limited spatial resolution. Therefore, a high-resolution modeling study may be helpful towards elucidating basic physics of velocity, shear, wakes, and vorticity by extending the spatial details. An approximately unit cubic domain is discretized that is identical to the field program's deployment, which is composed of a muddy sea bottom and vertical pneumatophores. The model domain is idealized: the pneumatophore geometries are specified as rigid Gaussian bumps that are fixed to a nonerodable seafloor. The three-dimensional, nonlinear, and nonhydrostatic RANS equations of motion are used to compute the momentum while a VOF formulation is used to capture the free-surface. The modeling is driven with wave data at a particular tidal stage from the field along with slip lateral boundaries and an absorbing far end boundary condition. The simulation is run for several waves, and the results are computed that rely upon computing velocity gradients. Results show a complex progressive wave behavior that includes run-up along the mangrove pneumatophore, oscillating wakes, and downward propagating vortex cores adjacent to the pneumatophores. Although the bottom is nonerodable, bed shear stress is computed as a proxy for sediment bedload transport.

  20. Short-term effectiveness of short-wave diathermy treatment on pain, clinical symptoms, and hand function in patients with mild or moderate idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incebiyik, Serap; Boyaci, Ahmet; Tutoglu, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of short-wave diathermy (SWD) treatment on mild and moderate idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial. The study involved 58 wrists in 31 patients diagnosed clinically and electrophysiologically with mild and moderate CTS. They were assigned randomly to one of two groups. Group 1 received a hot pack, SWD, and nerve and tendon gliding exercises and Group 2 received a hot pack, placebo SWD, and nerve and tendon gliding exercises. The treatment was applied five times weekly for a total of 15 sessions. Patients were evaluated using the Tinel test, Phalen test, carpal compression test, reverse Phalen test, carpal tunnel compression test, Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) Symptom Severity Scale (SSS), Functional Status Scale (FSS), and a visual analog scale (VAS). Clinical tests and scales were evaluated at the beginning and end of therapy. In the SWD group, in the Tinel test, Phalen test, reverse Phalen test, carpal compression test, VAS, BCTQ-FSS, and BCTQ-SSS, statistically significant improvements were detected (p 0.05) from baseline. All parameters improved significantly in the SWD group versus the controls (p < 0.05). SWD provided short-term improvements in pain, clinical symptoms, and hand function in patients with mild and moderate CTS.

  1. Observations of short period seismic scattered waves by small seismic arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Simini

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The most recent observations of well correlated seismic phases in the high frequency coda of local earthquakes recorded throughout the world are reported. In particular the main results, obtained on two active volcanoes, Teide and Deception, using small array are described. The ZLC (Zero Lag Cross-correlation method and polarization analysis have been applied to the data in order to distinguish the main phases in the recorded seismograms and their azimuths and apparent velocities. The results obtained at the Teide volcano demonstrate that the uncorrelated part of the seismograms may be produced by multiple scattering from randomly distributed heterogeneity, while the well correlated part, showing SH type polarization or the possible presence of Rayleigh surface waves, may be generated by single scattering by strong scatterers. At the Deception Volcano strong scattering, strongly focused in a precise direction, is deduced from the data. In that case, all the coda radiation is composed of surface waves.

  2. [Study on phase-matching of four-wave mixing spectrum in photonic crystal fiber].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-xu; Wang, Shu-tao; Zhao, Xing-tao; Chen, Shuang; Zhou, Gui-yao; Wu, Xi-jun; Li, Shu-guang; Hou, Lan-Tian

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, the four-wave mixing principle of fiber was analyzed, and the high-gain phase-matching conditions were shown. The nonlinear coefficient and dispersion characteristics of photonic crystal fibers were calculated by multipole method. The phase mismatch characteristics of fibers with multiple zero-dispersion wavelengths were analyzed for the first time. The changing rules of phase matching wavelength with the pump wavelength and the pump power were obtained, and the phase matching curves were shown. The characteristics of phase matching wavelengths for different dispersion curves were analyzed. There are four new excitation wavelengths of four-wave mixing spectrum in two zero-dispersion wavelength photonic crystal fiers. Four-wave mixing spectroscopy of photonic crystal fibers with two zero-dispersion wavelengths was obtained in the experi-ent, which is consistent with the theoretical analysis, and verified the reliability of the phase matching theory. The fiber with multiple zero-dispersion wavelengths can create a ricbhphase-matching topology, excite more four-wave mixing wavelengths, ena-ling enhanced control over the spectral locations of the four-wave mixing and resonant-radiation bands emitted by solitons and short pulses. These provide theoretical guidance for photonic crystal fiber wavelength conversion and supercontinoum generation based on four-wave mixing.

  3. Impacts of short-time scale water column variability on broadband high-frequency acoustic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickmeier, Justin

    Acoustical oceanography is one way to study the ocean, its internal layers, boundaries and all processes occurring within using underwater acoustics. Acoustical sensing techniques allows for the measurement of ocean processes from within that logistically or financially preclude traditional in-situ measurements. Acoustic signals propagate as pressure wavefronts from a source to a receiver through an ocean medium with variable physical parameters. The water column physical parameters that change acoustic wave propagation in the ocean include temperature, salinity, current, surface roughness, seafloor bathymetry, and vertical stratification over variable time scales. The impacts of short-time scale water column variability on acoustic wave propagation include coherent and incoherent surface reflections, wavefront arrival time delay, focusing or defocusing of the intensity of acoustic beams and refraction of acoustic rays. This study focuses on high-frequency broadband acoustic waves, and examines the influence of short-time scale water column variability on broadband high-frequency acoustics, wavefronts, from 7 to 28 kHz, in shallow water. Short-time scale variability is on the order of seconds to hours and the short-spatial scale variability is on the order of few centimeters. Experimental results were collected during an acoustic experiment along 100 m isobaths and data analysis was conducted using available acoustic wave propagation models. Three main topics are studied to show that acoustic waves are viable as a remote sensing tool to measure oceanographic parameters in shallow water. First, coherent surface reflections forming striation patterns, from multipath receptions, through rough surface interaction of broadband acoustic signals with the dynamic sea surface are analyzed. Matched filtered results of received acoustic waves are compared with a ray tracing numerical model using a sea surface boundary generated from measured water wave spectra at the time of

  4. Short-term effectiveness of bi-phase oscillatory waves versus hyperthermia for isolated long head biceps tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Francesco; Via, Alessio Giai; Rossi, Silvio

    2011-07-01

    Long head biceps (LHB) tendinopathy is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain. Isolated LHB pathology is most common among younger people who practise overhead sports. The authors conducted a short-term prospective randomised study to test the effectiveness of two different methods for the treatment of isolated LHB tendinopathy: biphasic oscillatory waves and hyperthermia. The study is a prospective randomised study (Level II). The authors identified 20 patients who had clinical and ultrasound (US) evidence of LHB tendinopathy. No patient was a high-level athlete. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups. Group A (10 patients) was treated with bi-phasic oscillatory waves, while Group B received hyperthermia. During the treatment period, no other electromedical therapy, injections with corticosteroids, oral analgesics or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were allowed. All the patients were assessed at baseline (T0), immediately after the end of the treatment period (T1) and 6 months after the end of treatment (T2) using a visual analogic scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley Score (CMS). Furthermore, all patients underwent US examinations at T0 and at T1. All the US examinations were performed by the same radiologist. The VAS scores showed a highly statistically significant reduction of pain at T1 both in Group A (65%; p=0,004) and in Group B (50%; p=0,0002). The CMS also showed a statistically significant improvement between the pre-intervention, the post-treatment and the short-term follow-up in both groups. In addition, the peritendinous fluid evident on US examination at T0 was no longer present in all cases at T1. These findings suggest that both bi-phasic oscillatory waves and hyperthermia are able to relieve pain in patients with isolated LHB tendinopathy. This is a Class II level of evidence.

  5. Study on Short-term Variability of Ship Responses in Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Iseki, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    of the cross-spectra, has not been discussed in detail. Using long stationary time series, the transition of amplitudes and relative phase angles of the cross-spectra has been investigated by iterative analyzes with a few seconds of time shifting. In the results, the short-term variability of the relative...

  6. Short-term statistics of waves measured off Ratnagiri, eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amrutha, M.M.; SanilKumar, V.

    is not always as narrow and the steepness is not as small as required by the theory [4, 5]. The field observations by Forristall [6] indicate that the Rayleigh distribution over predicts the significant wave height by 7 to 8%. Forristall [6] observed that over... density is up to 0.211, whereas the values based on Rayleigh distribution is up to 0.241. The strongest deviation of the observations from theory is observed in September (Figure 7). The Rayleigh distribution is a one-parameter distribution and depends...

  7. Nonlinear wave breaking in self-gravitating viscoelastic quantum fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, Aniruddha, E-mail: anibabun@gmail.com [Center for Plasma Studies, Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, 700 032 (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar, E-mail: rajdaju@rediffmail.com [Advanced Centre for Nonlinear and Complex Phenomena, 1175 Survey Park, Kolkata 700075 (India); Department of Mathematics, Bethune College, Kolkata 700006 (India); Bhar, Radhaballav [Center for Plasma Studies, Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, 700 032 (India); Khan, Manoranjan, E-mail: mkhan.ju@gmail.com [Center for Plasma Studies, Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, 700 032 (India)

    2017-02-12

    The stability of a viscoelastic self-gravitating quantum fluid has been studied. Symmetry breaking instability of solitary wave has been observed through ‘viscosity modified Ostrovsky equation’ in weak gravity limit. In presence of strong gravitational field, the solitary wave breaks into shock waves. Response to a Gaussian perturbation, the system produces quasi-periodic short waves, which in terns predicts the existence of gravito-acoustic quasi-periodic short waves in lower solar corona region. Stability analysis of this dynamical system predicts gravity has the most prominent effect on the phase portraits, therefore, on the stability of the system. The non-existence of chaotic solution has also been observed at long wavelength perturbation through index value theorem. - Highlights: • In weak gravitational field, viscoelastic quantum fluid exhibits symmetry breaking instability. • Gaussian perturbation produces quasi-periodic gravito-acoustic waves into the system. • There exists no chaotic state of the system against long wavelength perturbations.

  8. Improving Atmospheric Correction for Visible/Short Wave Infrared (VSWIR) Imaging Spectrometers with Iterative Fitting of Absorption By Three Phases of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, E. A.; Thompson, D. R.; Green, R. O.; Gao, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne imaging spectrometers like the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) offer valuable insight into the Earth's terrestrial and ocean ecosystems, mineralogy, and land use. Estimating surface reflectance requires accounting for atmospheric absorption, which is sensitive to the local abundance of water vapor. Analysts typically estimate water vapor concentrations using the depths of absorption features, which can be inaccurate by up to 50% over surface features containing liquid water or ice. This can bias the retrieved water vapor maps and create atmospheric artifacts in reflectance spectra. A new retrieval method offers significant accuracy improvements over plant canopies or ice by estimating the path lengths of all three phases of water simultaneously, adjusting absorptions to best fit the measurement over a broader spectral interval. This paper assesses the remaining sources of error for the three-phase retrieval technique. We analyze retrievals for synthetic data when the 940 and 1140 nm wavelength features are fitted, for initial vapor path estimates ranging from 0 to ±50% accuracy. These tests indicate that most error comes from inaccuracy in the initial path estimate used to obtain vapor absorption coefficients. We evaluate a modified algorithm that uses multiple iterations to refine this estimate. Error is found to approach a constant value, demonstrating improved robustness to initialization conditions. We also assess the new iterative method using corrected AVIRIS data over various environments. The iterative method yields significantly better water vapor maps, reducing spurious correlations between vegetation canopy water and vapor estimates. The new iterative method offers accuracy improvements over traditional Visible/Short Wave Infrared (VSWIR) atmospheric correction methods, at modest computational cost.

  9. Super-resolution depth information from a short-wave infrared laser gated-viewing system by using correlated double sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhler, Benjamin; Lutzmann, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Primarily, a laser gated-viewing (GV) system provides range-gated 2D images without any range resolution within the range gate. By combining two GV images with slightly different gate positions, 3D information within a part of the range gate can be obtained. The depth resolution is higher (super-resolution) than the minimal gate shift step size in a tomographic sequence of the scene. For a state-of-the-art system with a typical frame rate of 20 Hz, the time difference between the two required GV images is 50 ms which may be too long in a dynamic scenario with moving objects. Therefore, we have applied this approach to the reset and signal level images of a new short-wave infrared (SWIR) GV camera whose read-out integrated circuit supports correlated double sampling (CDS) actually intended for the reduction of kTC noise (reset noise). These images are extracted from only one single laser pulse with a marginal time difference in between. The SWIR GV camera consists of 640 x 512 avalanche photodiodes based on mercury cadmium telluride with a pixel pitch of 15 μm. A Q-switched, flash lamp pumped solid-state laser with 1.57 μm wavelength (OPO), 52 mJ pulse energy after beam shaping, 7 ns pulse length and 20 Hz pulse repetition frequency is used for flash illumination. In this paper, the experimental set-up is described and the operating principle of CDS is explained. The method of deriving super-resolution depth information from a GV system by using CDS is introduced and optimized. Further, the range accuracy is estimated from measured image data.

  10. Measuring noise equivalent irradiance of a digital short-wave infrared imaging system using a broadband source to simulate the night spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, John R.; Robinson, Timothy

    2015-05-01

    There is a growing interest in developing helmet-mounted digital imaging systems (HMDIS) for integration into military aircraft cockpits. This interest stems from the multiple advantages of digital vs. analog imaging such as image fusion from multiple sensors, data processing to enhance the image contrast, superposition of non-imaging data over the image, and sending images to remote location for analysis. There are several properties an HMDIS must have in order to aid the pilot during night operations. In addition to the resolution, image refresh rate, dynamic range, and sensor uniformity over the entire Focal Plane Array (FPA); the imaging system must have the sensitivity to detect the limited night light available filtered through cockpit transparencies. Digital sensor sensitivity is generally measured monochromatically using a laser with a wavelength near the peak detector quantum efficiency, and is generally reported as either the Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) or Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI). This paper proposes a test system that measures NEI of Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR) digital imaging systems using a broadband source that simulates the night spectrum. This method has a few advantages over a monochromatic method. Namely, the test conditions provide spectrum closer to what is experienced by the end-user, and the resulting NEI may be compared directly to modeled night glow irradiance calculation. This comparison may be used to assess the Technology Readiness Level of the imaging system for the application. The test system is being developed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Air Force Research Laboratory.

  11. Physical enviroment of 2-D animal cell aggregates formed in a short pathlength ultrasound standing wave trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazou, Despina; Kuznetsova, Larisa A; Coakley, W Terence

    2005-03-01

    2-D mammalian cell aggregates can be formed and levitated in a 1.5 MHz single half wavelength ultrasound standing wave trap. The physical environment of cells in such a trap has been examined. Attention was paid to parameters such as temperature, acoustic streaming, cavitation and intercellular forces. The extent to which these factors might be intrusive to a neural cell aggregate levitated in the trap was evaluated. Neural cells were exposed to ultrasound at a pressure amplitude of 0.54 MPa for 30 s; a small aggregate had been formed at the center of the trap. The pressure amplitude was then decreased to 0.27 MPa for 2 min, at which level the aggregation process continued at a slower rate. The pressure amplitude was then decreased to 0.06 MPa for 1 h. Temperature measurements that were conducted in situ with a 200 microm thermocouple over a 30 min period showed that the maximum temperature rise was less than 0.5 K. Acoustic streaming was measured by the particle image velocimetry method (PIV). It was shown that the hydrodynamic stress imposed on cells by acoustic streaming is less than that imposed by gentle preparative centrifugation procedures. Acoustic spectrum analysis showed that cavitation activity does not occur in the cell suspensions sonicated at the above pressures. White noise was detected only at a pressure amplitude of 1.96 MPa. Finally, it was shown that the attractive acoustic force between ultrasonically agglomerated cells is small compared with the normal attractive van der Waals force that operates at close cell surface separations. It is concluded that the standing wave trap operates only to concentrate cells locally, as in tissue, and does not modify the in vitro expression of surface receptor interactions.

  12. Field and numerical study of wind and surface waves at short fetches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydakov, Georgy; Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Sergeev, Daniil; Papko, Vladislav; Kandaurov, Alexander; Vdovin, Maxim; Troitskaya, Yuliya

    2016-04-01

    Measurements were carried out in 2012-2015 from May to October in the waters of Gorky Reservoir belonging to the Volga Cascade. The methods of the experiment focus on the study of airflow in the close proximity to the water surface. The sensors were positioned at the oceanographic Froude buoy including five two-component ultrasonic sensors WindSonic by Gill Instruments at different levels (0.1, 0.85, 1.3, 2.27, 5.26 meters above the mean water surface level), one water and three air temperature sensors, and three-channel wire wave gauge. One of wind sensors (0.1 m) was located on the float tracking the waveform for measuring the wind speed in the close proximity to the water surface. Basic parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer (the friction velocity u∗, the wind speed U10 and the drag coefficient CD) were calculated from the measured profiles of wind speed. Parameters were obtained in the range of wind speeds of 1-12 m/s. For wind speeds stronger than 4 m/s CD values were lower than those obtained before (see eg. [1,2]) and those predicted by the bulk parameterization. However, for weak winds (less than 3 m/s) CD values considerably higher than expected ones. The new parameterization of surface drag coefficient was proposed on the basis of the obtained data. The suggested parameterization of drag coefficient CD(U10) was implemented within wind input source terms in WAVEWATCH III [3]. The results of the numerical experiments were compared with the results obtained in the field experiments on the Gorky Reservoir. The use of the new drag coefficient improves the agreement in significant wave heights HS [4]. At the same time, the predicted mean wave periods are overestimated using both built-in source terms and adjusted source terms. We associate it with the necessity of the adjusting of the DIA nonlinearity model in WAVEWATCH III to the conditions of the middle-sized reservoir. Test experiments on the adjusting were carried out. The work was supported by the

  13. Measurement of absolute frequency of continuous-wave terahertz radiation in real time using a free-running, dual-wavelength mode-locked, erbium-doped fibre laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoqing; Mizuguchi, Tatsuya; Zhao, Xin; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizuno, Takahiko; Yang, Yuli; Li, Cui; Bai, Ming; Zheng, Zheng; Yasui, Takeshi

    2017-02-10

    A single, free-running, dual-wavelength mode-locked, erbium-doped fibre laser was exploited to measure the absolute frequency of continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) radiation in real time using dual THz combs of photo-carriers (dual PC-THz combs). Two independent mode-locked laser beams with different wavelengths and different repetition frequencies were generated from this laser and were used to generate dual PC-THz combs having different frequency spacings in photoconductive antennae. Based on the dual PC-THz combs, the absolute frequency of CW-THz radiation was determined with a relative precision of 1.2 × 10-9 and a relative accuracy of 1.4 × 10-9 at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. Real-time determination of the absolute frequency of CW-THz radiation varying over a few tens of GHz was also demonstrated. Use of a single dual-wavelength mode-locked fibre laser, in place of dual mode-locked lasers, greatly reduced the size, complexity, and cost of the measurement system while maintaining the real-time capability and high measurement precision.

  14. High-energy Neutrino Emission from Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Prospects for Coincident Detection with Gravitational Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kiuchi, Kenta [Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2017-10-10

    We investigate current and future prospects for coincident detection of high-energy neutrinos and gravitational waves (GWs). Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are believed to originate from mergers of compact star binaries involving neutron stars. We estimate high-energy neutrino fluences from prompt emission, extended emission (EE), X-ray flares, and plateau emission, and we show that neutrino signals associated with the EE are the most promising. Assuming that the cosmic-ray loading factor is ∼10 and the Lorentz factor distribution is lognormal, we calculate the probability of neutrino detection from EE by current and future neutrino detectors, and we find that the quasi-simultaneous detection of high-energy neutrinos, gamma-rays, and GWs is possible with future instruments or even with current instruments for nearby SGRBs having EE. We also discuss stacking analyses that will also be useful with future experiments such as IceCube-Gen2.

  15. High-energy Neutrino Emission from Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Prospects for Coincident Detection with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter; Kiuchi, Kenta

    2017-10-01

    We investigate current and future prospects for coincident detection of high-energy neutrinos and gravitational waves (GWs). Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are believed to originate from mergers of compact star binaries involving neutron stars. We estimate high-energy neutrino fluences from prompt emission, extended emission (EE), X-ray flares, and plateau emission, and we show that neutrino signals associated with the EE are the most promising. Assuming that the cosmic-ray loading factor is ˜10 and the Lorentz factor distribution is lognormal, we calculate the probability of neutrino detection from EE by current and future neutrino detectors, and we find that the quasi-simultaneous detection of high-energy neutrinos, gamma-rays, and GWs is possible with future instruments or even with current instruments for nearby SGRBs having EE. We also discuss stacking analyses that will also be useful with future experiments such as IceCube-Gen2.

  16. Short-time fourth-order squeezing effects in spontaneous and stimulated four- and six-wave mixing processes

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, D K

    2003-01-01

    The concept of fourth-order squeezing of the electromagnetic field is investigated in the fundamental mode in spontaneous and stimulated four- and six-wave mixing processes under the short-time approximation based on a fully quantum mechanical approach. The coupled Heisenberg equations of motion involving real and imaginary parts of the quadrature operators are established. The possibility of obtaining fourth-order squeezing is studied. The dependence of fourth-order squeezing on the number of photons is also investigated. It is shown that fourth-order squeezing, which is a higher-order squeezing, allows a much larger fractional noise reduction than lower-order squeezing. It is shown that squeezing is greater in a stimulated process than the corresponding squeezing in spontaneous interaction. The conditions for obtaining maximum and minimum squeezing are obtained. We have also established the non-classical nature of squeezed radiation using the Glauber-Sudarshan representation.

  17. Short term effect of air pollution, noise and heat waves on preterm births in Madrid (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Virginia; Díaz, Julio; Ortiz, Cristina; Carmona, Rocío; Sáez, Marc; Linares, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) refers to delivery before 37 weeks of gestation and represents the leading cause of early-life mortality and morbidity in developed countries. PTB can lead to serious infant health outcomes. The etiology of PTB remains uncertain, but epidemiologic studies have consistently shown elevated risks with different environmental variables as traffic-related air pollution (TRAP). The aim of the study was to evaluate with time series methodology the short-term effect of air pollutants, noise levels and ambient temperature on the number of births and preterm births occurred in Madrid City during the 2001-2009 period. A time-series analysis was performed to assess the short term impact of daily mean concentrations (µg/m(3)) of PM2.5 and PM10, O3 and NO2. Measurements of Acoustic Pollution in dB(A) analyzed were: Leqd, equivalent diurnal noise level and Leqn, equivalent nocturnal noise level. Maximum and Minimum daily temperature (°C), mean Humidity in the air (%) and Atmospheric Pressure (HPa), were included too. Linear trends, seasonality, as well as the autoregressive nature of the series itself were controlled. We added as covariate the day of the week too. Autoregressive over-dispersed Poisson regression models were performed and the environmental variables were included with short-term lags (from 0 to 7 days) in reference to the date of birth. Firstly, simple models for the total number of births and preterm births were done separately. In a second stage, a model for total births adjusted for preterm births was performed. A total of 298,705 births were analyzed. The results of the final models were expressed in relative risks (RRs) for interquartile increase. We observed evidence of a short term effect at Lag 0, for the following environmental variables analyzed, PM2.5 (RR: 1.020; 95% CI:(1.008 1.032)) and O3 (RR: 1.012; 95% CI:(1.002 1.022)) concentrations and Leqd (RR: 1.139; 95% CI:( (1.124 1.154)) for the total number of births, and besides

  18. Wave Generation Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Høgedal, Michael; Christensen, Morten

    The intention of this manual is to provide some formulas and techniques which can be used for generating waves in hydraulic laboratories. Both long crested waves (2-D waves) and short crested waves (3-D waves) are considered....

  19. 320x240 pixel InGaAs/InP focal plane array for short-wave infrared and visible light imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tara; Dixon, Peter; Gagliardi, Mari-Anne; Masaun, Navneet

    2005-04-01

    We report on the recent production release of our 320x240 pixel InGaAs/InP focal plane array and camera for visible and short-wavelength infrared light imaging. For this camera, we have fabricated a substrate-removed backside-illuminated InGaAs/InP photodiode array hybridized to a silicon read out integrated circuit (ROIC). Removing the InP substrate from the focal plane array allows visible wavelengths, which would otherwise be absorbed by the InP substrate due to its 920 nm wavelength cut-off, to reach the pixels" active region. Quantum efficiency is approximately 15% at 500 nm, 70% at 850 nm, 85% at 1310 nm and 80% at 1550 nm. This focal plane array is useable for visible imaging as well as imaging eye-safe lasers and is of particular interest for day and low light level imaging as well as hyperspectral imaging.

  20. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  1. Finite Amplitude Electron Plasma Waves in a Cylindrical Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1978-01-01

    The nonlinear behaviour of the electron plasma wave propagating in a cylindrical plasma waveguide immersed in an infinite axial magnetic field is investigated using the Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky perturbation method, by means of which is deduced the nonlinear Schrodinger equation governing...... the long-time slow modulation of the wave amplitude. From this equation the amplitude-dependent frequency and wavenumber shifts are calculated, and it is found that the electron waves with short wavelengths are modulationally unstable with respect to long-wavelength, low-frequency perturbations...

  2. The Formation Rate of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts and Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G. Q.; Wang, F. Y.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study the luminosity function and formation rate of short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). First, we derive the {E}p{--}{L}p correlation using 16 sGRBs with redshift measurements and determine the pseudo redshifts of 284 Fermi sGRBs. Then, we use the Lynden-Bell c‑ method to study the luminosity function and formation rate of sGRBs without any assumptions. A strong evolution of luminosity L{(z)\\propto (1+z)}4.47 is found. After removing this evolution, the luminosity function is {{\\Psi }}(L)\\propto {L}0-0.29+/- 0.01 for dim sGRBs and \\psi (L)\\propto {L}0-1.07+/- 0.01 for bright sGRBs, with the break point 8.26× {10}50 erg s‑1. We also find that the formation rate decreases rapidly at z< 1.0, which is different from previous works. The local formation rate of sGRBs is 7.53 events Gpc‑3 yr‑1. Considering the beaming effect, the local formation rate of sGRBs including off-axis sGRBs is {203.31}-135.54+1152.09 events Gpc‑3 yr‑1. We also estimate that the event rate of sGRBs detected by the advanced LIGO and Virgo is {0.85}-0.56+4.82 events yr‑1 for an NS–NS binary.

  3. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  4. Genomic organization of duplicated short wave-sensitive and long wave-sensitive opsin genes in the green swordtail, Xiphophorus helleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson William S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long wave-sensitive (LWS opsin genes have undergone multiple lineage-specific duplication events throughout the evolution of teleost fishes. LWS repertoire expansions in live-bearing fishes (family Poeciliidae have equipped multiple species in this family with up to four LWS genes. Given that color vision, especially attraction to orange male coloration, is important to mate choice within poeciliids, LWS opsins have been proposed as candidate genes driving sexual selection in this family. To date the genomic organization of these genes has not been described in the family Poeciliidae, and little is known about the mechanisms regulating the expression of LWS opsins in any teleost. Results Two BAC clones containing the complete genomic repertoire of LWS opsin genes in the green swordtail fish, Xiphophorus helleri, were identified and sequenced. Three of the four LWS loci identified here were linked in a tandem array downstream of two tightly linked short wave-sensitive 2 (SWS2 opsin genes. The fourth LWS opsin gene, containing only a single intron, was not linked to the other three and is the product of a retrotransposition event. Genomic and phylogenetic results demonstrate that the LWS genes described here share a common evolutionary origin with those previously characterized in other poeciliids. Using qualitative RT-PCR and MSP we showed that each of the LWS and SWS2 opsins, as well as three other cone opsin genes and a single rod opsin gene, were expressed in the eyes of adult female and male X. helleri, contributing to six separate classes of adult retinal cone and rod cells with average λmax values of 365 nm, 405 nm, 459 nm, 499 nm, 534 nm and 568 nm. Comparative genomic analysis identified two candidate teleost opsin regulatory regions containing putative CRX binding sites and hormone response elements in upstream sequences of LWS gene regions of seven teleost species, including X. helleri. Conclusions We report the

  5. Evaluating the suitability of the SWAN/COSMO-2 model system to simulate short-crested surface waves for a narrow lake with complex bathymetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Graf

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectral wave model SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore was applied to Lake Zurich, a narrow pre-Alpine lake in Switzerland. The aim of the study is to investigate whether the model system consisting of SWAN and the numerical weather prediction model COSMO-2 is a suitable tool for wave forecasts for the pre-Alpine Lake Zurich. SWAN is able to simulate short-crested wind-generated surface waves. The model was forced with a time varying wind field taken from COSMO-2 with hourly outputs. Model simulations were compared with measured wave data at one near-shore site during a frontal passage associated with strong on-shore winds. The overall course of the measured wave height is well captured in the SWAN simulation: the wave amplitude significantly increases during the frontal passage followed by a transient drop in amplitude. The wave pattern on Lake Zurich is quite complex. It strongly depends on the inherent variability of the wind field and on the external forcing due to the surrounding complex topography. The influence of the temporal wind resolution is further studied with two sensitivity experiments. The first one considers a low-pass filtered wind field, based on a 2-h running mean of COSMO-2 output, and the second experiment uses simple synthetic gusts, which are implemented into the SWAN model and take into account short-term fluctuations of wind speed at 1-sec resolution. The wave field significantly differs for the 1-h and 2-h simulations, but is only negligibly affected by the gusts.

  6. On the unstable mode merging of gravity-inertial waves with Rossby waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We recapitulate the results of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves in a rotating, stratified atmosphere. The system is shown to exhibit a "local" (JWKB instability whenever the phase speed of the low-frequency-long wavelength westward propagating Rossby wave exceeds the phase speed ("Kelvin" speed of the high frequency-short wavelength gravity-inertial wave. This condition ensures that mode merging, leading to instability, takes place in some intermediate band of frequencies and wave numbers. The contention that such an instability is "spurious" is not convincing. The energy source of the instability resides in the background enthalpy which can be released by the action of the gravitational buoyancy force, through the combined wave modes.

  7. The parallel-antiparallel signal difference in double-wave-vector diffusion-weighted MR at short mixing times: a phase evolution perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Experiments with two diffusion weightings applied in direct succession in a single acquisition, so-called double- or two-wave-vector diffusion-weighting (DWV) experiments at short mixing times, have been shown to be a promising tool to estimate cell or compartment sizes, e.g. in living tissue. The basic theory for such experiments predicts that the signal decays for parallel and antiparallel wave vector orientations differ by a factor of three for small wave vectors. This seems to be surprising because in standard, single-wave-vector experiments the polarity of the diffusion weighting has no influence on the signal attenuation. Thus, the question how this difference can be understood more pictorially is often raised. In this rather educational manuscript, the phase evolution during a DWV experiment for simple geometries, e.g. diffusion between parallel, impermeable planes oriented perpendicular to the wave vectors, is considered step-by-step and demonstrates how the signal difference develops. Considering the populations of the phase distributions obtained, the factor of three between the signal decays which is predicted by the theory can be reproduced. Furthermore, the intermediate signal decay for orthogonal wave vector orientations can be derived when investigating diffusion in a box. Thus, the presented "phase gymnastics" approach may help to understand the signal modulation observed in DWV experiments at short mixing times. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Optoelectronic cross-injection locking of a dual-wavelength photonic integrated circuit for low-phase-noise millimeter-wave generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervella, Gaël; Van Dijk, Frederic; Pillet, Grégoire; Lamponi, Marco; Chtioui, Mourad; Morvan, Loïc; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-08-01

    We report on the stabilization of a 90-GHz millimeter-wave signal generated from a fully integrated photonic circuit. The chip consists of two DFB single-mode lasers whose optical signals are combined on a fast photodiode to generate a largely tunable heterodyne beat note. We generate an optical comb from each laser with a microwave synthesizer, and by self-injecting the resulting signal, we mutually correlate the phase noise of each DFB and stabilize the beatnote on a multiple of the frequency delivered by the synthesizer. The performances achieved beat note linewidth below 30 Hz.

  9. Wavelength converter technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloch, Allan; Hansen, Peter Bukhave; Poulsen, Henrik Nørskov

    1999-01-01

    Wavelength conversion is important since it ensures full flexibility of the WDM network layer. Progress in optical wavelength converter technology is reviewed with emphasis on all-optical wavelength converter types based on semiconductor optical amplifiers.......Wavelength conversion is important since it ensures full flexibility of the WDM network layer. Progress in optical wavelength converter technology is reviewed with emphasis on all-optical wavelength converter types based on semiconductor optical amplifiers....

  10. Wavelength converter technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloch, Allan; Hansen, Peter Bukhave; Poulsen, Henrik Nørskov

    1999-01-01

    Wavelength conversion is important since it ensures full flexibility of the WDM network layer. Progress in optical wavelength converter technology is reviewed with emphasis on air-optical wavelength converter types based on semiconductor optical amplifiers.......Wavelength conversion is important since it ensures full flexibility of the WDM network layer. Progress in optical wavelength converter technology is reviewed with emphasis on air-optical wavelength converter types based on semiconductor optical amplifiers....

  11. Extreme events in Faraday waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzmann, Horst; Shats, Michael; Xia, Hua

    2014-05-01

    Observations of extreme wave events in the ocean are rare due to their low statistical probability. In the laboratory however, the evolution of extreme wave events can be studied in great detail with high spatial and temporal resolution. The reported surface wave experiments in the short wavelength gravity-capillary range aim to contribute to the understanding of some of the underlying mechanisms for rogue wave generation. In this talk, we report on extreme wave events in parametrically excited Faraday waves. Faraday waves appear if a fluid is accelerated (normal to the fluid surface) above a critical threshold. A variety of novel tools have been deployed to characterize the 2D surface elevation. The results presented show spatio-temporal and statistical data on the surface wave conditions leading up to extreme wave events. The peak in wave amplitude during such an event is shown to exceed six times the standard deviation of the average wave field with significantly increased statistical probability compared to the background wave field [1]. The experiments also show that parametrically excited waves can be viewed as assembles of oscillons [2] (or oscillating solitons) where modulation instability seems to play a crucial role in their formation. More detailed studies on the oscillon dynamics reveal that the onset of an increased probability of extreme wave events correlates with the increase in the oscillons mobility and merger [3]. Reference: 1. Xia H., Maimbourg T., Punzmann H., and Shats M., Oscillon dynamics and rogue wave generation in Faraday surface ripples, Physical Review Letters 109, 114502 (2012) 2. Shats M., Xia H., and Punzmann H., Parametrically excited water surface ripples as ensembles of oscillons, Physical Review Letters 108, 034502 (2012) 3. Shats M., Punzmann H., Xia H., Capillary rogue waves, Physical Review Letters, 104, 104503 (2010)

  12. InGaAs/GaAsSb Type-II superlattice based photodiodes for short wave infrared detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliel, Y.; Cohen-Elias, D.; Sicron, N.; Grimberg, I.; Snapi, N.; Paltiel, Y.; Katz, M.

    2017-08-01

    Short Wave Infra-Red (SWIR) photodetectors operating above the response cutoff of InGaAs- based detectors (1.7-2.5 μm) are required for both defense and civil applications. Type II Super-Lattices (T2SL) were recently proposed For near- room temperature SWIR detection as a possible system enabling bandgap adjustment in the required range. The work presented here focuses on a T2SL with alternating nano-layers of InGaAs and GaAsSb lattice-matched to an InP substrate. A near room temperature SWIR cutoff of 2.4 μm was measured. Electrical junctions were realized using Zn diffusion p-doping process. We realized and studied both mesa- and selective diffusion- based p-i-n photodiodes. Dark currents of mesa-based devices were 1.5 mA/cm2 and 32 μA/cm2 at 300 and 230 K respectively. Dark currents were reduced to 1.2 mA/cm2 and 12 μA/cm2 respectively by utilizing the selective diffusion process. The effect of operating voltage is discussed. At 300 K the quantum efficiency was up to 40% at 2.18 μm in mesa devices. D∗ was 1.7 ×1010cm ·√{Hz } /W at 2 μm.

  13. A Non-Destructive Distinctive Method for Discrimination of Automobile Lubricant Variety by Visible and Short-Wave Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel method which is a combination of wavelet packet transform (WPT, uninformative variable elimination by partial least squares (UVE-PLS and simulated annealing (SA to extract best variance information among different varieties of lubricants is presented. A total of 180 samples (60 for each variety were characterized on the basis of visible and short-wave infrared spectroscopy (VIS-SWNIR, and 90 samples (30 for each variety were randomly selected for the calibration set, whereas, the remaining 90 samples (30 for each variety were used for the validation set. The spectral data was split into different frequency bands by WPT, and different frequency bands were obtained. SA was employed to look for the best variance band (BVB among different varieties of lubricants. In order to improve prediction precision further, BVB was processed by UVE-PLS and the optimal cutoff threshold of UVE was found by SA. Finally, five variables were mined, and were set as inputs for a least square-support vector machine (LS-SVM to build the recognition model. An optimal model with a correlation coefficient (R of 0.9850 and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP of 0.0827 was obtained. The overall results indicated that the method of combining WPT, UVE-PLS and SA was a powerful way to select diagnostic information for discrimination among different varieties of lubricating oil, furthermore, a more parsimonious and efficient LS-SVM model could be obtained.

  14. Satellite-based forest monitoring: spatial and temporal forecast of growing index and short-wave infrared band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bayr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For detecting anomalies or interventions in the field of forest monitoring we propose an approach based on the spatial and temporal forecast of satellite time series data. For each pixel of the satellite image three different types of forecasts are provided, namely spatial, temporal and combined spatio-temporal forecast. Spatial forecast means that a clustering algorithm is used to group the time series data based on the features normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI and the short-wave infrared band (SWIR. For estimation of the typical temporal trajectory of the NDVI and SWIR during the vegetation period of each spatial cluster, we apply several methods of functional data analysis including functional principal component analysis, and a novel form of random regression forests with online learning (streaming capability. The temporal forecast is carried out by means of functional time series analysis and an autoregressive integrated moving average model. The combination of the temporal forecasts, which is based on the past of the considered pixel, and spatial forecasts, which is based on highly correlated pixels within one cluster and their past, is performed by functional data analysis, and a variant of random regression forests adapted to online learning capabilities. For evaluation of the methods, the approaches are applied to a study area in Germany for monitoring forest damages caused by wind-storm, and to a study area in Spain for monitoring forest fires.

  15. Satellite-based forest monitoring: spatial and temporal forecast of growing index and short-wave infrared band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayr, Caroline; Gallaun, Heinz; Kleb, Ulrike; Kornberger, Birgit; Steinegger, Martin; Winter, Martin

    2016-04-18

    For detecting anomalies or interventions in the field of forest monitoring we propose an approach based on the spatial and temporal forecast of satellite time series data. For each pixel of the satellite image three different types of forecasts are provided, namely spatial, temporal and combined spatio-temporal forecast. Spatial forecast means that a clustering algorithm is used to group the time series data based on the features normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the short-wave infrared band (SWIR). For estimation of the typical temporal trajectory of the NDVI and SWIR during the vegetation period of each spatial cluster, we apply several methods of functional data analysis including functional principal component analysis, and a novel form of random regression forests with online learning (streaming) capability. The temporal forecast is carried out by means of functional time series analysis and an autoregressive integrated moving average model. The combination of the temporal forecasts, which is based on the past of the considered pixel, and spatial forecasts, which is based on highly correlated pixels within one cluster and their past, is performed by functional data analysis, and a variant of random regression forests adapted to online learning capabilities. For evaluation of the methods, the approaches are applied to a study area in Germany for monitoring forest damages caused by wind-storm, and to a study area in Spain for monitoring forest fires.

  16. A low cost short wave near infrared spectrophotometer: application for determination of quality parameters of diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga, Fabiano Barbieri; Pasquini, Celio

    2010-06-18

    A low cost absorption spectrophotometer for the short wave near infrared spectral region (850-1050 nm) is described. The spectrophotometer is basically composed of a conventional dichroic lamp, a long-pass filter, a sample cell and a Czerny-Turner type polychromator coupled to a 1024 pixel non-cooled photodiode array. A preliminary evaluation of the spectrophotometer showed good repeatability of the first derivative of the spectra at a constant room temperature and the possibility of assigning some spectral regions to different C-H stretching third overtones. Finally, the spectrophotometer was successfully applied for the analysis of diesel samples and the determination of some of their quality parameters using partial least squares calibration models. The values found for the root mean square error of prediction using external validation were 0.5 for the cetane index and from 2.5 to 5.0 degrees C for the temperatures achieved during distillation when obtaining 10, 50, 85, and 90% (v/v) of the distilled sample, respectively. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Individual differences provide psychophysical evidence for separate on- and off-pathways deriving from short-wave cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosten, Jenny M; Bargary, Gary; Goodbourn, Patrick T; Hogg, Ruth E; Lawrance-Owen, Adam J; Mollon, J D

    2014-04-01

    Distinct neural populations carry signals from short-wave (S) cones. We used individual differences to test whether two types of pathways, those that receive excitatory input (S+) and those that receive inhibitory input (S-), contribute independently to psychophysical performance. We also conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to look for genetic correlates of the individual differences. Our psychophysical test was based on the Cambridge Color Test, but detection thresholds were measured separately for S-cone spatial increments and decrements. Our participants were 1060 healthy adults aged 16-40. Test-retest reliabilities for thresholds were good (ρ=0.64 for S-cone increments, 0.67 for decrements and 0.73 for the average of the two). "Regression scores," isolating variability unique to incremental or decremental sensitivity, were also reliable (ρ=0.53 for increments and ρ=0.51 for decrements). The correlation between incremental and decremental thresholds was ρ=0.65. No genetic markers reached genome-wide significance (pindividual differences in S-cone sensitivity in a normal adult population. Though a portion of the variance in sensitivity is shared between incremental and decremental sensitivity, over 26% of the variance is stable across individuals, but unique to increments or decrements, suggesting distinct neural substrates. Some of the variability in sensitivity is likely to be genetic. We note that four of the suggestive associations found in the GWAS are with genes that are involved in glucose metabolism or have been associated with diabetes.

  18. Millimeter Wave Systems for Airports and Short-Range Aviation Communications: A Survey of the Current Channel Models at mmWave Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Mahfuza; Mehrpouyan, Hani; Matolak, David; Guvenc, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Millimeter-wave (mmWave) communications will play a key role in enhancing the throughput, reliability, and security of next generation wireless networks. These advancements are achieved through the large bandwidth available in this band and through the use of highly directional links that will be used to overcome the large pathloss at these frequencies. Although the terrestrial application of mmWave systems is advancing at a rapid pace, the use of mmWave communication systems in aviation systems or airports is still in its infancy. This can be attributed to the challenges related to radio technology and lack of development, and characterization of mmWave wireless channels for the aviation field and the airport environment. Consequently, one of our goals is to develop methodologies that support mmWave air to ground links, and various links at airports, by applying new localization schemes that allow for application of highly directional links that can be deployed over longer distances despite the high path loss at mmWave frequencies. However, a very thorough understanding of the mmWave channel models are needed to enable such new applications. To this end, in this paper, we present a survey of the current channel models in the mmWave band. The 3-dimensional statistical channel model is also reviewed and its parameters and typical characteristics for this model are identified and computed through simulation for the Boise metropolitan area.

  19. The dynamics of interacting nonlinearities governing long wavelength driftwave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, David E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Because of the ubiquitous nature of turbulence and the vast array of different systems which have turbulent solutions, the study of turbulence is an area of active research. Much present day understanding of turbulence is rooted in the well established properties of homogeneous Navier-Stokes turbulence, which, due to its relative simplicity, allows for approximate analytic solutions. This work examines a group of turbulent systems with marked differences from Navier-Stokes turbulence, and attempts to quantify some of their properties. This group of systems represents a variety of drift wave fluctuations believed to be of fundamental importance in laboratory fusion devices. From extensive simulation of simple local fluid models of long wavelength drift wave turbulence in tokamaks, a reasonably complete picture of the basic properties of spectral transfer and saturation has emerged. These studies indicate that many conventional notions concerning directions of cascades, locality and isotropy of transfer, frequencies of fluctuations, and stationarity of saturation are not valid for moderate to long wavelengths. In particular, spectral energy transfer at long wavelengths is dominated by the E x B nonlinearity, which carries energy to short scale in a manner that is highly nonlocal and anisotropic. In marked contrast to the canonical self-similar cascade dynamics of Kolmogorov, energy is efficiently passed between modes separated by the entire spectrum range in a correlation time. At short wavelengths, transfer is dominated by the polarization drift nonlinearity. While the standard dual cascade applies in this subrange, it is found that finite spectrum size can produce cascades that are reverse directed and are nonconservative in enstrophy and energy similarity ranges. In regions where both nonlinearities are important, cross-coupling between the nolinearities gives rise to large no frequency shifts as well as changes in the spectral dynamics.

  20. High Power Short Wavelength Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-11-01

    grid of equally spaced energy values. This results in a large set (typically, > 500) of coupled algebraic equations, which is solved by an iterative...volume, and the 12 and 14 liter designations below their respective lineal dimensions indicate the available extraction volume. A5 mentioned in

  1. Short-Wavelength Countermeasures for Circadian Desynchrony

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heller, H. C; Smith, Mark

    2008-01-01

    ... cognitive functionality and restorative sleep. Our work on mice produced the unexpected result that exposure to intermittent millisecond flashes of light distributed over an hour for a total of only 120 msec...

  2. Physics of short-wavelength-laser design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1981-01-01

    The physics and design of vuv and soft x-ray lasers pumped by ICF class high intensity infrared laser drivers are described (for example, the SHIVA laser facility at LLNL). Laser design and physics issues are discussed in the case of a photoionization pumping scheme involving Ne II and line pumping schemes involving H-like and He-like neon.

  3. An evaluation of safety guidelines to restrict exposure to stray radiofrequency radiation from short-wave diathermy units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, Nora [School of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); O' Hare, Neil [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James' s Hospital, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Gormley, John [School of Physiotherapy, Trinity College Dublin, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St James' s Hospital, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2004-07-07

    Short-wave diathermy (SWD), a form of radiofrequency radiation used therapeutically by physiotherapists, may be applied in continuous (CSWD) or pulsed (PSWD) mode using either capacitive or inductive methods. Stray radiation emitted by these units may exceed exposure guidelines close to the equipment. Discrepant guidelines exist on a safe distance from an operating unit for operators and other personnel. Stray electric (E-field) and magnetic (H-field) field strengths from 10 SWD units in six departments were examined using a PMM 8053 meter and two isotropic probes (EP-330, HP-032). A 5 l saline phantom completed the patient circuit. Measurements were recorded in eight directions between 0.5 m and 2 m at hip and eye levels while the units operated at maximum output and data compared to current guidelines. Results found stray fields from capacitive CSWD fell below operator limits at 2 m (E-field 4.8-39.8 V/m; H-field 0.015-0.072 A/m) and at 1 m for inductive CSWD (E-field 0-36 V/m; H-field 0.01-0.065 A/m). Capacitive PSWD fields fell below the limits at 1.5 m (E-field 1.2-19.9 V/m; H-field 0.002-0.045 A/m) and at 1m for inductive PSWD (E-field 0.7-4.0 V/m; H-field 0.009-0.03 A/m). An extra 0.5 m was required before fields fell below the guidelines for other personnel. These results demonstrate, under a worst case scenario, emissions from SWD exceed the guidelines for operators at distances currently recommended as safe. Future guidelines should include recommendations for personnel other than physiotherapists.

  4. Sparse short-distance connections enhance calcium wave propagation in a 3D model of astrocyte networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallouette, Jules; De Pittà, Maurizio; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Berry, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, astrocytes have been considered to couple via gap-junctions into a syncytium with only rudimentary spatial organization. However, this view is challenged by growing experimental evidence that astrocytes organize as a proper gap-junction mediated network with more complex region-dependent properties. On the other hand, the propagation range of intercellular calcium waves (ICW) within astrocyte populations is as well highly variable, depending on the brain region considered. This suggests that the variability of the topology of gap-junction couplings could play a role in the variability of the ICW propagation range. Since this hypothesis is very difficult to investigate with current experimental approaches, we explore it here using a biophysically realistic model of three-dimensional astrocyte networks in which we varied the topology of the astrocyte network, while keeping intracellular properties and spatial cell distribution and density constant. Computer simulations of the model suggest that changing the topology of the network is indeed sufficient to reproduce the distinct ranges of ICW propagation reported experimentally. Unexpectedly, our simulations also predict that sparse connectivity and restriction of gap-junction couplings to short distances should favor propagation while long–distance or dense connectivity should impair it. Altogether, our results provide support to recent experimental findings that point toward a significant functional role of the organization of gap-junction couplings into proper astroglial networks. Dynamic control of this topology by neurons and signaling molecules could thus constitute a new type of regulation of neuron-glia and glia-glia interactions. PMID:24795613

  5. An evaluation of safety guidelines to restrict exposure to stray radiofrequency radiation from short-wave diathermy units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Nora; O'Hare, Neil; Gormley, John

    2004-07-01

    Short-wave diathermy (SWD), a form of radiofrequency radiation used therapeutically by physiotherapists, may be applied in continuous (CSWD) or pulsed (PSWD) mode using either capacitive or inductive methods. Stray radiation emitted by these units may exceed exposure guidelines close to the equipment. Discrepant guidelines exist on a safe distance from an operating unit for operators and other personnel. Stray electric (E-field) and magnetic (H-field) field strengths from 10 SWD units in six departments were examined using a PMM 8053 meter and two isotropic probes (EP-330, HP-032). A 5 l saline phantom completed the patient circuit. Measurements were recorded in eight directions between 0.5 m and 2 m at hip and eye levels while the units operated at maximum output and data compared to current guidelines. Results found stray fields from capacitive CSWD fell below operator limits at 2 m (E-field 4.8-39.8 V/m; H-field 0.015-0.072 A/m) and at 1 m for inductive CSWD (E-field 0-36 V/m; H-field 0.01-0.065 A/m). Capacitive PSWD fields fell below the limits at 1.5 m (E-field 1.2-19.9 V/m; H-field 0.002-0.045 A/m) and at 1m for inductive PSWD (E-field 0.7-4.0 V/m; H-field 0.009-0.03 A/m). An extra 0.5 m was required before fields fell below the guidelines for other personnel. These results demonstrate, under a worst case scenario, emissions from SWD exceed the guidelines for operators at distances currently recommended as safe. Future guidelines should include recommendations for personnel other than physiotherapists.

  6. On statistical properties of wave amplitudes in stormy sea. Effect of short-crestedness; Daihakoji no haro no tokeiteki seishitsu ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimoto, H. [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Since ocean waves encountered by ocean vessels or offshore structures in actual sea areas present extremely irregular variations, a stochastic method is necessary to estimate their statistical properties. This paper first shows a calculation method for probability density function for water level variation which strictly incorporates a secondary non-linear effect containing directional dispersibility by modeling ocean waves as short-crested irregular waves. Then, the paper specifically elucidates effects of the directional dispersibility of ocean waves on statistical amount of amplitudes by deriving the statistical amount of the amplitudes based on the probability density function of the water level variation and by using a numerical simulation. The paper finally takes up data of waves in stormy sea observed in an experiment in an actual sea area, compares the result with that of theoretical calculations, and evaluates reasonability of this method. With this estimation method, individual secondary components or components of difference and sum may be subjected to influence of the directional dispersibility, but they do not differ much from the case of long-crested irregular waves on the whole. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Resonances of periodic metal-dielectric structures at the infrared wavelength region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Oren

    2002-01-01

    Metal meshes have been used as reflectors in radar receivers for wavelength much longer than the periodic constant of the conducting wires and as optical reflectors in a Fabry-Perot in the far infrared. Cross shaped metal meshes can be used as band pass filters but the design theory and near field properties have not been known. Transmittance of thin, single-layer and multiplayer metal meshes has been investigated using Micro-Strips, yielding numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. The near field effect was studied for two alignment configurations of cross shaped metal meshes, both free standing and with dielectrics, and transmission line theory was applied for the interpretation as an oscillator mode model. The model for the interpretation of the mode of a single mesh uses a pair of coupled surface wave (that is one standing wave on each side). The transmittance of multi-layer metal meshes are interpreted as modes composed of resonance modes of the single mesh, the Fabry-Perot modes depending on the separation of the meshes, and their interaction. Experimental data for thick inductive cross shaped metal meshes agree very well with Micro-Strips calculations in the long wavelength region and with Fourier Modal method calculations in the short wavelength. The transmittances of all these meshes show similar resonance peaks and the same dependence on thickness of the short wavelength peaks, suggesting that the interpretation using the oscillator mode model is valid in the short and long wavelength region. Stacks of thin metal meshes have been studied with Micro-Strips and transmission line theory. Narrow transmission regions for inductive meshes and narrow bandgap regions for capacitive meshes may be obtained from layered structures for the aligned configuration and spacing of 1/4 resonance wavelength of a single layer.

  8. Excitation of parasitic waves near cutoff in forward-wave amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sinitsyn, Oleksandr V.; Antonsen, Thomas M., Jr.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, excitation of parasitic waves near cutoff in forward-wave amplifiers is studied in a rather general form. This problem is important for developing high-power sources of coherent, phase controlled short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation because just the waves which can be excited near cutoff have low group velocities. Since the wave coupling to an electron beam is inversely proportional to the group velocity, these waves are the most dangerous parasitic waves preventing stable amplification of desired signal waves. Two effects are analyzed in the paper. The first one is the effect of signal wave parameters on the self-excitation conditions of such parasitic waves. The second effect is the role of the beam geometry on excitation of these parasitic waves in forward-wave amplifiers with spatially extended interaction space, such as sheet-beam devices. It is shown that a large-amplitude signal wave can greatly influence the self-excitation conditions of the parasitic waves which define stability of operation. Therefore the effect described is important for accurate designing of high-power amplifiers of electromagnetic waves.

  9. Effect of Short-Crestedness and Obliquity on Non-Breaking and Breaking Wave Forces Applied to Vertical Caisson Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Luca; Lamberti, Alberto; Frigaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses wave forces applied to vertical caisson breakwaters. Design diagrams are proposed to evaluate the reduction of the breaker wave force with increasing horizontal length of the units. A model in 1:100 scale of a typical Italian vertical breakwater was tested under multidirectio......This paper addresses wave forces applied to vertical caisson breakwaters. Design diagrams are proposed to evaluate the reduction of the breaker wave force with increasing horizontal length of the units. A model in 1:100 scale of a typical Italian vertical breakwater was tested under...

  10. Gravitational wave memory in ΛCDM cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Lydia; Garfinkle, David; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-11-01

    We examine gravitational wave memory in the case where sources and detector are in a ΛCDM cosmology. We consider the case where the Universe can be highly inhomogeneous, but gravitational radiation is treated in the short wavelength approximation. We find results very similar to those of gravitational wave memory in an asymptotically flat spacetime; however, the overall magnitude of the memory effect is enhanced by a redshift-dependent factor. In addition, we find the memory can be affected by lensing.

  11. Heat input into a room due to short-wave solar radiation. Pt. 1; Waermeeintrag in den Raum aufgrund kurzwelliger Einstrahlung. T. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, C. [Institut fuer Luft- und Kaeltetechnik gemeinnuetzige Gesellschaft mbH Dresden (Germany); Rouvel, L.

    2007-07-15

    The calculation of short-wave solar radiation onto components of any orientation or inclination as well as the transmittance of transparent components is quantified. An evaluation factor permits the calculation of diffuse and direct insolation depending on the degree of cloudiness and the position of the sun. The energy input via transparent components is evaluated by the total energy transmittance - separate for direct and diffuse radiation with the sunscreen drawn. (orig.)

  12. Heat input into a room due to short-wave solar radiation. Pt. 2; Waermeeintrag in den Raum aufgrund kurzwelliger Einstrahlung. T. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, C. [Institut fuer Luft- und Kaeltetechnik gGmbH, Dresden (Germany); Rouvel, L.

    2007-09-15

    The calculation of short-wave solar radiation onto components of any orientation or inclination as well as the transmittance of transparent components is quantified. An evaluation factor permits the calculation of diffuse and direct insolation depending on the degree of cloudiness and the position of the sun. The energy input via transparent components is evaluated by the total energy transmittance - separate for direct and diffuse radiation with the sunscreen drawn. (orig.)

  13. Increased Range of Motion and Function in an Individual with Breast Cancer and Necrotizing Fasciitis—Manual Therapy and Pulsed Short-Wave Diathermy Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Wayne Johnson; Draper, David O.

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia affecting those predisposed to immune system compromise. It is a life threatening condition; mortality can be reduced by rapid diagnosis, adequate early surgical debridement and antibiotic ointment. In this case report we present the use of manual therapy (MT) techniques, joint and soft tissue mobilization, following a regimen of pulsed short wave diathermy (PSWD) in the treatment of a woman 3 years ...

  14. Effect of pulsed short-wave diathermy on pain and function of subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee: a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Y; Zilberman, R; Porat, R; Nahir, A M

    2005-05-01

    To examine the effects of pulsed short-wave diathermy (PSWD), delivered at an intensity sufficient to induce a thermal sensation and at an athermal intensity, in comparison with a placebo short-wave diathermy treatment, on reported pain, stiffness and functional ability and on mobility performance of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. A placebo-controlled double-blind trial with sequential allocation of patients to different treatment groups. Outpatient physiotherapy department. One hundred and three consecutive patients, mean age 73.7 (+/-6.6) years with osteoarthritis of one or both knees for at least three months. All participants received three 20-min-long treatments per week for three weeks. One group received PSWD with mean power of 18 W (thermal effect), one group received PSWD with mean power of 1.8 W (athermal effect), and one group received sham short-wave diathermy treatment. Patients were assessed before the initial treatment, immediately following the last treatment, and at a three-month follow-up. Outcome measures included the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, which assessed reported pain, stiffness, and functional ability, and four measures of mobility performance: Timed Get Up and Go test (TGUG), stair-climbing, stair, descending and a 3-min walk. A difference across time was observed for the pain and stiffness categories of the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index (p = 0.033 and p = 0.008, respectively), with no differences between groups. No other significant differences across time or between groups were observed in any of the other measures. The findings do not demonstrate pulsed short-wave diathermy, as it is utilized in clinical settings, to be effective in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee.

  15. Search for transient gravitational waves in coincidence with short-duration radio transients during 2007-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderon Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Simakov, D.; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stiles, C.D.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Archibald, A. M.; Banaszak, S.; Berndsen, A.; Boyles, J.; Cardoso, R. F.; Chawla, P.; Cherry, A.; Dartez, L. P.; Day-Lewis, F.D.; Epstein, C. R.; Ford, A. J.; Flanigan, J.; Garcia, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hinojosa, J; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Keane, E. F.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Leake, S.; Lorimer, D.; Lunsford, G.; Lynch, R. S.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; McPhee, C. A.; Penucci, T.; Ransom, S.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Rohr, M. D. W.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; van Leeuwen, J.; Walker, A. N.; Wells, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    We present an archival search for transient gravitational-wave bursts in coincidence with 27 single-pulse triggers from Green Bank Telescope pulsar surveys, using the LIGO, Virgo, and GEO interferometer network. We also discuss a check for gravitational-wave signals in coincidence with Parkes fast

  16. Harmonic generation by internal waves in a thermohaline staircase with rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Scott

    2017-11-01

    Thermohaline staircases, generated by double-diffusive convection, are found in many regions of the ocean. Oceanic internal waves interact with these staircases. Recent results show that, in linear theory, internal waves with sufficiently long wavelengths are transmitted through the staircase, while short wavelengths may be reflected. However, nonlinear self-interaction of internal waves with the sharp density jumps within the staircase is expected to generate double-wavenumber harmonics of the incident waves. This effect removes energy from the incident waves, reducing the transmitted energy in some cases. Energy transferred to the harmonic waves may also impact the stability of the staircase. Here, weakly nonlinear theory is used to explore the implications of this nonlinear effect on the dynamics of internal waves in oceanic thermohaline staircases. Rotation is included, and variations with latitude are considered.

  17. Feasibility Study of Using Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (SWIR-CRDS) for Biological Agent Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aker, Pam M.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Richard M.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2007-10-01

    This project focused on determining the feasibility of using short wave infrared (SWIR) cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as a means for real-time detection of biological aerosols. The first part of the project involved identifying biological agent signatures that could be detected with SWIR CRDS. After an exhaustive search of the open literature it was determined that whole biological spores and/or cells would not be good candidates for direct SWIR CRDS probing because they have no unique SWIR signatures. It was postulated that while whole cells or spores are not good candidates for SWIR CRDS detection, their pyrolysis break-down products might be. A literature search was then conducted to find biological pyrolysis products with low molecular weights and high symmetry since these species most likely would have overtone and combination vibrational bands that can be detected in the SWIR. It was determined that pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide were good candidates for evaluation. These molecules are formed when proteins and porphyrins, proteins and dipicolinic acid, and dipicolinic acid are pyrolyzed, respectively. The second part of the project involved measuring quantitative SWIR spectra of pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide in PNNL’s FTIR Spectroscopy Laboratory. Spectral information about these molecules, in the vapor phase is sparse – there were only a few prior studies that measured line positions and no information on absorption cross sections. Absorption cross sections are needed in order to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity, and line position determines what type of laser will be needed for the sensor. The results of the spectroscopy studies allowed us to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity for pyrrole to be 3 x 1012 molec cm-3 or 0.1 ppmv, and for pyridine it was 1.5 x 1015 molec cm-3 or 0.6 ppmv. These detection sensitivity limits are close what we have measured for ammonia. Given these detection limits we then estimated the

  18. Observationally constrained modeling of sound in curved ocean internal waves: examination of deep ducting and surface ducting at short range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Timothy F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2011-09-01

    A study of 400 Hz sound focusing and ducting effects in a packet of curved nonlinear internal waves in shallow water is presented. Sound propagation roughly along the crests of the waves is simulated with a three-dimensional parabolic equation computational code, and the results are compared to measured propagation along fixed 3 and 6 km source/receiver paths. The measurements were made on the shelf of the South China Sea northeast of Tung-Sha Island. Construction of the time-varying three-dimensional sound-speed fields used in the modeling simulations was guided by environmental data collected concurrently with the acoustic data. Computed three-dimensional propagation results compare well with field observations. The simulations allow identification of time-dependent sound forward scattering and ducting processes within the curved internal gravity waves. Strong acoustic intensity enhancement was observed during passage of high-amplitude nonlinear waves over the source/receiver paths, and is replicated in the model. The waves were typical of the region (35 m vertical displacement). Two types of ducting are found in the model, which occur asynchronously. One type is three-dimensional modal trapping in deep ducts within the wave crests (shallow thermocline zones). The second type is surface ducting within the wave troughs (deep thermocline zones). © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  19. Investigating of short period gravity waves using multi-beam experiments above Andenes in the polar summer mesopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, Gunter; Sommer, Svenja; Chau, Jorge L.; Latteck, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    In summer 2013 the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) conducted a multi-beam scanning experiment using 65 different beam directions. These systematic scanning experiments are analysed with respect to gravity waves with periods from 4 minutes up to 8 hours using polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) as tracer. The gravity waves are investigated by decomposing the wind field into a mean wind and superimposed tidal components (diurnal, semidiurnal and terdiurnal). After subtracting these mean winds and tides we get a residuum wind dominated by the gravity waves with periods shorter than 8 hours. Using this approach we have been able to identified significant wave burst, with amplitudes as high as 50 m/s and 10-20 m/s for the horizontal and vertical wind components, respectively. In addition, we have identified events that indicate the development of KH-instabilities.

  20. Short-term effects of thermotherapy for spasticity on tibial nerve F-waves in post-stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shuji; Kawahira, Kazumi; Etoh, Seiji; Ikeda, Satoshi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2006-03-01

    Thermotherapy is generally considered appropriate for post-stroke patients with spasticity, yet its acute antispastic effects have not been comprehensively investigated. F-wave parameters have been used to demonstrate changes in motor neuron excitability in spasticity and pharmacological antispastic therapy. The present study aimed to confirm the efficacy of thermotherapy for spasticity by evaluating alterations in F-wave parameters in ten male post-stroke patients with spastic hemiparesis (mean age: 49.0±15.0 years) and ten healthy male controls (mean age: 48.7±4.4 years). The subjects were immersed in water at 41°C for 10 min. Recordings were made over the abductor hallucis muscle, and antidromic stimulation was performed on the tibial nerve at the ankle. Twenty F-waves were recorded before, immediately after, and 30 min following thermotherapy for each subject. F-wave amplitude and F-wave/M-response ratio were determined. Changes in body temperature and surface-skin temperature were monitored simultaneously. The mean and maximum values of both F-wave parameters were higher on the affected side before thermotherapy. In the post-stroke patients, the mean and maximum values of both parameters were significantly reduced after thermotherapy ( Prole in decreased spasticity. Surface-skin temperature increased immediately after thermotherapy in both groups and returned to baseline 30 min later. These findings demonstrate that thermotherapy is an effective nonpharmacological antispastic treatment that might facilitate stroke rehabilitation.

  1. Numerical simulations of short-mixing-time double-wave-vector diffusion-weighting experiments with multiple concatenations on whole-body MR systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2010-12-01

    Double- or two-wave-vector diffusion-weighting experiments with short mixing times in which two diffusion-weighting periods are applied in direct succession, are a promising tool to estimate cell sizes in the living tissue. However, the underlying effect, a signal difference between parallel and antiparallel wave vector orientations, is considerably reduced for the long gradient pulses required on whole-body MR systems. Recently, it has been shown that multiple concatenations of the two wave vectors in a single acquisition can double the modulation amplitude if short gradient pulses are used. In this study, numerical simulations of such experiments were performed with parameters achievable with whole-body MR systems. It is shown that the theoretical model yields a good approximation of the signal behavior if an additional term describing free diffusion is included. More importantly, it is demonstrated that the shorter gradient pulses sufficient to achieve the desired diffusion weighting for multiple concatenations, increase the signal modulation considerably, e.g. by a factor of about five for five concatenations. Even at identical echo times, achieved by a shortened diffusion time, a moderate number of concatenations significantly improves the signal modulation. Thus, experiments on whole-body MR systems may benefit from multiple concatenations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Responses of spectrally selective cells in macaque area V2 to wavelengths and colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutoussis, K; Zeki, S

    2002-04-01

    We have recorded from wavelength-selective cells in macaque monkey visual area V2, interposed between areas V1 and V4 of the color-specialized pathway, to learn whether their responses correlate with perceived colors or are determined by the wavelength composition of light reflected from their receptive fields. All the cells we recorded from were unselective for the orientation and direction of motion of the stimulus, and all were histologically identified to be in the thin cytochrome oxidase stripes. Using multi-colored "Mondrian" scenes of the appropriate spatial configuration, areas of different color were placed in the receptive field of each cell and the entire scene illuminated by three projectors, passing long-, middle-, and short-wave light, respectively, in various combinations. Our results show that wavelength-selective cells in V2 respond to an area of any color depending on whether or not it reflects a sufficient amount of light of their preferred wavelength. In addition, the responses of a third of the cells tested were also influenced by the wavelength composition of their immediate surrounds, thus signaling the result of a local spatial comparison with respect to the amount of their preferred wavelength present. The responses of all also depended on the sequence with which their receptive fields were illuminated with light of the three different wavebands: cells were activated when there was an increase (and inhibited when there was a decrease) in the amount of their preferred wavelength with respect to the other two; the temporal route taken was therefore a determining factor, and, depending on it, cells would either respond or not to a particular combination of wavelengths. We conclude that although spatiotemporal wavelength comparisons are taking place in the color-specialized subdivisions of area V2, the determination of complete color-constant behavior at the neuronal level requires further processing, in other areas.

  3. Short-term fatigue analysis for tower base of a spar-type wind turbine under stochastic wind-wave loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoran Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to integrated stochastic wind and wave loads, the supporting platform of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT has to bear six Degrees of Freedom (DOF motion, which makes the random cyclic loads acting on the structural components, for instance the tower base, more complicated than those on bottom-fixed or land-based wind turbines. These cyclic loads may cause unexpected fatigue damages on a FOWT. This paper presents a study on short-term fatigue damage at the tower base of a 5 MW FOWT with a spar-type platform. Fully coupled time-domain simulations code FAST is used and realistic environment conditions are considered to obtain the loads and structural stresses at the tower base. Then the cumulative fatigue damage is calculated based on rainflow counting method and Miner's rule. Moreover, the effects of the simulation length, the wind-wave misalignment, the wind-only condition and the wave-only condition on the fatigue damage are investigated. It is found that the wind and wave induced loads affect the tower base's axial stress separately and in a decoupled way, and the wave-induced fatigue damage is greater than that induced by the wind loads. Under the environment conditions with rated wind speed, the tower base experiences the highest fatigue damage when the joint probability of the wind and wave is included in the calculation. Moreover, it is also found that 1 h simulation length is sufficient to give an appropriate fatigue damage estimated life for FOWT.

  4. A 12 GHz wavelength spacing multi-wavelength laser source for wireless communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, P. C.; Shiu, R. K.; Bitew, M. A.; Chang, T. L.; Lai, C. H.; Junior, J. I.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a multi-wavelength laser source with 12 GHz wavelength spacing based on a single distributed feedback laser. A light wave generated from the distributed feedback laser is fed into a frequency shifter loop consisting of 50:50 coupler, dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator, optical amplifier, optical filter, and polarization controller. The frequency of the input wavelength is shifted and then re-injected into the frequency shifter loop. By re-injecting the shifted wavelengths multiple times, we have generated 84 optical carriers with 12 GHz wavelength spacing and stable output power. For each channel, two wavelengths are modulated by a wireless data using the phase modulator and transmitted through a 25 km single mode fiber. In contrast to previously developed schemes, the proposed laser source does not incur DC bias drift problem. Moreover, it is a good candidate for radio-over-fiber systems to support multiple users using a single distributed feedback laser.

  5. WAVE-LENGTH DISCRIMINATION IN INSECTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    INSECTS , *VISION), ELECTRORETINOGRAPHY, MONOCHROMATIC LIGHT, ADAPTATION(PHYSIOLOGY), EYE, ARTHROPODA, FATIGUE(PHYSIOLOGY), PHOTORECEPTORS, COLOR VISION, ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA, VISIBLE SPECTRA, SENSITIVITY

  6. The short-term effect of heat waves on mortality and its modifiers in China: an analysis from 66 communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenjun; Zeng, Weilin; Zhou, Maigeng; Wang, Lijun; Rutherford, Shannon; Lin, Hualiang; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yonghui; Xiao, Jianpeng; Zhang, Yewu; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gu, Xin; Chu, Cordia

    2015-02-01

    Many studies have reported increased mortality risk associated with heat waves. However, few have assessed the health impacts at a nation scale in a developing country. This study examines the mortality effects of heat waves in China and explores whether the effects are modified by individual-level and community-level characteristics. Daily mortality and meteorological variables from 66 Chinese communities were collected for the period 2006-2011. Heat waves were defined as ≥2 consecutive days with mean temperature ≥95th percentile of the year-round community-specific distribution. The community-specific mortality effects of heat waves were first estimated using a Distributed Lag Non-linear Model (DLNM), adjusting for potential confounders. To investigate effect modification by individual characteristics (age, gender, cause of death, education level or place of death), separate DLNM models were further fitted. Potential effect modification by community characteristics was examined using a meta-regression analysis. A total of 5.0% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 2.9%-7.2%) excess deaths were associated with heat waves in 66 Chinese communities, with the highest excess deaths in north China (6.0%, 95% CI: 1%-11.3%), followed by east China (5.2%, 95% CI: 0.4%-10.2%) and south China (4.5%, 95% CI: 1.4%-7.6%). Our results indicate that individual characteristics significantly modified heat waves effects in China, with greater effects on cardiovascular mortality, cerebrovascular mortality, respiratory mortality, the elderly, females, the population dying outside of a hospital and those with a higher education attainment. Heat wave mortality effects were also more pronounced for those living in urban cities or densely populated communities. Heat waves significantly increased mortality risk in China with apparent spatial heterogeneity, which was modified by some individual-level and community-level factors. Our findings suggest adaptation plans that target vulnerable

  7. Dual-wavelength InP quantum dot lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shutts, S.; Smowton, P. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Krysa, A. B. [EPSRC National Centre for III-V Technologies, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-16

    We have demonstrated a two-section dual-wavelength diode laser incorporating distributed Bragg reflectors, with a peak-wavelength separation of 62.5 nm at 300 K. Each lasing wavelength has a different temperature dependence, providing a difference-tuning of 0.11 nm/K. We discuss the mechanisms governing the light output of the two competing modes and explain how the short wavelength can be relatively insensitive to output changes at the longer wavelength. Starting from an initial condition when the output at both wavelengths are equal, a 500% increase in the long wavelength output causes the short wavelength output to fall by only 6%.

  8. Functional characterization of spectral tuning mechanisms in the great bowerbird short-wavelength sensitive visual pigment (SWS1), and the origins of UV/violet vision in passerines and parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hazel, Ilke; Sabouhanian, Amir; Day, Lainy; Endler, John A; Chang, Belinda S W

    2013-11-13

    One of the most striking features of avian vision is the variation in spectral sensitivity of the short wavelength sensitive (SWS1) opsins, which can be divided into two sub-types: violet- and UV- sensitive (VS & UVS). In birds, UVS has been found in both passerines and parrots, groups that were recently shown to be sister orders. While all parrots are thought to be UVS, recent evidence suggests some passerine lineages may also be VS. The great bowerbird (Chlamydera nuchalis) is a passerine notable for its courtship behaviours in which males build and decorate elaborate bower structures. The great bowerbird SWS1 sequence possesses an unusual residue combination at known spectral tuning sites that has not been previously investigated in mutagenesis experiments. In this study, the SWS1 opsin of C. nuchalis was expressed along with a series of spectral tuning mutants and ancestral passerine SWS1 pigments, allowing us to investigate spectral tuning mechanisms and explore the evolution of UV/violet sensitivity in early passerines and parrots. The expressed C. nuchalis SWS1 opsin was found to be a VS pigment, with a λmax of 403 nm. Bowerbird SWS1 mutants C86F, S90C, and C86S/S90C all shifted λmax into the UV, whereas C86S had no effect. Experimentally recreated ancestral passerine and parrot/passerine SWS1 pigments were both found to be VS, indicating that UV sensitivity evolved independently in passerines and parrots from a VS ancestor. Our mutagenesis studies indicate that spectral tuning in C. nuchalis is mediated by mechanisms similar to those of other birds. Interestingly, our ancestral sequence reconstructions of SWS1 in landbird evolution suggest multiple transitions from VS to UVS, but no instances of the reverse. Our results not only provide a more precise prediction of where these spectral sensitivity shifts occurred, but also confirm the hypothesis that birds are an unusual exception among vertebrates where some descendants re-evolved UVS from a violet type

  9. Analytical Solution for Waves in Planets with Atmospheric Superrotation. I. Acoustic and Inertia-Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, J.; Imamura, T.; Read, P. L.; Luz, D.; Piccialli, A.; López-Valverde, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes.

  10. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. I. ACOUSTIC AND INERTIA-GRAVITY WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía, 18008 Granada (Spain); Imamura, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Read, P. L. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Luz, D. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa (CAAUL), Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa (Portugal); Piccialli, A., E-mail: peralta@iaa.es [LATMOS, UVSQ, 11 bd dAlembert, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes.

  11. Synergy of short gamma ray burst and gravitational wave observations: Constraining the inclination angle of the binary and possible implications for off-axis gamma ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, K. G.; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Pai, Archana; Mishra, Chandra Kant

    2014-07-01

    Compact binary mergers are the strongest candidates for the progenitors of short gamma ray bursts (SGRBs). If a gravitational wave signal from the compact binary merger is observed in association with a SGRB, such a synergy can help us understand many interesting aspects of these bursts. We examine the accuracies with which a worldwide network of gravitational wave interferometers would measure the inclination angle (the angle between the angular momentum axis of the binary and the observer's line of sight) of the binary. We compare the projected accuracies of gravitational wave detectors to measure the inclination angle of double neutron star and neutron star-black hole binaries for different astrophysical scenarios. We find that a five-detector network can measure the inclination angle to an accuracy of ˜5.1 (2.2) deg for a double neutron star (neutron star-black hole) system at 200 Mpc if the direction of the source as well as the redshift is known electromagnetically. We argue as to how an accurate estimation of the inclination angle of the binary can prove to be crucial in understanding off-axis GRBs, the dynamics and the energetics of their jets, and help the searches for (possible) orphan afterglows of the SGRBs.

  12. P Wave Duration And Dispersion In Patients With Hyperthyroidism And The Short-term Effects Of Antithyroid Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unal Guntekin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prolonged P wave duration and P wave dispersion (PWD have been associated with an increased risk for atrial fibrillation (AF. Hyperthytodism is a frequent cause of atrial fibrillation (AF. Methods: Forty-two patients with newly diagnosed overt hyperthyroidism and 20 healthy people were enrolled in the study. Transthoracic echocardiography, 12 lead surface ECG and thyroid hormone levels were studied at the time of enrollment and after achievement of euthyroid state with propylthiouracil treatment. Results: Maximum P wave duration (Pmax (97.4±14.6 vs. 84.2±9.5 msec, p<0.001, PWD (42.9±10.7 vs. 31.0±6.2 msec, p<0.001, deceleration (DT (190.7±22.6 vs. 177.0±10.2 msec, p=0.013 and isovolumetric relaxation times (IVRT (90.9±11.2 vs. 79.6±10.5 msec, p<0.001 were significantly higher in hyperthyroid patients compared to control group. Pmax and PWD were significantly correlated with the presence of hyperthyroidism. Pmax (97.4±14.6 to 84.3±8.6 msec, p<0,001 Pmin (54.1±8.6 to 48.1±8.5 msec, p=0.002, PWD (42.9±10.7 to 35.9±8.1 msec, p=0.002 and DT (190.7±22.6 to 185.5±18.3, p=0.036 were significantly decreased after achievement of euthyroid state in patients with hyperthyroidism. Diastolic dyfunction was seen in 5 patients at hyperthroid state but only in one patient at euthyroid state. Conclusions: Hyperthyroidism is associated with prolonged P wave duration and dispersion. Achievement of euthyroid state with propylthiouracil treatment results in shortening of P wave variables. Diastolic function may have a partial effect for the increased Pmax and PWD. Shortening of Pmax and PWD may be a marker for the prevention of AF with the anti-thyroid treatment.

  13. Calculating the fine structure of a Fabry-Perot resonator using spheroidal wave functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeppenfeld, M.; Pinkse, Pepijn Willemszoon Harry

    2010-01-01

    A new set of vector solutions to Maxwell’s equations based on solutions to the wave equation in spheroidal coordinates allows laser beams to be described beyond the paraxial approximation. Using these solutions allows us to calculate the complete first-order corrections in the short-wavelength limit

  14. Surface wave propagation in a double liquid layer over a liquid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The frequency equation is derived for surface waves in a liquidsaturated porous half-space supporting a double layer, that of inhomogeneous and homogeneous liquids. Asymptotic approximations of Bessel functions are used for long and short wavelength cases. Certain other problems are discussed as special cases.

  15. Surface wave propagation in a double liquid layer over a liquid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. The frequency equation is derived for surface waves in a liquid- saturated porous half-space supporting a double layer, that of inhomogeneous and homogeneous liquids. Asymptotic approximations of Bessel functions are used for long and short wavelength cases. Certain other problems are discussed as spe-.

  16. Wavelength-Scale Structures as Extremely High Haze Films for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Juyoung; Dong, Wan Jae; Jung, Gwan Ho; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2016-03-09

    Wavelength-scale inverted pyramid structures with low reflectance and excellent haze have been designed for application to polymer solar cells (PSCs). The wavelength-scale structured haze films are fabricated on the back surface of glass without damages to organic active layer by using a soft lithographic technique with etched GaN molds. With a rigorous coupled-wave analysis of optical modeling, we find the shift of resonance peaks with the increase of pattern's diameter. Wavelength-scale structures could provide the number of resonances at the long wavelength spectrum (λ = 650-800 nm), yielding enhancement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) in the PSCs. Compared with a flat device (PCE = 7.12%, Jsc = 15.6 mA/cm(2)), improved PCE of 8.41% is achieved in a haze film, which is mainly due to the increased short circuit current density (Jsc) of 17.5 mA/cm(2). Hence, it opens up exciting opportunities for a variety of PSCs with wavelength-scale structures to further improve performance, simplify complicated process, and reduce costs.

  17. Singly resonant cw OPO with simple wavelength tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainio, Markku; Peltola, Jari; Persijn, Stefan; Harren, Frans J M; Halonen, Lauri

    2008-07-21

    A singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator (cw OPO) is described. The OPO contains no intracavity etalon, which makes its wavelength tuning simple and straightforward, including only temperature tuning of the nonlinear crystal and wavelength tuning of the pump laser. The OPO provides watt-level output in the mid-infrared region and operates reliably without mode hops for several hours.

  18. Experimental determination of the slow-neutron wavelength distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Bente; Mikke, K.; Sledziewska-Blocka, D.

    1970-01-01

    Different experiments for determining the slow-neutron wavelength distribution in the region 227-3 meV have been carried out, and the results compared. It is concluded that the slow-neutron wave-length distribution can be determined accurately by elastic scattering on a pure incoherent or a pure...

  19. A linear model for amplitude modulation of Langmuir waves in weak electron-beam plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Baumgärtel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple linear approach to the phenomenon of amplitude modulation of Langmuir waves in weak beam plasma interaction is presented. During the short growth phase of the instability and within the longer period after saturation, the waves are described by their linear kinetic dispersion properties.The amplitude modulation appears as result of the beating of waves with different wavelengths and amplitudes that have grown from noise in the initial phase. The Langmuir wave fields are calculated via FFT (fast Fourier transform technique. The resulting waveforms in temporal representation are quite similar to those observed by spacecraft.

  20. Prototype for Long Wavelength Array Sees First Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    and dark energy." Although radio astronomy was discovered at low frequencies (near 20 MHz, corresponding to wavelengths of 15 meters), well below the current FM band, astronomers quickly moved up to higher frequencies (centimeter wavelengths) in search of higher resolution and to escape the corrupting effects of the Earth's ionosphere, a region of charged particles between about 50 and 600 miles above the surface. The ionosphere, which can "bend" radio waves to produce long-distance reception of AM and short-wave radio signals, also causes distortions in radio telescope images in much the same way that atmospheric irregularities cause twinkling of stars. Ionospheric effects become much worse at low frequencies, but new imaging techniques developed at NRL and elsewhere have allowed the "ionospheric barrier" to be broken and enabled high-resolution astronomical imaging at these low frequencies for the first time. These new imaging techniques provide an improved view of not only the astronomical sky, but the Earth's ionosphere as well. The full LWA will generate richly detailed measurements of the ionosphere that will complement other ionospheric data sources. Understanding the ionosphere is critically important to the Department of Defense because of its effects on communications and navigation systems. The current prototype, referred to as the Long Wavelength Demonstrator Array (LWDA) to differentiate it from the larger LWA project, completed installation on the Plains of San Agustin in southwestern New Mexico in the fall of 2006. Funded by NRL and built by the Applied Research Laboratories of the University of Texas, Austin (ARL:UT), the telescope consists of 16 antennas connected to a suite of electronics that combine the signals from each antenna. Each antenna is only 4 feet tall and acts much like an old style television antenna, receiving radio waves from many different directions simultaneously. When combined, the data from the individual antennas is comparable

  1. Comparative effects of pulsed and continuous short wave diathermy on pain and selected physiological parameters among subjects with chronic knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teslim, Onigbinde Ayodele; Adebowale, Adenle Charles; Ojoawo, Adesola Ojo; Sunday, Odejide Akinwole; Bosede, Arilewola

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the effects of pulsed and continuous short wave diathermy on pain, range of motion, pulse rate and skin temperature in subjects with chronic knee osteoarthritis. 24 Participants with grade 111 OA of the knee were randomly selected into CSWD and PSWD groups. Pre and post treatment parameters were recorded at onset and the end of 4th week. ANO VA, independent, paired t-test and chi-square were used to analyze the data. The pain experienced by participants in the CSWD group was significantly lower than that of the PSWD groups (P effective than PSWD in alleviating pain and in increasing knee flexion range of motion among subjects with chronic knee OA. Also, a mild elevation of skin temperature was able to elicit physiological effects that could exert therapeutic effects.

  2. All-fiber mode-locked laser via short single-wall carbon nanotubes interacting with evanescent wave in photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujia; Gao, Lei; Huang, Wei; Gao, Cong; Liu, Min; Zhu, Tao

    2016-10-03

    We report an all-fiber passively mode-locked laser based on a saturable absorber fabricated by filling short single-wall carbon nanotubes into cladding holes of grapefruit-type photonic crystal fiber. The single-wall carbon nanotube is insensitive to polarization of light for its one-dimensional structure, which suppresses the polarization dependence loss. Carbon nanotubes interact with photonic crystal fiber with ultra-weak evanescent field, which enhances the damage threshold of the saturable absorber and improves the operating stability. In our experiment, conventional soliton with a pulse duration of 1.003 ps and center wavelength of 1566.36 nm under a pump power of 240 mW is generated in a compact erbium-doped fiber laser cavity with net anomalous dispersion of -0.4102 ps2. The signal to noise ratio of the fundamental frequency component is ~80 dB. The maximum average output power of the mode-locked laser reaches 9.56 mW under a pump power of 360 mW. The output power can be further improved by a higher pump power.

  3. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Sangrey, Robert L [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL; Shea, Thomas J [ORNL; Hasegawa, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Kogawa, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Naoe, Dr. Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Farny, Dr. Caleb H. [Boston University; Kaminsky, Andrew L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  4. The Nonlinear Wave-Wave Interaction of the Kinetic Alfvén Wave and Its Application in the Solar-Terrestrial Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    magnetostatic convective cell in the kinetic region of Q≪βll 1. We finally discuss the coupling between KAWs and high-frequency whistler waves (WWs) and the three-wave coupling among WWs. The results show that: (1) the decay process of ``WW → WW + KAW'' can effectively excite KAWs, and the excited KAW can propagate parallel or antiparallel to the pump WW; (2) the three-wave coupling process of WWs occurs in the way that the long-wavelength pump wave decays into the short-wavelength waves, and it is dominated by the reverse decay. The results of this thesis show that our results can explain the excitation of two reversely-propagating electron fluxes in the Earth's auroral zone, the generation of KAWs in the solar atmosphere, and the production of WWs propagating towards the Sun in the interplanetary space.

  5. A review of short naps and sleep inertia: do naps of 30 min or less really avoid sleep inertia and slow-wave sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilditch, Cassie J; Dorrian, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan

    2017-04-01

    Napping is a widely used countermeasure to sleepiness and impaired performance caused by sleep loss and circadian pressure. Sleep inertia, the period of grogginess and impaired performance experienced after waking, is a potential side effect of napping. Many industry publications recommend naps of 30 min or less to avoid this side effect. However, the evidence to support this advice is yet to be thoroughly reviewed. Electronic databases were searched, and defined criteria were applied to select articles for review. The review covers literature on naps of 30 min or less regarding (a) sleep inertia, (b) slow-wave sleep (SWS) and (c) the relationship between sleep inertia and SWS. The review found that although the literature on short afternoon naps is relatively comprehensive, there are very few studies on naps of 30 min or less at night. Studies have mixed results regarding the onset of SWS and the duration and severity of sleep inertia following short naps, making guidelines regarding their use unclear. The varying results are likely due to differing sleep/wake profiles before the nap of interest and the time of the day at waking. The review highlights the need to have more detailed guidelines about the implementation of short naps according to the time of the day and prior sleep/wake history. Without this context, such a recommendation is potentially misleading. Further research is required to better understand the interactions between these factors, especially at night, and to provide more specific recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Sensitivity of Characteristics of Large Scale Baroclinic Unstable Waves in Southern Hemisphere to the Underlying Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Soldatenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of the main characteristics of baroclinically unstable waves with respect to fundamental parameters of the atmosphere (the static stability parameter σ0 and vertical shear of a zonal wind Λ is theoretically explored. Two types of waves are considered: synoptic scale waves and planetary scale (ultralong waves based on an Eady-type model and model with vertically averaged primitive equations. Sensitivity functions are obtained that estimate the impact of variations in σ0 and Λ on the growth rate and other characteristics of unstable waves and demonstrate that waves belonging to the short-wave part of the spectrum of unstable waves are more sensitive to changes in the static stability parameter than waves belonging to the long-wave part of the spectrum. The obtained theoretical results show that the increase of the static stability and decrease of the meridional temperature gradient in midlatitude baroclinic zones in some areas of the southern hemisphere lead to a slowing of the growth rate of baroclinic unstable waves and an increasing wavelength of baroclinic unstable wave maximum growth rate, that is, a spectrum shift of unstable waves towards longer wavelengths. These might affect the favorable conditions for the development of baroclinic instability and, therefore, the intensity of cyclone generation activity.

  7. Paraxial theory of electromagnetic waves in plane inhomogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2010-09-01

    The problem of electromagnetic waves propagating in inhomogeneous media is formulated within the paraxial approximation. The analysis is restricted to a medium with a plane and smooth inhomogeneity. The general form of a Gaussian beam is obtained in terms of the permittivity and permeability of the medium. Particular attention is paid to the case of internal reflection, where a short-wavelength approximation breaks down; a possible treatment of the problem is proposed. A simple model is worked out to illustrate the formalism.

  8. Wavelength conversion technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Kristian

    1998-01-01

    Optical wavelength conversion is currently attracting much interest. This is because it enables full flexibility and eases management of WDM fibre networks. The tutorial will review existing and potential application areas. Examples of node architectures and network demonstrators that use wavelen...

  9. EFFECTS OF LIGHT WAVELENGTHS AND COHERENCE ON BASIDIOSPORES GERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Poyedinok

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of light wavelengths and coherence on basidiospore germination of Agaricus bisporus, Flammulina velutipes, Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma lucidum, Hericium erinaceus, Lentinus edodes and Pleurotus ostreatus have been studied. Short-term low-intensity irradiation by coherent (laser light wavelength 488.0 nm and 632.8 nm at doses 45 and 230 mJ/cm2 has significantly increased the number of germinated basidiospores. It has established that there are differences in the photosensitivity not only between species but also between strains. Spores irradiation by 514.5 nm light has been either neutral or inhibitory. A comparative analysis of basidiospores sensitivity to laser and LED light has also been conducted. To stimulate germination of basidiospores and growth of monokaryons the most suitable solution was to use red coherent and incoherent light of 632.8 nm and 660,0 nm for A. bisporus, G. applanatum and P. ostreatus, red and blue coherent light of 632.8 nm and 488,0 nm for F. velutipes, and both red and blue laser and LED light G. lucidum and H. erinaceus and for L. edodes. No essential difference of a continuous wave mode and intermittent mode light effect at the same doses and wavelength on spore germination were revealed. Light influence has reduced germination time and formation of aerial mycelium on agar medium as compared to the original value and increased the growth rate of monosporous isolates. Characterization of basidiospores photosensitivity and development of environmentally friendly stimulating methods of their germination is important for creating highly effective technologies of mushrooms selection and cultivation.

  10. Waves and Water Beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Vance A.

    1971-01-01

    Capillary and gravity water waves are related to the position, wavelength, and velocity of an object in flowing water. Water patterns are presented for ships and the whirling beetle with an explanation of how the design affects the objects velocity and the observed water wavelengths. (DS)

  11. Wavelength-stepped, actively mode-locked fiber laser based on wavelength-division-multiplexed optical delay lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjoo; Kim, Byoung Yoon

    2017-12-01

    We propose a new scheme for an actively mode-locked wavelength-swept fiber laser that produces a train of discretely wavelength-stepped pulses from a short fiber cavity. Pulses with different wavelengths are split and combined by standard wavelength division multiplexers with fiber delay lines. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate a laser using an erbium doped fiber amplifier and commercially available wavelength-division multiplexers with wavelength spacing of 0.8 nm. The results show simultaneous mode-locking at three different wavelengths. Laser output parameters in time domain, optical and radio frequency spectral domain, and the noise characteristics are presented. Suggestions for the improved design are discussed.

  12. Wavelength sweepable laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength sweepable laser source is disclosed, wherein the laser source is a semiconductor laser source adapted for generating laser light at a lasing wavelength. The laser source comprises a substrate, a first reflector, and a second reflector. The first and second reflector together defines...... and having a rest position, the second reflector and suspension together defining a microelectromechanical MEMS oscillator. The MEMS oscillator has a resonance frequency and is adapted for oscillating the second reflector on either side of the rest position.; The laser source further comprises electrical...... connections adapted for applying an electric field to the MEMS oscillator. Furthermore, a laser source system and a method of use of the laser source are disclosed....

  13. Engineering the Propagation of High-k Bulk Plasmonic Waves in Multilayer Hyperbolic Metamaterials by Multiscale Structuring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Sipe, John E.

    layers. These high-k waves can have anomalously short wavelength, which underlies the concept of far-field subwavelength imaging (hyperlensing) in HMMs. In this work, we show that propagation of these high-k bulk plasmons can be controlled by modulating, or superstructuring, the filling fraction of metal...... in a subwavelength metal-dielectric stack on a longer, wavelength scale. The basic superstructure geometry is a hybrid multiscale HMM where the modulation itself is periodic, forming a photonic band gap (PBG) for the high-k waves according to the same principles as in conventional photonic crystals. As a result...

  14. Principles of electromagnetic waves in metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, XianGang

    2015-09-01

    Metasurfaces are artificially structured thin films with unusual properties on demand. Different from metamaterials, the metasurfaces change the electromagnetic waves mainly by exploiting the boundary conditions, rather than the constitutive parameters in three dimensional (3D) spaces. Despite the intrinsic similarities in the operational principles of metasurfaces, there is not a universal theory available for the understanding and design of these devices. In this article, we propose the concept of metasurface waves (M-waves) and provide a general theory to describe the principles of such waves. Most importantly, it is shown that the M-waves share some fundamental properties such as extremely short wavelength, abrupt phase change and strong chromatic dispersion, which making them different from traditional bulk waves. We show that these properties can enable many important applications such as subwavelength imaging and lithography, planar optical devices, broadband anti-reflection, absorption and polarization conversion. Our results demonstrated unambiguously that traditional laws of diffraction, refraction, reflection and absorption can be overcome by using the novel properties of M-waves. The theory provided here may pave the way for the design of new electromagnetic devices and further improvement of metasurfaces.

  15. Explaining polarization reversals in STEREO wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, Breneman et al. (2011) reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (L plane transverse to the magnetic field showed that the transmitter waves underwent periodic polarization reversals. Specifically, their polarization would cycle through a pattern of right-hand to linear to left-hand polarization at a rate of roughly 200 Hz. The lightning whistlers were observed to be left-hand polarized at frequencies greater than the lower hybrid frequency and less than the transmitter frequency (21.4 kHz) and right-hand polarized otherwise. Only right-hand polarized waves in the inner radiation belt should exist in the frequency range of the whistler mode and these reversals were not explained in the previous paper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by ±200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo (1984) whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by ˜200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al. (2008).

  16. Magnetic-distortion-induced Ellipticity and Gravitational Wave Radiation of Neutron Stars: Millisecond Magnetars in Short GRBs, Galactic Pulsars, and Magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, He; Cao, Zhoujian; Zhang, Bing

    2017-08-01

    Neutron stars may sustain a non-axisymmetric deformation due to magnetic distortion and are potential sources of continuous gravitational waves (GWs) for ground-based interferometric detectors. With decades of searches using available GW detectors, no evidence of a GW signal from any pulsar has been observed. Progressively stringent upper limits of ellipticity have been placed on Galactic pulsars. In this work, we use the ellipticity inferred from the putative millisecond magnetars in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) to estimate their detectability by current and future GW detectors. For ˜1 ms magnetars inferred from the SGRB data, the detection horizon is ˜30 Mpc and ˜600 Mpc for the advanced LIGO (aLIGO) and Einstein Telescope (ET), respectively. Using the ellipticity of SGRB millisecond magnetars as calibration, we estimate the ellipticity and GW strain of Galactic pulsars and magnetars assuming that the ellipticity is magnetic-distortion-induced. We find that the results are consistent with the null detection results of Galactic pulsars and magnetars with the aLIGO O1. We further predict that the GW signals from these pulsars/magnetars may not be detectable by the currently designed aLIGO detector. The ET detector may be able to detect some relatively low-frequency signals (pulsars. Limited by its design sensitivity, the eLISA detector seems to not be suitable for detecting the signals from Galactic pulsars and magnetars.

  17. Effects of Short-Term Exenatide Treatment on Regional Fat Distribution, Glycated Hemoglobin Levels, and Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity of Obese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Young Hong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMost type 2 diabetes mellitus patients are obese and have obesity related vascular complications. Exenatide treatment is well known for both decreasing glycated hemoglobin levels and reduction in body weight. So, this study aimed to determine the effects of exenatide on body composition, glycated hemoglobin levels, and vascular stiffness in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.MethodsFor 1 month, 32 obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients were administered 5 µg of exenatide twice daily. The dosage was then increased to 10 µg. Patients' height, body weight, glycated hemoglobin levels, lipid profile, pulse wave velocity (PWV, body mass index, fat mass, and muscle mass were measured by using Inbody at baseline and after 3 months of treatment.ResultsAfter 3 months of treatment, glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly (P=0.007. Triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein levels decreased, while aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were no change. Body weight, and fat mass decreased significantly (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively, while interestingly, muscle mass did not decrease (P=0.289. In addition to, Waist-to-hip ratio and aortic PWV decreased significantly (P=0.006 and P=0.001, respectively.ConclusionEffects of short term exenatide use in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus with cardiometabolic high risk patients not only reduced body weight without muscle mass loss, body fat mass, and glycated hemoglobin levels but also improved aortic PWV in accordance with waist to hip ratio.

  18. Increased range of motion and function in an individual with breast cancer and necrotizing fasciitis-manual therapy and pulsed short-wave diathermy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne; Draper, David O

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia affecting those predisposed to immune system compromise. It is a life threatening condition; mortality can be reduced by rapid diagnosis, adequate early surgical debridement and antibiotic ointment. In this case report we present the use of manual therapy (MT) techniques, joint and soft tissue mobilization, following a regimen of pulsed short wave diathermy (PSWD) in the treatment of a woman 3 years post necrotizing fasciitis developed during chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer. During her course of chemotherapy, she developed necrotizing fasciitis which was treated with extensive surgical debridement (8 linear feet of incisions) followed by debridement to both hips and the pelvis area. When we started working with her, we put her on a course of PSWD/MT. After six weeks of following this regimen, she gained 25 degrees of external rotation in both her left and right hips, 15 degrees of left hip flexion and 17 degrees of right hip flexion. The patient gained 10 degrees of right hip extension, yet there was no improvement in left hip extension. The treatments led to a dramatic reduction in pain and scarring from previous surgeries. The patient also returned to running.

  19. Increased Range of Motion and Function in an Individual with Breast Cancer and Necrotizing Fasciitis—Manual Therapy and Pulsed Short-Wave Diathermy Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne; Draper, David O.

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia affecting those predisposed to immune system compromise. It is a life threatening condition; mortality can be reduced by rapid diagnosis, adequate early surgical debridement and antibiotic ointment. In this case report we present the use of manual therapy (MT) techniques, joint and soft tissue mobilization, following a regimen of pulsed short wave diathermy (PSWD) in the treatment of a woman 3 years post necrotizing fasciitis developed during chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer. During her course of chemotherapy, she developed necrotizing fasciitis which was treated with extensive surgical debridement (8 linear feet of incisions) followed by debridement to both hips and the pelvis area. When we started working with her, we put her on a course of PSWD/MT. After six weeks of following this regimen, she gained 25° of external rotation in both her left and right hips, 15° of left hip flexion and 17° of right hip flexion. The patient gained 10° of right hip extension, yet there was no improvement in left hip extension. The treatments led to a dramatic reduction in pain and scarring from previous surgeries. The patient also returned to running. PMID:20706546

  20. Effect of Ge-doping on the short-wave, mid- and far-infrared intersubband transitions in GaN/AlGaN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Caroline B.; Ajay, Akhil; Lähnemann, Jonas; Bougerol, Catherine; Monroy, Eva

    2017-12-01

    This paper assesses the effects of Ge-doping on the structural and optical (band-to-band and intersubband (ISB)) properties of GaN/AlGaN multi-quantum wells (QWs) designed to display ISB absorption in the short-wave, mid- and far-infrared ranges (SWIR, MIR, and FIR, respectively). The standard c-plane crystallographic orientation is considered for wells absorbing in the SWIR and MIR spectral regions, whereas the FIR structures are grown along the nonpolar m-axis. In all cases, we compare the characteristics of Ge-doped and Si-doped samples with the same design and various doping levels. The use of Ge appears to improve the mosaicity of the highly lattice-mismatched GaN/AlN heterostructures. However, when reducing the lattice mismatch, the mosaicity is rather determined by the substrate and does not show any dependence on the dopant nature or concentration. From the optical point of view, by increasing the dopant density, we observe a blueshift of the photoluminescence in polar samples due to the screening of the internal electric field by free carriers. In the ISB absorption, on the other hand, there is a systematic improvement of the linewidth when using Ge as a dopant for high doping levels, whatever the spectral region under consideration (i.e. different QW size, barrier composition and crystallographic orientation).

  1. Magnetic-distortion-induced Ellipticity and Gravitational Wave Radiation of Neutron Stars: Millisecond Magnetars in Short GRBs, Galactic Pulsars, and Magnetars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, He; Cao, Zhoujian [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: gaohe@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Neutron stars may sustain a non-axisymmetric deformation due to magnetic distortion and are potential sources of continuous gravitational waves (GWs) for ground-based interferometric detectors. With decades of searches using available GW detectors, no evidence of a GW signal from any pulsar has been observed. Progressively stringent upper limits of ellipticity have been placed on Galactic pulsars. In this work, we use the ellipticity inferred from the putative millisecond magnetars in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) to estimate their detectability by current and future GW detectors. For ∼1 ms magnetars inferred from the SGRB data, the detection horizon is ∼30 Mpc and ∼600 Mpc for the advanced LIGO (aLIGO) and Einstein Telescope (ET), respectively. Using the ellipticity of SGRB millisecond magnetars as calibration, we estimate the ellipticity and GW strain of Galactic pulsars and magnetars assuming that the ellipticity is magnetic-distortion-induced. We find that the results are consistent with the null detection results of Galactic pulsars and magnetars with the aLIGO O1. We further predict that the GW signals from these pulsars/magnetars may not be detectable by the currently designed aLIGO detector. The ET detector may be able to detect some relatively low-frequency signals (<50 Hz) from some of these pulsars. Limited by its design sensitivity, the eLISA detector seems to not be suitable for detecting the signals from Galactic pulsars and magnetars.

  2. Wavelength conversion devices and techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Kristian; Jørgensen, Carsten; Danielsen, Søren Lykke

    1996-01-01

    wavelengths in an easy way and preferably without opto-electronic conversion. Here, we will first briefly look at advantages of employing optical wavelength converters in WDM networks and next review the optical wavelength conversion devices with emphasis on recent developments....

  3. Explaining Polarization Reversals in STEREO Wave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L, B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently Breneman et al. reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (Lwaves underwent periodic polarization reversals. Specifically, their polarization would cycle through a pattern of right-hand to linear to left-hand polarization at a rate of roughly 200 Hz. The lightning whistlers were observed to be left-hand polarized at frequencies greater than the lower hybrid frequency and less than the transmitter frequency (21.4 kHz) and right-hand polarized otherwise. Only righthand polarized waves in the inner radiation belt should exist in the frequency range of the whistler mode and these reversals were not explained in the previous paper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by +/-200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by 200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al.

  4. Layered semi-convection and tides in giant planet interiors. I. Propagation of internal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Q.; Barker, A. J.; Mathis, S.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Layered semi-convection is a possible candidate to explain Saturn's luminosity excess and the abnormally large radius of some hot Jupiters. In giant planet interiors, it could lead to the creation of density staircases, which are convective layers separated by thin stably stratified interfaces. These are also observed on Earth in some lakes and in the Arctic Ocean. Aims: We aim to study the propagation of internal waves in a region of layered semi-convection, with the aim to predict energy transport by internal waves incident upon a density staircase. The goal is then to understand the resulting tidal dissipation when these waves are excited by other bodies such as moons in giant planets systems. Methods: We used a local Cartesian analytical model, taking into account the complete Coriolis acceleration at any latitude, thus generalising previous works. We used a model in which stably stratified interfaces are infinitesimally thin, before relaxing this assumption with a second model that assumes a piecewise linear stratification. Results: We find transmission of incident internal waves to be strongly affected by the presence of a density staircase, even if these waves are initially pure inertial waves (which are restored by the Coriolis acceleration). In particular, low-frequency waves of all wavelengths are perfectly transmitted near the critical latitude, defined by θc = sin-1(ω/ 2Ω), where ω is the wave's frequency and Ω is the rotation rate of the planet. Otherwise, short-wavelength waves are only efficiently transmitted if they are resonant with a free mode (interfacial gravity wave or short-wavelength inertial mode) of the staircase. In all other cases, waves are primarily reflected unless their wavelengths are longer than the vertical extent of the entire staircase (not just a single step). Conclusions: We expect incident internal waves to be strongly affected by the presence of a density staircase in a frequency-, latitude- and wavelength

  5. Effectiveness of thermal and athermal short-wave diathermy for the management of knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Y; Dar, G

    2012-09-01

    To assess the effectiveness of short-wave diathermy (SWD) treatment in the management of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and to assess whether the effects are related to the induction of a thermal effect. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, PEDro, EMBASE, SPORTdiscus and Scholar Google. Included were trials that compared the use of SWD treatment in patients diagnosed with KOA with a control group (placebo SWD treatment or no intervention) and studies that used high-frequency electromagnetic energy (i.e., 27.12 MHz) with sufficient information regarding treatment dosage. Methodological quality of the included studies was assessed in accordance with the PEDro classification scale. A minimum of a 6/10 score was required for inclusion. Seven studies were included in the final analysis. Treatment protocols (dosage, duration, number of treatments) varied extensively between studies. The meta-analysis of the studies with low mean power did not favour SWD treatment for pain reduction, while the results of studies employing some thermal effect were significant. No treatment effect on functional performance measures was determined. This meta-analysis found small, significant effects on pain and muscle performance only when SWD evoked a local thermal sensation. However, the variability in the treatment protocols makes it difficult to draw definitive conclusions about the factors determining the effectiveness of SWD treatment. More research (using comparable protocols and outcome measurements) is needed to evaluate possible long-term effects of thermal SWD treatment and its cost effectiveness in patients with KOA. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. COMPARATIVE RESEARCH OF VARIOUS METHODS FOR DETERMINING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF AN ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE REFLECTED FROM A SCATTERING DIFFRACTION SCREEN IN THE PROPAGATION OF A RADIO SIGNAL IN THE EARTH-IONOSPHERE CHANNEL IN THE SHORT-WAVE RANGE OF RADIO WAVES WITH USE OF THE EXPERIMENTAL EQUIPMENT OF COHERENT RECEPTION OF A GROUND-BASED MEASURING COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Yu. Belov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of the earth’s surface by remote sensing in the short-wave band can provide quick identification of some characteristics of natural systems. This band range allows one to diagnose subsurface aspects of the earth, as the scattering parameter is affected by irregularities in the dielectric permittivity of subsurface structures. The new method is suggested. This method based on the organization of the monitoring probe may detect changes in these environments, for example, to assess seismic hazard, hazardous natural phenomena, changes ecosystems, as well as some man-made hazards and etc. The problem of measuring and accounting for the scattering power of the earth’s surface in the short-range of radio waves is important for a number of purposes, such as diagnosing properties of the medium, which is of interest for geological, environmental studies. In this paper, we propose a new method for estimating the parameters of incoherent signal/noise ratio. The paper presents the results of comparison of the measurement method from the point of view of their admissible relative analytical errors. A comparative analysis and shows that the analytical (relative accuracy of the determination of this parameter new method on the order exceeds the widely-used standard method. Analysis of admissible relative analytical error of estimation of this parameter allowed to recommend new method instead of standard method

  7. Metal-dielectric composites for beam splitting and far-field deep sub-wavelength resolution for visible wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Changchun; Zhang, Dao Hua; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Dongdong; Fiddy, M A

    2010-07-05

    We report beam splitting in a metamaterial composed of a silver-alumina composite covered by a layer of chromium containing one slit. By simulating distributions of energy flow in the metamaterial for H-polarized waves, we find that the beam splitting occurs when the width of the slit is shorter than the wavelength, which is conducive to making a beam splitter in sub-wavelength photonic devices. We also find that the metamaterial possesses deep sub-wavelength resolution capabilities in the far field when there are two slits and the central silver layer is at least 36 nm in thickness, which has potential applications in superresolution imaging.

  8. Relative efficiencies of three ultraviolet radiation wavelengths for cell killing and transformation in mouse cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulo, D.; Muel, B.; Latarjet, R. (Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. Curie)

    1983-09-01

    C3H 10 T 1/2 clone 8 mouse cells were irradiated in vitro with three U.V. wavelengths 280, 254, and 230 nm. Two effects were investigated, survival and malignant transformation, and the relative efficiences were determined for the three radiation. For transformation, these efficiences were: 280 nm: 3.9; 254 nm: 5.1; 230 nm: 2.3 (transformations produced by 5 J m/sup -2/ of U.V. for 1000 surviving cells). For cell killing the efficiencies were, in relative units, 34, 100, and 50 respectively. These efficiencies are in agreement with the hypothesis that the main chromophore for both effects is the nucleic acid, and not the protein moiety of the genome. This conclusion agrees with that previously reached by other investigators, but our present results obtained with the short wave-length 230 nm provide an especially strong new argument.

  9. Lux vs. wavelength in light treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J L; Glod, C A; Dai, J; Cao, Y; Lockley, S W

    2009-09-01

    Published dosing guidelines for treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) refer to photopic lux, which is not appropriate for short-wavelength light. Short wavelengths are most potent for many non-visual responses to light. If SAD therapy were similarly mediated, standards utilizing lux risk overestimating necessary dose. We investigated antidepressant responses to light using two light-emitting diode (LED) sources, each emitting substantial short-wavelength light, but <2500 lux. A randomized, double-blind trial investigated 3-week 45 min/day out-patient treatment with blue-appearing (goLITE) or blue-enriched white-appearing light in 18 moderately-depressed adults (12F, 49.1 +/- 9.5 years). Equivalent numbers of photons within the short-wavelength range were emitted, but the white source emitted twice as many photons overall and seven-fold more lux. Depression ratings (SIGH-ADS; http://www.cet.org) decrease averaged 82% (SD = 17%) from baseline (P < 0.0001) in both white- and blue-light groups. Both sources were well tolerated. Short-wavelength LED light sources may be effective in SAD treatment at fewer lux than traditional fluorescent sources.

  10. Influence of winds on temporally varying short and long period gravity waves in the near shore regions of the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Glejin, J.; SanilKumar, V.; Nair, T.M.B.; Singh, J.

    Ocean, due to storms during the pre- and postmonsoon periods, modify the near surface winds due to higher phase wave celerity than the wind speed. Estimation of inverse wave age using large-scale winds such as NCEP (National Centers for Environmental...

  11. Laser system with wavelength converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to an apparatus comprising a diode laser (10) providing radiation in a first wavelength interval, a radiation conversion unit (12) having an input and an output, the radiation converter configured to receive the radiation in the first wavelength interval from the diode...... laser at the input, the radiation conversion unit configured to convert the radiation in the first wavelength interval to radiation in a second wavelength interval and the output configured to output the converted radiation, the second wavelength interval having one end point outside the first...... wavelength interval. Further, the invention relates to a method of optically pumping a target laser (14) in a laser system, the laser system comprising a laser source providing radiation at a first frequency, the laser source being optically connected to an input of a frequency converter, the frequency...

  12. Wavelength Conversion of DP-QPSK Signals in a Silicon Polarization Diversity Circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vukovic, Dragana; Schroeder, Jochen; Ding, Yunhong

    2015-01-01

    Multichannel wavelength conversion is experimentally demonstrated for high-speed 128 Gb/s dual-polarization quadrature phase-shift keying signals using four-wave mixing in a polarization diversity circuit with silicon nanowires as nonlinear elements. The wavelength conversion performance is inves......Multichannel wavelength conversion is experimentally demonstrated for high-speed 128 Gb/s dual-polarization quadrature phase-shift keying signals using four-wave mixing in a polarization diversity circuit with silicon nanowires as nonlinear elements. The wavelength conversion performance...

  13. Mach-Zehnder wavelength selective switch embedded with microring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kengo; Shoji, Yuya; Mizumoto, Tetsuya

    2017-02-01

    A wavelength selective switch is proposed for optical wavelength division multiplexing network applications with very short range interconnections. The proposed device uses a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration incorporating wavelength selective phase shifters composed of microring resonators between their two arms. Wavelength selectivity is provided by cascaded microring resonators, which are placed in proximity so that the increase in excess loss caused by the difference in resonant wavelengths can be minimized. An on/off switching ratio >20 dB is obtainable when the drop/through transmittance ratio of the cascaded microring resonators is >22 dB and the coupling efficiency deviation from 50% is directional couplers constructing the Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  14. Properties, Propagation, and Excitation of EMIC Waves Properties, Propagation, and Excitation of EMIC Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jichun; Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Saikin, Anthony A.; Mello, Emily M.; Russell, Christopher T.; Torbert, Roy B.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Giles, Barbara L.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves (0.1-5 Hz) play an important role in particle dynamics in the Earth's magnetosphere. EMIC waves are preferentially excited in regions where hot anisotropic ions and cold dense plasma populations spatially overlap. While the generation region of EMIC waves is usually on or near the magnetic equatorial plane in the inner magnetosphere, EMIC waves have both equatorial and off-equator source regions on the dayside in the compressed outer magnetosphere. Using field and plasma measurements from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we perform a case study of EMIC waves and associated local plasma conditions observed on 19 October 2015. From 0315 to 0810 UT, before crossing the magnetopause into the magnetosheath, all four MMS spacecraft detected long-lasting He(exp +)-band EMIC wave emissions around local noon (MLT = 12.7 - 14.0) at high L-shells (L = 8.8 - 15.2) and low magnetic latitudes (MLAT = -21.8deg - -30.3deg). Energetic (greater than 1 keV) and anisotropic ions were present throughout this event that was in the recovery phase of a weak geomagnetic storm (min. Dst = -48 nT at 1000 UT on 18 October 2015). The testing of linear theory suggests that the EMIC waves were excited locally. Although the wave event is dominated by small normal angles, its polarization is mixed with right- and left-handedness and its propagation is bi-directional with regard to the background magnetic field. The short inter-spacecraft distances (as low as 15 km) of the MMS mission make it possible to accurately determine the k vector of the waves using the phase difference technique. Preliminary analysis finds that the k vector magnitude, phase speed, and wavelength of the 0.3-Hz wave packet at 0453:55 UT are 0.005 km(exp -1), 372.9 km/s, and 1242.9 km, respectively.

  15. Topology optimised wavelength dependent splitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, K. K.; Burgos Leon, J.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    A photonic crystal wavelength dependent splitter has been constructed by utilising topology optimisation1. The splitter has been fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator material (Fig. 1). The topology optimised wavelength dependent splitter demonstrates promising 3D FDTD simulation results. This com......A photonic crystal wavelength dependent splitter has been constructed by utilising topology optimisation1. The splitter has been fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator material (Fig. 1). The topology optimised wavelength dependent splitter demonstrates promising 3D FDTD simulation results...

  16. Millimeter Wave Holographical Inspection of Honeycomb Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, J. T.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Stefes, G.; Hepburn, Frank L.; Hepburn, Frank L.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-layered composite structures manufactured with honeycomb, foam or balsa wood cores are finding increasing utility in a variety of aerospace, transportation, and infrastructure applications. Due to the low conductivity and inhomogeneity associated with these composites standard nondestructive testing (NDT) methods are not always capable of inspecting their interior for various defects caused during the manufacturing process or as a result of in-service loading. On the contrary, microwave and millimeter wave NDT methods are well-suited for inspecting these structures since signals at these frequencies readily penetrate through these structures and reflect from different interior boundaries revealing the presence of a wide range of defects such as disbond, delamination, moisture and oil intrusion, impact damage, etc. Millimeter wave frequency spectrum spans 30 GHz - 300 GHz with corresponding wavelengths of 10 - 1 mm. Due to the inherent short wavelengths at these frequencies, one can produce high spatial resolution images of these composites either using real-antenna focused or synthetic-aperture focused methods. In addition, incorporation of swept-frequency in the latter method (i.e., holography) results in high-resolution three-dimensional images. This paper presents the basic steps behind producing such images at millimeter wave frequencies and the results of two honeycomb composite panels are demonstrated at Q-band (33-50 GHz). In addition, these results are compared to previous results using X-ray computed tomography.

  17. Millimeter Wave Holographical Inspection of Honeycomb Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, J. T.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Steffes, G.; Hepburn, F. L.

    2008-02-01

    Multi-layered composite structures manufactured with honeycomb, foam, or balsa wood cores are finding increasing utility in a variety of aerospace, transportation, and infrastructure applications. Due to the low conductivity and inhomogeneity associated with these composites, standard nondestructive testing (NDT) methods are not always capable of inspecting their interior for various defects caused during the manufacturing process or as a result of in-service loading. On the contrary, microwave and millimeter wave NDT methods are well-suited for inspecting these structures since signals at these frequencies readily penetrate through these structures and reflect from different interior boundaries revealing the presence of a wide range of defects such as isband, delamination, moisture and oil intrusion, impact damage, etc. Millimeter wave frequency spectrum spans 30 GHz-300 GHz with corresponding wavelengths of 10-1 mm. Due to the inherent short wavelengths at these frequencies, one can produce high spatial resolution images of these composites either using real-antenna focused or synthetic-aperture focused methods. In addition, incorporation of swept-frequency in the latter method (i.e., holography) results in high-resolution three-dimensional images. This paper presents the basic steps behind producing such images at millimeter wave frequencies and the results of two honeycomb composite panels are demonstrated at Q-band (33-50 GHz). In addition, these results are compared to previous results using X-ray computed tomography.

  18. Wavelength and polarization affect phototaxis of the Asian citrus psyllid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, D. citri, is a primary pest for citrus production due to its status as a vector of the citrus disease, huanglongbing. We investigated phototactic behavior of D. citri to evaluate effects of light of specific wavelength or polarization using a horizontal bioassay arena. Wave...

  19. Slot-grating flat lens for telecom wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Jonathan R; Stokes, Jamie L; Lopez-Garcia, Martin; Gan, Choon-How; Nash, Geoff R; Rarity, John G; Cryan, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    We present a stand-alone beam-focusing flat lens for use in the telecommunications wavelength range. Light incident on the back surface of the lens propagates through a subwavelength aperture and is heavily diffracted on exit and partially couples into a surface plasmon polariton and a surface wave propagating along the surface of the lens. Interference between the diffracted wave and re-emission from a grating patterned on the surface produces a highly collimated beam. We show for the first time a geometry at which a lens of this type can be used at telecommunication wavelengths (λ=1.55 μm) and identify the light coupling and re-emission mechanisms involved. Measured beam profile results at varying incident wavelengths show excellent agreement with Lumerical FDTD simulation results.

  20. Going Wave as a Model of Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Goryunov, A V

    2010-01-01

    The concept of going wave is introduced from classical positions (including the special relativity theory). One- and three-dimensional going waves considered with their wave equations and dispersion equations. It is shown that wave characteristics (de Broglie's and Compton's wavelengths) and corpuscular characteristics (energy-momentum vector and the rest mass) of particle may be expressed through parameters of going wave. By that the new view on a number concepts of physic related with particle-wave dualism is suggested.

  1. Studies on atmospheric gravity wave activity in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over a tropical station at Gadanki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Subba Reddy

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available MST radars are powerful tools to study the mesosphere, stratosphere and troposphere and have made considerable contributions to the studies of the dynamics of the upper, middle and lower atmosphere. Atmospheric gravity waves play a significant role in controlling middle and upper atmospheric dynamics. To date, frontal systems, convection, wind shear and topography have been thought to be the sources of gravity waves in the troposphere. All these studies pointed out that it is very essential to understand the generation, propagation and climatology of gravity waves. In this regard, several campaigns using Indian MST Radar observations have been carried out to explore the gravity wave activity over Gadanki in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. The signatures of the gravity waves in the wind fields have been studied in four seasons viz., summer, monsoon, post-monsoon and winter. The large wind fluctuations were more prominent above 10 km during the summer and monsoon seasons. The wave periods are ranging from 10 min-175 min. The power spectral densities of gravity waves are found to be maximum in the stratospheric region. The vertical wavelength and the propagation direction of gravity waves were determined using hodograph analysis. The results show both down ward and upward propagating waves with a maximum vertical wave length of 3.3 km. The gravity wave associated momentum fluxes show that long period gravity waves carry more momentum flux than the short period waves and this is presented.

  2. Congenital Short QT Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital short QT syndrome (SQTS is characterised by extremely short QT intervals, typically with QTc less than 330 ms and a propensity for life threatening ventricular arrhythmias and atrial fibrillation. The QT interval in SQTS does not change significantly with heart rate and the T waves have a narrow base and high voltage, similar to those in hyperkalemia.

  3. Wavelength conversion techniques and devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Søren Lykke; Mikkelsen, Benny; Hansen, Peter Bukhave

    1997-01-01

    Taking into account the requirements to the converters e.g., bit rate transparency (at least up to 10 Gbit/s), polarisation independence, wavelength independence, moderate input power levels, high signal-to-noise ratio and high extinction ratio interferometric wavelength convertors are very...

  4. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Marek; KoŻuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ṡ 10-8. Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  5. Multiwavelength digital holography with wavelength-multiplexed holograms and arbitrary symmetric phase shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Tatsuki; Otani, Reo; Omae, Kaito; Gotohda, Takuya; Arai, Yasuhiko; Takaki, Yasuhiro

    2017-05-15

    We propose multiwavelength in-line digital holography with wavelength-multiplexed phase-shifted holograms and arbitrary symmetric phase shifts. We use phase-shifting interferometry selectively extracting wavelength information to reconstruct multiwavelength object waves separately from wavelength-multiplexed monochromatic images. The proposed technique obtains systems of equations for real and imaginary parts of multiwavelength object waves from the holograms by introducing arbitrary symmetric phase shifts. Then, the technique derives each complex amplitude distribution of each object wave selectively and analytically by solving the two systems of equations. We formulate the algorithm in the case of an arbitrary number of wavelengths and confirm its validity numerically and experimentally in the cases where the number of wavelengths is two and three.

  6. Acoustic levitation of an object larger than the acoustic wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A B; Okina, Fábio T A; Bernassau, Anne L; Adamowski, Julio C

    2017-06-01

    Levitation and manipulation of objects by sound waves have a wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, material sciences, and engineering. However, the current acoustic levitation techniques are mainly restricted to particles that are much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this work, it is shown that acoustic standing waves can be employed to stably levitate an object much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The levitation of a large slightly curved object weighting 2.3 g is demonstrated by using a device formed by two 25 kHz ultrasonic Langevin transducers connected to an aluminum plate. The sound wave emitted by the device provides a vertical acoustic radiation force to counteract gravity and a lateral restoring force that ensure horizontal stability to the levitated object. In order to understand the levitation stability, a numerical model based on the finite element method is used to determine the acoustic radiation force that acts on the object.

  7. Design and Fabrication of Large Diameter Gradient-Index Lenses for Dual-Band Visible to Short-Wave Infrared Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Anthony Joseph

    The fabrication of gradient-index (GRIN) optical elements is quite challenging, which has traditionally restricted their use in many imaging systems; consequently, commercial-level GRIN components usually exist in one particular market or niche application space. One such fabrication technique, ion exchange, is a well-known process used in the chemical strengthening of glass, the fabrication of waveguide devices, and the production of small diameter GRIN optical relay systems. However, the manufacturing of large diameter ion-exchanged GRIN elements has historically been limited by long diffusion times. For example, the diffusion time for a 20 mm diameter radial GRIN lens in commercially available ion exchange glass for small diameter relays, is on the order of a year. The diffusion time can be dramatically reduced by addressing three key ion exchange process parameters; the composition of the glass, the diffusion temperature, and the composition of the salt bath. Experimental work throughout this thesis aims to (1) scale up the ion exchange diffusion process to 20 mm diameters for a fast-diffusing titania silicate glass family in both (2) sodium ion for lithium ion (Na+ for Li+) and lithium ion for sodium ion (Li+ for Na+) exchange directions, while (3) utilizing manufacturing friendly salt bath compositions. In addition, optical design studies have demonstrated that an important benefit of gradient-index elements in imaging systems is the added degree of freedom introduced with a gradient's optical power. However, these studies have not investigated the potential usefulness of GRIN materials in dual-band visible to short-wave infrared (vis-SWIR) imaging systems. The unique chromatic properties of the titania silicate ion exchange glass become a significant degree of freedom in the design process for these color-limited, broadband imaging applications. A single GRIN element can replace a cemented doublet or even a cemented triplet, without loss in overall system

  8. Micro hot embossed plastic millimeter-wave systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ying; Sammoura, Firas; Chi, Chen-Yu; Lin, Liwei; Chiao, J.-C.

    2005-12-01

    Recently, millimeter-wave devices have been attracted more attentions in applications owing to their short wavelengths, higher resolutions, broader bandwidths and higher environmental tolerance. The great challenges of high fabrication and assembly costs, bulky volumes, and heavy weights of millimeter-wave systems call for new integrated manufacturing techniques. The hot embossing technique could address these challenges. In this paper, a review of micro plastic hot embossing was given for the fabrication of miniaturized millimeter-wave systems. The micro hot embossing on plastic materials demonstrated its advantages on significant costs, volume and weight reduction, while maintaining high performances. We have designed, fabricated and characterized a W-band rectangular waveguide and a W-band iris waveguide filter with integrated plastic flanges using micro hot embossing and selective electroplating. In this paper, we reviewed the results and discussed the design methodology in details for the micromachined components. The prototype devices showed promise for the system designs.

  9. Instabilities and propagation of neutrino magnetohydrodynamic waves in arbitrary direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Fernando; Pascoal, Kellen Alves

    2017-09-01

    In a previous work [Haas et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 012104 (2016)], a new model was introduced, taking into account the role of the Fermi weak force due to neutrinos coupled to magnetohydrodynamic plasmas. The resulting neutrino-magnetohydrodynamics was investigated in a particular geometry associated with the magnetosonic wave, where the ambient magnetic field and the wavevector are perpendicular. The corresponding fast, short wavelength neutrino beam instability was then obtained in the context of supernova parameters. The present communication generalizes these results, allowing for arbitrary direction of wave propagation, including fast and slow magnetohydrodynamic waves and the intermediate cases of oblique angles. The numerical estimates of the neutrino-plasma instabilities are derived in extreme astrophysical environments where dense neutrino beams exist.

  10. Workshop on scientific applications of short wavelength coherent light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, W.; Arthur, J.; Winick, H.

    1993-02-01

    This report contains paper on the following topics: A 2 to 4nm High Power FEL On the SLAC Linac; Atomic Physics with an X-ray Laser; High Resolution, Three Dimensional Soft X-ray Imaging; The Role of X-ray Induced Damage in Biological Micro-imaging; Prospects for X-ray Microscopy in Biology; Femtosecond Optical Pulses ; Research in Chemical Physics Surface Science, and Materials Science, with a Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source; Application of 10 GeV Electron Driven X-ray Laser in Gamma-ray Laser Research; Non-Linear Optics, Fluorescence, Spectromicroscopy, Stimulated Desorption: We Need LCLS' Brightness and Time Scale; Application of High Intensity X-rays to Materials Synthesis and Processing; LCLS Optics: Selected Technological Issues and Scientific Opportunities; Possible Applications of an FEL for Materials Studies in the 60 eV to 200 eV Spectral Region.

  11. Workshop on scientific applications of short wavelength coherent light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, W.; Arthur, J.; Winick, H.

    1993-02-01

    This report contains paper on the following topics: A 2 to 4nm High Power FEL On the SLAC Linac; Atomic Physics with an X-ray Laser; High Resolution, Three Dimensional Soft X-ray Imaging; The Role of X-ray Induced Damage in Biological Micro-imaging; Prospects for X-ray Microscopy in Biology; Femtosecond Optical Pulses?; Research in Chemical Physics Surface Science, and Materials Science, with a Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source; Application of 10 GeV Electron Driven X-ray Laser in Gamma-ray Laser Research; Non-Linear Optics, Fluorescence, Spectromicroscopy, Stimulated Desorption: We Need LCLS` Brightness and Time Scale; Application of High Intensity X-rays to Materials Synthesis and Processing; LCLS Optics: Selected Technological Issues and Scientific Opportunities; Possible Applications of an FEL for Materials Studies in the 60 eV to 200 eV Spectral Region.

  12. Wavelength dimensioning for wavelength-routed WDM satellite network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Internet and broadband applications driven by data traffic demand have become key drivers for satellite constellations. The key technology to satisfy the high capacity requirements between satellites is optical satellite networks by means of wavelength division multiplexing inter-satellite links (ISLs with wavelength routing (WDM-OSN. Due to the limited optical amplifier bandwidth onboard the satellite, it is important to minimize the wavelength requirements to provision requests. However, ISLs should be dynamically established and deleted for each satellite according to its visible satellites. Furthermore, different link assignments will result in different topologies, hence yielding different routings and wavelength assignments. Thus, a perfect match model-based link assignment scheme (LAS-PMM is proposed to design an appropriate topology such that shorter path could be routed and less wavelengths could be assigned for each ISL along the path. Finally, simulation results show that in comparison to the regular Manhattan street network (MSN topology, wavelength requirements and average end-to-end delay based on the topology generated by LAS-PMM could be reduced by 24.8% and 12.4%, respectively.

  13. Characteristics of phase-averaged equations for modulated wave groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopman, G.; Petit, H.A.H.; Battjes, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The project concerns the influence of long waves on coastal morphology. The modelling of the combined motion of the long waves and short waves in the horizontal plane is done by phase-averaging over the short wave motion and using intra-wave modelling for the long waves, see e.g. Roelvink (1993).

  14. Space-Charge Waves and Instabilities in Intense Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. G.

    1997-11-01

    Advancced accelerator applications, such as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion, high-intensity synchrotrons for spallation neutron sources, high energy boosters, free electron lasers, high-power microwave generators, etc., require ever-increasing beam intensity. An important beam dynamics issue in such beams is the collective behavior of charged particles due to their space charge effects. This includes the phenomena of space-charge waves and instabilities excited on beams by external perturbations. It is very crucial to fully understand these phenomena in order to develop advanced accelerators for various applications. At the University of Maryland we have been conducting experimental programs to study space-charge waves and longitudinal instabilities by employing low-energy, high-current, space-charge dominated electron beams. Localized perturbations on the beams are generated from a gridded electron gun. In a conducting transport channel focused by short solenoids, these perturbations evolve into space-charge waves propagating on the beams. The wave speed is measured and many beam parameters are determined with this technique. The reflection of space-charge waves at the shoulder of an initially rectangular beam bunch is also observed. In a resistive-wall channel focused by a uniform long solenoid, the space-charge waves suffer longitudinal instability. The properties of the instabilities are studied in detail in the long wavelength range. In this talk we review our experimental results on the waves and instabilities and compare with theory.

  15. Novel anti-jamming technique for OCDMA network through FWM in SOA based wavelength converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, Vishav; Kaler, R. S.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel anti-jamming technique for optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) network through four wave mixing (FWM) in semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) based wavelength converter. OCDMA signal can be easily jammed with high power jamming signal. It is shown that wavelength conversion through four wave mixing in SOA has improved capability of jamming resistance. It is observed that jammer has no effect on OCDMA network even at high jamming powers by using the proposed technique.

  16. Bragg-scattering conversion at telecom wavelengths towards the photon counting regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Tonello, Alessandro; Kozlov, Victor V; Couderc, Vincent; Di Bin, Philippe; Wabnitz, Stefan; Barthélémy, Alain; Labonté, Laurent; Tanzilli, Sébastien

    2012-11-19

    We experimentally study Bragg-scattering four-wave mixing in a highly nonlinear fiber at telecom wavelengths using photon counters. We explore the polarization dependence of this process with a continuous wave signal in the macroscopic and attenuated regime, with a wavelength shift of 23 nm. Our measurements of mean photon numbers per second under various pump polarization configurations agree well with the theoretical and numerical predictions based on classical models. We discuss the impact of noise under these different polarization configurations.

  17. Characterization of the zero-dispersion wavelength variation in a strained highly nonlinear fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillieholm, Mads; Galili, Michael; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental characterization of longitudinal zero-dispersion wavelength variations in a novel, strained, highly nonlinear fiber, by simple four-wave mixing spectrum analysis, and provide new insights to the analysis supported by detailed numerical simulations.......We present an experimental characterization of longitudinal zero-dispersion wavelength variations in a novel, strained, highly nonlinear fiber, by simple four-wave mixing spectrum analysis, and provide new insights to the analysis supported by detailed numerical simulations....

  18. 15-THz Tunable Wavelength Conversion of Picosecond Pulses in a Silicon Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Hu, Hao; Galili, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate all-optical ultra-broadband tunable wavelength conversion of 1-ps pulses based on four-wave mixing in a 3-mm-long dispersion engineered silicon waveguide. In the waveguide, an input pulse with center wavelength at 1600 nm is down-converted by 135 nm (17.3 THz) to 1465 nm. A tuning...

  19. Coherence techniques at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chang [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The renaissance of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) optics in recent years is mainly driven by the desire of printing and observing ever smaller features, as in lithography and microscopy. This attribute is complemented by the unique opportunity for element specific identification presented by the large number of atomic resonances, essentially for all materials in this range of photon energies. Together, these have driven the need for new short-wavelength radiation sources (e.g. third generation synchrotron radiation facilities), and novel optical components, that in turn permit new research in areas that have not yet been fully explored. This dissertation is directed towards advancing this new field by contributing to the characterization of spatial coherence properties of undulator radiation and, for the first time, introducing Fourier optical elements to this short-wavelength spectral region. The first experiment in this dissertation uses the Thompson-Wolf two-pinhole method to characterize the spatial coherence properties of the undulator radiation at Beamline 12 of the Advanced Light Source. High spatial coherence EUV radiation is demonstrated with appropriate spatial filtering. The effects of small vertical source size and beamline apertures are observed. The difference in the measured horizontal and vertical coherence profile evokes further theoretical studies on coherence propagation of an EUV undulator beamline. A numerical simulation based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle is performed.

  20. MIRA: Dual wavelength band instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Georgii

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available MIRA is a dual wavelength band instrument operated by Technische Universität München TUM, which provides neutrons over a wide range of wavelengths 3.5 Å < λ < 20 Å combining the two beam ports of MIRA-1 and MIRA-2. The instrument´s setup is modular and allows for various different cold neutron experiments such as diffraction, spectroscopy or reflectometry.

  1. Firmness prediction in Prunus persica 'Calrico' peaches by visible/short-wave near infrared spectroscopy and acoustic measurements using optimised linear and non-linear chemometric models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Victoria; Herrera, Luis J; Pérez, María del Mar; Val, Jesús; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2015-08-15

    In this work, near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and an acoustic measure (AWETA) (two non-destructive methods) were applied in Prunus persica fruit 'Calrico' (n = 260) to predict Magness-Taylor (MT) firmness. Separate and combined use of these measures was evaluated and compared using partial least squares (PLS) and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) regression methods. Also, a mutual-information-based variable selection method, seeking to find the most significant variables to produce optimal accuracy of the regression models, was applied to a joint set of variables (NIR wavelengths and AWETA measure). The newly proposed combined NIR-AWETA model gave good values of the determination coefficient (R(2)) for PLS and LS-SVM methods (0.77 and 0.78, respectively), improving the reliability of MT firmness prediction in comparison with separate NIR and AWETA predictions. The three variables selected by the variable selection method (AWETA measure plus NIR wavelengths 675 and 697 nm) achieved R(2) values 0.76 and 0.77, PLS and LS-SVM. These results indicated that the proposed mutual-information-based variable selection algorithm was a powerful tool for the selection of the most relevant variables. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Application of the dispersion formula to long- and short-period gravity waves: Comparisons with ALOHA-93 data and an analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munasinghe, G.; Hur, H.; Huang, T. Y.; Bhattachryya, A.; Tuan, T. F.

    1998-03-01

    During the Airborne Lidar and Observations of Hawaiian Airglow (ALOHA) Campaign on October 10, 1993, a wave structure with a sharp front covering significant parts of the sky was observed to move with a phase velocity of 76 m/s at a period of 4 to 5 min. Simultaneous observations of the Green line and the OH emission brightness showed a 180° phase diffeence. We have two objectives. (1) By using a dispersion formula, we first separated the true partial wave guidance for long-period waves from the background effects and showed explicitly that many partial modes previously thought to exist do not in fact exist. In this way, we can show that two very different methods for computing partial modes which previously gave very different results can now be reconciled. We showed that by lowering the period the modes became, first, virtually guided and then fully guided. (2) We then showed that the long-period S2 partial mode eventually became a two-node fully guided mode, which at periods in the range of 4.6 min, had not only phase velocities comparable to the observed result, but also a phase reversal (from the two-node structure) at altitudes in the vicinity of the two airglow emission peaks. At those periods, the dispersion curves were shown to be out of the range of the nearest "kissing" mode and were thus largely unaffected by interference from the stratospheric duct. The results agree well with an analytic model. The wave explanation may in some way complement the other explanations (such as the bore, or soliton) for the same event mentioned in presentations elsewhere.

  3. Comparing hot pack, short-wave diathermy, ultrasound, and TENS on isokinetic strength, pain, and functional status of women with osteoarthritic knees: a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Nuri; Aytar, Aydan; Atalay, Ayce; Akman, Mahmut Nafiz

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effects of physical agents administered before isokinetic exercise in women with knee osteoarthritis. One hundred patients with bilateral knee osteoarthritis were randomized into five groups of 20 patients each: group 1 received short-wave diathermy + hot packs and isokinetic exercise; group 2 received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation + hot packs and isokinetic exercise; group 3 received ultrasound + hot packs and isokinetic exercise; group 4 received hot packs and isokinetic exercise; and group 5 served as controls and received only isokinetic exercise. Pain and disability index scores were significantly reduced in each group. Patients in the study groups had significantly greater reductions in their visual analog scale scores and scores on the Lequesne index than did patients in the control group (group 5). They also showed greater increases than did controls in muscular strength at all angular velocities. In most parameters, improvements were greatest in groups 1 and 2 compared with groups 3 and 4. Using physical agents before isokinetic exercises in women with knee osteoarthritis leads to augmented exercise performance, reduced pain, and improved function. Hot pack with a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator or short-wave diathermy has the best outcome.

  4. Wavelength-Modulated Diffraction System

    CERN Document Server

    Koganezawa, T; Nakamura, N; Yoshimura, Y; Iwasaki, H; Yamada, T; Shoji, T

    2001-01-01

    A new X-ray diffraction system has been constructed at the SR Center at Ritsumeikan University, in which the wavelength of the incident synchrotron radiation is continually and repeatedly changed over a definite range by rocking a couple of monochromator crystals while rotating a sample crystal and recording the diffraction pattern on a moving imaging plate detector. Bragg reflections appear as elongated spots and, if the wavelength range is chosen in the immediate vicinity of the absorption edge of an atom in the crystal, direct information on the phase of Bragg reflections can be derived from the intensity gradient of the elongated spots with respect to the wavelength. This method of phase determination is simple and free from the problem of intensity scaling encountered in the multi-wavelength diffraction method. When both a sample crystal and the detector are kept stationary while changing the wavelength, a pattern is obtained which is similar to Laue pattern, but there is a definite difference. The wavel...

  5. The Wavelength Conversion in WDM Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Bahleda

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we deal with a problem of wavelength conversion in WDM networks and with the wavelength conversion impact on throughput of network. The throughput of networks is determined in terms of blocking probability. The optical networks can be built without wavelength conversion or with full or limited wavelength conversion. Different traffic models are designed for different types of wavelength conversions, which describe performance of wavelength conversion. I describe some results of these models.

  6. Surface Waves on Metamaterials Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee

    2016-01-01

    We analyze surface electromagnetic waves supported at the interface between isotropic medium and effective anisotropic material that can be realized by alternating conductive and dielectrics layers. This configuration can host various types of surface waves and therefore can serve as a rich...... platform for applications of surface photonics. Most of these surface waves are directional and as such their propagation can be effectively controlled by changing wavelength or material parameters tuning....

  7. Inner harbour wave agitation using boussinesq wave model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panigrahi Jitendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Short crested waves play an important role for planning and design of harbours. In this context a numerical simulation is carried out to evaluate wave tranquility inside a real harbour located in east coast of India. The annual offshore wave climate proximity- to harbour site is established using Wave Model (WAM hindcast wave data. The deep water waves are transformed to harbour front using a Near Shore spectral Wave model (NSW. A directional analysis is carried out to determine the probable incident wave directions towards the harbour. Most critical threshold wave height and wave period is chosen for normal operating conditions using exceedence probability analysis. Irregular random waves from various directions are generated confirming to Pierson Moskowitz spectrum at 20m water depth. Wave incident into inner harbor through harbor entrance is performed using Boussinesq Wave model (BW. Wave disturbance experienced inside the harbour and at various berths are analysed. The paper discusses the progresses took place in short wave modeling and it demonstrates application of wave climate for the evaluation of harbor tranquility using various types of wave models.

  8. Inner harbour wave agitation using boussinesq wave model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra K. Panigrahi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Short crested waves play an important role for planning and design of harbours. In this context a numerical simulation is carried out to evaluate wave tranquility inside a real harbour located in east coast of India. The annual offshore wave climate proximity to harbour site is established using Wave Model (WAM hindcast wave data. The deep water waves are transformed to harbour front using a Near Shore spectral Wave model (NSW. A directional analysis is carried out to determine the probable incident wave directions towards the harbour. Most critical threshold wave height and wave period is chosen for normal operating conditions using exceedence probability analysis. Irregular random waves from various directions are generated confirming to Pierson Moskowitz spectrum at 20 m water depth. Wave incident into inner harbor through harbor entrance is performed using Boussinesq Wave model (BW. Wave disturbance experienced inside the harbour and at various berths are analysed. The paper discusses the progresses took place in short wave modeling and it demonstrates application of wave climate for the evaluation of harbor tranquility using various types of wave models.

  9. Planar Lenses at Visible Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Devlin, Robert C; Oh, Jaewon; Zhu, Alexander Y; Capasso, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Sub-wavelength resolution imaging requires high numerical aperture (NA) lenses, which are bulky and expensive. Metasurfaces allow the miniaturization of conventional refractive optics into planar structures. We show that high-aspect-ratio titanium dioxide metasurfaces can be fabricated and designed as meta-lenses with NA = 0.8. Diffraction-limited focusing is demonstrated at wavelengths of 405 nm, 532 nm, and 660 nm with corresponding efficiencies of 86%, 73%, and 66%. The meta-lenses can resolve nanoscale features separated by sub-wavelength distances and provide magnification as high as 170x with image qualities comparable to a state-of-the-art commercial objective. Our results firmly establish that meta-lenses can have widespread applications in laser-based microscopy, imaging, and spectroscopy.

  10. Spatial Damping of Linear Compressional Magnetoacoustic Waves ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    shows greater wave damping at low values of radiative time and then attains some maximum value and then decreases. The slow mode wave has higher values of damping per wavelength, showing higher levels of damping due to radiation. For τR → ∞, the wave takes infinite time to damp and therefore travels very long ...

  11. Wavelength standards in the infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, KN

    2012-01-01

    Wavelength Standards in the Infrared is a compilation of wavelength standards suitable for use with high-resolution infrared spectrographs, including both emission and absorption standards. The book presents atomic line emission standards of argon, krypton, neon, and xenon. These atomic line emission standards are from the deliberations of Commission 14 of the International Astronomical Union, which is the recognized authority for such standards. The text also explains the techniques employed in determining spectral positions in the infrared. One of the techniques used includes the grating con

  12. Instability of combined gravity-inertial-Rossby waves in atmospheres and oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the instability of combined gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane are investigated. The wave-energy exchange equation shows that there is an exchange of energy with the background stratified medium. The energy source driving the instability lies in the background enthalpy released by the gravitational buoyancy force.

    It is shown that if the phase speed of the westward propagating low frequency-long wavelength Rossby wave exceeds the Poincaré-Kelvin (or "equivalent" shallow water wave speed, instability arises from the merging of Rossby and Poincaré modes. There are two key parameters in this instability condition; namely, the equatorial/rotational Mach (or Froude number M and the latitude θ0 of the β-plane. In general waves equatorward of a critical latitude for given M can be driven unstable, with corresponding growth rates of the order of a day or so. Although these conclusions may only be safely drawn for short wavelengths corresponding to a JWKB wave packet propagating internally and located far from boundaries, nevertheless such a local instability may play a significant role in atmosphere-ocean dynamics.

  13. Instability of combined gravity-inertial-Rossby waves in atmospheres and oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the instability of combined gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane are investigated. The wave-energy exchange equation shows that there is an exchange of energy with the background stratified medium. The energy source driving the instability lies in the background enthalpy released by the gravitational buoyancy force. It is shown that if the phase speed of the westward propagating low frequency-long wavelength Rossby wave exceeds the Poincaré-Kelvin (or "equivalent" shallow water wave speed, instability arises from the merging of Rossby and Poincaré modes. There are two key parameters in this instability condition; namely, the equatorial/rotational Mach (or Froude number M and the latitude θ0 of the β-plane. In general waves equatorward of a critical latitude for given M can be driven unstable, with corresponding growth rates of the order of a day or so. Although these conclusions may only be safely drawn for short wavelengths corresponding to a JWKB wave packet propagating internally and located far from boundaries, nevertheless such a local instability may play a significant role in atmosphere-ocean dynamics.

  14. Nonlinear excitation of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability for all wave numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Betti, R.; Gopalaswamy, V.; Yan, R.; Aluie, H.

    2018-01-01

    Small-scale perturbations in the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability (ARTI) are often neglected because they are linearly stable when their wavelength is shorter than a linear cutoff. Using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations, it is shown that linearly stable modes of any wavelength can be destabilized. This instability regime requires finite amplitude initial perturbations and linearly stable ARTI modes to be more easily destabilized in 3D than in 2D. It is shown that for conditions found in laser fusion targets, short wavelength ARTI modes are more efficient at driving mixing of ablated material throughout the target since the nonlinear bubble density increases with the wave number and small-scale bubbles carry a larger mass flux of mixed material.

  15. Effects of wavelength filtering on pulse dynamics in a tunable, actively Q-switched fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Manas; Venkitesh, Deepa; Srinivasan, Balaji

    2018-01-01

    We present a numerical simulation, validated by experimental analysis, of the effect of wavelength filtering on pulse dynamics of a wavelength-tunable Erbium-doped fiber Q-switched laser in a ring configuration. Travelling wave time-dependent model is implemented using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method to accurately simulate the population dynamics and the pulse evolution in the ring laser. Such a model is experimentally validated for a wavelength tunable Q-switched fiber laser and stable Q-switched pulses are obtained over a wavelength tuning range of ∼30 nm in the C-band.

  16. Short baseline variations in site response and wave-propagation effects and their structural causes: Four examples in and around the santa clara valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.; Carver, D.; Liu, P.

    2010-01-01

    Ground motion records of local and regional events from a portable array are used to investigate the structural causes of variations in ground motion over distances of a few hundred meters to a few kilometers in the sedimentary basin environment of the Santa Clara Valley, California, and its margins. Arrays of portable seismic stations are used to target four study areas with different ground motion patterns: (1) an edge of the alluvial basin extending up onto a marginal ridge (Blossom Hill), (2) a Cenozoic basin with a nearly flat bottom (Cupertino Basin), (3) a long, narrow Cenozoic basin with a steep V profile (Evergreen Basin), and (4) a line perpendicular to the trace of the Hayward fault. Average peak velocities on Blossom Hill from local earthquakes are a factor of 2.5 times higher than nearby valley sites. Three-dimensional (3D) modeling is used to conclude that the majority of the amplification is due to lower shear-wave velocities along a local fault zone (Shannon–Berrocal). Site amplification over the Cupertino Basin in the frequency band 0.5–4 Hz is generally low (less than 2.0 relative to a Mesozoic rock site) and spatially uniform. This response is attributed to the shallow, flat-bottomed shape of the basin and the uniform, flat-laying sedimentary fill. In contrast, site amplification in the Evergreen Basin generally exceeds 3.0 and is attributed to the deep, V-shaped geometry of the basin and younger sedimentary fill. 3D waveform modeling shows the elongated shape of the Evergreen Basin causes more efficient trapping of long-period waves for sources along the long axis of the basin. A low-velocity zone is postulated along the Hayward fault with a width between 100 and 200 m, based on elevated site response along the fault trace and 4.5-Hz fault zone guided waves on the horizontal components of stations near the fault.

  17. Nonlinear wave damping due to multi-plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, G.; Ekman, R.; Zamanian, J.

    2018-02-01

    For short wavelengths, it is well known that the linearized Wigner–Moyal equation predicts wave damping due to wave-particle interaction, where the resonant velocity shifted from the phase velocity by a velocity {v}q={{\\hslash }}k/2m. Here {{\\hslash }} is the reduced Planck constant, k is the wavenumber and m is the electron mass. Going beyond linear theory, we find additional resonances with velocity shifts {{nv}}q,n=2,3, \\ldots , giving rise to a new wave-damping mechanism that we term multi-plasmon damping, as it can be seen as the simultaneous absorption (or emission) of multiple plasmon quanta. Naturally this wave damping is not present in classical plasmas. For a temperature well below the Fermi temperature, if the linear (n = 1) resonant velocity is outside the Fermi sphere, the number of linearly resonant particles is exponentially small, while the multi-plasmon resonances can be located in the bulk of the distribution. We derive sets of evolution equations for the case of two-plasmon and three-plasmon resonances for Langmuir waves in the simplest case of a fully degenerate plasma. By solving these equations numerically for a range of wave-numbers we find the corresponding damping rates, and we compare them to results from linear theory to estimate the applicability. Finally, we discuss the effects due to a finite temperature.

  18. Wavelength shifting of intra-cavity photons: Adiabatic wavelength tuning in rapidly wavelength-swept lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the physics behind the newest generation of rapidly wavelength tunable sources for optical coherence tomography (OCT), retaining a single longitudinal cavity mode during operation without repeated build up of lasing. In this context, we theoretically investigate the currently existing concepts of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers based on tuning of the cavity length or refractive index, leading to an altered optical path length inside the resonator. Specifically, we consider vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors as well as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) and Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) lasers. Based on heuristic arguments and exact analytical solutions of Maxwell's equations for a fundamental laser resonator model, we show that adiabatic wavelength tuning is achieved, i.e., hopping between cavity modes associated with a repeated build up of lasing is avoided, and the photon number is conserved. As a consequence, no fundamental limit exists for the wavelength tuning speed, in principle enabling wide-range wavelength sweeps at arbitrary tuning speeds with narrow instantaneous linewidth.

  19. Characteristics of gravity waves generated in a convective and a non-convective environment revealed from hourly radiosonde observation under CPEA-II campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Dhaka

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of hourly radiosonde data of temperature, wind, and relative humidity during four days (two with convection and two with no convection as a part of an intensive observation period in CPEA-2 campaign over Koto Tabang (100.32° E, 0.20° S, Indonesia, are presented. Characteristics of gravity waves in terms of dominant wave frequencies at different heights and their vertical wavelengths are shown in the lower stratosphere during a convective and non-convective period. Gravity waves with periods ~10 h and ~4–5 h were found dominant near tropopause (a region of high stability on all days of observation. Vertical propagation of gravity waves were seen modified near heights of the three identified strong wind shears (at ~16, 20, and 25 km heights due to wave-mean flow interaction. Between 17 and 21 km heights, meridional wind fluctuations dominated over zonal wind, whereas from 22 to 30 km heights, wave fluctuations with periods ~3–5 h and ~8–10 h in zonal wind and temperature were highly associated, suggesting zonal orientation of wave propagation. Gravity waves from tropopause region to 30 km heights were analyzed. In general, vertical wavelength of 2–5 km dominated in all the mean-removed (~ weekly mean wind and temperature hourly profiles. Computed vertical wavelength spectra are similar, in most of the cases, to the source spectra (1–16 km height except that of zonal wind spectra, which is broad during active convection. Interestingly, during and after convection, gravity waves with short vertical wavelength (~2 km and short period (~2–3 h emerged, which were confined in the close vicinity of tropopause, and were not identified on non-convective days, suggesting convection to be the source for them. Some wave features near strong wind shear (at 25 km height were also observed with short vertical wavelengths in both convective and non-convective days, suggesting wind shear to be the sole cause of generation and seemingly not

  20. Abnormal Waves Modelled as Second-order Conditional Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents results for the expected second order short-crested wave conditional of a given wave crest at a specific point in time and space. The analysis is based on the second order Sharma and Dean shallow water wave theory. Numerical results showing the importance of the spectral density......, the water depth and the directional spreading on the conditional mean wave profile are presented. Application of conditional waves to model and explain abnormal waves, e.g. the well-known New Year Wave measured at the Draupner platform January 1st 1995, is discussed. Whereas the wave profile can be modelled...... quite well by the second order conditional wave including directional spreading and finite water depth the probability to encounter such a wave is still, however, extremely rare. The use of the second order conditional wave as initial condition to a fully non-linear three-dimensional analysis...

  1. Estimating method for a phase-velocity of Rayleigh waves on multi-layered media and its application to inversion problem; Rayleigh ha no bunsan kyokusen no kinji keisanho no teian to chika kozo suitei eno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konno, K. [Shibaura Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-15

    An attempt was made to approximate a dispersion curve being a function of S-wave velocity, P-wave velocity, density and layer thickness by using only the S-wave velocity and the layer thickness. Then, this approximation method was utilized for an attempt of deriving the S-wave velocity structure directly from the observed dispersion curve. Lastly, the derived S-wave velocity structure was attempted to be utilized as an initial model for inversion analysis. The pseudo-phase velocity derived by using this proposed method becomes functions for only the cycle, S-wave velocity and layer thickness, converges into the S-wave velocity of the lowermost layer at the extreme of a long cycle, and agrees with the S-wave velocity of the surface layer in the short cycle side. The pseudo-dispersion curve approximates the dispersion curve of Rayleigh waves more closely than that of Love waves. If depths and pseudo-wave lengths are in rough agreement in a region in which amplitude of the base mode Rayleigh waves is distributed largely, the pseudo-phase velocity resembles to the theoretical phase velocity. S-wave velocity at a ground depth which corresponds to a length of the Rayleigh wave could be estimated to some extent by differentiating the wavelength with regard to the cycle. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Galactic superluminal sources at different wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyudin, A.F

    2000-05-01

    Jet-like superluminal motion was observed in few types of the astrophysical systems. The early observations were made from radio galaxies with an active galactic nuclei (AGN) harboring accreting supermassive black hole. Similar type superluminal jets were detected in some of the hard X-ray transients with a stellar mass black hole. Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries with relativistic jets are reminiscent, though on a much smaller scale, of many of the phenomena seen in AGNs. The contemporaneous multiwavelength observations of the superluminal sources reveal the close connection between instabilities obviously originated in the accretion disk and manifested by their short timescale signature in X-rays, and the ejection of clouds of relativistic plasma observed as synchrotron emission at longer wavelengths. In this review I will attempt to summarise the observational status of the galactic relativistic jet sources and to stress out the importance of the multiwavelength observations.

  3. [Fundus autofluorescence in patients with inherited retinal diseases : Patterns of fluorescence at two different wavelengths.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, T.; Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) may be excited and measured at different wavelengths. In the present study we compared short wavelength and near-infrared FAF patterns of retinal dystrophies. METHODS: We analysed both eyes of 108 patients with diverse retinal dystrophies. Besides colour

  4. Solutions for ultra-high speed optical wavelength conversion and clock recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Galili, Michael; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on our recent advances in ultra-fast optical communications relying on ultra-short pulses densely stacked in ultra-high bit rate serial data signals at a single wavelength. The paper describes details in solutions for the network functionalities of wavelength conversion and clo...

  5. Multi-wavelength and multi-colour temporal and spatial optical solitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivshar, Y. S.; Sukhorukov, A. A.; Ostrovskaya, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    We present an overview of several novel types of multi- component envelope solitary waves that appear in fiber and waveguide nonlinear optics. In particular, we describe multi-channel solitary waves in bit-parallel-wavelength fiber transmission systems for high performance computer networks, mult......-color parametric spatial solitary waves due to cascaded nonlinearities of quadratic materials, and quasiperiodic envelope solitons in Fibonacci optical superlattices....

  6. Geometrid outbreak waves travel across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenow, Olle; Nilssen, Arne C; Bylund, Helena; Pettersson, Rickard; Battisti, Andrea; Bohn, Udo; Caroulle, Fabien; Ciornei, Constantin; Csóka, György; Delb, Horst; De Prins, Willy; Glavendekić, Milka; Gninenko, Yuri I; Hrašovec, Boris; Matošević, Dinka; Meshkova, Valentyna; Moraal, Leen; Netoiu, Constantin; Pajares, Juan; Rubtsov, Vasily; Tomescu, Romica; Utkina, Irina

    2013-01-01

    We show that the population ecology of the 9- to 10-year cyclic, broadleaf-defoliating winter moth (Operophtera brumata) and other early-season geometrids cannot be fully understood on a local scale unless population behaviour is known on a European scale. Qualitative and quantitative data on O. brumata outbreaks were obtained from published sources and previously unpublished material provided by authors of this article. Data cover six decades from the 1950s to the first decade of twenty-first century and most European countries, giving new information fundamental for the understanding of the population ecology of O. brumata. Analyses on epicentral, regional and continental scales show that in each decade, a wave of O. brumata outbreaks travelled across Europe. On average, the waves moved unidirectionally ESE-WNW, that is, toward the Scandes and the Atlantic. When one wave reached the Atlantic coast after 9-10 years, the next one started in East Europe to travel the same c. 3000 km distance. The average wave speed and wavelength was 330 km year(-1) and 3135 km, respectively, the high speed being incongruous with sedentary geometrid populations. A mapping of the wave of the 1990s revealed that this wave travelled in a straight E-W direction. It therefore passed the Scandes diagonally first in the north on its way westward. Within the frame of the Scandes, this caused the illusion that the wave moved N-S. In analogy, outbreaks described previously as moving S-N or occurring contemporaneously along the Scandes were probably the result of continental-scale waves meeting the Scandes obliquely from the south or in parallel. In the steppe zone of eastern-most and south-east Europe, outbreaks of the winter moth did not participate in the waves. Here, broadleaved stands are small and widely separated. This makes the zone hostile to short-distance dispersal between O. brumata subpopulations and prevents synchronization within meta-populations. We hypothesize that hostile

  7. Analysis of bubble plume spacing produced by regular breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaksopa, J.; Haller, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    The breaking wave process in the ocean is a significant mechanism for energy dissipation, splash, and entrainment of air. The relationship between breaking waves and bubble plume characteristics is still a mystery because of the complexity of the breaking wave mechanism. This study takes a unique approach to quantitatively analyze bubble plumes produced by regular breaking waves. Various previous studies have investigated the formation and the characteristics of bubble plumes using either field observations, laboratory experiments, or numerical modeling However, in most observational work the plume characteristics have been studied from the underneath the water surface. In addition, though numerical simulations are able to include much of the important physics, the computational costs are high and bubble plume events are only simulated for short times. Hence, bubble plume evolution and generation throughout the surf zone is not yet computationally feasible. In the present work we take a unique approach to analyzing bubble plumes. These data may be of use for model/data comparisons as numerical simulations become more tractable. The remotely sensed video data from freshwater breaking waves in the OSU Large Wave Flume (Catalan and Haller, 2008) are analyzed. The data set contains six different regular wave conditions and the video intensity data are used to estimate the spacing of plume events (wavenumber spectrum), to calculate the spectral width (i.e. the range of plume spacing), and to relate these with the wave conditions. The video intensity data capture the evolution of the wave passage over a fixed bed arranged in a bar-trough morphology. Bright regions represent the moving path or trajectory coincident with bubble plume of each wave. It also shows the bubble foam were generated and released from wave crest shown in the form of bubble tails with almost regular spacing for each wave. The bubble tails show that most bubbles did not move along with wave. For the

  8. Opening a New Window on the Universe: High-Resolution, Long-Wavelength Radio Astronomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kassim, Namir

    2002-01-01

    Although Jansky's (1933) discovery of radio astronomy was at decametric wavelengths, the urgent quest for ever higher angular resolution and the fact that ionospheric structure limits interferometric imaging to short (less than 5 km...

  9. Hydromagnetic waves in weakly-ionized media - I. Basic theory, and application to interstellar molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.; Ciolek, Glenn E.; Morton, Scott A.

    2011-08-01

    We present a comprehensive study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and instabilities in a weakly-ionized system, such as an interstellar molecular cloud. We determine all the critical wavelengths of perturbations across which the sustainable wave modes can change radically (and so can their decay rates), and various instabilities are present or absent. Hence, these critical wavelengths are essential for understanding the effects of MHD waves (or turbulence) on the structure and evolution of molecular clouds. Depending on the angle of propagation relative to the zeroth-order magnetic field and the physical parameters of a model cloud, there are wavelength ranges in which no wave can be sustained as such. Yet, for other directions of propagation or different properties of a model cloud, there may always exist some wave mode(s) at all wavelengths (smaller than the size of the model cloud). For a typical model cloud, magnetically-driven ambipolar diffusion leads to removal of any support against gravity that most short-wavelength waves (or turbulence) may have had, and gravitationally-driven ambipolar diffusion sets in and leads to cloud fragmentation into stellar-size masses, as first suggested by Mouschovias more than three decades ago - a single-stage fragmentation theory of star formation, distinct from the then prevailing hierarchical fragmentation picture. The phase velocities, decay times and eigenvectors (e.g. the densities and velocities of neutral particles and the plasma, and the three components of the magnetic field) are determined as functions of the wavelength of the disturbances in a mathematically transparent way and are explained physically. Comparison of the results with those of nonlinear analytical or numerical calculations is also presented where appropriate, excellent agreement is found, and confidence in the analytical, linear approach is gained to explore phenomena difficult to study through numerical simulations. Mode splitting (or

  10. An assessment of hazards caused by electromagnetic interaction on humans present near short-wave physiotherapeutic devices of various types including hazards for users of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Leakage of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from short-wave radiofrequency physiotherapeutic diathermies (SWDs) may cause health and safety hazards affecting unintentionally exposed workers (W) or general public (GP) members (assisting patient exposed during treatment or presenting there for other reasons). Increasing use of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMDs), by patients, attendants, and workers, needs attention because dysfunctions of these devices may be caused by electromagnetic interactions. EMF emitted by 12 SWDs (with capacitive or inductive applicators) were assessed following international guidelines on protection against EMF exposure (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection for GP and W, new European directive 2013/35/EU for W, European Recommendation for GP, and European Standard EN 50527-1 for AIMD users). Direct EMF hazards for humans near inductive applicators were identified at a distance not exceeding 45 cm for W or 62 cm for GP, but for AIMD users up to 90 cm (twice longer than that for W and 50% longer than that for GP because EMF is pulsed modulated). Near capacitive applicators emitting continuous wave, the corresponding distances were: 120 cm for W or 150 cm for both-GP or AIMD users. This assessment does not cover patients who undergo SWD treatment (but it is usually recommended for AIMD users to be careful with EMF treatment).

  11. An Assessment of Hazards Caused by Electromagnetic Interaction on Humans Present near Short-Wave Physiotherapeutic Devices of Various Types Including Hazards for Users of Electronic Active Implantable Medical Devices (AIMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Karpowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leakage of electromagnetic fields (EMF from short-wave radiofrequency physiotherapeutic diathermies (SWDs may cause health and safety hazards affecting unintentionally exposed workers (W or general public (GP members (assisting patient exposed during treatment or presenting there for other reasons. Increasing use of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMDs, by patients, attendants, and workers, needs attention because dysfunctions of these devices may be caused by electromagnetic interactions. EMF emitted by 12 SWDs (with capacitive or inductive applicators were assessed following international guidelines on protection against EMF exposure (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection for GP and W, new European directive 2013/35/EU for W, European Recommendation for GP, and European Standard EN 50527-1 for AIMD users. Direct EMF hazards for humans near inductive applicators were identified at a distance not exceeding 45 cm for W or 62 cm for GP, but for AIMD users up to 90 cm (twice longer than that for W and 50% longer than that for GP because EMF is pulsed modulated. Near capacitive applicators emitting continuous wave, the corresponding distances were: 120 cm for W or 150 cm for both—GP or AIMD users. This assessment does not cover patients who undergo SWD treatment (but it is usually recommended for AIMD users to be careful with EMF treatment.

  12. Statistical analysis of mesospheric gravity waves over King Sejong Station, Antarctica (62.2°S, 58.8°W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Hosik; Jee, Geonhwa; Kim, Yong; Ham, Young-bae; Song, In-Sun

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of mesospheric short period (filtered out by strong eastward stratospheric winds. In order to obtain the intrinsic properties of the observed waves, we utilized winds simultaneously measured by KSS Meteor Radar and temperatures from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). More than half the waves propagated horizontally, as waves were in Doppler duct or evanescent in the vertical direction. This might be due to strong eastward background wind field in the mesosphere over KSS. For freely propagating waves, the vertical wavelengths were in the interquartile range of 9-33 km with a median value of 15 km. The vertical wavelengths are shorter than those observed at Halley station (76°S, 27°W) where the majority of the observed waves were freely propagating. The difference in the wave propagating characteristics between KSS and Halley station suggests that gravity waves may affect mesospheric dynamics in this part of the Antarctic Peninsula more strongly than over the Antarctic continent. Furthermore, strong wind shear over KSS played an important role in changing the vertical wavenumbers as the waves propagated upward between two airglow layers (87 and 96 km).

  13. Gabor Wave Packet Method to Solve Plasma Wave Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Pletzer; C.K. Phillips; D.N. Smithe

    2003-06-18

    A numerical method for solving plasma wave equations arising in the context of mode conversion between the fast magnetosonic and the slow (e.g ion Bernstein) wave is presented. The numerical algorithm relies on the expansion of the solution in Gaussian wave packets known as Gabor functions, which have good resolution properties in both real and Fourier space. The wave packets are ideally suited to capture both the large and small wavelength features that characterize mode conversion problems. The accuracy of the scheme is compared with a standard finite element approach.

  14. Terahertz focusing of multiple wavelengths by graphene metasurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Liming, E-mail: liming.liu@student.adfa.edu.au [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2612 (Australia); Zarate, Yair; Shadrivov, Ilya V. [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Hattori, Haroldo T. [School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2612 (Australia); Neshev, Dragomir N.; Powell, David A. [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2016-01-18

    Metasurfaces can achieve nearly arbitrary wavefront control based on manipulation of the wave phase profile. We propose a metasurface based on double graphene cut-wire resonators which can cover the complete 2π phase region with high reflection efficiency. This full phase coverage is essential for efficient wavefront manipulation, without reflecting energy into unwanted channels. A mirror capable of focusing multiple wavelengths is demonstrated numerically based on the proposed structure. The mirror can effectively focus terahertz (THz) waves from 1.2 to 1.9 THz to the same focal point by changing the Fermi level of each graphene resonator separately. The presented metasurface could provide a powerful platform for controlling THz waves, including focusing, beam steering, beam shaping, and holography.

  15. STEREO and Wind Observations of Intense Cyclotron Harmonic Waves at the Earth's Bow Shock and Inside the Magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A. W.; Cattell, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first observations of electron cyclotron harmonic waves at the Earth's bow shock from STEREO and Wind burst waveform captures. These waves are observed at magnetic field gradients at a variety of shock geometries ranging from quasi-parallel to nearly perpendicular along with whistler mode waves, ion acoustic waves, and electrostatic solitary waves. Large amplitude cyclotron harmonic waveforms are also observed in the magnetosheath in association with magnetic field gradients convected past the bow shock. Amplitudes of the cyclotron harmonic waves range from a few tens to more than 500 millivolts/meter peak-peak. A comparison between the short (15 meters) and long (100 meters) Wind spin plane antennas shows a similar response at low harmonics and a stronger response on the short antenna at higher harmonics. This indicates that wavelengths are not significantly larger than 100 meters, consistent with the electron cyclotron radius. Waveforms are broadband and polarizations are distinctively comma-shaped with significant power both perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. Harmonics tend to be more prominent in the perpendicular directions. These observations indicate that the waves consist of a combination of perpendicular Bernstein waves and field-aligned waves without harmonics. A likely source is the electron cyclotron drift instability which is a coupling between Bernstein and ion acoustic waves. These waves are the most common type of high-frequency wave seen by STEREO during bow shock crossings and magnetosheath traversals and our observations suggest that they are an important component of the high-frequency turbulent spectrum in these regions.

  16. Experimental investigation of shock wave - bubble interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Mohsen

    2010-04-09

    In this work, the dynamics of laser-generated single cavitation bubbles exposed to lithotripter shock waves has been investigated experimentally. The energy of the impinging shock wave is varied in several steps. High-speed photography and pressure field measurements simultaneously with image acquisition provide the possibility of capturing the fast bubble dynamics under the effect of the shock wave impact. The pressure measurement is performed using a fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) which operates based on optical diagnostics of the shock wave propagating medium. After a short introduction in chapter 1 an overview of the previous studies in chapter 2 is presented. The reported literatures include theoretical and experimental investigations of several configurations of physical problems in the field of bubble dynamics. In chapter 3 a theoretical description of propagation of a shock wave in a liquid like water has been discussed. Different kinds of reflection of a shock wave at an interface are taken into account. Undisturbed bubble dynamics as well as interaction between a planar shock wave and an initially spherical bubble are explored theoretically. Some physical parameters which are important in this issue such as the velocity of the shock-induced liquid jet, Kelvin impulse and kinetic energy are explained. The shock waves are generated in a water filled container by a focusing piezoelectric generator. The shock wave profile has a positive part with pulse duration of ∼1 μs followed by a longer tension tail (i.e. ∼3 μs). In chapter 4 high-speed images depict the propagation of a shock wave in the water filled tank. The maximum pressure is also derived for different intensity levels of the shock wave generator. The measurement is performed in the free field (i.e. in the absence of laser-generated single bubbles). In chapter 5 the interaction between lithotripter shock waves and laserinduced single cavitation bubbles is investigated experimentally. An

  17. Design of guided-mode resonance mirrors for short laser cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tomohiro; Ura, Shogo; Magnusson, Robert

    2015-08-01

    A guided-mode resonance mirror (GMRM) consists of a waveguide grating integrated on an optical buffer layer on a high-reflection substrate. An incident free-space wave at the resonance wavelength is once coupled by the grating to a guided mode and coupled again by the same grating back to free space. The reflection characteristics of a GMRM are numerically calculated and theoretically analyzed. It is predicted that notch filtering or flat reflection spectra are obtained depending on the optical buffer layer thickness. Design of short cavities using a GMRM is discussed for potential application in surface-mount packaging of diode lasers onto a photonic circuit board.

  18. Excitation of slow waves in front of an ICRF antenna in a basic plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Kunal; van Compernolle, Bart; Crombe, Kristel; van Eester, Dirk

    2017-10-01

    Recent results of ICRF experiments at the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) indicate parasitic coupling to the slow wave by the fast wave antenna. Plasma parameters in LAPD are similar to the scrape-off layer of current fusion devices. The machine has a 17 m long, 60 cm diameter magnetized plasma column with typical plasma parameters ne 1012 -1013 cm-3, Te 1 - 10 eV and B0 1000 G. It was found that coupling to the slow mode occurs when the plasma density in front of the antenna is low enough such that the lower hybrid resonance is present in the plasma. The radial density profile is tailored to allow for fast mode propagation in the high density core and slow mode propagation in the low density edge region. Measurements of the wave fields clearly show two distinct modes, one long wavelength m=1 fast wave mode in the core and a short wavelength backward propagating mode in the edge. Perpendicular wave numbers compare favorably to the predicted values. The experiment was done for varying frequencies, ω /Ωi = 25 , 6 and 1.5. Future experiments will investigate the dependence on antenna tilt angle with respect to the magnetic field, with and without Faraday screen. This work is performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, sponsored jointly by DOE and NSF.

  19. Developing de Broglie Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Johansson J. X.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity v, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed c between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength Λd=vcΛ and phase velocity c2/v+v which resembles directly L. de Broglie’s hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transmitting the particle mass at the speed v and angular frequency Ωd= 2πv/Λd, with Λd and Ωd obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schrödinger equation of an identical system.

  20. Wavelength-dependent effects of evening light exposure on sleep architecture and sleep EEG power density in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Mirjam; Kobialka, Szymon; Steiner, Roland; Oelhafen, Peter; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Cajochen, Christian

    2006-05-01

    Light strongly influences the circadian timing system in humans via non-image-forming photoreceptors in the retinal ganglion cells. Their spectral sensitivity is highest in the short-wavelength range of the visible light spectrum as demonstrated by melatonin suppression, circadian phase shifting, acute physiological responses, and subjective alertness. We tested the impact of short wavelength light (460 nm) on sleep EEG power spectra and sleep architecture. We hypothesized that its acute action on sleep is similar in magnitude to reported effects for polychromatic light at higher intensities and stronger than longer wavelength light (550 nm). The sleep EEGs of eight young men were analyzed after 2-h evening exposure to blue (460 nm) and green (550 nm) light of equal photon densities (2.8 x 10(13) photons x cm(-2) x s(-1)) and to dark (0 lux) under constant posture conditions. The time course of EEG slow-wave activity (SWA; 0.75-4.5 Hz) across sleep cycles after blue light at 460 nm was changed such that SWA was slightly reduced in the first and significantly increased during the third sleep cycle in parietal and occipital brain regions. Moreover, blue light significantly shortened rapid eye movement (REM) sleep duration during these two sleep cycles. Thus the light effects on the dynamics of SWA and REM sleep durations were blue shifted relative to the three-cone visual photopic system probably mediated by the circadian, non-image-forming visual system. Our results can be interpreted in terms of an induction of a circadian phase delay and/or repercussions of a stronger alerting effect after blue light, persisting into the sleep episode.