WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave radiative transport

  1. Supersonic Ionization Wave Driven by Radiation Transport in a Short-Pulse Laser-Produced Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditmire, T.; Gumbrell, E.T.; Smith, R.A.; Mountford, L.; Hutchinson, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Through the use of an ultrashort (2ps) optical probe, we have time resolved the propagation of an ionization wave into solid fused silica. This ionization wave results when a plasma is created by the intense irradiation of a solid target with a 2ps laser pulse. We find that the velocity of the ionization wave is consistent with radiation driven thermal transport, exceeding the velocity expected from simple electron thermal conduction by nearly an order of magnitude. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. Implicit Monte Carlo methods and non-equilibrium Marshak wave radiative transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Two enhancements to the Fleck implicit Monte Carlo method for radiative transport are described, for use in transparent and opaque media respectively. The first introduces a spectral mean cross section, which applies to pseudoscattering in transparent regions with a high frequency incident spectrum. The second provides a simple Monte Carlo random walk method for opaque regions, without the need for a supplementary diffusion equation formulation. A time-dependent transport Marshak wave problem of radiative transfer, in which a non-equilibrium condition exists between the radiation and material energy fields, is then solved. These results are compared to published benchmark solutions and to new discrete ordinate S-N results, for both spatially integrated radiation-material energies versus time and to new spatially dependent temperature profiles. Multigroup opacities, which are independent of both temperature and frequency, are used in addition to a material specific heat which is proportional to the cube of the temperature. 7 refs., 4 figs

  3. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  4. Introduction to radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    This lecture will present time-dependent radiation transport where the radiation is coupled to a static medium, i.e., the material is not in motion. In reality, radiation exerts a pressure on the materials it propagates through and will accelerate the material in the direction of the radiation flow. This fully coupled problem with radiation transport and materials in motion is referred to as radiation-hydrodynamics (or in a shorthand notation: rad-hydro) and is beyond the scope of this lecture

  5. Sediment transport under breaking waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob; Mayer, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    The sediment transport in the surf zone is modelled by combining a Navier-Stokes solver, a free surface model, a turbulence model, and a sediment transport model. The flow solver is based on the finite volume technique for non-orthogonal grids. The model is capable of simulating the turbulence...... generated at the surface where the wave breaks as well as the turbulence generated near the bed due to the wave-motion and the undertow. In general, the levels of turbulent kinetic energy are found to be higher than experiments show. This results in an over prediction of the sediment transport. Nevertheless...

  6. On helicon wave induced radial plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzilka, V.

    1993-04-01

    Estimates of helicon wave induced radial plasma transport are presented. The wave induced transport grows or decreases in dependence on the sign of the azimuthal wave number; these changes in transport may play an important role in helicon wave plasma sources. (author) 5 figs., 18 refs

  7. On radio frequency wave induced radial transport and wave helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzilka, V.

    1992-09-01

    Expressions for wave induced radial transport are derived allowing simple estimates. The transport is enhanced due to the presence of poloidal magnetostatic field and in the vicinity of the ion cyclotron resonance. The direction of the wave induced transport depends also on the wave polarization. (author) 19 refs

  8. Radiation transport in MEDUSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.J.; Evans, R.G.

    1983-09-01

    The transport of energy by X-ray photons has been included in the lD Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, MEDUSA. Calculations of the implosion by 0.53 μm laser irradiation of plastic and glass microballoons of current interest at the Central Laser Facility show that radiation preheats the fill gas and alters the temperature and density profiles during the implosion. A lower maximum gas temperature is obtained and this results, for a DT gas fill, in a greatly reduced neutron yield. (author)

  9. Sea Surface Micro-Structure: Relation to Air-Sea Fluxes, Bubble Transport and Electromagnetic Wave Radiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cox, Charles

    2001-01-01

    .... The camera responds to radiation in the three to five micrometer wavelength range. This is a useful range because the intensity of black body radiation from the water surface in this range is highly sensitive to the temperature of the source...

  10. Radiation Safety of Electromagnetic Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.

    2009-01-01

    The wide spread of Electromagnetic Waves (EMW) through the power lines, multimedia, communications, devices, appliances, etc., are well known. The probable health hazards associated with EMW and the radiation safety criteria are to be reviewed. However, the principles of the regulatory safety are based on radiation protection procedure, intervention to combat the relevant risk and to mitigate consequences. The oscillating electric magnetic fields (EMF) of the electromagnetic radiation (EMR) induce electrical hazards. The extremely high power EMR can cause fire hazards and explosions of pyrotechnic (Rad Haz). Biological hazards of EMF result as dielectric heat, severe burn, as well as the hazards of eyes. Shielding is among the technical protective measures against EMR hazards. Others are limitation of time of exposure and separation distance apart of the EMR source. Understanding and safe handling of the EMR sources are required to feel safety.

  11. Deterministic methods in radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, A.F.; Roussin, R.W.

    1992-06-01

    The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community

  12. Nonlinear radiation of waves at combination frequencies due to radiation-surface wave interaction in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naggar, I.A.; Hussein, A.M.; Khalil, Sh.M.

    1992-09-01

    Electromagnetic waves radiated with combination frequencies from a semi-bounded plasma due to nonlinear interaction of radiation with surface wave (both of P-polarization) has been investigated. Waves are radiated both into vacuum and plasma are found to be P-polarized. We take into consideration the continuity at the plasma boundary of the tangential components of the electric field of the waves. The case of normal incidence of radiation and rarefield plasma layer is also studied. (author). 7 refs

  13. Transport of radioactivity and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Beer, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    The movement of radioactivity and radiation is of prime importance in a wide variety of fields and the present advanced degree of knowledge of transport mechanisms is due largely to the application of sophisticated computer techniques

  14. Forms of Approximate Radiation Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, G

    2002-01-01

    Photon radiation transport is described by the Boltzmann equation. Because this equation is difficult to solve, many different approximate forms have been implemented in computer codes. Several of the most common approximations are reviewed, and test problems illustrate the characteristics of each of the approximations. This document is designed as a tutorial so that code users can make an educated choice about which form of approximate radiation transport to use for their particular simulation.

  15. Production of gravitation waves by electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchner, K.; Rosca, R.

    1980-01-01

    An exact solution of Einstein's equations is presented that corresponds to an axisymmetric bundle of electromagnetic waves with finite cross section. Outside this bundle, there is gravitational radiation parallel to the electromagnetic radiation. If no static electromagnetic fields are present, the frequency of the gravitational waves is twice the frequency of the electromagnetic waves. Einstein's energy complex vanishes identically. The covariant energy complex, however, yields also a radial momentum. (author)

  16. Radiation and propagation of electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tyras, George; Declaris, Nicholas

    1969-01-01

    Radiation and Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves serves as a text in electrical engineering or electrophysics. The book discusses the electromagnetic theory; plane electromagnetic waves in homogenous isotropic and anisotropic media; and plane electromagnetic waves in inhomogenous stratified media. The text also describes the spectral representation of elementary electromagnetic sources; the field of a dipole in a stratified medium; and radiation in anisotropic plasma. The properties and the procedures of Green's function method of solution, axial currents, as well as cylindrical boundaries a

  17. Radiation transport in numerical astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, C.M.

    1983-02-01

    In this article, we discuss some of the numerical techniques developed by Jim Wilson and co-workers for the calculation of time-dependent radiation flow. Difference equations for multifrequency transport are given for both a discrete-angle representation of radiation transport and a Fick's law-like representation. These methods have the important property that they correctly describe both the streaming and diffusion limits of transport theory in problems where the mean free path divided by characteristic distances varies from much less than one to much greater than one. They are also stable for timesteps comparable to the changes in physical variables, rather than being limited by stability requirements

  18. Radiation from nonlinear coupling of plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, S.F.

    1986-01-01

    The author examines the generation of electromagnetic radiation by nonlinear resonant interactions of plasma waves in a cold, uniformly magnetized plasma. In particular, he considers the up-conversion of two electrostatic wave packets colliding to produce high frequency electromagnetic radiation. Efficient conversion of electrostatic to electromagnetic wave energy occurs when the pump amplitudes approach and exceed the pump depletion threshold. Results from the inverse scattering transform analysis of the three-wave interaction equations are applied. When the wave packets are initially separated, the fully nonlinear set of coupling equations, which describe the evolution of the wave packets, can be reduced to three separate eigenvalue problems; each can be considered as a scattering problem, analogous to eh Schroedinger equation. In the scattering space, the wave packet profiles act as the scattering potentials. When the wavepacket areas approach (or exceed) π/2, the wave functions are localized (bound states) and the scattering potentials are said to contain solitons. Exchange of solitons occurs during the interaction. The transfer of solitons from the pump waves to the electromagnetic wave leads to pump depletion and the production of strong radiation. The emission of radio waves is considered by the coupling of two upper-hybrid branch wave packets, and an upper-hybrid and a lower hybrid branch wave packet

  19. Radiation phenomena of plasma waves, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Toshiro.

    1978-06-01

    The fundamental radiation theories on radiation phenomena of plasma waves are presented. As the fundamental concepts of propagating waves, phase, group and ray velocities are explained, and phase velocity surface, group velocity surface, ray velocity surface and refractive index surface are considered. These concepts are important in anisotropic plasma. Fundamental equations for electron plasma waves in a fluid model and fundamental equations for ion plasma waves can be expressed with the above mentioned concepts. Kuehl derived the formulas for general radiation fields of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves which are radiated from an arbitrary current source. Fundamental equations for kinetic model are the Vlasov equation and Maxwell equations. By investigating electromagnetic radiation in cold anisotropic plasma, Kuehl found the important behavior that the fields radiated from a source become very large in certain directions for some ranges of plasma parameters. The fact is the so-called high frequency resonance cone. A fundamental formula for quasi-static radiation from an oscillating point source in warm anisotropic plasma includes the near field of electromagnetic mode and the field of electrostatic mode, which are radiated from the source. This paper presents the formula in a generalized form. (Kato, T.)

  20. Wave transport in the South Australian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, John A. T.; James, Charles

    2018-02-01

    The specification of the dynamics of the air-sea boundary layer is of fundamental importance to oceanography. There is a voluminous literature on the subject, however a strong link between the velocity profile due to waves and that due to turbulent processes in the wave boundary layer does not appear to have been established. Here we specify the velocity profile due to the wave field using the Toba spectrum, and the velocity profile due to turbulence at the sea surface by the net effect of slip and wave breaking in which slip is the dominant process. Under this specification, the inertial coupling of the two fluids for a constant viscosity Ekman layer yields two independent estimates for the frictional parameter (which is a function of the 10 m drag coefficient and the peak wave period) of the coupled system, one of which is due to the surface Ekman current and the other to the peak wave period. We show that the median values of these two estimates, evaluated from a ROMS simulation over the period 2011-2012 at a station on the Southern Shelf in the South Australian Basin, are similar in strong support of the air-sea boundary layer model. On integrating over the planetary boundary layer we obtain the Ekman transport (w*2/f) and the wave transport due to a truncated Toba spectrum (w*zB/κ) where w* is the friction velocity in water, f is the Coriolis parameter, κ is von Karman's constant and zB = g T2/8 π2 is the depth of wave influence in which g is the acceleration of gravity and T is the peak wave period. A comparison of daily estimates shows that the wave transports from the truncated Toba spectrum and from the SWAN spectral model are highly correlated (r = 0.82) and that on average the Toba estimates are about 86% of the SWAN estimates due to the omission of low frequency tails of the spectra, although for wave transports less than about 0.5 m2 s-1 the estimates are almost equal. In the South Australian Basin the Toba wave transport is on average about 42% of

  1. Intense radiative heat transport across a nano-scale gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Ghafari, Amin; Bogy, David B.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the radiative heat transport in layered structures. The analysis is based on our prior description of the spectrum of thermally excited waves in systems with a heat flux. The developed method correctly predicts results for all known special cases for both large and closing gaps. Numerical examples demonstrate the applicability of our approach to the calculation of the radiative heat transport coefficient across various layered structures.

  2. Local Tensor Radiation Conditions For Elastic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2001-01-01

    A local boundary condition is formulated, representing radiation of elastic waves from an arbitrary point source. The boundary condition takes the form of a tensor relation between the stress at a point on an arbitrarily oriented section and the velocity and displacement vectors at the point....... The tensor relation generalizes the traditional normal incidence impedance condition by accounting for the angle between wave propagation and the surface normal and by including a generalized stiffness term due to spreading of the waves. The effectiveness of the local tensor radiation condition...

  3. Radiation stress and mean drift in continental shelf waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jan Erik H.; Drivdal, Magnus

    2012-03-01

    The time- and depth-averaged mean drift induced by barotropic continental shelf waves (CSW's) is studied theoretically for idealized shelf topography by calculating the mean volume fluxes to second order in wave amplitude. The waves suffer weak spatial damping due to bottom friction, which leads to radiation stress forcing of the mean fluxes. In terms of the total wave energy density E̅̅ over the shelf region, the radiation stress tensor component S̅11 for CSW's is found to be different from that of shallow water surface waves in a non-rotating ocean. For CSW's, the ratio S̅11/E̅ depends strongly on the wave number. The mean Lagrangian flow forced by the radiation stress can be subdivided into a Stokes drift and a mean Eulerian drift current. The magnitude of latter depends on ratio between the radiation stress and the bottom stress acting on the mean flow. When the effect of bottom friction acts equally strong on the waves and the mean current, calculations for short CSW's show that the Stokes drift and the friction-dependent wave-induced mean Eulerian current varies approximately in anti-phase over the shelf, and that the latter is numerically the largest. For long CSW's they are approximately in phase. In both cases the mean Lagrangian current, which is responsible for the net particle drift, has its largest numerical value at the coast on the shallow part of the shelf. Enhancing the effect of bottom friction on the Eulerian mean flow, results in a general current speed reduction, as well as a change in spatial structure for long waves. Applying realistic physical parameters for the continental shelf west of Norway, calculations yield along-shelf mean drift velocities for short CSW's that may be important for the transport of biological material, neutral tracers, and underwater plumes of dissolved oil from deepwater drilling accidents.

  4. Transport equation and shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multi-group method is derived from a one dimensional transport equation for the slowing down and spatial transport of energetic positive ions in a plasma. This method is used to calculate the behaviour of energetic charged particles in non homogeneous and non stationary plasma, and the effect of energy deposition of the particles on the heating of the plasma. In that purpose, an equation for the density of fast ions is obtained from the Fokker-Planck equation, and a closure condition for the second moment of this equation is deduced from phenomenological considerations. This method leads to a numerical method, simple and very efficient, which doesn't require much computer storage. Two types of numerical results are obtained. First, results on the slowing down of 3.5 MeV alpha particles in a 50 keV plasma plublished by Corman and al and Moses are compared with the results obtained with both our method and a Monte Carlo type method. Good agreement was obtained, even for energy deposition on the ions of the plasma. Secondly, we have calculated propagation of alpha particles heating a cold plasma. These results are in very good agreement with those given by an accurate Monte Carlo method, for both the thermal velocity, and the energy deposition in the plasma

  5. Resistive drift wave turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, M.

    1986-01-01

    Our efforts for studying the properties of resistive drift wave turbulence by using model mode-coupling equations are shown. It may be related to the edge turbulence and the associated anomalous transport in tokamaks or in stellarator/heliotron. (author)

  6. Transport and attenuation of radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Nimal, J C

    2003-01-01

    This article treats of the calculation methods used for the dimensioning of the protections against radiations. The method consists in determining for a given point the flux of particles coming from a source at a given time. A strong attenuation (of about some few mu Sv.h sup - sup 1) is in general expected between the source and the areas accessible to the personnel or the public. The calculation has to take into account a huge number of radiation-matter interactions and to solve the integral-differential transport equation which links the particles flux to the source. Several methods exist from the simplified physical model with numerical developments to the more or less precise resolution of the transport equation. These methods allows also the calculation of the uncertainties of equivalent dose rates, heat sources, structure damages using the data covariances (efficient cross-sections, modeling, etc..): 1 - transport equation; 2 - Monte-Carlo method; 3 - semi-numerical methods S sub N; 4 - methods based o...

  7. Plasma mechanizm for auroral kilometer wave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    The linear mechanism of auroral kilometer radiation (AKR) on the Cherenkov resonance is developed. The point is that plasma waves swinged by the electron beam in a dimer auroral plasma cavern on the Cherenkov resonance excercise 100% transformation under conventional and inconventional AKR modes under definite conditions

  8. Electromagnetic wave collapse in a radiation background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, Mattias; Brodin, Gert; Stenflo, Lennart

    2003-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction, due to quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects between an electromagnetic pulse and a radiation background, is investigated by combining the methods of radiation hydrodynamics with the QED theory for photon-photon scattering. For the case of a single coherent electromagnetic pulse, we obtain a Zakharov-like system, where the radiation pressure of the pulse acts as a driver of acoustic waves in the photon gas. For a sufficiently intense pulse and/or background energy density, there is focusing and the subsequent collapse of the pulse. The relevance of our results for various astrophysical applications are discussed

  9. Drift wave vortices and anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.

    1990-01-01

    Many plasma equations for drift waves and other modes possess vortex solutions, so it is important to consider the transport associated with vortex structures and their mutual interactions. Vortex structures occur when the amplitude of the fluctuation is sufficient to trap and circulate plasma around the vortex in one wave period. The vortex contribution of the diffusion of the passively convected scalar field was calculated. It was found that the field can be represented by the superposition of vortices and wave fluctuation components. For transport the computer solutions for the vortex-vortex collisions with various impact parameters while carrying along the passively convected scalar thermodynamic field were used. As the result, the inelastic collisions with b≅r 0 ≅1/k x cross-section σ(b)≅b exp(-b/r 0 )≅r 0 give the strongest transport. An example is shown in figure. As the final result, the anomalous diffusion D was derived in dimensional form. (M.T.)

  10. Directions in Radiation Transport Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Nicholas Smith

    2016-12-01

    More exciting advances are on the horizon to increase the power of simulation tools. The advent of high performance computers is allowing bigger, higher fidelity models to be created, if the challenges of parallelization and memory management can be met. 3D whole core transport modelling is becoming possible. Uncertainty quantification is improving with large benefits to be gained from more accurate, less pessimistic estimates of uncertainty. Advanced graphical displays allow the user to assimilate and make sense of the vast amounts of data produced by modern modelling tools. Numerical solvers are being developed that use goal-based adaptivity to adjust the nodalisation of the system to provide the optimum scheme to achieve the user requested accuracy on the results, thus removing the need to perform costly convergence studies in space and angle etc. More use is being made of multi-physics methods in which radiation transport is coupled with other phenomena, such as thermal-hydraulics, structural response, fuel performance and/or chemistry in order to better understand their interplay in reactor cores.

  11. Parallel processing Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    Issues related to distributed-memory multiprocessing as applied to Monte Carlo radiation transport are discussed. Measurements of communication overhead are presented for the radiation transport code MCNP which employs the communication software package PVM, and average efficiency curves are provided for a homogeneous virtual machine

  12. Modeling sheet-flow sand transport under progressive surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    In the near-shore zone, energetic sea waves generate sheet-flow sand transport. In present day coastal models, wave-induced sheet-flow sand transport rates are usually predicted with semi-empirical transport formulas, based on extensive research on this phenomenon in oscillatory flow tunnels.

  13. Modeling of Mud-Wave Interaction: Mud-Induced Wave Transport & Wave-Induced Mud Transport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winterwerp, Johan C

    2007-01-01

    .... Also a new rheological model has been proposed to describe liquefaction of soft mud by waves, and the subsequent strength recovery after the passage of the waves. A scheme is presented on how to implement these formulations in Delft3D.

  14. Coupled electron-photon radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorence, L.; Kensek, R.P.; Valdez, G.D.; Drumm, C.R.; Fan, W.C.; Powell, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Massively-parallel computers allow detailed 3D radiation transport simulations to be performed to analyze the response of complex systems to radiation. This has been recently been demonstrated with the coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code, ITS. To enable such calculations, the combinatorial geometry capability of ITS was improved. For greater geometrical flexibility, a version of ITS is under development that can track particles in CAD geometries. Deterministic radiation transport codes that utilize an unstructured spatial mesh are also being devised. For electron transport, the authors are investigating second-order forms of the transport equations which, when discretized, yield symmetric positive definite matrices. A novel parallelization strategy, simultaneously solving for spatial and angular unknowns, has been applied to the even- and odd-parity forms of the transport equation on a 2D unstructured spatial mesh. Another second-order form, the self-adjoint angular flux transport equation, also shows promise for electron transport

  15. Survey of radiation protection programmes for transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizot, M.T.; Perrin, M.L.; Sert, G.; Lange, F.; Schwarz, G.; Feet, H.J.; Christ, R.; Shaw, K.B.; Hughes, J.S.; Gelder, R.

    2001-07-01

    The survey of radiation protection programmes for transport has been jointly performed by three scientific organisations I.P.S.N. (France), G.R.S. ( Germany), and N.R.P.B. (United kingdom) on behalf of the European Commission and the pertaining documentation summarises the findings and conclusions of the work that was undertaken with the principal objectives to provide guidance on the establishment, implementation and application of radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials by operators and the assessment and evaluation of such programmes by the competent authority and to review currently existing radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials. (N.C.)

  16. Synchrotron-radiation plane-wave topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riglet, P.; Sauvage, M.; Petroff, J.F.; Epelboin, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program based on the Takagi-Taupin differential equations for X-ray propagation in distorted crystals has been developed in order to simulate dislocation images in the Bragg case. The program is valid both for thin and thick crystals. Simulated images of misfit dislocations formed either in a thin epilayer or in a thick substrate are compared with experimental images obtained by synchrotron-radiation plane-wave topography. The influence of the various strain components on the image features is discussed. (author)

  17. A multigroup treatment of radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N.A.; Laing, E.W.; Nicholas, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    A multi-group radiation package is outlined which will accurately handle radiation transfer problems in laser-produced plasmas. Bremsstrahlung, recombination and line radiation are included as well as fast electron Bremsstrahlung radiation. The entire radiation field is divided into a large number of groups (typically 20), which diffuse radiation energy in real space as well as in energy space, the latter occurring via electron-radiation interaction. Using this model a radiation transport code will be developed to be incorporated into MEDUSA. This modified version of MEDUSA will be used to study radiative preheat effects in laser-compression experiments at the Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Laboratory. The model is also relevant to heavy ion fusion studies. (author)

  18. Characterization of supersonic radiation diffusion waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Alastair S.; Guymer, Thomas M.; Morton, John; Williams, Benjamin; Kline, John L.; Bazin, Nicholas; Bentley, Christopher; Allan, Shelly; Brent, Katie; Comley, Andrew J.; Flippo, Kirk; Cowan, Joseph; Taccetti, J. Martin; Mussack-Tamashiro, Katie; Schmidt, Derek W.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Obrey, Kimberly; Lanier, Nicholas E.; Workman, Jonathan B.; Stevenson, R. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Supersonic and diffusive radiation flow is an important test problem for the radiative transfer models used in radiation-hydrodynamics computer codes owing to solutions being accessible via analytic and numeric methods. We present experimental results with which we compare these solutions by studying supersonic and diffusive flow in the laboratory. We present results of higher-accuracy experiments than previously possible studying radiation flow through up to 7 high-temperature mean free paths of low-density, chlorine-doped polystyrene foam and silicon dioxide aerogel contained by an Au tube. Measurements of the heat front position and absolute measurements of the x-ray emission arrival at the end of the tube are used to test numerical and analytical models. We find excellent absolute agreement with simulations provided that the opacity and the equation of state are adjusted within expected uncertainties; analytical models provide a good phenomenological match to measurements but are not in quantitative agreement due to their limited scope. - Highlights: • The supersonic, diffusion of x-rays through sub-solid density materials is studied. • The data are more diffusive and of higher velocity than any prior work. • Scaled 1D analytic diffusion models reproduce the heat front evolution. • Refined radiation transport approximations are tested in numerical simulations. • Simulations match the data if material properties are adjusted within uncertainties

  19. Oscillatory infragravity wave contribution to surf zone sediment transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Greenwood, Brian

    2008-01-01

    . It is shown that infragravity sediment transports are onshore directed at the landward side of relative (incident) wave height maxima, and offshore directed at the seaward side of such maxima. If a longshore infragravity wave structure exists, such as in the case of standing edge waves, the advection process...

  20. Radiative cooling and broadband phenomenon in low-frequency waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effects of radiative cooling on the pure baroclinic low-frequency waves under the approximation of equatorial -plane and semi-geostrophic condition. The results show that radiative cooling does not, exclusively, provide the damping effects on the development of low-frequency waves. Under the delicate radiative-convective equilibrium, radiative effects will alter the phase speed and wave period, and bring about the broadband of phase velocity and wave period by adjusting the vertical profiles of diabatic heating. when the intensity of diabatic heating is moderate and appropriate, it is conductive to the development and sustaining of the low-frequency waves and their broadband phenomena, not the larger, the better. The radiative cooling cannot be neglected in order to reach the moderate and appropriate intensity of diabatic heating.

  1. Nonlinear Whistler Wave Physics in the Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Chris

    2016-10-01

    Wave particle interactions between electrons and whistler waves are a dominant mechanism for controlling the dynamics of energetic electrons in the radiation belts. They are responsible for loss, via pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the loss cone, and energization to millions of electron volts. It has previously been theorized that large amplitude waves on the whistler branch may scatter their wave-vector nonlinearly via nonlinear Landau damping leading to important consequences for the global distribution of whistler wave energy density and hence the energetic electrons. It can dramatically reduce the lifetime of energetic electrons in the radiation belts by increasing the pitch angle scattering rate. The fundamental building block of this theory has now been confirmed through laboratory experiments. Here we report on in situ observations of wave electro-magnetic fields from the EMFISIS instrument on board NASA's Van Allen Probes that show the signatures of nonlinear scattering of whistler waves in the inner radiation belts. In the outer radiation belts, whistler mode chorus is believed to be responsible for the energization of electrons from 10s of Kev to MeV energies. Chorus is characterized by bursty large amplitude whistler mode waves with frequencies that change as a function of time on timescales corresponding to their growth. Theories explaining the chirping have been developed for decades based on electron trapping dynamics in a coherent wave. New high time resolution wave data from the Van Allen probes and advanced spectral techniques are revealing that the wave dynamics is highly structured, with sub-elements consisting of multiple chirping waves with discrete frequency hops between sub-elements. Laboratory experiments with energetic electron beams are currently reproducing the complex frequency vs time dynamics of whistler waves and in addition revealing signatures of wave-wave and beat-wave nonlinear wave-particle interactions. These new data

  2. Waves, currents and sediment transport modelling at the Wave Hub site

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Santamaria, Raul

    2013-01-01

    Primary supervisory team: Qingping Zou and Shunqi Pan This research project uses an integrated modelling system to investigate the effects of a wave farm on nearshore sediment transport at the Wave Hub site. The Wave Hub project is a large scale demonstration site for the development of the operation of arrays of wave energy generation devices located at the southwest coast of the UK where multiple field measurements took place. Particular attention of this study was paid to th...

  3. Parallel thermal radiation transport in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smedley-Stevenson, R.P.; Ball, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the distributed memory parallel implementation of a deterministic thermal radiation transport algorithm in a 2-dimensional ALE hydrodynamics code. The parallel algorithm consists of a variety of components which are combined in order to produce a state of the art computational capability, capable of solving large thermal radiation transport problems using Blue-Oak, the 3 Tera-Flop MPP (massive parallel processors) computing facility at AWE (United Kingdom). Particular aspects of the parallel algorithm are described together with examples of the performance on some challenging applications. (author)

  4. Parallel thermal radiation transport in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley-Stevenson, R.P.; Ball, S.R. [AWE Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the distributed memory parallel implementation of a deterministic thermal radiation transport algorithm in a 2-dimensional ALE hydrodynamics code. The parallel algorithm consists of a variety of components which are combined in order to produce a state of the art computational capability, capable of solving large thermal radiation transport problems using Blue-Oak, the 3 Tera-Flop MPP (massive parallel processors) computing facility at AWE (United Kingdom). Particular aspects of the parallel algorithm are described together with examples of the performance on some challenging applications. (author)

  5. Relativistic transport equation for a discontinuity wave of multiplicity one

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giambo, S; Palumbo, A [Istituto di Matematica, Universita degli Studi, Messina (Italy)

    1980-04-14

    In the framework of the theory of the singular hypersurfaces, the transport equation for the amplitude of a discontinuity wave, corresponding to a simple characteristic of a quasi-linear hyperbolic system, is established in the context of special relativity.

  6. Radiation Belt Transport Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mueller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The creation of the Earth's outer zone radiation belts is attributed to earthward transport and adiabatic acceleration of electrons by drift-resonant interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations in the magnetosphere. Three types of radial transport driven by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations that have been identified are: (1) radial diffusion [Falthammer, 1965], (2) significant changes in the phase space density radial profile due to a single or few ULF drift-resonant interactions [Ukhorskiy et al., 2006; Degeling et al., 2008], and (3) shock associated injections of radiation belt electrons occurring in less than a drift period [Li et al., 1993]. A progress report will be given on work to fully characterize different forms of radial transport and their effect on the Earth's radiation belts. The work is being carried out by computing test-particle trajectories in electric and magnetic fields from a simple analytic ULF field model and from global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. Degeling, A. W., L. G. Ozeke, R. Rankin, I. R. Mann, and K. Kabin (2008), Drift resonant generation of peaked relativistic electron distributions by Pc 5 ULF waves, textit{J. Geophys. Res., 113}, A02208, doi:10.1029/2007JA012411. Fälthammar, C.-G. (1965), Effects of Time-Dependent Electric Fields on Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, J. Geophys. Res., 70(11), 2503-2516, doi:10.1029/JZ070i011p02503. Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake (1993), Simulation of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 20}(22), 2423-2426, doi:10.1029/93GL02701. Ukhorskiy, A. Y., B. J. Anderson, K. Takahashi, and N. A. Tsyganenko (2006), Impact of ULF oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the outer radiation belt electrons, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 33}(6), L06111, doi:10.1029/2005GL024380.

  7. Cherenkov Radiation Control via Self-accelerating Wave-packets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Li, Zhili; Wetzel, Benjamin; Morandotti, Roberto; Chen, Zhigang; Xu, Jingjun

    2017-08-18

    Cherenkov radiation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature. It describes electromagnetic radiation from a charged particle moving in a medium with a uniform velocity larger than the phase velocity of light in the same medium. Such a picture is typically adopted in the investigation of traditional Cherenkov radiation as well as its counterparts in different branches of physics, including nonlinear optics, spintronics and plasmonics. In these cases, the radiation emitted spreads along a "cone", making it impractical for most applications. Here, we employ a self-accelerating optical pump wave-packet to demonstrate controlled shaping of one type of generalized Cherenkov radiation - dispersive waves in optical fibers. We show that, by tuning the parameters of the wave-packet, the emitted waves can be judiciously compressed and focused at desired locations, paving the way to such control in any physical system.

  8. Radiation and detection of gravitational waves in laboratory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogolyubov, P.N.; Pisarev, A.F.; Shavokhina, N.S.

    1981-01-01

    Two variants are proposed and analyzed for an experiment on radiation and detection of gravitational waves in laboratory conditions in the optical and superhigh frequency range (band). In the first variant the laser light is parametrically transformed to the gravitational wave in the optical-inhomogeneous medium. The gravitational flux produced is registered by the inverse parametric transformation of the gravitational to light wave. In the second variant the radiation of gravitational waves is realized through hypersonic oscillations in piezocrystals, and the reception of waves is made by the superconducting coaxial resonator in which the gravitational wave resonantly transforms into the electromag= . netic wave. The analysis performed testifies to the possibility of an experiment of this type at the present time [ru

  9. Unified formulation of radiation conditions for the wave equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2002-01-01

    A family of radiation conditions for the wave equation is derived by truncating a rational function approxiamtion of the corresponding plane wave representation, and it is demonstrated how these boundary conditions can be formulated in terms of fictitious surface densities, governed by second......-order wave equations on the radiating surface. Several well-established radiation boundary conditions appear as special cases, corresponding to different choice of the coefficients in the rational approximation. The relation between these choices is established, and an explicit formulation in terms...

  10. Trade and transport of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The guide specifies the obligations pertaining to the trade in and transport of radiation sources and other matters to be taken into account in safety supervision. It also specifies obligations and procedures relating to transfrontier movements of radioactive waste contained in the EU Council Directive 92/3/Euratom. (7 refs.)

  11. LDRD Final Review: Radiation Transport Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goorley, John Timothy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morgan, George Lake [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lestone, John Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-22

    Both high-fidelity & toy simulations are being used to understand measured signals and improve the Area 11 NDSE diagnostic. We continue to gain more and more confidence in the ability for MCNP to simulate neutron and photon transport from source to radiation detector.

  12. Dispersive effects in radiation transport and radiation hydrodynamics in matter at high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, B.J.B.

    1983-01-01

    In a recent research program (reported in AWRE 0 20/82) I have investigated the generalisation of the equations of radiation hydrodynamics when electromagnetic radiation is assumed to obey a linear-response dispersion relation of the form nω=kc where the refractive index n depends on the frequency ω and/or wave number k. From the application of the Boltzmann-Liouville transport theory to photons in the short-wavelength (geometrical optics) limit, I derive the energy and momentum equations which, when combined with a classical (Euler-Lagrange-Navier-Stokes) treatment of a fluid material medium in LTE, yield a complete dynamical theory of linear interactions (+ stimulated processes) between incoherent (thermal) radiation and dense, locally isotropic matter. The theory includes an account of pondero-motive forces and electro (magneto) striction. Moreover, it is apparently capable of being generalised to non-linear interactions in which the refractive index depends on the local specific intensity of the radiation field, and, to some extent, to the treatment of high-frequency coherent radiation. The generalisation of various approximated forms of radiation-transport theory (esp. diffusion) has been considered in detail. Some problems remain however. One such is the treatment of anomalous dispersion. Current research work is concentrating on the interesting atomic physics aspects of electromagnetic (esp. radiative) properties of a dispersive material medium

  13. Photonuclear Physics in Radiation Transport - II: Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.C.; Little, R.C.; Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.; MacFarlane, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    This is the second of two companion papers. The first paper describes model calculations and nuclear data evaluations of photonuclear reactions on isotopes of C, O, Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Cu, Ta, W, and Pb for incident photon energies up to 150 MeV. This paper describes the steps taken to process these files into transport libraries and to update the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) and MCNPX radiation transport codes to use tabular photonuclear reaction data. The evaluated photonuclear data files are created in the standard evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF) format. These files must be processed by the NJOY data processing system into A Compact ENDF (ACE) files suitable for radiation transport calculations. MCNP and MCNPX have been modified to use these new data in a self-consistent and fully integrated manner. Verification problems were used at each step along the path to check the integrity of the methodology. The resulting methodology and tools provide a comprehensive system for using photonuclear data in radiation transport calculations. Also described are initial validation simulations used to benchmark several of the photonuclear transport tables

  14. Wave-Particle Interactions in the Radiation Belts, Aurora,and Solar Wind: Opportunities for Lab Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletzing, C.

    2017-12-01

    The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field and particle interactions are involved in this physics from large-scale ring current ion and magnetic field dynamics to microscopic kinetic interactions of whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these kinds of radiation belt interactions, NASA implemented the two-satellite Van Allen Probes mission. As part of the mission, the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a triaxial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a triaxial search coil magnetometer (MSC). We show a variety of waves thought to be important for wave particle interactionsin the radiation belts: low frequency ULF pulsations, EMIC waves, and whistler mode waves including upper and lower band chorus. Outside ofthe radiation belts, Alfven waves play a key role in both solar wind turbulenceand auroral particle acceleration. Several of these wave modes could benefit (or have benefitted) from laboratory studies to further refineour understanding of the detailed physics of the wave-particle interactionswhich lead to energization, pitch angle scattering, and cross-field transportWe illustrate some of the processes and compare the wave data with particle measurements to show relationships between wave activity and particle processobserved in the inner magnetosphere and heliosphere.

  15. Nonlinear Scattering of VLF Waves in the Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Chris; Rudakov, Leonid; Ganguli, Guru; Mithaiwala, Manish

    2014-10-01

    Electromagnetic VLF waves, such as whistler mode waves, control the lifetime of trapped electrons in the radiation belts by pitch-angle scattering. Since the pitch-angle scattering rate is a strong function of the wave properties, a solid understanding of VLF wave sources and propagation in the magnetosphere is critical to accurately calculate electron lifetimes. Nonlinear scattering (Nonlinear Landau Damping) is a mechanism that can strongly alter VLF wave propagation [Ganguli et al. 2010], primarily by altering the direction of propagation, and has not been accounted for in previous models of radiation belt dynamics. Laboratory results have confirmed the dramatic change in propagation direction when the pump wave has sufficient amplitude to exceed the nonlinear threshold [Tejero et al. 2014]. Recent results show that the threshold for nonlinear scattering can often be met by naturally occurring VLF waves in the magnetosphere, with wave magnetic fields of the order of 50-100 pT inside the plasmapause. Nonlinear scattering can then dramatically alter the macroscopic dynamics of waves in the radiation belts leading to the formation of a long-lasting wave-cavity [Crabtree et al. 2012] and, when amplification is present, a multi-pass amplifier [Ganguli et al. 2012]. By considering these effects, the lifetimes of electrons can be dramatically reduced. This work is supported by the Naval Research Laboratory base program.

  16. Terahertz waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Hai-Wei; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Otani, Chiko, E-mail: otani@riken.jp [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Sendai, Miyagi 980-0845 (Japan); Midorikawa, Katsumi [Attosecond Science Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-11-23

    Terahertz (THz) waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments with a crossing angle of 25° are investigated. The irradiated THz waves from the crossing filaments show a small THz pulse after the main THz pulse, which was not observed in those from single-filament scheme. Since the position of the small THz pulse changes with the time-delay of two filaments, this phenomenon can be explained by a model in which the small THz pulse is from the second filament. The denser plasma in the overlap region of the filaments changes the movement of space charges in the plasma, thereby changing the angular distribution of THz radiation. As a result, this schematic induces some THz wave from the second filament to propagate along the path of the THz wave from the first filament. Thus, this schematic alters the direction of the THz radiation from the filamentation, which can be used in THz wave remote sensing.

  17. Radiation of Electron in the Field of Plane Light Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelinsky, A.; Drebot, I.V.; Grigorev, Yu.N.; Zvonareva, O.D.; Tatchyn, R.

    2006-01-01

    Results of integration of a Lorentz equation for a relativistic electron moving in the field of running, plane, linear polarized electromagnetic wave are presented in the paper. It is shown that electron velocities in the field of the wave are almost periodic functions of time. For calculations of angular spectrum of electron radiation intensity expansion of the electromagnetic field in a wave zone into generalized Fourier series was used. Expressions for the radiation intensity spectrum are presented in the paper. Derived results are illustrated for electron and laser beam parameters of NSC KIPT X-ray generator NESTOR. It is shown that for low intensity of the interacting electromagnetic wave the results of energy and angular spectrum calculations in the frame of classical electrodynamics completely coincide with calculation results produced using quantum electrodynamics. Simultaneously, derived expressions give possibilities to investigate dependence of energy and angular Compton radiation spectrum on phase of interaction and the interacting wave intensity

  18. The energy transport by the propagation of sound waves in wave guides with a moving medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Grand, P.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of the propagation of sound waves radiated by a source in a fluid moving with subsonic velocity between two parallel walls or inside a cylindrical tube is considered in [2], The most interesting thing of this problem is that waves may occur with constant amplitude coming from infinity.

  19. Nonlinear VLF Wave Physics in the Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, C. E.; Tejero, E. M.; Ganguli, G.; Mithaiwala, M.; Rudakov, L.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic VLF waves, such as whistler mode waves, both control the lifetime of trapped electrons in the radiation belts by pitch-angle scattering and are responsible for the energization of electrons during storms. Traditional approaches to understanding the influence of waves on trapped electrons have assumed that the wave characteristics (frequency spectrum, wave-normal angle distribution, etc.) were both stationary in time and amplitude independent from event to event. In situ data from modern satellite missions, such as the Van Allen probes, are showing that this assumption may not be justified. In addition, recent theoretical results [Crabtree et al. 2012] show that the threshold for nonlinear wave scattering can often be met by naturally occurring VLF waves in the magnetosphere, with wave magnetic fields of the order of 50-100 pT inside the plasmapause. Nonlinear wave scattering (Nonlinear Landau Damping) is an amplitude dependent mechanism that can strongly alter VLF wave propagation [Ganguli et al. 2010], primarily by altering the direction of propagation. Laboratory results have confirmed the dramatic change in propagation direction when the pump wave has sufficient amplitude to exceed the nonlinear threshold [Tejero et al. 2014]. Nonlinear scattering can alter the macroscopic dynamics of waves in the radiation belts leading to the formation of a long-lasting wave-cavity [Crabtree et al. 2012] and, when amplification is present, a multi-pass amplifier [Ganguli et al., 2012]. Such nonlinear wave effects can dramatically reduce electron lifetimes. Nonlinear wave dynamics such as these occur when there are more than one wave present, such a condition necessarily violates the assumption of traditional wave-normal analysis [Santolik et al., 2003] which rely on the plane wave assumption. To investigate nonlinear wave dynamics using modern in situ data we apply the maximum entropy method [Skilling and Bryan, 1984] to solve for the wave distribution function

  20. Spherical-wave expansions of piston-radiator fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, R C; Yaghjian, A D

    1991-09-01

    Simple spherical-wave expansions of the continuous-wave fields of a circular piston radiator in a rigid baffle are derived. These expansions are valid throughout the illuminated half-space and are useful for efficient numerical computation in the near-field region. Multipole coefficients are given by closed-form expressions which can be evaluated recursively.

  1. Radiation transport calculation methods in BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivunoro, H.; Seppaelae, T.; Savolainen, S.

    2000-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is used as a radiotherapy for malignant brain tumours. Radiation dose distribution is necessary to determine individually for each patient. Radiation transport and dose distribution calculations in BNCT are more complicated than in conventional radiotherapy. Total dose in BNCT consists of several different dose components. The most important dose component for tumour control is therapeutic boron dose D B . The other dose components are gamma dose D g , incident fast neutron dose D f ast n and nitrogen dose D N . Total dose is a weighted sum of the dose components. Calculation of neutron and photon flux is a complex problem and requires numerical methods, i.e. deterministic or stochastic simulation methods. Deterministic methods are based on the numerical solution of Boltzmann transport equation. Such are discrete ordinates (SN) and spherical harmonics (PN) methods. The stochastic simulation method for calculation of radiation transport is known as Monte Carlo method. In the deterministic methods the spatial geometry is partitioned into mesh elements. In SN method angular integrals of the transport equation are replaced with weighted sums over a set of discrete angular directions. Flux is calculated iteratively for all these mesh elements and for each discrete direction. Discrete ordinates transport codes used in the dosimetric calculations are ANISN, DORT and TORT. In PN method a Legendre expansion for angular flux is used instead of discrete direction fluxes, land the angular dependency comes a property of vector function space itself. Thus, only spatial iterations are required for resulting equations. A novel radiation transport code based on PN method and tree-multigrid technique (TMG) has been developed at VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland). Monte Carlo method solves the radiation transport by randomly selecting neutrons and photons from a prespecified boundary source and following the histories of selected particles

  2. Monte Carlo method in radiation transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejonghe, G.; Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T.

    1986-11-01

    In neutral radiation transport problems (neutrons, photons), two values are important: the flux in the phase space and the density of particles. To solve the problem with Monte Carlo method leads to, among other things, build a statistical process (called the play) and to provide a numerical value to a variable x (this attribution is called score). Sampling techniques are presented. Play biasing necessity is proved. A biased simulation is made. At last, the current developments (rewriting of programs for instance) are presented due to several reasons: two of them are the vectorial calculation apparition and the photon and neutron transport in vacancy media [fr

  3. Radiation transport: Progress report, July 1, 1987-September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, R.D.; Nagy, A.

    1988-05-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group S-6 for the fourth quarter of FY 87 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Deterministic Radiation Transport, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics. 23 refs., 9 figs

  4. Radiation from channeled positrons in a hypersonic wave field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchyan, A.R.; Gasparyan, R.A.; Gabrielyan, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation emitted by channeled positrons in a longitudinal or transverse standing hypersonic wave field is considered. In the case of plane channeling the spectral distribution of the radiation intensity is shown to be of a resonance nature depending on the hypersound frequency

  5. Angular momentum transport by tidal acoustic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, T.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical expression of the braking torque on a Jacobian ellipsoid rotating steadily in an enviromental gas is given, based on the assumption that the ellipsoid rotates around its shortest principal axis with an angular momentum slightly larger than that at the bifurcation point of the Maclaurin spheroid. This braking torque is effected by the gravitational interaction between the ellipsoid matter and a spiral density configuration in the environmental gas. This spiral configuration which is called a tidal acoustic wave, is caused by the zone of silence effect in a supersonic flow. With respect to a coordinates system rotating with the ellipsoid, a supersonic region appears outside a certain radius. In this supersonic region, the effect of the non-axisymmetric fluctuation in the ellipsoid potential propagates along the downstream branches of the Mach waves. This one-sided response of the supersonic part causes the tidal acoustic wave. The discussion is restricted to the equatorial plane, and an acoustic approximation of the basic equations is used under the assumption that the self-gravity effect of the environmental gas is negligable in comparison to the main gravity of the ellipsoid. The results are applied to the pre- and post-Main sequence phases of a rotating star, and relating astrophysical problems are discussed. (Auth.)

  6. Angular momentum transport by tidal acoustic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, T [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1976-05-01

    An analytical expression of the braking torque on a Jacobian ellipsoid rotating steadily in an enviromental gas is given, based on the assumption that the ellipsoid rotates around its shortest principal axis with an angular momentum slightly larger than that at the bifurcation point of the Maclaurin spheroid. This braking torque is effected by the gravitational interaction between the ellipsoid matter and a spiral density configuration in the environmental gas. This spiral configuration which is called a tidal acoustic wave, is caused by the zone of silence effect in a supersonic flow. With respect to a coordinates system rotating with the ellipsoid, a supersonic region appears outside a certain radius. In this supersonic region, the effect of the non-axisymmetric fluctuation in the ellipsoid potential propagates along the downstream branches of the Mach waves. This one-sided response of the supersonic part causes the tidal acoustic wave. The discussion is restricted to the equatorial plane, and an acoustic approximation of the basic equations is used under the assumption that the self-gravity effect of the environmental gas is negligable in comparison to the main gravity of the ellipsoid. The results are applied to the pre- and post-Main sequence phases of a rotating star, and relating astrophysical problems are discussed.

  7. Fallout radiation protection provided by transportation vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burson, Z.G.

    1972-10-20

    Fallout radiation protection factors (PF's) were estimated for a variety of civilian transportation vehicles using measurements of the natural terrain radiation as a source. The PF values are below 2 in light vehicles, truck beds, or trailers; from 2.5 to 3 in the cabs of heavy trucks and in a railway guard car; and from 3.0 to 3.5 in the engineer's seat of heavy locomotives. This information can be useful in planning the possible movement of personnel from or through areas contaminated either by a wartime incident or a peacetime accident. The information may also be useful for studying the reduction of exposure to the natural terrestrial radiation environment provided by vehicles.

  8. Langmuir-like waves and radiation in planetary foreshocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    1995-01-01

    The basic objectives of this NASA Grant are to develop theoretical understandings (tested with spacecraft data) of the generation and characteristics of electron plasma waves, commonly known as Langmuir-like waves, and associated radiation near f(sub p) and 2f(sub p) in planetary foreshocks. (Here f(sub p) is plasma frequency.) Related waves and radiation in the source regions of interplanetary type III solar radio bursts provide a simpler observational and theoretical context for developing and testing such understandings. Accordingly, applications to type III bursts constitute a significant fraction of the research effort. The testing of the new Stochastic Growth Theory (SGT) for type III bursts, and its extension and testing for foreshock waves and radiation, constitutes a major longterm strategic goal of the research effort.

  9. NASA space radiation transport code development consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the Univ. of Tennessee (lead institution), the Univ. of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking. (authors)

  10. Drift Wave Test Particle Transport in Reversed Shear Profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Park, H.B.; Kwon, J.M.; Stronzzi, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Choi, D.I.

    1998-01-01

    Drift wave maps, area preserving maps that describe the motion of charged particles in drift waves, are derived. The maps allow the integration of particle orbits on the long time scale needed to describe transport. Calculations using the drift wave maps show that dramatic improvement in the particle confinement, in the presence of a given level and spectrum of E x B turbulence, can occur for q(r)-profiles with reversed shear. A similar reduction in the transport, i.e. one that is independent of the turbulence, is observed in the presence of an equilibrium radial electric field with shear. The transport reduction, caused by the combined effects of radial electric field shear and both monotonic and reversed shear magnetic q-profiles, is also investigated

  11. Electromagnetic radiation accompanying gravitational waves from black hole binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolgov, A. [Dept. of Physics, Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Postnov, K., E-mail: dolgov@fe.infn.it, E-mail: kpostnov@gmail.com [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow M.V. Lomonosov State University, Universitetskij pr. 13, 119234 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-09-01

    The transition of powerful gravitational waves, created by the coalescence of massive black hole binaries, into electromagnetic radiation in external magnetic fields is considered. In contrast to the previous calculations of the similar effect we study the realistic case of the gravitational radiation frequency below the plasma frequency of the surrounding medium. The gravitational waves propagating in the plasma constantly create electromagnetic radiation dragging it with them, despite the low frequency. The plasma heating by the unattenuated electromagnetic wave may be significant in hot rarefied plasma with strong magnetic field and can lead to a noticeable burst of electromagnetic radiation with higher frequency. The graviton-to-photon conversion effect in plasma is discussed in the context of possible electromagnetic counterparts of GW150914 and GW170104.

  12. Electromagnetic radiation accompanying gravitational waves from black hole binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, A.; Postnov, K.

    2017-01-01

    The transition of powerful gravitational waves, created by the coalescence of massive black hole binaries, into electromagnetic radiation in external magnetic fields is considered. In contrast to the previous calculations of the similar effect we study the realistic case of the gravitational radiation frequency below the plasma frequency of the surrounding medium. The gravitational waves propagating in the plasma constantly create electromagnetic radiation dragging it with them, despite the low frequency. The plasma heating by the unattenuated electromagnetic wave may be significant in hot rarefied plasma with strong magnetic field and can lead to a noticeable burst of electromagnetic radiation with higher frequency. The graviton-to-photon conversion effect in plasma is discussed in the context of possible electromagnetic counterparts of GW150914 and GW170104.

  13. Mechanism of travelling-wave transport of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Hiroyuki; Seki, Kyogo; Kuromiya, Naoyuki

    2006-01-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations have been carried out on transport of particles in an electrostatic travelling field. A three-dimensional hard-sphere model of the distinct element method was developed to simulate the dynamics of particles. Forces applied to particles in the model were the Coulomb force, the dielectrophoresis force on polarized dipole particles in a non-uniform field, the image force, gravity and the air drag. Friction and repulsion between particle-particle and particle-conveyer were included in the model to replace initial conditions after mechanical contacts. Two kinds of experiments were performed to confirm the model. One was the measurement of charge of particles that is indispensable to determine the Coulomb force. Charge distribution was measured from the locus of free-fallen particles in a parallel electrostatic field. The averaged charge of the bulk particle was confirmed by measurement with a Faraday cage. The other experiment was measurements of the differential dynamics of particles on a conveyer consisting of parallel electrodes to which a four-phase travelling electrostatic wave was applied. Calculated results agreed with measurements, and the following characteristics were clarified. (1) The Coulomb force is the predominant force to drive particles compared with the other kinds of forces, (2) the direction of particle transport did not always coincide with that of the travelling wave but changed partially. It depended on the frequency of the travelling wave, the particle diameter and the electric field, (3) although some particles overtook the travelling wave at a very low frequency, the motion of particles was almost synchronized with the wave at the low frequency and (4) the transport of some particles was delayed to the wave at medium frequency; the majority of particles were transported backwards at high frequency and particles were not transported but only vibrated at very high frequency

  14. Particle transport model sensitivity on wave-induced processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Ricker, Marcel; Krüger, Oliver; Breivik, Oyvind; Stanev, Emil; Schrum, Corinna

    2017-04-01

    Different effects of wind waves on the hydrodynamics in the North Sea are investigated using a coupled wave (WAM) and circulation (NEMO) model system. The terms accounting for the wave-current interaction are: the Stokes-Coriolis force, the sea-state dependent momentum and energy flux. The role of the different Stokes drift parameterizations is investigated using a particle-drift model. Those particles can be considered as simple representations of either oil fractions, or fish larvae. In the ocean circulation models the momentum flux from the atmosphere, which is related to the wind speed, is passed directly to the ocean and this is controlled by the drag coefficient. However, in the real ocean, the waves play also the role of a reservoir for momentum and energy because different amounts of the momentum flux from the atmosphere is taken up by the waves. In the coupled model system the momentum transferred into the ocean model is estimated as the fraction of the total flux that goes directly to the currents plus the momentum lost from wave dissipation. Additionally, we demonstrate that the wave-induced Stokes-Coriolis force leads to a deflection of the current. During the extreme events the Stokes velocity is comparable in magnitude to the current velocity. The resulting wave-induced drift is crucial for the transport of particles in the upper ocean. The performed sensitivity analyses demonstrate that the model skill depends on the chosen processes. The results are validated using surface drifters, ADCP, HF radar data and other in-situ measurements in different regions of the North Sea with a focus on the coastal areas. The using of a coupled model system reveals that the newly introduced wave effects are important for the drift-model performance, especially during extremes. Those effects cannot be neglected by search and rescue, oil-spill, transport of biological material, or larva drift modelling.

  15. Anomalous momentum transport from drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, R.R.; Staebler, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    A sheared slab magnetic field model B = B 0 [z + (x/L s )y], with inhomogeneous flows in the y and z directions, is used to perform a fully-kinetic stability analysis of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and dissipative trapped electron (DTE) modes. The concomitant quasilinear stress components that couple to the local perpendicular (y-component) and parallel (z-component) momentum transport are also calculated and the anomalous perpendicular and parallel viscous stresses obtained. A breakdown of the ITG-induced perpendicular viscous stress is generally observed at moderate values of the sheared perpendicular flow. The ITG-induced parallel viscous stress is generally larger and strongly dependent on the sheared flows. The DTE-induced perpendicular viscous stress may sometimes be negative, tending to cancel the ITG contributions while the DTE-induced parallel viscous stress is generally small. The effect of the perpendicular stress component in the momentum balance equations is generally small while the parallel stress component can dominate the usual neoclassical viscous stress terms. The dominant contribution to parallel viscous stress by the ITG mode suggests that bulk plasma toroidal momentum confinement, like energy confinement, is governed by an anomalous ion loss mechanism. Furthermore, the large anomalous effect suggests that the neoclassical explanation of poloidal flows in tokamaks may be incorrect. The present results are in general agreement with existing experimental observations on momentum transport in tokamaks

  16. Helicity and evanescent waves. [Energy transport velocity, helicity, Lorentz transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agudin, J L; Platzeck, A M [La Plata Univ. Nacional (Argentina); Albano, J R [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    1978-02-20

    It is shown that the projection of the angular momentum of a circularly polarized electromagnetic evanescent wave along the mean velocity of energy transport (=helicity) can be reverted by a Lorentz transformation, in spite of the fact that this velocity is c.

  17. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, A. S., E-mail: alastair.moore@physics.org; Graham, P.; Comley, A. J.; Foster, J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Young, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2014-06-15

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in benchmarking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic diffusive Marshak wave, which propagates into a high atomic number Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range of x-ray measurements that absolutely quantify the energetics and radiation partition inside the target.

  18. MHD waves, reconnection, and plasma transport at the dayside magnetopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth creates a huge cavity in the solar wind known as the magnetosphere. The transition region between the solar wind plasma and magnetosphere plasma is of substantial interest because many magnetospheric processes are governed by the transport of particles, momentum and energy across that boundary. At this boundary, the magnetopause, there is an abrupt decrease in plasma bulk flow, density and pressure, and large increase in temperature and magnetic field. Throughout this region the plasmas is large. Large amplitude compressional waves are nearly always found in the region just outside of the magnetopause. These waves are either intrinsic solar wind fluctuations or they may be global mirror modes which are generated in a localized region of large pressure anisotropy just outside the magnetopause. The substantial background gradients observed at the magnetopause strongly couple the compressional waves with kinetic Alfven waves near the Alfven resonance location, leading to substantial particle transport. Moreover, for a sheared background magnetic field, as is found at times of southward interplanetary magnetic field, the mode converted kinetic Alfven waves can propagate to the location where k parallel = 0 and generate islands in phase space. We present a solution of the kinetic-MHD wave equations for the magnetic field structure based on a realistic steady state profile which includes: a sheared magnetic field; magnetic curvature; and gradients in the background density, pressure and magnetic field. We incorporate wave-particle resonance interactions for electrons and ions to obtain the dissipation. The background magnetic Keld curvature and gradient give rise to drifts which alter the resonance condition for the various particle species (ω - k circ V d - k parallel v parallel ) and reduces the Landau damping of the kinetic Alfven wave, allowing it to propagate to the k parallel = 0 location

  19. Radiation transport. Progress report, April 1-December 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, R.D.

    1984-10-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport by the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group X-6 for the last nine months of CY 83 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Fission Reactor Neutronics, Deterministic Transport Methods, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics

  20. Transport Powder and Liquid Samples by Surface Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Louyeh, Sahar

    2009-01-01

    Sample transport is an important requirement for In-situ analysis of samples in NASA planetary exploration missions. Tests have shown that powders or liquid drops on a surface can be transported by surface acoustic waves (SAW) that are generated on the surface using interdigital transducers. The phenomena were investigated experimentally and to generate SAWs interdigital electrodes were deposited on wafers of 128 deg rotated Y-cut LiNbO?. Transporting capability of the SAW device was tested using particles of various sizes and drops of various viscosities liquids. Because of different interaction mechanisms with the SAWs, the powders and the liquid drops were observed to move in opposite directions. In the preliminary tests, a speed of 180 mm/s was achieved for powder transportation. The detailed experimental setup and results are presented in this paper. The transporting mechanism can potentially be applied to miniaturize sample analysis system or " lab-on-chip" devices.

  1. Estimating net short-wave radiation with the Bellani pyranometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernier, Y.; Plamondon, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    Two methods were developed by which daily net short-wave radiation (K∗) can be evaluated from Bellani pyranometer readings. The first method involves a simple regression equation. The second method uses a physical approach taking into account the effect of the Bellani's geometry on its response to direct and diffuse radiation throughout the day. Both methods, when tested on experimental data, tended to underestimate the measured K∗, the regression approach exhibiting a higher variance of the error [fr

  2. Wave processes. Auroral kilometer radiowave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safargaleev, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of auroral kilometer radiowave radiation (AKRR) are discussed. AKRR is produced at altitudes 1.5-3 R e (R e is the Earth radius) in the auroral cavity. Electrons at energy 1-15 keV are always observed in AKRR production regions

  3. Rare event simulation in radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollman, C.

    1993-10-01

    This dissertation studies methods for estimating extremely small probabilities by Monte Carlo simulation. Problems in radiation transport typically involve estimating very rare events or the expected value of a random variable which is with overwhelming probability equal to zero. These problems often have high dimensional state spaces and irregular geometries so that analytic solutions are not possible. Monte Carlo simulation must be used to estimate the radiation dosage being transported to a particular location. If the area is well shielded the probability of any one particular particle getting through is very small. Because of the large number of particles involved, even a tiny fraction penetrating the shield may represent an unacceptable level of radiation. It therefore becomes critical to be able to accurately estimate this extremely small probability. Importance sampling is a well known technique for improving the efficiency of rare event calculations. Here, a new set of probabilities is used in the simulation runs. The results are multiple by the likelihood ratio between the true and simulated probabilities so as to keep the estimator unbiased. The variance of the resulting estimator is very sensitive to which new set of transition probabilities are chosen. It is shown that a zero variance estimator does exist, but that its computation requires exact knowledge of the solution. A simple random walk with an associated killing model for the scatter of neutrons is introduced. Large deviation results for optimal importance sampling in random walks are extended to the case where killing is present. An adaptive ''learning'' algorithm for implementing importance sampling is given for more general Markov chain models of neutron scatter. For finite state spaces this algorithm is shown to give with probability one, a sequence of estimates converging exponentially fast to the true solution

  4. Studying Electromechanical Wave Propagation and Transport Delays in Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Kalyan; Kulkarni, A. M.; Soman, Shreevardhan

    2013-05-01

    Abstract: In this paper, we make an attempt to describe the phenomenon of wave propagation when a disturbance is introduced in an electromechanical system. The focus is mainly on generator trips in a power system. Ordering of the generators is first done using a sensitivity matrix. Thereafter, orthogonal decomposition of the ordered generators is done to group them based on their participation in different modes. Finally, we find the velocity of propagation of the wave and the transport delay associated with it using the ESPRIT method. The analysis done on generators from the eastern and western regions of India.1

  5. Measurements of radiated elastic wave energy from dynamic tensile cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fracture-velocity, microstructure, and fracture-energy barriers in elastic wave radiation during a dynamic fracture was investigated in experiments in which dynamic tensile cracks of two fracture cofigurations of double cantilever beam geometry were propagating in glass samples. The first, referred to as primary fracture, consisted of fractures of intact glass specimens; the second configuration, referred to as secondary fracture, consisted of a refracture of primary fracture specimens which were rebonded with an intermittent pattern of adhesive to produce variations in fracture surface energy along the crack path. For primary fracture cases, measurable elastic waves were generated in 31 percent of the 16 fracture events observed; the condition for radiation of measurable waves appears to be a local abrupt change in the fracture path direction, such as occurs when the fracture intersects a surface flaw. For secondary fractures, 100 percent of events showed measurable elastic waves; in these fractures, the ratio of radiated elastic wave energy in the measured component to fracture surface energy was 10 times greater than for primary fracture.

  6. Available computer codes and data for radiation transport analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubey, D.K.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Roussin, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC), sponsored and supported by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA), is a technical institute serving the radiation transport and shielding community. It acquires, selects, stores, retrieves, evaluates, analyzes, synthesizes, and disseminates information on shielding and ionizing radiation transport. The major activities include: (1) operating a computer-based information system and answering inquiries on radiation analysis, (2) collecting, checking out, packaging, and distributing large computer codes, and evaluated and processed data libraries. The data packages include multigroup coupled neutron-gamma-ray cross sections and kerma coefficients, other nuclear data, and radiation transport benchmark problem results

  7. Excitation of intense shock waves by soft X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branitskij, A.V.; Fortov, V.E.; Danilenko, K.N.; Dyabilin, K.S.; Grabovskij, E.V.; Vorobev, O. Yu.; Lebedev, M.E.; Smirnov, V.P.; Zakharov, A.E.; Persyantsev, I.V.

    1996-01-01

    Investigation of the shock waves generated by soft x radiation in Al, Sn, Fe, and Pb targets is reported. The soft x radiation was induced by the dynamic compression and heating of the cylindrical z-pinch plasma generated in the ANGARA-5-1 pulsed power machine. The temperature of the z-pinch plasma was as high as 60 - 120 eV, and the duration of the x-ray pulse reached 30 ns FWHM. Thick stepped Al/Pb, Sn/Pb, and pure Pb targets were used. The results of experiments show that uniform intense shock waves can be generated by z-pinch plasma soft x-ray radiation. The uniformity of the shock is very high. At a flux power of the order of several TW/cm 2 , a shock pressure of some hundreds of GPa was achieved. (J.U.). 3 figs., 11 refs

  8. Excitation of intense shock waves by soft X-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branitskij, A V; Fortov, V E; Danilenko, K N; Dyabilin, K S; Grabovskij, E V; Vorobev, O Yu; Lebedev, M E; Smirnov, V P; Zakharov, A E; Persyantsev, I V [Troitsk Inst. of Innovative and Fusion Research, Troitsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Investigation of the shock waves generated by soft x radiation in Al, Sn, Fe, and Pb targets is reported. The soft x radiation was induced by the dynamic compression and heating of the cylindrical z-pinch plasma generated in the ANGARA-5-1 pulsed power machine. The temperature of the z-pinch plasma was as high as 60 - 120 eV, and the duration of the x-ray pulse reached 30 ns FWHM. Thick stepped Al/Pb, Sn/Pb, and pure Pb targets were used. The results of experiments show that uniform intense shock waves can be generated by z-pinch plasma soft x-ray radiation. The uniformity of the shock is very high. At a flux power of the order of several TW/cm{sup 2}, a shock pressure of some hundreds of GPa was achieved. (J.U.). 3 figs., 11 refs.

  9. Validation of comprehensive space radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinn, J.L.; Simonsen, L.C.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    1998-01-01

    The HZETRN code has been developed over the past decade to evaluate the local radiation fields within sensitive materials on spacecraft in the space environment. Most of the more important nuclear and atomic processes are now modeled and evaluation within a complex spacecraft geometry with differing material components, including transition effects across boundaries of dissimilar materials, are included. The atomic/nuclear database and transport procedures have received limited validation in laboratory testing with high energy ion beams. The codes have been applied in design of the SAGE-III instrument resulting in material changes to control injurious neutron production, in the study of the Space Shuttle single event upsets, and in validation with space measurements (particle telescopes, tissue equivalent proportional counters, CR-39) on Shuttle and Mir. The present paper reviews the code development and presents recent results in laboratory and space flight validation

  10. Electron cyclotron waves, transport and instabilities in hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerhof, E.

    1987-01-01

    A number of topics relevant to the magnetic confinement approach to the thermonuclear fusion is addressed. The absorption and emission of electron cyclotron waves in a thermal plasma with a small population of supra-thermal, streaming electrons is examined and the properties of electron cyclotron waves in a plasma with a pure loss-cone distribution are studied. A report is given on the 1-D transport code simulations that were performed to assist the interpretation of the electron cyclotron heating experiments on the TFR tokamak. Transport code simulations of sawteeth discharges in the T-10 tokamak are discussed in order to compare the predictions of different models for the sawtooth oscillations with the experimental findings. 149 refs.; 69 figs.; 7 tabs

  11. Extremal bounds on drift wave growth rates and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1990-03-01

    A variational technique is used to obtain bounds on the growth constant γ versus wave number κ for plasma drift waves. We find, for T i = T e , γ * (1 + 3/√2 η) in usual notation. This agrees closely with dispersion---relation results that have had good success in explaining global confinement times in tokamaks based on transport coefficients of the form (γ/κ 2 ). The present method is easier to calculate and results are of such general nature as to give greater assurance that nothing has been missed. The method is based on the time behavior of a free energy function that is chosen to be a constant of motion for an idealized Maxwellian plasma without currents, and almost constant for small departures from this ideal state. The underlying premise associating the variational technique with drift waves remains conjectural. 6 refs

  12. Effects of beach morphology and waves on onshore larval transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, A.; Reniers, A.; Paris, C. B.; Shanks, A.; MacMahan, J.; Morgan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Larvae of intertidal species grow offshore, and migrate back to the shore when they are ready to settle on their adult substrates. In order to reach the habitat, they must cross the surf zone, which is characterized as a semi-permeable barrier. This is accomplished through physical forcing (i.e., waves and current) as well as their own behavior. Two possible scenarios of onshore larval transport are proposed: Negatively buoyant larvae stay in the bottom boundary layer because of turbulence-dependent sinking behavior, and are carried toward the shore by streaming of the bottom boundary layer; positively buoyant larvae move to the shore during onshore wind events, and sink to the bottom once they encounter high turbulence (i.e., surf zone edge), where they are carried by the bottom current toward the shore (Fujimura et al. 2014). Our biophysical Lagrangian particle tracking model helps to explain how beach morphology and wave conditions affect larval distribution patterns and abundance. Model results and field observations show that larval abundance in the surf zone is higher at mildly sloped, rip-channeled beaches than at steep pocket beaches. Beach attributes are broken up to examine which and how beach configuration factors affect larval abundance. Modeling with alongshore uniform beaches with variable slopes reveal that larval populations in the surf zone are negatively correlated with beach steepness. Alongshore variability enhances onshore larval transport because of increased cross-shore water exchange by rip currents. Wave groups produce transient rip currents and enhance cross-shore exchange. Effects of other wave components, such as wave height and breaking wave rollers are also considered.

  13. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, A. S. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Cooper, A. B.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacLaren, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Graham, P. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Seugling, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Satcher, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Klingmann, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Comley, A. J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Marrs, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glendinning, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Castor, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sain, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Back, C. A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Hund, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Young, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Young, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  14. Estimates of Lagrangian particle transport by wave groups: forward transport by Stokes drift and backward transport by the return flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bremer, Ton S.; Taylor, Paul H.

    2014-11-01

    Although the literature has examined Stokes drift, the net Lagrangian transport by particles due to of surface gravity waves, in great detail, the motion of fluid particles transported by surface gravity wave groups has received considerably less attention. In practice nevertheless, the wave field on the open sea often has a group-like structure. The motion of particles is different, as particles at sufficient depth are transported backwards by the Eulerian return current that was first described by Longuet-Higgins & Stewart (1962) and forms an inseparable counterpart of Stokes drift for wave groups ensuring the (irrotational) mass balance holds. We use WKB theory to study the variation of the Lagrangian transport by the return current with depth distinguishing two-dimensional seas, three-dimensional seas, infinite depth and finite depth. We then provide dimensional estimates of the net horizontal Lagrangian transport by the Stokes drift on the one hand and the return flow on the other hand for realistic sea states in all four cases. Finally we propose a simple scaling relationship for the transition depth: the depth above which Lagrangian particles are transported forwards by the Stokes drift and below which such particles are transported backwards by the return current.

  15. The wave properties of matter and the zeropoint radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, L. de la; Cetto, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The origin of the wave properties of matter is discussed from the point of view of stochastic electrodynamics. A nonrelativistic model of a changed particle with an effective structure embedded in the random zeropoint radiation field reveals that the field induces a high-frequency vibration on the particle; internal consistency of the theory fixes the frequency of this jittering at mc 2 /h. The particle is therefore assumed to interact intensely with stationary zeropoint waves of this frequency as seen from its proper frame of reference; such waves, identified here as de Broglie's phase waves, give rise to a modulated wave in the laboratory frame, with de Broglie's wavelength and phase velocity equal to the particle velocity. The time-independent equation that describes this modulated wave is shown to be the stationary Schroedinger equation (or the Klein-Gordon equation in the relativistic version). In a heuristic analysis applied to simple periodic cases, the quantization rules are recovered from the assumption that for a particle in a stationary state there must correspond a stationary modulation. Along an independent and complementary line of reasoning, an equation for the probability amplitude in configuration space for a particle under a general potential V(x) is constructed, and it is shown that under conditions derived from stochastic electrodynamics it reduces to Schroedinger's equation. This equation reflects therefore the dual nature of the quantum particles, by describing simultaneously the corresponding modulated wave and the ensemble of particles

  16. Rare Event Simulation in Radiation Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollman, Craig

    This dissertation studies methods for estimating extremely small probabilities by Monte Carlo simulation. Problems in radiation transport typically involve estimating very rare events or the expected value of a random variable which is with overwhelming probability equal to zero. These problems often have high dimensional state spaces and irregular geometries so that analytic solutions are not possible. Monte Carlo simulation must be used to estimate the radiation dosage being transported to a particular location. If the area is well shielded the probability of any one particular particle getting through is very small. Because of the large number of particles involved, even a tiny fraction penetrating the shield may represent an unacceptable level of radiation. It therefore becomes critical to be able to accurately estimate this extremely small probability. Importance sampling is a well known technique for improving the efficiency of rare event calculations. Here, a new set of probabilities is used in the simulation runs. The results are multiplied by the likelihood ratio between the true and simulated probabilities so as to keep our estimator unbiased. The variance of the resulting estimator is very sensitive to which new set of transition probabilities are chosen. It is shown that a zero variance estimator does exist, but that its computation requires exact knowledge of the solution. A simple random walk with an associated killing model for the scatter of neutrons is introduced. Large deviation results for optimal importance sampling in random walks are extended to the case where killing is present. An adaptive "learning" algorithm for implementing importance sampling is given for more general Markov chain models of neutron scatter. For finite state spaces this algorithm is shown to give, with probability one, a sequence of estimates converging exponentially fast to the true solution. In the final chapter, an attempt to generalize this algorithm to a continuous

  17. Angular momentum transport with twisted exciton wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoning; Lusk, Mark T.

    2017-10-01

    A chain of cofacial molecules with CN or CN h symmetry supports excitonic states with a screwlike structure. These can be quantified with the combination of an axial wave number and an azimuthal winding number. Combinations of these states can be used to construct excitonic wave packets that spiral down the chain with well-determined linear and angular momenta. These twisted exciton wave packets can be created and annihilated using laser pulses, and their angular momentum can be optically modified during transit. This allows for the creation of optoexcitonic circuits in which information, encoded in the angular momentum of light, is converted into excitonic wave packets that can be manipulated, transported, and then reemitted. A tight-binding paradigm is used to demonstrate the key ideas. The approach is then extended to quantify the evolution of twisted exciton wave packets in a many-body, multilevel time-domain density functional theory setting. In both settings, numerical methods are developed that allow the site-to-site transfer of angular momentum to be quantified.

  18. Diffusive and convective transport modelling from analysis of ECRH-stimulated electron heat wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erckmann, V.; Gasparino, U.; Giannone, L.

    1992-01-01

    ECRH power modulation experiments in toroidal devices offer the chance to analyze the electron heat transport more conclusively: the electron heat wave propagation can be observed by ECE (or SX) leading to radial profiles of electron temperature modulation amplitude and time delay (phase shift). Taking also the stationary power balance into account, the local electron heat transport can be modelled by a combination of diffusive and convective transport terms. This method is applied to ECRH discharges in the W7-AS stellarator (B=2.5T, R=2m, a≤18 cm) where the ECRH power deposition is highly localized. In W7-AS, the T e modulation profiles measured by a high resolution ECE system are the basis for the local transport analysis. As experimental errors limit the separation of diffusive and convective terms in the electron heat transport for central power deposition, also ECRH power modulation experiments with off-axis deposition and inward heat wave propagation were performed (with 70 GHz o-mode as well as with 140 GHz x-mode for increased absorption). Because collisional electron-ion coupling and radiative losses are only small, low density ECRH discharges are best candidates for estimating the electron heat flux from power balance. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs

  19. Factors influencing radiation exposure during the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Chuan Chen; Ying Huei Lee; Ming Tsun Chen; Jong Khing Huang; Luke S Chang (Division of Urology, Dept. of Surgery, National Yang-Ming Medical College and Veterans General Hospital-Taipei, Taiwan (China))

    1991-01-01

    A prospective evaluation of 89 consecutive sessions of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was undertaken to try and find the best way of minimising the amount of exposure to radiation. Forty-two patients were randomly allocated to undergo ESWL treatment by experienced surgeons (group A), and 47 to undergo the treatment by inexperienced surgeons (group B). The mean calculated entrance radiation exposure was 3.01 rads (group A: 2.64 (0.97) rads, range 1.00-4.48, group B: 3.38 (0.86) rads, range 1.11-5.75). Among factors that influenced radiation exposure, the tissue: air ratio should be borne in mind and the level of skill in controlling movement of gantry was the most important in reducing the exposure to radiation. (au).

  20. Factors influencing radiation exposure during the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Chuan Chen; Ying Huei Lee; Ming Tsun Chen; Jong Khing Huang; Luke S Chang

    1991-01-01

    A prospective evaluation of 89 consecutive sessions of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was undertaken to try and find the best way of minimising the amount of exposure to radiation. Forty-two patients were randomly allocated to undergo ESWL treatment by experienced surgeons (group A), and 47 to undergo the treatment by inexperienced surgeons (group B). The mean calculated entrance radiation exposure was 3.01 rads (group A: 2.64 (0.97) rads, range 1.00-4.48, group B: 3.38 (0.86) rads, range 1.11-5.75). Among factors that influenced radiation exposure, the tissue: air ratio should be borne in mind and the level of skill in controlling movement of gantry was the most important in reducing the exposure to radiation. (au)

  1. Statistics of Monte Carlo methods used in radiation transport calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, D.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation transport calculation can be carried out by using either deterministic or statistical methods. Radiation transport calculation based on statistical methods is basic theme of the Monte Carlo methods. The aim of this lecture is to describe the fundamental statistics required to build the foundations of Monte Carlo technique for radiation transport calculation. Lecture note is organized in the following way. Section (1) will describe the introduction of Basic Monte Carlo and its classification towards the respective field. Section (2) will describe the random sampling methods, a key component of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation, Section (3) will provide the statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo estimates, Section (4) will describe in brief the importance of variance reduction techniques while sampling particles such as photon, or neutron in the process of radiation transport

  2. Radiation exposure to patients during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti, J.M.; Robles, J.E.; Arbizu, J.; Castro, F. de; Berian, J.M.; Richter, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    We analyzed the radiological exposure to patients during Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) using a second generator lithotriptor. Stone location is accomplished by fluoroscopy and 'quick pics' or snapshots. A prospective study over 55 patients showed a mean exposure of 32.2 R. The introduction of the ALARA criterion reduced it to 16.1 R in the following 145 patients. Mean radiation exposure to patient varies according to treatment difficulty. A mean increase of radiation exposure of 1.6 between low and high difficulty treatment groups was observed. This variation was about 96% when the physician who performed the treatment was considered. (author)

  3. Renormalization-group approach to nonlinear radiation-transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapline, G.F.

    1980-01-01

    A Monte Carlo method is derived for solving nonlinear radiation-transport problems that allows one to average over the effects of many photon absorptions and emissions at frequencies where the opacity is large. This method should allow one to treat radiation-transport problems with large optical depths, e.g., line-transport problems, with little increase in computational effort over that which is required for optically thin problems

  4. Imprints of relic gravitational waves in cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskaran, D.; Grishchuk, L. P.; Polnarev, A. G.

    2006-01-01

    A strong variable gravitational field of the very early Universe inevitably generates relic gravitational waves by amplifying their zero-point quantum oscillations. We begin our discussion by contrasting the concepts of relic gravitational waves and inflationary 'tensor modes'. We explain and summarize the properties of relic gravitational waves that are needed to derive their effects on cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies. The radiation field is characterized by four invariants I, V, E, B. We reduce the radiative transfer equations to a single integral equation of Voltairre type and solve it analytically and numerically. We formulate the correlation functions C l XX ' for X, X ' =T, E, B and derive their amplitudes, shapes and oscillatory features. Although all of our main conclusions are supported by exact numerical calculations, we obtain them, in effect, analytically by developing and using accurate approximations. We show that the TE correlation at lower l's must be negative (i.e. an anticorrelation), if it is caused by gravitational waves, and positive if it is caused by density perturbations. This difference in TE correlation may be a signature more valuable observationally than the lack or presence of the BB correlation, since the TE signal is about 100 times stronger than the expected BB signal. We discuss the detection by WMAP of the TE anticorrelation at l≅30 and show that such an anticorrelation is possible only in the presence of a significant amount of relic gravitational waves (within the framework of all other common assumptions). We propose models containing considerable amounts of relic gravitational waves that are consistent with the measured TT, TE and EE correlations

  5. Drift wave transport and origin of the disruption phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasselberg, G.; Rogister, A.

    1983-02-01

    Nonlinear ion Landau damping of drift waves yields a splitting of the spectrum into a long and a short wavelength branch. The latter contributes most (> 90%) of the transport and permits to explain the observed relaxation of Tokamak plasma profiles to a weakly unstable state, in the occurence with regard to the dissipative trapped electron mode. The fluxes indeed increase much more rapidly than the linear growth rates. This result and surprising coincidences between the linear theory and empirical laws concerning the high density limit lead us to propose that the slow rise of the sawtooth pulsations of the core occurs whilst the transport in the surrounding layer is insufficient to evacuate the power deposited. The sudden relaxation takes place once the released heat pulses are capable - much as in collisionless shock waves - of exciting the trapped electron mode to a sufficient level to ensure adequate transport. The model explains many experimental features associated with these sawteeth as well as with the related plasma disruptions: contraction of the current channel, high density limit (both the scaling and the order of magnitude are predicted), etc. ... (orig.)

  6. Coherent transport of matter waves in disordered optical potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Robert

    2007-07-01

    The development of modern techniques for the cooling and the manipulation of atoms in recent years, and the possibility to create Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases and to load them into regular optical lattices or disordered optical potentials, has evoked new interest for the disorder-induced localization of ultra-cold atoms. This work studies the transport properties of matter waves in disordered optical potentials, which are also known as speckle potentials. The effect of correlated disorder on localization is first studied numerically in the framework of the Anderson model. The relevant transport parameters in the configuration average over many different realizations of the speckle potential are then determined analytically, using self-consistent diagrammatic perturbation techniques. This allows to make predictions for a possible experimental observation of coherent transport phenomena for cold atoms in speckle potentials. Of particular importance are the spatial correlations of the speckle fluctuations, which are responsible for the anisotropic character of the single scattering processes in the effective medium. Coherent multiple scattering leads to quantum interference effects, which entail a renormalization of the diffusion constant as compared to the classical description. This so-called weak localization of matter waves is studied as the underlying mechanism for the disorder-driven transition to the Anderson-localization regime, explicitly taking into account the correlations of the speckle fluctuations. (orig.)

  7. Coherent transport of matter waves in disordered optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The development of modern techniques for the cooling and the manipulation of atoms in recent years, and the possibility to create Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases and to load them into regular optical lattices or disordered optical potentials, has evoked new interest for the disorder-induced localization of ultra-cold atoms. This work studies the transport properties of matter waves in disordered optical potentials, which are also known as speckle potentials. The effect of correlated disorder on localization is first studied numerically in the framework of the Anderson model. The relevant transport parameters in the configuration average over many different realizations of the speckle potential are then determined analytically, using self-consistent diagrammatic perturbation techniques. This allows to make predictions for a possible experimental observation of coherent transport phenomena for cold atoms in speckle potentials. Of particular importance are the spatial correlations of the speckle fluctuations, which are responsible for the anisotropic character of the single scattering processes in the effective medium. Coherent multiple scattering leads to quantum interference effects, which entail a renormalization of the diffusion constant as compared to the classical description. This so-called weak localization of matter waves is studied as the underlying mechanism for the disorder-driven transition to the Anderson-localization regime, explicitly taking into account the correlations of the speckle fluctuations. (orig.)

  8. Transport of infrared radiation in cuboidal clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshvardhan, MR.; Weinman, J. A.; Davies, R.

    1981-01-01

    The transport of infrared radiation in a single cuboidal cloud is modeled using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. Computations are made at 10 microns for a Deirmendjian (1969) C-1 water cloud where the single scattering albedo is equal to 0.638 and the asymmetry parameter is 0.865. The results indicate that the emittance of the top face of the model cloud is always less than that for a plane parallel cloud of the same optical depth. The hemispheric flux escaping from the cloud top possesses a gradient from the center to the edges which are warmer when the cloud is over warmer ground. Cooling rate calculations in the 8-13.6 micron region demonstrate that there is cooling out of the sides of the cloud at all levels even when there is heating of the core from the ground below. The radiances exiting from model cuboidal clouds are computed by path integration over the source function obtained with the two-stream approximation. Results indicate that the brightness temperature measured from finite clouds will overestimate the cloud-top temperature.

  9. Self-consistent collisional-radiative model for hydrogen atoms: Atom–atom interaction and radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colonna, G.; Pietanza, L.D.; D’Ammando, G.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Self-consistent coupling between radiation, state-to-state kinetics, electron kinetics and fluid dynamics. Highlight: ► A CR model of shock-wave in hydrogen plasma has been presented. ► All equations have been coupled self-consistently. ► Non-equilibrium electron and level distributions are obtained. ► The results show non-local effects and non-equilibrium radiation. - Abstract: A collisional-radiative model for hydrogen atom, coupled self-consistently with the Boltzmann equation for free electrons, has been applied to model a shock tube. The kinetic model has been completed considering atom–atom collisions and the vibrational kinetics of the ground state of hydrogen molecules. The atomic level kinetics has been also coupled with a radiative transport equation to determine the effective adsorption and emission coefficients and non-local energy transfer.

  10. Experimental study of coherent radiation in the millimeter-wave region at the KURRI-LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshiharu [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1996-07-01

    Coherent radiation, i.e., synchrotron radiation, transition radiation, Cherenkov radiation, or Smith-Purcell radiation emitted by short bunches of electrons has been observed in the millimeter-wave region. Properties of coherent radiation are characterized by the coherence effect and the relativistic one. The intensity of coherent radiation is enormously enhanced by several orders of magnitude in comparison with the incoherent radiation and the flux of radiation concentrates around the direction of the electron beam. Coherent radiation is useful as the intense light source in the millimeter-wave region. (author)

  11. CHROMOSPHERIC HEATING BY ACOUSTIC WAVES COMPARED TO RADIATIVE COOLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobotka, M.; Heinzel, P.; Švanda, M.; Jurčák, J. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (v.v.i.), Fričova 298, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Del Moro, D.; Berrilli, F. [Department of Physics, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy)

    2016-07-20

    Acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves are among the possible candidate mechanisms that heat the upper layers of the solar atmosphere. A weak chromospheric plage near the large solar pore NOAA 11005 was observed on 2008 October 15, in the Fe i 617.3 nm and Ca ii 853.2 nm lines of the Interferometric Bidimemsional Spectrometer attached to the Dunn Solar Telescope. In analyzing the Ca ii observations (with spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.″4 and 52 s) the energy deposited by acoustic waves is compared to that released by radiative losses. The deposited acoustic flux is estimated from the power spectra of Doppler oscillations measured in the Ca ii line core. The radiative losses are calculated using a grid of seven one-dimensional hydrostatic semi-empirical model atmospheres. The comparison shows that the spatial correlation of the maps of radiative losses and acoustic flux is 72%. In a quiet chromosphere, the contribution of acoustic energy flux to radiative losses is small, only about 15%. In active areas with a photospheric magnetic-field strength between 300 and 1300 G and an inclination of 20°–60°, the contribution increases from 23% (chromospheric network) to 54% (a plage). However, these values have to be considered as lower limits and it might be possible that the acoustic energy flux is the main contributor to the heating of bright chromospheric network and plages.

  12. Implementation and testing of a multivariate inverse radiation transport solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, John; Mitchell, Dean J.

    2012-01-01

    Detection, identification, and characterization of special nuclear materials (SNM) all face the same basic challenge: to varying degrees, each must infer the presence, composition, and configuration of the SNM by analyzing a set of measured radiation signatures. Solutions to this problem implement inverse radiation transport methods. Given a set of measured radiation signatures, inverse radiation transport estimates properties of the source terms and transport media that are consistent with those signatures. This paper describes one implementation of a multivariate inverse radiation transport solver. The solver simultaneously analyzes gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity measurements to fit a one-dimensional radiation transport model with variable layer thicknesses using nonlinear regression. The solver's essential components are described, and its performance is illustrated by application to benchmark experiments conducted with plutonium metal. - Highlights: ► Inverse problems, specifically applied to identifying and characterizing radiation sources . ► Radiation transport. ► Analysis of gamma spectroscopy and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. ► Experimental testing of the inverse solver against measurements of plutonium.

  13. Los Alamos radiation transport code system on desktop computing platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briesmeister, J.F.; Brinkley, F.W.; Clark, B.A.; West, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. These codes were originally developed many years ago and have undergone continual improvement. With a large initial effort and continued vigilance, the codes are easily portable from one type of hardware to another. The performance of scientific work-stations (SWS) has evolved to the point that such platforms can be used routinely to perform sophisticated radiation transport calculations. As the personal computer (PC) performance approaches that of the SWS, the hardware options for desk-top radiation transport calculations expands considerably. The current status of the radiation transport codes within the LARTCS is described: MCNP, SABRINA, LAHET, ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, and ONELD. Specifically, the authors discuss hardware systems on which the codes run and present code performance comparisons for various machines

  14. Radiation exposure to patients during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Swearingen, F.L.; McCullough, D.L.; Dyer, R.; Appel, B.

    1987-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is rapidly becoming an accepted treatment of renal calculi. Since fluoroscopy is involved to image the stones it is important to know how much radiation the patient receives during this procedure. Surface radiation exposure to the patient was measured in more than 300 fluoroscopic and radiographic procedures using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Initial results showed an average skin exposure of 10.1 rad per procedure for each x-ray unit, comparing favorably with exposure rates for percutaneous nephrostolithotomy and other routine radiological procedures. Factors influencing exposure levels include stone characteristics (location, size and opacity), physician experience and number of shocks required. Suggestions are given that may result in a 50 per cent reduction of radiation exposure

  15. Directional radiative cooling thermal compensation for gravitational wave interferometer mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justin Kamp, Carl [Department of Chemical Reaction Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goteborg (Sweden)], E-mail: carl.kamp@chalmers.se; Kawamura, Hinata [Yokoyama Junior High School, Sanda, Hachioji, Tokyo 193-0832 (Japan); Passaquieti, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Enrico Fermi' and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Universita' di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); DeSalvo, Riccardo [LIGO Observatories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2009-08-21

    The concept of utilizing directional radiative cooling to correct the problem of thermal lensing in the mirrors of the LIGO/VIRGO gravitational wave detectors has been shown and has prospects for future use. Two different designs utilizing this concept, referred to as the baffled and parabolic mirror solutions, have been proposed with different means of controlling the cooling power. The technique takes advantage of the power naturally radiated by the mirror surfaces at room temperature to prevent their heating by the powerful stored laser beams. The baffled solution has been simulated via COMSOL Multiphysics as a design tool. Finally, the parabolic mirror concept was experimentally validated with the results falling in close agreement with theoretical cooling calculations. The technique of directional radiative thermal correction can be reversed to image heat rings on the mirrors periphery to remotely and dynamically correct their radius of curvature without subjecting the mirror to relevant perturbations.

  16. Investigation of the radiation properties of magnetospheric ELF waves induced by modulated ionospheric heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhao, Shufan; Zhao, Guangxin; Wang, Min

    2017-05-01

    Electromagnetic extremely low frequency (ELF) waves play an important role in modulating the Earth's radiation belt electron dynamics. High-frequency (HF) modulated heating of the ionosphere acts as a viable means to generate artificial ELF waves. The artificial ELF waves can reside in two different plasma regions in geo-space by propagating in the ionosphere and penetrating into the magnetosphere. As a consequence, the entire trajectory of ELF wave propagation should be considered to carefully analyze the wave radiation properties resulting from modulated ionospheric heating. We adopt a model of full wave solution to evaluate the Poynting vector of the ELF radiation field in the ionosphere, which can reflect the propagation characteristics of the radiated ELF waves along the background magnetic field and provide the initial condition of waves for ray tracing in the magnetosphere. The results indicate that the induced ELF wave energy forms a collimated beam and the center of the ELF radiation shifts obviously with respect to the ambient magnetic field with the radiation power inversely proportional to the wave frequency. The intensity of ELF wave radiation also shows a weak correlation with the size of the radiation source or its geographical location. Furthermore, the combination of ELF propagation in the ionosphere and magnetosphere is proposed on basis of the characteristics of the ELF radiation field from the upper ionospheric boundary and ray tracing simulations are implemented to reasonably calculate magnetospheric ray paths of ELF waves induced by modulated ionospheric heating.

  17. Statistical theory of resistive drift-wave turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, G.; Krommes, J.A.; Bowman, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Resistive drift-wave turbulence in a slab geometry is studied by statistical closure methods and direct numerical simulations. The two-field Hasegawa endash Wakatani (HW) fluid model, which evolves the electrostatic potential and plasma density self-consistently, is a paradigm for understanding the generic nonlinear behavior of multiple-field plasma turbulence. A gyrokinetic derivation of the HW model is sketched. The recently developed Realizable Markovian Closure (RMC) is applied to the HW model; spectral properties, nonlinear energy transfers, and turbulent transport calculations are discussed. The closure results are also compared to direct numerical simulation results; excellent agreement is found. The transport scaling with the adiabaticity parameter, which measures the strength of the parallel electron resistivity, is analytically derived and understood through weak- and strong-turbulence analyses. No evidence is found to support previous suggestions that coherent structures cause a large depression of saturated transport from its quasilinear value in the hydrodynamic regime of the HW model. Instead, the depression of transport is well explained by the spectral balance equation of the (second-order) statistical closure when account is taken of incoherent noise. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. Discrete event simulation of Maglev transport considering traffic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo Hyun Cha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A magnetically levitated vehicle (Maglev system is under commercialization as a new transportation system in Korea. The Maglev is operated by an unmanned automatic control system. Therefore, the plan of train operation should be carefully established and validated in advance. In general, when making a train operation plan, statistically predicted traffic data is used. However, a traffic wave often occurs in real train service, and demand-driven simulation technology is required to review a train operation plan and service quality considering traffic waves. We propose a method and model to simulate Maglev operation considering continuous demand changes. For this purpose, we employed a discrete event model that is suitable for modeling the behavior of railway passenger transportation. We modeled the system hierarchically using discrete event system specification (DEVS formalism. In addition, through implementation and an experiment using the DEVSim++ simulation environment, we tested the feasibility of the proposed model. Our experimental results also verified that our demand-driven simulation technology can be used for a priori review of train operation plans and strategies.

  19. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-15

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  20. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-01

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  1. Radiation doses from the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, K.B.; Holyoak, B.

    1983-01-01

    A summary is given of a study on radiation exposure resulting from the transport of radioactive materials within the United Kingdom. It was concluded that the transport of technetium generators for hospital use accounts for about 49% of the occupational exposure for the normal transport of radioactive materials. Other isotopes for medical and industrial use contribute about 38% of the occupational exposure and the remainder can be attributed to transportation as a result of the nuclear fuel cycle including the transport of irradiated nuclear fuel. The occupational collective dose for all modes of transport is estimated at 1 man Sv y -1 . (UK)

  2. A systematic study of wave conditions and sediment transport near Mormugao harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, M.P.M.

    Wave conditions and the nature of sediment transport in the Mormugao Harbour area have been evaluated in view of the proposed development project of this harbour It has been found from this study that generally high waves will be experienced...

  3. Variations of helicon wave induced radial plasma transport in different experimental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzilka, V.

    1993-08-01

    Variations of the helicon wave induced radial plasma transport are presented in dependence on values of the plasma radius, magnetostatic field, plasma density, frequency of the helicon wave and on the ion charge. 22 refs., 14 figs

  4. Theory for beam-plasma millimeter-wave radiation source experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Krall, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on theoretical studies for millimeter-wave plasma source experiments. In the device, millimeter-wave radiation is generated in a plasma-filled waveguide driven by counter-streaming electron beams. The beams excite electron plasma waves which couple to produce radiation at twice the plasma frequency. Physics topics relevant to the high electron beam current regime are discussed

  5. Radiation safety in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odano, N.; Yanagi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation safety for sea transport of radioactive material in Japan has been discussed based on records of the exposed dose of sea transport workers and measured data of dose rate equivalents distribution inboard exclusive radioactive material shipping vessels. Recent surveyed records of the exposed doses of workers who engaged in sea transport operation indicate that exposed doses of transport workers are significantly low. Measured distribution of the exposed dose equivalents inboard those vessels indicates that dose rate equivalents inside those vessels are lower than levels regulated by the transport regulations of Japan. These facts clarify that radiation safety of inboard environment and handling of transport casks in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan are assured

  6. Radiation safety in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odano, N. [National Maritime Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Yanagi, H. [Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Radiation safety for sea transport of radioactive material in Japan has been discussed based on records of the exposed dose of sea transport workers and measured data of dose rate equivalents distribution inboard exclusive radioactive material shipping vessels. Recent surveyed records of the exposed doses of workers who engaged in sea transport operation indicate that exposed doses of transport workers are significantly low. Measured distribution of the exposed dose equivalents inboard those vessels indicates that dose rate equivalents inside those vessels are lower than levels regulated by the transport regulations of Japan. These facts clarify that radiation safety of inboard environment and handling of transport casks in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan are assured.

  7. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling - part A: Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorence, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    The need to understand how particle radiation (high-energy photons and electrons) from a variety of sources affects materials and electronics has motivated the development of sophisticated computer codes that describe how radiation with energies from 1.0 keV to 100.0 GeV propagates through matter. Predicting radiation transport is the necessary first step in predicting radiation effects. The radiation transport codes that are described here are general-purpose codes capable of analyzing a variety of radiation environments including those produced by nuclear weapons (x-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons), by sources in space (electrons and ions) and by accelerators (x-rays, gamma rays, and electrons). Applications of these codes include the study of radiation effects on electronics, nuclear medicine (imaging and cancer treatment), and industrial processes (food disinfestation, waste sterilization, manufacturing.) The primary focus will be on coupled electron-photon transport codes, with some brief discussion of proton transport. These codes model a radiation cascade in which electrons produce photons and vice versa. This coupling between particles of different types is important for radiation effects. For instance, in an x-ray environment, electrons are produced that drive the response in electronics. In an electron environment, dose due to bremsstrahlung photons can be significant once the source electrons have been stopped

  8. Path Toward a Unified Geometry for Radiation Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kerry

    The Direct Accelerated Geometry for Radiation Analysis and Design (DAGRAD) element of the RadWorks Project under Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) within the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) of NASA will enable new designs and concepts of operation for radiation risk assessment, mitigation and protection. This element is designed to produce a solution that will allow NASA to calculate the transport of space radiation through complex CAD models using the state-of-the-art analytic and Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. Due to the inherent hazard of astronaut and spacecraft exposure to ionizing radiation in low-Earth orbit (LEO) or in deep space, risk analyses must be performed for all crew vehicles and habitats. Incorporating these analyses into the design process can minimize the mass needed solely for radiation protection. Transport of the radiation fields as they pass through shielding and body materials can be simulated using Monte Carlo techniques or described by the Boltzmann equation, which is obtained by balancing changes in particle fluxes as they traverse a small volume of material with the gains and losses caused by atomic and nuclear collisions. Deterministic codes that solve the Boltzmann transport equation, such as HZETRN (high charge and energy transport code developed by NASA LaRC), are generally computationally faster than Monte Carlo codes such as FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP(X) or PHITS; however, they are currently limited to transport in one dimension, which poorly represents the secondary light ion and neutron radiation fields. NASA currently uses HZETRN space radiation transport software, both because it is computationally efficient and because proven methods have been developed for using this software to analyze complex geometries. Although Monte Carlo codes describe the relevant physics in a fully three-dimensional manner, their computational costs have thus far prevented their widespread use for analysis of complex CAD models, leading

  9. Generating Far-Infrared Radiation By Two-Wave Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstain, Shmuel

    1992-01-01

    Far-infrared radiation 1 to 6 GHz generated by two-wave mixing in asymmetrically grown GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple-quantum-well devices. Two near-infrared semiconductor diode lasers phase-locked. Outputs amplified, then combined in semiconductor nonlinear multiple-quantum-well planar waveguide. Necessary to optimize design of device with respect to three factors: high degree of confinement of electromagnetic field in nonlinear medium to maximize power density, phase matching to extend length of zone of interaction between laser beams in non-linear medium, and nonlinear susceptibility. Devices used as tunable local oscillators in heterodyne-detection radiometers.

  10. On the derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiative transport in graded index media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.M.; Tan, J.Y.; Liu, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    Light transport in graded index media follows a curved trajectory determined by Fermat's principle. Besides the effect of variation of the refractive index on the transport of radiative intensity, the curved ray trajectory will induce geometrical effects on the transport of polarization ellipse. This paper presents a complete derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiation transport in absorption, emission and scattering graded index media. The derivation is based on the analysis of the conserved quantities for polarized light transport along curved trajectory and a novel approach. The obtained transfer equation can be considered as a generalization of the classic vector radiative transfer equation that is only valid for uniform refractive index media. Several variant forms of the transport equation are also presented, which include the form for Stokes parameters defined with a fixed reference and the Eulerian forms in the ray coordinate and in several common orthogonal coordinate systems.

  11. Nonrelativistic grey Sn-transport radiative-shock solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J. M.; Morel, J. E.; Lowrie, R. B.

    2017-01-01

    We present semi-analytic radiative-shock solutions in which grey Sn-transport is used to model the radiation, and we include both constant cross sections and cross sections that depend on temperature and density. These new solutions solve for a variable Eddington factor (VEF) across the shock domain, which allows for interesting physics not seen before in radiative-shock solutions. Comparisons are made with the grey nonequilibrium-diffusion radiative-shock solutions of Lowrie and Edwards [1], which assumed that the Eddington factor is constant across the shock domain. It is our experience that the local Mach number is monotonic when producing nonequilibrium-diffusion solutions, but that this monotonicity may disappear while integrating the precursor region to produce Sn-transport solutions. For temperature- and density-dependent cross sections we show evidence of a spike in the VEF in the far upstream portion of the radiative-shock precursor. We show evidence of an adaptation zone in the precursor region, adjacent to the embedded hydrodynamic shock, as conjectured by Drake [2, 3], and also confirm his expectation that the precursor temperatures adjacent to the Zel’dovich spike take values that are greater than the downstream post-shock equilibrium temperature. We also show evidence that the radiation energy density can be nonmonotonic under the Zel’dovich spike, which is indicative of anti-diffusive radiation flow as predicted by McClarren and Drake [4]. We compare the angle dependence of the radiation flow for the Sn-transport and nonequilibriumdiffusion radiation solutions, and show that there are considerable differences in the radiation flow between these models across the shock structure. Lastly, we analyze the radiation flow to understand the cause of the adaptation zone, as well as the structure of the Sn-transport radiation-intensity solutions across the shock structure.

  12. ipole: Semianalytic scheme for relativistic polarized radiative transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscibrodzka, Monika; Gammie, Charles F.

    2018-04-01

    ipole is a ray-tracing code for covariant, polarized radiative transport particularly useful for modeling Event Horizon Telescope sources, though may also be used for other relativistic transport problems. The code extends the ibothros scheme for covariant, unpolarized transport using two representations of the polarized radiation field: in the coordinate frame, it parallel transports the coherency tensor, and in the frame of the plasma, it evolves the Stokes parameters under emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion. The transport step is as spacetime- and coordinate- independent as possible; the emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion step is implemented using an analytic solution to the polarized transport equation with constant coefficients. As a result, ipole is stable, efficient, and produces a physically reasonable solution even for a step with high optical depth and Faraday depth.

  13. Net radiation of mountain cultivated Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] stand: evaluation of shortand long-wave radiation ratio

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marková, I.; Marek, Michal V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2011), s. 114-122 ISSN 0071-6677 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : downward short- and long-wave radiation * upward short- and long-wave radiation * sun elevation * clearness index Subject RIV: GK - Forestry

  14. On creating transport barrier by radio-frequency waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Cairns, R.A.; Dasgupta, B.; Pantis, G.

    1998-01-01

    The use of radio frequency (RF) waves in the range of Alfven frequencies is shown to stabilize the drift-ballooning modes in the tokamak if the radial profile of the RF field energy is properly chosen. Stabilization is achieved by the ponder motive force arising due to the radial gradient in the RF field energy. The estimate of the RF power required for this stabilization is found to be rather modest and hence should be easily obtained in the actual experiments. This result therefore shows that the use of the RF waves can create a transport barrier to reduce the loss of particle and energy from the plasma. The new improved mode produced by the RF is expected to have all the advantageous features of the enhanced reverse shear (ERS) modes and at the same time will, unlike the ERS plasma, be sustainable for unlimited period of time and hence should be an attractive choice for the reactor-grade self-sustaining plasma. (author)

  15. Discontinuous Galerkin for the Radiative Transport Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc; Kanschat, Guido; Ragusa, Jean C.

    2013-01-01

    This note presents some recent results regarding the approximation of the linear radiative transfer equation using discontinuous Galerkin methods. The locking effect occurring in the diffusion limit with the upwind numerical flux is investigated and a correction technique is proposed.

  16. Discontinuous Galerkin for the Radiative Transport Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2013-10-11

    This note presents some recent results regarding the approximation of the linear radiative transfer equation using discontinuous Galerkin methods. The locking effect occurring in the diffusion limit with the upwind numerical flux is investigated and a correction technique is proposed.

  17. Modeling of laser radiation transport in powder beds with high-dispersive metal particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharanzhevskiy, Evgeny, E-mail: eh@udsu.ru [Udmurt State University, 426034 Universitetskaya St., 1, Izhevsk (Russian Federation); Kostenkov, Sergey [Udmurt State University, 426034 Universitetskaya St., 1, Izhevsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: ► Transport of laser energy in dispersive powder beds was numerically simulated. ► The results of simulating are compared with physicals experiments. ► We established the dependence of the extinction coefficient from powder properties. ► A confirmation of a geometric optic approach for monodisperse powders was proposed. -- Abstract: Two-dimensional transfer of laser radiation in a high-dispersive powder heterogeneous media is numerically calculated. The size of particles is comparable with the wave length of laser radiation so the model takes into account all known physical effects that are occurred on the vacuum–metal surface interface. It is shown that in case of small particles size both morphology of powder particles and porosity of beds influence on absorptance by the solid phase and laser radiation penetrate deep into the area of geometric shadow. Intensity of laser radiation may be described as a function corresponded to the Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law.

  18. Modeling of laser radiation transport in powder beds with high-dispersive metal particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharanzhevskiy, Evgeny; Kostenkov, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: ► Transport of laser energy in dispersive powder beds was numerically simulated. ► The results of simulating are compared with physicals experiments. ► We established the dependence of the extinction coefficient from powder properties. ► A confirmation of a geometric optic approach for monodisperse powders was proposed. -- Abstract: Two-dimensional transfer of laser radiation in a high-dispersive powder heterogeneous media is numerically calculated. The size of particles is comparable with the wave length of laser radiation so the model takes into account all known physical effects that are occurred on the vacuum–metal surface interface. It is shown that in case of small particles size both morphology of powder particles and porosity of beds influence on absorptance by the solid phase and laser radiation penetrate deep into the area of geometric shadow. Intensity of laser radiation may be described as a function corresponded to the Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law

  19. Radiation transport Part B: Applications with examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutler, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    In the previous sections Len Lorence has described the need, theory, and types of radiation codes that can be applied to model the results of radiation effects tests or working environments for electronics. For the rest of this segment, the author will concentrate on the specific ways the codes can be used to predict device response or analyze radiation test results. Regardless of whether one is predicting responses in a working or test environment, the procedures are virtually the same. The same can be said for the use of 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional codes and Monte Carlo or discrete ordinates codes. No attempt is made to instruct the student on the specifics of the code. For example, the author will not discuss the details, such as the number of meshes, energy groups, etc. that are appropriate for a discrete ordinates code. For the sake of simplicity, he will restrict himself to the 1-dimensional code CEPXS/ONELD. This code along with a wide variety of other radiation codes can be obtained form the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) for a nominal handling fee

  20. Overview. Department of Environmental and Radiation Transport Physics. Section 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loskiewicz, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Research activities in the Department of Environmental and Radiation Transport Physics are carried out by three Laboratories: Laboratory of Environmental Physics, Laboratory of Neutron Transport Physics and Laboratory of Physics and Modeling of Radiation Transport. The researches provided in 1994 cover: tracer transport and flows in porous media, studies on pollution in atmospheric air, physics of molecular phenomena in chromatographic detectors, studies on neutron transport in heterogenous media, studies on evaluation of neutron cross-section in the thermal region, studies on theory and utilization of neural network in data evaluation, numerical modelling of particle cascades for particle accelerator shielding purpose. In this section the description of mentioned activities as well as the information about personnel employed in the Department, papers and reports published in 1994, contribution to conferences and grants is also given.

  1. Overview. Department of Environmental and Radiation Transport Physics. Section 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loskiewicz, J [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    Research activities in the Department of Environmental and Radiation Transport Physics are carried out by three Laboratories: Laboratory of Environmental Physics, Laboratory of Neutron Transport Physics and Laboratory of Physics and Modeling of Radiation Transport. The researches provided in 1994 cover: tracer transport and flows in porous media, studies on pollution in atmospheric air, physics of molecular phenomena in chromatographic detectors, studies on neutron transport in heterogenous media, studies on evaluation of neutron cross-section in the thermal region, studies on theory and utilization of neural network in data evaluation, numerical modelling of particle cascades for particle accelerator shielding purpose. In this section the description of mentioned activities as well as the information about personnel employed in the Department, papers and reports published in 1994, contribution to conferences and grants is also given.

  2. Radiological emergency: road map for radiation accident victim transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, V.S.G.; Alcantara, Y.P.; Lima, C.M.A.; Silva, F. C. A. da

    2017-01-01

    During a radiological or nuclear emergency, a number of necessary actions are taken, both within the radiation protection of individuals and the environment, involving many institutions and highly specialized personnel. Among them it is possible to emphasize the air transportation of radiation accident victims.The procedures and measures for the safe transport of these radiation accident victims are generally the responsibility of the armed forces, specifically the Aeronautics, with the action denominated 'Aeromedical Military Evacuation of Radiation Accident Victims'. The experience with the Radiological Accident of Goiânia demonstrated the importance of adequate preparation and response during a radiological emergency and the need for procedures and measures with regard to the transport of radiation victims are clearly defined and clearly presented for the effectiveness of the actions. This work presents the necessary actions for the transport of radiation accident victim during a radiological emergency, through the road map technique, which has been widely used in scientific technical area to facilitate understanding and show the way to be followed to reach the proposed objectives

  3. Transport of cobalt-60 industrial radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstadt, Peter; Gibson, Wayne

    This paper will deal with safety aspects of the handling of Cobalt-60, the most widely used industrial radio-isotope. Cobalt-60 is a man-made radioisotope of Cobalt-59, a naturally occurring non radioactive element, that is made to order for radiation therapy and a wide range of industrial processing applications including sterilization of medical disposables, food irradiation, etc.

  4. bhlight: GENERAL RELATIVISTIC RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS WITH MONTE CARLO TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, B. R.; Gammie, C. F.; Dolence, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    We present bhlight, a numerical scheme for solving the equations of general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics using a direct Monte Carlo solution of the frequency-dependent radiative transport equation. bhlight is designed to evolve black hole accretion flows at intermediate accretion rate, in the regime between the classical radiatively efficient disk and the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF), in which global radiative effects play a sub-dominant but non-negligible role in disk dynamics. We describe the governing equations, numerical method, idiosyncrasies of our implementation, and a suite of test and convergence results. We also describe example applications to radiative Bondi accretion and to a slowly accreting Kerr black hole in axisymmetry

  5. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A V; Agapitov, O V; Mourenas, D; Krasnoselskikh, V V; Mozer, F S

    2015-05-15

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave-particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity.

  6. Radiation transport in statistically inhomogeneous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukhminskij, B.E.

    1975-01-01

    A study has been made of radiation transfer in statistically inhomogeneous rocks. Account has been taken of the statistical character of rock composition through randomization of density. Formulas are summarized for sigma-distribution, homogeneous density, the Simpson and Cauchy distributions. Consideration is given to the statistics of mean square ranges in a medium, simulated by the jump Markov random function. A quantitative criterion of rock heterogeneity is proposed

  7. Radiation dominated acoustophoresis driven by surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinhong; Kang, Yuejun; Ai, Ye

    2015-10-01

    Acoustophoresis-based particle manipulation in microfluidics has gained increasing attention in recent years. Despite the fact that experimental studies have been extensively performed to demonstrate this technique for various microfluidic applications, numerical simulation of acoustophoresis driven by surface acoustic waves (SAWs) has still been largely unexplored. In this work, a numerical model taking into account the acoustic-piezoelectric interaction was developed to simulate the generation of a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) field and predict the acoustic pressure field in the liquid. Acoustic radiation dominated particle tracing was performed to simulate acoustophoresis of particles with different sizes undergoing a SSAW field. A microfluidic device composed of two interdigital transducers (IDTs) for SAW generation and a microfluidic channel was fabricated for experimental validation. Numerical simulations could well capture the focusing phenomenon of particles to the pressure nodes in the experimental observation. Further comparison of particle trajectories demonstrated considerably quantitative agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results with fitting in the applied voltage. Particle switching was also demonstrated using the fabricated device that could be further developed as an active particle sorting device. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cellular and molecular effects of electromagnetic radiation and sonic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Froes Meyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic radiation (in the form of pulsed magnetic fields, radiofrequency and intense pulsed light and mechanical agents (such as sonic waves have been used in physical therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of low-intensity magnetic fields, sonic and radiofrequency waves, and intense pulsed light on the survival of Escherichia coli cultures and on the electrophoretic mobility of plasmid DNA. Exponentially growing E. coli AB1157 cultures and plasmid DNA samples were exposed to these physical agents and 0.9% NaCl (negative control and SnCl2 (positive control solutions. Aliquots of the cultures were diluted and spread onto a solidified rich medium. The colony-forming units were counted after overnight incubation and the survival fraction was calculated. Agarose gel electrophoresis was performed to visualise and quantify the plasmid topological forms. The results suggest that these agents do not alter the survival of E. coli cells or plasmid DNA electrophoresis mobility. Moreover, they do not protect against the lesive action of SnCl2. These physical agents therefore had no cytotoxic or genotoxic effects under the conditions studied.

  9. An inverse method for radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, J. A. (Jeffrey A.); Sanchez, R. (Richard)

    2004-01-01

    Adjoint functions have been used with forward functions to compute gradients in implicit (iterative) solution methods for inverse problems in optical tomography, geoscience, thermal science, and other fields, but only once has this approach been used for inverse solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation. In this paper, this approach is used to develop an inverse method that requires only angle-independent flux measurements, rather than angle-dependent measurements as was done previously. The method is applied to a simplified form of the transport equation that does not include scattering. The resulting procedure uses measured values of gamma-ray fluxes of discrete, characteristic energies to determine interface locations in a multilayer shield. The method was implemented with a Newton-Raphson optimization algorithm, and it worked very well in numerical one-dimensional spherical test cases. A more sophisticated optimization method would better exploit the potential of the inverse method.

  10. Radiative transport-based frequency-domain fluorescence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Amit; Rasmussen, John C; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M; Wareing, Todd A; McGhee, John

    2008-01-01

    We report the development of radiative transport model-based fluorescence optical tomography from frequency-domain boundary measurements. The coupled radiative transport model for describing NIR fluorescence propagation in tissue is solved by a novel software based on the established Attila(TM) particle transport simulation platform. The proposed scheme enables the prediction of fluorescence measurements with non-contact sources and detectors at a minimal computational cost. An adjoint transport solution-based fluorescence tomography algorithm is implemented on dual grids to efficiently assemble the measurement sensitivity Jacobian matrix. Finally, we demonstrate fluorescence tomography on a realistic computational mouse model to locate nM to μM fluorophore concentration distributions in simulated mouse organs

  11. On the role of lateral waves in the radiation from the dielectric wedge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Peter

    1973-01-01

    The field on the dielectric wedge is approximated by a plane-wave expansion as in [1]. Contributions from this solution to both the surface field and the radiation field are examined. Finally, an experimental radiation field is compared with the plane-wave solution and with a geometric-optical...

  12. Induced Compton scattering effects in radiation transport approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, D.R. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis the method of characteristics is used to solve radiation transport problems with induced Compton scattering effects included. The methods used to date have only addressed problems in which either induced Compton scattering is ignored, or problems in which linear scattering is ignored. Also, problems which include both induced Compton scattering and spatial effects have not been considered previously. The introduction of induced scattering into the radiation transport equation results in a quadratic nonlinearity. Methods are developed to solve problems in which both linear and nonlinear Compton scattering are important. Solutions to scattering problems are found for a variety of initial photon energy distributions

  13. Induced Compton-scattering effects in radiation-transport approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, D.R. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    The method of characteristics is used to solve radiation transport problems with induced Compton scattering effects included. The methods used to date have only addressed problems in which either induced Compton scattering is ignored, or problems in which linear scattering is ignored. Also, problems which include both induced Compton scattering and spatial effects have not been considered previously. The introduction of induced scattering into the radiation transport equation results in a quadratic nonlinearity. Methods are developed to solve problems in which both linear and nonlinear Compton scattering are important. Solutions to scattering problems are found for a variety of initial photon energy distributions

  14. Radiation exposure during air and ground transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.C.; Weng, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a one year study program of radiation exposure experienced on both domestic and international flights of the China Airline and the Far East Airline in the Pacific, Southeast Asia and Taiwan areas and on trains and buses on Taiwan island are reported. CaSO 4 :Dy thermoluminescent dosimeters were used. It has been shown that transit exposures may amount to 10 times that on the ground with an altitude varying from 3,050 to 12,200 m. (U.K.)

  15. Controlling Energy Radiations of Electromagnetic Waves via Frequency Coding Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haotian; Liu, Shuo; Wan, Xiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Dan; Li, Lianlin; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-09-01

    Metamaterials are artificial structures composed of subwavelength unit cells to control electromagnetic (EM) waves. The spatial coding representation of metamaterial has the ability to describe the material in a digital way. The spatial coding metamaterials are typically constructed by unit cells that have similar shapes with fixed functionality. Here, the concept of frequency coding metamaterial is proposed, which achieves different controls of EM energy radiations with a fixed spatial coding pattern when the frequency changes. In this case, not only different phase responses of the unit cells are considered, but also different phase sensitivities are also required. Due to different frequency sensitivities of unit cells, two units with the same phase response at the initial frequency may have different phase responses at higher frequency. To describe the frequency coding property of unit cell, digitalized frequency sensitivity is proposed, in which the units are encoded with digits "0" and "1" to represent the low and high phase sensitivities, respectively. By this merit, two degrees of freedom, spatial coding and frequency coding, are obtained to control the EM energy radiations by a new class of frequency-spatial coding metamaterials. The above concepts and physical phenomena are confirmed by numerical simulations and experiments.

  16. Double shock front formation in cylindrical radiative blast waves produced by laser irradiation of krypton gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.; Quevedo, H. J.; Feldman, S.; Bang, W.; Serratto, K.; McCormick, M.; Aymond, F.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T. [Center for High Energy Density Science, Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, C1510, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Radiative blast waves were created by irradiating a krypton cluster source from a supersonic jet with a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. It was found that the radiation from the shock surface is absorbed in the optically thick upstream medium creating a radiative heat wave that travels supersonically ahead of the main shock. As the blast wave propagates into the heated medium, it slows and loses energy, and the radiative heat wave also slows down. When the radiative heat wave slows down to the transonic regime, a secondary shock in the ionization precursor is produced. This paper presents experimental data characterizing both the initial and secondary shocks and numerical simulations to analyze the double-shock dynamics.

  17. Regulatory practices of radiation safety of SNF transportation in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuryndina, Lidia; Kuryndin, Anton; Stroganov, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    This paper overviews current regulatory practices for the assurance of nuclear and radiation safety during railway transportation of SNF on the territory of Russian Federation from NPPs to longterm-storage of reprocessing sites. The legal and regulatory requirements (mostly compliant with IAEA ST-1), licensing procedure for NM transportation are discussed. The current procedure does not require a regulatory approval for each particular shipment if the SNF fully comply with the Rosatom's branch standard and is transported in approved casks. It has been demonstrated that SNF packages compliant with the branch standard, which is knowingly provide sufficient safety margin, will conform to the federal level regulations. The regulatory approval is required if a particular shipment does not comply with the branch standard. In this case, the shipment can be approved only after regulatory review of Applicant's documents to demonstrate that the shipment still conformant to the higher level (federal) regulations. The regulatory review frequently needs a full calculation test of the radiation safety assurance. This test can take a lot of time. That's why the special calculation tools were created in SEC NRS. These tools aimed for precision calculation of the radiation safety parameters by SNF transportation use preliminary calculated Green's functions. Such approach allows quickly simulate any source distribution and optimize spent fuel assemblies placement in cask due to the transport equation property of linearity relatively the source. The short description of calculation tools are presented. Also, the paper discusses foreseen implications related to transportation of mixed-oxide SNF. (author)

  18. Four-Wave Mixing of Gigawatt Power, Long-Wave Infrared Radiation in Gases and Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeon, Jeremy James

    The nonlinear optics of gigawatt power, 10 microm, 3 and 200 ps long pulses propagating in gases and semiconductors has been studied experimentally and numerically. In this work, the development of a high-repetition rate, picosecond, CO2 laser system has enabled experiments using peak intensities in the range of 1-10 GW/cm2, approximately one thousand times greater than previous nonlinear optics experiments in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral region. The first measurements of the nonlinear refractive index of the atomic and molecular gases Kr, Xe, N2, O2 and the air at a wavelength near 10 microm were accomplished by studying the four-wave mixing (FWM) of dual-wavelength, 200 ps CO2 laser pulses. These measurements indicate that the nonlinearities of the diatomic molecules N2, O2 and the air are dominated by the molecular contribution to the nonlinear refractive index. Supercontinuum (SC) generation covering the infrared spectral range, from 2-20 microm, was realized by propagating 3 ps, 10 microm pulses in an approximately 7 cm long, Cr-doped GaAs crystal. Temporal measurements of the SC radiation show that pulse splitting accompanies the generation of such broadband light in GaAs. The propagation of 3 ps, 10 microm pulses in GaAs was studied numerically by solving the Generalized Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation (GNLSE). These simulations, combined with analytic estimates, were used to determine that stimulated Raman scattering combined with a modulational instability caused by the propagation of intense LWIR radiation in the negative group velocity dispersion region of GaAs are responsible for the SC generation process. The multiple FWM of a 106 GHz, 200 ps CO2 laser beat-wave propagating in GaAs was used to generate a broadband FWM spectrum that was compressed by the negative group velocity dispersion of GaAs and NaCl crystals to form trains of high-power, picosecond pulses at a wavelength near 10 microm. Experimental FWM spectra obtained using 165 and 882

  19. Precipitated Fluxes of Radiation Belt Electrons via Injection of Whistler-Mode Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, P.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    2005-12-01

    Inan et al. (U.S. Inan et al., Controlled precipitation of radiation belt electrons, Journal of Geophysical Research-Space Physics, 108 (A5), 1186, doi: 10.1029/2002JA009580, 2003.) suggested that the lifetime of energetic (a few MeV) electrons in the inner radiation belts may be moderated by in situ injection of whistler mode waves at frequencies of a few kHz. We use the Stanford 2D VLF raytracing program (along with an accurate estimation of the path-integrated Landau damping based on data from the HYDRA instrument on the POLAR spacecraft) to determine the distribution of wave energy throughout the inner radiation belts as a function of injection point, wave frequency and injection wave normal angle. To determine the total wave power injected and its initial distribution in k-space (i.e., wave-normal angle), we apply the formulation of Wang and Bell ( T.N.C. Wang and T.F. Bell, Radiation resistance of a short dipole immersed in a cold magnetoionic medium, Radio Science, 4 (2), 167-177, February 1969) for an electric dipole antenna placed at a variety of locations throughout the inner radiation belts. For many wave frequencies and wave normal angles the results establish that most of the radiated power is concentrated in waves whose wave normals are located near the resonance cone. The combined use of the radiation pattern and ray-tracing including Landau damping allows us to make quantitative estimates of the magnetospheric distribution of wave power density for different source injection points. We use these results to estimate the number of individual space-based transmitters needed to significantly impact the lifetimes of energetic electrons in the inner radiation belts. Using the wave power distribution, we finally determine the energetic electron pitch angle scattering and the precipitated flux signatures that would be detected.

  20. Chemical and kinetic equilibrations via radiative parton transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bin; Wortman, Warner A

    2011-01-01

    A hot and dense partonic system can be produced in the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. How it equilibrates is important for the extraction of Quark-Gluon Plasma properties. We study the chemical and kinetic equilibrations of the Quark-Gluon Plasma using a radiative transport model. Thermal and Color-Glass-Condensate motivated initial conditions are used. We observe that screened parton interactions always lead to partial pressure isotropization. Different initial pressure anisotropies result in the same asymptotic evolution. Comparison of evolutions with and without radiative processes shows that chemical equilibration interacts with kinetic equilibration and radiative processes can contribute significantly to pressure isotropization.

  1. Signal Processing Model for Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D H

    2008-07-28

    This note describes the design of a simplified gamma ray transport model for use in designing a sequential Bayesian signal processor for low-count detection and classification. It uses a simple one-dimensional geometry to describe the emitting source, shield effects, and detector (see Fig. 1). At present, only Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption are implemented for the shield and the detector. Other effects may be incorporated in the future by revising the expressions for the probabilities of escape and absorption. Pair production would require a redesign of the simulator to incorporate photon correlation effects. The initial design incorporates the physical effects that were present in the previous event mode sequence simulator created by Alan Meyer. The main difference is that this simulator transports the rate distributions instead of single photons. Event mode sequences and other time-dependent photon flux sequences are assumed to be marked Poisson processes that are entirely described by their rate distributions. Individual realizations can be constructed from the rate distribution using a random Poisson point sequence generator.

  2. Wave-Particle Interactions Involving Correlated Electron Bursts and Whistler Chorus in Earth's Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echterling, N.; Schriver, D.; Roeder, J. L.; Fennell, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    During the recovery phase of substorm plasma injections, the Van Allen Probes commonly observe events of quasi-periodic energetic electron bursts correlating with simultaneously detected upper-band, whistler-mode chorus emissions. These electron bursts exhibit narrow ranges of pitch angles (75-80° and 100-105°) and energies (20-40 keV). Electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) emissions are also commonly detected, but typically do not display correlation with the electron bursts. To examine sources of free energy and the generation of these wave emissions, an observed electron velocity distribution on January 13, 2013 is used as the starting condition for a particle in cell (PIC) simulation. Effects of temperature anisotropy (perpendicular temperature greater than parallel temperature), the presence of a loss cone and a cold electron population on the generation of whistler and ECH waves are examined to understand wave generation and nonlinear interactions with the particle population. These nonlinear interactions produce energy diffusion along with strong pitch angle scattering into the loss cone on the order of milliseconds, which is faster than a typical bounce period of seconds. To examine the quasi-periodic nature of the electron bursts, a loss-cone recycling technique is implemented to model the effects of the periodic emptying of the loss cone and electron injection on the growth of whistler and ECH waves. The results of the simulations are compared to the Van Allen Probe observations to determine electron acceleration, heating and transport in Earth's radiation belts due to wave-particle interactions.

  3. On the influence of suspended sediment transport on the generation of offshore sand waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterlini-Van der Meer, Fenneke; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; van den Berg, J.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Uijttewaal, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Sand waves are bed-forms occurring in shallow seas. Although their characteristics are mainly affected by bed load transport, during rough weather suspended sediment transport can influence their characteristics. As a first step to model these influences, we added suspended sediment transport to a

  4. IPOLE - semi-analytic scheme for relativistic polarized radiative transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mościbrodzka, M.; Gammie, C. F.

    2018-03-01

    We describe IPOLE, a new public ray-tracing code for covariant, polarized radiative transport. The code extends the IBOTHROS scheme for covariant, unpolarized transport using two representations of the polarized radiation field: In the coordinate frame, it parallel transports the coherency tensor; in the frame of the plasma it evolves the Stokes parameters under emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion. The transport step is implemented to be as spacetime- and coordinate- independent as possible. The emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion step is implemented using an analytic solution to the polarized transport equation with constant coefficients. As a result, IPOLE is stable, efficient, and produces a physically reasonable solution even for a step with high optical depth and Faraday depth. We show that the code matches analytic results in flat space, and that it produces results that converge to those produced by Dexter's GRTRANS polarized transport code on a complicated model problem. We expect IPOLE will mainly find applications in modelling Event Horizon Telescope sources, but it may also be useful in other relativistic transport problems such as modelling for the IXPE mission.

  5. DIAPHANE: A portable radiation transport library for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Darren S.; Dykes, Tim; Cabezón, Rubén; Gheller, Claudio; Mayer, Lucio

    2018-05-01

    One of the most computationally demanding aspects of the hydrodynamical modelingof Astrophysical phenomena is the transport of energy by radiation or relativistic particles. Physical processes involving energy transport are ubiquitous and of capital importance in many scenarios ranging from planet formation to cosmic structure evolution, including explosive events like core collapse supernova or gamma-ray bursts. Moreover, the ability to model and hence understand these processes has often been limited by the approximations and incompleteness in the treatment of radiation and relativistic particles. The DIAPHANE project has focused on developing a portable and scalable library that handles the transport of radiation and particles (in particular neutrinos) independently of the underlying hydrodynamic code. In this work, we present the computational framework and the functionalities of the first version of the DIAPHANE library, which has been successfully ported to three different smoothed-particle hydrodynamic codes, GADGET2, GASOLINE and SPHYNX. We also present validation of different modules solving the equations of radiation and neutrino transport using different numerical schemes.

  6. Academic Training - The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 27, 28, 29 June 11:00-12:00 - TH Conference Room, bldg. 4 The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona, A. FERRARI, CERN-AB, M. SILARI, CERN-SC Lecture 1. Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interaction models and multiple-scattering theories will be analyzed. Benchmark comparisons of simu...

  7. Some factors affecting radiative heat transport in PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, A.N.

    1989-04-01

    This report discusses radiative heat transport in Pressurized Water Reactor cores, using simple models to illustrate basic features of the transport process. Heat transport by conduction and convection is ignored in order to focus attention on the restrictions on radiative heat transport imposed by the geometry of the heat emitting and absorbing structures. The importance of the spacing of the emitting and absorbing structures is emphasised. Steady state temperature distributions are found for models of cores which are uniformly heated by fission product decay. In all of the models, a steady state temperature distribution can only be obtained if the central core temperature is in excess of the melting point of UO 2 . It has recently been reported that the MIMAS computer code, which takes into account radiative heat transport, has been used to model the heat-up of the Three Mile Island-2 reactor core, and the computations indicate that the core could not have reached the melting point of UO 2 at any time or any place. We discuss this result in the light of the calculations presented in this paper. It appears that the predicted stabilisation of the core temperatures at ∼ 2200 0 C may be a consequence of the artificially large spacing between the radial rings employed in the MIMAS code, rather than a result of physical significance. (author)

  8. A study on an object transport system using ultrasonic wave excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Sang Hwa; Kim, Gwang Ho; Choi, Suk Bong; Park, Jun Ho; Cha, Kyoung Rae

    2007-01-01

    The development of information and telecommunication industries leads to the development of semiconductor and optical industries. In recent years, the demand of optical components is growing due to the demand of faster network. On the other hand, conventional transport systems are not adequate for transporting precision optical components and semiconductors. Because the conveyor belt can damage precision optical components with contact force and a magnetic system would destroy the inner structure of semiconductor with magnetic field, a new system for transporting optical components and semiconductors is required. One of the alternatives to the existing systems is a transport system using ultrasonic wave excitation since it can transport precision components such as semiconductors and optical components without damage. In this paper, a transport system using 2-mode ultrasonic wave excitation was developed for transporting optical components and semiconductor, and its performance was evaluated. The relationship between transporting characteristics and flexural beam shapes were evaluated

  9. Kinetic Alfven Waves at the Magnetopause-Mode Conversion, Transport and Formation of LLBL; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay R. Johnson; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-01-01

    At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity[Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D(approx) 109m2/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (Bwave/B0 and gt; 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in

  10. The effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic wave beams on single electron acoustic charge transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jianhong; Guo Huazhong; Song Li; Zhang Wei; Gao Jie; Lu Chuan

    2010-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic waves on the acoustoelectric current of single electron transport devices. A significant improvement in the accuracy of current quantization is achieved as a result of an additional surface acoustic wave beam. The experiments reveal the sinusoidally periodical modulation in the acoustoelectric current characteristic as a function of the relative phase of the two surface acoustic wave beams. Besides, by using standing surface acoustic waves, the acoustoelectric current is detected which we consider as the so-called anomalous acoustoelectric current produced by acoustic wave mechanical deformations. This kind current is contributed to one component of the acoustoelectric current in surface acoustic wave device, which could enable us to establish a more adequate description of acoustoelectric effects on single-electron acoustic charge transport.

  11. Diffusive and convective transport modelling from analysis of ECRH-stimulated electron heat wave propagation. [ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erckmann, V; Gasparino, U; Giannone, L. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)) (and others)

    1992-01-01

    ECRH power modulation experiments in toroidal devices offer the chance to analyze the electron heat transport more conclusively: the electron heat wave propagation can be observed by ECE (or SX) leading to radial profiles of electron temperature modulation amplitude and time delay (phase shift). Taking also the stationary power balance into account, the local electron heat transport can be modelled by a combination of diffusive and convective transport terms. This method is applied to ECRH discharges in the W7-AS stellarator (B=2.5T, R=2m, a[<=]18 cm) where the ECRH power deposition is highly localized. In W7-AS, the T[sub e] modulation profiles measured by a high resolution ECE system are the basis for the local transport analysis. As experimental errors limit the separation of diffusive and convective terms in the electron heat transport for central power deposition, also ECRH power modulation experiments with off-axis deposition and inward heat wave propagation were performed (with 70 GHz o-mode as well as with 140 GHz x-mode for increased absorption). Because collisional electron-ion coupling and radiative losses are only small, low density ECRH discharges are best candidates for estimating the electron heat flux from power balance. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Transport of radioactive materials: the need for radiation protection programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masinza, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    The increase in the use of radioactive materials worldwide requires that these materials be moved from production sites to the end user or in the case of radioactive waste, from the waste generator to the repository. Tens of millions of packages containing radioactive material are consigned for transport each year throughout the world. The amount of radioactive material in these packages varies from negligible quantities in shipments of consumer products to very large quantities of shipments of irradiated nuclear fuel. Transport is the main way in which the radioactive materials being moved get into the public domain. The public is generally unaware of the lurking danger when transporting these hazardous goods. Thus radiation protection programmes are important to assure the public of the certainty of their safety during conveyance of these materials. Radioactive material is transported by land (road and rail), inland waterways, sea/ocean and air. These modes of transport are regulated by international 'modal' regulations. The international community has formulated controls to reduce the number of accidents and mitigate their consequences should they happen. When accidents involving the transport of radioactive material occur, it could result in injury, loss of life and pollution of the environment. In order to ensure the safety of people, property and the environment, national and international transport regulations have been developed. The appropriate authorities in each state utilise them to control the transport of radioactive material. Stringent measures are required in these regulations to ensure adequate containment, shielding and the prevention of criticality in all spheres of transport, i.e. routine, minor incidents and accident conditions. Despite the extensive application of these stringent safety controls, transport accidents involving packages containing radioactive material have occurred and will continue to occur. When a transport accident occurs, it

  13. Application of radiation protection programmes to transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Vietri, Jorge; Capadona, Nancy; Barenghi, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The principles for implementing radiation protection programmes (RPP) are detailed in the draft IAEA safety guide TS-G-1.5 'Radiation protection programmes for transport of radioactive material'. The document is described in this paper and analysis is made for typical applications to current operations carried out by consignors, carriers and consignees. Systematic establishment and application of RPPs is a way to control radiological protection during different steps of transport activity. The most widely transported packages in the world are radiopharmaceuticals by road. It is described an application of RPP for an organization involved in road transport of Type A packages containing radiopharmaceuticals. Considerations based on the radionuclides, quantities and activities transported are the basis to design and establish the scope of the RPP for the organizations involved in transport. Next stage is the determination of roles and responsibilities for each activity related to transport of radioactive materials. An approach to the dose received by workers is evaluated considering the type, category and quantity of packages, the radionuclides, the frequency of consignments and how long are the storages. The average of transports made in the last years must be taken into account and special measures intended to optimize the protection are evaluated. Tasks like monitoring, control of surface contamination and segregation measures, are designed based on the dose evaluation and optimization. The RPP also indicates main measures to follow in case of emergency during transport taking account of radionuclides, activities and category of packages for different accident scenarios. Basis for training personnel involved in handling of radioactive materials to insure they have appropriate knowledge about preparing packages, measuring dose rates, calculating transport index, labelling, marking and placarding, transport documents, etc, are considered. The RPP is a part

  14. Transport-constrained extensions of collision and track length estimators for solutions of radiative transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Rong; Spanier, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we develop novel extensions of collision and track length estimators for the complete space-angle solutions of radiative transport problems. We derive the relevant equations, prove that our new estimators are unbiased, and compare their performance with that of more conventional estimators. Such comparisons based on numerical solutions of simple one dimensional slab problems indicate the the potential superiority of the new estimators for a wide variety of more general transport problems

  15. Database of full-scale laboratory experiments on wave-driven sand transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Schretlen, Johanna Lidwina Maria; Ribberink, Jan S.; O'Donoghue, Tom

    2009-01-01

    A new database of laboratory experiments involving sand transport processes over horizontal, mobile sand beds under full-scale non-breaking wave and non-breaking wave-plus-current conditions is described. The database contains details of the flow and bed conditions, information on which quantities

  16. Computer codes in nuclear safety, radiation transport and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordy, J.M.; Kodeli, I.; Menard, St.; Bouchet, J.L.; Renard, F.; Martin, E.; Blazy, L.; Voros, S.; Bochud, F.; Laedermann, J.P.; Beaugelin, K.; Makovicka, L.; Quiot, A.; Vermeersch, F.; Roche, H.; Perrin, M.C.; Laye, F.; Bardies, M.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.; Gschwind, R.; Fernandez, F.; Quesne, B.; Fritsch, P.; Lamart, St.; Crovisier, Ph.; Leservot, A.; Antoni, R.; Huet, Ch.; Thiam, Ch.; Donadille, L.; Monfort, M.; Diop, Ch.; Ricard, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to describe the present state of computer codes dedicated to radiation transport or radiation source assessment or dosimetry. The presentations have been parted into 2 sessions: 1) methodology and 2) uses in industrial or medical or research domains. It appears that 2 different calculation strategies are prevailing, both are based on preliminary Monte-Carlo calculations with data storage. First, quick simulations made from a database of particle histories built though a previous Monte-Carlo simulation and secondly, a neuronal approach involving a learning platform generated through a previous Monte-Carlo simulation. This document gathers the slides of the presentations

  17. Radiation transport modelling for the interpretation of oblique ECE measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denk Severin S.

    2017-01-01

    Since radiation transport modelling is required for the interpretation of oblique ECE diagnostics we present in this paper an extended forward model that supports oblique lines of sight. To account for the refraction of the line of sight, ray tracing in the cold plasma approximation was added to the model. Furthermore, an absorption coefficient valid for arbitrary propagation was implemented. Using the revised model it is shown that for the oblique ECE Imaging diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade there can be a significant difference between the cold resonance position and the point from which most of the observed radiation originates.

  18. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K.

    1997-01-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results

  19. Atmospheric Transport and Mixing linked to Rossby Wave Breaking in GFDL Dynamical Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Barnes, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric transport and mixing plays an important role in the global energy balance and the distribution of health-related chemical constituents. Previous studies suggest a close linkage between large-scale transport and Rossby wave breaking (RWB). In this work, we use the GFDL spectral dynamical core to investigate this relationship and study the response of RWB-related transport in different climate scenarios. In a standard control run, we quantify the contribution of RWB to the total transport and mixing of an idealized tracer. In addition, we divide the contribution further into the two types of RWB - anticyclonic wave breaking (AWB) and cyclonic wave breaking (CWB) -- and contrast their efficiency at transport and mixing. Our results are compared to a previous study in which the transport ability of the two types of RWB is studied for individual baroclinic wave life-cycles. In a series of sensitivity runs, we study the response of RWB-related transport and mixing to various states of the jet streams. The responses of the mean strength, frequency, and the efficiency of RWB-related transport are documented and the implications for the transport and mixing in a warmer climate are discussed.

  20. Fundamental investigation on electrostatic travelling-wave transport of a liquid drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Basic research has been carried out on the transport of a liquid drop and a soft body in an electrostatic travelling field. A conveyer consisting of parallel electrodes was constructed and a four-phase electrostatic travelling wave was applied to the electrodes to transport the drop on the conveyer. The following were clarified by the experiment. (1) Drops and soft bodies can be transported by virtue of the travelling wave in an insulative liquid that is insoluble to the drop, because the drop was charged on the conveyer by friction and driven by the Coulomb force. (2) A drop that covered less than three arrays of the parallel electrode can be transported in the travelling wave field. (3) A threshold voltage exists for the transport. (4) Although the transport was possible not only for insulative but also for conductive drops, the insulative drop can be transported efficiently. (5) The modes of transport can be classified into three categories, namely, a synchronous region where the motion of the liquid drop is in synchrony with the travelling wave, a delayed response regime, and a regime where transport does not occur. (6) Mixing of drops for a chemical reaction was demonstrated on the conveyer with scroll electrodes. A simple model was proposed to simulate the dynamics of the drop in the electrostatic travelling field

  1. An Eulerian two-phase flow model for sediment transport under realistic surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, T. J.; Kim, Y.; Cheng, Z.; Chauchat, J.

    2017-12-01

    Wave-driven sediment transport is of major importance in driving beach morphology. However, the complex mechanisms associated with unsteadiness, free-surface effects, and wave-breaking turbulence have not been fully understood. Particularly, most existing models for sediment transport adopt bottom boundary layer approximation that mimics the flow condition in oscillating water tunnel (U-tube). However, it is well-known that there are key differences in sediment transport when comparing to large wave flume datasets, although the number of wave flume experiments are relatively limited regardless of its importance. Thus, a numerical model which can resolve the entire water column from the bottom boundary layer to the free surface can be a powerful tool. This study reports an on-going effort to better understand and quantify sediment transport under shoaling and breaking surface waves through the creation of open-source numerical models in the OpenFOAM framework. An Eulerian two-phase flow model, SedFoam (Cheng et al., 2017, Coastal Eng.) is fully coupled with a volume-of-fluid solver, interFoam/waves2Foam (Jacobsen et al., 2011, Int. J. Num. Fluid). The fully coupled model, named SedWaveFoam, regards the air and water phases as two immiscible fluids with the interfaces evolution resolved, and the sediment particles as dispersed phase. We carried out model-data comparisons with the large wave flume sheet flow data for nonbreaking waves reported by Dohmen-Janssen and Hanes (2002, J. Geophysical Res.) and good agreements were obtained for sediment concentration and net transport rate. By further simulating a case without free-surface (mimic U-tube condition), the effects of free-surface, most notably the boundary layer streaming effect on total transport, can be quantified.

  2. On the relativistic transport equation for a multiple discontinuity wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambo, Sebastiano

    1980-01-01

    The theory of singular hypersurfaces is combined with the ray theory to study propagation of weak discontinuities of solutions of quasi-linear hyperbolic system in the context of special relativity. The case of a multiple wave is considered [fr

  3. Relativistic transport equation for a multiple discontinuity wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giambo, S [Istituto di Matematica, Universita degli Studi, Messina (Italy)

    1980-09-29

    The theory of singular hypersurfaces is combined with the ray theory to study propagation of weak discontinuities of solutions of a quasi-linear hyperbolic system in the context of special relativity. The case of a multiple wave is considered.

  4. Electromagnetic radiation by parametric decay of upper hybrid waves in ionospheric modification experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyser, T.B.

    1994-01-01

    A nonlinear dispersion relation for the parametric decay of an electrostatic upper hybrid wave into an ordinary mode electromagnetic wave, propagating parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and an electrostatic low frequency wave, being either a lower hybrid wave or a high harmonic ion Bernstein wave, is derived. The coherent and resonant wave interaction is considered to take place in a weakly magnetized and collisionless Vlasov plasma. The instability growth rate is computed for parameter values typical of ionospheric modification experiments, in which a powerful high frequency electromagnetic pump wave is injected into the ionospheric F-region from ground-based transmitters. The electromagnetic radiation which is excited by the decaying upper hybrid wave is found to be consistent with the prominent and commonly observed downshifted maximum (DM) emission in the spectrum of stimulated electromagnetic emission

  5. Secondary Flows and Sediment Transport due to Wave - Current Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nabil; Wiegel, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Objectives: The main purpose of this study is to determine the modifications of coastal processes driven by wave-current interaction and thus to confirm hydrodynamic mechanisms associated with the interaction at river mouths and tidal inlets where anthropogenic impacts were introduced. Further, the aim of the work has been to characterize the effect of the relative strength of momentum action of waves to the opposing current on the nearshore circulation where river flow was previously effective to entrain sediments along the shoreline. Such analytical information are useful to provide guidelines for sustainable design of coastal defense structures. Methodology and Analysis: Use is made of an earlier study reported by the authors (1983) on the interaction of horizontal momentum jets and opposing shallow water waves at shorelines, and of an unpublished laboratory study (1980). The turbulent horizontal discharge was shore-normal, directed offshore, and the incident wave direction was shore-normal, travelling toward shore. Flow visualization at the smooth bottom and the water surface, velocity and water surface elevation measurements were made. Results were obtained for wave , current modifications as well as the flow pattern in the jet and the induced circulation on both sides of the jet, for a range of wave and jet characteristics. The experimental data, obtained from measurement in the 3-D laboratory basin, showed several distinct flow pattern regimes on the bottom and the water surface. The observed flow circulation regimes were found to depend on the ratio of the wave momentum action on the jet to the jet initial momentum. Based on the time and length scales of wave and current parameters and using the time average of the depth integrated conservation equations, it is found that the relative strength of the wave action on the jet could be represented by a dimensionless expression; Rsm ( ) 12ρSa20g-L0h-Cg- 2 Rsm ≈ (C0 - U) /ρ0U w (1) In the above dimensionless

  6. Hybrid formulation of radiation transport in optically thick divertor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.; Bufferand, H.; Stamm, R. [PIIM, UMR 7345 Aix-Marseille Universite / CNRS, Centre de St-Jerome, Marseille (France); Reiter, D. [IEK-4 Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of coupled atom-radiation transport in optically thick divertor plasmas can be computationally very demanding, in particular in ITER relevant conditions or even larger devices, e.g. for power plant divertor studies. At high (∝ 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) atomic densities, it can be shown that sufficiently large divertors behave in certain areas like a black body near the first resonance line of hydrogen (Lyman α). This suggests that, at least in part, the use of continuum model (radiation hydrodynamics) can be sufficiently accurate, while being less time consuming. In this work, we report on the development of a hybrid model devoted to switch automatically between a kinetic and a continuum description according to the plasma conditions. Calculations of the photo-excitation rate in a homogeneous slab are performed as an illustration. The outlined hybrid concept might be also applicable to neutral atom transport, due to mathematical analogy of transport equations for neutrals and radiation. (copyright 2016 The Authors. Contributions to Plasma Physics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA Weinheim. This)

  7. Effects of Drift-Shell Splitting by Chorus Waves on Radiation Belt Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, A. A.; Zheng, L.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Elkington, S. R.; Albert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drift shell splitting in the radiation belts breaks all three adiabatic invariants of charged particle motion via pitch angle scattering, and produces new diffusion terms that fully populate the diffusion tensor in the Fokker-Planck equation. Based on the stochastic differential equation method, the Radbelt Electron Model (REM) simulation code allows us to solve such a fully three-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation, and to elucidate the sources and transport mechanisms behind the phase space density variations. REM has been used to perform simulations with an empirical initial phase space density followed by a seed electron injection, with a Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model, and with chorus wave and ULF wave diffusion models. Our simulation results show that adding drift shell splitting changes the phase space location of the source to smaller L shells, which typically reduces local electron energization (compared to neglecting drift-shell splitting effects). Simulation results with and without drift-shell splitting effects are compared with Van Allen Probe measurements.

  8. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Frank M.; Paoletti, M. S.; Swinney, Harry L.; Morrison, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux $\\left$ and total radiated power $P$ for two-dimensional internal gravity waves. Both $\\left$ and $P$ are determined from expressions involving only a scalar function, the stream function $\\psi$. We test the method using data from a direct numerical simulation for tidal flow of a stratified fluid past a knife edge. The results for the radiated internal wave power given by the stream function method...

  9. Department of Environmental and Radiation Transport Physics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicka, U.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: We deal with environmental physics and the radiation transport physics, both theoretically and experimentally. Some results find their way to practical applications. Our environmental physics research encompasses hydrogeological problems as well as measurements of trace elements in the atmosphere and in the water. Theoretical (analytical and numerical) and experimental issues of the radiation transport and radiation fields are our main field of research. The interest in radiation transport phenomena is stimulated by their importance for the environmental physics, industrial and nuclear facilities and methods of geophysical. Environmental isotopes and noble gases are used in the investigation of water-bearing geological formations in order to determine the origin and age of groundwater. The papers listed below and three ''Reports on research'' present recent achievements in this field. The gas chromatography methods are used for monitoring the anthropogenic trace gases (SF 6 and freons), which participate in the Earth green-house effect. A very high detection level of SF 6 in water, 0.0028 fg/cm 3 H 2 0, has been reached as required for hydrogeological purposes. A preliminary verification of the SF 6 tracer method for dating young groundwaters by the tritium method has been carried out. We carried on the work on a method of radon measurement in soil in connection with geological conditions. The national seminar ''Radon in Environment'' organized at the INP aroused an interest of Polish scientific centres in that field. The seminar gathered 60 participants who presented 24 oral reports and 8 posters. Within the scope of the radiation transport physics we studied thermal neutron transport in finite hydrogenous media. Advantages and limitations of a Monte Carlo code (MCNP) in thermal neutron transport simulations have been examined by both the analytical solution and the experiment on the INP pulsed neutron generator. An interesting contribution to the

  10. Radiation doses arising from the air transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelder, R.; Shaw, K.B.; Wilson, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    There is a compelling need for the transport of radioactive material by air because of the requirement by hospitals throughout the world for urgent delivery for medical purposes. Many countries have no radionuclide-producing capabilities and depend on imports: a range of such products is supplied from the United Kingdom. Many of these are short lived, which explains the need for urgent delivery. The only satisfactory method of delivery on a particular day to a particular destination is often by the use of scheduled passenger air service. The International Civil Aviation Organization's Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (ICAO 1987-1988), prescribe the detailed requirements applicable to the international transport of dangerous goods by air. Radioactive materials are required to be separated from persons and from undeveloped photographic films or plates: minimum distances as a function of the total sum of transport indexes are given in the Instructions. A study, which included the measurement and assessment of the radiation doses resulting from the transport of radioactive materials by air from the UK, has been performed by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) on behalf of the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and the Department of Transport (DTp)

  11. Nonlinear waves in reaction-diffusion systems: The effect of transport memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manne, K. K.; Hurd, A. J.; Kenkre, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    Motivated by the problem of determining stress distributions in granular materials, we study the effect of finite transport correlation times on the propagation of nonlinear wave fronts in reaction-diffusion systems. We obtain results such as the possibility of spatial oscillations in the wave-front shape for certain values of the system parameters and high enough wave-front speeds. We also generalize earlier known results concerning the minimum wave-front speed and shape-speed relationships stemming from the finiteness of the correlation times. Analytic investigations are made possible by a piecewise linear representation of the nonlinearity. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  12. Nonlinear waves in reaction-diffusion systems: The effect of transport memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, K. K.; Hurd, A. J.; Kenkre, V. M.

    2000-04-01

    Motivated by the problem of determining stress distributions in granular materials, we study the effect of finite transport correlation times on the propagation of nonlinear wave fronts in reaction-diffusion systems. We obtain results such as the possibility of spatial oscillations in the wave-front shape for certain values of the system parameters and high enough wave-front speeds. We also generalize earlier known results concerning the minimum wave-front speed and shape-speed relationships stemming from the finiteness of the correlation times. Analytic investigations are made possible by a piecewise linear representation of the nonlinearity.

  13. Directional Absorption of Parameterized Mountain Waves and Its Influence on the Wave Momentum Transport in the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Tang, Ying; Wang, Yuan; Xue, Ming

    2018-03-01

    The directional absorption of mountain waves in the Northern Hemisphere is assessed by examination of horizontal wind rotation using the 2.5° × 2.5° European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim reanalysis between 2011 and 2016. In the deep layer of troposphere and stratosphere, the horizontal wind rotates by more than 120° all over the Northern Hemisphere primary mountainous areas, with the rotation mainly occurring in the troposphere (stratosphere) of lower (middle to high) latitudes. The rotation of tropospheric wind increases markedly in summer over the Tibetan Plateau and Iranian Plateau, due to the influence of Asian summer monsoonal circulation. The influence of directional absorption of mountain waves on the mountain wave momentum transport is also studied using a new parameterization scheme of orographic gravity wave drag (OGWD) which accounts for the effect of directional wind shear. Owing to the directional absorption, the wave momentum flux is attenuated by more than 50% in the troposphere of lower latitudes, producing considerable orographic gravity wave lift which is normal to the mean wind. Compared with the OGWD produced in traditional schemes assuming a unidirectional wind profile, the OGWD in the new scheme is suppressed in the lower stratosphere but enhanced in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. This is because the directional absorption of mountain waves in the troposphere reduces the wave amplitude in the stratosphere. Consequently, mountain waves are prone to break at higher altitudes, which favors the production of stronger OGWD given the decrease of air density with height.

  14. Atmospheric transport, clouds and the Arctic longwave radiation paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlar, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Clouds interact with radiation, causing variations in the amount of electromagnetic energy reaching the Earth's surface, or escaping the climate system to space. While globally clouds lead to an overall cooling radiative effect at the surface, over the Arctic, where annual cloud fractions are high, the surface cloud radiative effect generally results in a warming. The additional energy input from absorption and re-emission of longwave radiation by the clouds to the surface can have a profound effect on the sea ice state. Anomalous atmospheric transport of heat and moisture into the Arctic, promoting cloud formation and enhancing surface longwave radiation anomalies, has been identified as an important mechanism in preconditioning Arctic sea ice for melt. Longwave radiation is emitted equally in all directions, and changes in the atmospheric infrared emission temperature and emissivity associated with advection of heat and moisture over the Arctic should correspondingly lead to an anomalous signal in longwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). To examine the role of atmospheric heat and moisture transport into the Arctic on TOA longwave radiation, infrared satellite sounder observations from AIRS during 2003-2014 are analyzed for summer (JJAS). Thermodynamic metrics are developed to identify months characterized by a high frequency of warm and moist advection into the Arctic, and segregate the 2003-14 time period into climatological and anomalously warm, moist summer months. We find that anomalously warm, moist months result in a significant TOA longwave radiative cooling, which is opposite the forcing signal that the surface experiences during these months. At the timescale of the advective events, 3-10 days, the TOA cooling can be as large as the net surface energy budget during summer. When averaged on the monthly time scale, and over the full Arctic basin (poleward of 75°N), summer months experiencing frequent warm, moist advection events are

  15. The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ferrari, Alfredo; Silari, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. In these codes, photon transport is simulated by using the detailed scheme, i.e., interaction by interaction. Detailed simulation is easy to implement, and the reliability of the results is only limited by the accuracy of the adopted cross sections. Simulations of electron and positron transport are more difficult, because these particles undergo a large number of interactions in the course of their slowing down. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interacti...

  16. Dynamics of Quasi-Electrostatic Whistler waves in Earth's Radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, R.; Sharma, R. P.; Gupta, D. N.

    2017-12-01

    A numerical model is proposed to study the dynamics of high amplitude quasi-electrostatic whistler waves propagating near resonance cone angle and their interaction with finite frequency kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in Earth's radiation belts. The quasi-electrostatic character of whistlers is narrated by dynamics of wave propagating near resonance cone. A high amplitude whistler wave packet is obtained using the present analysis which has also been observed by S/WAVES instrument onboard STEREO. The numerical simulation technique employed to study the dynamics, leads to localization (channelling) of waves as well as turbulent spectrum suggesting the transfer of wave energy over a range of frequencies. The turbulent spectrum also indicates the presence of quasi-electrostatic whistlers and density fluctuations associated with KAW in radiation belts plasma. The ponderomotive force of pump quasi-electrostatic whistlers (high frequency) is used to excite relatively much lower frequency waves (KAWs). The wave localization and steeper spectra could be responsible for particle energization or heating in radiation belts.

  17. Point vortex description of drift wave vortices: Dynamics and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, M.; Horton, W.

    1991-05-01

    Point-vortex description for drift wave vortices is formulated based on the Hasegawa-Mima equation to study elementary processes for the interactions of vortices as well as statistical properties like vortex diffusion. Dynamical properties of drift wave vortices known by numerical experiments are recovered. Furthermore a vortex diffusion model discussed by Horton based on numerical simulations is shown to be analytically obtained. A variety of phenomena arising from the short-range nature of the interaction force of point vortices are suggested. 12 refs., 10 figs

  18. Experimental modelling of wave amplification over irregular bathymetry for investigations of boulder transport by extreme wave events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Whittaker, Trevor; Cox, Ronadh; Elsäßer, Björn

    2017-04-01

    During the winter of 2013-2014 the west coast of Ireland was exposed to 6 storms over a period of 8 weeks with wind speeds equating to hurricane categories 3 and 4. During this period, the largest significant wave height recorded at the Marine Institute M6 wave buoy, approximately 300km from the site, was 13.6m (on 26th January 2014). However, this may not be the largest sea state of that winter, because the buoy stopped logging on 30th January and therefore failed to capture the full winter period. During the February 12th 2014 "Darwin" storm, the Kinsale Energy Gas Platform off Ireland's south coast measured a wave height of 25 m, which remains the highest wave measured off Ireland's coasts[1]. Following these storms, significant dislocation and transportation of boulders and megagravel was observed on the Aran Islands, Co. Galway at elevations of up to 25m above the high water mark and distances up to 220 m inland including numerous clasts with masses >50t, and at least one megagravel block weighing >500t [2]. Clast movements of this magnitude would not have been predicted from the measured wave heights. This highlights a significant gap in our understanding of the relationships between storms and the coastal environment: how are storm waves amplified and modified by interactions with bathymetry? To gain further understanding of wave amplification, especially over steep and irregular bathymetry, we have designed Froude-scaled wave tank experiments using the 3D coastal wave basin facility at Queen's University Belfast. The basin is 18m long by 16m wide with wave generation by means of a 12m wide bank of 24 top hinged, force feedback, sector carrier wave paddles at one end. The basin is equipped with gravel beaches to dissipate wave energy on the remaining three sides, capable of absorbing up to 99% of the incident wave energy, to prevent unwanted reflections. Representative bathymetry for the Aran Islands is modelled in the basin based on a high resolution

  19. Radioactive materials' transportation main routes in Brazil. Radiation protection aspects about radioactive materials transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Solange dos Reis e; Andrade, Fernando de Menezes; Aleixo, Luiz Claudio Martins

    2007-01-01

    The heavy transportation in Brazil is generally done by highways. The radioactive material transportation follow this same rule. Whenever a radioactive material is carried by the road, by the sea or by the air, in some cases, a kind of combination of those transportation ways, the transport manager has to create a Transportation Plan and submit it to CNEN. Only after CNEN's approval, the transportation can be done. The plan must have the main action on Radiation Protection, giving responsibilities and showing all the directing that will be take. Although, the Brazilian's highways are not in good conditions, one could say that some of them are not good enough for any kind of transportation. But we are facing radioactive material use increase but the hospitals and industries, that the reason it's much more common that kind of transportation nowadays. So, because of that, a special attention by the governments must be provide to those activities. This paper goal is to show the real conditions of some important highways in Brazil in a radioactive protection's perspective and give some suggestions to adjust some of those roads to this new reality. (author)

  20. Electron-temperature-gradient-driven drift waves and anomalous electron energy transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.; Murtaza, G.; Weiland, J.

    1990-01-01

    By means of a kinetic description for ions and Braginskii's fluid model for electrons, three coupled nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of low-frequency short-wavelength electrostatic waves in the presence of equilibrium density temperature and magnetic-field gradients in a two-component magnetized plasma are derived. In the linear limit a dispersion relation that admits new instabilities of drift waves is presented. An estimate of the anomalous electron energy transport due to non-thermal drift waves is obtained by making use of the saturated wave potential, which is deduced from the mixing-length hypothesis. Stationary solutions of the nonlinear equations governing the interaction of linearly unstable drift waves are also presented. The relevance of this investigation to wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas is pointed out. (author)

  1. Anomalous transport of magnetized electrons interacting with EC waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsironis, C; Vlahos, L [Section of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2005-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear interaction of magnetized electrons with an oblique narrow-band electromagnetic wave-packet. The interaction is analysed over and near the local threshold to chaos. The statistical character of the forcing that controls the trajectories of the particles is also studied. We focus our analysis on issues related to energy and spatial diffusion across the magnetic field by following the evolution of the ensemble mean squares (({gamma} - {gamma}{sub 0}){sup 2}) and ((r{sub perpendicular}-r{sub perpendicular0}){sup 2}) for various values of the wave amplitude and angle of wave propagation. We study, in particular, the interaction of magnetized electrons with waves having strong and moderate amplitudes, near the transition to chaos, where the dynamics is complex and a mixture of periodic and stochastic orbits coexist. The electron diffusions in real and energy spaces are found to obey simple power laws in time, and the scaling exponents are indicative of sub-diffusion. This is a direct consequence of the effect of the resonant phase-space islands in the particle motion.

  2. Waves, Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport Modeling at Grays Harbor, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    advertising , publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such...mono- chromatic and irregular or random waves moving from deep to shallow waters over varying bathymetry (Nwogu and Demirbilek 2001; Demirbilek and

  3. Emergence of traveling density waves in cyclic multiparticle transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kannellopoulos, G.; van der Meer, Roger M.; van der Weele, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Multiparticle flow through a cyclic array of connected compartments with a preferential direction is found to be able to organize itself in traveling waves. This behavior is connected with the transition between uniform flow and cluster formation. When the bias in the system is large, the particles

  4. Flow and sediment transport induced by a plunging solitary wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Sen, M.Berke; Karagali, Ioanna

    2011-01-01

    Two parallel experiments involving the evolution and runup of plunging solitary waves on a sloping bed were conducted: (1) a rigid-bed experiment, allowing direct (hot film) measurements of bed shear stresses, and (2) a sediment-bed experiment, allowing for the measurement of pore-water pressures...

  5. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang

    -Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron......-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system....

  6. Wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth and associated radiative impacts over the central Himalayan region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Kumar, K.  Niranjan; Reddy, Kishore; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Newsom, Rob K.; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-10-01

    Doppler Lidar and Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) observations are utilized to show wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth (AOD) during daytime boundary layer evolution over the Himalayan region. Fourier analysis depicted 60–80 min periods dominant during afternoon hours, implying that observed modulations could be plausible reason for the AOD forenoon–afternoon asymmetry which was previously reported. Inclusion of wave amplitude in diurnal variation of aerosol radiative forcing estimates showed ~40% additional warming in the atmosphere relative to mean AOD. The present observations emphasize the importance of wave induced variations in AOD and radiation budget over the site.

  7. Effect of a gravitational wave on electromagnetic radiation confined in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourrenc, P.

    1978-01-01

    Gravitational radiation is considered within the first-order approximation. A pattern of an electromagnetic cavity is studied: Gravitational waves give rise to a deformation of the planes limiting the cavity. This deformation alters the electromagnetic radiation. Several cases are studied and orders of magnitude are put forward. (author)

  8. Anomalous transport due to shear-Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Chance, M.S.; Okuda, H.

    1980-10-01

    The behavior of shear-Alfven eigenmodes and the accompanied anomalous transport have been investigated. In the particle simulation, equilibrium thermal fluctuations associated with the eigenmodes have been observed to nullify the zeroth-order shear near the rational surface through the induced second-order eddy current, and, in turn, give rise to the formation of magnetic islands which cause rapid electron energy transport in the region. The theoretical verification of the observed behavior is discussed

  9. Millimeter-wave radiation from a Teflon dielectric probe and its imaging application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Eiji; Sakai, Shigeki

    2008-01-01

    The beam profile of a millimeter wave radiated from the tip of a Teflon dielectric probe was characterized experimentally by using a three-dimensional scanning dielectric probe and numerically by using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The measured intensity distribution and polarization of the millimeter wave radiated from the tip of the probe was in good agreement with those of the FDTD simulation. A reflection type of a millimeter- wave imaging system using this dielectric probe was constructed. The resolution of the imaging system was as small as 1 mm, which was slightly smaller than a half wavelength, 1.6 mm, of the radiation wave. Translucent measurement of a commercially manufactured IC card which consists of an IC chip and a leaf-shaped antenna coil was demonstrated. Not only the internal two-dimensional structures but also the vertical information of the card could be provided

  10. Radiation safety of crew and passengers of air transportation in civil aviation. Provisional standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, A. F.; Burnazyan, A. I.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose and application of the provisional standards for radiation safety of crew and passengers in civil aviation are given. The radiation effect of cosmic radiation in flight on civil aviation air transport is described. Standard levels of radiation and conditions of radiation safety are discussed.

  11. Estimated routine radiation doses to transportation workers in alternative spent-fuel transportation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Smith, R.I.; Daling, P.M.; Ross, W.A.; McNair, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    The federal system for the management of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste includes the acceptance by the US Department of Energy (DOE) of the spent fuel or waste loaded in casks at the reactor or other waste generators, its transportation to a repository, and its handling and final emplacement in the repository. The DOE plans to implement a transportation system that is safe, secure, efficient, and cost-effective and will meet applicable regulatory safety and security requirements. The DOE commissioned the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to develop estimates of the routine radiation doses that would result from the operation of a system postulated using current designs and practices. From that evaluation, PNL identified activities/operations that result in the higher fraction of doses, proposed conceptual alternatives that would effectively reduce such exposures, and evaluated the cost-effectiveness of such alternatives. The study is one of a series used in making overall system design and operational decisions in the development of the DOE's spent-fuel/high-level waste transportation system. This paper contains the highlights from the PNL study of the estimated radiation doses to the transportation workers in a postulated reference transportation system and potential alternatives to that system

  12. Two-wave generator of subnanosecond radiation pulses on an yttrium-aluminium garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babikov, Yu.I.; Ir, K.S.; Mironov, V.E.

    1988-01-01

    Great attention is paid to the electron accelerator based on the mechanism of electron accelerator in the field of plasma wave, excited by laser radiation. The laser system master generator based on serial LTIPC-8 laser is described. The system is intended for investigating the plasma excitation processes initiated by two-frequency laser radiation beats. Pulse duration is ≤1 ns at 3-4 pulse train. Radiation on 1.0615 and 1.0641 μm wave length is generated. 5 refs.; 3 figs

  13. Parametrically tunable soliton-induced resonant radiation by three-wave mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Binbin; Liu, Xing; Guo, Hairun

    2017-01-01

    We show that a temporal soliton can induce resonant radiation by three-wave mixing nonlinearities. This constitutes a new class of resonant radiation whose spectral positions are parametrically tunable. The experimental verification is done in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, where...... a femtosecond near-IR soliton is excited and resonant radiation waves are observed exactly at the calculated soliton phasematching wavelengths via the sum- and difference-frequency generation nonlinearities. This extends the supercontinuum bandwidth well into the mid IR to span 550–5000 nm, and the mid-IR edge...

  14. Effects of Rubber Loading on the Ultrasonic Backward Radiation Profile of Leaky Lamb Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin; Jung, Min Ho; Kim, Young H.; Kwon, Sung Duk

    2002-01-01

    The characterization of adhesive property in multi-layer materials has been hot issue for a long time. In order to evaluate adhesive properties, we constructed fully automated system for the backward radiation of leaky Lamb wave. The backward radiation profiles were obtained for the bare steel plate and plates with rubber-loading. The rf waveforms and frequency spectra of backward radiation show the characteristics of involved leaky Lamb wave modes. As the thickness of rubber-loading increased, the amplitude of profile at the incident angle of 13.4' exponentially decreased. Scanning the incident position over the partially rubber-loaded specimen shows good agreement with the actual rubber-loading. The backward radiation of leaky Lamb wave has great potential to evaluate the adhesive condition as well as material properties of plates

  15. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munroe, James R., E-mail: jmunroe@mun.ca [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland A1B 3X7 (Canada); Sutherland, Bruce R., E-mail: bsuther@ualberta.ca [Departments of Physics and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  16. grmonty: A MONTE CARLO CODE FOR RELATIVISTIC RADIATIVE TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Gammie, Charles F.; Leung, Po Kin; Moscibrodzka, Monika

    2009-01-01

    We describe a Monte Carlo radiative transport code intended for calculating spectra of hot, optically thin plasmas in full general relativity. The version we describe here is designed to model hot accretion flows in the Kerr metric and therefore incorporates synchrotron emission and absorption, and Compton scattering. The code can be readily generalized, however, to account for other radiative processes and an arbitrary spacetime. We describe a suite of test problems, and demonstrate the expected N -1/2 convergence rate, where N is the number of Monte Carlo samples. Finally, we illustrate the capabilities of the code with a model calculation, a spectrum of the slowly accreting black hole Sgr A* based on data provided by a numerical general relativistic MHD model of the accreting plasma.

  17. A FORMALISM FOR COVARIANT POLARIZED RADIATIVE TRANSPORT BY RAY TRACING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammie, Charles F.; Leung, Po Kin

    2012-01-01

    We write down a covariant formalism for polarized radiative transfer appropriate for ray tracing through a turbulent plasma. The polarized radiation field is represented by the polarization tensor (coherency matrix) N αβ ≡ (a α k a* β k ), where a k is a Fourier coefficient for the vector potential. Using Maxwell's equations, the Liouville-Vlasov equation, and the WKB approximation, we show that the transport equation in vacuo is k μ ∇ μ N αβ = 0. We show that this is equivalent to Broderick and Blandford's formalism based on invariant Stokes parameters and a rotation coefficient, and suggest a modification that may reduce truncation error in some situations. Finally, we write down several alternative approaches to integrating the transfer equation.

  18. Radiation transport in high-level waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakali, V.S.; Barnes, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The waste form selected for vitrifying high-level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at West Valley, NY is borosilicate glass. The maximum radiation level at the surface of a canister filled with the high-level waste form is prescribed by repository design criteria for handling and disposition of the vitrified waste. This paper presents an evaluation of the radiation transport characteristics for the vitreous waste form expected to be produced at West Valley and the resulting neutron and gamma dose rates. The maximum gamma and neutron dose rates are estimated to be less than 7500 R/h and 10 mRem/h respectively at the surface of a West Valley canister filled with borosilicate waste glass

  19. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Ralph G.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    Computational modeling of radiation transport problems including homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety all depend upon material definitions. This document has been created to serve two purposes: (1) to provide a quick reference of material compositions for analysts and (2) a standardized reference to reduce the differences between results from two independent analysts. Analysts are always encountering a variety of materials for which elemental definitions are not readily available or densities are not defined. This document provides a location where unique or hard to define materials will be located to reduce duplication in research for modeling purposes. Additionally, having a common set of material definitions helps to standardize modeling across PNNL and provide two separate researchers the ability to compare different modeling results from a common materials basis.

  20. Radiation, waves, fields. Causes and effects on environment and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitgeb, N.

    1990-01-01

    The book discusses static electricity, alternating electric fields, magnetostatic fields, alternating magnetic fields, electromagnetic radiation, optical and ionizing radiation and their hazards and health effects. Each chapter presents basic physical and biological concepts and describes the common radiation sources and their biological effects. Each chapter also contains hints for everyday behaviour as well as in-depth information an specific scientific approaches for assessing biological effects; the latter are addressed to all expert readers working in these fields. There is a special chapter on the problem of so-called 'terrestrial radiation'. (orig.) With 88 figs., 31 tabs [de

  1. Radiation transport methods for nuclear log assessment - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badruzzaman, A.

    1996-01-01

    Methods of radiation transport have been applied to well-logging problems with nuclear sources since the early 1960s. Nuclear sondes are used in identifying rock compositions and fluid properties in reservoirs to predict the porosity and oil saturation. Early computational effort in nuclear logging used diffusion techniques. As computers became more powerful, deterministic transport methods and, finally, Monte Carlo methods were applied to solve these problems in three dimensions. Recently, the application has been extended to problems with a new generation of devices, including spectroscopic sondes that measure such quantities as the carbon/oxygen ratio to predict oil saturation and logging-while-drilling (LWD) sondes that take neutron and gamma measurements as they rotate in the borehole. These measurements present conditions that will be difficult to calibrate in the laboratory

  2. Transport methods: general. 1. The Analytical Monte Carlo Method for Radiation Transport Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, William R.; Brown, Forrest B.

    2001-01-01

    We present an alternative Monte Carlo method for solving the coupled equations of radiation transport and material energy. This method is based on incorporating the analytical solution to the material energy equation directly into the Monte Carlo simulation for the radiation intensity. This method, which we call the Analytical Monte Carlo (AMC) method, differs from the well known Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) method of Fleck and Cummings because there is no discretization of the material energy equation since it is solved as a by-product of the Monte Carlo simulation of the transport equation. Our method also differs from the method recently proposed by Ahrens and Larsen since they use Monte Carlo to solve both equations, while we are solving only the radiation transport equation with Monte Carlo, albeit with effective sources and cross sections to represent the emission sources. Our method bears some similarity to a method developed and implemented by Carter and Forest nearly three decades ago, but there are substantive differences. We have implemented our method in a simple zero-dimensional Monte Carlo code to test the feasibility of the method, and the preliminary results are very promising, justifying further extension to more realistic geometries. (authors)

  3. Phase Aberration and Attenuation Effects on Acoustic Radiation Force-Based Shear Wave Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascal, Carolina Amador; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-02-01

    Elasticity is measured by shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) methods using acoustic radiation force to create the shear waves. Phase aberration and tissue attenuation can hamper the generation of shear waves for in vivo applications. In this study, the effects of phase aberration and attenuation in ultrasound focusing for creating shear waves were explored. This includes the effects of phase shifts and amplitude attenuation on shear wave characteristics such as shear wave amplitude, shear wave speed, shear wave center frequency, and bandwidth. Two samples of swine belly tissue were used to create phase aberration and attenuation experimentally. To explore the phase aberration and attenuation effects individually, tissue experiments were complemented with ultrasound beam simulations using fast object-oriented C++ ultrasound simulator (FOCUS) and shear wave simulations using finite-element-model (FEM) analysis. The ultrasound frequency used to generate shear waves was varied from 3.0 to 4.5 MHz. Results: The measured acoustic pressure and resulting shear wave amplitude decreased approximately 40%-90% with the introduction of the tissue samples. Acoustic intensity and shear wave displacement were correlated for both tissue samples, and the resulting Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.99 and 0.97. Analysis of shear wave generation with tissue samples (phase aberration and attenuation case), measured phase screen, (only phase aberration case), and FOCUS/FEM model (only attenuation case) showed that tissue attenuation affected the shear wave generation more than tissue aberration. Decreasing the ultrasound frequency helped maintain a focused beam for creation of shear waves in the presence of both phase aberration and attenuation.

  4. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION MODEL OF ENERGETIC PROTON TRANSPORT THROUGH SELF-GENERATED ALFVEN WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasiev, A.; Vainio, R., E-mail: alexandr.afanasiev@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-08-15

    A new Monte Carlo simulation model for the transport of energetic protons through self-generated Alfven waves is presented. The key point of the model is that, unlike the previous ones, it employs the full form (i.e., includes the dependence on the pitch-angle cosine) of the resonance condition governing the scattering of particles off Alfven waves-the process that approximates the wave-particle interactions in the framework of quasilinear theory. This allows us to model the wave-particle interactions in weak turbulence more adequately, in particular, to implement anisotropic particle scattering instead of isotropic scattering, which the previous Monte Carlo models were based on. The developed model is applied to study the transport of flare-accelerated protons in an open magnetic flux tube. Simulation results for the transport of monoenergetic protons through the spectrum of Alfven waves reveal that the anisotropic scattering leads to spatially more distributed wave growth than isotropic scattering. This result can have important implications for diffusive shock acceleration, e.g., affect the scattering mean free path of the accelerated particles in and the size of the foreshock region.

  5. Discussion of and guidance on the optimization of radiation protection in the transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The document provides guidance on one of the components of the system of dose limitation as it applies to the transport of radioactive material, namely the optimization of radiation protection. It focuses on the following parts of the transport system: design, maintenance, preparation for transport, transport, storage-in-transit and handling and it considers occupational and public exposures. The application is intended mainly for those transport situations within the regulatory requirements where potential radiation exposures could be beneficially reduced

  6. Radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive material. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on meeting the requirements for the establishment of radiation protection programmes (RPPs) for the transport of radioactive material, to optimize radiation protection in order to meet the requirements for radiation protection that underlie the Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. This Guide covers general aspects of meeting the requirements for radiation protection, but does not cover criticality safety or other possible hazardous properties of radioactive material. The annexes of this Guide include examples of RPPs, relevant excerpts from the Transport Regulations, examples of total dose per transport index handled, a checklist for road transport, specific segregation distances and emergency instructions for vehicle operators

  7. Plasma Turbulence Suppression and Transport Barrier Formation by Externally Driven RF Waves in Spherical Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruma, C.; Cuperman, S.C.; Komoshvili, K.

    2002-01-01

    Turbulent transport of heat and particles is the principle obstacle confronting controlled fusion today. Thus, we investigate quantitatively the suppression of turbulence and formation of transport barriers in spherical tokamaks by sheared electric fields generated by externally driven radio-frequency (RF) waves, in the frequency range o)A n o] < o)ci (e)A and o)ci are the Alfven and ion cyclotron frequencies). This investigation consists of the solution of the full-wave equation for a spherical tokamak in the presence of externally driven fast waves and the evaluation of the power dissipation by the mode-converted Alfven waves. This in turn, provides a radial flow shear responsible for the suppression of plasma turbulence. Thus, a strongly non-linear equation for the radial sheared electric field is solved, the turbulent transport suppression rate is evaluated and compared with the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability increment. For illustration, the case of START-like device (Sykes 2000) is treated. Thus, (i) the exact D-shape cross-section is considered; (ii) additional kinetic (including Landau damping) and particle trapping effects are added to the resistive two-fluid dielectric tensor operator; (iii) a finite extension antenna located on the low-field-side of the plasma is considered; (iv) a rigorous 2.5 finite elements numerical code (Sewell 1993) is used; and (v) the turbulence and transport barrier generated as a result of wave-plasma interaction is evaluated

  8. Charge transport in junctions between d-wave superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barash, Y.S.; Galaktionov, A.V.; Zaikin, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    We develop a microscopic analysis of superconducting and dissipative currents in junctions between superconductors with d-wave symmetry of the order parameter. We study the proximity effect in such superconductors and show that for certain crystal orientations the superconducting order parameter can be essentially suppressed in the vicinity of a nontransparent specularly reflecting boundary. This effect strongly influences the value and the angular dependence of the dc Josephson current j S . At T∼T c it leads to a crossover between j S ∝T c -T and j S ∝(T c -T) 2 respectively for homogeneous and nonhomogeneous distribution of the order parameter in the vicinity of a tunnel junction. We show that at low temperatures the current-phase relation j S (cphi) for superconductor--normal-metal--superconductor junctions and short weak links between d-wave superconductors is essentially nonharmonic and contains a discontinuity at cphi=0. This leads to further interesting features of such systems which can be used for pairing symmetry tests in high-temperature superconductors (HTSC). We also investigated the low-temperature I-V curves of normal-metal--superconductor and superconductor-superconductor tunnel junctions and demonstrated that depending on the junction type and crystal orientation these curves show zero-bias anomalies I∝V 2 , I∝V 2 ln(1/V), and I∝V 3 caused by the gapless behavior of the order parameter in d-wave superconductors. Many of our results agree well with recent experimental findings for HTSC compounds

  9. Radiation of planar electromagnetic waves by a line source in anisotropic metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Qiang; Jiang Weixiang; Cui Tiejun

    2010-01-01

    We show experimentally that a line source in an anisotropic metamaterial directly radiates planar electromagnetic waves instead of cylindrical waves, when one component of the permeability tensor approaches zero. The impedance of this material can be perfectly matched to that of free space, which can significantly reduce the reflections between the source and the superstrate, as in traditional highly directive antennas based on zero index metamaterials. Such a unique property determines the two-way propagation of electromagnetic waves excited by a line source, instead of all-way propagation. From this feature, a highly directive emission of electromagnetic waves is achieved using the anisotropic metamaterial with arbitrary shape. We have designed and fabricated the anisotropic metamaterial in the microwave region, and observed the generation of plane waves and their highly directive emission. The proposed plane-wave emission is independent of the shape variance of the anisotropic metamaterial, which can be utilized in the design of conformal antennas.

  10. Multiscaling Dynamics of Impurity Transport in Drift-Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatani, S.; Benkadda, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Kondo, K.

    2008-01-01

    Intermittency effects and the associated multiscaling spectrum of exponents are investigated for impurities advection in tokamak edge plasmas. The two-dimensional Hasagawa-Wakatani model of resistive drift-wave turbulence is used as a paradigm to describe edge tokamak turbulence. Impurities are considered as a passive scalar advected by the plasma turbulent flow. The use of the extended self-similarity technique shows that the structure function relative scaling exponent of impurity density and vorticity follows the She-Leveque model. This confirms the intermittent character of the impurities advection in the turbulent plasma flow and suggests that impurities are advected by vorticity filaments

  11. Possible effects of drift wave turbulence on magnetic structure and plasma transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    1977-07-01

    A new mechanism is proposed by which low level, drift wave type fluctuations, such as those observed in the ATC and TFR experiments, can cause anomalous radial electron heat transport in tokamaks. The model is based on the fact that since transport processes parallel to the magnetic field are many orders of magnitude more rapid than perpendicular ones, very small helically resonant magnetic perturbations that cause field lines to move radially allow the parallel transport process to contribute to radial electron heat transport. It is hypothesized that the small magnetic perturbations accompanying drift waves at any nonzero plasma β are large enough to produce significant effects in present tokamak experiments. The helical magnetic component of drift waves produces magnetic island structures whose spatial widths can easily exceed the ion gyroradius. In a drift wave oscillation period, electrons circumnavigate a magnetic island, whereas the slower moving ions see only a tilt of the magnetic field lines. Thus, electrons try to diffuse radially more rapidly than ions; however, a radialpotential builds up on a very short time scale to confine the electrons electrostatically and thereby keep the particle diffusion ambipolar. Nonetheless, this parallel electron diffusion process does cause net radial electron heat conduction through an ensemble of closely packed island structures. The heat conduction coefficient is estimated. Other effects that these magnetic flutters may have on plasma transport and runaway electron processes are also discussed

  12. Study of Radiation Shielding Analysis for Low-Intermediate Level Waste Transport Ship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dohyung; Lee, Unjang; Song, Yangsoo; Kim, Sukhoon; Ko, Jaehoon [Korea Nuclear Engineering and Service Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In Korea, it is planed to transport Low-Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (LILW) from each nuclear power plant site to Kyongju LILW repository after 2009. Transport through the sea using ship is one of the most prospective ways of LILW transport for current situation in Korea. There are domestic and international regulations for radiation dose limit for radioactive material transport. In this article, radiation shielding analysis for LILW transport ship is performed using 3-D computer simulation code, MCNP. As a result, the thickness and materials for radiation shielding walls next to cargo in the LILW transport ship are determined.

  13. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

    2011-03-04

    Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library

  14. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth’s radiation belts uncovers a missing energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A.V.; Agapitov, O.V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V.V.; Mozer, F.S.

    2015-01-01

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth’s magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth’s magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave–particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth’s radiation belts, controlled by solar activity. PMID:25975615

  15. Global aerosol transport and consequences for the radiation budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newiger, M.; Grassl, H.; Schussel, P.; Rehkopf, J.

    1984-01-01

    Man's activities may influence global climate by changing the atmospheric composition and surface characteristics and by waste heat. Most prominent within this discussion is the increase or decrease of radiatively active trace gases like CO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/O, O/sub 3/, and others. The general opinion is converging towards a greenhouse effect as a combined action of all trace gases, whose exact magnitude is uncertain mainly because of the unknown reaction of water cycle. The aim of our global 2-D (resolving latitude and height) aerosol transport model is the calculation of aerosol particle number density profiles as a function of latitude for present natural plus anthropogenic emissions. The aerosol transport model uses prescribed meridonal circulation, diffusivity factors and cloud climatology for January as well as July. All these latitude and height dependent input parameters were taken from well known sources. The fixed climatology excludes the feedback of aerosol particle parameter changes on mean circulation. However, the radiative parameters of six clouds types are modified, although they possess by adoption of the Telegadas and London (1954) cloud climatology prescribed amount and height. The inclusion of the feedback on mean circulation seems premature at present. Adding particles either accounting for natural emissions or natural anthropogenic emission and removing particles by all known sinks outside and within clouds gives us - for the stationary state - vertical profiles of aerosol number density in three sizes classes as a function of latitude. These profiles in turn are input for radiation flux calculations in clear and cloudy areas in order to assess net flux changes caused by the present aerosol load in comparison to a scenario without anthropogenic emissions. The net flux changes finally are compared to those calculated for increased CO/sub 2/ levels

  16. Military jet pilots have higher p-wave dispersions compared to the transport aircraft aircrew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Çakar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: For the purpose of flight safety military aircrew must be healthy. P-wave dispersion (PWD is the p-wave length difference in an electrocardiographic (ECG examination and represents the risk of developing atrial fibrillation. In the study we aimed at investigating PWD in healthy military aircrew who reported for periodical examinations. Material and Methods: Seventy-five asymptomatic military aircrew were enrolled in the study. All the subjects underwent physical, radiologic and biochemical examinations, and a 12-lead electrocardiography. P-wave dispersions were calculated. Results: The mean age of the study participants was 36.15±8.97 years and the mean p-wave duration was 100.8±12 ms in the whole group. Forty-seven subjects were non-pilot aircrew, and 28 were pilots. Thirteen study subjects were serving in jets, 49 in helicopters, and 13 were transport aircraft pilots. Thirty-six of the helicopter and 11 of the transport aircraft aircrew were non-pilot aircrew. P-wave dispersion was the lowest in the transport aircraft aircrew, and the highest in jet pilots. P-wave dispersions were similar in the pilots and non-pilot aircrew. Twenty-three study subjects were overweight, 19 had thyroiditis, 26 had hepatosteatosis, 4 had hyperbilirubinemia, 2 had hypertension, and 5 had hyperlipidemia. The PWD was significantly associated with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH levels. Serum uric acid levels were associated with p-wave durations. Serum TSH levels were the most important predictor of PWD. Conclusions: When TSH levels were associated with PWD, uric acid levels were associated with p-wave duration in the military aircrew. The jet pilots had higher PWDs. These findings reveal that military jet pilots may have a higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation, and PWD should be recorded during periodical examinations.

  17. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Hao, Yan-Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  18. Radiation of Sawtooth Waves from the End of an Open Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaitis, Rachael; Bodon, Josh; Gee, Kent; Thomas, Derek

    2012-10-01

    It is known, that because of nonlinear propagation distortion, a sinusoidal wave is transformed into a sawtooth-like wave as it travels through a pipe. It has been observed that the sawtooth wave, when measured immediately after it exits a pipe, has a form similar to a delta function. Currently this behavior is not understood, but has potential application to radiation of sound from brass instruments and rocket motors. Building on previous work in the 1970s by Blackstock and Wright, the purpose of the current research is to better understand the radiation of sawtooth waves from the open end of a circular pipe. Nonlinear propagation theory, the experimental apparatus and considerations, and some preliminary results are described.

  19. Implementation of the vortex force formalism in the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system for inner shelf and surf zone applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nirnimesh; Voulgaris, George; Warner, John C.; Olabarrieta, Maitane

    2012-01-01

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport modeling system (COAWST) enables simulations that integrate oceanic, atmospheric, wave and morphological processes in the coastal ocean. Within the modeling system, the three-dimensional ocean circulation module (ROMS) is coupled with the wave generation and propagation model (SWAN) to allow full integration of the effect of waves on circulation and vice versa. The existing wave-current coupling component utilizes a depth dependent radiation stress approach. In here we present a new approach that uses the vortex force formalism. The formulation adopted and the various parameterizations used in the model as well as their numerical implementation are presented in detail. The performance of the new system is examined through the presentation of four test cases. These include obliquely incident waves on a synthetic planar beach and a natural barred beach (DUCK' 94); normal incident waves on a nearshore barred morphology with rip channels; and wave-induced mean flows outside the surf zone at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO).

  20. Extremely frequency-widened terahertz wave generation using Cherenkov-type radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suizu, Koji; Koketsu, Kaoru; Shibuya, Takayuki; Tsutsui, Toshihiro; Akiba, Takuya; Kawase, Kodo

    2009-04-13

    Terahertz (THz) wave generation based on nonlinear frequency conversion is promising way for realizing a tunable monochromatic bright THz-wave source. Such a development of efficient and wide tunable THz-wave source depends on discovery of novel brilliant nonlinear crystal. Important factors of a nonlinear crystal for THz-wave generation are, 1. High nonlinearity and 2. Good transparency at THz frequency region. Unfortunately, many nonlinear crystals have strong absorption at THz frequency region. The fact limits efficient and wide tunable THz-wave generation. Here, we show that Cherenkov radiation with waveguide structure is an effective strategy for achieving efficient and extremely wide tunable THz-wave source. We fabricated MgO-doped lithium niobate slab waveguide with 3.8 microm of thickness and demonstrated difference frequency generation of THz-wave generation with Cherenkov phase matching. Extremely frequency-widened THz-wave generation, from 0.1 to 7.2 THz, without no structural dips successfully obtained. The tuning frequency range of waveguided Cherenkov radiation source was extremely widened compare to that of injection seeded-Terahertz Parametric Generator. The tuning range obtained in this work for THz-wave generation using lithium niobate crystal was the widest value in our knowledge. The highest THz-wave energy obtained was about 3.2 pJ, and the energy conversion efficiency was about 10(-5) %. The method can be easily applied for many conventional nonlinear crystals, results in realizing simple, reasonable, compact, high efficient and ultra broad band THz-wave sources.

  1. Atomic collisions in the presence of laser radiation - Time dependence and the asymptotic wave function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    A time-dependent, wave-packet description of atomic collisions in the presence of laser radiation is extracted from the more conventional time-independent, stationary-state description. This approach resolves certain difficulties of interpretation in the time-independent approach which arise in the case of asymptotic near resonance. In the two-state model investigated, the approach predicts the existence of three spherically scattered waves in this asymptotically near-resonant case.

  2. Numerical simulations for radiation hydrodynamics. 2: Transport limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, W.W.; Woodward, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    A finite difference scheme is proposed for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical equations in the transport limit. The scheme is of Godunov-type, in which the set of time-averaged flux needed in the scheme is calculated through Riemann problems solved. In the scheme, flow signals are explicitly treated, while radiation signals are implicitly treated. Flow fields and radiation fields are updated simultaneously. An iterative approach is proposed to solve the set of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the implicitness of the scheme. The sweeping method used in the scheme significantly reduces the number of iterations or computer CPU time needed. A new approach to further accelerate the convergence is proposed, which further reduces the number of iterations needed by more than one order. No matter how many cells radiation signals propagate in one time step, only an extremely small number of iterations are needed in the scheme, and each iteration costs only about 0.8% of computer CPU time which is needed for one time step of a second order accurate and fully explicit scheme. Two-dimensional problems are treated through a dimensionally split technique. Therefore, iterations for solving the set of algebraic equations are carried out only in each one-dimensional sweep. Through numerical examples it is shown that the scheme keeps the principle advantages of Godunov schemes for flow motion. In the time scale of flow motion numerical results are the same as those obtained from a second order accurate and fully explicit scheme. The acceleration of the convergence proposed in this paper may be directly applied to other hyperbolic systems. This study is important for laser fusion and astrophysics

  3. Application of multi-parameter chorus and plasmaspheric hiss wave models in radiation belt modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, H.; Kang, S. B.; Balikhin, M. A.; Fok, M. C. H.; Agapitov, O. V.; Komar, C. M.; Kanekal, S. G.; Nagai, T.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Numerical simulation studies of the Earth's radiation belts are important to understand the acceleration and loss of energetic electrons. The Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (CIMI) model along with many other radiation belt models require inputs for pitch angle, energy, and cross diffusion of electrons, due to chorus and plasmaspheric hiss waves. These parameters are calculated using statistical wave distribution models of chorus and plasmaspheric hiss amplitudes. In this study we incorporate recently developed multi-parameter chorus and plasmaspheric hiss wave models based on geomagnetic index and solar wind parameters. We perform CIMI simulations for two geomagnetic storms and compare the flux enhancement of MeV electrons with data from the Van Allen Probes and Akebono satellites. We show that the relativistic electron fluxes calculated with multi-parameter wave models resembles the observations more accurately than the relativistic electron fluxes calculated with single-parameter wave models. This indicates that wave models based on a combination of geomagnetic index and solar wind parameters are more effective as inputs to radiation belt models.

  4. On the relativistic transport equation for a discontinuity wave of multiplicity one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambo, Sebastiano; Palumbo, Annunziata

    1980-01-01

    In the framework of the theory of the singular hypersurfaces, the transport equation for the amplitude of a discontinuity wave, corresponding to a simple characteristic of a quasi-linear hyperbolic system, is established in the context of special relativity [fr

  5. Nonadiabaticity and single-electron transport driven by surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensberg, Karsten; Niu, Q.; Pustilnik, M.

    1999-01-01

    Single-electron transport driven by surface acoustic waves (SAW) through a narrow constriction, formed in a two-dimensional electron gas, is studied theoretically. Due to long-range Coulomb interaction, the tunneling coupling between the electron gas and the moving minimum of the SAW...

  6. Scattering of lower-hybrid waves by drift-wave density fluctuations: solutions of the radiative transfer equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, P.L.; Perkins, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    The investigation of the scattering of lower-hybrid waves by density fluctuations arising from drift waves in tokamaks is distinguished by the presence in the wave equation of a large, random, derivative-coupling term. The propagation of the lower-hybrid waves is well represented by a radiative transfer equation when the scale size of the density fluctuations is small compared to the overall plasma size. The radiative transfer equation is solved in two limits: first, the forward scattering limit, where the scale size of density fluctuations is large compared to the lower-hybrid perpendicular wavelength, and second, the large-angle scattering limit, where this inequality is reversed. The most important features of these solutions are well represented by analytical formulas derived by simple arguments. Based on conventional estimates for density fluctuations arising from drift waves and a parabolic density profile, the optical depth tau for scattering through a significant angle, is given by tauroughly-equal(2/N 2 /sub parallel/) (#betta#/sub p/i0/#betta#) 2 (m/sub e/c 2 /2T/sub i/)/sup 1/2/ [c/α(Ω/sub i/Ω/sub e/)/sup 1/2/ ], where #betta#/sub p/i0 is the central ion plasma frequency and T/sub i/ denotes the ion temperature near the edge of the plasma. Most of the scattering occurs near the surface. The transmission through the scattering region scales as tau - 1 and the emerging intensity has an angular spectrum proportional to cos theta, where sin theta = k/sub perpendicular/xB/sub p//(k/sub perpendicular/B/sub p/), and B/sub p/ is the poloidal field

  7. Survey of radiation protection programmes for transport; Etude des programmes de radioprotection pour les transports de matieres radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizot, M.T.; Perrin, M.L.; Sert, G. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 (France); Lange, F.; Schwarz, G.; Feet, H.J.; Christ, R. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen-und Reaktorsicherheit, GRS, mbH, Cologne (Germany); Shaw, K.B.; Hughes, J.S.; Gelder, R. [National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), Oxon, OX (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The survey of radiation protection programmes for transport has been jointly performed by three scientific organisations I.P.S.N. (France), G.R.S. ( Germany), and N.R.P.B. (United kingdom) on behalf of the European Commission and the pertaining documentation summarises the findings and conclusions of the work that was undertaken with the principal objectives to provide guidance on the establishment, implementation and application of radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials by operators and the assessment and evaluation of such programmes by the competent authority and to review currently existing radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials. (N.C.)

  8. Reception of low-intensity millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation by the electroreceptors in skates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akoev, G.N.; Avelev, V.D.

    1995-01-01

    Low intensity millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation of less than 10 mW cm -2 power intensity has a nonthermal effect on the body and it is widely used in medical practice for treatment of various diseases. Nevertheless, the effect of EMR on biological tissues is not understood. The skin and its sensory receptors are considered to be responsible for EMR reception, but this has yet to be confirmed. The present experiments were designed to study the effect of millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation on the ampullae of Lorenzini in skates, which are very sensitive to weak electrical stimuli at low frequency. (author)

  9. The Role of Kinetic Alfven Waves in Plasma Transport in an Ion-scale Flux Rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, B.; Li, W.; Wang, C.; Dai, L.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic flux ropes, if generated by multiply X-line reconnections, would be born as a crater type one, meaning the plasma density within is relatively high. They will then evolve into typical flux ropes as plasma are transported away along the magnetic field lines [Zhang et al., 2010]. In this study, we report an ion-scale flux rope observed by MMS on November 28, 2016, which is accompanied by strong kinetic Alfven waves (KAW). The related wave parallel electric field can effectively accelerate electrons inside the flux rope by Landau resonance, resulting into a significant decrease of the electron at 90° pitch angle. The change of electron pitch angle distribution would cause the rapid plasma transport along the magnetic field lines, and help the flux rope evolve into a strong magnetic core in a short time. This wave-particle interaction would be a candidate mechanism to explain the rareness of crater flux ropes in reality.

  10. A Bingham-plastic model for fluid mud transport under waves and currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-rong; Wu, Bo; Huhe, Ao-de

    2014-04-01

    Simplified equations of fluid mud motion, which is described as Bingham-Plastic model under waves and currents, are presented by order analysis. The simplified equations are non-linear ordinary differential equations which are solved by hybrid numerical-analytical technique. As the computational cost is very low, the effects of wave current parameters and fluid mud properties on the transportation velocity of the fluid mud are studied systematically. It is found that the fluid mud can move toward one direction even if the shear stress acting on the fluid mud bed is much smaller than the fluid mud yield stress under the condition of wave and current coexistence. Experiments of the fluid mud motion under current with fluctuation water surface are carried out. The fluid mud transportation velocity predicted by the presented mathematical model can roughly match that measured in experiments.

  11. ATR, Radiation Transport Models in Atmosphere at Various Altitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ATR is a user-oriented code for calculating quickly and simply radiation environment problems at all altitudes in the atmosphere. The code is based on parametric models of a comprehensive data base of air transport results which were generated using discrete ordinates transport techniques for infinite homogeneous air. The effects of air-ground interface and non-uniform air density are treated as perturbation corrections on homogeneous air results. ATR includes parametric models for neutrons and secondary gamma rays as a function of space, energy and source- target angle out to angles of 550 g/cm 2 of air. ATR contains parameterizations of infinite medium air transport of neutrons and secondary gamma rays and correction factors for the air-ground interface and high altitude exponential air. It responds to a series of user-oriented commands which specify the source, geometry and print options to output a variety of useful air transport information, including energy-angle dependent fluence, dose, current, and isodose ranges. 2 - Method of solution: The version 3 differs from earlier versions in that version 3 contains the parameterization of the new neutron and secondary gamma rays data base that was calculated using the latest DNA approved cross sections for air. Other improvements to the ATR code include: parameterization and inclusion into ATR of new air- over-ground correction factors, low energy x-rays calculations, new fission source, and new convenience options. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: ATR takes approximately 36,000 decimal words of storage. This can be lessened by overlaying different parts of the code

  12. Nonlinear mechanisms for drift wave saturation and induced particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimits, A.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1989-12-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the nonlinear dynamics of gyrokinetic particle simulations of electrostatic collisionless and weakly collisional drift waves is presented. In previous studies it was shown that, in the nonlinearly saturated phase of the evolution, the saturation levels and especially the particle fluxes have an unexpected dependence on collisionality. In this paper, the explanations for these collisionality dependences are found to be as follows: The saturation level is determined by a balance between the electron and ion fluxes. The ion flux is small for levels of the potential below an E x B-trapping threshold and increases sharply once this threshold is crossed. Due to the presence of resonant electrons, the electron flux has a much smoother dependence on the potential. In the 2-1/2-dimensional (''pseudo-3D'') geometry, the electrons are accelerated away from the resonance as they diffuse spatially, resulting in an inhibition of their diffusion. Collisions and three-dimensional effects can repopulate the resonance thereby increasing the value of the particle flux. 30 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Theoretical analysis on radiation and reception characteristics of an oblate spheroidal antenna for electron plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, S.; Adachi, S.; Ohnuma, T.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation and reception characteristics of the oblate spheroidal antenna for electron plasma waves are theoretically investigated. The analysis is carried out as a boundary-value problem. The formulas for the radiation and reception characteristics such as radiation impedance, electron charge distributions, radiated wave potential, directional properties, and receiving voltage of the oblate spheroidal antenna are analytically obtained. As a result, it is concluded that the radiation and reception characteristics of the antennas are not uniquely determined by k/sub p/a (k/sub p/ is the wave number of an electron plasma wave, and a is the radius of the circular-plate antenna), but are determined by two out of three factors, k/sub p/a, zeta (radius divided by Debye length), and ω/ω/sub p/ (angular signal frequency to angular plasma frequency). This conclusion is in marked contrast to the conventional theory in which the charge distribution on the antenna is assumed a priori as uniform and, thus, the antenna characteristics are uniquely determined by k/sub p/a. It is claimed that the experimental results obtained hitherto support the present new theory

  14. Use of implicit Monte Carlo radiation transport with hydrodynamics and compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleck, J.A. Jr.

    1971-03-01

    It is shown that the combination of implicit radiation transport and hydrodynamics, Compton scattering, and any other energy transport can be simply carried out by a ''splitting'' procedure. Contributions to material energy exchange can be reckoned separately for hydrodynamics, radiation transport without scattering, Compton scattering, plus any other possible energy exchange mechanism. The radiation transport phase of the calculation would be implicit, but the hydrodynamics and Compton portions would not, leading to possible time step controls. The time step restrictions which occur on radiation transfer due to large Planck mean absorption cross-sections would not occur

  15. High-Fidelity Kinetics and Radiation Transport for NLTE Hypersonic Flows, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The modeling of NLTE hypersonic flows combines several disciplines: chemistry, kinetics, radiation transport, fluid mechanics, and surface science. No single code or...

  16. Gravitational waves — A review on the theoretical foundations of gravitational radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkes, Alain

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we review the theoretical foundations of gravitational waves in the framework of Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity. Following Einstein’s early efforts, we first derive the linearized Einstein field equations and work out the corresponding gravitational wave equation. Moreover, we present the gravitational potentials in the far away wave zone field point approximation obtained from the relaxed Einstein field equations. We close this review by taking a closer look on the radiative losses of gravitating n-body systems and present some aspects of the current interferometric gravitational waves detectors. Each section has a separate appendix contribution where further computational details are displayed. To conclude, we summarize the main results and present a brief outlook in terms of current ongoing efforts to build a spaced-based gravitational wave observatory.

  17. Risks of exposure to ionizing and millimeter-wave radiation from airport whole-body scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E

    2012-06-01

    Considerable public concern has been expressed around the world about the radiation risks posed by the backscatter (ionizing radiation) and millimeter-wave (nonionizing radiation) whole-body scanners that have been deployed at many airports. The backscatter and millimeter-wave scanners currently deployed in the U.S. almost certainly pose negligible radiation risks if used as intended, but their safety is difficult-to-impossible to prove using publicly accessible data. The scanners are widely disliked and often feared, which is a problem made worse by what appears to be a veil of secrecy that covers their specifications and dosimetry. Therefore, for these and future similar technologies to gain wide acceptance, more openness is needed, as is independent review and regulation. Publicly accessible, and preferably peer-reviewed evidence is needed that the deployed units (not just the prototypes) meet widely-accepted safety standards. It is also critical that risk-perception issues be handled more competently.

  18. Investigation of radiant millimeter wave/terahertz radiation from low-infrared signature targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytaç, B.; Alkuş, Ü.; Sivaslıgil, M.; Şahin, A. B.; Altan, H.

    2017-10-01

    Millimeter (mm) and sub-mm wave radiation is increasingly becoming a region of interest as better methods are developed to detect in this wavelength range. The development of sensitive focal plane array (FPA) architectures as well as single pixel scanners has opened up a new field of passive detection and imaging. Spectral signatures of objects, a long standing area of interest in the Short Wave Infrared (SWIR), Mid-Wave (MWIR) and Long Wave-IR (LWIR) bands can now be assessed in the mm-wave/terahertz (THz) region. The advantage is that this form of radiation is not as adversely affected by poor atmospheric conditions compared to other bands. In this study, a preliminary experiment in a laboratory environment is performed to assess the radiance from targets with low infrared signatures in the millimeter wave/terahertz (THz) band (<1 THz). The goal of this approach is to be able to model the experimental results to better understand the mm-wave/THz signature of targets with low observability in the IR bands.

  19. Wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth and associated radiative impacts over the central Himalayan region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Kumar, K.  Niranjan; Reddy, Kishore; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Newsom, Rob K.; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we present a case study on 16 October 2011 to show the first observational evidence of the influence of short period gravity waves in aerosol transport during daytime over the central Himalayan region. The Doppler lidar data has been utilized to address the daytime boundary layer evolution and related aerosol dynamics over the site. Mixing layer height is estimated by wavelet covariance transform method and found to be ~ 0.7 km, AGL. Aerosol optical depth observations during daytime revealed an asymmetry showing clear enhancement during afternoon hours as compared to forenoon. Interestingly, Fourier and wavelet analysis of vertical velocity and attenuated backscatter showed similar 50-90 min short period gravity wave signatures during afternoon hours. Moreover, our observations showed that gravity waves are dominant within the boundary layer implying that the daytime boundary layer dynamics is playing a vital role in transporting the aerosols from surface to the top of the boundary layer. Similar modulations are also evident in surface parameters like temperature, relative humidity and wind speed indicating these waves are associated with the dynamical aspects over Himalayan region. Finally, time evolution of range-23 height indicator snapshots during daytime showed strong upward velocities especially during afternoon hours implying that convective processes through short period gravity waves plays a significant role in transporting aerosols from the nearby valley region to boundary layer top over the site. These observations also establish the importance of wave induced daytime convective boundary layer dynamics in the lower Himalayan region.

  20. The influence of wave energy and sediment transport on seagrass distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Andrew W.; Lacy, Jessica R.

    2012-01-01

    A coupled hydrodynamic and sediment transport model (Delft3D) was used to simulate the water levels, waves, and currents associated with a seagrass (Zostera marina) landscape along a 4-km stretch of coast in Puget Sound, WA, USA. A hydroacoustic survey of seagrass percent cover and nearshore bathymetry was conducted, and sediment grain size was sampled at 53 locations. Wave energy is a primary factor controlling seagrass distribution at the site, accounting for 73% of the variability in seagrass minimum depth and 86% of the variability in percent cover along the shallow, sandy portions of the coast. A combination of numerical simulations and a conceptual model of the effect of sea-level rise on the cross-shore distribution of seagrass indicates that the area of seagrass habitat may initially increase and that wave dynamics are an important factor to consider in predicting the effect of sea-level rise on seagrass distributions in wave-exposed areas.

  1. Transport of energy and momentum due to spatial Landau damping and growth of electrostatic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacina, J.

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that Landau damping in space (LDS), occuring for time-periodic electrostatic waves, does not lead to any deposition of energy in plasmas. A steady-state balance and a steady-state transport of energy, momentum and particles take place both for damped and growing waves. Because of the phase interference of coherent free and forced particle oscillations, the oscillatory energy of particles increases in the direction of wave propagation; the time-averaged flow of plasma kinetic energy being constant in space for these waves, the LDS must take place for a Maxwellian plasma in order to compensate for the growth of the particle oscillatory energy in space. (Author)

  2. X-radiation effect on water transport in ascite cells of Ehrlich carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnov, V.A.; Ajvazishvili, M.A.; Kartvelishvili, I.I.; Tushishvili, D.I.

    1988-01-01

    Effect of local X radiation with doses 0.05 and 0.15 C/kg on water transport in ascitic cells of Erlich carcinoma is studied in rats. To study water transport through cell membranes, tritium mark was used. It is concluded that radiation effect on water transport in cells of Erlich carcinoma may be related to change in ionic permittivity of the membrane, because small changes in transmembrane ion transport affect immediately the osmotic motion of water. 5 refs

  3. Acceleration of a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochstedler, R.D.; Smith, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    Execution time for the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) Monte Carlo radiation transport code has been reduced by careful re-coding of computationally intensive subroutines. Three test cases for the TIGER (1-D slab geometry), CYLTRAN (2-D cylindrical geometry), and ACCEPT (3-D arbitrary geometry) codes were identified and used to benchmark and profile program execution. Based upon these results, sixteen top time-consuming subroutines were examined and nine of them modified to accelerate computations with equivalent numerical output to the original. The results obtained via this study indicate that speedup factors of 1.90 for the TIGER code, 1.67 for the CYLTRAN code, and 1.11 for the ACCEPT code are achievable. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  4. Charge transport properties of CdMnTe radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim K.; Rafiel, R.; Boardman, M.; Reinhard, I.; Sarbutt, A.; Watt, G.; Watt, C.; Uxa, S.; Prokopovich, D.A.; Belas, E.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; James, R.B.

    2012-04-11

    Growth, fabrication and characterization of indium-doped cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe)radiation detectors have been described. Alpha-particle spectroscopy measurements and time resolved current transient measurements have yielded an average charge collection efficiency approaching 100 %. Spatially resolved charge collection efficiency maps have been produced for a range of detector bias voltages. Inhomogeneities in the charge transport of the CdMnTe crystals have been associated with chains of tellurium inclusions within the detector bulk. Further, it has been shown that the role of tellurium inclusions in degrading chargecollection is reduced with increasing values of bias voltage. The electron transit time was determined from time of flight measurements. From the dependence of drift velocity on applied electric field the electron mobility was found to be n = (718 55) cm2/Vs at room temperature.

  5. Charge transport properties of CdMnTe radiation detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokopovich D. A.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth, fabrication and characterization of indium-doped cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe radiation detectors have been described. Alpha-particle spectroscopy measurements and time resolved current transient measurements have yielded an average charge collection efficiency approaching 100 %. Spatially resolved charge collection efficiency maps have been produced for a range of detector bias voltages. Inhomogeneities in the charge transport of the CdMnTe crystals have been associated with chains of tellurium inclusions within the detector bulk. Further, it has been shown that the role of tellurium inclusions in degrading charge collection is reduced with increasing values of bias voltage. The electron drift velocity was calculated from the rise time distribution of the preamplifier output pulses at each measured bias. From the dependence of drift velocity on applied electric field the electron mobility was found to be μn = (718 ± 55 cm2/Vs at room temperature.

  6. Stationary neutrino radiation transport by maximum entropy closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bludman, S.A.

    1994-11-01

    The authors obtain the angular distributions that maximize the entropy functional for Maxwell-Boltzmann (classical), Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac radiation. In the low and high occupancy limits, the maximum entropy closure is bounded by previously known variable Eddington factors that depend only on the flux. For intermediate occupancy, the maximum entropy closure depends on both the occupation density and the flux. The Fermi-Dirac maximum entropy variable Eddington factor shows a scale invariance, which leads to a simple, exact analytic closure for fermions. This two-dimensional variable Eddington factor gives results that agree well with exact (Monte Carlo) neutrino transport calculations out of a collapse residue during early phases of hydrostatic neutron star formation

  7. Current drive by EC waves in the presence of magnetic islands and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, P R da S; Ziebell, L F

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of current drive by electron cyclotron (EC) waves in the presence of magnetic islands and transport. Our approach makes use of quasilinear theory by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation in cylindrical geometry. We take into account the actual geometry of the islands along the calculations as well as the changes in the plasma density profile due to the action of the radial particle transport. The particle transport is supposed to have a magnetic origin. The waves are assumed to be launched and propagated in the equatorial plane of the tokamak, as in the slab geometry. Our results show that the use of equilibrium profiles as usually done in the studies on neoclassical tearing mode control may not be a better choice and point to the need for taking into account the actual island geometry

  8. Effects of Ultraviolet (UV) Radiations at Different Wave Lengths on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    The effects of UV-radiation on the bacterial load and yeast viability of palm wine were ... shelf life due to the uncontrolled metabolic activities of yeast and bacteria. .... Process. Biochemistry International 8:23-220. Okafor, N. (2007). Palm Wine ...

  9. Radiation-pressure-driven dust waves inside bursting interstellar bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochsendorf, B.B.; Verdolini, S.; Cox, N.L.J.; Berné, O.; Kaper, L.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars drive the evolution of the interstellar medium through their radiative and mechanical energy input. After their birth, they form "bubbles" of hot gas surrounded by a dense shell. Traditionally, the formation of bubbles is explained through the input of a powerful stellar wind, even

  10. Variables influencing radiation exposure during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Review of 298 treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, H.B.; Naeslund, E.B.R.; Riehle, R.A. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Retrospective review of 298 extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) treatments was undertaken to determine the factors which influence radiation exposure during ESWL. Fluoroscopy time averaged 160 seconds (3-509), and the average number of spot films taken per patient was 26 (5-68). The average stone burden was 19.3 mm (3-64). Average calculated skin surface radiation exposure was 17.8 R per treatment. Radiation exposure increased with increasing stone burden and patient weight. Stones treated in the ureter resulted in a higher average patient radiation exposure than for renal stones (19 R vs 16 R), even though the average size of these ureteral stones (11.3 mm) was significantly less than the mean. However, type of anesthetic (general or regional) used was not a significant factor. Operator training, experience, and familiarity with radiation physics should significantly decrease the amount of imaging time and consequent patient radiation exposure during ESWL

  11. Variables influencing radiation exposure during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Review of 298 treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, H.B.; Naeslund, E.B.R.; Riehle, R.A. Jr.

    1987-12-01

    Retrospective review of 298 extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) treatments was undertaken to determine the factors which influence radiation exposure during ESWL. Fluoroscopy time averaged 160 seconds (3-509), and the average number of spot films taken per patient was 26 (5-68). The average stone burden was 19.3 mm (3-64). Average calculated skin surface radiation exposure was 17.8 R per treatment. Radiation exposure increased with increasing stone burden and patient weight. Stones treated in the ureter resulted in a higher average patient radiation exposure than for renal stones (19 R vs 16 R), even though the average size of these ureteral stones (11.3 mm) was significantly less than the mean. However, type of anesthetic (general or regional) used was not a significant factor. Operator training, experience, and familiarity with radiation physics should significantly decrease the amount of imaging time and consequent patient radiation exposure during ESWL.

  12. HZETRN radiation transport validation using balloon-based experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, James E.; Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2018-05-01

    The deterministic radiation transport code HZETRN (High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport) was developed by NASA to study the effects of cosmic radiation on astronauts and instrumentation shielded by various materials. This work presents an analysis of computed differential flux from HZETRN compared with measurement data from three balloon-based experiments over a range of atmospheric depths, particle types, and energies. Model uncertainties were quantified using an interval-based validation metric that takes into account measurement uncertainty both in the flux and the energy at which it was measured. Average uncertainty metrics were computed for the entire dataset as well as subsets of the measurements (by experiment, particle type, energy, etc.) to reveal any specific trends of systematic over- or under-prediction by HZETRN. The distribution of individual model uncertainties was also investigated to study the range and dispersion of errors beyond just single scalar and interval metrics. The differential fluxes from HZETRN were generally well-correlated with balloon-based measurements; the median relative model difference across the entire dataset was determined to be 30%. The distribution of model uncertainties, however, revealed that the range of errors was relatively broad, with approximately 30% of the uncertainties exceeding ± 40%. The distribution also indicated that HZETRN systematically under-predicts the measurement dataset as a whole, with approximately 80% of the relative uncertainties having negative values. Instances of systematic bias for subsets of the data were also observed, including a significant underestimation of alpha particles and protons for energies below 2.5 GeV/u. Muons were found to be systematically over-predicted at atmospheric depths deeper than 50 g/cm2 but under-predicted for shallower depths. Furthermore, a systematic under-prediction of alpha particles and protons was observed below the geomagnetic cutoff, suggesting that

  13. Ring waves as a mass transport mechanism in air-driven core-annular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camassa, Roberto; Forest, M Gregory; Lee, Long; Ogrosky, H Reed; Olander, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Air-driven core-annular fluid flows occur in many situations, from lung airways to engineering applications. Here we study, experimentally and theoretically, flows where a viscous liquid film lining the inside of a tube is forced upwards against gravity by turbulent airflow up the center of the tube. We present results on the thickness and mean speed of the film and properties of the interfacial waves that develop from an instability of the air-liquid interface. We derive a long-wave asymptotic model and compare properties of its solutions with those of the experiments. Traveling wave solutions of this long-wave model exhibit evidence of different mass transport regimes: Past a certain threshold, sufficiently large-amplitude waves begin to trap cores of fluid which propagate upward at wave speeds. This theoretical result is then confirmed by a second set of experiments that show evidence of ring waves of annular fluid propagating over the underlying creeping flow. By tuning the parameters of the experiments, the strength of this phenomenon can be adjusted in a way that is predicted qualitatively by the model.

  14. Transport of radioactive wastes to the planned final waste repository Konrad: Radiation exposure resulting from normal transport and radiological risks from transport accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, F.; Fett, H.J.; Gruendler, D.; Schwarz, G.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation exposures of members of critical groups of the general population and of transport personnel resulting from normal transport of radioactive wastes to the planned final waste repository Konrad have been evaluated in detail. By applying probabilistic safety assessment techniques radiological risks from transport accidents have been analysed by quantifying potential radiation exposures and contaminations of the biosphere in connection with their expected frequencies of occurrence. The Konrad transport study concentrates on the local region of the waste repository, where all transports converge. (orig.) [de

  15. Dissipative-drift wave instability in the presence of impurity radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharuthram, R.; Shukla, P.K.

    1992-01-01

    It is believed that electrostatic fluctuations in edge plasmas are usually triggered by micro and macroscopic plasma instabilities. The latter involve dissipative-drift waves as well as tearing and rippling modes in nonuniform plasmas. However, if the plasma edge contains impurity radiation, then the radiative condensation instability could be the cause of nonthermal fluctuations. The radiative condensation instabilities have been extensively investigated in a homogeneous plasma by many authors. The effect of equilibrium density and electron temperature inhomogeneities in the study of radiative condensation instabilities has been examined by Shukla and Yu. They found new drift-like modes driven by the combined effect of impurity radiation loss and the equilibrium density and temperature gradients. The analyses of Shukla and Yu is, however, limited to low-frequency, long wavelength collisionless drift waves. Since the edge plasma of toroidal devices is highly collisional, the results of collisionless theories cannot be directly applied to explain the origin of nonthermal fluctuations. In this paper, we study the influence of impurity radiation on the dissipative-drift wave instability in a collision-dominated nonuniform plasma embedded in a homogeneous magnetic field. (author) 6 refs

  16. Vertical Transport of Momentum by the Inertial-Gravity Internal Waves in a Baroclinic Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Slepyshev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available When the internal waves break, they are one of the sources of small-scale turbulence. Small-scale turbulence causes the vertical exchange in the ocean. However, internal waves with regard to the Earth rotation in the presence of vertically inhomogeneous two-dimensional current are able to contribute to the vertical transport. Free inertial-gravity internal waves in a baroclinic current in a boundless basin of a constant depth are considered in the Bussinesq approximation. Boundary value problem of linear approximation for the vertical velocity amplitude of internal waves has complex coefficients when current velocity component, which is transversal to the wave propagation direction, depends on the vertical coordinate (taking into account the rotation of the Earth. Eigenfunction and wave frequency are complex, and it is shown that a weak wave damping takes place. Dispersive relation and wave damping decrement are calculated in the linear approximation. At a fixed wave number damping decrement of the second mode is larger (in the absolute value than the one of the first mode. The equation for vertical velocity amplitude for real profiles of the Brunt – Vaisala frequency and current velocity are numerically solved according to implicit Adams scheme of the third order of accuracy. The dispersive curves of the first two modes do not reach inertial frequency in the low-frequency area due to the effect of critical layers in which wave frequency of the Doppler shift is equal to the inertial one. Termination of the second mode dispersive curves takes place at higher frequency than the one of the first mode. In the second order of the wave amplitude the Stokes drift speed is determined. It is shown that the Stokes drift speed, which is transversal to the wave propagation direction, differs from zero if the transversal component of current velocity depends on the vertical coordinate. In this case, the Stokes drift speed in the second mode is lower than

  17. Measurement and simulation of ionic current as a means of quantifying effects of therapeutic millimeter wave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovinsky, William Stanley

    A "millimeter wave" (MMW) is an electromagnetic oscillation with a wavelength between 1 and 10 mm, and a corresponding frequency of 30 to 300 GHz. In the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, this band falls above the frequencies of radio waves and microwaves, and below that of infrared radiation. Since the 1950s, frequencies in this regime have been used for short range communications and beginning in the 1970s, a form of therapy known as "millimeter wave therapy" (MWT) , or microwave resonance therapy, in some publications. This form of therapy has been widely used in the republics of the former Soviet Union (FSU). As of 1995, it is estimated that more than one thousand medical centers in the FSU have performed MWT and more than three million patients have received this method of treatment. Despite the abundant use of this form of medicine, very little is known about the mechanisms by which it works. Early accounts of use are limited to Soviet government documents, largely unavailable to the scientific public, and limited translations and oral accounts from FSU scientists and literature reviews . This anecdotal body of evidence lacks the scrutiny of peer-reviewed journal publications. In order to gain more widespread acceptance in Western medicine, the pathway through which this regime of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum affects the human body must be rigorously mapped and quantified. Despite the anecdotal nature of a large portion of the existing research on biological MMW effects, a common link is the idea of an interaction occurring at the skin level, which is transduced into a signal used at a remote location in the body. This study explores a possible mechanism for the generation of this signal. The effects of therapeutic frequency MMW on the ionic currents through two different types of ion transport channels were studied, and the results are discussed with emphasis on how they relate to possible changes in nerve signals used by the body for

  18. Method for generation of THz frequency radiation and sensing of large amplitude material strain waves in piezoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan J.; Armstrong, Michael R.

    2010-09-07

    Strain waves of THz frequencies can coherently generate radiation when they propagate past an interface between materials with different piezoelectric coefficients. Such radiation is of detectable amplitude and contains sufficient information to determine the time-dependence of the strain wave with unprecedented subpicosecond, nearly atomic time and space resolution.

  19. Metachronal waves in epithelium cilia to transport bronchial mucus in airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Julien; Sylvain, Chateau; D'Ortona, Umberto; Poncet, Sébastien

    2017-11-01

    Metachronal waves of beating cilia are an efficient mechanism to transport mucus in human airways. The numerical results we will present will shed new light on the understanding of chronic respiratory diseases, such as Asthma of COPD. A coupled lattice Boltzmann - Immersed Boundary is used to simulate the multiphase environment in which the cilia are immersed: a periciliary layer and the mucus layer. A purely hydrodynamical feedback of the fluids is taken into account, and a coupling parameter α is introduced, allowing the tuning of both the direction of the wave propagation, and the strength of the fluid feedback. The cilia, initially set in a random state, quickly synchronize with their immediate neighbors giving birth to metachronal waves. A comparative study of both antipleptic and sympleptic waves is performed by imposing the metachrony. Antiplectic waves are found to be the most efficient to transport and mix fluids compared to other random or synchronised cilia motions. The numerical results will be discussed and compared to experimental and clinical results obtained by collaborators, to progress on the understanding of the inner mechanisms of chronic respiratory diseases.

  20. Calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydock, David [Unilever R and D Colworth, Sharnbrook, Bedford MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-15

    We present a new calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field. We use the formula to calculate the force on a cylinder which is free to move in the field and one which is fixed in space.

  1. Calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydock, David

    2005-01-01

    We present a new calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field. We use the formula to calculate the force on a cylinder which is free to move in the field and one which is fixed in space

  2. Continuous wave terahertz radiation from an InAs/GaAs quantum-dot photomixer device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruczek, T.; Leyman, R.; Carnegie, D.; Bazieva, N.; Erbert, G.; Schulz, S.; Reardon, C.; Reynolds, S.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2012-08-01

    Generation of continuous wave radiation at terahertz (THz) frequencies from a heterodyne source based on quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor materials is reported. The source comprises an active region characterised by multiple alternating photoconductive and QD carrier trapping layers and is pumped by two infrared optical signals with slightly offset wavelengths, allowing photoconductive device switching at the signals' difference frequency ˜1 THz.

  3. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  4. Acoustic radiation force on cylindrical shells in a plane standing wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitri, F G

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the radiation force per length resulting from a plane standing wave incident on an infinitely long cylindrical shell is computed. The cases of elastic and viscoelastic shells immersed in ideal (non-viscous) fluids are considered with particular emphasis on their thickness and the content of their interior hollow spaces. Numerical calculations of the radiation force function Y st are performed. The fluid-loading effect on the radiation force function curves is analysed as well. The results show several features quite different when the interior hollow space is changed from air to water. Moreover, the theory developed here is more general since it includes the results on cylinders

  5. Observational evidence of competing source, loss, and transport processes for relativistic electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Drew; Mann, Ian; Usanova, Maria; Rodriguez, Juan; Henderson, Mike; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Morley, Steven; Claudepierre, Seth; Li, Wen; Kellerman, Adam; Boyd, Alexander; Kim, Kyung-Chan

    Earth’s outer electron radiation belt is a region of extreme variability, with relativistic electron intensities changing by orders of magnitude over time scales ranging from minutes to years. Extreme variations of outer belt electrons ultimately result from the relative impacts of various competing source (and acceleration), loss, and transport processes. Most of these processes involve wave-particle interactions between outer belt electrons and different types of plasma waves in the inner magnetosphere, and in turn, the activity of these waves depends on different solar wind and magnetospheric driving conditions and thus can vary drastically from event to event. Using multipoint analysis with data from NASA’s Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and SAMPEX missions, NOAA’s GOES and POES constellations, and ground-based observatories, we present results from case studies revealing how different source/acceleration and loss mechanisms compete during active periods to result in drastically different distributions of outer belt electrons. By using a combination of low-Earth orbiting and high-altitude-equatorial orbiting satellites, we briefly review how it is possible to get a much more complete picture of certain wave activity and electron losses over the full range of MLTs and L-shells throughout the radiation belt. We then show example cases highlighting the importance of particular mechanisms, including: substorm injections and whistler-mode chorus waves for the source and acceleration of relativistic electrons; magnetopause shadowing and wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves for sudden losses; and ULF wave activity for driving radial transport, a process which is important for redistributing relativistic electrons, contributing both to acceleration and loss processes. We show how relativistic electron enhancement events involve local acceleration that is consistent with wave-particle interactions between a seed population of 10s to 100s of keV electrons, with a

  6. Nonlinear generation of kinetic-scale waves by magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén waves and nonlocal spectral transport in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China); Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J., E-mail: js_zhao@pmo.ac.cn [Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence, Space Physics Division, Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Ringlaan-3-Avenue Circulaire, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-04-20

    We study the nonlocal nonlinear coupling and generation of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) and kinetic slow waves (KSWs) by magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén waves (MHD AWs) in conditions typical for the solar wind in the inner heliosphere. This cross-scale process provides an alternative to the turbulent energy cascade passing through many intermediate scales. The nonlinearities we study are proportional to the scalar products of wave vectors and hence are called 'scalar' ones. Despite the strong Landau damping of kinetic waves, we found fast growing KAWs and KSWs at perpendicular wavelengths close to the ion gyroradius. Using the parametric decay formalism, we investigate two independent decay channels for the pump AW: forward decay (involving co-propagating product waves) and backward decay (involving counter-propagating product waves). The growth rate of the forward decay is typically 0.05 but can exceed 0.1 of the pump wave frequency. The resulting spectral transport is nonlocal and anisotropic, sharply increasing perpendicular wavenumbers but not parallel ones. AWs and KAWs propagating against the pump AW grow with about the same rate and contribute to the sunward wave flux in the solar wind. Our results suggest that the nonlocal decay of MHD AWs into KAWs and KSWs is a robust mechanism for the cross-scale spectral transport of the wave energy from MHD to dissipative kinetic scales in the solar wind and similar media.

  7. Acoustic backscattering and radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane progressive waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes a formal analytical theory using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates, to calculate the acoustic backscattering form function as well as the radiation force-per-length on an infinitely long elliptical (non-circular) cylinder in plane progressive waves. The major (or minor) semi-axis of the ellipse coincides with the direction of the incident waves. The scattering coefficients for the rigid elliptical cylinder are determined by imposing the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface and solving a resulting system of linear equations by matrix inversion. The present method, which utilizes standard cylindrical (Bessel and Hankel) wave functions, presents an advantage over the solution for the scattering that is ordinarily expressed in a basis of elliptical Mathieu functions (which are generally non-orthogonal). Furthermore, an integral equation showing the direct connection of the radiation force function with the square of the scattering form function in the far-field from the scatterer (applicable for plane waves only), is noted and discussed. An important application of this integral equation is the adequate evaluation of the radiation force function from a bistatic measurement (i.e., in the polar plane) of the far-field scattering from any 2D object of arbitrary shape. Numerical predictions are evaluated for the acoustic backscattering form function and the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density, and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb, without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation, acousto-fluidics and particle dynamics applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Wave Characteristics of Temperature Inversion Process of Nighttime Radiation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-09

    CHARACTERISTICS OF TEMPERATURE INVERSION PROCESS OF NIGHTTIME RADIATION By: Zhou Mingyu and Zhang ¥i English pages: 8 Source: Kexue Tongbao, 1982, pp. 156...lJournal of Meteorology], 39 (1981), 1:70-81. 3. Drazin, P. G., J. Fluid. Mech., 4 (1958), 214-224. 4. Zhou Mingyu et al., QIXIANG XUEBAO, 38 (1980), 3: 250...258. 5. Emnanuel, C. B., B-L. Meteor., 5(1973), N(1/2)8 19-27. 6. Zhou Mingyu et al., J. Acoust. Soc., A. m., 68 (1980), 1: 303-308. 8 I iI

  9. Wave-induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drivdal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on how wave–current and wave–turbulence interactions modify the transport of buoyant particles in the ocean. Here the particles can represent oil droplets, plastic particles, or plankton such as fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production, as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis–Stokes force, affects the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes, as well as the Stokes drift, depend on the directional wave spectrum obtained from a wave model. As a first test, the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (i.e., classical Ekman theory. Secondly, the model is applied to a case in which we investigate the oil drift after an oil spill off the west coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by oil-drift models. In this case, using wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift and have the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  10. The use of shore wave ultraviolet radiation for disinfection in operating rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baanrud, H.; Moan, J.

    1999-01-01

    Over a number of years short wave ultraviolet radiation (UVC;200-280 nm) has been used to disinfect air and surfaces in operating rooms, patient rooms and laboratories, as well as air in ventilation ducts. Despite the well-documented effect of ultraviolet radiation on air quality, this technology has been relatively little used. One advantage of this method is that the UVC sources ensure a continuous reduction in the number of airborne microorganisms that are generated all the time. There are, however, some disadvantages with this method. Human exposure to ultraviolet C may cause keratoconjunctivitis and erythema and requires protection of the skin and the eyes of people exposed to levels above recommended exposure limits. However, by enclosing the UVC sources or by irradiation in the absence of human activity, human exposure is eliminated. These and other aspects concerning the use of short wave ultraviolet radiation as a disinfection agent in operating rooms are discussed in this article

  11. ANTENNA RADIATION NEAR THE LOCAL PLASMA FREQUENCY BY LANGMUIR WAVE EIGENMODES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaspina, David M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Ergun, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Langmuir waves (LWs) in the solar wind are generated by electron beams associated with solar flares, interplanetary shock fronts, planetary bow shocks, and magnetic holes. In principle, LWs localized as eigenmodes of density fluctuations can emit electromagnetic (EM) radiation by an antenna mechanism near the local plasma frequency f p and twice the local plasma frequency. In this work, analytic expressions are derived for the radiated electric and magnetic fields and power generated near f p by LW eigenmodes. The EM wave power emitted near f p is predicted as a function of the eigenmode length scale L, maximum electric field, driving electron beam speed, and the ambient plasma density and temperature. The escape to a distant observer of f p radiation from a localized Langmuir eigenmode is also briefly explored as a function of the plasma conditions.

  12. Generation of thermo-acoustic waves from pulsed solar/IR radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Aowabin

    Acoustic waves could potentially be used in a wide range of engineering applications; however, the high energy consumption in generating acoustic waves from electrical energy and the cost associated with the process limit the use of acoustic waves in industrial processes. Acoustic waves converted from solar radiation provide a feasible way of obtaining acoustic energy, without relying on conventional nonrenewable energy sources. One of the goals of this thesis project was to experimentally study the conversion of thermal to acoustic energy using pulsed radiation. The experiments were categorized into "indoor" and "outdoor" experiments, each with a separate experimental setup. The indoor experiments used an IR heater to power the thermo-acoustic lasers and were primarily aimed at studying the effect of various experimental parameters on the amplitude of sound waves in the low frequency range (below 130 Hz). The IR radiation was modulated externally using a chopper wheel and then impinged on a porous solid, which was housed inside a thermo-acoustic (TA) converter. A microphone located at a certain distance from the porous solid inside the TA converter detected the acoustic signals. The "outdoor" experiments, which were targeted at TA conversion at comparatively higher frequencies (in 200 Hz-3 kHz range) used solar energy to power the thermo-acoustic laser. The amplitudes (in RMS) of thermo-acoustic signals obtained in experiments using IR heater as radiation source were in the 80-100 dB range. The frequency of acoustic waves corresponded to the frequency of interceptions of the radiation beam by the chopper. The amplitudes of acoustic waves were influenced by several factors, including the chopping frequency, magnitude of radiation flux, type of porous material, length of porous material, external heating of the TA converter housing, location of microphone within the air column, and design of the TA converter. The time-dependent profile of the thermo-acoustic signals

  13. Ab initio nonequilibrium quantum transport and forces with the real-space projector augmented wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jingzhe; Thygesen, Kristian S.; Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    2012-01-01

    We present an efficient implementation of a nonequilibrium Green's function method for self-consistent calculations of electron transport and forces in nanostructured materials. The electronic structure is described at the level of density functional theory using the projector augmented wave method...... over k points and real space makes the code highly efficient and applicable to systems containing several hundreds of atoms. The method is applied to a number of different systems, demonstrating the effects of bias and gate voltages, multiterminal setups, nonequilibrium forces, and spin transport....

  14. Transport of particles by surface waves: a modification of the classical bouncer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragulskis, M; Sanjuan, M A F

    2008-01-01

    We consider a ball under the influence of gravity on a platform. A propagating surface wave travels on the surface of the platform, while the platform remains motionless. This is a modification of the classical bouncing ball problem and describes the transport of particles by surface waves. Phase and velocity maps cannot be expressed in an explicit form owing to implicit formulations, and no formal analytical analysis is possible. Numerical analysis shows that the transition to chaos is produced via a period doubling route, which is a common property for classical bouncers. The bouncing process can be sensitive to the initial conditions, which can build the ground for control techniques that can dramatically increase the effectiveness of particle transport in practical applications

  15. Deterministic methods in radiation transport. A compilation of papers presented February 4--5, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, A.F.; Roussin, R.W. [eds.

    1992-06-01

    The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

  16. Deterministic methods in radiation transport. A compilation of papers presented February 4-5, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, A. F.; Roussin, R. W. [eds.

    1992-06-01

    The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

  17. BALTORO a general purpose code for coupling discrete ordinates and Monte-Carlo radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zazula, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The general purpose code BALTORO was written for coupling the three-dimensional Monte-Carlo /MC/ with the one-dimensional Discrete Ordinates /DO/ radiation transport calculations. The quantity of a radiation-induced /neutrons or gamma-rays/ nuclear effect or the score from a radiation-yielding nuclear effect can be analysed in this way. (author)

  18. To the development of numerical methods in problems of radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germogenova, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Review of studies on the development of numerical methods and the discrete ordinate method in particular, used for solution of radiation protection physics problems is given. Consideration is given to the problems, which arise when calculating fields of penetrating radiation and when studying processes of charged-particle transport and cascade processes, generated by high-energy primary radiation

  19. Atmospheric-radiation boundary conditions for high-frequency waves in time-distance helioseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, D.; Leguèbe, M.; Hanson, C. S.; Gizon, L.; Barucq, H.; Chabassier, J.; Duruflé, M.

    2017-12-01

    The temporal covariance between seismic waves measured at two locations on the solar surface is the fundamental observable in time-distance helioseismology. Above the acoustic cut-off frequency ( 5.3 mHz), waves are not trapped in the solar interior and the covariance function can be used to probe the upper atmosphere. We wish to implement appropriate radiative boundary conditions for computing the propagation of high-frequency waves in the solar atmosphere. We consider recently developed and published radiative boundary conditions for atmospheres in which sound-speed is constant and density decreases exponentially with radius. We compute the cross-covariance function using a finite element method in spherical geometry and in the frequency domain. The ratio between first- and second-skip amplitudes in the time-distance diagram is used as a diagnostic to compare boundary conditions and to compare with observations. We find that a boundary condition applied 500 km above the photosphere and derived under the approximation of small angles of incidence accurately reproduces the "infinite atmosphere" solution for high-frequency waves. When the radiative boundary condition is applied 2 Mm above the photosphere, we find that the choice of atmospheric model affects the time-distance diagram. In particular, the time-distance diagram exhibits double-ridge structure when using a Vernazza Avrett Loeser atmospheric model.

  20. Proposal of coherent Cherenkov radiation matched to circular plane wave for intense terahertz light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sei, Norihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Ken; Tanaka, Toshinari; Hayakawa, Yasushi; Nakao, Keisuke; Nogami, Kyoko; Inagaki, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed a new intense terahertz-wave source based on coherent Cherenkov radiation (CCR). • A hollow conical dielectric is used to generate the CCR beam. • The wave front of the CCR beam can be matched to the basal plane. • The peak-power of the CCR beam is above 1 MW per micropulse with a short interval of 350 ps. - Abstract: We propose a high-peak-power terahertz-wave source based on an electron accelerator. By passing an electron beam through a hollow conical dielectric with apex facing the incident electron beam, the wave front of coherent Cherenkov radiation generated on the inner surface of the hollow conical dielectric matches the basal plane. Using the electron beam generated at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application at Nihon University, the calculated power of coherent Cherenkov radiation that matched the circular plane (CCR-MCP) was above 1 MW per micropulse with a short interval of 350 ps, for wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 5 mm. The electron beam is not lost for generating the CCR-MCP beam by using the hollow conical dielectric. It is possible to combine the CCR-MCP beams with other light sources based on an accelerator

  1. Experimental verification of theoretical equations for acoustic radiation force on compressible spherical particles in traveling waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kennita A.; Vormohr, Hannah R.; Doinikov, Alexander A.; Bouakaz, Ayache; Shields, C. Wyatt; López, Gabriel P.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustophoresis uses acoustic radiation force to remotely manipulate particles suspended in a host fluid for many scientific, technological, and medical applications, such as acoustic levitation, acoustic coagulation, contrast ultrasound imaging, ultrasound-assisted drug delivery, etc. To estimate the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, equations derived for an inviscid host fluid are commonly used. However, there are theoretical predictions that, in the case of a traveling wave, viscous effects can dramatically change the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, which make the equations obtained for an inviscid host fluid invalid for proper estimation of acoustic radiation forces. To date, experimental verification of these predictions has not been published. Experimental measurements of viscous effects on acoustic radiation forces in a traveling wave were conducted using a confocal optical and acoustic system and values were compared with available theories. Our results show that, even in a low-viscosity fluid such as water, the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces is increased manyfold by viscous effects in comparison with what follows from the equations derived for an inviscid fluid.

  2. Effect of parallel transport currents on the d-wave Josephson junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashedi, Gholamreza

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the non-local mixing of coherent current states in d-wave superconducting banks is investigated. The superconducting banks are connected via a ballistic point contact. The banks have mis-orientation and phase difference. Furthermore, they are subjected to a tangential transport current along the ab plane of d-wave crystals and parallel to the interface between the superconductors. The effects of mis-orientation and external transport current on the current-phase relations and current distributions are the subjects of this paper. It is observed that, at values of phase difference close to 0, π and 2π, the current distribution may have a vortex-like form in the vicinity of the point contact. The current distribution of the above-mentioned junction between d-wave superconductors is totally different from the junction between s-wave superconductors. The interesting result which this study shows is that spontaneous and Josephson currents are observed for the case of φ = 0.

  3. Nearshore waves and longshore sediment transport along Rameshwaram Island off the east coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamanickam Gowthaman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wave-induced Longshore Sediment Transport (LST play an important role in the dynamics of the Dhanushkodi sandspit located southeast of Rameshwaram. The LST along the Dhanushkodi coast is studied based on data collected simultaneously in Gulf of Mannar (GoM and Palk Bay (PB using directional waverider buoys. The numerical model REF/DIF1 was used to calculate the nearshore waves and the LST rate was estimated using three different formulae. The model validation was done based on the measured nearshore waves using InterOcean S4DW. Numerical model LITPACK was also used for simulating non-cohesive sediment transport and the LITLINE module was used to study the shoreline evolution over 5 years. Low net annual LST along PB (~0.01 × 106 m3 compared to the GoM region (0.3 × 106 m3 were due to the weak waves. Accretion in the region led to growth of the Dhanushkodi sandspit by 65 m during the period 2010-2015.

  4. Wave-Particle Interactions in the Earth's Radiation Belts: Recent Advances and Unprecedented Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.

    2017-12-01

    In the collisionless heliospheric plasmas, wave-particle interaction is a fundamental physical process in transferring energy and momentum between particles with different species and energies. This presentation focuses on one of the important wave-particle interaction processes: interaction between whistler-mode waves and electrons. Whistler-mode waves have frequencies between proton and electron cyclotron frequency and are ubiquitously present in the heliospheric plasmas including solar wind and planetary magnetospheres. I use Earth's Van Allen radiation belt as "local space laboratory" to discuss the role of whistler-mode waves in energetic electron dynamics using multi-satellite observations, theory and modeling. I further discuss solar wind drivers leading to energetic electron dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts, which is critical in predicting space weather that has broad impacts on our technological systems and society. At last, I discuss the unprecedented future opportunities of exploring space science using multi-satellite observations and state-of-the-art theory and modeling.

  5. Generation of auroral kilometric radiation in upper hybrid wave-lower hybrid soliton interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pottelette, R.; Dubouloz, N.; Treumann, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Sporadic bursts of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) associated with strong bursty electrostatic turbulence in the vicinity of the lower hybrid frequency have been frequently recorded in the AKR source region by the Viking satellite. The variation time scale of these emissions is typically 1 s, long enough for lower hybrid waves to grow to amplitudes of several hundred millivolts per meter and to evolve nonlinearly into solitons. On the basis on these observations it is suggested that formation of lower hybrid solitons may play a role in the generation of AKR. A theoretical model is proposed which is based on the direct acceleration of electrons in the combined lower hybrid soliton and upper hybrid wave fields. The solitons act as sporadic, localized antennas allowing for efficient conversions of the electrostatic energy stored in upper hybrid waves into electromagnetic radiation at a frequency above the X mode cutoff. Excitation of lower hybrid waves is due to the presence of energetic electron beams in the auroral zone found to be associated with steep plasma density gradients. Upper hybrid waves can be excited by a population of energetic electrons with loss cone distributions. The power of the electromagnetic radiation obtained is only noticeable in regions where the plasma frequency is less than the electron gyrofrequency. The theory predicts spectral power densities of the order of 10 -11 to 10 -9 W m -2 Hz -1 in the source region, in good agreement with the Viking observations. The sporadic nature of the radiation derives from lower hybrid soliton collapses which occur on ∼1-s time scales

  6. Graphene-mediated microfluidic transport and nebulization via high frequency Rayleigh wave substrate excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Hung, Yew M; Tan, Ming K

    2016-09-21

    The deposition of a thin graphene film atop a chip scale piezoelectric substrate on which surface acoustic waves are excited is observed to enhance its performance for fluid transport and manipulation considerably, which can be exploited to achieve further efficiency gains in these devices. Such gains can then enable complete integration and miniaturization for true portability for a variety of microfluidic applications across drug delivery, biosensing and point-of-care diagnostics, among others, where field-use, point-of-collection or point-of-care functionality is desired. In addition to a first demonstration of vibration-induced molecular transport in graphene films, we show that the coupling of the surface acoustic wave gives rise to antisymmetric Lamb waves in the film which enhance molecular diffusion and hence the flow through the interstitial layers that make up the film. Above a critical input power, the strong substrate vibration displacement can also force the molecules out of the graphene film to form a thin fluid layer, which subsequently destabilizes and breaks up to form a mist of micron dimension aerosol droplets. We provide physical insight into this coupling through a simple numerical model, verified through experiments, and show several-fold improvement in the rate of fluid transport through the film, and up to 55% enhancement in the rate of fluid atomization from the film using this simple method.

  7. Hydrogen Production from Sea Wave for Alternative Energy Vehicles for Public Transport in Trapani (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Franzitta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of renewable energy and hydrogen technologies represents in the mid-term a very interesting way to match the tasks of increasing the reliable exploitation of wind and sea wave energy and introducing clean technologies in the transportation sector. This paper presents two different feasibility studies: the first proposes two plants based on wind and sea wave resource for the production, storage and distribution of hydrogen for public transportation facilities in the West Sicily; the second applies the same approach to Pantelleria (a smaller island, including also some indications about solar resource. In both cases, all buses will be equipped with fuel-cells. A first economic analysis is presented together with the assessment of the avoidable greenhouse gas emissions during the operation phase. The scenarios addressed permit to correlate the demand of urban transport to renewable resources present in the territories and to the modern technologies available for the production of hydrogen from renewable energies. The study focuses on the possibility of tapping the renewable energy potential (wind and sea wave for the hydrogen production by electrolysis. The use of hydrogen would significantly reduce emissions of particulate matter and greenhouse gases in urban districts under analysis. The procedures applied in the present article, as well as the main equations used, are the result of previous applications made in different technical fields that show a good replicability.

  8. Activities of the Radiation Shielding Information Center and a report on codes/data for high energy radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussin, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    From the very early days in its history Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) has been involved with high energy radiation transport. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was an early sponsor of RSIC until the completion of the Apollo Moon Exploration Program. In addition, the intranuclear cascade work of Bertini at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided valuable resources which were made available through RSIC. Over the years, RSIC has had interactions with many of the developers of high energy radiation transport computing technology and data libraries and has been able to collect and disseminate this technology. The current status of this technology will be reviewed and prospects for new advancements will be examined

  9. Monte Carlo radiation transport: A revolution in science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.

    1993-01-01

    When Enrico Fermi, Stan Ulam, Nicholas Metropolis, John von Neuman, and Robert Richtmyer invented the Monte Carlo method fifty years ago, little could they imagine the far-flung consequences, the international applications, and the revolution in science epitomized by their abstract mathematical method. The Monte Carlo method is used in a wide variety of fields to solve exact computational models approximately by statistical sampling. It is an alternative to traditional physics modeling methods which solve approximate computational models exactly by deterministic methods. Modern computers and improved methods, such as variance reduction, have enhanced the method to the point of enabling a true predictive capability in areas such as radiation or particle transport. This predictive capability has contributed to a radical change in the way science is done: design and understanding come from computations built upon experiments rather than being limited to experiments, and the computer codes doing the computations have become the repository for physics knowledge. The MCNP Monte Carlo computer code effort at Los Alamos is an example of this revolution. Physicians unfamiliar with physics details can design cancer treatments using physics buried in the MCNP computer code. Hazardous environments and hypothetical accidents can be explored. Many other fields, from underground oil well exploration to aerospace, from physics research to energy production, from safety to bulk materials processing, benefit from MCNP, the Monte Carlo method, and the revolution in science

  10. Scattering of internal gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Leaman Nye, Abigail

    2011-01-01

    Internal gravity waves play a fundamental role in the dynamics of stably stratified regions of the atmosphere and ocean. In addition to the radiation of momentum and energy remote from generation sites, internal waves drive vertical transport of heat and mass through the ocean by wave breaking and the mixing subsequently produced. Identifying regions where internal gravity waves contribute to ocean mixing and quantifying this mixing are therefore important for accurate climate ...

  11. Interaction of electromagnetic waves with plasma in the radiation-dominated regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanov, S.V.; Esirkepov, T.Zh.; Koga, J.; Tajima, T.

    2004-01-01

    A study is made of the main regimes of interaction of relativistically strong electromagnetic waves with plasma under conditions in which the radiation from particles plays a dominant role. The discussion is focused on such issues as the generation of short electromagnetic pulses in the interaction of laser light with clusters and highly efficient ion acceleration in a thin plasma slab under the action of the ponderomotive pressure of the wave. An approach is developed for generating superintense electromagnetic pulses by means of up-to-date laser devices

  12. Depth-of-field effects in wiggler radiation sources: Geometrical versus wave optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Walker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis is carried out of the optical properties of synchrotron radiation emitted by multipole wigglers, concentrating on the effective source size and brightness and the so-called “depth of field” effects, concerning which there has been some controversy in the literature. By comparing calculations made with both geometrical optics and wave optics methods we demonstrate that the two approaches are not at variance, and that the wave optics results tend towards those of geometrical optics under well-defined conditions.

  13. Two modes of wave propagation manifested in vertical electric dipole radiation over a sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houdzoumis, Vassilios A.

    2000-01-01

    The radiation of a vertical electric dipole over an electrically homogeneous sphere is considered anew, starting with a novel mathematical formulation. Both the dipole and the point of observation are assumed to lie on the spherical interface. The analysis is valid for a sphere whose radius is much larger than the wavelength in the outside region. Contributions to the value of the fields come, on the one hand, from the waves that propagate along the interface and, on the other hand, from the waves that propagate through the sphere by successive reflections. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union

  14. Acoustic radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane (quasi)standing waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force on a 2D elliptical (non-circular) cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of plane quasi-standing and standing waves is derived, based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates. A non-dimensional acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, is defined in terms of the scattering coefficients that are determined by applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface. A system of linear equations involving a single numerical integration procedure is solved by matrix inversion. Numerical simulations showing the transition from the quasi-standing to the (equi-amplitude) standing wave behaviour are performed with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the ellipse semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb (where k is the wavenumber), without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. It is found that at high kb values > 1, the radiation force per length with broadside incidence is larger, whereas the opposite situation occurs in the long-wavelength limit (i.e., kb < 1). The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation of elliptical cylinders, the acoustic stabilization of liquid columns in a host medium, acousto-fluidics devices, and other particle dynamics applications to name a few. Moreover, the formalism presented here may be effectively applied to compute the acoustic radiation force on other 2D surfaces of arbitrary shape such as super-ellipses, Chebyshev cylindrical particles, or other non-circular geometries

  15. Acoustic radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane (quasi)standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic radiation force on a 2D elliptical (non-circular) cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of plane quasi-standing and standing waves is derived, based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates. A non-dimensional acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, is defined in terms of the scattering coefficients that are determined by applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface. A system of linear equations involving a single numerical integration procedure is solved by matrix inversion. Numerical simulations showing the transition from the quasi-standing to the (equi-amplitude) standing wave behaviour are performed with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the ellipse semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb (where k is the wavenumber), without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. It is found that at high kb values > 1, the radiation force per length with broadside incidence is larger, whereas the opposite situation occurs in the long-wavelength limit (i.e., kb acoustic levitation of elliptical cylinders, the acoustic stabilization of liquid columns in a host medium, acousto-fluidics devices, and other particle dynamics applications to name a few. Moreover, the formalism presented here may be effectively applied to compute the acoustic radiation force on other 2D surfaces of arbitrary shape such as super-ellipses, Chebyshev cylindrical particles, or other non-circular geometries.

  16. Acoustic radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane (quasi)standing waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitri, F. G., E-mail: F.G.Mitri@ieee.org [Chevron, Area 52 Technology–ETC, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87508 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    The acoustic radiation force on a 2D elliptical (non-circular) cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of plane quasi-standing and standing waves is derived, based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates. A non-dimensional acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, is defined in terms of the scattering coefficients that are determined by applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface. A system of linear equations involving a single numerical integration procedure is solved by matrix inversion. Numerical simulations showing the transition from the quasi-standing to the (equi-amplitude) standing wave behaviour are performed with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the ellipse semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb (where k is the wavenumber), without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. It is found that at high kb values > 1, the radiation force per length with broadside incidence is larger, whereas the opposite situation occurs in the long-wavelength limit (i.e., kb < 1). The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation of elliptical cylinders, the acoustic stabilization of liquid columns in a host medium, acousto-fluidics devices, and other particle dynamics applications to name a few. Moreover, the formalism presented here may be effectively applied to compute the acoustic radiation force on other 2D surfaces of arbitrary shape such as super-ellipses, Chebyshev cylindrical particles, or other non-circular geometries.

  17. Wave-optics modeling of the optical-transport line for passive optical stochastic cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorf, M. B.; Lebedev, V. A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsystemcritical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the SYNCHROTRON RADIATION WORKSHOP (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  18. Wave-Optics Modeling of the Optical-Transport Line for Passive Optical Stochastic Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andorf, M. B. [NICADD, DeKalb; Lebedev, V. A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsytem critical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the {\\sc Synchrotron Radiation Workshop} (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  19. Investigation of hurricane Ivan using the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) model is used to hindcast Hurricane Ivan (2004), an extremely intense tropical cyclone (TC) translating through the Gulf of Mexico. Sensitivity experiments with increasing complexity in ocean–atmosphere–wave coupled exchange processes are performed to assess the impacts of coupling on the predictions of the atmosphere, ocean, and wave environments during the occurrence of a TC. Modest improvement in track but significant improvement in intensity are found when using the fully atmosphere–ocean-wave coupled configuration versus uncoupled (e.g., standalone atmosphere, ocean, or wave) model simulations. Surface wave fields generated in the fully coupled configuration also demonstrates good agreement with in situ buoy measurements. Coupled and uncoupled model-simulated sea surface temperature (SST) fields are compared with both in situ and remote observations. Detailed heat budget analysis reveals that the mixed layer temperature cooling in the deep ocean (on the shelf) is caused primarily by advection (equally by advection and diffusion).

  20. Radial energy transport by magnetospheric ULF waves: Effects of magnetic curvature and plasma pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsov, Igor; Lotko, William

    1995-01-01

    The 'radial' transport of energy by internal ULF waves, stimulated by dayside magnetospheric boundary oscillations, is analyzed in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. (the term radial is used here to denote the direction orthogonal to geomagnetic flux surfaces.) The model for the inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma and background magnetic field is axisymmetric and includes radial and parallel variations in the magnetic field, magnetic curvature, plasma density, and low but finite plasma pressure. The radial mode structure of the coupled fast and intermediate MHD waves is determined by numerical solution of the inhomogeneous wave equation; the parallel mode structure is characterized by a Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Ionospheric dissipation is modeled by allowing the parallel wave number to be complex. For boudnary oscillations with frequencies in the range from 10 to 48 mHz, and using a dipole model for the background magnetic field, the combined effects of magnetic curvature and finite plasma pressure are shown to (1) enhance the amplitude of field line resonances by as much as a factor of 2 relative to values obtained in a cold plasma or box-model approximation for the dayside magnetosphere; (2) increase the energy flux delivered to a given resonance by a factor of 2-4; and (3) broaden the spectral width of the resonance by a factor of 2-3. The effects are attributed to the existence of an 'Alfven buoyancy oscillation,' which approaches the usual shear mode Alfven wave at resonance, but unlike the shear Alfven mode, it is dispersive at short perpendicular wavelengths. The form of dispersion is analogous to that of an internal atmospheric gravity wave, with the magnetic tension of the curved background field providing the restoring force and allowing radial propagation of the mode. For nominal dayside parameters, the propagation band of the Alfven buoyancy wave occurs between the location of its (field line) resonance and that of the

  1. High-Speed Transport of Fluid Drops and Solid Particles via Surface Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Lih, Shyh-shiuh

    2012-01-01

    A compact sampling tool mechanism that can operate at various temperatures, and transport and sieve particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains with no moving parts, has been created using traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs) that are emitted by an inter-digital transducer (IDT). The generated waves are driven at about 10 MHz, and it causes powder to move towards the IDT at high speed with different speeds for different sizes of particles, which enables these particles to be sieved. This design is based on the use of SAWs and their propelling effect on powder particles and fluids along the path of the waves. Generally, SAWs are elastic waves propagating in a shallow layer of about one wavelength beneath the surface of a solid substrate. To generate SAWs, a piezoelectric plate is used that is made of LiNbO3 crystal cut along the x-axis with rotation of 127.8 along the y-axis. On this plate are printed pairs of fingerlike electrodes in the form of a grating that are activated by subjecting the gap between the electrodes to electric field. This configuration of a surface wave transmitter is called IDT. The IDT that was used consists of 20 pairs of fingers with 0.4-mm spacing, a total length of 12.5 mm. The surface wave is produced by the nature of piezoelectric material to contract or expand when subjected to an electric field. Driving the IDT to generate wave at high amplitudes provides an actuation mechanism where the surface particles move elliptically, pulling powder particles on the surface toward the wavesource and pushing liquids in the opposite direction. This behavior allows the innovation to separate large particles and fluids that are mixed. Fluids are removed at speed (7.5 to 15 cm/s), enabling this innovation of acting as a bladeless wiper for raindrops. For the windshield design, the electrodes could be made transparent so that they do not disturb the driver or pilot. Multiple IDTs can be synchronized to transport water or powder over larger

  2. Back Radiation Suppression through a Semitransparent Ground Plane for a mm-Wave Patch Antenna

    KAUST Repository

    Klionovski, Kirill

    2017-06-21

    Omnidirectional radiation pattern with minimum backward radiation is highly desirable for base station antennas to minimize the multipath effects. Semitransparent ground planes have been used to reduce the backward radiation, but mostly with complicated non-uniform impedance distribution. In this work, we propose, for the first time, a round semitransparent ground plane of radius 0.8 λ with uniform impedance distribution that can improve the front-to-back ratio of a wideband patch antenna by 11.6 dB as compared to a similar sized metallic ground plane. The value of uniform impedance is obtained through analytical optimization by using asymptotic expressions in the Kirchhoff approximation of the radiation pattern of a toroidal wave scattered by a round semitransparent ground plane. The semitransparent ground plane has been realized using a low-cost carbon paste on a Kapton film. Experimental results match closely with those of simulations and validate the overall concept.

  3. A simulation model for the actual, long wave and net solar radiation computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, B.; Stoilov, A.; Lyubomirov, L.

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to present a calculating procedure for the components of the radiation balance - actual, long-wave and net radiation calculation, using the sunshine duration and the standard meteorological information, through a previously prepared program product.To calculate the actual solar radiation using the total cloudiness only, an empirical regression model has been developed. The results of the coefficient of correlation R(0.75-0.88), respectively for the spring and summer periods (March-May; June-August) show the adequacy of the chosen model. The verification of the model on the independent experimental material prove that the approach that authors suggested, can be successfully applied to the calculation of the actual radiation of the current place

  4. Dynamics of flexural gravity waves: from sea ice to Hawking radiation and analogue gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S; Sahoo, T; Meylan, M H

    2018-01-01

    The propagation of flexural gravity waves, routinely used to model wave interaction with sea ice, is studied, including the effect of compression and current. A number of significant and surprising properties are shown to exist. The occurrence of blocking above a critical value of compression is illustrated. This is analogous to propagation of surface gravity waves in the presence of opposing current and light wave propagation in the curved space-time near a black hole, therefore providing a novel system for studying analogue gravity. Between the blocking and buckling limit of the compressive force, the dispersion relation possesses three positive real roots, contrary to an earlier observation of having a single positive real root. Negative energy waves, in which the phase and group velocity point in opposite directions, are also shown to exist. In the presence of an opposing current and certain critical ranges of compressive force, the second blocking point shifts from the positive to the negative branch of the dispersion relation. Such a shift is known as the Hawking effect from the analogous behaviour in the theory of relativity which leads to Hawking radiation. The theory we develop is illustrated with simulations of linear waves in the time domain.

  5. Radiative corrections to the Coulomb law and model of dense quantum plasmas: Dispersion of longitudinal waves in magnetized quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2018-04-01

    Two kinds of quantum electrodynamic radiative corrections to electromagnetic interactions and their influence on the properties of highly dense quantum plasmas are considered. Linear radiative correction to the Coulomb interaction is considered. Its contribution in the spectrum of the Langmuir waves is presented. The second kind of radiative corrections are related to the nonlinearity of the Maxwell equations for the strong electromagnetic field. Their contribution in the spectrum of transverse waves of magnetized plasmas is briefly discussed. At the consideration of the Langmuir wave spectrum, we included the effect of different distributions of the spin-up and spin-down electrons revealing in the Fermi pressure shift.

  6. Subphotospheric fluctuations in magnetized radiative envelopes: contribution from unstable magnetosonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Koushik; Fernández, Rodrigo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2018-06-01

    We examine the excitation of unstable magnetosonic waves in the radiative envelopes of intermediate- and high-mass stars with a magnetic field of ˜kG strength. Wind clumping close to the star and microturbulence can often be accounted for when including small-scale, subphotospheric density or velocity perturbations. Compressional waves - with wavelengths comparable to or shorter than the gas pressure scale height - can be destabilized by the radiative flux in optically thick media when a magnetic field is present, in a process called the radiation-driven magneto-acoustic instability (RMI). The instability does not require radiation or magnetic pressure to dominate over gas pressure, and acts independently of subsurface convection zones. Here we evaluate the conditions for the RMI to operate on a grid of stellar models covering a mass range 3-40 M⊙ at solar metallicity. For a uniform 1 kG magnetic field, fast magnetosonic modes are unstable down to an optical depth of a few tens, while unstable slow modes extend beyond the depth of the iron convection zone. The qualitative behaviour is robust to magnetic field strength variations by a factor of a few. When combining our findings with previous results for the saturation amplitude of the RMI, we predict velocity fluctuations in the range ˜0.1-10 km s-1. These amplitudes are a monotonically increasing function of the ratio of radiation to gas pressure, or alternatively, of the zero-age main sequence mass.

  7. Structure and damping of toroidal drift waves (and their implications for anomalous transport)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.B.; Connor, J.; Wilson, H.R.

    1993-05-01

    The conventional theory of high-n toroidal drift waves, based on the ballooning representation, indicates that shear-damping is generally reduced in a torus compared to its plane-slab value. It therefore describes the most unstable class of toroidal drift waves. However, modes of this type occur only i f the diamagnetic frequency ω*(r) has a maximum in r, and they affect only a small fraction, Ο(1/n l/2 ), of the plasma radius around this maximum. Consequently they may produce little anomalous transport. In the present work we show that, within the ballooning description, there is another class of toroidal drift waves with very different properties to the conventional ones. The new modes have greater shear-damping (closer to that in a plane-slab) than the conventional ones and so have a higher instability threshold. However, they occur for any plasma profile and at all radii, and they have larger radial extent. Consequently they may produce much greater anomalous transport than the possibly benign conventional modes. This suggests a picture of anomalous transport in which the plasma profile is determined by marginal stability, but marginal to the new class of modes not to the conventional ones. This might explain why marginally stable profiles calculated for drift waves with plane-slab damping sometimes agree well with the profiles in toroidal experiments. It is also consistent with the fact that experimental profiles may exceed conventional toroidal instability thresholds. The new modes may also be related to the tong radial structures which appear in some plasma simulations and in experiments

  8. Radiation exposures of workers and the public associated with the transport of radioactive material in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, G.; Fett, H.J.; Lange, F.

    2004-01-01

    Most radioactive material packages transported emit penetrating ionising radiation and radiation exposures of transport workers and the public may occur during their transport. The radiation exposures incurred by transport workers and members of the public can vary significantly depending on a number of factors: most important is the type of radiation emitted (primarily gamma and neutron radiation), the radiation field intensity in the surrounding of a package and conveyance and the duration of exposure to ionising radiation. The information and guidance material on occupational exposures has primarily been derived from a survey and analysis of personal monitoring data provided by a number of commercial transport operators in Germany known as major carrier and handler organisations of fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle material (in terms of the number of pack-ages and the activity carriaged). To some extent advantage was taken of compilations of statistical transport and exposure data collated within other transport safety analysis studies including research projects funded by the European Commission. The exposure data collected cover the time period of the last 4 - 8 years and are most representative for routine transport operations closely related to the movement phase of packaged radioactive material, i.e. receipt, vehicle loading, carriage, in-transit storage, intra-/intermodal transfer, vehicle unloading and delivery at the final destination of loads of radioactive material and packages and the related supervisory and health physics functions. Radiation dose monitoring of members of the public, however, is generally impracticable and, consequently, the information available relies on employing dose assessment models and reflects radiation exposures incurred by hypothetical or critical group individuals of members of the public under normal conditions of transport

  9. Enhanced polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation from thermal gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Mohanty, Subhendra; Nautiyal, Akhilesh

    2006-12-22

    If inflation was preceded by a radiation era, then at the time of inflation there will exist a decoupled thermal distribution of gravitons. Gravitational waves generated during inflation will be amplified by the process of stimulated emission into the existing thermal distribution of gravitons. Consequently, the usual zero temperature scale invariant tensor spectrum is modified by a temperature dependent factor. This thermal correction factor amplifies the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation by an order of magnitude at large angles, which may now be in the range of observability of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.

  10. Renal shear wave velocity by acoustic radiation force impulse did not reflect advanced renal impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Tomoaki; Koda, Masahiko; Sugihara, Takaaki; Sugihara, Shinobu; Okamoto, Toshiaki; Miyoshi, Kenichi; Matono, Tomomitsu; Hosho, Keiko; Mae, Yukari; Iyama, Takuji; Fukui, Takeaki; Fukuda, Satoko; Munemura, Chishio; Isomoto, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse is a noninvasive method for evaluating tissue elasticity on ultrasound. Renal shear wave velocity measured by this technique has not been fully investigated in patients with renal disease. The aim of the present study was to compare renal shear wave velocity in end-stage renal disease patients and that in patients without chronic kidney disease and to investigate influencing factors. Renal shear wave velocities were measured in 59 healthy young subjects (control group), 31 subjects without chronic kidney disease (non-CKD group), and 39 end-stage renal disease patients (ESRD group). Each measurement was performed 10 times at both kidneys, and the mean value of eight of 10 measurements, excluding the maximum and minimum values, was compared. Renal shear wave velocity could be measured in all subjects. Renal shear wave velocity in the control group was higher than in the non-CKD group and in the ESRD group, and no difference was found between the non-CKD group and the ESRD group. Age and depth were negatively correlated to the renal shear wave velocity. In multiple regression analysis, age and depth were independent factors for renal shear wave velocity, while renal impairment was not. There was no difference between the non-CKD group and the ESRD group, even when ages were matched and depth was adjusted. Renal shear wave velocity was not associated with advanced renal impairment. However, it reflected alteration of renal aging, and this technique may be useful to detect renal impairment in the earlier stages. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  11. Kinetic theory for radiation interacting with sound waves in ultrarelativistic pair plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, Mattias; Shukla, Padma K.; Stenflo, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    A kinetic theory for radiation interacting with sound waves in an ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma is developed. It is shown that the effect of a spatial spectral broadening of the electromagnetic pulse is to introduce a reduction of the growth rates for the decay and modulational instabilities. Such spectral broadening could be due to a finite pulse coherence length, or through the use of random phase filters, and would stabilize the propagation of electromagnetic pulses

  12. Discrete ordinate solution of the radiative transfer equation in the 'polarization normal wave representation'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylling, A.

    1991-01-01

    The transfer equations for normal waves in finite, inhomogeneous and plane-parallel magnetoactive media are solved using the discrete ordinate method. The physical process of absorption, emission, and multiple scattering are accounted for, and the medium may be forced both at the top and bottom boundary by anisotropic radiation as well as by internal anisotropic sources. The computational procedure is numerically stable for arbitrarily large optical depths, and the computer time is independent of optical thickness.

  13. A simple formula for the net long-wave radiation flux in the southern Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Zapadka

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses problems of estimating the net long-wave radiation flux at the sea surface on the basis of easily measurable meteorological quantities (air and sea surface temperatures, near-surface water vapour pressure, cloudiness. Empirical data and existing formulae are compared. Additionally, an improved formula for the southern Baltic region is introduced, with a systematic error of less than 1 W -2 and a statistical error of less than 20 W -2.

  14. Use of Z pinch radiation sources for high pressure shock wave studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, J.R.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A.; Trott, W.M.; Chandler, G.A.; Holland, K.G.; Fleming, K.J.; Trucano, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments in pulsed power technology demonstrate use of intense radiation sources (Z pinches) for driving planar shock waves in samples with spatial dimensions larger than possible with other radiation sources. Initial indications are that the use of Z pinch sources can be used to produce planar shock waves in samples with diameters of a few millimeters and thicknesses approaching one half millimeter. These dimensions allow increased accuracy of both shock velocity and particle velocity measurements. The Z pinch radiation source uses imploding metal plasma induced by self-magnetic fields applied to wire arrays to produce high temperature x-ray environments in vacuum hohlraum enclosures. Previous experiments have demonstrated that planar shock waves can be produced with this approach. A photograph of a wire array located inside the vacuum hohlraum is shown here. Typically, a few hundred individual wires are used to produce the Z pinch source. For the shock wave experiments being designed, arrays of 120 to 240 tungsten wires with a diameter of 40 mm and with individual diameters of about 10 microm are used. Preliminary experiments have been performed on the Z pulsed radiation source to demonstrate the ability to obtain VISAR measurements in the Z accelerator environment. Analysis of these results indicate that another effect, not initially anticipated, is an apparent change in refractive index that occurs in the various optical components used in the system. This effect results in an apparent shift in the frequency of reflected laser light, and causes an error in the measured particle velocity. Experiments are in progress to understand and minimize this effect

  15. The adaptive collision source method for discrete ordinates radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, William J.; Haghighat, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new adaptive quadrature method to solve the discrete ordinates transport equation. • The adaptive collision source (ACS) method splits the flux into n’th collided components. • Uncollided flux requires high quadrature; this is lowered with number of collisions. • ACS automatically applies appropriate quadrature order each collided component. • The adaptive quadrature is 1.5–4 times more efficient than uniform quadrature. - Abstract: A novel collision source method has been developed to solve the Linear Boltzmann Equation (LBE) more efficiently by adaptation of the angular quadrature order. The angular adaptation method is unique in that the flux from each scattering source iteration is obtained, with potentially a different quadrature order used for each. Traditionally, the flux from every iteration is combined, with the same quadrature applied to the combined flux. Since the scattering process tends to distribute the radiation more evenly over angles (i.e., make it more isotropic), the quadrature requirements generally decrease with each iteration. This method allows for an optimal use of processing power, by using a high order quadrature for the first iterations that need it, before shifting to lower order quadratures for the remaining iterations. This is essentially an extension of the first collision source method, and is referred to as the adaptive collision source (ACS) method. The ACS methodology has been implemented in the 3-D, parallel, multigroup discrete ordinates code TITAN. This code was tested on a several simple and complex fixed-source problems. The ACS implementation in TITAN has shown a reduction in computation time by a factor of 1.5–4 on the fixed-source test problems, for the same desired level of accuracy, as compared to the standard TITAN code.

  16. Drift-Alfven wave mediated particle transport in an elongated density depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Cross-field particle transport due to drift-Alfven waves is measured in an elongated density depression within an otherwise uniform, magnetized helium plasma column. The depression is formed by drawing an electron current to a biased copper plate with cross-field dimensions of 28x0.24 ion sound-gyroradii ρ s =c s /ω ci . The process of density depletion and replenishment via particle flux repeats in a quasiperiodic fashion for the duration of the current collection. The mode structure of the wave density fluctuations in the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field is revealed using a two-probe correlation technique. The particle flux as a function of frequency is measured using a linear array of Langmuir probes and the only significant transport occurs for waves with frequencies between 15%-25% of the ion cyclotron frequency (measured in the laboratory frame) and with perpendicular wavelengths k perpendicular ρ s ∼0.7. The frequency-integrated particle flux is in rough agreement with observed increases in density in the center of the depletion as a function of time. The experiments are carried out in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the Basic Plasma Science Facility located at the University of California, Los Angeles

  17. Drift-Alfvén wave mediated particle transport in an elongated density depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2006-06-01

    Cross-field particle transport due to drift-Alfvén waves is measured in an elongated density depression within an otherwise uniform, magnetized helium plasma column. The depression is formed by drawing an electron current to a biased copper plate with cross-field dimensions of 28ρs=cs/ωci. The process of density depletion and replenishment via particle flux repeats in a quasiperiodic fashion for the duration of the current collection. The mode structure of the wave density fluctuations in the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field is revealed using a two-probe correlation technique. The particle flux as a function of frequency is measured using a linear array of Langmuir probes and the only significant transport occurs for waves with frequencies between 15%-25% of the ion cyclotron frequency (measured in the laboratory frame) and with perpendicular wavelengths k ⊥ρs˜0.7. The frequency-integrated particle flux is in rough agreement with observed increases in density in the center of the depletion as a function of time. The experiments are carried out in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the Basic Plasma Science Facility located at the University of California, Los Angeles.

  18. Radiation inactivation studies of renal brush border water and urea transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkman, A.S.; Dix, J.A.; Seifter, J.L.; Skorecki, K.L.; Jung, C.Y.; Ausiello, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation inactivation was used to determine the nature and molecular weight of water and urea transport pathways in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) isolated from rabbit renal cortex. BBMV were frozen to -50 degrees C, irradiated with 1.5 MeV electrons, thawed, and assayed for transport or enzyme activity. The freezing process had no effect on enzyme or transport kinetics. BBMV alkaline phosphatase activity gave linear ln(activity) vs. radiation dose plots with a target size of 68 +/- 3 kDa, similar to previously reported values. Water and solute transport were measured using the stopped-flow light-scattering technique. The rates of acetamide and osmotic water transport did not depend on radiation dose (0-7 Mrad), suggesting that transport of these substances does not require a protein carrier. In contrast, urea and thiourea transport gave linear ln(activity) vs. dose curves with a target size of 125-150 kDa; 400 mM urea inhibited thiourea flux by -50% at 0 and 4.7 Mrad, showing that radiation does not affect inhibitor binding to surviving transporters. These studies suggest that BBMV urea transport requires a membrane protein, whereas osmotic water transport does not

  19. Stabilized platform for tethered balloon soundings of broadband long- and short-wave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer, J.M.; Anderson, G.A.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in the composition of trace gases in the earth's atmosphere have been reported by many observers, and a general concern has been expressed regarding possible changes to the earth's climate that may be caused by radiatively active gases introduced into the earth's atmosphere by man's activities. Radiatively active trace gases produce temperature changes in the earth's atmosphere through changes in radiative flux divergence. Our knowledge of and means of measuring radiative flux divergence is very limited. A few observations of vertical radiative flux divergences have been reported from aircraft from radiometersondes from towers and from large tethered balloons. These measurement techniques suffers from one or more drawbacks, including shallow sounding depths (towers), high cost (aircraft), complicated logistics (large tethered balloons), and limitation to nighttime hours (radiometersondes). Changes in radiative flux divergence caused by anthropogenic trace gases are expected to be quite small, and will be difficult to measure with existing broadband radiative flux instruments. The emphasis of present research in global climate change is thus being focused on improving radiative transfer algorithms in global climate models. The radiative parameterizations in these models are at an early stage of development and information is needed regarding their performance, especially in cloudy conditions. The impetus for the research reported in this paper is the need for a device that can supplement existing means of measuring vertical profiles of long- and short-wave irradiance and radiative flux divergence. We have designed a small tethered-balloon-based system that can make radiometric soundings through the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper discusses the concept, the design considerations, and the design and construction of this sounding system. The performance of the system will be tested in a series of balloon flights scheduled for the fall and winter of 1992

  20. Ballistic transport of spin waves incident from cobalt leads across cobalt–gadolinium alloy nanojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashokan, V.; Abou Ghantous, M.; Ghader, D.; Khater, A.

    2014-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the scattering and ballistic transport of spin waves (SW) incident from cobalt leads, on ultrathin ferrimagnetic cobalt–gadolinium ‥Co][Co (1−c) Gd (c) ] ℓ [Co‥ nanojunction systems. The nanojunction [Co (1−c) Gd (c) ] ℓ itself is a randomly disordered alloy of thickness ℓ hcp lattice planes between matching hcp planes of the Co leads, at known stable concentrations c≤0.5 for this alloy system. To compute the spin dynamics, and the SW scattering and ballistic transport, this alloy nanojunction is modeled in the virtual crystal approximation (VCA), valid in particular at the length scale of the nanojunction for submicroscopic SW wavelengths. The phase field matching theory (PFMT) is applied to compute the localized and resonant magnons on the nanojunction. These magnons, characteristic of the embedded nanostructure, propagate in its symmetry plane with spin precession amplitudes that decay or match the spin wave states in the semi-infinite leads. The eigenvectors of these magnon modes are calculated for certain cases to illustrate the spin precession configurations on the nanojunction. The VCA-PFMT approach is also used to calculate the reflection and transmission spectra for the spin waves incident from the Co leads on the nanojunction. The results demonstrate resonance assisted maxima for the ballistic SW transmission spectra due to interactions between the incident spin waves and the nanojunction magnon modes. These properties are general for variable nanojunction thicknesses and alloy stable concentrations c≤0.5. In particular, the positions of the resonance assisted maxima of spin wave transmission can be modified with nanojunction thickness and alloy concentration. - Highlights: • Model is presented for spin wave scattering at CoGd disordered alloy nanojunctions. • Computations yield the localized and resonant magnon modes on the nanojunctions. • The spin waves ballistic reflection and transmission

  1. Relationship of scattering phase shifts to special radiation force conditions for spheres in axisymmetric wave-fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Philip L; Zhang, Likun

    2017-05-01

    When investigating the radiation forces on spheres in complicated wave-fields, the interpretation of analytical results can be simplified by retaining the s-function notation and associated phase shifts imported into acoustics from quantum scattering theory. For situations in which dissipation is negligible, as taken to be the case in the present investigation, there is an additional simplification in that partial-wave phase shifts become real numbers that vanish when the partial-wave index becomes large and when the wave-number-sphere-radius product vanishes. By restricting attention to monopole and dipole phase shifts, transitions in the axial radiation force for axisymmetric wave-fields are found to be related to wave-field parameters for traveling and standing Bessel wave-fields by considering the ratio of the phase shifts. For traveling waves, the special force conditions concern negative forces while for standing waves, the special force conditions concern vanishing radiation forces. An intermediate step involves considering the functional dependence on phase shifts. An appendix gives an approximation for zero-force plane standing wave conditions. Connections with early investigations of acoustic levitation are mentioned and some complications associated with viscosity are briefly noted.

  2. A low-frequency wave motion mechanism enables efficient energy transport in carbon nanotubes at high heat fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-07-11

    The great majority of investigations of thermal transport in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the open literature focus on low heat fluxes, that is, in the regime of validity of the Fourier heat conduction law. In this paper, by performing nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we investigated thermal transport in a single-walled CNT bridging two Si slabs under constant high heat flux. An anomalous wave-like kinetic energy profile was observed, and a previously unexplored, wave-dominated energy transport mechanism is identified for high heat fluxes in CNTs, originated from excited low frequency transverse acoustic waves. The transported energy, in terms of a one-dimensional low frequency mechanical wave, is quantified as a function of the total heat flux applied and is compared to the energy transported by traditional Fourier heat conduction. The results show that the low frequency wave actually overtakes traditional Fourier heat conduction and efficiently transports the energy at high heat flux. Our findings reveal an important new mechanism for high heat flux energy transport in low-dimensional nanostructures, such as one-dimensional (1-D) nanotubes and nanowires, which could be very relevant to high heat flux dissipation such as in micro/nanoelectronics applications.

  3. Production of narrowband tunable extreme-ultraviolet radiation by noncollinear resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannemann, S.; Hollenstein, U.; van Duijn, E.J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    Fourier-transform-limited extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation (bandwidth ≲300 MHz) tunable around 91 nm is produced by use of two-photon resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing on the Kr resonance at 94 093 cm

  4. Quantum transport of atomic matter waves in anisotropic two-dimensional and three-dimensional disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piraud, M; Pezzé, L; Sanchez-Palencia, L

    2013-01-01

    The macroscopic transport properties in a disordered potential, namely diffusion and weak/strong localization, closely depend on the microscopic and statistical properties of the disorder itself. This dependence is rich in counter-intuitive consequences. It can be particularly exploited in matter wave experiments, where the disordered potential can be tailored and controlled, and anisotropies are naturally present. In this work, we apply a perturbative microscopic transport theory and the self-consistent theory of Anderson localization to study the transport properties of ultracold atoms in anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) speckle potentials. In particular, we discuss the anisotropy of single-scattering, diffusion and localization. We also calculate disorder-induced shift of the energy states and propose a method to include it, which amounts to renormalizing energies in the standard on-shell approximation. We show that the renormalization of energies strongly affects the prediction for the 3D localization threshold (mobility edge). We illustrate the theoretical findings with examples which are relevant for current matter wave experiments, where the disorder is created with laser speckle. This paper provides a guideline for future experiments aiming at the precise location of the 3D mobility edge and study of anisotropic diffusion and localization effects in 2D and 3D. (paper)

  5. Three-dimensional wave-induced current model equations and radiation stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua-yong

    2017-08-01

    After the approach by Mellor (2003, 2008), the present paper reports on a repeated effort to derive the equations for three-dimensional wave-induced current. Via the vertical momentum equation and a proper coordinate transformation, the phase-averaged wave dynamic pressure is well treated, and a continuous and depth-dependent radiation stress tensor, rather than the controversial delta Dirac function at the surface shown in Mellor (2008), is provided. Besides, a phase-averaged vertical momentum flux over a sloping bottom is introduced. All the inconsistencies in Mellor (2003, 2008), pointed out by Ardhuin et al. (2008) and Bennis and Ardhuin (2011), are overcome in the presently revised equations. In a test case with a sloping sea bed, as shown in Ardhuin et al. (2008), the wave-driving forces derived in the present equations are in good balance, and no spurious vertical circulation occurs outside the surf zone, indicating that Airy's wave theory and the approach of Mellor (2003, 2008) are applicable for the derivation of the wave-induced current model.

  6. Process and appliance for determining the nature of transported substances by measuring the radiations transmitted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wykes, J.S.; Surzyn, P.M.; Croke, G.M.; Adsley, Ian.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a process for determining the nature of a substance transported, comprising the collimation of the radiation of not less than two energies so that they form beams; the irradiation of the matter transported by the beams, the detection of the non-scattered radiations for the two energies at least, after passing in the transported matter, and the deduction of the nature of the transported matter according to the radiations detected. The radiations are collimated by placing a shield around the gamma source (americium 241 or cesium 137). The detector is protected by a shield so that it prevents any significant interference due to the reactions near the surface provoked by those radiations not of the lowest energy, with detection of those radiations of lesser energy. In a variation, a source of relatively higher energy radiations is placed at a distance from the source of relatively lesser energy radiations. The latter have a component taken from natural ionizing radiation and this component is withdrawn to a predetermined calibration [fr

  7. Full-Wave Techniques for the Analysis of Electrodynamics and Coherent Quantum Transport in Graphene Nanodevices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Pierantoni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on full-wave techniques in the frequency (energy-domain and the time-domain, aimed at the investigation of the combined electromagnetic-coherent transport problem in carbon based nanostructured materials and devices viz. graphene nanoribbons. The frequency-domain approach is introduced in order to describe a Poisson-Schrödinger / Dirac system in a quasi static framework. Thetime-domain approach deals with the full-wave solution of the combined Maxwell-Schrödinger / Dirac system of equations. From the above theoretical platforms, home-made solvers are provided, aimed atdealing with challenging problems in realistic devices / systems environments, typical of the area of radio-frequency nanoelectronics.

  8. Nonequilibrium radiation behind a strong shock wave in CO{sub 2}-N{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rond, C. [Universite de Provence - IUSTI, 5 rue Enrico Fermi, Marseille 13013 (France)], E-mail: rond@coria.fr; Boubert, P.; Felio, J.-M.; Chikhaoui, A. [Universite de Provence - IUSTI, 5 rue Enrico Fermi, Marseille 13013 (France)

    2007-11-09

    This work presents experiments reproducing plasma re-entry for one trajectory point of a Martian mission. The typical facility to investigate such hypersonic flow is shock tube; here we used the free-piston shock tube TCM2. Measurements of radiative flux behind the shock wave are realized thanks to time-resolved emission spectroscopy which is calibrated in intensity. As CN violet system is the main radiator in near UV-visible range, we have focused our study on its spectrum. Moreover a physical model, based on a multi-temperature kinetic code and a radiative code, for calculation of non equilibrium radiation behind a shock wave is developed for CO{sub 2}-N{sub 2}-Ar mixtures. Comparisons between experiments and calculations show that standard kinetic models (Park, McKenzie) are inefficient to reproduce our experimental results. Therefore we propose new rate coefficients in particular for the dissociation of CO{sub 2}, showing the way towards a better description of the chemistry of the mixture.

  9. Nonequilibrium radiation behind a strong shock wave in CO 2-N 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rond, C.; Boubert, P.; Félio, J.-M.; Chikhaoui, A.

    2007-11-01

    This work presents experiments reproducing plasma re-entry for one trajectory point of a Martian mission. The typical facility to investigate such hypersonic flow is shock tube; here we used the free-piston shock tube TCM2. Measurements of radiative flux behind the shock wave are realized thanks to time-resolved emission spectroscopy which is calibrated in intensity. As CN violet system is the main radiator in near UV-visible range, we have focused our study on its spectrum. Moreover a physical model, based on a multi-temperature kinetic code and a radiative code, for calculation of non equilibrium radiation behind a shock wave is developed for CO 2-N 2-Ar mixtures. Comparisons between experiments and calculations show that standard kinetic models (Park, McKenzie) are inefficient to reproduce our experimental results. Therefore we propose new rate coefficients in particular for the dissociation of CO 2, showing the way towards a better description of the chemistry of the mixture.

  10. Resonant trapping in the transport of a matter-wave soliton through a quantum well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, Thomas; Brand, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the scattering of bright solitons in a Bose-Einstein condensate on narrow attractive potential wells. Reflection, transmission, and trapping of an incident soliton are predicted to occur with remarkably abrupt transitions upon varying the potential depth. Numerical simulations of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation are complemented by a variational collective coordinate approach. The mechanism for nonlinear trapping is found to rely both on resonant interaction between the soliton and bound states in the potential well and on the radiation of small-amplitude waves. These results suggest that solitons can be used to probe bound states that are not accessible through scattering with single atoms.

  11. Experimental validation of GADRAS's coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Harding, Lee T.

    2010-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed an inverse radiation transport solver that applies nonlinear regression to coupled neutron-photon deterministic transport models. The inverse solver uses nonlinear regression to fit a radiation transport model to gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5 kg sphere of α-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured bare and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses between 1.27 and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to evaluate the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured radiation signatures.

  12. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  13. Effects of Millimeter-Wave Electromagnetic Radiation on the Experimental Model of Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivachenko, I B; Medvedev, D S; Molodtsova, I D; Panteleev, S S; Sokolov, A Yu; Lyubashina, O A

    2016-02-01

    Effects of millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation (40 GHz frequency, 0.01 mW power) on the spontaneous fi ring of convergent neurons of the spinal trigeminal nucleus and their responses to electrical stimulation of the dura mater were studied in neurophysiological experiments on rats. Irradiation of the area of cutaneous receptive fields of spinal trigeminal nucleus reversibly inhibited both spontaneous discharges and activity induced by electrical stimulation of the dura mater. The second and third exposures to electromagnetic radiation with an interval of 10 min were ineffective. These results suggest that suppression of neuronal excitability in the spinal trigeminal ganglion can be a mechanism of the anti-migraine effects of electromagnetic radiation observed in clinical practice.

  14. Drying of Agricultural Products Using Long Wave Infrared Radiation(Part 2). Drying of Welsh Onion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Han, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    The investigation was carried out to clarify the intermittent drying characteristics for welsh onion use of long-wave infrared radiation. When compared with two other methods: use of air and vacuum freezing, this method showed significantly high rate of drying. The experiments were carried out analyzing the influence of different lengths of the welsh onion, different rate of radiation and different temperature of the airflow. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The rate of drying increases as the length of welsh onion decrease and the rate of radiation increase. 2. The airflow, temperature does not influence to the rate of drying. 3. The increasing of the drying time considerably aggravate the quality the dried welsh onion

  15. Possibility of obtaining coherent short wave radiation from a solid state free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogacz, S.A.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1986-03-01

    The idea of using a crystal lattice or a superlattice as an undulator for a free electron laser is explored. A purely classical treatment of relativistic positrons channeling through the proposed structure involving a self consistent solution of the wave equation for the radiating electromagnetic field and the kinetic equation for the positron distribution function leads to a positive gain coefficient for a forward radiating field. Matching the Kumakhov resonance to the undulator frequency further enhances the gain. This result, combined with a feedback mechanism arising from Bragg diffraction within the basic crystal lattice, leads to an instability of the radiation inside the crystal. Finally a numerical estimate of the Kumakhov-enhanced gain coefficient is made for the (110) planar channeling in a strain modulated Si superlattice. 8 refs., 4 figs

  16. Higher-fidelity yet efficient modeling of radiation energy transport through three-dimensional clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, M.L.; Davis, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate modeling of radiative energy transport through cloudy atmospheres is necessary for both climate modeling with GCMs (Global Climate Models) and remote sensing. Previous modeling efforts have taken advantage of extreme aspect ratios (cells that are very wide horizontally) by assuming a 1-D treatment vertically - the Independent Column Approximation (ICA). Recent attempts to resolve radiation transport through the clouds have drastically changed the aspect ratios of the cells, moving them closer to unity, such that the ICA model is no longer valid. We aim to provide a higher-fidelity atmospheric radiation transport model which increases accuracy while maintaining efficiency. To that end, this paper describes the development of an efficient 3-D-capable radiation code that can be easily integrated into cloud resolving models as an alternative to the resident 1-D model. Applications to test cases from the Intercomparison of 3-D Radiation Codes (I3RC) protocol are shown

  17. A Photon Free Method to Solve Radiation Transport Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, B

    2006-01-01

    The multi-group discrete-ordinate equations of radiation transfer is solved for the first time by Newton's method. It is a photon free method because the photon variables are eliminated from the radiation equations to yield a N group XN direction smaller but equivalent system of equations. The smaller set of equations can be solved more efficiently than the original set of equations. Newton's method is more stable than the Semi-implicit Linear method currently used by conventional radiation codes

  18. SPREADING LAYERS IN ACCRETING OBJECTS: ROLE OF ACOUSTIC WAVES FOR ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT, MIXING, AND THERMODYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M., E-mail: sashaph@princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    Disk accretion at a high rate onto a white dwarf (WD) or a neutron star has been suggested to result in the formation of a spreading layer (SL)—a belt-like structure on the object's surface, in which the accreted matter steadily spreads in the poleward (meridional) direction while spinning down. To assess its basic characteristics, we perform two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of supersonic SLs in the relevant morphology with a simple prescription for cooling. We demonstrate that supersonic shear naturally present at the base of the SL inevitably drives sonic instability that gives rise to large-scale acoustic modes governing the evolution of the SL. These modes dominate the transport of momentum and energy, which is intrinsically global and cannot be characterized via some form of local effective viscosity (e.g., α-viscosity). The global nature of the wave-driven transport should have important implications for triggering Type I X-ray bursts in low-mass X-ray binaries. The nonlinear evolution of waves into a system of shocks drives effective rearrangement (sensitively depending on thermodynamical properties of the flow) and deceleration of the SL, which ultimately becomes transonic and susceptible to regular Kelvin–Helmholtz instability. We interpret this evolution in terms of the global structure of the SL and suggest that mixing of the SL material with the underlying stellar fluid should become effective only at intermediate latitudes on the accreting object's surface, where the flow has decelerated appreciably. In the near-equatorial regions the transport is dominated by acoustic waves and mixing is less efficient. We speculate that this latitudinal nonuniformity of mixing in accreting WDs may be linked to the observed bipolar morphology of classical nova ejecta.

  19. Anthology of the development of radiation transport tools as applied to single event effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkerman, A.; Barak, J.; Murat, M.; Duzellier, S.; Hubert, G.; Gaillardin, M.; Raine, M.; Jordan, T.; Jun, I.; Koontz, S.; Reddell, B.; O'Neill, P.; Foster, C.; Culpepper, W.; Lei, F.; McNulty, P.; Nieminen, P.; Saigne, F.; Wrobel, F.; Santin, G.; Sihver, L.; Tang, H.H.K.; Truscott, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    This anthology contains contributions from eleven different groups, each developing and/or applying Monte Carlo-based radiation transport tools to simulate a variety of effects that result from energy transferred to a semiconductor material by a single particle event. The topics span from basic mechanisms for single-particle induced failures to applied tasks like developing web sites to predict on-orbit single event failure rates using Monte Carlo radiation transport tools. (authors)

  20. Anthology of the Development of Radiation Transport Tools as Applied to Single Event Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. A.; Weller, R. A.; Akkerman, A.; Barak, J.; Culpepper, W.; Duzellier, S.; Foster, C.; Gaillardin, M.; Hubert, G.; Jordan, T.; Jun, I.; Koontz, S.; Lei, F.; McNulty, P.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Murat, M.; Nieminen, P.; O'Neill, P.; Raine, M.; Reddell, B.; Saigné, F.; Santin, G.; Sihver, L.; Tang, H. H. K.; Truscott, P. R.; Wrobel, F.

    2013-06-01

    This anthology contains contributions from eleven different groups, each developing and/or applying Monte Carlo-based radiation transport tools to simulate a variety of effects that result from energy transferred to a semiconductor material by a single particle event. The topics span from basic mechanisms for single-particle induced failures to applied tasks like developing websites to predict on-orbit single event failure rates using Monte Carlo radiation transport tools.

  1. Lagrangian transport in poleward breaking Rossby waves in the North Atlantic - Europe tropopause region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, J; Peters, D [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1998-12-31

    The poleward advection of upper-tropospheric air is investigated for poleward Rossby wave breaking events. During boreal winter months the isentropic deformations of the tropopause are examined using maps of Ertel`s potential vorticity (EPV) and contour advection (CA) calculations. The role of ambient baro-tropic flow is further examined by idealized numerical models. In the vicinity of the tropopause the characteristic Lagrangian transport of air masses for ECMWF-analysis data are compared with high resolution (T106) ECHAM4 experiments. (author) 3 refs.

  2. Electronic Transport Behaviors due to Charge Density Waves in Ni-Nb-Zr-H Glassy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Umemori, Yoshimasa

    2013-11-01

    The amorphous Ni-Nb-Zr-H glassy alloy containing subnanometer-sized icosahedral Zr5 Nb5Ni3 clusters exhibited four types of electronic phenomena: a metal/insulator transition, an electric current-induced voltage oscillation (Coulomb oscillation), giant capacitor behavior and an electron avalanche with superior resistivity. These findings could be excluded by charge density waves that the low-dimensional component of clusters, in which the atoms are lined up in chains along the [130] direction, plays important roles in various electron transport phenomena.

  3. RANS-based simulation of turbulent wave boundary layer and sheet-flow sediment transport processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Schløer, Signe; Sterner, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model coupling the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equationswith two-equation k−ω turbulence closure is presented and used to simulate a variety of turbulent wave boundary layer processes. The hydrodynamic model is additionally coupled...... with bed and suspended load descriptions, the latter based on an unsteady turbulent-diffusion equation, for simulation of sheet-flow sediment transport processes. In addition to standard features common within such RANS-based approaches, the present model includes: (1) hindered settling velocities at high...

  4. Diffuser Design for Marine Outfalls in Areas with Strong Currents, High waves and Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    The design of marine outfalls is often based on environmental criteria for a minimum initial dilution. Accordingly advanced diffuser arrangement are designed to fulfil these requirements. A large number of examples of malfunction and blocking in sea outfalls have occurred around the world...... as a result of this uncompromising consent to environmental demands. Two examples of unconventional design are given in this paper. Both cases involved risk of blockage of the diffuser section because of wave and current induced sediment transport The paper also discusses how acceptable far field dilution...

  5. Lagrangian transport in poleward breaking Rossby waves in the North Atlantic - Europe tropopause region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, J.; Peters, D. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    The poleward advection of upper-tropospheric air is investigated for poleward Rossby wave breaking events. During boreal winter months the isentropic deformations of the tropopause are examined using maps of Ertel`s potential vorticity (EPV) and contour advection (CA) calculations. The role of ambient baro-tropic flow is further examined by idealized numerical models. In the vicinity of the tropopause the characteristic Lagrangian transport of air masses for ECMWF-analysis data are compared with high resolution (T106) ECHAM4 experiments. (author) 3 refs.

  6. Effect of d-wave pairing symmetry in transport properties of silicene-based superconductor junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosoughi-nia, S.; Rashedi, G.; hajati, Y.

    2018-06-01

    We theoretically study the tunneling conductance of a normal/d-wave superconductor silicene junction using Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) formalism. We discuss how the conductance spectra are affected by changing the chemical potential (μN) in the normal silicene region. It is obtained that the amplitude of the spin/valley-dependent Andreev reflection (AR) and charge conductance (G) of the junction can be strongly modulated by the orientation angle of superconductive gap (β) and perpendicular electric field (Ez). We demonstrate that the charge conductance exhibits an oscillatory behavior as a function of β by a period of π/2. Remarkably, variation of μN strongly modifies the amplitude of the oscillations and periodically there are transport gaps in the G - β oscillations for a range of μN. These findings suggest that one may experimentally tune the transport properties of the junction through changing β, Ez and μN.

  7. The Fourth Wave of Digitalization and Public Transport: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Davidsson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the opportunities and challenges of the forth wave of digitalization, also referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT, with respect to public transport and how it can support sustainable development of society. Environmental, economical, and social perspectives are considered through analysis of the existing literature and explorative studies. We conclude that there are great opportunities for both transport operators and planners, as well as for the travelers. We describe and analyze a number of concrete opportunities for each of these actors. However, in order to realize these opportunities, there are also a number of challenges that needs to be addressed. There are both technical challenges, such as data collection issues, interoperability, scalability and information security, and non-technical challenges such as business models, usability, privacy issues, and deployment.

  8. Monitoring dynamic reactions of red blood cells to UHF electromagnetic waves radiation using a novel micro-imaging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Ping; Yong, Junguang; Shen, Hongtao; Zheng, Xianrong

    2012-12-01

    Multiple state-of-the-art techniques, such as multi-dimensional micro-imaging, fast multi-channel micro-spetrophotometry, and dynamic micro-imaging analysis, were used to dynamically investigate various effects of cell under the 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Cell changes in shape, size, and parameters of Hb absorption spectrum under different power density electromagnetic waves radiation were presented in this article. Experimental results indicated that the isolated human red blood cells (RBCs) do not have obviously real-time responses to the ultra-low density (15 μW/cm(2), 31 μW/cm(2)) electromagnetic wave radiation when the radiation time is not more than 30 min; however, the cells do have significant reactions in shape, size, and the like, to the electromagnetic waves radiation with power densities of 1 mW/cm(2) and 5 mW/cm(2). The data also reveal the possible influences and statistical relationships among living human cell functions, radiation amount, and exposure time with high-frequency electromagnetic waves. The results of this study may be significant on protection of human being and other living organisms against possible radiation affections of the high-frequency electromagnetic waves.

  9. Department of Environmental and Radiation Transport Physics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicka, U.

    2002-01-01

    geological structures, in collaboration with the Institute of Geological Sciences of Polish Academy of Sciences. The geological fault system which surrounds the ''Las Wolski'' horst is covered with loess overburden. An evident increase in radon concentration in the upper loess layer is observed over the fault position. This may have important environmental implications. Several samples of soil taken from those areas were analysed for the concentration of natural isotopes (U, Th, and K). Natural radioactivity measurements in various samples (soils, rocks, raw, and building materials, etc.) have been carried out using low background spectrometers (with NaI(Tl) and HPGe detectors). We took part in the national inter-comparison concerning the methodology of ''radon-in-water'' measurements. The results are to be published. A joint project ''The Radon Centre - Non- Governmental International Scientific Network'' has been started in co-operation with the Central Mining Institute in Katowice. The main goals are to prepare and execute joint research projects and programmes, and to disseminate and put into practice the results of research activities of particular Network members. Neutron methods are an important part of nuclear geophysics and are also used in medical modalities. Investigations of the neutron transport parameters require usually the detection and/or calculation of spatial, time, and energy distributions of fast, epithermal and thermal neutrons, and of the accompanying γ radiation. The research has been directed into several aspects: - Basic theoretical and experimental investigation for the thermal neutron transport: a) the temperature behaviour of the pulsed parameters in a hydrogenous moderator, b) diffusion cooling in small two-region systems containing substances of different types of energy characteristics of thermal neutron scattering. - Calculations of the radiation field and energy deposition in the water beam dump for the TESLA electron-positron collider for

  10. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling. Part A: Codes; Part B: Applications with examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Beutler, D.E.

    1997-09-01

    This report contains the notes from the second session of the 1997 IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference Short Course on Applying Computer Simulation Tools to Radiation Effects Problems. Part A discusses the physical phenomena modeled in radiation transport codes and various types of algorithmic implementations. Part B gives examples of how these codes can be used to design experiments whose results can be easily analyzed and describes how to calculate quantities of interest for electronic devices

  11. Plasma scattering measurement using a submillimeter wave gyrotron as a radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, I.; Idehara, T.; Itakura, Y.; Myodo, M.; Hori, T.; Hatae, T.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma scattering measurement is an effective technique to observe low frequency density fluctuations excited in plasma. The spatial and wave number resolutions and the S/N ratio of measurement depend on the wavelength range, the size and the intensity of a probe beam. A well-collimated, submillimeter wave beam is suitable for improving the spatial and wave number resolutions. Application of high frequency gyrotron is effective in improving the S/N ratio of the measurement because of its capacity to deliver high power. Unlike the molecular vapor lasers, the gyrotrons generate diverging beam of radiation with TE mn mode structure. It is therefore necessary to convert the output radiation into a Gaussian beam. A quasi-optical antenna is a suitable element for the conversion system under consideration since it is applicable to several TE 0n and TE 1n modes. In order to apply the gyrotron to plasma scattering measurement, we have stabilized the output (P = 110 W, f = 354 GHz) of gyrotron up to the level (ΔP/P < 1 %, Δf< 10 kHz). The gyrotron output can be stabilized by decreasing the fluctuation of the cathode potential. (authors)

  12. Mechanisms of Saharan Dust Radiative Effects Coupled to Eddy Energy and Wave Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, F.; Wilcox, E. M.; Colarco, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    We explore mechanisms addressing the relationships between the net radiative forcing of Saharan Air Layer (SAL) and eddy energetics of the African Easterly jet-African easterly wave (AEJ-AEWs) system across the tropical Atlantic storm track. This study indicates that radiatively interactive dust aerosols have the capability to modify the exchange of kinetic energy between the AEWs and AEJ. We find that while dust can have both constructive and destructive effects on eddy activity of the waves, depending on the behavior and structure of waves exhibiting different characteristic time-scales, the local heating by dust tends to change the quadruple pattern of eddy momentum fluxes of the AEWs which can yield feedbacks onto the mean-flow. These results arise from applying an ensemble of large NASA satellite observational data sets, such as MODIS, SeaWiFS and TRMM, as well as the GOCART aerosol model and MERRA reanalysis. Sensitivity studies indicate that the results are consistent when the analysis is performed with multiple different aerosol datasets. While the mechanisms proposed here require further evaluation with numerical model experiments, this study presents a novel approach and new insights into Saharan dust effects on large-scale climate dynamics.

  13. Design for LTE EOS and opacity experiments using supersonic radiation waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, T. E.; Peterson, R. R.; Tierney, H. E.

    2007-11-01

    Opacity and EOS at 100-200 eV are important physical parameters in ICF experiments. We describe an experiment design that uses the supersonic propagation of hohlraum radiation in foams to isochorically heat samples. Laser and Z-pinch experiments frequently use 150 to 220-eV quasi-blackbody emission from hohlraums to drive physics experiments. A foam target encapsulated in a gold-wall cylinder is placed next to the hohlraum. The low density and opacity foam captures some hohlraum emission and generates a supersonically-propagating radiation wave. The material heated by the wave is cooler towards the high-albedo gold wall. Modeling and past measurements show that core regions of the foam have small thermal gradients. We place a small, thin sample (e.g., Al, Si, or Fe) in the thermally-uniform region. X-ray emission of tracers and the sample as well as quasi-continuum x-ray absorption will be measured using time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The foam's EOS can be measured to ±5% by blast waves with a well characterized drive. This experiment could use the OMEGA, Z-Beamlet, and/or ZR facilities to explore temperature-dependent conditions.

  14. Water vapor radiative effects on short-wave radiation in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero-Martínez, Javier; Antón, Manuel; Ortiz de Galisteo, José Pablo; Román, Roberto; Cachorro, Victoria E.

    2018-06-01

    In this work, water vapor radiative effect (WVRE) is studied by means of the Santa Barbara's Disort Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model, fed with integrated water vapor (IWV) data from 20 ground-based GPS stations in Spain. Only IWV data recorded during cloud-free days (selected using daily insolation data) were used in this study. Typically, for SZA = 60.0 ± 0.5° WVRE values are around - 82 and - 66 Wm-2 (first and third quartile), although it can reach up - 100 Wm-2 or decrease to - 39 Wm-2. A power dependence of WVRE on IWV and cosine of solar zenith angle (SZA) was found by an empirical fit. This relation is used to determine the water vapor radiative efficiency (WVEFF = ∂WVRE/∂IWV). Obtained WVEFF values range from - 9 and 0 Wm-2 mm-1 (- 2.2 and 0% mm-1 in relative terms). It is observed that WVEFF decreases as IWV increases, but also as SZA increases. On the other hand, when relative WVEFF is calculated from normalized WVRE, an increase of SZA results in an increase of relative WVEFF. Heating rates were also calculated, ranging from 0.2 Kday-1 to 1.7 Kday-1. WVRE was also calculated at top of atmosphere, where values ranged from 4 Wm-2 to 37 Wm-2.

  15. Gray and multigroup radiation transport models for two-dimensional binary stochastic media using effective opacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional models for the transport of radiation through binary stochastic media do not work in multi-dimensions. Authors have attempted to modify or extend the 1D models to work in multidimensions without success. Analytic one-dimensional models are successful in 1D only when assuming greatly simplified physics. State of the art theories for stochastic media radiation transport do not address multi-dimensions and temperature-dependent physics coefficients. Here, the concept of effective opacities and effective heat capacities is found to well represent the ensemble averaged transport solutions in cases with gray or multigroup temperature-dependent opacities and constant or temperature-dependent heat capacities. In every case analyzed here, effective physics coefficients fit the transport solutions over a useful range of parameter space. The transport equation is solved with the spherical harmonics method with angle orders of n=1 and 5. Although the details depend on what order of solution is used, the general results are similar, independent of angular order. - Highlights: • Gray and multigroup radiation transport is done through 2D stochastic media. • Approximate models for the mean radiation field are found for all test problems. • Effective opacities are adjusted to fit the means of stochastic media transport. • Test problems include temperature dependent opacities and heat capacities • Transport solutions are done with angle orders n=1 and 5.

  16. Monte Carlo analysis of radiative transport in oceanographic lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E.; Ferro, G. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, N. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ingegneria Energetica, Nucleare e del Controllo Ambientale

    2001-07-01

    The analysis of oceanographic lidar systems measurements is often carried out with semi-empirical methods, since there is only a rough understanding of the effects of many environmental variables. The development of techniques for interpreting the accuracy of lidar measurements is needed to evaluate the effects of various environmental situations, as well as of different experimental geometric configurations and boundary conditions. A Monte Carlo simulation model represents a tool that is particularly well suited for answering these important questions. The PREMAR-2F Monte Carlo code has been developed taking into account the main molecular and non-molecular components of the marine environment. The laser radiation interaction processes of diffusion, re-emission, refraction and absorption are treated. In particular are considered: the Rayleigh elastic scattering, produced by atoms and molecules with small dimensions with respect to the laser emission wavelength (i.e. water molecules), the Mie elastic scattering, arising from atoms or molecules with dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength (hydrosols), the Raman inelastic scattering, typical of water, the absorption of water, inorganic (sediments) and organic (phytoplankton and CDOM) hydrosols, the fluorescence re-emission of chlorophyll and yellow substances. PREMAR-2F is an extension of a code for the simulation of the radiative transport in atmospheric environments (PREMAR-2). The approach followed in PREMAR-2 was to combine conventional Monte Carlo techniques with analytical estimates of the probability of the receiver to have a contribution from photons coming back after an interaction in the field of view of the lidar fluorosensor collecting apparatus. This offers an effective mean for modelling a lidar system with realistic geometric constraints. The retrieved semianalytic Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been developed in the frame of the Italian Research Program for Antarctica (PNRA) and it is

  17. Survey of radiation protection, radiation transport, and shielding information needs of the nuclear power industry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskewitz, B.F.; Trubey, D.K.; Roussin, R.W.; McGill, B.L.

    1976-04-01

    The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) is engaged in a program to seek out, organize, and disseminate information in the area of radiation transport, shielding, and radiation protection. This information consists of published literature, nuclear data, and computer codes and advanced analytical techniques required by ERDA, its contractors, and the nuclear power industry to improve radiation analysis and computing capability. Information generated in this effort becomes a part of the RSIC collection and/or data base. The purpose of this report on project 219-1 is to document the results of the survey of information and computer code needs of the nuclear power industry in the area of radiation analysis and protection

  18. Survey of radiation protection, radiation transport, and shielding information needs of the nuclear power industry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskewitz, B.F.; Trubey, D.K.; Roussin, R.W.; McGill, B.L.

    1976-04-01

    The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) is engaged in a program to seek out, organize, and disseminate information in the area of radiation transport, shielding, and radiation protection. This information consists of published literature, nuclear data, and computer codes and advanced analytical techniques required by ERDA, its contractors, and the nuclear power industry to improve radiation analysis and computing capability. Information generated in this effort becomes a part of the RSIC collection and/or data base. The purpose of this report on project 219-1 is to document the results of the survey of information and computer code needs of the nuclear power industry in the area of radiation analysis and protection.

  19. Transport of pollutants and sediment in the area of the Wave Hub (Celtic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Georgy; Huntley, David

    2010-05-01

    consequences. This paper presents some preliminary modelling results of a baseline study focussed on hind-cast and now-cast simulation of the 3D structure of temperature, salinity and current velocity in the area immediately adjacent to the location of the Wave Hub. Of the range of available 3D numerical models for shelf sea hydrodynamics, we have selected the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Coastal Modelling System (POLCOMS). The POLCOMS has successfully been used in a number of coastal/shelf sea regions to simulate circulation of coastal waters. Modelling is carried out in the region of approximately 200x 200 km with the variable vertical resolution typically less than 2 m. Such parameters allow resololution of the formation of coastal density fronts both within and outside the wave shadow zone, expected to be of the order of tens of kilometres. The meteorological parameters are obtained from the publicly available NCEP re-analyses data base. These parameters include components of the wind velocity and the surface heat fluxes, air pressure at sea level; temperature and humidity in the low troposphere; precipitation and cloudiness. In this study, the transport of pollution is simulated by a number of passive drifters located at a certain depth at a number of locations including the central point of the Wave Hub. Sediment transport is modelled using the Engelund-Hansen algorithm taking the current velocities produced by the POLCOMS as an input parameter. The Celtic sea is a tidally dominated region, and the modelling is run both in full-forcing and in tide-only modes in order to assess effects of density fronts on the residual (tidally averaged) circulation pattern. The results show that the pollution pathways are very sensitive to the formation of temperature fronts. In some cases the passive traces move in nearly opposite directions when the effect of temperature fronts is disregarded. Sediment transport is highly non-uniform spatially with some four areas along the

  20. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Frank M.; Paoletti, M. S.; Swinney, Harry L.; Morrison, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    We present a method to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux left and total radiated power P for two-dimensional internal gravity waves. Both left and P are determined from expressions involving only a scalar function, the stream function ψ. We test the method using data from a direct numerical simulation for tidal flow of a stratified fluid past a knife edge. The results for the radiated internal wave power given by the stream function method agree to within 0.5% with results obtained using pressure and velocity data from the numerical simulation. The results for the radiated power computed from the stream function agree well with power computed from the velocity and pressure if the starting point for the stream function computation is on a solid boundary, but if a boundary point is not available, care must be taken to choose an appropriate starting point. We also test the stream function method by applying it to laboratory data for tidal flow past a knife edge, and the results are found to agree with the direct numerical simulation. The supplementary material includes a Matlab code with a graphical user interface that can be used to compute the energy flux and power from two-dimensional velocity field data.

  1. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2012-03-07

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g. Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements.

  2. Revised model for the radiation force exerted by standing surface acoustic waves on a rigid cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shen; Chaohui, Wang

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a model for the radiation force exerted by standing surface acoustic waves (SSAWs) on a rigid cylinder in inviscid fluids is extended to account for the dependence on the Rayleigh angle. The conventional model for the radiation force used in the SSAW-based applications is developed in plane standing waves, which fails to predict the movement of the cylinder in the SSAW. Our revised model reveals that, in the direction normal to the piezoelectric substrate on which the SSAW is generated, acoustic radiation force can be large enough to drive the cylinder even in the long-wavelength limit. Furthermore, the force in this direction can not only push the cylinder away, but also pull it back toward the substrate. In the direction parallel to the substrate, the equilibrium positions for particles can be actively tuned by changing Rayleigh angle. As an example considered in the paper, with the reduction of Rayleigh angle the equilibrium positions for steel cylinders in water change from pressure nodes to pressure antinodes. The model can thus be used in the design of SSAWs for particle manipulations.

  3. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, P. J.; Paoletti, M. S.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux (J) and total radiated power P for two-dimensional internal gravity waves. Both (J) and P are determined from expressions involving only a scalar function, the stream function ψ. We test the method using data from a direct numerical simulation for tidal flow of a stratified fluid past a knife edge. The results for the radiated internal wave power given by the stream function method agree to within 0.5% with results obtained using pressure and velocity data from the numerical simulation. The results for the radiated power computed from the stream function agree well with power computed from the velocity and pressure if the starting point for the stream function computation is on a solid boundary, but if a boundary point is not available, care must be taken to choose an appropriate starting point. We also test the stream function method by applying it to laboratory data for tidal flow past a knife edge, and the results are found to agree with the direct numerical simulation. The supplementary material includes a Matlab code with a graphical user interface that can be used to compute the energy flux and power from two-dimensional velocity field data

  4. Guiding electromagnetic waves around sharp corners: topologically protected photonic transport in meta-waveguides (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvets, Gennady B.; Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Ma, Tzuhsuan; Lai, Kueifu

    2015-09-01

    Science thrives on analogies, and a considerable number of inventions and discoveries have been made by pursuing an unexpected connection to a very different field of inquiry. For example, photonic crystals have been referred to as "semiconductors of light" because of the far-reaching analogies between electron propagation in a crystal lattice and light propagation in a periodically modulated photonic environment. However, two aspects of electron behavior, its spin and helicity, escaped emulation by photonic systems until recent invention of photonic topological insulators (PTIs). The impetus for these developments in photonics came from the discovery of topologically nontrivial phases in condensed matter physics enabling edge states immune to scattering. The realization of topologically protected transport in photonics would circumvent a fundamental limitation imposed by the wave equation: inability of reflections-free light propagation along sharply bent pathway. Topologically protected electromagnetic states could be used for transporting photons without any scattering, potentially underpinning new revolutionary concepts in applied science and engineering. I will demonstrate that a PTI can be constructed by applying three types of perturbations: (a) finite bianisotropy, (b) gyromagnetic inclusion breaking the time-reversal (T) symmetry, and (c) asymmetric rods breaking the parity (P) symmetry. We will experimentally demonstrate (i) the existence of the full topological bandgap in a bianisotropic, and (ii) the reflectionless nature of wave propagation along the interface between two PTIs with opposite signs of the bianisotropy.

  5. Wave Glider Monitoring of Sediment Transport and Dredge Plumes in a Shallow Marine Sandbank Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, Vera; Baeye, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    As human pressure on the marine environment increases, safeguarding healthy and productive seas increasingly necessitates integrated, time- and cost-effective environmental monitoring. Employment of a Wave Glider proved very useful for the study of sediment transport in a shallow sandbank area in the Belgian part of the North Sea. During 22 days, data on surface and water-column currents and turbidity were recorded along 39 loops around an aggregate-extraction site. Correlation with wave and tidal-amplitude data allowed the quantification of current- and wave-induced advection and resuspension, important background information to assess dredging impacts. Important anomalies in suspended particulate matter concentrations in the water column suggested dredging-induced overflow of sediments in the near field (i.e., dynamic plume), and settling of finer-grained material in the far field (i.e., passive plume). Capturing the latter is a successful outcome to this experiment, since the location of dispersion and settling of a passive plume is highly dependent on the ruling hydro-meteorological conditions and thus difficult to predict. Deposition of the observed sediment plumes may cause habitat changes in the long-term.

  6. Wave Glider Monitoring of Sediment Transport and Dredge Plumes in a Shallow Marine Sandbank Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Van Lancker

    Full Text Available As human pressure on the marine environment increases, safeguarding healthy and productive seas increasingly necessitates integrated, time- and cost-effective environmental monitoring. Employment of a Wave Glider proved very useful for the study of sediment transport in a shallow sandbank area in the Belgian part of the North Sea. During 22 days, data on surface and water-column currents and turbidity were recorded along 39 loops around an aggregate-extraction site. Correlation with wave and tidal-amplitude data allowed the quantification of current- and wave-induced advection and resuspension, important background information to assess dredging impacts. Important anomalies in suspended particulate matter concentrations in the water column suggested dredging-induced overflow of sediments in the near field (i.e., dynamic plume, and settling of finer-grained material in the far field (i.e., passive plume. Capturing the latter is a successful outcome to this experiment, since the location of dispersion and settling of a passive plume is highly dependent on the ruling hydro-meteorological conditions and thus difficult to predict. Deposition of the observed sediment plumes may cause habitat changes in the long-term.

  7. Parametric validations of analytical lifetime estimates for radiation belt electron diffusion by whistler waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Artemyev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lifetimes of electrons trapped in Earth's radiation belts can be calculated from quasi-linear pitch-angle diffusion by whistler-mode waves, provided that their frequency spectrum is broad enough and/or their average amplitude is not too large. Extensive comparisons between improved analytical lifetime estimates and full numerical calculations have been performed in a broad parameter range representative of a large part of the magnetosphere from L ~ 2 to 6. The effects of observed very oblique whistler waves are taken into account in both numerical and analytical calculations. Analytical lifetimes (and pitch-angle diffusion coefficients are found to be in good agreement with full numerical calculations based on CRRES and Cluster hiss and lightning-generated wave measurements inside the plasmasphere and Cluster lower-band chorus waves measurements in the outer belt for electron energies ranging from 100 keV to 5 MeV. Comparisons with lifetimes recently obtained from electron flux measurements on SAMPEX, SCATHA, SAC-C and DEMETER also show reasonable agreement.

  8. Radiation assisted thermonuclear burn wave dynamics in heavy ion fast ignition of cylindrical deuterium-tritium fuel target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S.; Kouser, R.; Nazir, R.; Manzoor, Z.; Tasneem, G.; Jehan, N.; Nasim, M.H.; Salahuddin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of thermonuclear burn wave propagation assisted by thermal radiation precursor in a heavy ion fast ignition of cylindrical deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel target are studied by two dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations using Multi-2D code. Thermal radiations, as they propagate ahead of the burn wave, suffer multiple reflections and preheat the fuel, are found to play a vital role in burn wave dynamics. After fuel ignition, the burn wave propagates in a steady state manner for some time. Multiple reflection and absorption of radiation at the fuel-tamper interface, fuel ablation and radial implosion driven by ablative shock and fast fusion rates on the fuel axis, at relatively later times, result into filamentary wave front. Strong pressure gradients are developed and sausage like structures behind the front are appeared. The situation leads to relatively reduced and non-uniform radial fuel burning and burn wave propagation. The fuel burning due to DD reaction is also taken into account and overall fusion energy and fusion power density, due to DT and DD reactions, during the burn wave propagation are determined as a function of time. (authors)

  9. Auroral kilometric radiation - An example of relativistic wave-particle interaction in geoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchett, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    The earth's auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is believed to be produced by the electron-cyclotron maser instability. This instability is the result of a wave-particle interaction in which relativistic effects are crucial. An explanation is given as to how these relativistic effects alter the shape of the resonance curve in velocity space and modify the R - X mode wave dispersion near the electron cyclotron frequency compared to the results obtained in the nonrelativistic limit and from cold-plasma theory. The properties of the cyclotron maser instability in a driven system are illustrated using two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations which incorporate a continual flow of primary energetic electrons along the magnetic field. 31 refs

  10. Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety Newsletter, No. 2b, May 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-05-01

    The IAEA Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety (2011-2020) provides a framework for establishing a sustainable education and training infrastructure in Member States that addresses national needs for building and maintaining competence in radiation, transport and waste safety that is consistent with IAEA Safety Standards. For this purpose, IAEA's General Conference has encouraged Member States to develop a national strategy for education and training, underlining the fundamental importance of sustainable programmes for building competence in radiation, transport and waste safety, as a key component of safety infrastructure. Furthermore Member States that receive assistance from IAEA are obliged to apply IAEA Safety Standards which require, inter alia, governments to establish a national policy and strategy for safety, including provisions for acquiring and maintaining the necessary competence nationally for ensuring safety. IAEA's Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety is assisting Member States to develop their own national strategies in Asia and the Pacific via the Regional project RAS/9/066 on ''Strengthening Education and training Infrastructure, and Building Competence in Radiation Safety'', which includes, inter alia, Regional Workshops on National Strategies for education and training in radiation transport and waste safety. IAEA's Regional Training Centres (RTCs) in Malaysia and Syrian Arabic Republic are key partners in the Asian and the Pacific region.

  11. Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety Newsletter, No. 2c, May 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-05-01

    The IAEA Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety (2011-2020) provides a framework for establishing a sustainable education and training infrastructure in Member States that addresses national needs for building and maintaining competence in radiation, transport and waste safety that is consistent with IAEA Safety Standards. For this purpose, IAEA's General Conference has encouraged Member States to develop a national strategy for education and training, underlining the fundamental importance of sustainable programmes for building competence in radiation, transport and waste safety, as a key component of safety infrastructure. Furthermore Member States that receive assistance from IAEA are obliged to apply IAEA Safety Standards which require, inter alia, governments to establish a national policy and strategy for safety, including provisions for acquiring and maintaining the necessary competence nationally for ensuring safety. IAEA's Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety is assisting Member States to develop their own national strategies in Europe via the Regional Project RER/9/109 on ''Strengthening Education and training Infrastructure, and Building Competence in Radiation Safety'', which includes, inter alia, Regional Workshops on National Strategies for education and training in radiation transport and waste safety. IAEA's Regional Training Centres (RTCs) in Greece and Belarus are key partners in the European region.

  12. Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety Newsletter, No. 2d, June 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety (2011-2020) provides a framework for establishing a sustainable education and training infrastructure in Member States that addresses national needs for building and maintaining competence in radiation, transport and waste safety that is consistent with IAEA Safety Standards. For this purpose, IAEA's General Conference has encouraged Member States to develop a national strategy for education and training, underlining the fundamental importance of sustainable programmes for building competence in radiation, transport and waste safety, as a key component of safety infrastructure. Furthermore Member States that receive assistance from IAEA are obliged to apply IAEA Safety Standards which require, inter alia, governments to establish a national policy and strategy for safety, including provisions for acquiring and maintaining the necessary competence nationally for ensuring safety. IAEA's Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety is assisting Member States to develop their own national strategies in Latin America via the Regional Project RLA/9/070 on ''Strengthening Education and training Infrastructure, and Building Competence in Radiation Safety'', which includes, inter alia, Regional Workshops on National Strategies for education and training in radiation transport and waste safety. IAEA's Regional Training Centres (RTCs) in Argentina and Brazil are key partners in the Latin-American region.

  13. Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety Newsletter, No. 2a, May 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-05-01

    The IAEA Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety (2011-2020) provides a framework for establishing a sustainable education and training infrastructure in Member States that addresses national needs for building and maintaining competence in radiation, transport and waste safety that is consistent with IAEA Safety Standards. For this purpose, IAEA's General Conference has encouraged Member States to develop a national strategy for education and training, underlining the fundamental importance of sustainable programmes for building competence in radiation, transport and waste safety, as a key component of safety infrastructure. Furthermore Member States that receive assistance from IAEA are obliged to apply IAEA Safety Standards which require, inter alia, governments to establish a national policy and strategy for safety, including provisions for acquiring and maintaining the necessary competence nationally for ensuring safety. IAEA's Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety is assisting Member States to develop their own national strategies in Africa via the Regional project RAF/9/04 on ''Strengthening Education and training Infrastructure, and Building Competence in Radiation Safety'', which includes, inter alia, Regional Workshops on National Strategies for education and training in radiation transport and waste safety. AFRA Regional Designated Centres, in Algeria, Ghana and Morocco, equivalent to the IAEA's Regional Training Centres (RTCs) present in all the other regions, are key partners in the African region.

  14. Transport analysis of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casali L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Future fusion reactors, foreseen in the “European road map” such as DEMO, will operate under more demanding conditions compared to present devices. They will require high divertor and core radiation by impurity seeding to reduce heat loads on divertor target plates. In addition, DEMO will have to work at high core densities to reach adequate fusion performance. The performance of fusion reactors depends on three essential parameters: temperature, density and energy confinement time. The latter characterizes the loss rate due to both radiation and transport processes. The DEMO foreseen scenarios described above were not investigated so far, but are now addressed at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. In this work we present the transport analysis of such scenarios. Plasma with high radiation by impurity seeding: transport analysis taking into account the radiation distribution shows no change in transport during impurity seeding. The observed confinement improvement is an effect of higher pedestal temperatures which extend to the core via stiffness. A non coronal radiation model was developed and compared to the bolometric measurements in order to provide a reliable radiation profile for transport calculations. High density plasmas with pellets: the analysis of kinetic profiles reveals a transient phase at the start of the pellet fuelling due to a slower density build up compared to the temperature decrease. The low particle diffusion can explain the confinement behaviour.

  15. Novel Parallel Numerical Methods for Radiation and Neutron Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P N

    2001-01-01

    In many of the multiphysics simulations performed at LLNL, transport calculations can take up 30 to 50% of the total run time. If Monte Carlo methods are used, the percentage can be as high as 80%. Thus, a significant core competence in the formulation, software implementation, and solution of the numerical problems arising in transport modeling is essential to Laboratory and DOE research. In this project, we worked on developing scalable solution methods for the equations that model the transport of photons and neutrons through materials. Our goal was to reduce the transport solve time in these simulations by means of more advanced numerical methods and their parallel implementations. These methods must be scalable, that is, the time to solution must remain constant as the problem size grows and additional computer resources are used. For iterative methods, scalability requires that (1) the number of iterations to reach convergence is independent of problem size, and (2) that the computational cost grows linearly with problem size. We focused on deterministic approaches to transport, building on our earlier work in which we performed a new, detailed analysis of some existing transport methods and developed new approaches. The Boltzmann equation (the underlying equation to be solved) and various solution methods have been developed over many years. Consequently, many laboratory codes are based on these methods, which are in some cases decades old. For the transport of x-rays through partially ionized plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium, the transport equation is coupled to nonlinear diffusion equations for the electron and ion temperatures via the highly nonlinear Planck function. We investigated the suitability of traditional-solution approaches to transport on terascale architectures and also designed new scalable algorithms; in some cases, we investigated hybrid approaches that combined both

  16. Modelling of sediment transport and morphological evolution under the combined action of waves and currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Guilherme; Delpey, Matthias T.; Brito, David; Pinto, Lígia; Leitão, Paulo; Neves, Ramiro

    2017-09-01

    Coastal defence structures are often constructed to prevent beach erosion. However, poorly designed structures may cause serious erosion problems in the downdrift direction. Morphological models are useful tools to predict such impacts and assess the efficiency of defence structures for different scenarios. Nevertheless, morphological modelling is still a topic under intense research effort. The processes simulated by a morphological model depend on model complexity. For instance, undertow currents are neglected in coastal area models (2DH), which is a limitation for simulating the evolution of beach profiles for long periods. Model limitations are generally overcome by predefining invariant equilibrium profiles that are allowed to shift offshore or onshore. A more flexible approach is described in this paper, which can be generalised to 3-D models. The present work is based on the coupling of the MOHID modelling system and the SWAN wave model. The impacts of different designs of detached breakwaters and groynes were simulated in a schematic beach configuration following a 2DH approach. The results of bathymetry evolution are in agreement with the patterns found in the literature for several existing structures. The model was also tested in a 3-D test case to simulate the formation of sandbars by undertow currents. The findings of this work confirmed the applicability of the MOHID modelling system to study sediment transport and morphological changes in coastal zones under the combined action of waves and currents. The same modelling methodology was applied to a coastal zone (Costa da Caparica) located at the mouth of a mesotidal estuary (Tagus Estuary, Portugal) to evaluate the hydrodynamics and sediment transport both in calm water conditions and during events of highly energetic waves. The MOHID code is available in the GitHub repository.

  17. Radiation transport effects in divertor plasmas generated during a tokamak reactor disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.R.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Wang, P.

    1994-01-01

    Vaporization of material from tokamak divertors during disruptions is a critical issue for tokamak reactors from ITER to commercial power plants. Radiation transport from the vaporized material onto the remaining divertor surface plays an important role in the total mass loss to the divertor. Radiation transport in such a vapor is very difficult to calculate in full detail, and this paper quantifies the sensitivity of the divertor mass loss to uncertainties in the radiation transport. Specifically, the paper presents the results of computer simulations of the vaporization of a graphite coated divertor during a tokamak disruption with ITER CDA parameters. The results show that a factor of 100 change in the radiation conductivity changes the mass loss by more than a factor of two

  18. The use of symbolic computation in radiative, energy, and neutron transport calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, J. I.

    This investigation uses symbolic computation in developing analytical methods and general computational strategies for solving both linear and nonlinear, regular and singular, integral and integro-differential equations which appear in radiative and combined mode energy transport. This technical report summarizes the research conducted during the first nine months of the present investigation. The use of Chebyshev polynomials augmented with symbolic computation has clearly been demonstrated in problems involving radiative (or neutron) transport, and mixed-mode energy transport. Theoretical issues related to convergence, errors, and accuracy have also been pursued. Three manuscripts have resulted from the funded research. These manuscripts have been submitted to archival journals. At the present time, an investigation involving a conductive and radiative medium is underway. The mathematical formulation leads to a system of nonlinear, weakly-singular integral equations involving the unknown temperature and various Legendre moments of the radiative intensity in a participating medium. Some preliminary results are presented illustrating the direction of the proposed research.

  19. Enhancement of terahertz radiation in a Smith-Purcell backward-wave oscillator by an inverse wet-etched grating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung-Il; Jeon, Seok-Gy; Kim, Geun-Ju; Kim, Jaehong

    2011-01-01

    A terahertz (THz) Smith-Purcell (SP) backward-wave oscillator with an inverse wet-etched grating based on silicon has been proposed to enhance radiation intensity. This grating strengthens the interactions between an electron beam and the evanescent wave due to the adjacent surface structure between gratings that improves the magnitude of the electric field up to 1.7 times compared to the conventional rectangular gratings. A two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation shows that the radiated power is increased up to 2.3 times higher at the radiated frequency of 0.66 THz for an electron-beam energy of 30 keV.

  20. Integral and Lagrangian simulations of particle and radiation transport in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christlieb, A J; Hitchon, W N G; Lawler, J E; Lister, G G

    2009-01-01

    Accurate integral and Lagrangian models of transport in plasmas, in which the models reflect the actual physical behaviour as closely as possible, are presented. These methods are applied to the behaviour of particles and photons in plasmas. First, to show how these types of models arise in a wide range of plasma physics applications, an application to radiation transport in a lighting discharge is given. The radiation transport is solved self-consistently with a model of the discharge to provide what are believed to be very accurate 1D simulations of fluorescent lamps. To extend these integral methods to higher dimensions is computationally very costly. The wide utility of 'treecodes' in solving massive integral problems in plasma physics is discussed, and illustrated in modelling vortex formation in a Penning trap, where a remarkably detailed simulation of vortex formation in the trap is obtained. Extension of treecode methods to other integral problems such as radiation transport is under consideration.

  1. Factors affecting radiation doses from dedicated rail transport of spent reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports there are two exposure control concerns associated with the shipment of spent reactor fuel in dedicated trains -- compliance with transportation regulations for maximum allowable radiation levels, and minimizing the dose received by the general public. This article examines the methods used to calculate the dose equivalent rates alongside stationary (transport regulations) and moving trains (public exposure) of various lengths. The factors examined include the source term, the effect of overlapping radiation fields, the speed of the train, and the location of the population relative to the train. Trains made up of series of cars that individually meet transport regulations can, as a whole, exceed transport vehicle dose equivalent rate limits by up to 23% due to overlapping radiation fields. For moving trains and the worst case analyzed -- a person located 20 feet from the tracks and a train speed of 5 mph --- 141 rail cars would have to pass by to deliver a dose equivalent of 1 mrem

  2. Security measures in transport of radiation source in Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Alslman [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Kaist Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwang Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Radioactive materials are used in Jordan for peaceful applications in medicine, industry, agriculture, environmental science, education and research and military applications. Most of these radioactive sources used are imported, therefore trans-boundary movement is a significant factor in consideration of security measures during movement of these sources. After 11/9 2001 event, IAEA efforts began to focus and concentrate on security in transport of radioactive materials, after the emergence of risks of using these sources in terrorist activities. In 2002, Efforts were initiated by the IAEA to provide additional guidance for security in the transport of radioactive materials, based upon the new security requirements in the Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods. This paper reviews some of the measures relating to the transport of radioactive materials in Jordan

  3. Plasma Wave Turbulence and Particle Heating Caused by Electron Beams, Radiation and Pinches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    current as dP K .2 Td - _c 2 . dt (K 2 (28a) where r 2 2 [ W (r)] , (28b) is the principal wave vector of the emitted radiation, and w p(r) is the...resulting from the angular average of coa 260, Tis research was supported In part by Hughes In the lowest bound state, which t an a state. TD . F. DuBois ad...Pbs.-JEW7, 21. 1127). and Sbsvchenko. V. 1. 1975, Fiz. Plasmy. 1, 10 (English Smith, D. F. 1977, J~ . (Leoaer). 214. L53 . tram!. in Soviet J. Plasim

  4. Continuous wave ultraviolet radiation induced frustration of etching in lithium niobate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailis, S.; Riziotis, C.; Smith, P.G.R.; Scott, J.G.; Eason, R.W

    2003-02-15

    Illumination of the -z face of congruent lithium niobate single crystals with continuous wave (c.w.) ultraviolet (UV) laser radiation modifies the response of the surface to subsequent acid etching. A frequency doubled Ar{sup +} laser ({lambda}=244 nm) was used to illuminate the -z crystal face making it resistive to HF etching and thus transforming the illuminated tracks into ridge structures. This process enables the fabrication of relief patterns in a photolithographic manner. Spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy indicates preservation of the good crystal quality after irradiation.

  5. Near-field characteristics of radiating-wave simulator antenna based on TEM horn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Chunming; Ge Debiao

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a novel antenna of NEMP (nuclear electromagnetic pulse) radiating-wave simulator, which is analyzed and optimized using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method. The intense voltage pulse is fed as the source to this antenna by the coaxial line. The parallel plate transmission line and the size of the transverse electromagnetic horn are optimized. The near field of antenna is analyzed, and the effects of the size on the near field are also given. The antenna designed in this paper can well satisfy the requirement for studying the EMP effects

  6. Blood-brain barrier disruption by continuous-wave radio frequency radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones and the increasing number of associated base stations are becoming a widespread source of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Some biological effects are likely to occur even at low-level EM fields. This study was designed to investigate the effects of 900 and 1,800 MHz Continuous Wave Radio Frequency Radiation (CW RFR) on the permeability of Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) of rats. Results have shown that 20 min RFR exposure of 900 and 1,800 MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of BBB of male rats. There was no change in female rats. The scientific evidence on RFR safety or harm remains inconclusive. More studies are needed to demonstrate the effects of RFR on the permeability of BBB and the mechanisms of that breakdown.

  7. Propagation of a shock wave in a radiating spherically symmetric distribution of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, L.; Nunez, L.; Universidad de Los Andes, Merida, Venezuela)

    1987-01-01

    A method used to study the evolution of radiating spheres reported by Herrera et al. (1980) is extended to the case in which the sphere is divided in two regions by a shock wave front. The equations of state at both sides of the shock are different, and the solutions are matched on it via the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. The outer-region metric is matched with a Vaidya solution on the boundary surface of the sphere. As an example of the procedure, two known solutions for radiating systems are considered. The matter distribution is free of singularities everywhere within the sphere and a Gaussian-like pulse is assumed to carry out a fraction of the total mass. Exploding models are then obtained. Finally, the results are discussed in the light of recent work on gravitational collapse and supernovae. 29 references

  8. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertz, Ruediger S., E-mail: ruediger.goertz@uk-erlangen.de; Schuderer, Johanna, E-mail: Johanna@schuderer-floss.de; Strobel, Deike, E-mail: deike.strobel@uk-erlangen.de; Pfeifer, Lukas, E-mail: Lukas.Pfeifer@uk-erlangen.de; Neurath, Markus F., E-mail: Markus.Neurath@uk-erlangen.de; Wildner, Dane, E-mail: Dane.Wildner@uk-erlangen.de

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • ARFI elastography of the pancreas is feasible. • Shear wave velocities in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma are higher than those occurring in normal tissue. • ARFI values considerable overlap between different pathologies. - Abstract: Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. Material and methods: In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. Results: A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n = 21) and lipomatosis (n = 30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3 m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n = 35), chronic pancreatitis (n = 53) and adenocarcinoma (n = 52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n = 4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62 m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74 m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. Conclusion: ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities.

  9. Modeling of high‐frequency seismic‐wave scattering and propagation using radiative transfer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuehua

    2017-01-01

    This is a study of the nonisotropic scattering process based on radiative transfer theory and its application to the observation of the M 4.3 aftershock recording of the 2008 Wells earthquake sequence in Nevada. Given a wide range of recording distances from 29 to 320 km, the data provide a unique opportunity to discriminate scattering models based on their distance‐dependent behaviors. First, we develop a stable numerical procedure to simulate nonisotropic scattering waves based on the 3D nonisotropic scattering theory proposed by Sato (1995). By applying the simulation method to the inversion of M 4.3 Wells aftershock recordings, we find that a nonisotropic scattering model, dominated by forward scattering, provides the best fit to the observed high‐frequency direct S waves and S‐wave coda velocity envelopes. The scattering process is governed by a Gaussian autocorrelation function, suggesting a Gaussian random heterogeneous structure for the Nevada crust. The model successfully explains the common decay of seismic coda independent of source–station locations as a result of energy leaking from multiple strong forward scattering, instead of backscattering governed by the diffusion solution at large lapse times. The model also explains the pulse‐broadening effect in the high‐frequency direct and early arriving S waves, as other studies have found, and could be very important to applications of high‐frequency wave simulation in which scattering has a strong effect. We also find that regardless of its physical implications, the isotropic scattering model provides the same effective scattering coefficient and intrinsic attenuation estimates as the forward scattering model, suggesting that the isotropic scattering model is still a viable tool for the study of seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation coefficients in the Earth.

  10. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertz, Ruediger S.; Schuderer, Johanna; Strobel, Deike; Pfeifer, Lukas; Neurath, Markus F.; Wildner, Dane

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • ARFI elastography of the pancreas is feasible. • Shear wave velocities in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma are higher than those occurring in normal tissue. • ARFI values considerable overlap between different pathologies. - Abstract: Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. Material and methods: In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. Results: A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n = 21) and lipomatosis (n = 30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3 m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n = 35), chronic pancreatitis (n = 53) and adenocarcinoma (n = 52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n = 4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62 m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74 m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. Conclusion: ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities.

  11. Radiation characteristics of input power from surface wave sustained plasma antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, T., E-mail: Naito.Teruki@bc.MitsubishiElectric.co.jp [Advanced Technology R& D Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-8661 (Japan); Yamaura, S. [Information Technology R& D Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Kamakura, Kanagawa 247-8501 (Japan); Fukuma, Y. [Communication System Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-8661 (Japan); Sakai, O. [Department of Electronic System Engineering, The University of Shiga Prefecture, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    This paper reports radiation characteristics of input power from a surface wave sustained plasma antenna investigated theoretically and experimentally, especially focusing on the power consumption balance between the plasma generation and the radiation. The plasma antenna is a dielectric tube filled with argon and small amount of mercury, and the structure is a basic quarter wavelength monopole antenna at 2.45 GHz. Microwave power at 2.45 GHz is supplied to the plasma antenna. The input power is partially consumed to sustain the plasma, and the remaining part is radiated as a signal. The relationship between the antenna gain and the input power is obtained by an analytical derivation and numerical simulations. As a result, the antenna gain is kept at low values, and most of the input power is consumed to increase the plasma volume until the tube is filled with the plasma whose electron density is higher than the critical electron density required for sustaining the surface wave. On the other hand, the input power is consumed to increase the electron density after the tube is fully filled with the plasma, and the antenna gain increases with increasing the electron density. The dependence of the antenna gain on the electron density is the same as that of a plasma antenna sustained by a DC glow discharge. These results are confirmed by experimental results of the antenna gain and radiation patterns. The antenna gain of the plasma is a few dB smaller than that of the identical metal antenna. The antenna gain of the plasma antenna is sufficient for the wireless communication, although it is difficult to substitute the plasma antenna for metal antennas completely. The plasma antenna is suitable for applications having high affinity with the plasma characteristics such as low interference and dynamic controllability.

  12. Radiation characteristics of input power from surface wave sustained plasma antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, T.; Yamaura, S.; Fukuma, Y.; Sakai, O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports radiation characteristics of input power from a surface wave sustained plasma antenna investigated theoretically and experimentally, especially focusing on the power consumption balance between the plasma generation and the radiation. The plasma antenna is a dielectric tube filled with argon and small amount of mercury, and the structure is a basic quarter wavelength monopole antenna at 2.45 GHz. Microwave power at 2.45 GHz is supplied to the plasma antenna. The input power is partially consumed to sustain the plasma, and the remaining part is radiated as a signal. The relationship between the antenna gain and the input power is obtained by an analytical derivation and numerical simulations. As a result, the antenna gain is kept at low values, and most of the input power is consumed to increase the plasma volume until the tube is filled with the plasma whose electron density is higher than the critical electron density required for sustaining the surface wave. On the other hand, the input power is consumed to increase the electron density after the tube is fully filled with the plasma, and the antenna gain increases with increasing the electron density. The dependence of the antenna gain on the electron density is the same as that of a plasma antenna sustained by a DC glow discharge. These results are confirmed by experimental results of the antenna gain and radiation patterns. The antenna gain of the plasma is a few dB smaller than that of the identical metal antenna. The antenna gain of the plasma antenna is sufficient for the wireless communication, although it is difficult to substitute the plasma antenna for metal antennas completely. The plasma antenna is suitable for applications having high affinity with the plasma characteristics such as low interference and dynamic controllability.

  13. Emission of Electromagnetic Waves through Medium of Matter Waves, Correlation between Wavelengths and Temperatures in Radiation Series of Hydrogen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pekárek, Viktor

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2002), s. 139-149 ISSN 0001-7043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2057903 Keywords : Matter waves * interference and surges of matter waves Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  14. Formation of core transport barrier and CH-Mode by ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Gettelfinger, G.; Hatcher, R.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.

    1995-01-01

    Observation of core transport barrier formation (for particles, ion and electron energies, and toroidal momentum) by ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) in PBX-M plasma is reported. The formation of a transport barrier leads to a strong peaking and significant increase of the core pressure (70%) and toroidal momentum (20%), and has been termed the core-high confinement mode (CH-Mode). This formation of a transport barrier is consistent, in terms of the expected barrier location as well as the required threshold power, with a theoretical model based on the poloidal sheared flow generation by the ion Bernstein wave power. The use of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) induced sheared flow as a tool to control plasma pressure and bootstrap current profiles shows a favorable scaling for the use in future reactor grade tokamak plasmas

  15. Possible standoff detection of ionizing radiation using high-power THz electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sprangle, Phillip; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.; Rodgers, John; Pu, Ruifeng; Kashyn, Dmytro G.; Antonsen, Thomas M., Jr.; Granatstein, Victor L.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, a new method of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials was proposed. This method is based on focusing high-power short wavelength electromagnetic radiation in a small volume where the wave electric field exceeds the breakdown threshold. In the presence of free electrons caused by ionizing radiation, in this volume an avalanche discharge can then be initiated. When the wavelength is short enough, the probability of having even one free electron in this small volume in the absence of additional sources of ionization is low. Hence, a high breakdown rate will indicate that in the vicinity of this volume there are some materials causing ionization of air. To prove this concept a 0.67 THz gyrotron delivering 200-300 kW power in 10 microsecond pulses is under development. This method of standoff detection of concealed sources of ionizing radiation requires a wide range of studies, viz., evaluation of possible range, THz power and pulse duration, production of free electrons in air by gamma rays penetrating through container walls, statistical delay time in initiation of the breakdown in the case of low electron density, temporal evolution of plasma structure in the breakdown and scattering of THz radiation from small plasma objects. Most of these issues are discussed in the paper.

  16. Effects and radiation dose to patients during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for kidney stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng Zhigen; Shao Songsheng; Shao Min

    1991-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is rapidly becoming an accepted treatment of renal calculi. Since fluoroscopy is involved in it to image the stones, it is important to know how much radiation and effects the patients receive during ESWL. Surface radiation exposure to 134 patients and medical personnel were measured during the course of ESWL using LiF(Mg, P, Cu) thermoluminescent dosimeters. Initial results showed an average skin exposure of 162 mSv per case, with a wide range of 5 to 2360 mSv. Factors influencing exposure levels include stone characteristics (location, size and opacity), physician's experience and number of shocks required. The monthly radiation dose to personnel working in the ESWL suite averaged 0.07-0.54 mSv. The effects of radiation to patients were observed pre-and post-ESWL by using white blood cell counts, lyphocyte micronucleus assays and chromosome aberration analysis. White blood cell counts rose or reduced to > 1000 cells in 50 per cent of cases and rose in one third of cases. Lymphocyte micronuclei and chromosome aberrations were observed in 20 patients during the cources. The average frequency of micronuclei was 0.5 per mille pre-ESWL and 1 per mille post-ESWL (P < 0.05). The dicentric chromosomes were markedly increased as compared with those of pre-ESWL with statistically significant difference (P < 0.05)

  17. Radiation exposures of workers resulting from the transport of gamma radiography sources in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentuc, F.N.; Schwarz, G.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma radiation sources are widely used for industrial purposes e.g. for non-destructive material testing. Many of these sources are permanently installed at a facility within instruments e.g. for level or thickness gauging. Other radioactive sources are implemented in portable devices for industrial gamma radiography which have to be carried to the various remote usage sites. In Germany, approximately 20 000 - 25 000 shipments of gamma radiography sources are proceeding annually on public transport routes. Since routine radiation monitoring programmes do not permit task-specific determination of occupational doses e.g. doses incurred during the movement phase and handling related doses, work has been carried out with the objective to determine the radiation exposures of the personnel attributable to transportation. For this purpose, a survey was launched in 2005 collecting data about e.g. the number and conditions of transports, the activity and type of transported radiation sources and the radiation level within the driver's cab to allow a dose assessment to be made for transport workers. The results of this survey covering the most important companies for gamma radiography services in Germany are presented in this paper. (authors)

  18. VU-B radiation inhibits the photosynthetic electron transport chain in chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, W.; Li, X.; Chen, L.

    2016-01-01

    UV radiation of sunlight is one of harmful factors for earth organisms, especially for photoautotrophs because they require light for energy and biomass production. A number of works have already been done regarding the effects of UV-B radiation at biochemical and molecular level, which showed that UV-B radiation could inhibit photosynthesis activity and reduce photosynthetic electron transport. However quite limited information can accurately make out inhibition site of UV-B radiation on photosynthetic electron transport. In this study, this issue was investigated through measuring oxygen evolution activity, chlorophyll a fluorescence and gene expression in a model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our results indicated that UV-B radiation could evidently decrease photosynthesis activity and inhibit electron transport by blocking electron transfer process from the first plastoquinone electron acceptors QA to second plastoquinone electron acceptors QB, but not impair electron transfer from the water oxidizing complex to QA. The psbA gene expression was also altered by UV-B radiation, where up-regulation occurred at 2, 4 and 6h after exposure and down-regulation happened at 12 and 24 h after exposure. These results suggested that UV-B could affects D1 protein normal turnover, so there was not enough D1 for binding with QB, which may affect photosynthetic electron transport and photosynthesis activity. (author)

  19. Two-dimensional radiation shielding optimization analysis of spent fuel transport container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yingnan; Chen Yixue; Yang Shouhai

    2013-01-01

    The intelligent radiation shielding optimization design software platform is a one-dimensional multi-target radiation shielding optimization program which is developed on the basis of the genetic algorithm program and one-dimensional discrete ordinate program-ANISN. This program was applied in the optimization design analysis of the spent fuel transport container radiation shielding. The multi-objective optimization calculation model of the spent fuel transport container radiation shielding was established, and the optimization calculation of the spent fuel transport container weight and radiation dose rate was carried by this program. The calculation results were checked by Monte-Carlo program-MCNP/4C. The results show that the weight of the optimized spent fuel transport container decreases to 81.1% of the origin and the radiation dose rate decreases to below 65.4% of the origin. The maximum deviation between the calculated values from the program and the MCNP is below 5%. The results show that the optimization design scheme is feasible and the calculation result is correct. (authors)

  20. ETRAN, Electron Transport and Gamma Transport with Secondary Radiation in Slab by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A - Nature of physical problem solved: ETRAN computes the transport of electrons and photons through plane-parallel slab targets that have a finite thickness in one dimension and are unbound in the other two-dimensions. The incident radiation can consist of a beam of either electrons or photons with specified spectral and directional distribution. Options are available by which all orders of the electron-photon cascade can be included in the calculation. Thus electrons are allowed to give rise to secondary knock-on electrons, continuous Bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-rays; and photons are allowed to produce photo-electrons, Compton electrons, and electron- positron pairs. Annihilation quanta, fluorescence radiation, and Auger electrons are also taken into account. If desired, the Monte- Carlo histories of all generations of secondary radiations are followed. The information produced by ETRAN includes the following items: 1) reflection and transmission of electrons or photons, differential in energy and direction; 2) the production of continuous Bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-rays by electrons and the emergence of such radiations from the target (differential in photon energy and direction); 3) the spectrum of the amounts of energy left behind in a thick target by an incident electron beam; 4) the deposition of energy and charge by an electron beam as function of the depth in the target; 5) the flux of electrons, differential in energy, as function of the depth in the target. B - Method of solution: A programme called DATAPAC-4 takes data for a particular material from a library tape and further processes them. The function of DATAPAC-4 is to produce single-scattering and multiple-scattering data in the form of tabular arrays (again stored on magnetic tape) which facilitate the rapid sampling of electron and photon Monte Carlo histories in ETRAN. The photon component of the electron-photon cascade is calculated by conventional random sampling that imitates

  1. 2-D FEM Simulation of Propagation and Radiation of Leaky Lamb Wave in a Plate-Type Ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-Jin; Kim, Hoe-Woong; Joo, Young-Sang; Kim, Sung-Kyun; Kim, Jong-Bum [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This paper introduces the 2-D FEM simulation of the propagation and radiation of the leaky Lamb wave in and from a plate-type ultrasonic waveguide sensor conducted for the radiation beam profile analysis. The FEM simulations are performed with three different excitation frequencies and the radiation beam profiles obtained from FEM simulations are compared with those obtained from corresponding experiments. This paper deals with the 2-D FEM simulation of the propagation and radiation of the leaky Lamb wave in and from a plate-type ultrasonic waveguide sensor conducted to analyze the radiation beam profiles. The radiation beam profile results obtained from the FEM simulation show good agreement with the ones obtained from the experiment. This result will be utilized to improve the performance of the developed waveguide sensor. The quality of the visualized image is mainly affected by beam profile characteristics of the leaky wave radiated from the waveguide sensor. However, the relationships between the radiation beam profile and many parameters of the waveguide sensor are not fully revealed yet. Therefore, further parametric studies are necessary to improve the performance of the sensor and the finite element method (FEM) is one of the most effective tools for the parametric study.

  2. Satellite Based Downward Long Wave Radiation by Various Models in Northeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanyang Sur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-based downward long wave radiation measurement under clear sky conditions in Northeast Asia was conducted using five well-known physical models (Brunt 1932, Idso and Jackson 1969, Brutsaert 1975, Satterlund 1979, Prata 1996 with a newly proposed global Rld model (Abramowitz et al. 2012. Data from two flux towers in South Korea were used to validate downward long wave radiation. Moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS atmospheric profile products were used to develop the Rld models. The overall root mean square error (RMSE of MODIS Rld with respect to two ecosystem-type flux towers was determined to be ≈ 20 W m-2. Based on the statistical analyses, MODIS Rld estimates with Brutsaert (1975 and Abramowitz et al. (2012 models were the most applicable for evaluating Rld for clear sky conditions in Northeast Asia. The Abramowitz Rld maps with MODIS Ta and ea showed reasonable seasonal patterns, which were well-aligned with other biophysical variables reported by previous studies. The MODIS Rld map developed in this study will be very useful for identifying spatial patterns that are not detectable from ground-based Rld measurement sites.

  3. Unconventional transport characteristics of p-wave superconducting junctions in Sr2RuO4-Ru eutectic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kambara, H.; Kashiwaya, S.; Yaguchi, H.; Asano, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Maeno, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We report on novel local transport characteristics of naturally formed p-wave superconducting junctions of Sr 2 RuO 4 -Ru eutectic system by using microfabrication technique. We observed quite anomalous voltage-current (differential resistance-current) characteristics for both I//ab and I//c directions, which are not seen in conventional Josephson junctions. The anomalous features suggest the internal degrees of freedom of the superconducting state, possibly due to chiral p-wave domain. The dc current acts as a driving force to move chiral p-wave domain walls and form larger critical current path to cause the anomalous hysteresis.

  4. Interaction between breaking/broken waves and infragravity-scale phenomena to control sediment suspension transport in the surf zone

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, GG

    2002-07-30

    Full Text Available suspension was further found to be related to the onset of lower water-levels associated with infragravity wave action, which corresponded with a predominance of breaking/broken waves. These breaking/broken waves (which are induced by the low water... is transported down- wards. Nadaoka et al. (1989) have furthermore identi?ed an eddy structure whereby the surface roller is dominated by a nearly two-dimensional ?ow structure, bounded below by strongly three- dimensional obliquely descending eddies bringing...

  5. Brachytherapy with 125-Iodine sources: transport and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Carla D.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Moura, Joao A.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Nagatomi, Helio R.; Feher, Anselmo; Hilario, Katia F.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.

    2009-01-01

    The estimates for the year 2009 show that 466,730 new cancer cases will occur in Brazil. Prostate cancer is the second most incident type. Brachytherapy, a type of radiotherapy, with Iodine-125 sources are an important form of treatment for this kind of cancer. The Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN) created a project to develop a national prototype of these sources and is implementing a facility for local production. The seeds manufacture in Brazil will allow to diminish the treatment cost and make it possible for a larger number of patients. While the laboratory is not ready, the IPEN import and it distributes seeds. This work aim is to present and evaluate the transport procedures and the radiological protection applied to imported sources in order to assist the procedures for the new laboratory implementation. Before sending to hospitals, the seeds are packed by a radioprotector supervisor, in accordance with CNEN NE 5.01 standard 'Radioactive Material Transport'. Despite Iodine-125 presents low energy photons, around 29 keV, local and personal dosimeters are used during the transport process, as described in CNEN NN 3.01 standard 'Radiological Protection Basic Guideline'. All the results show no contamination and very low exposure, proving the method to be valid. The transport procedure used is correct, according to the regulations. As an result of this work, a new dosimeter should be installed and evaluate in future study. (author)

  6. Experience with the loading and transport of fuel assembly transport casks, including CASTOR casks, and the radiation exposure of personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentele, W.; Kinzelmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    In 1997 and 1998, six spent fuel assembly transports started from the nuclear power plant Gemeinschaftskernkraftwerk Neckar (GKN), using CASTOR-V19 casks. Professor Kuni of Marburg University challenged the statement made by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS)) based on accepted scientific knowledge, according to which so-called CASTOR transports present no risk, either to the population or to the escorting police units. This paper shows that the collective dose during the loading of the CASTOR casks amounted to 4.5 mSv (gamma and neutrons) per cask at the most, and that the maximum individual dose amounted to 0.26 mSv. In addition to these doses, the collective dose during handling and transport must be considered: this amounted to 0.35 mSv (gamma and neutrons). The dose to the police escort was -2 (limit for surface contamination), presented degrees of contamination >4 Bq cm -2 upon reaching the Valognes/Cogema terminal. However, transport casks coming from French plants also revealed degrees of contamination >4 Bq cm -2 , as well as 'hot spots'. No such contamination was found on NTL 11 casks transported from the GKN to Sellafield. Neither was any increased contamination found upon the arrival of CASTOR-V19 casks transported from GKN to Gorleben or Ahaus. The partially sensationalist media reports were inversely proportional to the actual radiological relevance of the matter. The German Commission on Radiation Protection (SSK) confirmed that the radiological effect of such contaminated spent fuel transports is negligible. (author)

  7. Parametric excitation of very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic whistler waves and interaction with energetic electrons in radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Caplinger, J.; Main, D.; Mishin, E.; Gershenzon, N.; Genoni, T.; Paraschiv, I.; Rose, D.

    2018-04-01

    The concept of a parametric antenna in ionospheric plasma is analyzed. Such antennas are capable of exciting electromagnetic radiation fields, specifically the creation of whistler waves generated at the very low frequency (VLF) range, which are also capable of propagating large distances away from the source region. The mechanism of whistler wave generation is considered a parametric interaction of quasi-electrostatic whistler waves (also known as low oblique resonance (LOR) oscillations) excited by a conventional loop antenna. The interaction of LOR waves with quasi-neutral density perturbations in the near field of an antenna gives rise to electromagnetic whistler waves on combination frequencies. It is shown in this work that the amplitude of these waves can considerably exceed the amplitude of whistler waves directly excited by a loop. Additionally, particle-in-cell simulations, which demonstrate the excitation and spatial structure of VLF waves excited by a loop antenna, are presented. Possible applications including the wave-particle interactions to mitigate performance anomalies of low Earth orbit satellites, active space experiments, communication via VLF waves, and modification experiments in the ionosphere will be discussed.

  8. Chaotic transport of a matter-wave soliton in a biperiodically driven optical superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zheng; Hai Wenhua; Deng Yan; Xie Qiongtao

    2012-01-01

    Under the effective particle approximation, we study the temporal ratchet effect for chaotic transport of a matter-wave soliton consisting of an attractive Bose–Einstein condensate held in a quasi-one-dimensional symmetric optical superlattice with biperiodic driving. It is known that chaos can substitute for disorder in Anderson’s scenario [Wimberger S, Krug A, Buchleitner A. Phys Rev Lett 2002;89:263601] and only a higher level of disorder can induce Anderson localization for some special systems [Schwartz T, Bartal G, Fishman S, Segev M. Nature 2007;46:52], and a matter-wave soliton can transit to chaos with high or low probability in a high- or low-chaoticity region [Zhu Q, Hai W, Rong S. Phys Rev E 2009;80:016203]. Here we demonstrate that varying the driving phase to break the time reversal symmetry of the system can increase the size of the high-chaoticity region for low- and moderate-frequency regions. Consequently, the parameter region of the exponential spatial localization increases to the same size, and the low-chaoticity and delocalization region, which includes subregions of the ratchet effect and its inverse effect, correspondingly decreases. The positive dependence of the localization on the driving frequency is also revealed. The results indicate that a high-chaoticity region could replace higher disorder and assists in Anderson localization. From the results we suggest a method for controlling directed motion of a matter-wave soliton by adjusting the driving frequency and amplitude to strengthen or suppress, or even reverse, the temporal ratchet effect.

  9. On- and off-resonance radiation-atom-coupling matrix elements involving extended atomic wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of our earlier works, we present results concerning the computation of matrix elements of the multipolar Hamiltonian (MPH) between extended wave functions that are obtained numerically. The choice of the MPH is discussed in connection with the broader issue of the form of radiation-atom (or -molecule) interaction that is appropriate for the systematic solution of various problems of matter-radiation interaction. We derive analytic formulas, in terms of the sine-integral function and spherical Bessel functions of various orders, for the cumulative radial integrals that were obtained and calculated by Komninos, Mercouris, and Nicolaides [Phys. Rev. A 71, 023410 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.71.023410]. This development allows the much faster and more accurate computation of such matrix elements, a fact that enhances the efficiency with which the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved nonperturbatively, in the framework of the state-specific expansion approach. The formulas are applicable to the general case where a pair of orbitals with angular parts |ℓ1,m1> and |ℓ2,m2> are coupled radiatively. As a test case, we calculate the matrix elements of the electric field and of the paramagnetic operators for on- and off-resonance transitions, between hydrogenic circular states of high angular momentum, whose quantum numbers are chosen so as to satisfy electric dipole and electric quadrupole selection rules. Because of the nature of their wave function (they are nodeless and the large centrifugal barrier keeps their overwhelming part at large distances from the nucleus), the validity of the electric dipole approximation in various applications where the off-resonance couplings must be considered becomes precarious. For example, for the transition from the circular state with n = 20 to that with n = 21, for which ≈400 a.u., the dipole approximation starts to fail already at XUV wavelengths (λ <125nm).

  10. Small-sized linear accelerator of 2.5 MeV electrons with a local radiation shield for custom examination of freight transported by motor transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baklanov, A.V.; Gavrish, Yu.N.; Klinov, A.P.; Krest'yaninov, A.S.; Nikolaev, V.M.; Fomin, L.P.; Linkenbach, H.A.; Geus, G.; Knospel, W.

    2001-01-01

    A new development of a small-sized linear accelerator of 2.5 MeV electrons with a local radiation protection is described. The accelerator is intended for movable facilities of radiation custom of the freight transported by motor transport. Main constructive solutions, mass and dimension characteristics and results of preliminary tests of the accelerator parameters and characteristics of radiation protection are presented [ru

  11. Highly radiative plasmas for local transport studies and power and particle handling in reactor regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, K.W.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.

    1999-01-01

    To study the applicability of artificially enhanced impurity radiation for mitigation of the plasma-limiter interaction in reactor regimes, krypton and xenon gases were injected into TFTR supershots and high-l i plasmas. At neutral beam injection (NBI) powers P B ≥ 30 MW, carbon influxes (blooms) were suppressed, leading to improved energy confinement and neutron production in both D and DT plasmas, and the highest DT fusion energy production (7.6 MJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles with predictions of the MIST impurity transport code have guided studies of highly-radiative plasmas in ITER. The response of the electron and ion temperatures to greatly increased radiative losses from the electrons was used to study thermal transport mechanisms. (author)

  12. Highly radiative plasmas for local transport studies and power and particle handling in reactor regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, K.W.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.

    2001-01-01

    To study the applicability of artificially enhanced impurity radiation for mitigation of the plasma-limiter interaction in reactor regimes, krypton and xenon gases were injected into TFTR supershots and high-l i plasmas. At neutral beam injection (NBI) powers P B ≤30MW, carbon influxes (blooms) were suppressed, leading to improved energy confinement and neutron production in both D and DT plasmas, and the highest DT fusion energy production (7.6 MJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles with predictions of the MIST impurity transport code have guided studies of highly-radiative plasmas in ITER. The response of the electron and ion temperatures to greatly increased radiative losses from the electrons was used to study thermal transport mechanisms. (author)

  13. Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle Handling in Reactor Regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Hill, K.W.

    1998-01-01

    To study the applicability of artificially enhanced impurity radiation for mitigation of the plasma-limiter interaction in reactor regimes, krypton and xenon gases were injected into the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) supershots and high-l(subscript) plasmas. At neutral beam injection (NBI) powers P(subscript B) greater than or equal to 30 MW, carbon influxes (blooms) were suppressed, leading to improved energy confinement and neutron production in both deuterium (D) and deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas, and the highest DT fusion energy production (7.6 MJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles with predictions of the MIST impurity transport code have guided studies of highly-radiative plasmas in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The response of the electron and ion temperatures to greatly increased radiative losses from the electrons was used to study thermal transport mechanisms

  14. Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety Newsletter, No. 3, May 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Building competence through education and training in radiation protection, radioactive waste safety, and safety in transport of radioactive material is fundamental to the establishment of a comprehensive and sustainable national infrastructure for radiation safety, which in turn is essential for the beneficial uses of radiation while ensuring appropriate protection of workers, patients, the public and the environment. IAEA’s Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety provides direct assistance to Member States via a range of tools and mechanisms, such as by organizing educational and training events, developing standardized syllabi with supporting material and documents, and by fostering methodologies to build sustainable competence and enhance effectiveness in the provision of training. The main objective is to support Member States in the application of the IAEA Safety Standards. Seminars and additional activities are also promoted to broaden knowledge on relevant areas for an effective application of the standards

  15. Soliton radiation beat analysis of optical pulses generated from two continuous-wave lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajnulina, M.; Böhm, M.; Blow, K.; Rieznik, A. A.; Giannone, D.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a fibre-based approach for generation of optical frequency combs (OFCs) with the aim of calibration of astronomical spectrographs in the low and medium-resolution range. This approach includes two steps: in the first step, an appropriate state of optical pulses is generated and subsequently moulded in the second step delivering the desired OFC. More precisely, the first step is realised by injection of two continuous-wave (CW) lasers into a conventional single-mode fibre, whereas the second step generates a broad OFC by using the optical solitons generated in step one as initial condition. We investigate the conversion of a bichromatic input wave produced by two initial CW lasers into a train of optical solitons, which happens in the fibre used as step one. Especially, we are interested in the soliton content of the pulses created in this fibre. For that, we study different initial conditions (a single cosine-hump, an Akhmediev breather, and a deeply modulated bichromatic wave) by means of soliton radiation beat analysis and compare the results to draw conclusion about the soliton content of the state generated in the first step. In case of a deeply modulated bichromatic wave, we observed the formation of a collective soliton crystal for low input powers and the appearance of separated solitons for high input powers. An intermediate state showing the features of both, the soliton crystal and the separated solitons, turned out to be most suitable for the generation of OFC for the purpose of calibration of astronomical spectrographs.

  16. Analytical Radiation Transport Benchmarks for The Next Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapol, B.D.

    2005-01-01

    Verification of large-scale computational algorithms used in nuclear engineering and radiological applications is an essential element of reliable code performance. For this reason, the development of a suite of multidimensional semi-analytical benchmarks has been undertaken to provide independent verification of proper operation of codes dealing with the transport of neutral particles. The benchmarks considered cover several one-dimensional, multidimensional, monoenergetic and multigroup, fixed source and critical transport scenarios. The first approach, called the Green's Function. In slab geometry, the Green's function is incorporated into a set of integral equations for the boundary fluxes. Through a numerical Fourier transform inversion and subsequent matrix inversion for the boundary fluxes, a semi-analytical benchmark emerges. Multidimensional solutions in a variety of infinite media are also based on the slab Green's function. In a second approach, a new converged SN method is developed. In this method, the SN solution is ''minded'' to bring out hidden high quality solutions. For this case multigroup fixed source and criticality transport problems are considered. Remarkably accurate solutions can be obtained with this new method called the Multigroup Converged SN (MGCSN) method as will be demonstrated

  17. Radiation Transport in Random Media With Large Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Aaron; Prinja, Anil; Franke, Brian

    2017-09-01

    Neutral particle transport in media exhibiting large and complex material property spatial variation is modeled by representing cross sections as lognormal random functions of space and generated through a nonlinear memory-less transformation of a Gaussian process with covariance uniquely determined by the covariance of the cross section. A Karhunen-Loève decomposition of the Gaussian process is implemented to effciently generate realizations of the random cross sections and Woodcock Monte Carlo used to transport particles on each realization and generate benchmark solutions for the mean and variance of the particle flux as well as probability densities of the particle reflectance and transmittance. A computationally effcient stochastic collocation method is implemented to directly compute the statistical moments such as the mean and variance, while a polynomial chaos expansion in conjunction with stochastic collocation provides a convenient surrogate model that also produces probability densities of output quantities of interest. Extensive numerical testing demonstrates that use of stochastic reduced-order modeling provides an accurate and cost-effective alternative to random sampling for particle transport in random media.

  18. Graphical-based construction of combinatorial geometries for radiation transport and shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    A graphical-based code system is being developed at ORNL to manipulate combinatorial geometries for radiation transport and shielding applications. The current version (basically a combinatorial geometry debugger) consists of two parts: a FORTRAN-based ''view'' generator and a Microsoft Windows application for displaying the geometry. Options and features of both modules are discussed. Examples illustrating the various options available are presented. The potential for utilizing the images produced using the debugger as a visualization tool for the output of the radiation transport codes is discussed as is the future direction of the development

  19. PRIMORDIAL GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND RESCATTERED ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon [Basic Science Research Institute, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760 (Korea, Republic of); Trippe, Sascha, E-mail: ki13130@gmail.com, E-mail: trippe@astro.snu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-20

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  20. Optical Spectroscopy Measurements of Shock Waves Driven by Intense Z-Pinch Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, J.; Bernard, M.; Bailey, J.E.; Carlson, A.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Hall, C.A.; Hanson, D.; Johnston, R.; Lake, P.; Lawrence, J.

    1999-01-01

    Z-pinches created using the Z accelerator generate approximately220 TW, 1.7 MJ radiation pulses that heat large (approximately10 cm 3 ) hohlraums to 100-150 eV temperatures for times of order 10 nsec. We are performing experiments exploiting this intense radiation to drive shock waves for equation of state studies. The shock pressures are typically 1-10 Mbar with 10 nsec duration in 6-mm-diameter samples. In this paper we demonstrate the ability to perform optical spectroscopy measurements on shocked samples located in close proximity to the z-pinch. These experiments are particularly well suited to optical spectroscopy measurements because of the relatively large sample size and long duration. The optical emission is collected using fiber optics and recorded with a streaked spectrograph. Other diagnostics include VISAR and active shock breakout measurements of the shocked sample and a suite of diagnostics that characterize the radiation drive. Our near term goal is to use the spectral emission to obtain the temperature of the shocked material. Longer term objectives include the examination of deviations of the spectrum from blackbody, line emission from lower density regions, determination of kinetic processes in molecular systems, evaluation of phase transitions such as the onset of metalization in transparent materials, and characterization of the plasma formed when the shock exits the rear surface. An initial set of data illustrating both the potential and the challenge of these measurements is described

  1. Modeling and simulations of radiative blast wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimony, Assaf; Huntington, Channing M.; Trantham, Matthew; Malamud, Guy; Elbaz, Yonatan; Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Shvarts, Dov

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility measured the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor RT instabilities driven by radiative blast waves, relevant to astrophysics and other HEDP systems. We constructed a new Buoyancy-Drag (BD) model, which accounts for the ablation effect on both bubble and spike. This ablation effect is accounted for by using the potential flow model ]Oron et al PoP 1998], adding another term to the classical BD formalism: βDuA / u , where β the Takabe constant, D the drag term, uA the ablation velocity and uthe instability growth velocity. The model results are compared with the results of experiments and 2D simulations using the CRASH code, with nominal radiation or reduced foam opacity (by a factor of 1000). The ablation constant of the model, βb / s, for the bubble and for the spike fronts, are calibrated using the results of the radiative shock experiments. This work is funded by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under subcontract B614207, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. BURNING PLASMA PROJECTIONS USING DRIFT WAVE TRANSPORT MODELS AND SCALINGS FOR THE H-MODE PEDESTAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KINSEY, J.E.; ONJUN, T.; BATEMAN, G.; KRITZ, A.; PANKIN, A.; STAEBLER, G.M.; WALTZ, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    OAK-B135 The GLF23 and Multi-Mode (MM95) transport models are used along with a model for the H-mode pedestal to predict the fusion performance for the ITER, FIRE, and IGNITOR tokamak designs. The drift-wave predictive transport models reproduce the core profiles in a wide variety of tokamak discharges, yet they differ significantly in their response to temperature gradient (stiffness). Recent gyro-kinetic simulations of ITG/TEM and ETG modes motivate the renormalization of the GLF23 model. The normalizing coefficients for the ITG/TEM modes are reduced by a factor of 3.7 while the ETG mode coefficient is increased by a factor of 4.8 in comparison with the original model. A pedestal temperature model is developed for type I ELMy H-mode plasmas based on ballooning mode stability and a theory-motivated scaling for the pedestal width. In this pedestal model, the pedestal density is proportional to the line-averaged density and the pedestal temperature is inversely related to the pedestal density

  3. Optical transport and statistics of radiative losses in disordered chains of microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Chaosheng; Xu Hui; Deych, Lev

    2010-01-01

    Optical transport in a one-dimensional chain of microspherical resonators with size disorder is studied in the spectral range of high-Q whispering gallery modes. An ab initio approach is used to develop a theoretical framework for analysis of steady-state transport parameters with main emphasis on properly defined radiative loss coefficient. Probability distribution and scaling properties of the latter are established and explained.

  4. Monte Carlo closure for moment-based transport schemes in general relativistic radiation hydrodynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucart, Francois

    2018-04-01

    General relativistic radiation hydrodynamic simulations are necessary to accurately model a number of astrophysical systems involving black holes and neutron stars. Photon transport plays a crucial role in radiatively dominated accretion discs, while neutrino transport is critical to core-collapse supernovae and to the modelling of electromagnetic transients and nucleosynthesis in neutron star mergers. However, evolving the full Boltzmann equations of radiative transport is extremely expensive. Here, we describe the implementation in the general relativistic SPEC code of a cheaper radiation hydrodynamic method that theoretically converges to a solution of Boltzmann's equation in the limit of infinite numerical resources. The algorithm is based on a grey two-moment scheme, in which we evolve the energy density and momentum density of the radiation. Two-moment schemes require a closure that fills in missing information about the energy spectrum and higher order moments of the radiation. Instead of the approximate analytical closure currently used in core-collapse and merger simulations, we complement the two-moment scheme with a low-accuracy Monte Carlo evolution. The Monte Carlo results can provide any or all of the missing information in the evolution of the moments, as desired by the user. As a first test of our methods, we study a set of idealized problems demonstrating that our algorithm performs significantly better than existing analytical closures. We also discuss the current limitations of our method, in particular open questions regarding the stability of the fully coupled scheme.

  5. A Novel Radiation Transport Algorithm for Radiography Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inanc, Feyzi

    2004-01-01

    The simulations used in the NDE community are becoming more realistic with the introduction of more physics. In this work, we have developed a new algorithm that is capable of representing photon and charged particle fluxes through spherical harmonic expansions in a manner similar to well known discrete ordinates method with the exception that Boltzmann operator is treated through exact integration rather than conventional Legendre expansions. This approach provides a mean to include radiation interactions for higher energy regimes where there are additional physical mechanisms for photons and charged particles

  6. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics, heat transport and thermal waves in laminar and turbulent superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongiovì, Maria Stella; Jou, David; Sciacca, Michele

    2018-01-01

    ballistic regimes, from isotropic to anisotropic situations, are analyzed, thus providing a wide range of practical applications. Besides the steady-state effective thermal conductivity, the propagation of harmonic waves is also studied, motivated by the fact that vortex line density is experimentally detected via the attenuation of second sound and because it provides dynamical information on heat transport and thermal waves which complement the static information of the thermal conductivity.

  7. Ducting of the Whistler-Mode Waves by Magnetic Field-Aligned Density Enhancements in the Radiation Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Bengtson, M.; English, D.; Miller, M.; Turco, L.

    2017-12-01

    Whistler-mode waves (or whistlers) are the right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves with a frequency in the range above the lower hybrid frequency and below the electron cyclotron frequency. They can efficiently interact with energetic electrons in the equatorial magnetosphere and remediate them from the earth's radiation belt. These interactions are non-linear, they depend on the wave amplitude, and for them to be efficient the wave power needs to be delivered from the transmitter to the interaction region without significant losses. The main physical mechanism which can solve this problem is ducting/guiding of whistlers by magnetic field-aligned density inhomogeneities or ducts. We present results from a modeling of whistler-mode waves observed by the NASA Van Allen Probes satellites inside the ducts formed by density enhancements (also known as, high-density ducts or HDD). Our previous studies suggest that HDD can confine without leakage only waves with some particular parameters (frequency, perpendicular and parallel wavelength) connected with the parameters of the duct (like duct's "width" and "depth"). Our numerical results confirm that 1) the high-density ducts with amplitudes and perpendicular sizes observed by the RBSP satellites can indeed guide whistlers over significant distances along the ambient magnetic field with small leakage, and 2) the quality of the ducting indeed depends on the wave perpendicular and parallel wavelengths and, therefore, the fact that the wave is ducted by HDD can be used to determine parameters of the wave.

  8. Transfer of radioactive materials in the fuel cycle. Transportation systems, transportation volume and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, G.

    1997-01-01

    No other aspect of the carriage of hazardous goods has been provoking such long-lived concern in the general public and in the press during the last few years as the transport of spent nuclear fuels and high-level radioactive wastes to the storage facility at Gorleben. One reason for this controversy, besides clear-cut opposition in principal against such transfer activities, is the fact that there is an information gap, so that large parts of the population are not well informed about the relevant legal safety requirements and obligations governing such transports. The article therefore tries to fill this gap, presenting information on the number and necessity of transports of radioactive materials in the nuclear fuel cycle, the relevant scenarios, the transportation systems and packing and shielding requirements, as well as information on the radiological classification and hazardousness of waste forms. (Orig.) [de

  9. Back radiation suppression through a semi-transparent round ground plane for a mm-Wave monopole antenna

    KAUST Repository

    Klionovski, Kirill; Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Shamim, Atif

    2017-01-01

    Omnidirectional radiation pattern with minimum backward radiation is highly desirable for millimeter-wave telecommunication antennas. In this work, we propose a round, semitransparent ground plane of radius 0.8λ with uniform impedance distribution that can reduce the back radiation of a monopole antenna by 8.8 dB as compared with a similar sized metallic ground plane. The value of uniform impedance is obtained through analytical optimization by using asymptotic expressions in the Kirchhoff approximation of the radiation pattern of a toroidal wave scattered by a round semitransparent ground plane. The semitransparent ground plane has been realized using a low-cost carbon paste on a Kapton film. Experimental results match closely with those of simulations and validate the overall concept.

  10. Back radiation suppression through a semi-transparent round ground plane for a mm-Wave monopole antenna

    KAUST Repository

    Klionovski, Kirill

    2017-10-25

    Omnidirectional radiation pattern with minimum backward radiation is highly desirable for millimeter-wave telecommunication antennas. In this work, we propose a round, semitransparent ground plane of radius 0.8λ with uniform impedance distribution that can reduce the back radiation of a monopole antenna by 8.8 dB as compared with a similar sized metallic ground plane. The value of uniform impedance is obtained through analytical optimization by using asymptotic expressions in the Kirchhoff approximation of the radiation pattern of a toroidal wave scattered by a round semitransparent ground plane. The semitransparent ground plane has been realized using a low-cost carbon paste on a Kapton film. Experimental results match closely with those of simulations and validate the overall concept.

  11. Radiation risk assessment for the transport of radioisotopes using KRI-BGM B(U) type container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Woon-Kap

    2008-01-01

    The radiation risks were estimated for the transportation of radioisotopes using KRI-BGM transport container. KRI-BGM container was specially designed for transportation of large amount of radioisotopes for industrial or medical applications. The container can carry maximum 370 TBq of solid Ir-192, 29.6 TBq of liquid Mo-99 and 37 TBq of liquid I-131 respectively. For the radiation risk assessment, it was assumed that maximum design activity of those radioisotopes was transported. Transportation route is from Daejeon where radioisotopes are produced to Seoul where radioisotopes are consumed. Transport distance is 200 km including highway and downtown area from Daejeon to Seoul. As the transportation conveyance, an ordinary cargo truck is used exclusively. Radiation risks were estimated for incident free and accident condition of transportation and RADTRAN 5.6 was used as the risk assessment tool. For the risk assessment of radioisotopes transportation, various parameters such as population density around transport route, weather condition, probability of specific accidents such as impact, fire, etc. were considered. From the results of this study, the exclusive transportation of radioisotopes using KRI-BGM transport container by truck showed low radiological risks with manageable safety and health consequences. This paper discusses the methods and results of the radiation risks assessment for the radioisotopes transportation by an ordinary truck and presents the expected radiation risks in person-Sv and latent cancer fatalities. (author)

  12. Radiation inactivation target size of rat adipocyte glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and intracellular pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, D.B.; Berenski, C.J.; Spangler, R.A.; Jung, C.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The in situ assembly states of the glucose transport carrier protein in the plasma membrane and in the intracellular (microsomal) storage pool of rat adipocytes were assessed by studying radiation-induced inactivation of the D-glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding activities. High energy radiation inactivated the glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding of each of these membrane preparations by reducing the total number of the binding sites without affecting the dissociation constant. The reduction in total number of binding sites was analyzed as a function of radiation dose based on target theory, from which a radiation-sensitive mass (target size) was calculated. When the plasma membranes of insulin-treated adipocytes were used, a target size of approximately 58,000 daltons was obtained. For adipocyte microsomal membranes, we obtained target sizes of approximately 112,000 and 109,000 daltons prior to and after insulin treatment, respectively. In the case of microsomal membranes, however, inactivation data showed anomalously low radiation sensitivities at low radiation doses, which may be interpreted as indicating the presence of a radiation-sensitive inhibitor. These results suggest that the adipocyte glucose transporter occurs as a monomer in the plasma membrane while existing in the intracellular reserve pool either as a homodimer or as a stoichiometric complex with a protein of an approximately equal size

  13. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  14. Monitoring millimeter wave stray radiation during ECRH operation at ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, M.; Honecker, F.; Monaco, F.; Schmid-Lorch, D.; Schütz, H.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D.

    2012-09-01

    Due to imperfection of the single path absorption, ECRH at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is always accompanied by stray radiation in the vacuum vessel. New ECRH scenarios with O2 and X3 heating schemes extend the operational space, but they have also the potential to increase the level of stray radiation. There are hazards for invessel components. Damage on electric cables has already been encountered. It is therefore necessary to monitor and control the ECRH with respect to the stray radiation level. At AUG a system of Sniffer antennas equipped with microwave detection diodes is installed. The system is part of the ECRH interlock circuit. We notice, however, that during plasma operation the variations of the Sniffer antenna signal are very large. In laboratory measurements we see variations of up to 20 dB in the directional sensitivity and we conclude that an interference pattern is formed inside the copper sphere of the antenna. When ECRH is in plasma operation at AUG, the plasma is acting as a phase and mode mixer for the millimeter waves and thus the interference pattern inside the sphere changes with the characteristic time of the plasma dynamics. In order to overcome the difficulty of a calibrated measurement of the average stray radiation level, we installed bolometer and pyroelectric detectors, which intrinsically average over interference structures due to their large active area. The bolometer provides a robust calibration but with moderate temporal resolution. The pyroelectric detector provides high sensitivity and a good temporal resolution, but it raises issues of possible signal drifts in long pulses.

  15. Monitoring millimeter wave stray radiation during ECRH operation at ASDEX Upgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner D.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to imperfection of the single path absorption, ECRH at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG is always accompanied by stray radiation in the vacuum vessel. New ECRH scenarios with O2 and X3 heating schemes extend the operational space, but they have also the potential to increase the level of stray radiation. There are hazards for invessel components. Damage on electric cables has already been encountered. It is therefore necessary to monitor and control the ECRH with respect to the stray radiation level. At AUG a system of Sniffer antennas equipped with microwave detection diodes is installed. The system is part of the ECRH interlock circuit. We notice, however, that during plasma operation the variations of the Sniffer antenna signal are very large. In laboratory measurements we see variations of up to 20 dB in the directional sensitivity and we conclude that an interference pattern is formed inside the copper sphere of the antenna. When ECRH is in plasma operation at AUG, the plasma is acting as a phase and mode mixer for the millimeter waves and thus the interference pattern inside the sphere changes with the characteristic time of the plasma dynamics. In order to overcome the difficulty of a calibrated measurement of the average stray radiation level, we installed bolometer and pyroelectric detectors, which intrinsically average over interference structures due to their large active area. The bolometer provides a robust calibration but with moderate temporal resolution. The pyroelectric detector provides high sensitivity and a good temporal resolution, but it raises issues of possible signal drifts in long pulses.

  16. Advantages of Analytical Transformations in Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, M S; Brooks III, E D; Daffin, F

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport typically attempt to solve an integral by directly sampling analog or weighted particles, which are treated as physical entities. Improvements to the methods involve better sampling, probability games or physical intuition about the problem. We show that significant improvements can be achieved by recasting the equations with an analytical transform to solve for new, non-physical entities or fields. This paper looks at one such transform, the difference formulation for thermal photon transport, showing a significant advantage for Monte Carlo solution of the equations for time dependent transport. Other related areas are discussed that may also realize significant benefits from similar analytical transformations

  17. Energy distributions and radiation transport in uranium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.; Bathke, C.; Maceda, E.; Choi, C.

    1976-01-01

    Electron energy distribution functions have been calculated in a 235 U-plasma at 1 atmosphere for various plasma temperatures (5000 to 8000 0 K) and neutron fluxes (2 x 10 12 to 2 x 10 16 neutrons/(cm 2 -sec)). Two sources of energetic electrons are included; namely fission-fragment and electron-impact ionization, resulting in a high-energy tail superimposed on the thermalized electron distribution. Consequential derivations from equilibrium collision rates are of interest relative to direct pumping of lasers and radiation emission. Results suggest that non-equilibrium excitation can best be achieved with an additive gas such as helium or in lower temperature plasmas requiring UF 6 . An approximate analytic model, based on continuous electron slowing, has been used for survey calculations. Where more accuracy is required, a Monte Carlo technique is used which combines an analytic representation of Coulombic collisions with a random-walk treatment of inelastic collisions

  18. Experiences with radiation portal detectors for international rail transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromswold, D. C.; McCormick, K.; Todd, L.; Ashbaker, E. D.; Evans, J. C.

    2006-08-01

    Radiation detectors monitored trains at two international borders to evaluate the performance of NaI(Tl) and plastic (polyvinyltoluene: PVT) gamma-ray detectors to characterize rail cargo. The detectors included a prototype NaI(Tl) radiation-portal-monitor panel having four large detectors (10-cm × 10-cm × 41-cm) and a PVT panel with a 41 cm × 173 cm × 3.8-cm detector. Spectral data from the NaI(Tl) and PVT detectors were recorded. Of particular emphasis was the identification of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) and the resultant frequency of nuisance alarms. For rail monitoring, the difficulty in stopping trains to perform secondary inspection on alarming cars creates a need for reliable identification of NORM during initial screening. Approximately 30 trains were monitored, and the commodities in individual railcars were ascertained from manifest information. At one test site, the trains carried inter-modal containers that had been unloaded from ships, and at the other site, the trains contained bulk cargo in tanker cars and hopper cars or individual items in boxcars or flatbeds. NORM encountered included potash, liquefied petroleum gas, fireworks, televisions, and clay-based products (e.g., pottery). Analysis of the spectral data included the use of the template-fitting portion of the program GADRAS developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For most of the NORM, the NaI(Tl) data produced a correct identification of the radionuclides present in the railcars. The same analysis was also used for PVT data in which the spectral information (no peaks but only gradual spectral changes including Compton edges) was limited. However, the PVT analysis provided correct identification of 40K and 226Ra in many cases.

  19. Experiences with radiation portal detectors for international rail transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromswold, David C.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Evans, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation detectors monitored trains at two international borders to evaluate the performance of NaI(Tl) and plastic (polyvinyltoluene: PVT) gamma-ray detectors to characterize rail cargo. The detectors included a prototype NaI(Tl) radiation-portal-monitor panel having four large detectors (10-cm x 10-cm x 41-cm) and a PVT panel with a 41 cm x 173 cm x 3.8-cm detector. Spectral data from the NaI(Tl) and PVT detectors were recorded. Of particular emphasis was the identification of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) and the resultant frequency of nuisance alarms. For rail monitoring, the difficulty in stopping trains to perform secondary inspection on alarming cars creates a need for reliable identification of NORM during initial screening. Approximately 30 trains were monitored, and the commodities in individual railcars were ascertained from manifest information. At one test site the trains carried inter-modal containers that had been unloaded from ships, and at the other site the trains contained bulk cargo or individual items in boxcars or flatbeds. NORM encountered included potash, liquefied petroleum gas, fireworks, televisions, and clay-based products (e.g., pottery). Analysis of the spectral data included the use of the template-fitting program GADRAS/FitToDB from Sandia National Laboratories. For much of the NORM the NaI(Tl) data produced a correct identification of the radionuclides present in the railcars. The same analysis was also used for PVT data in which the spectral information (no peaks but only gradual spectral changes including Compton edges) was limited. However, the PVT analysis provided correct identification of 40K and 226Ra in many cases

  20. Pulse picker for synchrotron radiation driven by a surface acoustic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadilonga, Simone; Zizak, Ivo; Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Petsiuk, Andrei; Dolbnya, Igor; Sawhney, Kawal; Erko, Alexei

    2017-05-15

    A functional test for a pulse picker for synchrotron radiation was performed at Diamond Light Source. The purpose of a pulse picker is to select which pulse from the synchrotron hybrid-mode bunch pattern reaches the experiment. In the present work, the Bragg reflection on a Si/B4C multilayer was modified using surface acoustic wave (SAW) trains. Diffraction on the SAW alters the direction of the x rays and it can be used to modulate the intensity of the x rays that reach the experimental chamber. Using electronic modulation of the SAW amplitude, it is possible to obtain different scattering conditions for different x-ray pulses. To isolate the single bunch, the state of the SAW must be changed in the short time gap between the pulses. To achieve the necessary time resolution, the measurements have been performed in conical diffraction geometry. The achieved time resolution was 120 ns.

  1. Radiation tails of the scalar wave equation in a weak gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankin, R.; Piir, I.

    1974-01-01

    A class of solutions of the linearized Einstein equations is found making use of the Newman-Penrose spin coefficient formalism. These solutions describe a weak retarded gravitational field with an arbitrary multipole structure. The study of the radial propagation of the scalar waves in this gravitational field shows that in the first approximation the tails of the scalar outgoing radiation appear either in the presence of a gravitational mass or in the case of a nonzero linear momentum of the gravitational source. The quadrupole moment and the higher multipole moments of the gravitational field as well as the constant dipole moment and the angular moment of the source do not contribute to the tail

  2. Luminosity profiles and the evolution of shock waves in general relativistic radiating spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, L.; Nunez, L.A.

    1989-10-01

    A method recently proposed by the authors to study the evolution of discontinuities in radiating spherically symmetric distributions of matter is systematically applied to model the evolution of a composite radiant sphere. The matter configuration, free of singularities, is divided in two regions by a shock wave front, and at each side of this interface a different equation of state is considered. Solutions are matched across the shock via the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions while the outer region metric joins the Vaidya solution at the boundary surface. The influence on the evolution of these composite spheres of different shapes of neutrino outburst profiles, and particular neutrino-transfer processes from the inner core to the outer mantel is explored. Prospective applications to supernova scenarios are discussed. (author). 18 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  3. State-Space Realization of the Wave-Radiation Force within FAST: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, T.; Sarmento, A.; Alves, M.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-06-01

    Several methods have been proposed in the literature to find a state-space model for the wave-radiation forces. In this paper, four methods were compared, two in the frequency domain and two in the time domain. The frequency-response function and the impulse response of the resulting state-space models were compared against the ones derived by the numerical code WAMIT. The implementation of the state-space module within the FAST offshore wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool was verified, comparing the results against the previously implemented numerical convolution method. The results agreed between the two methods, with a significant reduction in required computational time when using the state-space module.

  4. Propagation of electromagnetic radiation in a random field of gravitational waves and space radio interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braginsky, V.B.; Kardashev, N.S.; Polnarev, A.G.; Novikov, I.D.

    1989-12-01

    Propagation of an electromagnetic wave in the field of gravitational waves is considered. Attention is given to the principal difference between the electromagnetic wave propagation in the field of random gravitational waves and the electromagnetic wave propagation in a medium with a randomly-inhomogeneous refraction index. It is shown that in the case of the gravitation wave field the phase shift of an electromagnetic wave does not increase with distance. The capability of space radio interferometry to detect relic gravitational waves as well as gravitational wave bursts of non cosmological origin are analyzed. (author). 64 refs, 2 figs

  5. Wave refraction and longshore transport patterns along the southern Santa Catarina coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Siegle

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the wave climate for the southern Brazilian coast, wave refraction has been modelled in order to obtain the refracted wave heights and directions along the southern Santa Catarina coast, providing the needed information for potential longshore drift estimates. According to its coastline orientation, different sectors of the coast present varying longshore drift patterns. Estimates have been made for the yearly-averaged wave climate as well as for each season, showing thereby the longshore drift patterns along the year. Based on the results of the potential longshore drift intensities and directions and on the shoreline outline in plan, it has been possible to identify a strongly drift-dominated coast in the south turning to a mixed drift and swash dominated coast towards the north of the studied area. Contrasting patterns of longshore drift between the southern and northern portion of the coastline indicate a sediment surplus in the central portion, making sediment available for cross-shore transport processes, either on- or offshore. Considering long-term aspects, the longshore drift patterns are in agreement with the coastal infilling process which has mainly been driven by persistent surplus from littoral sediment drift.Com base no clima de ondas para o sul da costa brasileira, a refração de ondas foi modelada para a obtenção de alturas e direção das ondas ao longo da costa sul de Santa Catarina. Essas informações permitem a estimativa da deriva litorânea potencial para a região. De acordo com a orientação da linha de costa, diferentes setores do litoral apresentam variados padrões de deriva. As estimativas foram realizadas com base nos dados médios anuais e para cada estação do ano, demonstrando assim a variabilidade dos padrões ao longo do ano. A configuração da linha de costa e os resultados das estimativas de intensidade e direção da deriva indicam o predomínio da deriva litorânea na porção sul da área e

  6. Study on transport safety of refresh MOX fuel. Radiation dose from package hypothetically submerged into sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Suzuki; Hiroshi; Saegusa, Toshiari; Maruyama, Koki; Ito, Chihiro; Watabe, Naoto

    1999-01-01

    The sea transport of fresh MOX fuel from Europe to Japan is under planning. For the structure and equipment of transport ships for fresh MOX fuels, there is a special safety standard called the INF Code of IMO (International Maritime Organization). For transport of radioactive materials, there is a safety standard stipulated in Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material issued by IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). Under those code and standard, fresh MOX fuel will be transported safely on the sea. However, a dose assessment has been made by assuming that a fresh MOX fuel package might be sunk into the sea by unexpected reasons. In the both cases for a package sunk at the coastal region and for that sunk at the ocean, the evaluated result of the dose equivalent by radiation exposure to the public are far below the dose equivalent limit of the ICRP recommendation (1 mSv/year). (author)

  7. Transport of Terrestrial gamma-Radiation in Plane Semi-Infinite Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Peter; Løvborg, Leif

    1980-01-01

    The plane one-dimensional photon transport equation is solved for the scattered γ-radiation flux in the case of two adjacent media. One medium represents a natural ground with uniformly distributed potassium, uranium, and thorium γ-ray emitters. The other medium is air with no radioactive contami...

  8. Continuous weighing of conveyor-transported materials based on gamma radiation conversion to electric current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principle is described of the continuous weighing of conveyer-transported materials applied in the food industry. The weighing technique is based on the measurement of the absorption of gamma radiation emitted by a source located behind the material to be scaled. (Z.M.)

  9. 2D deterministic radiation transport with the discontinuous finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kershaw, D.; Harte, J.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides a complete description of the analytic and discretized equations for 2D deterministic radiation transport. This computational model has been checked against a wide variety of analytic test problems and found to give excellent results. We make extensive use of the discontinuous finite element method

  10. The use of symbolic computation in radiative, energy, and neutron transport calculations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, J.I.

    1997-01-01

    This investigation used sysmbolic manipulation in developing analytical methods and general computational strategies for solving both linear and nonlinear, regular and singular integral and integro-differential equations which appear in radiative and mixed-mode energy transport. Contained in this report are seven papers which present the technical results as individual modules

  11. Simple analytical methods for computing the gravity-wave contribution to the cosmic background radiation anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.

    1996-01-01

    We present two simple analytical methods for computing the gravity-wave contribution to the cosmic background radiation (CBR) anisotropy in inflationary models; one method uses a time-dependent transfer function, the other methods uses an approximate gravity-mode function which is a simple combination of the lowest order spherical Bessel functions. We compare the CBR anisotropy tensor multipole spectrum computed using our methods with the previous result of the highly accurate numerical method, the open-quote open-quote Boltzmann close-quote close-quote method. Our time-dependent transfer function is more accurate than the time-independent transfer function found by Turner, White, and Lindsey; however, we find that the transfer function method is only good for l approx-lt 120. Using our approximate gravity-wave mode function, we obtain much better accuracy; the tensor multipole spectrum we find differs by less than 2% for l approx-lt 50, less than 10% for l approx-lt 120, and less than 20% for l≤300 from the open-quote open-quote Boltzmann close-quote close-quote result. Our approximate graviton mode function should be quite useful in studying tensor perturbations from inflationary models. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  12. Analysis of transport of collimated radiation in a participating media using the lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Subhash C.; Vernekar, Rohan Ranganath

    2012-01-01

    Application of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) recently proposed by Asinari et al. [Asinari P, Mishra SC, Borchiellini R. A lattice Boltzmann formulation to the analysis of radiative heat transfer problems in a participating medium. Numer Heat Transfer B 2010; 57:126–146] is extended to the analysis of transport of collimated radiation in a planar participating medium. To deal with azimuthally symmetric radiation in planar medium, a new lattice structure for the LBM is used. The transport of the collimated component in the medium is analysed by two different, viz., flux splitting and direct approaches. For different angles of incidence of the collimated radiation, the LBM formulation is tested for the effects of the extinction coefficient, the anisotropy factor, and the boundary emissivities on heat flux and emissive power distributions. Results are compared with the benchmark results obtained using the finite volume method. Both the approaches in LBM provide accurate results. -- Highlights: ► Transport of collimated radiation in participating media is studied. ► Usage of Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is extended in this study. ► In LBM, flux splitting and direct approaches are proposed. ► Effects of various parameters are studied on heat flux and temperature profiles. ► In all cases, LBM provides correct results.

  13. Applications Of Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Simulation Techniques For Predicting Single Event Effects In Microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Kevin; Reed, Robert; Weller, Robert; Mendenhall, Marcus; Sierawski, Brian; Schrimpf, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    MRED (Monte Carlo Radiative Energy Deposition) is Vanderbilt University's Geant4 application for simulating radiation events in semiconductors. Geant4 is comprised of the best available computational physics models for the transport of radiation through matter. In addition to basic radiation transport physics contained in the Geant4 core, MRED has the capability to track energy loss in tetrahedral geometric objects, includes a cross section biasing and track weighting technique for variance reduction, and additional features relevant to semiconductor device applications. The crucial element of predicting Single Event Upset (SEU) parameters using radiation transport software is the creation of a dosimetry model that accurately approximates the net collected charge at transistor contacts as a function of deposited energy. The dosimetry technique described here is the multiple sensitive volume (MSV) model. It is shown to be a reasonable approximation of the charge collection process and its parameters can be calibrated to experimental measurements of SEU cross sections. The MSV model, within the framework of MRED, is examined for heavy ion and high-energy proton SEU measurements of a static random access memory.

  14. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics.

  15. Utilization of a photon transport code to investigate radiation therapy treatment planning quantities and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A versatile computer program MORSE, based on neutron and photon transport theory has been utilzed to investigate radiation therapy treatment planning quantities and techniques. A multi-energy group representation of transport equation provides a concise approach in utilizing Monte Carlo numerical techniques to multiple radiation therapy treatment planning problems. Central axis total and scattered dose distributions for homogeneous and inhomogeneous water phantoms are calculated and the correction factor for lung and bone inhomogeneities are also evaluated. Results show that Monte Carlo calculations based on multi-energy group tansport theory predict the depth dose distributions that are in good agreement with available experimental data. Central axis depth dose distributions for a bremsstrahlung spectrum from a linear accelerator is also calculated to exhibit the versatility of the computer program in handling multiple radiation therapy problems. A novel approach is undertaken to study the dosimetric properties of brachytherapy sources

  16. Effect of gamma radiation on the transport of spin-labeled compounds across the erythrocyte membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwozdzinski, K.; Bartosz, G.; Leyko, W.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on the non-electrolyte, anion and cation permeability of the erythrocyte membrane was studied by measurement of the reduction rate of appropriate nitroxyl derivatives. Irradiation of bovine erythrocytes in the dose-range of 2-50 krad resulted in a regular dose-dependent increase in the reduction rates of a cation (TEMPO-choline) and a hydrophobic non-electrolyte (TEMPO), and non-regular changes in the reduction rate of a hydrophilic non-electrolyte (TEMPOL). The permeation constant for TEMPO-choline also showed a non-regular response to radiation, similar to the response pattern of other red blood cell parameters. These results also demonstrate that the effects of radiation on the transport of various solutes can be used as a means of distinguishing between different channels of membrane transport. (orig.)

  17. Density convection near radiating ICRF antennas and its effect on the coupling of lower hybrid waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Beaumont, B.; Bibet, Ph.; Bremond, S.; Kazarian, F.; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Tuccillo, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Combined operation of lower hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) waves can result in a degradation of the LH wave coupling, as observed both in the Tore-Supra and Jet tokamaks. The reflection coefficient on the part of the LH launcher magnetically connected to the powered ICRF antenna increases, suggesting a local decrease in the electron density in the connecting flux tubes. This has been confirmed by Langmuir probe measurements on the LH launchers in the latest Tore-Supra experiments. Moreover, recent experiments in Jet indicate that the LH coupling degradation depends on the ICRF power and its launched k / spectrum. The 2D density distribution around the Tore-Supra ICRF antennas has been modelled with the CELLS-code, balancing parallel losses with diffusive transport and sheath induced ExB convection, obtained from RF field mapping using the ICANT-code. The calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations, i.e. density depletion is obtained, localised mainly in the antenna shadow, and dependent on ICRF power and antenna spectrum. (authors)

  18. Density Convection near Radiating ICRF Antennas and its Effect on the Coupling of Lower Hybrid Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Beaumont, B.; Bibet, Ph.; Bremond, S.; Kazarian, F.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Mailloux, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Tuccillo, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Combined operation of Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) waves can result in a degradation of the LH wave coupling, as observed both in the Tore Supra and JET tokamaks. The reflection coefficient on the part of the LH launcher magnetically connected to the powered ICRF antenna increases, suggesting a local decrease in the electron density in the connecting flux tubes. This has been confirmed by Langmuir probe measurements on the LH launchers in the latest Tore Supra experiments. Moreover, recent experiments in JET indicate that the LH coupling degradation depends on the ICRF power and its launched k//-spectrum. The 2D density distribution around the Tore Supra ICRF antennas has been modelled with the CELLS-code, balancing parallel losses with diffusive transport and sheath induced ExB convection, obtained from RF field mapping using the ICANT-code. The calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations, i.e. density depletion is obtained, localised mainly in the antenna shadow, and dependent on ICRF power and antenna spectrum

  19. Volume-based geometric modeling for radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Williamson, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate theoretical characterization of radiation fields is a valuable tool in the design of complex systems, such as linac heads and intracavitary applicators, and for generation of basic dose calculation data that is inaccessible to experimental measurement. Both Monte Carlo and deterministic solutions to such problems require a system for accurately modeling complex 3-D geometries that supports ray tracing, point and segment classification, and 2-D graphical representation. Previous combinatorial approaches to solid modeling, which involve describing complex structures as set-theoretic combinations of simple objects, are limited in their ease of use and place unrealistic constraints on the geometric relations between objects such as excluding common boundaries. A new approach to volume-based solid modeling has been developed which is based upon topologically consistent definitions of boundary, interior, and exterior of a region. From these definitions, FORTRAN union, intersection, and difference routines have been developed that allow involuted and deeply nested structures to be described as set-theoretic combinations of ellipsoids, elliptic cylinders, prisms, cones, and planes that accommodate shared boundaries. Line segments between adjacent intersections on a trajectory are assigned to the appropriate region by a novel sorting algorithm that generalizes upon Siddon's approach. Two 2-D graphic display tools are developed to help the debugging of a given geometric model. In this paper, the mathematical basis of our system is described, it is contrasted to other approaches, and examples are discussed

  20. A positive correlation between energetic electron butterfly distributions and magnetosonic waves in the radiation belt slot region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chang; Su, Z.; Xiao, F.; Zheng, H.

    2017-01-01

    Energetic (hundreds of keV) electrons in the radiation belt slot region have been found to exhibit the butterfly pitch angle distributions. Resonant interactions with magnetosonic and whistler-mode waves are two potential mechanisms for the formation of these peculiar distributions. Here we perform a statistical study of energetic electron pitch angle distribution characteristics measured by Van Allen Probes in the slot region during a three-year period from May 2013 to May 2016. Our results show that electron butterfly distributions are closely related to magnetosonic waves rather than to whistlermode waves. Both electron butterfly distributions and magnetosonic waves occur more frequently at the geomagnetically active times than at the quiet times. In a statistical sense, more distinct butterfly distributions usually correspond to magnetosonic waves with larger amplitudes and vice versa. The averaged magnetosonic wave amplitude is less than 5 pT in the case of normal and flat-top distributions with a butterfly index BI = 1 but reaches ~ 35–95 pT in the case of distinct butterfly distributions with BI > 1:3. For magnetosonic waves with amplitudes > 50 pT, the occurrence rate of butterfly distribution is above 80%. Our study suggests that energetic electron butterfly distributions in the slot region are primarily caused by magnetosonic waves.

  1. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes

  2. Analysis of radiation doses for a transportation system and its interface operations for commercial spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Ross, W.A.; Smith, R.I.; Wilmot, E.L.

    1987-07-01

    This paper gives the results of estimates of aggregated radiation doses to the affected public and workers in the US that would be associated with loading spent fuel at the reactors, transporting the spent fuel by truck and rail, and receiving and unloading the spent fuel at a deep geological repository. The estimates are for a postulated transportation-related system using current state-of-the-art technology, if employed in the high-level waste management system in the future, and the approximate dose reduction from some potential system improvements. The results of the study provide a starting point for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an improved transportation system that is cost effective, safe, and results in low radiation doses. 4 refs., 1 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P., E-mail: richard.smedley-stevenson@awe.co.uk [AWE PLC, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); McClarren, Ryan G., E-mail: rmcclarren@ne.tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  4. Water-wave diffraction and radiation by multiple three-dimensional bodies over a mild-slope bottom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Pau Mercadé; Ferri, Francesco; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •A tool to model wave diffraction and radiation in mild-slope bottoms is proposed. •The tool combines a mild-slope equation model with diffraction transfer matrices. •The tool predictions are verified against analytical solutions for two test problems....

  5. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation and the High Speed Civil Transport. Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, D. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Jones, I. W.; Goldhagen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is produced by extraterrestrial radiations incident on the Earth's atmosphere. These extraterrestrial radiations are of two sources: ever present galactic cosmic rays with origin outside the solar system and transient solar particle events that are at times very intense events associated with solar activity lasting several hours to a few days. Although the galactic radiation penetrating through the atmosphere to the ground is low in intensity, the intensity is more than two orders of magnitude greater at commercial aircraft altitudes. The radiation levels at the higher altitudes of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are an additional factor of two higher. Ionizing radiation produces chemically active radicals in biological tissues that alter the cell function or result in cell death. Protection standards against low levels of ionizing radiation are based on limitation of excess cancer mortality or limitation of developmental injury resulting in permanent damage to the offspring during pregnancy. The crews of commercial air transport operations are considered as radiation workers by the EPA, the FAA, and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The annual exposures of aircrews depend on the latitudes and altitudes of operation and flight time. Flight hours have significantly increased since deregulation of the airline industry in the 1980's. The FAA estimates annual subsonic aircrew exposures to range from 0.2 to 9.1 mSv compared to 0.5 mSv exposure of the average nuclear power plant worker in the nuclear industry. The commercial aircrews of the HSCT may receive exposures above recently recommended allowable limits for even radiation workers if flying their allowable number of flight hours. An adequate protection philosophy for background exposures in HSCT commercial airtraffic cannot be developed at this time due to current uncertainty in environmental levels. In addition, if a large solar particle event

  6. Solar Radiation Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere: A 3D Perspective on Observations and Climate Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Marshak, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The interplay of sunlight with clouds is a ubiquitous and often pleasant visual experience, but it conjures up major challenges for weather, climate, environmental science and beyond. Those engaged in the characterization of clouds (and the clear air nearby) by remote sensing methods are even more confronted. The problem comes, on the one hand, from the spatial complexity of real clouds and, on the other hand, from the dominance of multiple scattering in the radiation transport. The former ingredient contrasts sharply with the still popular representation of clouds as homogeneous plane-parallel slabs for the purposes of radiative transfer computations. In typical cloud scenes the opposite asymptotic transport regimes of diffusion and ballistic propagation coexist. We survey the three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer literature over the past 50 years and identify three concurrent and intertwining thrusts: first, how to assess the damage (bias) caused by 3D effects in the operational 1D radiative transfer models? Second, how to mitigate this damage? Finally, can we exploit 3D radiative transfer phenomena to innovate observation methods and technologies? We quickly realize that the smallest scale resolved computationally or observationally may be artificial but is nonetheless a key quantity that separates the 3D radiative transfer solutions into two broad and complementary classes: stochastic and deterministic. Both approaches draw on classic and contemporary statistical, mathematical and computational physics.

  7. Experimental study of intense radiation in terahertz region based on cylindrical surface wave resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Shaoyan; Ogura, Kazuo; Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Nomizu, Shintaro; Shirai, Akihiro; Yamazaki, Kosuke; Kawamura, Jun; Miura, Takuro; Takanashi, Sho; San, Min Thu

    2015-01-01

    Periodical corrugations structured on a cylindrical conductor have cylindrical surface waves (CSWs), which are reflected at the corrugation ends and form a CSW-resonator. In this paper, intense radiations in terahertz region based on the CSW-resonator are reported. The CSW-resonators with upper cut off frequencies in the modern IEEE G-band (110–300 GHz) are excited by a coaxially injected annular beam in a weakly relativistic region less than 100 kV. It is shown that there exists an oscillation starting energy for the CSW-resonator. Above the starting energy, very intense terahertz radiations on the order of kW are obtained. The operation frequencies in the range of 166–173 GHz and 182–200 GHz are obtained using two types of CSW-resonator with the different corrugation amplitude. Electromagnetic properties of the CSW-resonator can be controlled by the artificial structure and may play an important role in high-intensity terahertz generations and applications

  8. Inertia–gravity wave radiation from the elliptical vortex in the f -plane shallow water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko, E-mail: nori@phys-h.keio.ac.jp [Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Department of Physics, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Kouhoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Inertia–gravity wave (IGW) radiation from the elliptical vortex is investigated in the f -plane shallow water system. The far field of IGW is analytically derived for the case of an almost circular Kirchhoff vortex with a small aspect ratio. Cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at finite values of the Rossby number (Ro) caused by the source originating in the Coriolis acceleration. While the intensity of IGWs from the cyclone monotonically decreases as f increases, that from the anticyclone increases as f increases for relatively smaller f and has a local maximum at intermediate f . A numerical experiment is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain. The numerical results agree quite well with the analytical ones for elliptical vortices with small aspect ratios, implying that the derived analytical forms are useful for the verification of the numerical model. For elliptical vortices with larger aspect ratios, however, significant deviation from the analytical estimates appears. The intensity of IGWs radiated in the numerical simulation is larger than that estimated analytically. The reason is that the source of IGWs is amplified during the time evolution because the shape of the vortex changes from ideal ellipse to elongated with filaments. Nevertheless, cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry similar to the analytical estimate appears in all the range of aspect ratios, suggesting that this asymmetry is a robust feature. (paper)

  9. Measurement of tissue-radiation dosage using a thermal steady-state elastic shear wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng-Yi; Hsieh, Tung-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Ru; Chen, Jin-Chung; Chou, Chien

    2017-08-01

    A biodosimeter based on thermal-induced elastic shear wave (TIESW) in silicone acellular porcine dermis (SAPD) at thermal steady state has been proposed and demonstrated. A square slab SAPD treated with ionizing radiation was tested. The SAPD becomes a continuous homogeneous and isotropic viscoelastic medium due to the generation of randomly coiled collagen fibers formed from their bundle-like structure in the dermis. A harmonic TIESW then propagates on the surface of the SAPD as measured by a nanometer-scaled strain-stress response under thermal equilibrium conditions at room temperature. TIESW oscillation frequency was noninvasively measured in real time by monitoring the transverse displacement of the TIESW on the SAPD surface. Because the elastic shear modulus is highly sensitive to absorbed doses of ionizing radiation, this proposed biodosimeter can become a highly sensitive and noninvasive method for quantitatively determining tissue-absorbed dosage in terms of TIESW’s oscillation frequency. Detection sensitivity at 1 cGy and dynamic ranges covering 1 to 40 cGy and 80 to 500 cGy were demonstrated.

  10. Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformation in a solution: Including mass transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqshenas, S R; Ford, I J; Saffari, N

    2018-01-14

    Effects of acoustic waves on a phase transformation in a metastable phase were investigated in our previous work [S. R. Haqshenas, I. J. Ford, and N. Saffari, "Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on nucleation," J. Chem. Phys. 145, 024315 (2016)]. We developed a non-equimolar dividing surface cluster model and employed it to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallisation induced by an acoustic field in a mass-conserved system. In the present work, we developed a master equation based on a hybrid Szilard-Fokker-Planck model, which accounts for mass transportation due to acoustic waves. This model can determine the kinetics of nucleation and the early stage of growth of clusters including the Ostwald ripening phenomenon. It was solved numerically to calculate the kinetics of an isothermal sonocrystallisation process in a system with mass transportation. The simulation results show that the effect of mass transportation for different excitations depends on the waveform as well as the imposed boundary conditions and tends to be noticeable in the case of shock waves. The derivations are generic and can be used with any acoustic source and waveform.

  11. δ- and δ'-shock wave types of singular solutions of systems of conservation laws and transport and concentration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelkovich, V M

    2008-01-01

    This is a survey of some results and problems connected with the theory of generalized solutions of quasi-linear conservation law systems which can admit delta-shaped singularities. They are the so-called δ-shock wave type solutions and the recently introduced δ (n) -shock wave type solutions, n=1,2,..., which cannot be included in the classical Lax-Glimm theory. The case of δ- and δ'-shock waves is analyzed in detail. A specific analytical technique is developed to deal with such solutions. In order to define them, some special integral identities are introduced which extend the concept of weak solution, and the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are derived. Solutions of Cauchy problems are constructed for some typical systems of conservation laws. Also investigated are multidimensional systems of conservation laws (in particular, zero-pressure gas dynamics systems) which admit δ-shock wave type solutions. A geometric aspect of such solutions is considered: they are connected with transport and concentration processes, and the balance laws of transport of 'volume' and 'area' to δ- and δ'-shock fronts are derived for them. For a 'zero-pressure gas dynamics' system these laws are the mass and momentum transport laws. An algebraic aspect of these solutions is also considered: flux-functions are constructed for them which, being non-linear, are nevertheless uniquely defined Schwartz distributions. Thus, a singular solution of the Cauchy problem generates algebraic relations between its components (distributions).

  12. Feasibility study of the plasma electron density measurement by electromagnetic radiation from the laser-driven plasma wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, D G; Kim, J J; Suk, H; Hur, M S

    2012-01-01

    When an intense laser beam is focused in a plasma, a plasma wake wave is generated and the oscillatary motion of the plasma electrons produces a strong electromagnetic wave by a Cherenkov-like process. Spectrum of the genetated electromagnetic wave has dependence on the plasma density. In this paper, we propose to use the emitted electromagnetic radiation for plasma diagnostic, which may provide an accurate information for local electron densities of the plasma and will be very useful for three-dimensional plasma density profiles by changing the focal point location of the laser beam. Two-dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is used to study the correlation between the spectrum of the emitted radiation and plasma density, and the results demonstrate that this method is promising for the electron density measurement in the plasma.

  13. Goal based mesh adaptivity for fixed source radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.M.J.; Buchan, A.G.; Pain, C.C.; Tollit, B.S.; Goffin, M.A.; Merton, S.R.; Warner, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Derives an anisotropic goal based error measure for shielding problems. ► Reduces the error in the detector response by optimizing the finite element mesh. ► Anisotropic adaptivity captures material interfaces using fewer elements than AMR. ► A new residual based on the numerical scheme chosen forms the error measure. ► The error measure also combines the forward and adjoint metrics in a novel way. - Abstract: In this paper, the application of goal based error measures for anisotropic adaptivity applied to shielding problems in which a detector is present is explored. Goal based adaptivity is important when the response of a detector is required to ensure that dose limits are adhered to. To achieve this, a dual (adjoint) problem is solved which solves the neutron transport equation in terms of the response variables, in this case the detector response. The methods presented can be applied to general finite element solvers, however, the derivation of the residuals are dependent on the underlying finite element scheme which is also discussed in this paper. Once error metrics for the forward and adjoint solutions have been formed they are combined using a novel approach. The two metrics are combined by forming the minimum ellipsoid that covers both the error metrics rather than taking the maximum ellipsoid that is contained within the metrics. Another novel approach used within this paper is the construction of the residual. The residual, used to form the goal based error metrics, is calculated from the subgrid scale correction which is inherent in the underlying spatial discretisation employed

  14. How to turn gravity waves into Alfven waves and other such tricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newington, Marie E; Cally, Paul S

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations of travelling gravity waves at the base of the chromosphere suggest an interplay between gravity wave propagation and magnetic field. Our aims are: to explain the observation that gravity wave flux is suppressed in magnetic regions; to understand why we see travelling waves instead of standing waves; and to see if gravity waves can undergo mode conversion and couple to Alfven waves in regions where the plasma beta is of order unity. We model gravity waves in a VAL C atmosphere, subject to a uniform magnetic field of various orientations, considering both adiabatic and radiatively damped propagation. Results indicate that in the presence of a magnetic field, the gravity wave can propagate as a travelling wave, with the magnetic field orientation playing a crucial role in determining the wave character. For the majority of magnetic field orientations, the gravity wave is reflected at low heights as a slow magneto-acoustic wave, explaining the observation of reduced flux in magnetic regions. In a highly inclined magnetic field, the gravity wave undergoes mode conversion to either field guided acoustic waves or Alfven waves. The primary effect of incorporating radiative damping is a reduction in acoustic and magnetic fluxes measured at the top of the integration region. By demonstrating the mode conversion of gravity waves to Alfven waves, this work identifies a possible pathway for energy transport from the solar surface to the upper atmosphere.

  15. Leaf temperature and transpiration of rice plants in relation to short-wave radiation and wind speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, D.; Haseba, T.

    1984-01-01

    Leaf temperature and transpiration amount of rice plants were measured in a steady environment in a laboratory and in field situations. The plants set in Wagner pots were used. Experiments were carried out at the tillering and booting stages, and on the date of maturity. Measured leaf temperatures and transpiration rates were analyzed in connection with incident short-wave radiation on a leaf and wind speed measured simultaneously.Instantaneous supplying and turning-off of steady artificial light caused cyclic changes in leaf temperature and transpiration. Leaf temperature dropped in feeble illumination compared with the steady temperature in the preceeding dark.On the date of maturity, a rice plant leaf was warmer than the air, even in feeble light. Then, the leaf-air temperature difference and transpiration rate showed approximately linear increases with short-wave radiation intensity. On the same date, an increase in wind speed produced a decrease in leaf-air temperature difference, i.e., leaf temperature dropped, and an increase in transpiration rate. The rates of both changes in leaf temperature and transpiration rate were fairly large in a range of wind speed below about 1m/s.For rice plants growing favorably from the tillering stage through the booting stage, the leaves were considerably cooler than the air, even in an intense light and/or solar radiation. The leaf temperature showed the lowest value at short-wave radiations between 0.15 and 0.20ly/min, at above which the leaf temperature rised with an increase in short-wave radiation until it approached the air temperature. Transpiration rate of rice plants increased rapidly with an increase in short-wave radiation ranging below 0.2 or 0.3ly/min, at above which the increase in transpiration rate slowed.The relationships between leaf temperature and/or transpiration rate and wind speed and/or incident short-wave radiation (solar radiation) which were obtained experimentally, supported the relationships

  16. Status of the solar and infrared radiation submodels in the LLNL 1-D and 2-D chemical-transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, K.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Ellis, J.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have implemented a series of state of the art radiation transport submodels in previously developed one dimensional and two dimensional chemical transport models of the troposphere and stratosphere. These submodels provide the capability of calculating accurate solar and infrared heating rates. They are a firm basis for further radiation submodel development as well as for studying interactions between radiation and model dynamics under varying conditions of clear sky, clouds, and aerosols. 37 refs., 3 figs

  17. Wave and transport studies utilizing dense plasma filaments generated with a lanthanum hexaboride cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Compernolle, B.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Cooper, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    A portable lanthanum hexaboride (LaB 6 ) cathode has been developed for use in the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. The LaB 6 cathode can be used as a tool for many different studies in experimental plasma physics. To date, the cathode has been used as a source of a plasma with a hot dense core for transport studies and diagnostics development, as a source of gradient driven modes, as a source of shear Alfven waves, and as a source of interacting current channels in reconnection experiments. The LaB 6 cathode is capable of higher discharge current densities than the main barium oxide coated LAPD cathode and is therefore able to produce plasmas of higher densities and higher electron temperatures. The 8.25 cm diameter cathode can be introduced into the LAPD at different axial locations without the need to break vacuum. The cathode can be scaled up or down for use as a portable secondary plasma source in other machines.

  18. A compact micro-wave synthesizer for transportable cold-atom interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautier, J.; Lours, M.; Landragin, A., E-mail: arnaud.landragin@obspm.fr [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 61 avenue de l’Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2014-06-15

    We present the realization of a compact micro-wave frequency synthesizer for an atom interferometer based on stimulated Raman transitions, applied to transportable inertial sensing. Our set-up is intended to address the hyperfine transitions of {sup 87}Rb at 6.8 GHz. The prototype is evaluated both in the time and the frequency domain by comparison with state-of-the-art frequency references developed at Laboratoire national de métrologie et d'essais−Systémes de référence temps espace (LNE-SYRTE). In free-running mode, it features a residual phase noise level of −65 dB rad{sup 2} Hz{sup −1} at 10 Hz offset frequency and a white phase noise level in the order of −120 dB rad{sup 2} Hz{sup −1} for Fourier frequencies above 10 kHz. The phase noise effect on the sensitivity of the atomic interferometer is evaluated for diverse values of cycling time, interrogation time, and Raman pulse duration. To our knowledge, the resulting contribution is well below the sensitivity of any demonstrated cold atom inertial sensors based on stimulated Raman transitions. The drastic improvement in terms of size, simplicity, and power consumption paves the way towards field and mobile operations.

  19. Advanced Monte Carlo methods for thermal radiation transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollaber, Allan B.

    During the past 35 years, the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) method proposed by Fleck and Cummings has been the standard Monte Carlo approach to solving the thermal radiative transfer (TRT) equations. However, the IMC equations are known to have accuracy limitations that can produce unphysical solutions. In this thesis, we explicitly provide the IMC equations with a Monte Carlo interpretation by including particle weight as one of its arguments. We also develop and test a stability theory for the 1-D, gray IMC equations applied to a nonlinear problem. We demonstrate that the worst case occurs for 0-D problems, and we extend the results to a stability algorithm that may be used for general linearizations of the TRT equations. We derive gray, Quasidiffusion equations that may be deterministically solved in conjunction with IMC to obtain an inexpensive, accurate estimate of the temperature at the end of the time step. We then define an average temperature T* to evaluate the temperature-dependent problem data in IMC, and we demonstrate that using T* is more accurate than using the (traditional) beginning-of-time-step temperature. We also propose an accuracy enhancement to the IMC equations: the use of a time-dependent "Fleck factor". This Fleck factor can be considered an automatic tuning of the traditionally defined user parameter alpha, which generally provides more accurate solutions at an increased cost relative to traditional IMC. We also introduce a global weight window that is proportional to the forward scalar intensity calculated by the Quasidiffusion method. This weight window improves the efficiency of the IMC calculation while conserving energy. All of the proposed enhancements are tested in 1-D gray and frequency-dependent problems. These enhancements do not unconditionally eliminate the unphysical behavior that can be seen in the IMC calculations. However, for fixed spatial and temporal grids, they suppress them and clearly work to make the solution more

  20. A Monte Carlo transport code study of the space radiation environment using FLUKA and ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, T; Carminati, F; Brun, R; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Empl, A; MacGibbon, J

    2001-01-01

    We report on the progress of a current study aimed at developing a state-of-the-art Monte-Carlo computer simulation of the space radiation environment using advanced computer software techniques recently available at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland. By taking the next-generation computer software appearing at CERN and adapting it to known problems in the implementation of space exploration strategies, this research is identifying changes necessary to bring these two advanced technologies together. The radiation transport tool being developed is tailored to the problem of taking measured space radiation fluxes impinging on the geometry of any particular spacecraft or planetary habitat and simulating the evolution of that flux through an accurate model of the spacecraft material. The simulation uses the latest known results in low-energy and high-energy physics. The output is a prediction of the detailed nature of the radiation environment experienced in space as well a...