WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave packet simulation

  1. Simulation of the collapse and dissipation of Langmuir wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.L.; Winglee, R.M.; Robinson, P.A.; Glanz, J.; Goldman, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    The collapse of isolated Langmuir wave packets is studied numerically in two dimensions using both particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and by integrating the Zakharov partial differential equations (PDE's). The initial state consists of a localized Langmuir wave packet in an ion background that either is uniform or has a profile representative of the density wells in which wave packets form during strong plasma turbulence. Collapse thresholds are determined numerically and compared to analytical estimates. A model in which Langmuir damping is significantly stronger than Landau damping is constructed which, when included in the PDE simulations, yields good agreement with the collapse dynamics observed in PIC simulations for wave packets with initial wave energy densities small compared to the thermal level. For more intense initial Langmuir fields, collapse is arrested in PIC simulations at lower field strengths than in PDE simulations. Neither nonlinear saturation of the density perturbation nor fluid electron nonlinearities can account for the difference between simulation methods in this regime. However, at these wave levels inhomogeneous electron heating and coherent jets of transit-time accelerated electrons in phase space are observed, resulting in further enhancement of wave damping and the consequent reduction of fields in the PIC simulations

  2. revivals of Rydberg wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, R.; Kostelecky, V.A.; Tudose, B.

    1998-01-01

    We examine the revival structure of Rydberg wave packets. The effects of quantum defects on wave packets in alkali-metal atoms and a squeezed-state description of the initial wave packets are also described. We then examine the revival structure of Rydberg wave packets in the presence of an external electric field, i.e., the revival structure of Stark wave packets. These wave packets have energies that depend on two quantum numbers and exhibit new types of interference behaviour

  3. Revivals of Rydberg wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, R.; Kostelecky, V.A.; Tudose, B.

    1998-01-01

    We examine the revival structure of Rydberg wave packets. These wave packets exhibit initial classical periodic motion followed by a sequence of collapse, fractional (or full) revivals, and fractional (or full) superrevivals. The effects of quantum defects on wave packets in alkali-metal atoms and a squeezed-state description of the initial wave packets are also considered. We then examine the revival structure of Rydberg wave packets in the presence of an external electric field - that is, the revival structure of Stark wave packets. These wave packets have energies that depend on two quantum numbers and exhibit new types of interference behavior

  4. Nondispersive Wave Packets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaarawi, Amr Mohamed

    In this work, nondispersive wavepacket solutions to linear partial differential equations are investigated. These solutions are characterized by infinite energy content; otherwise they are continuous, nonsingular and propagate in free space without spreading out. Examples of such solutions are Berry and Balazs' Airy packet, MacKinnon's wave packet and Brittingham's Focus Wave Mode (FWM). It is demonstrated in this thesis that the infinite energy content is not a basic problem per se and that it can be dealt with in two distinct ways. First these wave packets can be used as bases to construct highly localized, slowly decaying, time-limited pulsed solutions. In the case of the FWMs, this path leads to the formulation of the bidirectional representation, a technique that provides the most natural basis for synthesizing Brittingham-like solutions. This representation is used to derive new exact solutions to the 3-D scalar wave equation. It is also applied to problems involving boundaries, in particular to the propagation of a localized pulse in a infinite acoustic waveguide and to the launchability of such a pulse from the opening of a semi-infinite waveguide. The second approach in dealing with the infinite energy content utilizes the bump-like structure of nondispersive solutions. With an appropriate choice of parameters, these bump fields have very large amplitudes around the centers, in comparison to their tails. In particular, the FWM solutions are used to model massless particles and are capable of providing an interesting interpretation to the results of Young's two slit experiment and to the wave-particle duality of light. The bidirectional representation provides, also, a systematic way of deriving packet solutions to the Klein-Gordon, the Schrodinger and the Dirac equations. Nondispersive solutions of the former two equations are compared to previously derived ones, e.g., the Airy packet and MacKinnon's wave packet.

  5. Quantum wave packet revivals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinett, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    The numerical prediction, theoretical analysis, and experimental verification of the phenomenon of wave packet revivals in quantum systems has flourished over the last decade and a half. Quantum revivals are characterized by initially localized quantum states which have a short-term, quasi-classical time evolution, which then can spread significantly over several orbits, only to reform later in the form of a quantum revival in which the spreading reverses itself, the wave packet relocalizes, and the semi-classical periodicity is once again evident. Relocalization of the initial wave packet into a number of smaller copies of the initial packet ('minipackets' or 'clones') is also possible, giving rise to fractional revivals. Systems exhibiting such behavior are a fundamental realization of time-dependent interference phenomena for bound states with quantized energies in quantum mechanics and are therefore of wide interest in the physics and chemistry communities. We review the theoretical machinery of quantum wave packet construction leading to the existence of revivals and fractional revivals, in systems with one (or more) quantum number(s), as well as discussing how information on the classical period and revival time is encoded in the energy eigenvalue spectrum. We discuss a number of one-dimensional model systems which exhibit revival behavior, including the infinite well, the quantum bouncer, and others, as well as several two-dimensional integrable quantum billiard systems. Finally, we briefly review the experimental evidence for wave packet revivals in atomic, molecular, and other systems, and related revival phenomena in condensed matter and optical systems

  6. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear dynamics of packets of spiral density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchagin, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    In a numerical experiment, the behavior of nonlinear packets of spiral density waves in a gas disk has been investigated for different initial wave amplitudes. If the amplitude of the density perturbations is small (<5%), the wave packet is drawn toward the center or toward the periphery of the disk in accordance with the linear theory. The behavior of linear packets of waves with wavelength comparable to the disk radius (R/sub d//lambda = 4) exhibits good agreement with the conclusions of the linear theory of tightly wound spiral waves. The dynamics of wave packets with initial density amplitudes 16, 30, 50% demonstrates the nonlinear nature of the behavior. THe behavior is governed by whether or not the nonlinear effects of higher than third order in the wave amplitude play a part. If the wave packet dynamics is determined by the cubic nonlinearity, the results of the numerical experiment are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the nonlinear theory of short waves, although the characteristic scale of the packet and the wavelength are of the order of the disk radius. In the cases when the nonlinear effects of higher orders in the amplitude play an important part, the behavior of a packet does not differ qualitatively from the behavior predicted by the theory of cubic nonlinearity, but the nonlinear spreading of the packet takes place more rapidly

  7. Packet Tracer network simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Jesin, A

    2014-01-01

    A practical, fast-paced guide that gives you all the information you need to successfully create networks and simulate them using Packet Tracer.Packet Tracer Network Simulator is aimed at students, instructors, and network administrators who wish to use this simulator to learn how to perform networking instead of investing in expensive, specialized hardware. This book assumes that you have a good amount of Cisco networking knowledge, and it will focus more on Packet Tracer rather than networking.

  8. Revivals of Quantum Wave Packets

    OpenAIRE

    Bluhm, Robert; Kostelecky, Alan; Porter, James; Tudose, Bogdan

    1997-01-01

    We present a generic treatment of wave-packet revivals for quantum-mechanical systems. This treatment permits a classification of certain ideal revival types. For example, wave packets for a particle in a one-dimensional box are shown to exhibit perfect revivals. We also examine the revival structure of wave packets for quantum systems with energies that depend on two quantum numbers. Wave packets in these systems exhibit quantum beats in the initial motion as well as new types of long-term r...

  9. Wave Packet Simulation of Nonadiabatic Dynamics in Highly Excited 1,3-Dibromopropane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2008-01-01

    ]. In the experiment. DBP is excited to a Rydberg state 8 eV above the ground state. The interpretation of the results is that a torsional motion of the bromomethylene groups with a vibrational period of 680 is is activated upon excitation. The Rydberg state decays to a valence state, causing a dissociation of one...... of the carbon bromine bonds oil a time scale of 2.5 ps. Building the theoretical framework for the wave packet propagation around this model of the reaction dynamics, the Simulations reproduce, to a good extent, the time scales observed in the experiment. Furthermore. the Simulations provide insight into how...... the torsion motion influences the bond breakage, and C we can conclude that the mechanism that delays the dissociation is solely the electronic transition from the Rydberg state to the valence state and does not involve, for example, intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR)....

  10. Scattering of accelerated wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, S.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Della Valle, G.

    2018-03-01

    Wave-packet scattering from a stationary potential is significantly modified when the wave packet is subject to an external time-dependent force during the interaction. In the semiclassical limit, wave-packet motion is simply described by Newtonian equations, and the external force can, for example, cancel the potential force, making a potential barrier transparent. Here we consider wave-packet scattering from reflectionless potentials, where in general the potential becomes reflective when probed by an accelerated wave packet. In the particular case of the recently introduced class of complex Kramers-Kronig potentials we show that a broad class of time-dependent forces can be applied without inducing any scattering, while there is a breakdown of the reflectionless property when there is a broadband distribution of initial particle momentum, involving both positive and negative components.

  11. Attosecond electron wave packet interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remetter, T.; Ruchon, T.; Johnsson, P.; Varju, K.; Gustafsson, E.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. The well controlled generation and characterization of attosecond XUV light pulses provide an unprecedented tool to study electron wave packets (EWPs). Here a train of attosecond pulses is used to create and study the phase of an EWP in momentum space. There is a clear analogy between electronic wave functions and optical fields. In optics, methods like SPIDER or wave front shearing interferometry, allow to measure the spectral or spatial phase of a light wave. These two methods are based on the same principle: an interferogram is produced when recombining two sheared replica of a light pulse, spectrally (SPIDER) or spatially (wave front shearing interferometry). This enables the comparison of two neighbouring different spectral or spatial slices of the original wave packet. In the experiment, a train of attosecond pulses is focused in an Argon atomic gas jet. EWPs are produced from the single XUV photon ionization of Argon atoms. If an IR beam is synchronized to the EWPs, it is possible to introduce a shear in momentum space between two consecutive s wave packets. A Velocity Map Imaging Spectrometer (VMIS) enables us to detect the interference pattern. An analysis of the interferograms will be presented leading to a conclusion about the symmetry of the studied wave packet.

  12. High Angular Momentum Rydberg Wave Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyker, Brendan

    2011-12-01

    High angular momentum Rydberg wave packets are studied. Application of carefully tailored electric fields to low angular momentum, high- n (n ˜ 300) Rydberg atoms creates coherent superpositions of Stark states with near extreme values of angular momentum, ℓ. Wave packet components orbit the parent nucleus at rates that depend on their energy, leading to periods of localization and delocalization as the components come into and go out of phase with each other. Monitoring survival probability signals in the presence of position dependent probing leads to observation of characteristic oscillations based on the composition of the wave packet. The discrete nature of electron energy levels is observed through the measurement of quantum revivals in the wave packet localization signal. Time-domain spectroscopy of these signals allows determination of both the population and phase of individual superposition components. Precise manipulation of wave packets is achieved through further application of pulsed electric fields. Decoherence effects due to background gas collisions and electrical noise are also detailed. Quantized classical trajectory Monte-Carlo simulations are introduced and agree remarkably well with experimental results.

  13. Dynamics of quantum wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosnell, T.R.; Taylor, A.J.; Rodriguez, G.; Clement, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop ultrafast laser techniques for the creation and measurement of quantum vibrational wave packets in gas phase diatomic molecules. Moreover, the authors sought to manipulate the constitution of these wave packets in terms of harmonic-oscillator basis wavefunctions by manipulating the time-dependent amplitude and phase of the incident ultrashort laser pulse. They specifically investigated gaseous diatomic potassium (K 2 ), and discovered variations in the shape of the wave packets as a result of changing the linear chirp in the ultrashort preparation pulse. In particular, they found evidence for wave-packet compression for a specific degree of chirp. Important ancillary results include development of new techniques for denoising and deconvolution of femtosecond time traces and techniques for diagnosing the phase and amplitude of the electric field of femtosecond laser pulses

  14. Time-dependent wave packet simulations of transport through Aharanov-Bohm rings with an embedded quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisbeck, C; Kramer, T; Molina, R A

    2017-04-20

    We have performed time-dependent wave packet simulations of realistic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) devices with a quantum dot embedded in one of the arms of the interferometer. The AB ring can function as a measurement device for the intrinsic transmission phase through the quantum dot, however, care has to be taken in analyzing the influence of scattering processes in the junctions of the interferometer arms. We consider a harmonic quantum dot and show how the Darwin-Fock spectrum emerges as a unique pattern in the interference fringes of the AB oscillations.

  15. Spreading of a relativistic wave packet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, C.; Jabs, A.

    1983-01-01

    A simple general proof that the spreading velocity of a relativistic free wave packet of the Broglie waves is limited is presented. For a wide class of packets it is confirmed that the limit is the velocity of light, and it is shown how this limit is approached when the width Δp of the wave packet in momentum space tends to infinity and the minimum width σ(t=o) in ordinary space tends to zero. (Author) [pt

  16. Three-dimensional electromagnetic strong turbulence. II. Wave packet collapse and structure of wave packets during strong turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, D. B.; Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, Iver H.; Skjaeraasen, O.

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale simulations of wave packet collapse are performed by numerically solving the three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic Zakharov equations, focusing on individual wave packet collapses and on wave packets that form in continuously driven strong turbulence. The collapse threshold is shown to decrease as the electron thermal speed ν e /c increases and as the temperature ratio T i /T e of ions to electrons decreases. Energy lost during wave packet collapse and dissipation is shown to depend on ν e /c. The dynamics of density perturbations after collapse are studied in 3D electromagnetic strong turbulence for a range of T i /T e . The structures of the Langmuir, transverse, and total electric field components of wave packets during strong turbulence are investigated over a range of ν e /c. For ν e /c e /c > or approx. 0.17, transverse modes become trapped in density wells and contribute significantly to the structure of the total electric field. At all ν e /c, the Langmuir energy density contours of wave packets are predominantly oblate (pancake shaped). The transverse energy density contours of wave packets are predominantly prolate (sausage shaped), with the major axis being perpendicular to the major axes of the Langmuir component. This results in the wave packet becoming more nearly spherical as ν e /c increases, and in turn generates more spherical density wells during collapse. The results obtained are compared with previous 3D electrostatic results and 2D electromagnetic results.

  17. Time evolution of wave packets on nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunele, E de

    2005-01-01

    Time evolution of wave packets on nanostructures is studied on the basis of a three-dimensional solvable model with singular interactions (de Prunele 1997 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 30 7831). In particular, methods and tools are provided to determine time independent upper bounds for the overlap of the normalized time-dependent wave packet with the time independent normalized wave packet concentrated at an arbitrarily chosen vertex of the nanosystem. The set of upper bounds referring to all initial positions of the wave packet and all overlaps are summarized in a matrix. The analytical formulation allows a detailed study for arbitrary geometrical configurations. Time evolution on truncated quasicrystalline systems has been found to be site selective, depending on the position of the initial wave packet

  18. Transfer of a wave packet in double-well potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai-Feng; Hu, Yao-Hua; Tan, Yong-Gang

    2018-04-01

    Energy potentials with double-well structures are typical in atoms and molecules systems. A manipulation scheme using Half Cycles Pulses (HCPs) is proposed to transfer a Gaussian wave packet between the two wells. On the basis of quantum mechanical simulations, the time evolution and the energy distribution of the wave packet are evaluated. The effect of time parameters, amplitude, and number of HCPs on spatial and energy distribution of the final state and transfer efficiency are investigated. After a carefully tailored HCPs sequence is applied to the initial wave packet localized in one well, the final state is a wave packet localized in the other well and populated at the lower energy levels with narrower distribution. The present scheme could be used to control molecular reactions and to prepare atoms with large dipole moments.

  19. On the theory of wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, D.V.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss some aspects of the theory of wave packets. We consider a popular non-covariant Gaussian model used in various applications and show that it predicts too slow a longitudinal dispersion rate for relativistic particles. We revise this approach by considering a covariant model of Gaussian wave packets, and examine our results by inspecting a wave packet of an arbitrary form. A general formula for the time dependence of the dispersion of a wave packet of an arbitrary form is found. Finally, we give a transparent interpretation of the disappearance of the wave function over time due to the dispersion - a feature often considered undesirable, but which is unavoidable for wave packets. We find, starting with simple examples, proceeding with their generalizations and finally by considering the continuity equation, that the integral over time of both the flux and probability densities is asymptotically proportional to the factor 1/|x| 2 in the rest frame of the wave packet, just as in the case of an ensemble of classical particles

  20. Revivals of quantum wave packets in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueckl, Viktor; Kramer, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of wave packets on graphene in a perpendicular magnetic field and the appearance of collapses and revivals in the time evolution of an initially localized wave packet. The wave-packet evolution in graphene differs drastically from the one in an electron gas and shows a rich revival structure similar to the dynamics of highly excited Rydberg states. We present a novel numerical wave-packet propagation scheme in order to solve the effective single-particle Dirac-Hamiltonian of graphene and show how the collapse and revival dynamics is affected by the presence of disorder. Our effective numerical method is of general interest for the solution of the Dirac equation in the presence of potentials and magnetic fields.

  1. Dispersionless wave packets in Dirac materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubský, Vít; Tušek, Matěj

    2017-01-01

    We show that a wide class of quantum systems with translational invariance can host dispersionless, soliton-like, wave packets. We focus on the setting where the effective, two-dimensional Hamiltonian acquires the form of the Dirac operator. The proposed framework for construction of the dispersionless wave packets is illustrated on silicene-like systems with topologically nontrivial effective mass. Our analytical predictions are accompanied by a numerical analysis and possible experimental realizations are discussed.

  2. The description of dense hydrogen with Wave Packet Molecular Dynamics (WPMD) simulations; Die Beschreibung von dichtem Wasserstoff mit der Methode der Wellenpaket-Molekulardynamik (WPMD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakob, B.

    2006-10-10

    In this work the wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD) is presented and applied to dense hydrogen. In the WPMD method the electrons are described by a slater determinant of periodic Gaussian wave packets. Each single particle wave function can parametrised through 8 coordinates which can be interpreted as the position and momentum, the width and its conjugate momentum. The equation of motion for these coordinates can be derived from a time depended variational principle. Properties of the equilibrium can be ascertained by a Monte Carlo simulation. With the now completely implemented antisymmetrisation the simulation yields a fundamental different behavior for dense hydrogen compare to earlier simplified models. The results show a phase transition to metallic hydrogen with a higher density than in the molecular phase. This behavior has e.g. a large implication to the physics of giant planets. This work describes the used model and explains in particular the calculation of the energy and forces. The periodicity of the wave function leads to a description in the Fourier space. The antisymmetrisation is done by Matrix operations. Moreover the numerical implementation is described in detail to allow the further development of the code. The results provided in this work show the equation of state in the temperature range 300K - 50000K an density 10{sup 23}-10{sup 24} cm{sup -3}, according a pressure 1 GPa-1000 GPa. In a phase diagram the phase transition to metallic hydrogen can be red off. The electrical conductivity of both phases is destined. (orig.)

  3. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  4. Gabor Wave Packet Method to Solve Plasma Wave Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletzer, A.; Phillips, C.K.; Smithe, D.N.

    2003-01-01

    A numerical method for solving plasma wave equations arising in the context of mode conversion between the fast magnetosonic and the slow (e.g ion Bernstein) wave is presented. The numerical algorithm relies on the expansion of the solution in Gaussian wave packets known as Gabor functions, which have good resolution properties in both real and Fourier space. The wave packets are ideally suited to capture both the large and small wavelength features that characterize mode conversion problems. The accuracy of the scheme is compared with a standard finite element approach

  5. Engineering and manipulating exciton wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoning; Montangero, Simone; Carr, Lincoln D.; Lusk, Mark T.

    2017-05-01

    When a semiconductor absorbs light, the resulting electron-hole superposition amounts to a uncontrolled quantum ripple that eventually degenerates into diffusion. If the conformation of these excitonic superpositions could be engineered, though, they would constitute a new means of transporting information and energy. We show that properly designed laser pulses can be used to create such excitonic wave packets. They can be formed with a prescribed speed, direction, and spectral make-up that allows them to be selectively passed, rejected, or even dissociated using superlattices. Their coherence also provides a handle for manipulation using active, external controls. Energy and information can be conveniently processed and subsequently removed at a distant site by reversing the original procedure to produce a stimulated emission. The ability to create, manage, and remove structured excitons comprises the foundation for optoexcitonic circuits with application to a wide range of quantum information, energy, and light-flow technologies. The paradigm is demonstrated using both tight-binding and time-domain density functional theory simulations.

  6. Wave-packet revivals for quantum systems with nondegenerate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, R.; Tudose, B.

    1996-01-01

    The revival structure of wave packets is examined for quantum systems having energies that depend on two nondegenerate quantum numbers. For such systems, the evolution of the wave packet is controlled by two classical periods and three revival times. These wave packets exhibit quantum beats in the initial motion as well as new types of long-term revivals. The issue of whether fractional revivals can form is addressed. We present an analytical proof showing that at certain times equal to rational fractions of the revival times the wave packet can reform as a sum of subsidiary waves and that both conventional and new types of fractional revivals can occur. (orig.)

  7. Scattering of wave packets with phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlovets, Dmitry V. [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Lenina Ave. 36, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-09

    A general problem of 2→N{sub f} scattering is addressed with all the states being wave packets with arbitrary phases. Depending on these phases, one deals with coherent states in (3+1) D, vortex particles with orbital angular momentum, the Airy beams, and their generalizations. A method is developed in which a number of events represents a functional of the Wigner functions of such states. Using width of a packet σ{sub p}/〈p〉 as a small parameter, the Wigner functions, the number of events, and a cross section are represented as power series in this parameter, the first non-vanishing corrections to their plane-wave expressions are derived, and generalizations for beams are made. Although in this regime the Wigner functions turn out to be everywhere positive, the cross section develops new specifically quantum features, inaccessible in the plane-wave approximation. Among them is dependence on an impact parameter between the beams, on phases of the incoming states, and on a phase of the scattering amplitude. A model-independent analysis of these effects is made. Two ways of measuring how a Coulomb phase and a hadronic one change with a transferred momentum t are discussed.

  8. The Evolution and Revival Structure of Localized Quantum Wave Packets

    OpenAIRE

    Bluhm, Robert; Kostelecky, Alan; Porter, James

    1995-01-01

    Localized quantum wave packets can be produced in a variety of physical systems and are the subject of much current research in atomic, molecular, chemical, and condensed-matter physics. They are particularly well suited for studying the classical limit of a quantum-mechanical system. The motion of a localized quantum wave packet initially follows the corresponding classical motion. However, in most cases the quantum wave packet spreads and undergoes a series of collapses and revivals. We pre...

  9. Microwave Ionization of an Atomic Electron Wave Packet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, Michael W.; Ko, Lung; Gallagher, T. F.

    2001-01-01

    A short microwave pulse is used to ionize a lithium Rydberg wave packet launched from the core at a well-defined phase of the field. We observe a strong dependence on the relative phase between the motion of the wave packet and the oscillations of the field. This phase dependent ionization is also studied as a function of the relative frequency. Our experimental observations are in good qualitative agreement with a one-dimensional classical model of wave packet ionization

  10. Dispersionless wave packets in Dirac materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubský, Vít; Tušek, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 378, MAR (2017), s. 171-182 ISSN 0003-4916 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-07674Y; GA ČR GA17-01706S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : quantum systems * wave packets * dispersion * dirac materials Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics ( physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 2.465, year: 2016

  11. Massachusetts Bay - Internal wave packets digitized from SAR imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This feature class contains internal wave packets digitized from SAR imagery at 1:350,000 scale in Massachusetts Bay. Internal waves are nonsinusoidal waves that...

  12. Manifestations of wave packet revivals in the moments of observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudheesh, C.; Lakshmibala, S.; Balakrishnan, V.

    2004-01-01

    Using a generic Hamiltonian that models wave packet propagation in a Kerr-like medium, matter wave field dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensation, etc., we show that distinctive signatures of wave packet revivals and fractional revivals are displayed by the time evolution of the expectation values of appropriate observables, enabling selective identification of different fractional revivals

  13. A time-frequency analysis of wave packet fractional revivals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Suranjana; Banerji, J

    2007-01-01

    We show that the time-frequency analysis of the autocorrelation function is, in many ways, a more appropriate tool to resolve fractional revivals of a wave packet than the usual time-domain analysis. This advantage is crucial in reconstructing the initial state of the wave packet when its coherent structure is short-lived and decays before it is fully revived. Our calculations are based on the model example of fractional revivals in a Rydberg wave packet of circular states. We end by providing an analytical investigation which fully agrees with our numerical observations on the utility of time-frequency analysis in the study of wave packet fractional revivals

  14. Aeroacoustic directivity via wave-packet analysis of mean or base flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edstrand, Adam; Schmid, Peter; Cattafesta, Louis

    2017-11-01

    Noise pollution is an ever-increasing problem in society, and knowledge of the directivity patterns of the sound radiation is required for prediction and control. Directivity is frequently determined through costly numerical simulations of the flow field combined with an acoustic analogy. We introduce a new computationally efficient method of finding directivity for a given mean or base flow field using wave-packet analysis (Trefethen, PRSA 2005). Wave-packet analysis approximates the eigenvalue spectrum with spectral accuracy by modeling the eigenfunctions as wave packets. With the wave packets determined, we then follow the method of Obrist (JFM, 2009), which uses Lighthill's acoustic analogy to determine the far-field sound radiation and directivity of wave-packet modes. We apply this method to a canonical jet flow (Gudmundsson and Colonius, JFM 2011) and determine the directivity of potentially unstable wave packets. Furthermore, we generalize the method to consider a three-dimensional flow field of a trailing vortex wake. In summary, we approximate the disturbances as wave packets and extract the directivity from the wave-packet approximation in a fraction of the time of standard aeroacoustic solvers. ONR Grant N00014-15-1-2403.

  15. Geometrical aspects in optical wave-packet dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Masaru; Murakami, Shuichi; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2006-12-01

    We construct a semiclassical theory for propagation of an optical wave packet in a nonconducting medium with a periodic structure of dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability, i.e., a nonconducting photonic crystal. We employ a quantum-mechanical formalism in order to clarify its link to those of electronic systems. It involves the geometrical phase, i.e., Berry's phase, in a natural way, and describes an interplay between orbital motion and internal rotation. Based on the above theory, we discuss the geometrical aspects of the optical Hall effect. We also consider a reduction of the theory to a system without periodic structure and apply it to the transverse shift of an optical beam at an interface reflection or refraction. For a generic incident beam with an arbitrary polarization, an identical result for the transverse shift of each reflected or transmitted beam is given by the following different approaches: (i) analytic evaluation of wave-packet dynamics, (ii) total angular momentum (TAM) conservation for individual photons, and (iii) numerical simulation of wave-packet dynamics. It is consistent with a result by classical electrodynamics. This means that the TAM conservation for individual photons is already taken into account in wave optics, i.e., classical electrodynamics. Finally, we show an application of our theory to a two-dimensional photonic crystal, and propose an optimal design for the enhancement of the optical Hall effect in photonic crystals.

  16. Collective neutrino oscillations and neutrino wave packets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmedov, Evgeny; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp, Joachim, E-mail: akhmedov@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: jkopp@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: lindner@mpi-hd.mpg.de [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence and Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2017-09-01

    Effects of decoherence by wave packet separation on collective neutrino oscillations in dense neutrino gases are considered. We estimate the length of the wave packets of neutrinos produced in core collapse supernovae and the expected neutrino coherence length, and then proceed to consider the decoherence effects within the density matrix formalism of neutrino flavour transitions. First, we demonstrate that for neutrino oscillations in vacuum the decoherence effects are described by a damping term in the equation of motion of the density matrix of a neutrino as a whole (as contrasted to that of the fixed-momentum components of the neutrino density matrix). Next, we consider neutrino oscillations in ordinary matter and dense neutrino backgrounds, both in the adiabatic and non-adiabatic regimes. In the latter case we study two specific models of adiabaticity violation—one with short-term and another with extended non-adiabaticity. It is demonstrated that, while in the adiabatic case a damping term is present in the equation of motion of the neutrino density matrix (just like in the vacuum oscillation case), no such term in general appears in the non-adiabatic regime.

  17. Wave packet construction in three-dimensional quantum billiards

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We examine the dynamical evolution of wave packets in a cubical billiard where three quantum numbers (, , ) determine its energy spectrum and consequently its dynamical behaviour. We have constructed the wave packet in the cubical billiard and have observed its time evolution for various closed orbits.

  18. Do Free Quantum-Mechanical Wave Packets Always Spread?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, James R.

    1980-01-01

    The spreading or shrinking of free three-dimensional quantum-mechanical wave packets is addressed. A seeming paradox concerning the time evolution operator and nonspreading wave packets is discussed, and the necessity of taking into account the appropriate mathematical structure of quantum mechanics is emphasized. Teaching implications are given.…

  19. Controlling the spreading of wave packets of a dissociating molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiwari, Ashwani Kumar; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2007-01-01

    A first-order perturbation theoretic approach within the electric-dipole approximation is used to study the time evolution of wave packets created by linearly chirped laser pulses on a repulsive potential of Br-2. Our calculations show that negatively chirped pulses focus the wave packet in the F...

  20. Electron Rydberg wave packets in one-dimensional atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    produced by the application of a single impulsive kick was explicitly demonstrated. The undulation of ..... In this context, let us divide the wave packet .... wave packet with special attention to the time evolution of its components associ- ated with ...

  1. Exact wave packet decoherence dynamics in a discrete spectrum environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Matisse W Y; Zhang Weimin

    2008-01-01

    We find an exact analytical solution of the reduced density matrix from the Feynman-Vernon influence functional theory for a wave packet in an environment containing a few discrete modes. We obtain two intrinsic energy scales relating to the time scales of the system and the environment. The different relationship between these two scales alters the overall form of the solution of the system. We also introduce a decoherence measure for a single wave packet which is defined as the ratio of Schroedinger uncertainty over the delocalization extension of the wave packet and characterizes the time-evolution behaviour of the off-diagonal reduced density matrix element. We utilize the exact solution and the decoherence measure to study the wave packet decoherence dynamics. We further demonstrate how the dynamical diffusion of the wave packet leads to non-Markovian decoherence in such a microscopic environment.

  2. Wave packets, Maslov indices, and semiclassical quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlejohn, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition, as refined by Keller and Maslov, reads I=(n+m/4)h, where I is the classical action, n is the quantum number, and where m is the Maslov index, an even integer. The occurrence of the integers n and m in this formula is a reflection of underlying topological features of semiclassical quantization. In particular, the work of Arnold and others has shown that m/2 is a winding number of closed curves on the classical symplectic group manifold, Sp(2N). Wave packets provide a simple and elegant means of establishing the connection between semiclassical quantization and the homotopy classes of Sp(2N), as well as a practical way of calculating Maslov indices in complex problems. Topological methods can also be used to derive general formulas for the Maslov indices of invariant tori in the classical phase space corresponding to resonant motion. (orig.)

  3. Construction of localized atomic wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjani, S Sree; Kapoor, A K; Panigrahi, P K

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that highly localized solitons can be created in lower dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), trapped in a regular harmonic trap, by temporally varying the trap frequency. A BEC confined in such a trap can be effectively used to construct a pulsed atomic laser emitting coherent atomic wave packets. In addition to having a complete control over the spatio-temporal dynamics of the solitons, we can separate the equation governing the Kohn mode (centre of mass motion). We investigate the effect of the temporal modulation of the trap frequency on the spatio-temporal dynamics of the bright solitons and also on the Kohn mode. The dynamics of the solitons and the variations in the Kohn mode with time are compared with those in a BEC confined in a trap with unmodulated trap frequency.

  4. Coulomb Final State Interactions for Gaussian Wave Packets

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Heinz, Ulrich W

    1999-01-01

    Two-particle like-sign and unlike-sign correlations including Coulomb final state interactions are calculated for Gaussian wave packets emitted from a Gaussian source. We show that the width of the wave packets can be fully absorbed into the spatial and momentum space widths of an effective emission function for plane wave states, and that Coulomb final state interaction effects are sensitive only to the latter, but not to the wave packet width itself. Results from analytical and numerical calculations are compared with recently published work by other authors.

  5. The nonlinear effects on the characteristics of gravity wave packets: dispersion and polarization relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-D. Zhang

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing the results of the numerical simulations of nonlinear propagation of three Gaussian gravity-wave packets in isothermal atmosphere individually, the nonlinear effects on the characteristics of gravity waves are studied quantitatively. The analyses show that during the nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packets the mean flows are accelerated and the vertical wavelengths show clear reduction due to nonlinearity. On the other hand, though nonlinear effects exist, the time variations of the frequencies of gravity wave packets are close to those derived from the dispersion relation and the amplitude and phase relations of wave-associated disturbance components are consistent with the predictions of the polarization relation of gravity waves. This indicates that the dispersion and polarization relations based on the linear gravity wave theory can be applied extensively in the nonlinear region.Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides

  6. Observation of moving wave packets reveals their quantum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, U.; Raymer, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    We show how to infer the quantum state of a wave packet from position probability distributions measured during the packet close-quote s motion in an arbitrary potential. We assume a nonrelativistic one-dimensional or radial wave packet. Temporal Fourier transformation and spatial sampling with respect to a newly found set of functions project the density-matrix elements out of the probability distributions. The sampling functions are derivatives of products of regular and irregular wave functions. We note that the ability to infer quantum states in this way depends on the structure of the Schroedinger equation. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  7. Resonance-assisted decay of nondispersive wave packets

    OpenAIRE

    Wimberger, S.; Schlagheck, P.; Eltschka, C.; Buchleitner, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present a quantitative semiclassical theory for the decay of nondispersive electronic wave packets in driven, ionizing Rydberg systems. Statistically robust quantities are extracted combining resonance assisted tunneling with subsequent transport across chaotic phase space and a final ionization step.

  8. On wave-packet dynamics in a decaying quadratic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We consider the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for a quadratic potential with an exponentially decaying force constant. General analytical solutions are presented and we highlight in particular, the signatures of classical mechanics in the wave packet dynamics.......We consider the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for a quadratic potential with an exponentially decaying force constant. General analytical solutions are presented and we highlight in particular, the signatures of classical mechanics in the wave packet dynamics....

  9. Airy Wave Packets Accelerating in Space-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.

    2018-04-01

    Although diffractive spreading is an unavoidable feature of all wave phenomena, certain waveforms can attain propagation invariance. A lesser-explored strategy for achieving optical self-similar propagation exploits the modification of the spatiotemporal field structure when observed in reference frames moving at relativistic speeds. For such an observer, it is predicted that the associated Lorentz boost can bring to a halt the axial dynamics of a wave packet of an arbitrary profile. This phenomenon is particularly striking in the case of a self-accelerating beam—such as an Airy beam—whose peak normally undergoes a transverse displacement upon free propagation. Here we synthesize an acceleration-free Airy wave packet that travels in a straight line by deforming its spatiotemporal spectrum to reproduce the impact of a Lorentz boost. The roles of the axial spatial coordinate and time are swapped, leading to "time diffraction" manifested in self-acceleration observed in the propagating Airy wave-packet frame.

  10. Zeno dynamics in wave-packet diffraction spreading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porras, Miguel A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Rios Rosas 21, ES-28003 Madrid (Spain); Luis, Alfredo; Gonzalo, Isabel [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, ES-28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Angel S. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental-CSIC, Serrano 123, ES-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    We analyze a simple and feasible practical scheme displaying Zeno, anti-Zeno, and inverse-Zeno effects in the observation of wave-packet spreading caused by free evolution. The scheme is valid both in spatial diffraction of classical optical waves and in time diffraction of a quantum wave packet. In the optical realization, diffraction spreading is observed by placing slits between a light source and a light-power detector. We show that the occurrence of Zeno or anti-Zeno effects depends just on the frequency of observations between the source and detector. These effects are seen to be related to the diffraction mode theory in Fabry-Perot resonators.

  11. Attosecond Electron Wave Packet Dynamics in Strong Laser Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, P.; Remetter, T.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier, A.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Valentin, C.; Balcou, Ph.; Kazamias, S.; Mauritsson, J.; Gaarde, M. B.; Schafer, K. J.; Mairesse, Y.; Wabnitz, H.; Salieres, P.

    2005-01-01

    We use a train of sub-200 attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses with energies just above the ionization threshold in argon to create a train of temporally localized electron wave packets. We study the energy transfer from a strong infrared (IR) laser field to the ionized electrons as a function of the delay between the XUV and IR fields. When the wave packets are born at the zero crossings of the IR field, a significant amount of energy (∼20 eV) is transferred from the field to the electrons. This results in dramatically enhanced above-threshold ionization in conditions where the IR field alone does not induce any significant ionization. Because both the energy and duration of the wave packets can be varied independently of the IR laser, they are valuable tools for studying and controlling strong-field processes

  12. Squeezing a wave packet with an angular-dependent mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G M [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. dos Trabalhadores 420, Volta Redonda RJ, CEP 27255-125 (Brazil)], E-mail: agmschmidt@gmail.com, E-mail: agmschmidt@pq.cnpq.br

    2009-06-19

    We present a new effect of position-dependent mass (PDM) systems: the possibility of creating squeezed wave packets at the partial revival times. We solve exactly the PDM Schroedinger equation for the two-dimensional quantum rotor with two effective masses {mu}({theta}), both free and interacting with a uniform electric field, and present their energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions in terms of Mathieu functions. For the first one, in order to squeeze the wave packet it is necessary to apply an electric field; for the second one such an effect can be achieved without the field.

  13. Squeezing a wave packet with an angular-dependent mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G M

    2009-01-01

    We present a new effect of position-dependent mass (PDM) systems: the possibility of creating squeezed wave packets at the partial revival times. We solve exactly the PDM Schroedinger equation for the two-dimensional quantum rotor with two effective masses μ(θ), both free and interacting with a uniform electric field, and present their energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions in terms of Mathieu functions. For the first one, in order to squeeze the wave packet it is necessary to apply an electric field; for the second one such an effect can be achieved without the field

  14. Universal potential-barrier penetration by initially confined wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granot, Er'el; Marchewka, Avi

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of an initially sharp-boundary wave packet in the presence of an arbitrary potential barrier is investigated. It is shown that the penetration through the barrier is universal in the sense that it depends only on the values of the wave function and its derivatives at the boundary. The dependence on the derivatives vanishes at long distances from the barrier, where the dynamics is governed solely by the initial value of the wave function at the boundary

  15. Universal potential-barrier penetration by initially confined wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Er'El; Marchewka, Avi

    2007-07-01

    The dynamics of an initially sharp-boundary wave packet in the presence of an arbitrary potential barrier is investigated. It is shown that the penetration through the barrier is universal in the sense that it depends only on the values of the wave function and its derivatives at the boundary. The dependence on the derivatives vanishes at long distances from the barrier, where the dynamics is governed solely by the initial value of the wave function at the boundary.

  16. Angular momentum transport with twisted exciton wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoning; Lusk, Mark T.

    2017-10-01

    A chain of cofacial molecules with CN or CN h symmetry supports excitonic states with a screwlike structure. These can be quantified with the combination of an axial wave number and an azimuthal winding number. Combinations of these states can be used to construct excitonic wave packets that spiral down the chain with well-determined linear and angular momenta. These twisted exciton wave packets can be created and annihilated using laser pulses, and their angular momentum can be optically modified during transit. This allows for the creation of optoexcitonic circuits in which information, encoded in the angular momentum of light, is converted into excitonic wave packets that can be manipulated, transported, and then reemitted. A tight-binding paradigm is used to demonstrate the key ideas. The approach is then extended to quantify the evolution of twisted exciton wave packets in a many-body, multilevel time-domain density functional theory setting. In both settings, numerical methods are developed that allow the site-to-site transfer of angular momentum to be quantified.

  17. The pump-probe coupling of matter wave packets to remote lattice states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob F; Park, Sung Jong; Pedersen, Poul Lindholm

    2012-01-01

    containing a Bose–Einstein condensate. The evolution of these wave packets is monitored in situ and their six-photon reflection at a band gap is observed. In direct analogy with pump–probe spectroscopy, a probe pulse allows for the resonant de-excitation of the wave packet into states localized around...... selected lattice sites at a long, controllable distance of more than 100 lattice sites from the main component. This precise control mechanism for ultra-cold atoms thus enables controlled quantum state preparation and splitting for quantum dynamics, metrology and simulation....

  18. Isolated drops from capillary jets by means of Gaussian wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Francisco Javier; Gonzalez, Heliodoro; Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Castrejon-Pita, Jose Rafael; Gomez-Aguilar, Francisco Jose

    2017-11-01

    The possibility of obtaining isolated drops from a continuous liquid jet through localized velocity perturbations is explored analytically, numerically and experimentally. We show that Gaussian wave packets are appropriate for this goal. A temporal linear analysis predicts the early evolution of these wave packets and provides an estimate of the breakup length of the jet. Non-linear numerical simulations allow us both to corroborate these results and to obtain the shape of the surface of the jet prior to breakup. Finally, we show experimental evidence that stimulating with a Gaussian wave packet can lead to the formation of an isolated drop without disturbing the rest of the jet. The authors acknowledge support from the Spanish Government under Contract No. FIS2014-25161, the Junta de Andalucia under Contract No. P11-FQM-7919, the EPSRC-UK via the Grant EP/P024173/1, and the Royal Society.

  19. State reconstruction of one-dimensional wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krähmer, D. S.; Leonhardt, U.

    1997-12-01

    We review and analyze the method [U. Leonhardt, M.G. Raymer: Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1985 (1996)] for quantum-state reconstruction of one-dimensional non-relativistic wave packets from position observations. We illuminate the theoretical background of the technique and show how to extend the procedure to the continuous part of the spectrum.

  20. Quantum wave-packet revivals in circular billiards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinett, R.W.; Heppelmann, S.

    2002-01-01

    We examine the long-term time dependence of Gaussian wave packets in a circular infinite well (billiard) system and find that there are approximate revivals. For the special case of purely m=0 states (central wave packets with no momentum) the revival time is T rev (m=0) =8μR 2 /(ℎ/2π)π, where μ is the mass of the particle, and the revivals are almost exact. For all other wave packets, we find that T rev (m≠0) =(π 2 /2)T rev (m=0) ≅5T rev (m=0) and the nature of the revivals becomes increasingly approximate as the average angular momentum or number of m≠0 states is increased. The dependence of the revival structure on the initial position, energy, and angular momentum of the wave packet and the connection to the energy spectrum is discussed in detail. The results are also compared to two other highly symmetrical two-dimensional infinite well geometries with exact revivals, namely, the square and equilateral triangle billiards. We also show explicitly how the classical periodicity for closed orbits in a circular billiard arises from the energy eigenvalue spectrum, using a WKB analysis

  1. Cherenkov Radiation Control via Self-accelerating Wave-packets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Li, Zhili; Wetzel, Benjamin; Morandotti, Roberto; Chen, Zhigang; Xu, Jingjun

    2017-08-18

    Cherenkov radiation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature. It describes electromagnetic radiation from a charged particle moving in a medium with a uniform velocity larger than the phase velocity of light in the same medium. Such a picture is typically adopted in the investigation of traditional Cherenkov radiation as well as its counterparts in different branches of physics, including nonlinear optics, spintronics and plasmonics. In these cases, the radiation emitted spreads along a "cone", making it impractical for most applications. Here, we employ a self-accelerating optical pump wave-packet to demonstrate controlled shaping of one type of generalized Cherenkov radiation - dispersive waves in optical fibers. We show that, by tuning the parameters of the wave-packet, the emitted waves can be judiciously compressed and focused at desired locations, paving the way to such control in any physical system.

  2. Structure of Langmuir and electromagnetic collapsing wave packets in two-dimensional strong plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinejad, H.; Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.; Skjaeraasen, O.; Sobhanian, S.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleating and collapsing wave packets relevant to electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence are studied theoretically in two dimensions. Model collapsing Langmuir and transverse potentials are constructed as superpositions of approximate eigenstates of a spherically symmetric density well. Electrostatic and electromagnetic potentials containing only components with azimuthal quantum numbers m=0, 1, 2 are found to give a good representation of the electric fields of nucleating collapsing wave packets in turbulence simulations. The length scales of these trapped states are related to the electron thermal speed v e and the length scale of the density well. It is shown analytically that the electromagnetic trapped states change with v e and that for v e e > or approx. 0.17c, the Langmuir and transverse modes remain coupled during collapse, with autocorrelation lengths in a constant ratio. An investigation of energy transfer to packets localized in density wells shows that the strongest power transfer to the nucleating state occurs for Langmuir waves. Energy transitions between different trapped and free states for collapsing wave packets are studied, and the transition rate from trapped Langmuir to free plane electromagnetic waves is calculated and related to the emission of electromagnetic waves at the plasma frequency

  3. Strongly nonlinear evolution of low-frequency wave packets in a dispersive plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Bernard J.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of strongly nonlinear, strongly modulated wave packets is investigated in a dispersive plasma using a hybrid numerical code. These wave packets have amplitudes exceeding the strength of the external magnetic field, along which they propagate. Alfven (left helicity) wave packets show strong steepening for p Schrodinger (DNLS) equation.

  4. Nonlinear Evolution of Alfvenic Wave Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, B.; Jayanti, V.; Vinas, A. F.; Ghosh, S.; Goldstein, M. L.; Roberts, D. A.; Lakhina, G. S.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1998-01-01

    Alfven waves are a ubiquitous feature of the solar wind. One approach to studying the evolution of such waves has been to study exact solutions to approximate evolution equations. Here we compare soliton solutions of the Derivative Nonlinear Schrodinger evolution equation (DNLS) to solutions of the compressible MHD equations.

  5. Pump-dump iterative squeezing of vibrational wave packets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo Y; Sola, Ignacio R

    2005-12-22

    The free motion of a nonstationary vibrational wave packet in an electronic potential is a source of interesting quantum properties. In this work we propose an iterative scheme that allows continuous stretching and squeezing of a wave packet in the ground or in an excited electronic state, by switching the wave function between both potentials with pi pulses at certain times. Using a simple model of displaced harmonic oscillators and delta pulses, we derive the analytical solution and the conditions for its possible implementation and optimization in different molecules and electronic states. We show that the main constraining parameter is the pulse bandwidth. Although in principle the degree of squeezing (or stretching) is not bounded, the physical resources increase quadratically with the number of iterations, while the achieved squeezing only increases linearly.

  6. Runge-Lenz wave packet in multichannel Stark photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Texier, F.

    2005-01-01

    In a previous slow photoionization experiment, modulations of ionization rings were manifested for Xe in a constant electric field. The present quantum calculation reveals that the modulation is an effect of the multichannel core scattering and of tunneling waves through the Coulomb-Stark potential barrier: the barrier reduces the number of oscillations that is observed relatively to the number of oscillations of the short range wave functions, and the nonhydrogenic core phase shifts modify the position of the ionization rings. We find a hidden difference, in the ionization process, for two close values of the energy depending on the resonance with the barrier. The ionization intensity is interpreted as a Runge-Lenz wave packet; thus, we can relate the quantum modulation to the classical Coulomb-Stark trajectories. The Runge-Lenz wave packet differs from a usual temporal wave packet because its components are eigenstates of the Runge-Lenz vector z projection and its evolution is not temporal but spatial

  7. Square-integrable wave packets from the Volkov solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakowicz, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    Rigorous mathematical proofs of some properties of the Volkov solutions are presented, which describe the motion of a relativistic charged Dirac particle in a classical, plane electromagnetic wave. The Volkov solutions are first rewritten in a convenient form, which clearly reveals some of the symmetries of the underlying Dirac equation. Assuming continuity and boundedness of the electromagnetic vector potential, it is shown how one may construct square-integrable wave packets from momentum distributions in the space C 0 ∞ (R 3 ) 4 . If, in addition, the vector potential is C 1 and the derivative is bounded, these wave packets decay in space faster than any polynomial and fulfill the Dirac equation. The mapping which takes momentum distributions into wave packets is shown to be isometric with respect to the L 2 (R 3 ) 4 norm and may therefore be continuously extended to a mapping from L 2 (R 3 ) 4 . For a momentum function in L 1 (R 3 ) 4 intersection L 2 (R 3 ) 4 , an integral representation of this extension is presented

  8. Square-Integrable Wave Packets from the Volkov Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Zakowicz, S

    2004-01-01

    Rigorous mathematical proofs of some properties of the Volkov solutions are presented, which describe the motion of a relativistic charged Dirac particle in a classical, plane electromagnetic wave. The Volkov solutions are first rewritten in a convenient form, which clearly reveals some of the symmetries of the underlying Dirac equation. Assuming continuity and boundedness of the electromagnetic vector potential, it is shown how one may construct square-integrable wave packets from momentum distributions in the space $\\mathcal{C}^{\\infty}_0(\\mathbb{R}^3)^4$. If, in addition, the vector potential is $\\mathcal{C}^1$ and the derivative is bounded, these wave packets decay in space faster than any polynomial and fulfill the Dirac equation. The mapping which takes momentum distributions into wave packets is shown to be isometric with respect to the $L^2(\\mathbb{R}^3)^4$ norm and may therefore be continuously extended to a mapping from $L^2(\\mathbb{R}^3)^4$. For a momen! tum function in $L^1(\\mathbb{R}^3)^4 \\cap L^...

  9. Energy and Information Transfer Via Coherent Exciton Wave Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoning

    Electronic excitons are bound electron-hole states that are generated when light interacts with matter. Such excitations typically entangle with phonons and rapidly decohere; the resulting electronic state dynamics become diffusive as a result. However, if the exciton-phonon coupling can be reduced, it may be possible to construct excitonic wave packets that offer a means of efficiently transmitting information and energy. This thesis is a combined theory/computation investigation to design condensed matter systems which support the requisite coherent transport. Under the idealizing assumption that exciton-phonon entanglement could be completely suppressed, the majority of this thesis focuses on the creation and manipulation of exciton wave packets in quasi-one-dimensional systems. While each site could be a silicon quantum dot, the actual implementation focused on organic molecular assemblies for the sake of computational simplicity, ease of experimental implementation, potential for coherent transport, and promise because of reduced structural uncertainty. A laser design was derived to create exciton wave packets with tunable shape and speed. Quantum interference was then exploited to manipulate these packets to block, pass, and even dissociate excitons based on their energies. These developments allow exciton packets to be considered within the arena of quantum information science. The concept of controllable excitonic wave packets was subsequently extended to consider molecular designs that allow photons with orbital angular momentum to be absorbed to create excitons with a quasi-angular momentum of their own. It was shown that a well-defined measure of topological charge is conserved in such light-matter interactions. Significantly, it was also discovered that such molecules allow photon angular momenta to be combined and later emitted. This amounts to a new way of up/down converting photonic angular momentum without relying on nonlinear optical materials. The

  10. Theoretical prediction of a rotating magnon wave packet in ferromagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ryo; Murakami, Shuichi

    2011-05-13

    We theoretically show that the magnon wave packet has a rotational motion in two ways: a self-rotation and a motion along the boundary of the sample (edge current). They are similar to the cyclotron motion of electrons, but unlike electrons the magnons have no charge and the rotation is not due to the Lorentz force. These rotational motions are caused by the Berry phase in momentum space from the magnon band structure. Furthermore, the rotational motion of the magnon gives an additional correction term to the magnon Hall effect. We also discuss the Berry curvature effect in the classical limit of long-wavelength magnetostatic spin waves having macroscopic coherence length.

  11. Initial dynamics of the Norrish Type I reaction in acetone: probing wave packet motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y; Sølling, Theis I; Møller, Klaus B

    2011-02-10

    The Norrish Type I reaction in the S(1) (nπ*) state of acetone is a prototype case of ketone photochemistry. On the basis of results from time-resolved mass spectrometry (TRMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) experiments, it was recently suggested that after excitation the wave packet travels toward the S(1) minimum in less than 30 fs and stays there for more than 100 picoseconds [Chem. Phys. Lett.2008, 461, 193]. In this work we present simulated TRMS and TRPES signals based on ab initio multiple spawning simulations of the dynamics during the first 200 fs after excitation, getting quite good agreement with the experimental signals. We can explain the ultrafast decay of the experimental signals in the following manner: the wave packet simply travels, mainly along the deplanarization coordinate, out of the detection window of the ionizing probe. This window is so narrow that subsequent revival of the signal due to the coherent deplanarization vibration is not observed, meaning that from the point of view of the experiment the wave packets travels directly to the S(1) minimum. This result stresses the importance of pursuing a closer link to the experimental signal when using molecular dynamics simulations in interpreting experimental results.

  12. Nonspreading Wave Packets for Rydberg Electrons in Rotating Molecules with Electric Dipole Moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, I.; Bialynicka-Birula, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Nonspreading wave packets for Rydberg electrons are predicted in rotating molecules with electric dipole moments. We have named them the Trojan wave packets since their stability is due to the same mechanism that governs the motion of the Trojan asteroids in the Sun-Jupiter system. Unlike all previously predicted Trojan wave packets in atoms, molecular Trojan states do not require external fields for their existence

  13. Riemann zeta function from wave-packet dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mack, R.; Dahl, Jens Peder; Moya-Cessa, H.

    2010-01-01

    We show that the time evolution of a thermal phase state of an anharmonic oscillator with logarithmic energy spectrum is intimately connected to the generalized Riemann zeta function zeta(s, a). Indeed, the autocorrelation function at a time t is determined by zeta (sigma + i tau, a), where sigma...... index of JWKB. We compare and contrast exact and approximate eigenvalues of purely logarithmic potentials. Moreover, we use a numerical method to find a potential which leads to exact logarithmic eigenvalues. We discuss possible realizations of Riemann zeta wave-packet dynamics using cold atoms...

  14. Wave packet formulation of the boomerang model for resonant electron--molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurdy, C.W.; Turner, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent formulation of the boomerang model for resonant electron--molecule scattering is presented in terms of a wave packet propagating on the complex potential surface of the metastable anion. The results of calculations using efficient semiclassical techniques for propagating the wave packet are found to be in excellent agreement with full quantum-mechanical calculations of vibrational excitation cross sections in e - --N 2 scattering. The application of the wave packet formulation as a computational and conceptual approach to the problem of resonant collisions with polyatomic molecules is discussed in the light of recent wave packet calculations on polyatomic photodissociation and Raman spectra

  15. Monte Carlo wave packet approach to dissociative multiple ionization in diatomic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Henriette Astrup; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    A detailed description of the Monte Carlo wave packet technique applied to dissociative multiple ionization of diatomic molecules in short intense laser pulses is presented. The Monte Carlo wave packet technique relies on the Born-Oppenheimer separation of electronic and nuclear dynamics...... and provides a consistent theoretical framework for treating simultaneously both ionization and dissociation. By simulating the detection of continuum electrons and collapsing the system onto either the neutral, singly ionized or doubly ionized states in every time step the nuclear dynamics can be solved....... The computational effort is restricted and the model is applicable to any molecular system where electronic Born-Oppenheimer curves, dipole moment functions, and ionization rates as a function of nuclear coordinates can be determined....

  16. Wave-packet approach to Rydberg resonances in dissociative recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisset, Sabine; Pichl, Lukas; Orel, Ann E.; Schneider, Ioan F.

    2007-01-01

    We report the time-dependent approach to resonant electron capture into Rydberg states in collisions with molecular cations at low impact energy, as an alternative to the method based on multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT), and present the results for the HD + ion. The propagation of the initial wave function on 13 Rydberg states (besides one valence state) correctly describes the indirect dissociative recombination mechanism in the time domain. Notably, the nonlocal coupling operator between the ionization and dissociation channels is accounted for in the indirect process, extending previous work on the case of direct coupling. The present approach compares to the MQDT framework with remarkable precision: resonant structures in the cross section correctly emerge from the wave-packet propagation; the time-dependent result also forms a cross section envelope for the dense series of ultrafine MQDT resonances corresponding to the quasicontinuous part of the Rydberg state manifold

  17. Magnetic helicity conservation and inverse energy cascade in electron magnetohydrodynamic wave packets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jungyeon

    2011-05-13

    Electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) provides a fluidlike description of small-scale magnetized plasmas. An EMHD wave propagates along magnetic field lines. The direction of propagation can be either parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field lines. We numerically study propagation of three-dimensional (3D) EMHD wave packets moving in one direction. We obtain two major results. (1) Unlike its magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) counterpart, an EMHD wave packet is dispersive. Because of this, EMHD wave packets traveling in one direction create opposite-traveling wave packets via self-interaction and cascade energy to smaller scales. (2) EMHD wave packets traveling in one direction clearly exhibit inverse energy cascade. We find that the latter is due to conservation of magnetic helicity. We compare inverse energy cascade in 3D EMHD turbulence and two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic turbulence.

  18. Magnetic Helicity Conservation and Inverse Energy Cascade in Electron Magnetohydrodynamic Wave Packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jungyeon

    2011-01-01

    Electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) provides a fluidlike description of small-scale magnetized plasmas. An EMHD wave propagates along magnetic field lines. The direction of propagation can be either parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field lines. We numerically study propagation of three-dimensional (3D) EMHD wave packets moving in one direction. We obtain two major results. (1) Unlike its magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) counterpart, an EMHD wave packet is dispersive. Because of this, EMHD wave packets traveling in one direction create opposite-traveling wave packets via self-interaction and cascade energy to smaller scales. (2) EMHD wave packets traveling in one direction clearly exhibit inverse energy cascade. We find that the latter is due to conservation of magnetic helicity. We compare inverse energy cascade in 3D EMHD turbulence and two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic turbulence.

  19. Time-resolved X-ray scattering by electronic wave packets: analytic solutions to the hydrogen atom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmermacher, Mats; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2017-01-01

    Modern pulsed X-ray sources permit time-dependent measurements of dynamical changes in atoms and molecules via non-resonant scattering. The planning, analysis, and interpretation of such experiments, however, require a firm and elaborated theoretical framework. This paper provides a detailed...... description of time-resolved X-ray scattering by non-stationary electronic wave packets in atomic systems. A consistent application of the Waller-Hartree approximation is discussed and different contributions to the total differential scattering signal are identified and interpreted. Moreover......, it is demonstrated how the scattering signal of wave packets in the hydrogen atom can be expressed analytically. This permits simulations without numerical integration and establishes a benchmark for both efficiency and accuracy. Based on that, scattering patterns of an exemplary wave packet in the hydrogen atom...

  20. Dynamics of electron wave packet in a disordered chain with delayed nonlinear response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Hongjun; Xiong Shijie

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of one electron wave packet in a linear chain with random on-site energies and a nonadiabatic electron-phonon interaction which is described by a delayed cubic nonlinear term in the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We show that in the regime where the wave packet is delocalized in the case with only the delayed nonlinearity, the wave packet becomes localized when the disorder is added and the localization is enhanced by increasing the disorder. In the regime where the self-trapping phenomenon occurs in the case with only the delayed nonlinearity, by adding the disorder the general dynamical features of the wave packet do not change if the nonlinearity parameter is small, but the dynamics shows the subdiffusive behavior if the nonlinearity parameter is large. The numerical results demonstrate complicated wave packet dynamics of systems with both the disorder and nonlinearity.

  1. Dynamical behavior of the wave packets on adiabatic potential surfaces observed by femtosecond luminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suemoto, Tohru; Nakajima, Makoto; Matsuoka, Taira; Yasukawa, Keizo; Koyama, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    The wave packet dynamics on adiabatic potential surfaces studied by means of time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy is reviewed and the advantages of this method are discussed. In quasi-one-dimensional bromine-bridged platinum complexes, a movie representing the time evolution of the wave packet motion and shape was constructed. A two-dimensional Lissajous-like motion of the wave packet was suggested in the same material at low temperature. In F-centers in KI, evidence for tunneling of the wave packet between the adjacent adiabatic potential surfaces was found. Selective observation of the wave packet motion on the excited state was demonstrated for F-centers in KBr and compared with the results from pump-and-probe experiments in literature

  2. Wave packets in quantum cosmology and the cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, C.

    1990-01-01

    Wave packets are constructed explicitly in minisuperspace of quantum gravity corresponding to a Friedmann universe containing a conformally coupled scalar field with and without a cosmological constant. The construction is performed in close analogy to the case of constructing coherent states in quantum mechanics. Various examples are also depicted numerically. The corresponding lorentzian path integrals are evaluated for some cases. It is emphasized that the new concept of time in quantum gravity demands the imposition of a kind of boundary conditions not encountered in quantum gravity demands the imposition of a kind of boundary conditions not encountered in quantum mechanics. Connection is also made to recent investigations predicting a vanishing cosmological constant. It is shown that the fact of whether this result is generic or not depends on where the boundary conditions are imposed in the configuration space. (orig.)

  3. Quantum wave packet study of D+OF reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurban, M.; Karabulut, E.; Tutuk, R.; Goektas, F.

    2010-01-01

    The quantum dynamics of the D+OF reaction on the adiabatic potential energy surface of the ground 1 3 A ' state has been studied by using a time-dependent quantum real wave packet method. The state-to-state and state-to-all reaction probabilities for total angular momentum J = 0 have been calculated. The probabilities for J > 0 have been calculated by J-shifting the J = 0 results by means of capture model. Then, the integral cross sections and initial state selected rate constants have been calculated. The initial state-selected reaction probabilities and reaction cross section show threshold but not manifest any resonances and the initial state selected rate constants are sensitive to the temperature.

  4. Nonlinear saturation of wave packets excited by low-energy electron horseshoe distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, C; Volokitin, A

    2013-05-01

    Horseshoe distributions are shell-like particle distributions that can arise in space and laboratory plasmas when particle beams propagate into increasing magnetic fields. The present paper studies the stability and the dynamics of wave packets interacting resonantly with electrons presenting low-energy horseshoe or shell-type velocity distributions in a magnetized plasma. The linear instability growth rates are determined as a function of the ratio of the plasma to the cyclotron frequencies, of the velocity and the opening angle of the horseshoe, and of the relative thickness of the shell. The nonlinear stage of the instability is investigated numerically using a symplectic code based on a three-dimensional Hamiltonian model. Simulation results show that the dynamics of the system is mainly governed by wave-particle interactions at Landau and normal cyclotron resonances and that the high-order normal cyclotron resonances play an essential role. Specific features of the dynamics of particles interacting simultaneously with two or more waves at resonances of different natures and orders are discussed, showing that such complex processes determine the main characteristics of the wave spectrum's evolution. Simulations with wave packets presenting quasicontinuous spectra provide a full picture of the relaxation of the horseshoe distribution, revealing two main phases of the evolution: an initial stage of wave energy growth, characterized by a fast filling of the shell, and a second phase of slow damping of the wave energy, accompanied by final adjustments of the electron distribution. The influence of the density inhomogeneity along the horseshoe on the wave-particle dynamics is also discussed.

  5. Quantum chaos induced by nonadiabatic coupling in wave-packet dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Hisashi; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    The effect of nonadiabatic coupling due to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation on chaos is investigated. A couple of measures (indicators) that detect the extent of chaos in wave-packet dynamics on coupled potential functions are devised. Using them, we show that chaos is indeed induced by a nonadiabatic coupling in individual time-dependent wave-packet dynamics. This chaos is genuinely of quantum nature, since it arises from bifurcation and merging of a wave packet at the quasicrossing region of two coupled potential functions

  6. Coherent wave packet dynamics in a double-well potential in cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li; Li, Gang; Ding, Ming-Song; Wang, Yong-Liang; Zhang, Yun-Cui

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the coherent wave packet dynamics of a two-level atom trapped in a symmetric double-well potential in a near-resonance cavity. Prepared on one side of the double-well potential, the atom wave packet oscillates between the left and right wells, while recoil induced by the emitted photon from the atom entangles the atomic internal and external degrees of freedom. The collapse and revival of the tunneling occurs. Adjusting the width of the wave packets, one can modify the tunneling frequency and suppress the tunneling.

  7. Hanbury Brown–Twiss Effect with Wave Packets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabish Qureshi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Hanbury Brown–Twiss (HBT effect, at the quantum level, is essentially an interference of one particle with another, as opposed to interference of a particle with itself. Conventional treatments of identical particles encounter difficulties while dealing with entanglement. A recently introduced label-free approach to indistinguishable particles is described, and is used to analyze the HBT effect. Quantum wave-packets have been used to provide a better understanding of the quantum interpretation of the HBT effect. The effect is demonstrated for two independent particles governed by Bose–Einstein or Fermi–Dirac statistics. The HBT effect is also analyzed for pairs of entangled particles. Surprisingly, entanglement has almost no effect on the interference seen in the HBT effect. In the light of the results, an old quantum optics experiment is reanalyzed, and it is argued that the interference seen in that experiment is not a consequence of non-local correlations between the photons, as is commonly believed. Quanta 2017; 6: 61–69.

  8. Trajectory description of the quantum–classical transition for wave packet interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chia-Chun, E-mail: ccchou@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2016-08-15

    The quantum–classical transition for wave packet interference is investigated using a hydrodynamic description. A nonlinear quantum–classical transition equation is obtained by introducing a degree of quantumness ranging from zero to one into the classical time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This equation provides a continuous description for the transition process of physical systems from purely quantum to purely classical regimes. In this study, the transition trajectory formalism is developed to provide a hydrodynamic description for the quantum–classical transition. The flow momentum of transition trajectories is defined by the gradient of the action function in the transition wave function and these trajectories follow the main features of the evolving probability density. Then, the transition trajectory formalism is employed to analyze the quantum–classical transition of wave packet interference. For the collision-like wave packet interference where the propagation velocity is faster than the spreading speed of the wave packet, the interference process remains collision-like for all the degree of quantumness. However, the interference features demonstrated by transition trajectories gradually disappear when the degree of quantumness approaches zero. For the diffraction-like wave packet interference, the interference process changes continuously from a diffraction-like to collision-like case when the degree of quantumness gradually decreases. This study provides an insightful trajectory interpretation for the quantum–classical transition of wave packet interference.

  9. Wave-packet revival for the Schroedinger equation with position-dependent mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G.M.

    2006-01-01

    We study the temporal evolution of solutions of 1D Schroedinger equation with position-dependent mass inside an infinite well. Revival of wave-packet is shown to exist and partial revivals are different from the usual ones

  10. Spectro-spatial analysis of wave packet propagation in nonlinear acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W. J.; Li, X. P.; Wang, Y. S.; Chen, W. Q.; Huang, G. L.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this work is to analyze wave packet propagation in weakly nonlinear acoustic metamaterials and reveal the interior nonlinear wave mechanism through spectro-spatial analysis. The spectro-spatial analysis is based on full-scale transient analysis of the finite system, by which dispersion curves are generated from the transmitted waves and also verified by the perturbation method (the L-P method). We found that the spectro-spatial analysis can provide detailed information about the solitary wave in short-wavelength region which cannot be captured by the L-P method. It is also found that the optical wave modes in the nonlinear metamaterial are sensitive to the parameters of the nonlinear constitutive relation. Specifically, a significant frequency shift phenomenon is found in the middle-wavelength region of the optical wave branch, which makes this frequency region behave like a band gap for transient waves. This special frequency shift is then used to design a direction-biased waveguide device, and its efficiency is shown by numerical simulations.

  11. The Generation Mechanism of Airy—Bessel Wave Packets in Free Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhi-Jun; Ying Chao-Fu; Fan Chang-Jiang; Wu Qiong

    2012-01-01

    Localized optical Airy—Bessel configuration wave packets were first generated on the basis of a grating-telescope combination [Nat. Photon. 4(2010) 103]. By studying the spatially induced group velocity dispersion effect of ultrashort pulsed Bessel beams during propagation, we find the universal physical foundation of generating Airy—Bessel wave packets (ABWs) in free space. The research results are expected to open up more common channels for generating stable linear localized ABWs

  12. Coherent structural trapping through wave packet dispersion during photoinduced spin state switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Hartsock, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The description of ultrafast nonadiabatic chemical dynamics during molecular photo-transformations remains challenging because electronic and nuclear configurations impact each other and cannot be treated independently. Here we gain experimental insights, beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation...... is distinguished from the structural trapping dynamics, which launches a coherent oscillating wave packet (265 fs period), clearly identified as molecular breathing. Throughout the structural trapping, the dispersion of the wave packet along the reaction coordinate reveals details of intramolecular vibronic...

  13. Mesoscopic states in graphene in magnetic field: collapse and revival of wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demikhovskij, V.Ya.; Telezhnikov, A.V.; Frolova, E.V.; Kravets, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of wave packet collapse and revival in monolayer and bilayer graphene at an external perpendicular magnetic field are described. The evolution of electron wave packets, which are a superposition of the states with quantum numbers n around that of some Landau level n 0 was studied. The probability densities as well as average velocities of the packet center were calculated analytically and then visualized. The initial wave packet consisting only of positive energy decomposed into several subpackets at the moments t = (m/n)T R , where T R is the revival time and m, n are the mutually prime integers. Besides, it is shown that the behavior of a wave packet containing the states of both energy bands (with E n > 0 and E n < 0) is more complicated. Such packet splits into two parts, which rotate with a cyclotron frequency in the opposite directions, and then experience collapse and revival. The structure of multipole electromagnetic radiation of these packets is analyzed.

  14. Evolution of a wave packet scattered by a one-dimensional potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatrian, A Zh; Alexanyan, Al G; Khoetsyan, V A; Alexanyan, N A

    2013-06-30

    We consider the evolution of a wave packet that is made up of a group of the wave functions describing the stationary scattering process and tunnels through a one-dimensional potential of arbitrary form. As the main characteristics of the time difference of the tunnelling process, use is made of the propagation speed of the wave-packet maximum. We show that the known Hartman formula for the tunnelling time corresponds to the wave packet with a wavenumber-uniform spectral composition in the case, when the phase and transmission coefficient modulus dispersions are taken into account only in the linear approximation. The amplitude of the main peak of the transmitted wave intensity is proven to be independent of the tunnelling time and is determined by the transmission coefficient of the spectral component at the carrier frequency and the spectral width of the wave packet. In the limit of an infinitely wide potential barrier the amplitude of the wave-packet maximum is shown to tend to zero slower than the tunnelling time tends to its asymptotic value, i.e., indeed we deal with the paradox of an infinitely large propagation speed of a wave disturbance through the barrier. (propagation of wave fronts)

  15. Evolution of a wave packet scattered by a one-dimensional potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachatrian, A Zh; Alexanyan, Al G; Khoetsyan, V A; Alexanyan, N A

    2013-01-01

    We consider the evolution of a wave packet that is made up of a group of the wave functions describing the stationary scattering process and tunnels through a one-dimensional potential of arbitrary form. As the main characteristics of the time difference of the tunnelling process, use is made of the propagation speed of the wave-packet maximum. We show that the known Hartman formula for the tunnelling time corresponds to the wave packet with a wavenumber-uniform spectral composition in the case, when the phase and transmission coefficient modulus dispersions are taken into account only in the linear approximation. The amplitude of the main peak of the transmitted wave intensity is proven to be independent of the tunnelling time and is determined by the transmission coefficient of the spectral component at the carrier frequency and the spectral width of the wave packet. In the limit of an infinitely wide potential barrier the amplitude of the wave-packet maximum is shown to tend to zero slower than the tunnelling time tends to its asymptotic value, i.e., indeed we deal with the paradox of an infinitely large propagation speed of a wave disturbance through the barrier. (propagation of wave fronts)

  16. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics of wave packets with stochastic incorporation of Vlasov equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Akira; Horiuchi, Hisashi.

    1996-01-01

    The first purpose of this report is to present an extended AMD model which can generally describe such minor branching processes by removing the restriction on the one-body distribution function. This is done not by generalizing the wave packets to arbitrary single-particle wave functions but by representing the diffused and/or deformed wave packet as an ensemble of Gaussian wave packets. In other words, stochastic displacements are given to the wave packets in phase space so that the ensemble-average of the time evolution of the one-body distribution function is essentially equivalent to the solution of Vlasov equation which does not have any restriction on the shape of wave packets. This new model is called AMD-V. Although AMD-V is equivalent to Vlasov equation in the instantaneous time evolution of the one-body distribution function for an AMD wave function, AMD-V describes the branching into channels and the fluctuation of the mean field which are caused by the spreading or the splitting of the single-particle wave function. The second purpose of this report is to show the drastic effect of this new stochastic process of wave packet splitting on the dynamics of heavy ion collisions, especially in the fragmentation mechanism. We take the 40 Ca + 40 Ca system at the incident energy 35 MeV/nucleon. It will be shown that the reproduction of data by the AMD-V calculation is surprisingly good. We will see that the effect of the wave packet diffusion is crucially important to remove the spurious binary feature of the AMD calculation and to enable the multi-fragment final state. (J.P.N.)

  17. Self-action of Bessel wave packets in a system of coupled light guides and formation of light bullets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakin, A. A., E-mail: balakin.alexey@yandex.ru; Mironov, V. A.; Skobelev, S. A., E-mail: sk.sa1981@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The self-action of two-dimensional and three-dimensional Bessel wave packets in a system of coupled light guides is considered using the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The features of the self-action of such wave fields are related to their initial strong spatial inhomogeneity. The numerical simulation shows that for the field amplitude exceeding a critical value, the development of an instability typical of a medium with the cubic nonlinearity is observed. Various regimes are studied: the self-channeling of a wave beam in one light guide at powers not strongly exceeding a critical value, the formation of the “kaleidoscopic” picture of a wave packet during the propagation of higher-power radiation along a stratified medium, the formation of light bullets during competition between self-focusing and modulation instabilities in the case of three-dimensional wave packets, etc. In the problem of laser pulse shortening, the situation is considered when the wave-field stratification in the transverse direction dominates. This process is accompanied by the self-compression of laser pulses in well enough separated light guides. The efficiency of conversion of the initial Bessel field distribution to two flying parallel light bullets is about 50%.

  18. Comparison of a noncausal with a causal relativistic wave-packet evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.N. de; Jabs, A.

    1991-01-01

    In order to study causality violation in more detail we contrast the Klein-Gordon wave packet of Rosenstein und Usher with the Dirac wave packet of Bakke and Wergeland. Both packets are initially localized with exponentially bounded tails but just outside the condition of the general Hegerfeldt theorem for causality violation. It turns out that the wave packet of Bakke and Wergeland exhibits all the features investigated by Rosenstein and Usher, except that it never violates relativistic causality. Thus none of those features, in particular the back- and forerunners emerging from the light cone, can be held responsible for causality violation, and the Ruijsenaars integral is not necessarily a measure of the amount of causality violation. (orig.)

  19. Production and manipulation of wave packets from ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Winter, Nils

    2013-01-01

    of the system. The modulation technique also allows for a controllable transfer (deexcitation) of atoms from such wave packets to a state bound by the lattice. Thus, it acts as a beam splitter for matter waves that can selectively address different bands, enabling the preparation of atoms in localized states...

  20. Review of inelastic losses of UCN and quantum mechanics of the de Broglie wave packet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatovich, V.K.; Utsuro, M.

    1998-01-01

    Different inelastic processes of ultracold neutrons (UCN) losses in traps are considered. A hypothesis of the de Broglie singular wave-packet description of the neutron wave-function to explain anomalous losses of UCN is proposed. An experiment to check the hypothesis and its results are discussed

  1. Phase Structure of Strong-Field Tunneling Wave Packets from Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Ming; Li, Min; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; Staudte, André; Liu, Yunquan

    2016-04-22

    We study the phase structure of the tunneling wave packets from strong-field ionization of molecules and present a molecular quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo model to describe the laser-driven dynamics of photoelectron momentum distributions of molecules. Using our model, we reproduce and explain the alignment-dependent molecular frame photoelectron spectra of strong-field tunneling ionization of N_{2} reported by M. Meckel et al. [Nat. Phys. 10, 594 (2014)]. In addition to modeling the low-energy photoelectron angular distributions quantitatively, we extract the phase structure of strong-field molecular tunneling wave packets, shedding light on its physical origin. The initial phase of the tunneling wave packets at the tunnel exit depends on both the initial transverse momentum distribution and the molecular internuclear distance. We further show that the ionizing molecular orbital has a critical effect on the initial phase of the tunneling wave packets. The phase structure of the photoelectron wave packet is a key ingredient for modeling strong-field molecular photoelectron holography, high-harmonic generation, and molecular orbital imaging.

  2. Extracting continuum information from Ψ(t) in time-dependent wave-packet calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, L. B.; Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Kjeldsen, T. K.; Fernandez, J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory of measurement projection operators in grid-based time-dependent wave-packet calculations involving electronic continua in atoms and molecules is discussed. A hierarchy of projection operators relevant in their individual restricted configuration spaces is presented. At asymptotically large distances from the scattering or interaction center the projection operators involve plane waves only. To reach this asymptotic regime, however, large propagation times and large boxes may be required. At somewhat smaller distances from the scattering center, the projection operators are expressed in terms of analytical single-center Coulomb scattering waves with incoming wave boundary conditions. If propagation of the wave packet to these asymptotic regimes is impeded, the projection operators involve the exact scattering states which are not readily available in the wave-packet calculation and hence must be supplied by an additional, typically very demanding, calculation. The present approach suggests an exact way of analyzing the timely problem of the one-electron continuum in nonperturbative calculations. A key feature is that the propagated wave packet includes every interaction of the full Hamiltonian. The practicality of the proposed method is illustrated by the nontrivial example of strong-field ionization of the molecular hydrogen ion. Finally, the extension of the presented ideas to single and double ionization of two-electron systems is discussed

  3. Long-term evolution and revival structure of Rydberg wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, R.

    1995-01-01

    It is known that, after formation, a Rydberg wave packet undergoes a series of collapses and revivals within a time period called the revival time, t rev , at the end of which it is close to its original shape. We study the behavior of Rydberg wave packets on time scales much greater than t rev . We show that after a few revival cycles the wave packet ceases to reform at multiples of the revival time. Instead, a new series of collapses and revivals commences, culminating after a time period t sr >>t rev with the formation of a wave packet that more closely resembles the initial packet than does the full revival at time t rev . Furthermore, at times that are rational fractions of t sr , the square of the autocorrelation function exhibits large peaks with periodicities that can be expressed as fractions of the revival time t rev . These periodicities indicate a new type of fractional revival occurring for times much greater than t rev . A theoretical explanation of these effects is outlined. ((orig.))

  4. Extended wave-packet model to calculate energy-loss moments of protons in matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archubi, C. D.; Arista, N. R.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we introduce modifications to the wave-packet method proposed by Kaneko to calculate the energy-loss moments of a projectile traversing a target which is represented in terms of Gaussian functions for the momentum distributions of electrons in the atomic shells. These modifications are introduced using the Levine and Louie technique to take into account the energy gaps corresponding to the different atomic levels of the target. We use the extended wave-packet model to evaluate the stopping power, the energy straggling, the inverse mean free path, and the ionization cross sections for protons in several targets, obtaining good agreements for all these quantities on an extensive energy range that covers low-, intermediate-, and high-energy regions. The extended wave-packet model proposed here provides a method to calculate in a very straightforward way all the significant terms of the inelastic interaction of light ions with any element of the periodic table.

  5. Steering dissociation of Br2 molecules with two femtosecond pulses via wave packet interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong-Chang; Yuan, Kai-Jun; Hu, Wen-Hui; Yan, Tian-Min; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2008-04-07

    The dissociation dynamics of Br2 molecules induced by two femtosecond pump pulses are studied based on the calculation of time-dependent quantum wave packet. Perpendicular transition from X 1Sigma g+ to A 3Pi 1u+ and 1Pi 1u+ and parallel transition from X 1Sigma g+ to B 3Pi 0u+, involving two product channels Br (2P3/2)+Br (2P3/2) and Br (2P3/2)+Br* (2P1/2), respectively, are taken into account. Two pump pulses create dissociating wave packets interfering with each other. By varying laser parameters, the interference of dissociating wave packets can be controlled, and the dissociation probabilities of Br2 molecules on the three excited states can be changed to different degrees. The branching ratio of Br*/(Br+Br*) is calculated as a function of pulse delay time and phase difference.

  6. On the definition of the momentum of an Alfven wave packet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudik, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    The different definitions of the momentum of a wave disturbance are considered, corresponding to the invariance of the Lagrangian with respect to different kinds of translation in magnetohydrodynamics. It is shown that the value of the momentum of an Alfven wave packet calculated using the definition accepted in the electrodynamics of continuous media is not the same as the total momentum of the particles in the medium and the electromagnetic field in the region within which the packet is localized. 5 refs., 2 figs

  7. Wave packet fractional revivals in a one-dimensional Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veilande, Rita; Bersons, Imants

    2007-01-01

    We investigate many characteristic features of revival and fractional revival phenomena via derived analytic expressions for an autocorrelation function of a one-dimensional Rydberg atom with weighting probabilities modelled by a Gaussian or a Lorentzian distribution. The fractional revival phenomenon in the ionization probabilities of a one-dimensional Rydberg atom irradiated by two short half-cycle pulses is also studied. When many states are involved in the formation of the wave packet, the revival is lower and broader than the initial wave packet and the fractional revivals overlap and disappear with time

  8. High-order-harmonic generation from solids: The contributions of the Bloch wave packets moving at the group and phase velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tao-Yuan; Huang, Xiao-Huan; Bian, Xue-Bin

    2018-01-01

    We study numerically the Bloch electron wave-packet dynamics in periodic potentials to simulate laser-solid interactions. We introduce an alternative perspective in the coordinate space combined with the motion of the Bloch electron wave packets moving at group and phase velocities under the laser fields. This model interprets the origins of the two contributions (intra- and interband transitions) in the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) processes by investigating the local and global behaviours of the wave packets. It also elucidates the underlying physical picture of the HHG intensity enhancement by means of carrier-envelope phase, chirp, and inhomogeneous fields. It provides a deep insight into the emission of high-order harmonics from solids. This model is instructive for experimental measurements and provides an alternative avenue to distinguish mechanisms of the HHG from solids in different laser fields.

  9. Resonant tunneling of spin-wave packets via quantized states in potential wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ulf-Hendrik; Gatzen, Marius; Demidov, Vladislav E; Demokritov, Sergej O

    2007-09-21

    We have studied the tunneling of spin-wave pulses through a system of two closely situated potential barriers. The barriers represent two areas of inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field, where the existence of spin waves is forbidden. We show that for certain values of the spin-wave frequency corresponding to the quantized spin-wave states existing in the well formed between the barriers, the tunneling has a resonant character. As a result, transmission of spin-wave packets through the double-barrier structure is much more efficient than the sequent tunneling through two single barriers.

  10. Apocrypha of standard scattering theory (SST) and quantum mechanics of the de Broglie wave packet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatovich, V.K.

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the Standard Scattering Theory (SST) does not correspond to the principles of Standard Quantum Mechanics (SQM). A more consistent theory is formulated. Some new results are obtained. Reflection and transmission of the de Broglie wave packet by thin layers of matter is considered

  11. Quantum spreading of a self-gravitating wave-packet in singularity free gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buoninfante, Luca; Lambiase, Gaetano; Mazumdar, Anupam

    In this paper we will study for the first time how the wave-packet of a self-gravitating meso-scopic system spreads in theories beyond Einstein’s general relativity. In particular, we will consider a ghost-free infinite derivative gravity, which resolves the 1 / r singularity in the potential – such

  12. Numerical study of the time evolution of a wave packet in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segura, J.; Fernandez de Cordoba, P.

    1993-01-01

    We solve the Schrodinger equation in order to study the time evolution of a wave packet in different situations of physical interest. This work illustrates, with pedagogical aim, some quantum phenomena which shock our classical conception of the universe: propagation in classically forbidden regions, energy quantization. (Author)

  13. Wave packet dynamics and photofragmentation in time-dependent quadratic potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1996-01-01

    We study the dynamics of generalized harmonic oscillator states in time-dependent quadratic potentials and derive analytical expressions for the momentum space and the Wigner phase space representation of these wave packets. Using these results we consider a model for the rotational excitation...

  14. Quantum Mechanics in the Gaussian wave-packet phase space representation: Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizrahi, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Heisenberg and Liouville dynamical equations are mapped using the Wave-Packet Phase Space Representation. A semiclassical perturbative expansion is introduced - the Quasi-Causal Approximation - for the Green function and an expression for transition probabilities is derived up to the first order. (Author) [pt

  15. Global time asymmetry as a consequence of a wave packets theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castagnino, Mario A.; Gueron, Jorge; Ordonez, Adolfo R.

    2002-01-01

    When t→∞ any wave packet in the Liouvillian representation of the density matrices becomes a Hardy class function from below. This fact, in the global frame of the Reichenbach diagram, is used to explain the observed global time asymmetry of the universe

  16. Quantum mechanical analysis of the equilateral triangle billiard: Periodic orbit theory and wave packet revivals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doncheski, M.A.; Robinett, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Using the fact that the energy eigenstates of the equilateral triangle infinite well (or billiard) are available in closed form, we examine the connections between the energy eigenvalue spectrum and the classical closed paths in this geometry, using both periodic orbit theory and the short-term semi-classical behavior of wave packets. We also discuss wave packet revivals and show that there are exact revivals, for all wave packets, at times given by T rev =9μa 2 /4(h/2π) where a and μ are the length of one side and the mass of the point particle, respectively. We find additional cases of exact revivals with shorter revival times for zero-momentum wave packets initially located at special symmetry points inside the billiard. Finally, we discuss simple variations on the equilateral (60 deg. -60 deg. -60 deg. ) triangle, such as the half equilateral (30 deg. -60 deg. -90 deg.) triangle and other 'foldings', which have related energy spectra and revival structures

  17. Initial Dynamics of The Norrish Type I Reaction in Acetone: Probing Wave Packet Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y.; Sølling, Theis I.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2011-01-01

    The Norrish Type I reaction in the S1 (nπ*) state of acetone is a prototype case of ketone photochemistry. On the basis of results from time-resolved mass spectrometry (TRMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) experiments, it was recently suggested that after excitation the wave packet travels...

  18. Effects of delayed nonlinear response on wave packet dynamics in one-dimensional generalized Fibonacci chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianxin; Zhang, Zhenjun; Tong, Peiqing

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spreading of an initially localized wave packet in one-dimensional generalized Fibonacci (GF) lattices by solving numerically the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLSE) with a delayed cubic nonlinear term. It is found that for short delay time, the wave packet is self-trapping in first class of GF lattices, that is, the second moment grows with time, but the corresponding participation number does not grow. However, both the second moment and the participation number grow with time for large delay time. This illuminates that the wave packet is delocalized. For the second class of GF lattices, the dynamic behaviors of wave packet depend on the strength of on-site potential. For a weak on-site potential, the results are similar to the case of the first class. For a strong on-site potential, both the second moment and the participation number does not grow with time in the regime of short delay time. In the regime of large delay time, both the second moment and the participation number exhibit stair-like growth

  19. Frame properties of wave packet systes in L^2 (R^d)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Rahimi, Asghar

    2008-01-01

    Extending work by Hernandez, Labate and Weiss, we present a sufficent condition for a generalized shift-invariant system to be a Bessel sequence or even a frame forL(2)(R-d). In particular, this leads to a sufficient condition for a wave packet system to form a frame. On the other hand, we show...

  20. Monte Carlo Wave Packet Theory of Dissociative Double Ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Henriette Astrup; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Mølmer, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in strong-field double ionization processes is predicted using a stochastic Monte Carlo wave packet technique. Using input from electronic structure calculations and strong-field electron dynamics the description allows for field-dressed dynamics within a given molecule as well...

  1. Effects of delayed nonlinear response on wave packet dynamics in one-dimensional generalized Fibonacci chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianxin; Zhang, Zhenjun [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Tong, Peiqing, E-mail: pqtong@njnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Numerical Simulation of Large Scale Complex Systems, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spreading of an initially localized wave packet in one-dimensional generalized Fibonacci (GF) lattices by solving numerically the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLSE) with a delayed cubic nonlinear term. It is found that for short delay time, the wave packet is self-trapping in first class of GF lattices, that is, the second moment grows with time, but the corresponding participation number does not grow. However, both the second moment and the participation number grow with time for large delay time. This illuminates that the wave packet is delocalized. For the second class of GF lattices, the dynamic behaviors of wave packet depend on the strength of on-site potential. For a weak on-site potential, the results are similar to the case of the first class. For a strong on-site potential, both the second moment and the participation number does not grow with time in the regime of short delay time. In the regime of large delay time, both the second moment and the participation number exhibit stair-like growth.

  2. Dynamics of coupled plasmon polariton wave packets excited at a subwavelength slit in optically thin metal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei-Ming; Zhang, Lingxiao; Seideman, Tamar; Petek, Hrvoje

    2012-10-01

    We study by numerical simulations the excitation and propagation dynamics of coupled surface plasmon polariton (SPP) wave packets (WPs) in optically thin Ag films and a bulk Ag/vacuum interface under the illumination of a subwavelength slit by 400 nm continuous wave (cw) and femtosecond pulsed light. The generated surface fields include contributions from both SPPs and quasicylindrical waves, which dominate in different regimes. We explore aspects of the coupled SPP modes in Ag thin films, including symmetry, propagation, attenuation, and the variation of coupling with incident angle and film thickness. Simulations of the electromagnetic transients initiated with femtosecond pulses reveal new features of coupled SPP WP generation and propagation in thin Ag films. Our results show that, under pulsed excitation, the SPP modes in an Ag thin film break up into two distinct bound surface wave packets characterized by marked differences in symmetries, group velocities, attenuation lengths, and dispersion properties. The nanometer spatial and femtosecond temporal scale excitation and propagation dynamics of the coupled SPP WPs are revealed in detail by movies recording the evolution of their transient field distributions.

  3. Wave-packet treatment of reactor neutrino oscillation experiments and its implications on determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Yat-Long; Chu, M.C.; Xu, Jianyi [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Physics, Shatin (China); Tsui, Ka Ming [University of Tokyo, RCCN, ICRR, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Wong, Chan Fai [Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-06-15

    We derive the neutrino flavor transition probabilities with the neutrino treated as a wave packet. The decoherence and dispersion effects from the wave-packet treatment show up as damping and phase-shifting of the plane-wave neutrino oscillation patterns. If the energy uncertainty in the initial neutrino wave packet is larger than around 0.01 of the neutrino energy, the decoherence and dispersion effects would degrade the sensitivity of reactor neutrino experiments to mass hierarchy measurement to lower than 3 σ confidence level. (orig.)

  4. Understanding the spreading of a Gaussian wave packet using the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ploiting the machinery of the Bohmian model of quantum mechanics, the way the wave ... inexactness of quantum theory seems to be eliminated by ensuring a ... In this paper, keeping aside the subtle conceptual debates concerning the.

  5. Quantum dynamics of solid Ne upon photo-excitation of a NO impurity: A Gaussian wave packet approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unn-Toc, W.; Meier, C.; Halberstadt, N.; Uranga-Piña, Ll.; Rubayo-Soneira, J.

    2012-01-01

    A high-dimensional quantum wave packet approach based on Gaussian wave packets in Cartesian coordinates is presented. In this method, the high-dimensional wave packet is expressed as a product of time-dependent complex Gaussian functions, which describe the motion of individual atoms. It is applied to the ultrafast geometrical rearrangement dynamics of NO doped cryogenic Ne matrices after femtosecond laser pulse excitation. The static deformation of the solid due to the impurity as well as the dynamical response after femtosecond excitation are analyzed and compared to reduced dimensionality studies. The advantages and limitations of this method are analyzed in the perspective of future applications to other quantum solids.

  6. Quantum dynamics of solid Ne upon photo-excitation of a NO impurity: A Gaussian wave packet approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unn-Toc, W.; Meier, C.; Halberstadt, N. [Laboratoire Collisions Agregats et Reactivite, IRSAMC, UMR CNRS 5589, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France); Uranga-Pina, Ll. [Laboratoire Collisions Agregats et Reactivite, IRSAMC, UMR CNRS 5589, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France); Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de la Habana, San Lazaro y L, Vedado, 10400 La Habana (Cuba); Rubayo-Soneira, J. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Habana 10600, AP 6163 La Habana (Cuba)

    2012-08-07

    A high-dimensional quantum wave packet approach based on Gaussian wave packets in Cartesian coordinates is presented. In this method, the high-dimensional wave packet is expressed as a product of time-dependent complex Gaussian functions, which describe the motion of individual atoms. It is applied to the ultrafast geometrical rearrangement dynamics of NO doped cryogenic Ne matrices after femtosecond laser pulse excitation. The static deformation of the solid due to the impurity as well as the dynamical response after femtosecond excitation are analyzed and compared to reduced dimensionality studies. The advantages and limitations of this method are analyzed in the perspective of future applications to other quantum solids.

  7. Study of the wave packet treatment of neutrino oscillation at Daya Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, F.P. [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China). Inst. of Modern Physics; Balantekin, A.B. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Band, H.R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Collaboration: Daya Bay Collaboration; and others

    2017-09-15

    The disappearance of reactor anti ν{sub e} observed by the Daya Bay experiment is examined in the framework of a model in which the neutrino is described by a wave packet with a relative intrinsic momentum dispersion σ{sub rel}. Three pairs of nuclear reactors and eight antineutrino detectors, each with good energy resolution, distributed among three experimental halls, supply a high-statistics sample of anti ν{sub e} acquired at nine different baselines. This provides a unique platform to test the effects which arise from the wave packet treatment of neutrino oscillation. The modified survival probability formula was used to fit Daya Bay data, providing the first experimental limits: 2.38 x 10{sup -17} < σ{sub rel} < 0.23. Treating the dimensions of the reactor cores and detectors as constraints, the limits are improved: 10{sup -14} or similar 10{sup -11} cm) is obtained. All limits correspond to a 95% C.L. Furthermore, the effect due to the wave packet nature of neutrino oscillation is found to be insignificant for reactor antineutrinos detected by the Daya Bay experiment thus ensuring an unbiased measurement of the oscillation parameters sin{sup 2}2θ{sub 13} and Δm{sup 2}{sub 32} within the plane wave model. (orig.)

  8. Study of the wave packet treatment of neutrino oscillation at Daya Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya Bay Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The disappearance of reactor \\bar{ν }_e observed by the Daya Bay experiment is examined in the framework of a model in which the neutrino is described by a wave packet with a relative intrinsic momentum dispersion σ _{rel}. Three pairs of nuclear reactors and eight antineutrino detectors, each with good energy resolution, distributed among three experimental halls, supply a high-statistics sample of \\bar{ν }_e acquired at nine different baselines. This provides a unique platform to test the effects which arise from the wave packet treatment of neutrino oscillation. The modified survival probability formula was used to fit Daya Bay data, providing the first experimental limits: 2.38 × 10^{-17}< σ _{rel} < 0.23. Treating the dimensions of the reactor cores and detectors as constraints, the limits are improved: 10^{-14} ≲ σ _ {rel} < 0.23, and an upper limit of σ _ {rel}<0.20 (which corresponds to σ _x ≳ 10^{-11} {cm }) is obtained. All limits correspond to a 95% C.L. Furthermore, the effect due to the wave packet nature of neutrino oscillation is found to be insignificant for reactor antineutrinos detected by the Daya Bay experiment thus ensuring an unbiased measurement of the oscillation parameters sin ^22θ _{13} and Δ m^2_{32} within the plane wave model.

  9. Quantum spreading of a self-gravitating wave-packet in singularity free gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buoninfante, Luca [Universita di Salerno, Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' E.R. Caianiello' ' , Fisciano (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy); University of Groningen, Van Swinderen Institute, Groningen (Netherlands); Lambiase, Gaetano [Universita di Salerno, Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' E.R. Caianiello' ' , Fisciano (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy); Mazumdar, Anupam [University of Groningen, Van Swinderen Institute, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2018-01-15

    In this paper we will study for the first time how the wave-packet of a self-gravitating meso-scopic system spreads in theories beyond Einstein's general relativity. In particular, we will consider a ghost-free infinite derivative gravity, which resolves the 1/r singularity in the potential - such that the gradient of the potential vanishes within the scale of non-locality. We will show that a quantum wave-packet spreads faster for a ghost-free and singularity-free gravity as compared to the Newtonian case, therefore providing us a unique scenario for testing classical and quantum properties of short-distance gravity in a laboratory in the near future. (orig.)

  10. Quantum spreading of a self-gravitating wave-packet in singularity free gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoninfante, Luca; Lambiase, Gaetano; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we will study for the first time how the wave-packet of a self-gravitating meso-scopic system spreads in theories beyond Einstein's general relativity. In particular, we will consider a ghost-free infinite derivative gravity, which resolves the 1 / r singularity in the potential - such that the gradient of the potential vanishes within the scale of non-locality. We will show that a quantum wave-packet spreads faster for a ghost-free and singularity-free gravity as compared to the Newtonian case, therefore providing us a unique scenario for testing classical and quantum properties of short-distance gravity in a laboratory in the near future.

  11. Time-Dependent Wave Packet Dynamics Calculations of Cross Sections for Ultracold Scattering of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiayu; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.; Krems, Roman V.

    2018-04-01

    Because the de Broglie wavelength of ultracold molecules is very large, the cross sections for collisions of molecules at ultracold temperatures are always computed by the time-independent quantum scattering approach. Here, we report the first accurate time-dependent wave packet dynamics calculation for reactive scattering of ultracold molecules. Wave packet dynamics calculations can be applied to molecular systems with more dimensions and provide real-time information on the process of bond rearrangement and/or energy exchange in molecular collisions. Our work thus makes possible the extension of rigorous quantum calculations of ultracold reaction properties to polyatomic molecules and adds a new powerful tool for the study of ultracold chemistry.

  12. Optimal reflection-free complex absorbing potentials for quantum propagation of wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemer, Oded; Brisker, Daria; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2005-01-01

    The conditions for optimal reflection-free complex-absorbing potentials (CAPs) are discussed. It is shown that the CAPs as derived from the smooth-exterior-scaling transformation of the Hamiltonian [J. Phys. B 31, 1431 (1998)] serve as optimal reflection-free CAPs (RF CAPs) in wave-packet propagation calculations of open systems. The initial wave packet, Φ(t=0), can be located in the interaction region (as in half collision experiments) where the CAPs have vanished or in the asymptote where V CAP ≠0. As we show, the optimal CAPs can be introduced also in the region where the physical potential has not vanished. The unavoided reflections due to the use of a finite number of grid points (or basis functions) are discussed. A simple way to reduce the 'edge-grid' reflection effect is described

  13. Space-time evolution of Gaussian wave packets through superlattices containing left-handed layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra, P; Romero-Serrano, M [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Mexico DF (Mexico); Robledo-Martinez, A, E-mail: ppereyra@correo.azc.uam.m, E-mail: a.robledo@mailaps.or [Departamento de EnergIa, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    We study the space-time evolution of Gaussian electromagnetic wave packets moving through (L/R){sup n} superlattices, containing alternating layers of left and right-handed materials. We show that the time spent by the wave packet moving through arbitrary (L/R){sup n} superlattices are well described by the phase time. We show that in the particular case where the thicknesses d{sub L,R} and indices n{sub l,r} of the layers satisfy the condition d{sub L}|n{sub L}| = d{sub R}n{sub R}, the usual band structure becomes a sequence of isolated and equidistant peaks with negative phase times.

  14. Characterizing the astrophysical S factor for 12C+12C fusion with wave-packet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis; Wiescher, Michael

    2018-05-01

    A quantitative study of the astrophysically important subbarrier fusion of 12C+12C is presented. Low-energy collisions are described in the body-fixed reference frame using wave-packet dynamics within a nuclear molecular picture. A collective Hamiltonian drives the time propagation of the wave packet through the collective potential-energy landscape. The fusion imaginary potential for specific dinuclear configurations is crucial for understanding the appearance of resonances in the fusion cross section. The theoretical subbarrier fusion cross sections explain some observed resonant structures in the astrophysical S factor. These cross sections monotonically decline towards stellar energies. The structures in the data that are not explained are possibly due to cluster effects in the nuclear molecule, which need to be included in the present approach.

  15. Wave packet revivals in a graphene quantum dot in a perpendicular magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J. J.; Romera, E.

    2010-01-01

    We study the time evolution of localized wave packets in graphene quantum dots in a perpendicular magnetic field, focusing on the quasiclassical and revival periodicities, for different values of the magnetic field intensities in a theoretical framework. We have considered contributions of the two inequivalent points in the Brillouin zone. The revival time has been found as an observable that shows the break valley degeneracy.

  16. Quantum wave packet revival in two-dimensional circular quantum wells with position-dependent mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G.M. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Polo Universitario de Volta Redonda-Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. dos Trabalhadores 420, Volta Redonda RJ, CEP 27255-125 (Brazil)], E-mail: agmschmidt@gmail.com; Azeredo, Abel D. [Departamento de Fisica-Universidade Federal de Roraima, Av. Cap. Ene Garcez 2413, Boa Vista RR, CEP 69304-000 (Brazil)], E-mail: aazeredo@gmail.com; Gusso, A. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas-Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, km 16 Rodovia Ilheus-Itabuna, Ilheus BA, CEP 45662-000 (Brazil)], E-mail: agusso@uesc.br

    2008-04-14

    We study quantum wave packet revivals on two-dimensional infinite circular quantum wells (CQWs) and circular quantum dots with position-dependent mass (PDM) envisaging a possible experimental realization. We consider CQWs with radially varying mass, addressing particularly the cases where M(r){proportional_to}r{sup w} with w=1,2, or -2. The two PDM Hamiltonians currently allowed by theory were analyzed and we were able to construct a strong theoretical argument favoring one of them.

  17. Quantum wave packet revival in two-dimensional circular quantum wells with position-dependent mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G.M.; Azeredo, Abel D.; Gusso, A.

    2008-01-01

    We study quantum wave packet revivals on two-dimensional infinite circular quantum wells (CQWs) and circular quantum dots with position-dependent mass (PDM) envisaging a possible experimental realization. We consider CQWs with radially varying mass, addressing particularly the cases where M(r)∝r w with w=1,2, or -2. The two PDM Hamiltonians currently allowed by theory were analyzed and we were able to construct a strong theoretical argument favoring one of them

  18. Wave packet dynamics, time scales and phase diagram in the IBM-Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaños, Octavio; de los Santos, Francisco; Yáñez, Rafael; Romera, Elvira

    2018-02-01

    We derive the phase diagram of a scalar two-level boson model by studying the equilibrium and stability properties of its energy surface. The plane of control parameters is enlarged with respect to previous studies. We then analyze the time evolution of wave packets centered around the ground state at various quantum phase transition boundary lines. In particular, classical and revival times are computed numerically.

  19. Massachusetts Bay - Internal wave packets digitized from SAR imagery and intersected with a bathymetrically derived slope surface

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This feature class contains internal wave packets digitized from SAR imagery and intersected with a bathymetrically derived slope surface for Massachusetts Bay. The...

  20. Following dynamic nuclear wave packets in N2,O2, and CO with few-cycle infrared pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, S.; Magrakvelidze, M.; Bocharova, I. A.; Ray, D.; Cao, W.; Li, H.; Wang, Z.; Laurent, G.; Thumm, U.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Cocke, C. L.; Znakovskaya, I.; Kling, M. F.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2011-01-01

    We study the evolution of nuclear wave packets launched in molecular nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon monoxide by intense 8-fs infrared pulses. We use velocity map imaging to measure the momentum of the ion fragments when these wave packets are interrogated by a second such pulse after a variable time delay. Both quasibound and dissociative wave packets are observed. For the former, measurements of bound-state oscillations are used to identify the participating states and, in some cases, extract properties of the relevant potential-energy surfaces. Vibrational structure is resolved in both energy and oscillation frequencies for the cations of oxygen and carbon monoxide, displaying the same quantum wave-packet motion in both energy and time domains. In addition, vibrational structure is seen in the dication of carbon monoxide in a situation where the energy resolution by itself is inadequate to resolve the structure.

  1. Following dynamic nuclear wave packets in N2,O2, and CO with few-cycle infrared pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, S.; Magrakvelidze, M.; Bocharova, I. A.; Ray, D.; Cao, W.; Znakovskaya, I.; Li, H.; Wang, Z.; Laurent, G.; Thumm, U.; Kling, M. F.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Cocke, C. L.

    2011-10-01

    We study the evolution of nuclear wave packets launched in molecular nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon monoxide by intense 8-fs infrared pulses. We use velocity map imaging to measure the momentum of the ion fragments when these wave packets are interrogated by a second such pulse after a variable time delay. Both quasibound and dissociative wave packets are observed. For the former, measurements of bound-state oscillations are used to identify the participating states and, in some cases, extract properties of the relevant potential-energy surfaces. Vibrational structure is resolved in both energy and oscillation frequencies for the cations of oxygen and carbon monoxide, displaying the same quantum wave-packet motion in both energy and time domains. In addition, vibrational structure is seen in the dication of carbon monoxide in a situation where the energy resolution by itself is inadequate to resolve the structure.

  2. Delocalization of charge and current in a chiral quasiparticle wave packet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Subhajit

    2018-03-01

    A chiral quasiparticle wave packet (c-QPWP) is defined as a conventional superposition of chiral quasiparticle states corresponding to an interacting electron system in two dimensions (2D) in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling (RSOC). I investigate its internal structure via studying the charge and the current densities within the first-order perturbation in the electron-electron interaction. It is found that the c-QPWP contains a localized charge which is less than the magnitude of the bare charge and the remaining charge resides at the system boundary. The amount of charge delocalized turns out to be inversely proportional to the degenerate Fermi velocity v0(=√{α2+2 μ /m }) when RSOC (with strength α ) is weak, and therefore externally tunable. For strong RSOC, the magnitudes of both the delocalized charge and the current further strongly depend on the direction of propagation of the wave packet. Both the charge and the current densities consist of an anisotropic r-2 tail away from the center of the wave packet. Possible implications of such delocalizations in real systems corresponding to 2D semiconductor heterostructure are also discussed within the context of particle injection experiments.

  3. Strong quantum violation of the gravitational weak equivalence principle by a non-Gaussian wave packet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, P; Majumdar, A S; Sinha, S; Home, D; Mousavi, S V; Mozaffari, M R

    2012-01-01

    The weak equivalence principle of gravity is examined at the quantum level in two ways. First, the position detection probabilities of particles described by a non-Gaussian wave packet projected upwards against gravity around the classical turning point and also around the point of initial projection are calculated. These probabilities exhibit mass dependence at both these points, thereby reflecting the quantum violation of the weak equivalence principle. Second, the mean arrival time of freely falling particles is calculated using the quantum probability current, which also turns out to be mass dependent. Such a mass dependence is shown to be enhanced by increasing the non-Gaussianity parameter of the wave packet, thus signifying a stronger violation of the weak equivalence principle through a greater departure from Gaussianity of the initial wave packet. The mass dependence of both the position detection probabilities and the mean arrival time vanishes in the limit of large mass. Thus, compatibility between the weak equivalence principle and quantum mechanics is recovered in the macroscopic limit of the latter. A selection of Bohm trajectories is exhibited to illustrate these features in the free fall case. (paper)

  4. Energy-flux characterization of conical and space-time coupled wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotti, A.; Couairon, A.; Faccio, D.; Trapani, P. Di

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the concept of energy density flux as a characterization tool for the propagation of ultrashort laser pulses with spatiotemporal coupling. In contrast with calculations for the Poynting vector, those for energy density flux are derived in the local frame moving at the velocity of the envelope of the wave packet under examination and do not need knowledge of the magnetic field. We show that the energy flux defined from a paraxial propagation equation follows specific geometrical connections with the phase front of the optical wave packet, which demonstrates that the knowledge of the phase fronts amounts to the measurement of the energy flux. We perform a detailed numerical study of the energy density flux in the particular case of conical waves, with special attention paid to stationary-envelope conical waves (X or O waves). A full characterization of linear conical waves is given in terms of their energy flux. We extend the definition of this concept to the case of nonlinear propagation in Kerr media with nonlinear losses.

  5. Generic short-time propagation of sharp-boundaries wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, E.; Marchewka, A.

    2005-11-01

    A general solution to the "shutter" problem is presented. The propagation of an arbitrary initially bounded wave function is investigated, and the general solution for any such function is formulated. It is shown that the exact solution can be written as an expression that depends only on the values of the function (and its derivatives) at the boundaries. In particular, it is shown that at short times (t << 2mx2/hbar, where x is the distance to the boundaries) the wave function propagation depends only on the wave function's values (or its derivatives) at the boundaries of the region. Finally, we generalize these findings to a non-singular wave function (i.e., for wave packets with finite-width boundaries) and suggest an experimental verification.

  6. Mean flow generated by an internal wave packet impinging on the interface between two layers of fluid with continuous density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, John P. [The University of New Hampshire, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kingsbury Hall, Durham, NH (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Internal waves propagating in an idealized two-layer atmosphere are studied numerically. The governing equations are the inviscid anelastic equations for a perfect gas atmosphere. The numerical formulation eliminates all variables in the linear terms except vertical velocity, which are then treated implicitly. Nonlinear terms are treated explicitly. The basic state is a two-layer flow with continuous density at the interface. Each layer has a unique constant for the Brunt-Vaeisaelae frequency. Waves are forced at the bottom of the domain, are periodic in the horizontal direction, and form a finite wave packet in the vertical. The results show that the wave packet forms a mean flow that is confined to the interface region that persists long after the wave packet has moved away. Large-amplitude waves are forced to break beneath the interface. (orig.)

  7. Propagation of arbitrary initial wave packets in a quantum parametric oscillator: Instability zones for higher order moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subhadip; Chattopadhyay, Rohitashwa; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2018-05-01

    We consider the dynamics of a particle in a parametric oscillator with a view to exploring any quantum feature of the initial wave packet that shows divergent (in time) behaviour for parameter values where the classical motion dynamics of the mean position is bounded. We use Ehrenfest's theorem to explore the dynamics of nth order moment which reduces exactly to a linear non autonomous differential equation of order n + 1. It is found that while the width and skewness of the packet is unbounded exactly in the zones where the classical motion is unbounded, the kurtosis of an initially non-gaussian wave packet can become infinitely large in certain additional zones. This implies that the shape of the wave packet can change drastically with time in these zones.

  8. Dynamics of an atomic wave packet in a standing-wave cavity field: A cavity-assisted single-atom detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chough, Young-Tak; Nha, Hyunchul; Kim, Sang Wook; An, Kyungwon; Youn, Sun-Hyun

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the single-atom detection system using an optical standing-wave cavity, from the viewpoint of the quantized center-of-mass motion of the atomic wave packet. We show that since the atom-field coupling strength depends upon the overlap integral of the atomic wave packet and the field mode function, the effect of the wave-packet spreading via the momentum exchange process brings about a significant effect in the detection efficiency. We find that, as a result, the detection efficiency is not sensitive to the individual atomic trajectory for reasonably slow atoms. We also address an interesting phenomenon of the atomic wave-packet splitting occurring when an atom passes through a node of the cavity field

  9. Dissipative Bohmian mechanics within the Caldirola–Kanai framework: A trajectory analysis of wave-packet dynamics in viscid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, A.S., E-mail: asanz@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martínez-Casado, R. [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Peñate-Rodríguez, H.C.; Rojas-Lorenzo, G. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias Aplicadas, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Quinta de Los Molinos, Plaza, La Habana 10600 (Cuba); Miret-Artés, S. [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Classical viscid media are quite common in our everyday life. However, we are not used to find such media in quantum mechanics, and much less to analyze their effects on the dynamics of quantum systems. In this regard, the Caldirola–Kanai time-dependent Hamiltonian constitutes an appealing model, accounting for friction without including environmental fluctuations (as it happens, for example, with quantum Brownian motion). Here, a Bohmian analysis of the associated friction dynamics is provided in order to understand how a hypothetical, purely quantum viscid medium would act on a wave packet from a (quantum) hydrodynamic viewpoint. To this purpose, a series of paradigmatic contexts have been chosen, such as the free particle, the motion under the action of a linear potential, the harmonic oscillator, or the superposition of two coherent wave packets. Apart from their analyticity, these examples illustrate interesting emerging behaviors, such as localization by “quantum freezing” or a particular type of quantum–classical correspondence. The reliability of the results analytically determined has been checked by means of numerical simulations, which has served to investigate other problems lacking of such analyticity (e.g., the coherent superpositions). - Highlights: • A dissipative Bohmian approach is developed within the Caldirola–Kanai model. • Some simple yet physically insightful systems are then studied analytically. • Dissipation leads to spatial localization in free-force regimes. • Under the action of linear forces, dissipation leads to uniform motion. • In harmonic potentials, the system decays unavoidable to the well minimum.

  10. Dissipative Bohmian mechanics within the Caldirola–Kanai framework: A trajectory analysis of wave-packet dynamics in viscid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, A.S.; Martínez-Casado, R.; Peñate-Rodríguez, H.C.; Rojas-Lorenzo, G.; Miret-Artés, S.

    2014-01-01

    Classical viscid media are quite common in our everyday life. However, we are not used to find such media in quantum mechanics, and much less to analyze their effects on the dynamics of quantum systems. In this regard, the Caldirola–Kanai time-dependent Hamiltonian constitutes an appealing model, accounting for friction without including environmental fluctuations (as it happens, for example, with quantum Brownian motion). Here, a Bohmian analysis of the associated friction dynamics is provided in order to understand how a hypothetical, purely quantum viscid medium would act on a wave packet from a (quantum) hydrodynamic viewpoint. To this purpose, a series of paradigmatic contexts have been chosen, such as the free particle, the motion under the action of a linear potential, the harmonic oscillator, or the superposition of two coherent wave packets. Apart from their analyticity, these examples illustrate interesting emerging behaviors, such as localization by “quantum freezing” or a particular type of quantum–classical correspondence. The reliability of the results analytically determined has been checked by means of numerical simulations, which has served to investigate other problems lacking of such analyticity (e.g., the coherent superpositions). - Highlights: • A dissipative Bohmian approach is developed within the Caldirola–Kanai model. • Some simple yet physically insightful systems are then studied analytically. • Dissipation leads to spatial localization in free-force regimes. • Under the action of linear forces, dissipation leads to uniform motion. • In harmonic potentials, the system decays unavoidable to the well minimum

  11. Determining the wavelength of Langmuir wave packets at the Earth's bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Krasnoselskikh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of Langmuir waves in plasmas is known to be sensitive to density fluctuations. Such fluctuations may lead to the coexistence of wave pairs that have almost opposite wave-numbers in the vicinity of their reflection points. Using high frequency electric field measurements from the WIND satellite, we determine for the first time the wavelength of intense Langmuir wave packets that are generated upstream of the Earth's electron foreshock by energetic electron beams. Surprisingly, the wavelength is found to be 2 to 3 times larger than the value expected from standard theory. These values are consistent with the presence of strong inhomogeneities in the solar wind plasma rather than with the effect of weak beam instabilities.

  12. DRI internal Wave Simulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, Stephen A; Levine, Murray D

    2005-01-01

    .... A processing module is developed that takes profile estimates as input and uses numerically simulated linear internal wave displacements to create two-dimensional range-dependent sound speed fields...

  13. Quantum wave packet dynamics with trajectories: Implementation with distributed approximating functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyatt, Robert E.; Kouri, Donald J.; Hoffman, David K.

    2000-01-01

    The quantum trajectory method (QTM) was recently developed to solve the hydrodynamic equations of motion in the Lagrangian, moving-with-the-fluid, picture. In this approach, trajectories are integrated for N fluid elements (particles) moving under the influence of both the force from the potential surface and from the quantum potential. In this study, distributed approximating functionals (DAFs) are used on a uniform grid to compute the necessary derivatives in the equations of motion. Transformations between the physical grid where the particle coordinates are defined and the uniform grid are handled through a Jacobian, which is also computed using DAFs. A difficult problem associated with computing derivatives on finite grids is the edge problem. This is handled effectively by using DAFs within a least squares approach to extrapolate from the known function region into the neighboring regions. The QTM-DAF is then applied to wave packet transmission through a one-dimensional Eckart potential. Emphasis is placed upon computation of the transmitted density and wave function. A problem that develops when part of the wave packet reflects back into the reactant region is avoided in this study by introducing a potential ramp to sweep the reflected particles away from the barrier region. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  14. Attosecond ionization gating for isolated attosecond electron wave packet and broadband attosecond xuv pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Pengfei; Lu Peixiang; Cao Wei; Li Yuhua; Wang Xinlin

    2007-01-01

    An attosecond ionization gating is achieved using a few-cycle laser pulse in combination with its second harmonic. With this gating, the generation of the electron wave packet (EWP) is coherently controlled, and an isolated EWP of about 270 as is generated. An isolated broadband attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulse with a bandwidth of about 75 eV can also be generated using this gating, which can be used for EWP measurements as efficiently as a 50-as pulse, allowing one to measure a wide range of ultrafast dynamics not normally accessible before

  15. Probability distribution of wave packet delay time for strong overlapping of resonance levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyuboshits, V.L.

    1983-01-01

    Time behaviour of nuclear reactions in the case of high level densities is investigated basing on the theory of overlapping resonances. In the framework of a model of n equivalent channels an analytical expression is obtained for the probability distribution function for wave packet delay time at the compound nucleus production. It is shown that at strong overlapping of the resonance levels the relative fluctuation of the delay time is small at the stage of compound nucleus production. A possible increase in the duration of nuclear reactions with the excitation energy rise is discussed

  16. The coupled three-dimensional wave packet approach to reactive scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Nikola; Billing, Gert D.

    1994-01-01

    A recently developed scheme for time-dependent reactive scattering calculations using three-dimensional wave packets is applied to the D+H2 system. The present method is an extension of a previously published semiclassical formulation of the scattering problem and is based on the use of hyperspherical coordinates. The convergence requirements are investigated by detailed calculations for total angular momentum J equal to zero and the general applicability of the method is demonstrated by solving the J=1 problem. The inclusion of the geometric phase is also discussed and its effect on the reaction probability is demonstrated.

  17. Wave packet interferometry and quantum state reconstruction by acousto-optic phase modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekavec, Patrick F.; Dyke, Thomas R.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2006-01-01

    Studies of wave packet dynamics often involve phase-selective measurements of coherent optical signals generated from sequences of ultrashort laser pulses. In wave packet interferometry (WPI), the separation between the temporal envelopes of the pulses must be precisely monitored or maintained. Here we introduce a new (and easy to implement) experimental scheme for phase-selective measurements that combines acousto-optic phase modulation with ultrashort laser excitation to produce an intensity-modulated fluorescence signal. Synchronous detection, with respect to an appropriately constructed reference, allows the signal to be simultaneously measured at two phases differing by 90 deg. Our method effectively decouples the relative temporal phase from the pulse envelopes of a collinear train of optical pulse pairs. We thus achieve a robust and high signal-to-noise scheme for WPI applications, such as quantum state reconstruction and electronic spectroscopy. The validity of the method is demonstrated, and state reconstruction is performed, on a model quantum system - atomic Rb vapor. Moreover, we show that our measurements recover the correct separation between the absorptive and dispersive contributions to the system susceptibility

  18. The role of ro-vibrational coupling in the revival dynamics of diatomic molecular wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerji, J; Ghosh, Suranjana

    2006-01-01

    We study the revival and fractional revivals of a diatomic molecular wave packet of circular states whose weighing coefficients are peaked about a vibrational quantum number ν-bar and a rotational quantum number j-bar. Furthermore, we show that the interplay between the rotational and vibrational motion is determined by a parameter γ =√D/C, where D is the dissociation energy and C is inversely proportional to the reduced mass of the two nuclei. Using I 2 and H 2 as examples, we show, both analytically and visually (through animations), that for γ>>ν-bar, j-bar, the rotational and vibrational time scales are so far apart that the ro-vibrational motion gets decoupled and the revival dynamics depends essentially on one time scale. For γ∼ν-bar, j-bar, on the other hand, the evolution of the wave packet depends crucially on both the rotational and vibrational time scales of revival. In the latter case, an interesting rotational-vibrational fractional revival is predicted and explained

  19. Preparing isolated vibrational wave packets with light-induced molecular potentials by chirped laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatasescu, Mihaela

    2012-05-01

    We consider a specific wave packet preparation arising from the control of tunneling in the 0g-(6s,6p3/2) double well potential of a Cs2 cold molecule with chirped laser pulses. Such a possibility to manipulate the population dynamics in the 0g-(6s,6p3/2) potential appears in a pump-dump scheme designed to form cold molecules by photoassociation of two cold cesium atoms. The initial population in the 0g-(6s,6p3/2) double well is a wave packet prepared in the outer well at large interatomic distances (94 a0) by a photoassociation step with a first chirped pulse, being a superposition of several vibrational states whose energies surround the energy of a tunneling resonance. Our present work is focused on a second delayed chirped pulse, coupling the 0g-(6s,6p3/2) surface with the a3Σu+(6s,6s) one in the zone of the double well barrier (15 a0) and creating deeply bound cold molecules in the a3Σu+(6s,6s) state. We explore the parameters choice (intensity, duration, chirp rate and sign) for this second pulse, showing that picoseconds pulses with a negative chirp can lead to trapping of population in the inner well in strongly bound vibrational states, out of the resonant tunneling able to transfer it back to the outer well.

  20. On the Quantum Potential and Pulsating Wave Packet in the Harmonic Oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental mathematical formalism related to the Quantum Potential factor, Q, is presented in this paper. The Schroedinger equation can be transformed to two equations depending on a group velocity and a density of presence of the particle. A factor, in these equations, was called ''Quantum Potential'' by D. Bohm and B. Hiley. In 1999, I demonstrated that this Quantum Potential, Q, can be split in two Quantum Potentials, Q 1 , and Q 2 , for which the relation, Q=Q 1 +Q 2 , holds. These two Quantum Potentials depend on a fundamental new variable, what I called a phase velocity, u, directly related to the probability density of presence of the wave-particle, given by the modulus of the wave function. This paper gives some further developments for explaining the Quantum Potential for oscillating and pulsating Gaussian wave packets in the Harmonic Oscillator. It is shown that the two Quantum Potentials play a central role in the interpretation of quantum mechanics. A breakthrough in the formalism of the Quantum Mechanics could be provoked by the physical properties of these Quantum Potentials. The probability density of presence of the oscillating and pulsating Gaussian wave packets in the Harmonic Oscillator is directly depending on the ratio Q 2 /Q 1 of the two Quantum Potentials. In the general case, the energy of these Gaussian wave packets is not constant, but is oscillating. The energy is given by the sum of the kinetic energy, T, the potential energy, V, and the two Quantum Potentials: E=T+V+Q 1 +Q 2 . For some conditions, given in the paper, the energy can be a constant. The first remarkable result is the fact that the first Quantum Potential, Q 1 , is related to the ground state energy, E 0 , of the Quantum Harmonic Oscillator: Q 1 =h-bar ω/2=E 0 . The second result is related to the property of the second Quantum Potential, Q 2 , which plays the role of an anti-potential, Q 2 =-V(x), where V is the harmonic oscillator potential. This Quantum Potential

  1. Steering wave packet dynamics and population transfer between electronic states of the Na2 molecule by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Kaijun; Sun Zhigang; Cong Shulin; Wang Senming; Yu Jie; Lou Nanquan

    2005-01-01

    An approach used for steering the wave packet dynamics and the population transfer between electronic states of the Na 2 molecule by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses is demonstrated. Four controlling schemes, i.e., four different combinations of time delays (intuitive and counterintuitive sequences) and frequency detunings (positive and negative detunings), are discussed in detail. The light-induced potentials are used to describe the wave packet dynamics and population transfer. The numerical results show that the wave packet excited by femtosecond laser pulses oscillates drastically on 2 1 Π g state with time. The efficiency of controlling population transfer from the X 1 Σ g + to2 1 Π g states of Na 2 is nearly 100% for the schemes of the counterintuitive sequence pulses with positive and negative detunings

  2. Tracking nuclear wave-packet dynamics in molecular oxygen ions with few-cycle infrared laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, S.; Bocharova, I. A.; Magrakvelidze, M.; Ray, D.; Cao, W.; Thumm, U.; Cocke, C. L.; Bergues, B.; Kling, M. F.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2010-01-01

    We have tracked nuclear wave-packet dynamics in doubly charged states of molecular oxygen using few-cycle infrared laser pulses. Bound and dissociating wave packets were launched and subsequently probed via a pair of 8-fs pulses of 790 nm radiation. Ionic fragments from the dissociating molecules were monitored by velocity-map imaging. Pronounced oscillations in the delay-dependent kinetic energy release spectra were observed. The occurrence of vibrational revivals permits us to identify the potential curves of the O 2 dication which are most relevant to the molecular dynamics. These studies show the accessibility to the dynamics of such higher-charged molecules.

  3. Quantum solitonic wave-packet of a meso-scopic system in singularity free gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoninfante, Luca; Lambiase, Gaetano; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2018-06-01

    In this paper we will discuss how to localise a quantum wave-packet due to self-gravitating meso-scopic object by taking into account gravitational self-interaction in the Schrödinger equation beyond General Relativity. In particular, we will study soliton-like solutions in infinite derivative ghost free theories of gravity, which resolves the gravitational 1 / r singularity in the potential. We will show a unique feature that the quantum spread of such a gravitational system is larger than that of the Newtonian gravity, therefore enabling us a window of opportunity to test classical and quantum properties of such theories of gravity in the near future at a table-top experiment.

  4. Control and dynamics of attosecond electron wave packets in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, P.; Remetter, T.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier; Lopez-Martens, R.; Valentin, C.; Balcou, P.; Kazamias, S.; Mauritsson, J.; Gaarde, M.B.; Schafer, K.J.; Mairess, Y.; Wabnitz, H.; Boutu, W.; Salieres, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Trains of attosecond pulses, emerging from the phase-locking of high-order harmonics generated in a strong laser field are now being routinely produced and characterized in a few laser laboratories. Attosecond pulse trains (APTs) are flexible attosecond sources, since the amplitude and relative phase of the spectral components (the harmonics) can be tailored, allowing us to vary both the duration and the carrier frequency of the pulses. Attosecond pulses interacting with a gas of atoms generate electron wave packets (EWPs), which are temporally localized with approximately the same duration as the attosecond pulses. In contrast to the tunneling electron wave packets giving rise to processes such as high-order harmonic generation and above-threshold-ionization (ATI), the properties of these EWPs are inherited from the attosecond pulses through the single-photon ionization step. Thus the energy and temporal characteristics of the EWPs can be varied independently of the process under investigation, by controlling the properties of the attosecond pulses. This talk will describe two recent experiments done in Lund. First we report on the generation, compression and delivery on target of ultrashort extreme-ultraviolet light pulses using external amplitude and phase control. The APT is synthesized from the 13 th to 35 th harmonics of a 35 fs Ti:sapphire laser. The harmonics are generated by focusing the laser beam into a window-less gas cell, filled with argon. To achieve the required on-target attosecond pulses, the harmonics are filtered spatially, using a fixed aperture, and spectrally using aluminum filters. The aluminum filters also serve the purpose of compressing the attosecond pulses, using the negative group-delay dispersion of aluminum to compensate for the intrinsic positive chirp of the attosecond pulses. This experiment demonstrates a practical method for the synthesis and control of attosecond waveforms, and in this case the production of pulses

  5. The Liouville equation for flavour evolution of neutrinos and neutrino wave packets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Rasmus Sloth Lundkvist; Smirnov, Alexei Yu., E-mail: rasmus@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: smirnov@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    We consider several aspects related to the form, derivation and applications of the Liouville equation (LE) for flavour evolution of neutrinos. To take into account the quantum nature of neutrinos we derive the evolution equation for the matrix of densities using wave packets instead of Wigner functions. The obtained equation differs from the standard LE by an additional term which is proportional to the difference of group velocities. We show that this term describes loss of the propagation coherence in the system. In absence of momentum changing collisions, the LE can be reduced to a single derivative equation over a trajectory coordinate. Additional time and spatial dependence may stem from initial (production) conditions. The transition from single neutrino evolution to the evolution of a neutrino gas is considered.

  6. Wave packet methods for the direct calculation of energy-transfer moments in molecular collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, K.S.; Schatz, G.C.; Balint-Kurti, G.G.

    1999-01-01

    The authors present a new wave packet based theory for the direct calculation of energy-transfer moments in molecular collision processes. This theory does not contain any explicit reference to final state information associated with the collision dynamics, thereby avoiding the need for determining vibration-rotation bound states (other than the initial state) for the molecules undergoing collision and also avoiding the calculation of state-to-state transition probabilities. The theory applies to energy-transfer moments of any order, and it generates moments for a wide range of translational energies in a single calculation. Two applications of the theory are made that demonstrate its viability; one is to collinear He + H 2 and the other to collinear He + CS 2 (with two active vibrational modes in CS 2 ). The results of these applications agree well with earlier results based on explicit calculation of transition probabilities

  7. The motion of a Dirac wave packet in a gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietropaolo, F.; Toller, M.

    1983-01-01

    It is studied the motion of a test particle provided with spin in a gravitational field with a nonvanishing torsion with the aim of clarifying the relationship between the approach based on the balance equations for energy, momentum and angular momentum and the approach based directly on a semiclassical approximation of the Dirac equation. The balance equations in the pole-dipole approximation are applied to a Dirac wave packet minimally coupled to the gravitational field and it is shown that, in this particular case, it is possible to compute the dipole moments of energy current, which are essential for a correct calculation of the motion of the centre of the particle and of the precession of its spin

  8. Magnetized Langmuir wave packets excited by a strong beam-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, G.; Sol, H.; Asseo, E.

    1988-01-01

    The physics of beam-plasma interaction, which has been investigated for a long time mostly in relation with solar bursts, is now more widely invoked in various astrophysical contexts such as pulsars, active galactic nuclei, close binaries, cataclysmic variables, γ bursters, and so on. In these situations the interaction is more likely in the spirit of strong Langmuir turbulence rather than in the spirit of quasilinear theory. Many investigations have been done for two opposite extremes, namely, in very weak and in very strong magnetic fields. Very few properties of the strong Langmuir turbulence are known in the most usual astrophysical situation where the magnetic field plays a significant role but is not strong enough to force the electrons into one-dimensional motion. For this case, we analyze the dynamics of Langmuir wave packets and provide new results about the stability of the solitons against transverse perturbations. It turns out that both the averaged Lagrangian method and the adiabatic perturbation method derived from the inverse scattering transform give exactly the same results (which is not obvious in soliton perturbation theory). In particular, they predict the stability of the solitons as long as the electron gyrofrequency is greater than the plasma frequency (strong magnetic field) and their instability against transverse self-modulation in the opposite case (weak magnetic field); moreover, they allow one to deduce the self-similar collapsing oblate cavitons in the latter case. The laws governing the collapse of the wave packets determine the relaxation of the beam in the surrounding medium and we derive a useful formula giving the power loss of the beam. We outline the astrophysical consequences of this investigation

  9. Wave packet dynamics for a system with position and time-dependent effective mass in an infinite square well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vubangsi, M.; Tchoffo, M.; Fai, L. C. [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Dschang, P.O. Box 417 Dschang (Cameroon); Pisma’k, Yu. M. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Saint Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The problem of a particle with position and time-dependent effective mass in a one-dimensional infinite square well is treated by means of a quantum canonical formalism. The dynamics of a launched wave packet of the system reveals a peculiar revival pattern that is discussed. .

  10. On the development and evolution of nonlinear ion acoustic wave packets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Hamza

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple model of ion fluctuations (ion acoustic and ion cyclotron fluctuations for example driven by an electron current which leads to intermittent fluctuations when the linear growth rate exceeds the wave packet dispersion rate is analized. The normalized fluctuation amplitude eφ0/T can be much larger than the mass ratio (me/mi level predicted by the conventional quasilinear theory or Manheimer's theory (see references in this document, and where φ0 represents the amplitude of the main peak of the ion fluctuations. Although the ion motion is linear, intermittency is produced by the strong nonlinear electron response, which causes the electron momentum input to the ion fluctuations to be spatially localized. We treat the 1-D case because it is especially simple from an intuitive and analytical point of view, but it is readily apparent and one can put forward the conjecture that the effect occurs in a three dimensional magnetized plasma. The 1-D analysis, as shown in this manuscript will clearly help identify the subtle difference between turbulence as conventionally understood and intermittency as it occurs in space and laboratory plasmas. Keywords. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (Turbulence – Ionosphere (Wave-particles interactions – Space plasma physics (Waves and instabilities

  11. Semiclassical wave packet treatment of scattering resonances: application to the delta zero-point energy effect in recombination reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetoshkin, Evgeny; Babikov, Dmitri

    2007-09-28

    For the first time Feshbach-type resonances important in recombination reactions are characterized using the semiclassical wave packet method. This approximation allows us to determine the energies, lifetimes, and wave functions of the resonances and also to observe a very interesting correlation between them. Most important is that this approach permits description of a quantum delta-zero-point energy effect in recombination reactions and reproduces the anomalous rates of ozone formation.

  12. Femtosecond Electron Wave Packet Propagation and Diffraction: Towards Making the ``Molecular Movie"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2003-03-01

    Time-resolved electron diffraction harbors great promise for achieving atomic resolution of the fastest chemical processes. The generation of sufficiently short electron pulses to achieve this real time view of a chemical reaction has been limited by problems in maintaining short electron pulses with realistic electron densities to the sample. The propagation dynamics of femtosecond electron packets in the drift region of a photoelectron gun are investigated with an N-body numerical simulation and mean-field model. This analyis shows that the redistribution of electrons inside the packet, arising from space-charge and dispersion contributions, changes the pulse envelope and leads to the development of a spatially linear axial velocity distribution. These results have been used in the design of femtosecond photoelectron guns with higher time resolution and novel electron-optical methods of pulse characterization that are approaching 100 fs timescales. Time-resolved diffraction studies with electron pulses of approximately 500 femtoseconds have focused on solid-liquid phase transitions under far from equilibrium conditions. This work gives a microscopic description of the melting process and illustrates the promise of atomically resolving transition state processes.

  13. LANGMUIR WAVE DECAY IN INHOMOGENEOUS SOLAR WIND PLASMAS: SIMULATION RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krafft, C. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Volokitin, A. S. [IZMIRAN, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krasnoselskikh, V. V., E-mail: catherine.krafft@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l’Environnement et de l’Espace, 3A Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-08-20

    Langmuir turbulence excited by electron flows in solar wind plasmas is studied on the basis of numerical simulations. In particular, nonlinear wave decay processes involving ion-sound (IS) waves are considered in order to understand their dependence on external long-wavelength plasma density fluctuations. In the presence of inhomogeneities, it is shown that the decay processes are localized in space and, due to the differences between the group velocities of Langmuir and IS waves, their duration is limited so that a full nonlinear saturation cannot be achieved. The reflection and the scattering of Langmuir wave packets on the ambient and randomly varying density fluctuations lead to crucial effects impacting the development of the IS wave spectrum. Notably, beatings between forward propagating Langmuir waves and reflected ones result in the parametric generation of waves of noticeable amplitudes and in the amplification of IS waves. These processes, repeated at different space locations, form a series of cascades of wave energy transfer, similar to those studied in the frame of weak turbulence theory. The dynamics of such a cascading mechanism and its influence on the acceleration of the most energetic part of the electron beam are studied. Finally, the role of the decay processes in the shaping of the profiles of the Langmuir wave packets is discussed, and the waveforms calculated are compared with those observed recently on board the spacecraft Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory and WIND.

  14. Radon movement simulation in overburden by the 'Scattered Packet Method'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marah, H.; Sabir, A.; Hlou, L.; Tayebi, M.

    1998-01-01

    The analysis of Radon ( 222 Rn) movement in overburden needs the resolution of the General Equation of Transport in porous medium, involving diffusion and convection. Generally this equation was derived and solved analytically. The 'Scattered Packed Method' is a recent mathematical method of resolution, initially developed for the electrons movements in the semiconductors studies. In this paper, we have adapted this method to simulate radon emanation in porous medium. The keys parameters are the radon concentration at the source, the diffusion coefficient, and the geometry. To show the efficiency of this method, several cases of increasing complexity are considered. This model allows to follow the migration, in the time and space, of radon produced as a function of the characteristics of the studied site. Forty soil radon measurements were taken from a North Moroccan fault. Forward modeling of the radon anomalies produces satisfactory fits of the observed data and allows the overburden thickness determination. (author)

  15. Manipulating the Shape of Electronic Non-Dispersive Wave-Packets in the Hydrogen Atom: Numerical Tests in Realistic Experimental Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delande, D.; Sacha, K.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2002-01-01

    We show that combination of a linearly polarized resonant microwave field and a parallel static electric field may be used to create a non-dispersive electronic wave packet in Rydberg atoms. The static electric field allows for manipulation of the shape of the elliptical trajectory the wave packet is propagating on. Exact quantum numerical calculations for realistic experimental parameters show that the wave packet evolving on a linear orbit can be very easily prepared in a laboratory either by a direct optical excitation or by preparing an atom in an extremal Stark state and then slowly switching on the micro wave field. The latter scheme seems to be very resistant to experimental imperfections. Once the wave packet on the linear orbit is excited, the static field may be used to manipulate the shape of the orbit. (author)

  16. Langmuir wave-packet generation from an electron beam propagating in the inhomogeneous solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Volokitin, A. S.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Bale, S. D.

    2010-01-01

    Recent in-situ observations by the TDS instrument equipping the STEREO spacecraft revealed that large amplitude spatially localized Langmuir waves are frequent in the solar wind, and correlated with the presence of suprathermal electron beams during type III events or close to the electron foreshock. We briefly present the new theoretical model used to perform the study of these localized electrostatic waves, and show first results of simulations of the destabilization of Langmuir waves by a beam propagating in the inhomogeneous solar wind. The main results are that the destabilized waves are mainly focalized near the minima of the density profiles, and that the nonlinear interaction of the waves with the resonant particles enhances this focalization compared to a situation in which the only propagation effects are taken into account.

  17. Dynamics of wave packets in two-dimensional random systems with anisotropic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelsohn, Gregory; Gruzdev, Eugene

    2008-09-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe narrowband pulse dynamics in two-dimensional systems with arbitrary correlated disorder. In anisotropic systems with elongated cigarlike inhomogeneities, fast propagation is predicted in the direction across the structure where the wave is exponentially localized and tunneling of evanescent modes plays a dominant role in typical realizations. Along the structure, where the wave is channeled as in a waveguide, the motion of the wave energy is relatively slow. Numerical simulations performed for ultra-wide-band pulses show that even at the initial stage of wave evolution, the radiation diffuses predominantly in the direction along the major axis of the correlation ellipse. Spectral analysis of the results relates the long tail of the wave observed in the transverse direction to a number of frequency domain "lucky shots" associated with the long-living resonant modes localized inside the sample.

  18. Coherent control of interfering wave packets in dissociating HD+ molecules: the role of phase and delay time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Chaochao; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Xianzhou; Liu, Yufang; Qiu, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    The coherent control of interference between dissociating wave packets of the HD + molecules generated by a pair of time-delayed and phase-locked femtosecond laser pulses is theoretically studied by using the time-dependent quantum wave packet method. The density function in both coordinate and momentum representation are presented and discussed. It is demonstrated that the interference pattern is observed in both coordinate and momentum density functions. The interference undergoes a π-phase shift when the delay time between the two phase-locked femtosecond laser pulses is changed by half an optical period. In particular, the number of interference fringes, the fringe spacing in the R-dependent density distribution |ψ(R)| 2 , and the modulation period of the energy-dependent distribution of the fragments P(E) can be tuned by two phase-locked femtosecond pulses. (paper)

  19. Dissociative double ionization of H2 and D2: Comparison between experiment and Monte Carlo wave packet calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Henriette Astrup; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical calculations on dissociative double ionization of H2 and D2 in short intense laser pulses using the Monte Carlo wave packet technique are presented for several different field intensities, wavelengths, and pulse durations. We find convincing agreement between theory and experimental...... results for the kinetic energy release spectra of the nuclei. Besides the correctly predicted spectra the Monte Carlo wave packet method offers insight into the nuclear dynamics during the pulse and makes it possible to address the origin of different structures observed in the spectra. Three......-photon resonances in the singly ionized molecule and charge-resonance-enhanced ionization are shown to be the main processes responsible for the observed nuclear energy distributions....

  20. On reduction of the wave-packet, decoherence, irreversibility and the second law of thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narnhofer, H.; Wreszinski, W.F.

    2014-01-01

    We prove a quantum version of the second law of thermodynamics: the (quantum) Boltzmann entropy increases if the initial (zero time) density matrix decoheres, a condition generally satisfied in Nature. It is illustrated by a model of wave-packet reduction, the Coleman–Hepp model, along the framework introduced by Sewell (2005) in his approach to the quantum measurement problem. Further models illustrate the monotonic-versus-non-monotonic behavior of the quantum Boltzmann entropy in time. As a last closely related topic, decoherence, which was shown by Narnhofer and Thirring (1999) to enforce macroscopic purity in the case of quantum K systems, is analyzed within a different class of quantum chaotic systems, viz. the quantum Anosov models as defined by Emch, Narnhofer, Sewell and Thirring (1994). A review of the concept of quantum Boltzmann entropy, as well as of some of the rigorous approaches to the quantum measurement problem within the framework of Schrödinger dynamics, is given, together with an overview of the C* algebra approach, which encompasses the relevant notions and definitions in a comprehensive way

  1. Wave packet study of the secondary emission of negatively charged, monoatomic ions from sputtered metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindona, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy)]. E-mail: sindona@fis.unical.it; Riccardi, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Maletta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Rudi, S.A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Falcone, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    Secondary emission of Ag{sup -} and Au{sup -} particles, following the sputtering of clean Ag(1 0 0) and Au(1 0 0) targets, respectively, is studied with a Crank-Nicholson wave-packet propagation method. A one-electron pseudo-potential is used to describe the plane metal surface, with a projected band gap, the ejected ion, whose charge state is investigated, and its nearest-neighbor substrate ion, put in motion by the collision cascade generated by the primary ion beam. Time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved backwards in time to determine the evolution of the affinity orbital of the negative particles from an instant when they are unperturbed, at distances of the order of {approx}10{sup 2} a.u. from the surface, to the instant of ejection. The probability that a band electron will be eventually detected in affinity state of the ejected particle is, thus, calculated and compared with the result of another method based on the spectral decomposition of the one-electron Hamiltonian.

  2. Heralded wave packet manipulation and storage of a frequency-converted pair photon at telecom wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroh, Tim; Ahlrichs, Andreas; Sprenger, Benjamin; Benson, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Future quantum networks require a hybrid platform of dissimilar quantum systems. Within the platform, joint quantum states have to be mediated either by single photons, photon pairs or entangled photon pairs. The photon wavelength has to lie within the telecommunication band to enable long-distance fibre transmission. In addition, the temporal shape of the photons needs to be tailored to efficiently match the involved quantum systems. Altogether, this requires the efficient coherent wavelength-conversion of arbitrarily shaped single-photon wave packets. Here, we demonstrate the heralded temporal filtering of single photons as well as the synchronisation of state manipulation and detection as key elements in a typical experiment, besides of delaying a photon in a long fibre. All three are realised by utilising commercial telecommunication fibre-optical components which will permit the transition of quantum networks from the lab to real-world applications. The combination of these renders a temporally filtering single-photon storage in a fast switchable fibre loop possible.

  3. Characterization of a quantum phase transition in Dirac systems by means of the wave-packet dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Romera

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the signatures of phase transitions in the time evolution of wave-packets by analyzing two simple model systems: a graphene quantum dot model in a magnetic field and a Dirac oscillator in a magnetic field. We have characterized the phase transitions using the autocorrelation function. Our work also reveals that the description in terms of Shannon entropy of the autocorrelation function is a clear phase transition indicator.

  4. Tunnel ionization of H2 in a low-frequency laser field: A wave-packet approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Dang, T.; Chateauneuf, F.; Manoli, S.; Atabek, O.; Keller, A.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of multielectron dissociative ionization (MEDI) of H 2 in an intense IR laser pulse are investigated using a wave-packet propagation scheme. The electron tunneling processes corresponding to the successive ionizations of H 2 are expressed in terms of field-free Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential energy surfaces (PES) by transforming the tunnel shape resonance picture into a Feshbach resonance problem. This transformation is achieved by defining a new, time-dependent electronic basis in which the bound electrons are still described by field-free BO electronic states while the ionized ones are described by Airy functions. In the adiabatic, quasistatic approximation, these functions describe free electrons under the influence of the instantaneous electric field of the laser and such an ionized electron can have a negative total energy. As a consequence, when dressed by the continuous ejected electron energy, the BO PES of an ionic channel can be brought into resonance with states of the parent species. This construction gives a picture in which wave packets are to be propagated on a continuum of coupled electronic manifolds. A reduction of the wave-packet propagation scheme to an effective five-channel problem has been obtained for the description of the first dissociative ionization process in H 2 by using Fano's formalism [U. Fano, Phys. Rev. 124, 1866 (1961)] to analytically diagonalize the infinite, continuous interaction potential matrix and by using the properties of Fano's solutions. With this algorithm, the effect that continuous ionization of H 2 has on the dissociation dynamics of the H 2 + ion has been investigated. In comparison with results that would be obtained if the first ionization of H 2 was impulsive, the wave-packet dynamics of the H 2 + ion prepared continuously by tunnel ionization are markedly nonadiabatic. (Abstract Truncated)

  5. Theoretical study of the influence of intense femtosecond laser field on the evolution of the wave packet and the population of NaRb molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Ma; Mei-Shan, Wang; Chuan-Lu, Yang; Xiao-Guang, Ma; De-Hua, Wang

    2010-01-01

    Employing the two-state model and the time-dependent wave packet method, we have investigated the influences of the parameters of the intense femtosecond laser field on the evolution of the wave packet, as well as the population of ground and double-minimum electronic states of the NaRb molecule. For the different laser wavelengths, the evolution of the wave packet of 6 1 σ + state with time and internuclear distance is different, and the different laser intensity brings different influences on the population of the electronic states of the NaRb molecule. One can control the evolutions of wave packet and the population in each state by varying the laser parameters appropriately, which will be a benefit for the light manipulation of atomic and molecular processes. (atomic and molecular physics)

  6. Time-resolved dynamics of two-channel molecular systems in cw laser fields: Wave-packet construction in the Floquet formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Dang, T.T.; Chateauneuf, F.; Atabek, O.; He, X.

    1995-01-01

    The description of the wave-packet time-resolved dynamics in a two-channel molecular system driven by a cw laser field is considered within the time-independent Floquet representation. It is shown that, at high field intensity, the wave-packet motions are governed solely by the pair of adiabatic dressed potential-energy surfaces (PES's) associated with a single Brillouin zone. The same expressions of the wave-packet motions in terms of the adiabatic PES's are obtained within a short-time approximation, thereby furnishing a new numerical algorithm for the wave-packet propagation in a laser-driven two-channel system at any intensity. Numerical tests of this algorithm are presented. The numerical results establish unambiguously the adiabaticity of nuclear motions at high field intensities

  7. Nonlinear wave-packet dynamics for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system and its application to the hydrogen atom in a weak magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupret, K.; Delande, D.

    1996-01-01

    We study the time propagation of an initially localized wave packet for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system, using the open-quote open-quote nonlinear wave-packet dynamics close-quote close-quote [S. Tomsovic and E. J. Heller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 664 (1991)], a semiclassical approximation using a local linearization of the wave packet in the vicinity of classical reference trajectories. Several reference trajectories are needed to describe the behavior of the full wave packet. The introduction of action-angle variables allows us to obtain a simple analytic expression for the autocorrelation function, and to show that a universal behavior (quantum collapses, quantum revivals, etc.) is obtained via interferences between the reference trajectories. A connection with the standard WKB approach is established. Finally, we apply the nonlinear wave-packet dynamics to the case of the hydrogen atom in a weak magnetic field, and show that the semiclassical expressions obtained by nonlinear wave-packet dynamics are extremely accurate. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. Experimental study of turbulent-jet wave packets and their acoustic efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breakey, David E. S.; Jordan, Peter; Cavalieri, André V. G.; Nogueira, Petrônio A.; Léon, Olivier; Colonius, Tim; Rodríguez, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    This paper details the statistical and time-resolved analysis of the relationship between the near-field pressure fluctuations of unforced, subsonic free jets (0.4 ≤M ≤0.6 ) and their far-field sound emissions. Near-field and far-field microphone measurements were taken on a conical array close to the jets and an azimuthal ring at 20∘ to the jet axis, respectively. Recent velocity and pressure measurements indicate the presence of linear wave packets in the near field by closely matching predictions from the linear homogenous parabolized stability equations, but the agreement breaks down both beyond the end of the potential core and when considering higher order statistical moments, such as the two-point coherence. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), interpreted in terms of inhomogeneous linear models using the resolvent framework allows us to understand these discrepancies. A new technique is developed for projecting time-domain pressure measurements onto a statistically obtained POD basis, yielding the time-resolved activity of each POD mode and its correlation with the far field. A single POD mode, interpreted as an optimal high-gain structure that arises due to turbulent forcing, captures the salient near-field-far-field correlation signature; further, the signatures of the next two modes, understood as suboptimally forced structures, suggest that these POD modes represent higher order, acoustically important near-field behavior. An existing Green's-function-based technique is used to make far-field predictions, and results are interpreted in terms of POD/resolvent modes, indicating the acoustic importance of this higher order behavior. The technique is extended to provide time-domain far-field predictions.

  9. ‘Superluminal paradox’ in wave packet propagation and its quantum mechanical resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolovski, D., E-mail: dgsokol15@gmail.com [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of the Basque Country, Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011, Bilbao (Spain); Akhmatskaya, E. [Basque Center for Applied Mathematics (BCAM), Alameda de Mazarredo, 14 48009, Bilbao Bizkaia (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    We analyse in detail the reshaping mechanism leading to apparently ‘superluminal’ advancement of a wave packet traversing a classically forbidden region. In the coordinate representation, a barrier is shown to act as an effective beamsplitter, recombining envelopes of the freely propagating pulse with various spacial shifts. Causality ensures that none of the constituent envelopes are advanced with respect to free propagation, yet the resulting pulse is advanced due to a peculiar interference effect, similar to the one responsible for ‘anomalous’ values which occur in Aharonov’s ‘weak measurements’. In the momentum space, the effect is understood as a bandwidth phenomenon, where the incident pulse probes local, rather than global, analytical properties of the transmission amplitude T(p). The advancement is achieved when T(p) mimics locally an exponential behaviour, similar to the one occurring in Berry’s ‘superoscillations’. Seen in a broader quantum mechanical context, the ‘paradox’ is but a consequence of an attempt to obtain ‘which way?’ information without destroying the interference between the pathways of interest. This explains, to a large extent, the failure to adequately describe tunnelling in terms of a single ‘tunnelling time’. -- Highlights: •Apparent superluminality is described in the language of quantum measurements. •A barrier acts as a beamsplitter delaying copies of the initial pulse. •In the coordinate space the effect is similar to what occurs in ‘weak measurements’. •In the momentum space it relies on superoscillations in the transmission amplitude. •It is an interference effect, unlikely to be explained in simpler physical terms.

  10. Description and Simulation of a Fast Packet Switch Architecture for Communication Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Jorge A.; Lizanich, Paul J.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been developing the architecture for a multichannel communications signal processing satellite (MCSPS) as part of a flexible, low-cost meshed-VSAT (very small aperture terminal) network. The MCSPS architecture is based on a multifrequency, time-division-multiple-access (MF-TDMA) uplink and a time-division multiplex (TDM) downlink. There are eight uplink MF-TDMA beams, and eight downlink TDM beams, with eight downlink dwells per beam. The information-switching processor, which decodes, stores, and transmits each packet of user data to the appropriate downlink dwell onboard the satellite, has been fully described by using VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated-Circuit) Hardware Description Language (VHDL). This VHDL code, which was developed in-house to simulate the information switching processor, showed that the architecture is both feasible and viable. This paper describes a shared-memory-per-beam architecture, its VHDL implementation, and the simulation efforts.

  11. Time-dependent wave-packet study of the direct low-energy dissociative recombination of HD+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orel, A. E.

    2000-01-01

    Wave-packet methods involving the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation have been used with great success in the calculation of cross sections for dissociative recombination of molecular ions by electron impact in the high energy region where the ''boomerang'' model [L. Dube and A. Herzenberg, Phys. Rev. A 11, 1314 (1975)] is valid. We extend this method to study low-energy dissociative recombination where this approximation is no longer appropriate. We apply the method to the ''direct'' low-energy dissociative recombination of HD + . Our results are in excellent agreement with calculations using the multichannel quantum defect method. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  12. The probability distribution of the delay time of a wave packet in strong overlap of resonance levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyuboshitz, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    The time development of nuclear reactions at a large density of levels is investigated using the theory of overlapping resonances. The analytical expression for the function describing the time delay probability distribution of a wave packet is obtained in the framework of the model of n equi - valent channels. It is shown that a relative fluctuation of the time delay at the stage of the compound nucleus is snall. The possibility is discussed of increasing the duration of nuclear raactions with rising excitation energy

  13. Wave-packet continuum-discretization approach to ion-atom collisions including rearrangement: Application to differential ionization in proton-hydrogen scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Bailey, J. J.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we develop a wave-packet continuum-discretization approach to ion-atom collisions that includes rearrangement processes. The total scattering wave function is expanded using a two-center basis built from wave-packet pseudostates. The exact three-body Schrödinger equation is converted into coupled-channel differential equations for time-dependent expansion coefficients. In the asymptotic region these time-dependent coefficients represent transition amplitudes for all processes including elastic scattering, excitation, ionization, and electron capture. The wave-packet continuum-discretization approach is ideal for differential ionization studies as it allows one to generate pseudostates with arbitrary energies and distribution. The approach is used to calculate the double differential cross section for ionization in proton collisions with atomic hydrogen. Overall good agreement with experiment is obtained for all considered cases.

  14. Distortion of gravitational-wave packets due to their self-gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocsis, Bence; Loeb, Abraham

    2007-01-01

    When a source emits a gravity-wave (GW) pulse over a short period of time, the leading edge of the GW signal is redshifted more than the inner boundary of the pulse. The GW pulse is distorted by the gravitational effect of the self-energy residing in between these shells. We illustrate this distortion for GW pulses from the final plunge of black hole binaries, leading to the evolution of the GW profile as a function of the radial distance from the source. The distortion depends on the total GW energy released ε and the duration of the emission τ, scaled by the total binary mass M. The effect should be relevant in finite box simulations where the waveforms are extracted within a radius of 2 M. For characteristic emission parameters at the final plunge between binary black holes of arbitrary spins, this effect could distort the simulated GW templates for LIGO and LISA by a fraction of 10 -3 . Accounting for the wave distortion would significantly decrease the waveform extraction errors in numerical simulations

  15. A Wave-guide Model for Packetized Media Streaming in Lossless Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantas, D.; Widya, I.A.

    2002-01-01

    Optimal operation of network based multimedia applications requires a precise specification of the network parameters. Different models have been used in the past in calculating the behavior of the network and defining parameters like throughput and delays of packets, using among others fluid

  16. Study of diffusion of wave packets in a square lattice under external fields along the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, P.E. de; Nazareno, H.N.

    2012-01-01

    The object of the present work is to analyze the effect of nonlinearity on wave packet propagation in a square lattice subject to a magnetic and an electric field in the Hall configuration, by using the Discrete Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation (DNLSE). In previous works we have shown that without the nonlinear term, the presence of the magnetic field induces the formation of vortices that remain stationary, while a wave packet is introduced in the system. As for the effect of an applied electric field, it was shown that the vortices propagate in a direction perpendicular to the electric field, similar behavior as presented in the classical treatment, we provide a quantum mechanics explanation for that. We have performed the calculations considering first the action of the magnetic field as well as the nonlinearity. The results indicate that for low values of the nonlinear parameter U the vortices remain stationary while preserving the form. For greater values of the parameter the picture gets distorted, the more so, the greater the nonlinearity. As for the inclusion of the electric field, we note that for small U, the wave packet propagates perpendicular to the applied field, until for greater values of U the wave gets partially localized in a definite region of the lattice. That is, for strong nonlinearity the wave packet gets partially trapped, while the tail of it can propagate through the lattice. Note that this tail propagation is responsible for the over-diffusion for long times of the wave packet under the action of an electric field. We have produced short films that show clearly the time evolution of the wave packet, which can add to the understanding of the dynamics.

  17. Phase and group velocity tracing analysis of projected wave packet motion along oblique radar beams – qualitative analysis of QP echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Kuo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The wave packets of atmospheric gravity waves were numerically generated, with a given characteristic wave period, horizontal wave length and projection mean wind along the horizontal wave vector. Their projection phase and group velocities along the oblique radar beam (vpr and vgr, with different zenith angle θ and azimuth angle φ, were analyzed by the method of phase- and group-velocity tracing. The results were consistent with the theoretical calculations derived by the dispersion relation, reconfirming the accuracy of the method of analysis. The RTI plot of the numerical wave packets were similar to the striation patterns of the QP echoes from the FAI irregularity region. We propose that the striation range rate of the QP echo is equal to the radial phase velocity vpr, and the slope of the energy line across the neighboring striations is equal to the radial group velocity vgr of the wave packet; the horizontal distance between two neighboring striations is equal to the characteristic wave period τ. Then, one can inversely calculate all the properties of the gravity wave responsible for the appearance of the QP echoes. We found that the possibility of some QP echoes being generated by the gravity waves originated from lower altitudes cannot be ruled out.

  18. Propagation of nonlinear ion acoustic wave with generation of long-wavelength waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsawa, Yukiharu; Kamimura, Tetsuo

    1978-01-01

    The nonlinear propagation of the wave packet of an ion acoustic wave with wavenumber k 0 asymptotically equals k sub(De) (the electron Debye wavenumber) is investigated by computer simulations. From the wave packet of the ion acoustic wave, waves with long wavelengths are observed to be produced within a few periods for the amplitude oscillation of the original wave packet. These waves are generated in the region where the original wave packet exists. Their characteristic wavelength is of the order of the length of the wave packet, and their propagation velocity is almost equal to the ion acoustic speed. The long-wavelength waves thus produced strongly affect the nonlinear evolution of the original wave packet. (auth.)

  19. Molecular orientation via a dynamically induced pulse-train: Wave packet dynamics of NaI in a static electric field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquetand, P.; Materny, A.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2004-01-01

    We regard the rovibrational wave packet dynamics of NaI in a static electric field after femtosecond excitation to its first electronically excited state. The following quasibound nuclear wave packet motion is accompanied by a bonding situation changing from covalent to ionic. At times when...... the charge separation is present, i.e., when the bond-length is large, a strong dipole moment exists and rotational excitation takes place. Upon bond contraction, the then covalently bound molecule does not experience the external field. This scenario repeats itself periodically. Thus, the vibrational...

  20. Expansion of a quantum wave packet in a one-dimensional disordered potential in the presence of a uniform bias force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosnier de Bellaistre, C.; Trefzger, C.; Aspect, A.; Georges, A.; Sanchez-Palencia, L.

    2018-01-01

    We study numerically the expansion dynamics of an initially confined quantum wave packet in the presence of a disordered potential and a uniform bias force. For white-noise disorder, we find that the wave packet develops asymmetric algebraic tails for any ratio of the force to the disorder strength. The exponent of the algebraic tails decays smoothly with that ratio and no evidence of a critical behavior on the wave density profile is found. Algebraic localization features a series of critical values of the force-to-disorder strength where the m th position moment of the wave packet diverges. Below the critical value for the m th moment, we find fair agreement between the asymptotic long-time value of the m th moment and the predictions of diagrammatic calculations. Above it, we find that the m th moment grows algebraically in time. For correlated disorder, we find evidence of systematic delocalization, irrespective to the model of disorder. More precisely, we find a two-step dynamics, where both the center-of-mass position and the width of the wave packet show transient localization, similar to the white-noise case, at short time and delocalization at sufficiently long time. This correlation-induced delocalization is interpreted as due to the decrease of the effective de Broglie wavelength, which lowers the effective strength of the disorder in the presence of finite-range correlations.

  1. The Role of the Bainitic Packet in Control of Impact Toughness in a Simulated CGHAZ of X90 Pipeline Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Guo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available X90 pipeline steel was processed with the simulated coarse grain heat affect zone (CGHAZ thermal cycle with heat input varying from 30 kJ/cm to 60 kJ/cm, the microstructures were investigated by means of optical microscope (OM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD, and transmission electron microscope (TEM, and the impact properties were evaluated from the welding thermal cycle treated samples. The results indicate that the microstructure is primarily composed of lath bainite. When decreasing the heat input, both bainite packet and block are significantly refined, and the toughness has an increased tendency due to the grain refinement. The fracture surfaces all present cleavage fracture for the samples with different heat inputs. Moreover, the average cleavage facet size for the CGHAZ is nearly equal to the average bainite packet size, and the bainitic packet boundary can strongly impede the crack propagation, indicating that the bainitic packet is the most effective unit in control of impact toughness in the simulated CGHAZ of X90 pipeline steel.

  2. Finite-measuring approximation of operators of scattering theory in representation of wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukulin, V.I.; Rubtsova, O.A.

    2004-01-01

    Several types of the packet quantization of the continuos spectrum in the scattering theory quantum problems are considered. Such a quantization leads to the convenient finite-measuring (i.e. matrix) approximation of the integral operators in the scattering theory and it makes it possible to reduce the solution of the singular integral equations, complying with the scattering theory, to the convenient purely algebraic equations on the analytical basis, whereby all the singularities are separated in the obvious form. The main attention is paid to the problems of the method practical realization [ru

  3. Particle in a uniform magnetic field under the symmetric gauge: the eigenfunctions and the time evolution of wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, P E de; Nazareno, H N

    2007-01-01

    In the present work we treat the problem of a particle in a uniform magnetic field along the symmetric gauge, so chosen since the wavefunctions present the required cylindrical symmetry. It is our understanding that by means of this work we can make a contribution to the teaching of the present subject, as well as encourage students to use computer algebra systems in solving problems of quantum mechanics. We obtained the degeneracy of the spectrum of eigenvalues in a very clear way. Through the use of a computer algebra system we show graphs of the probability density associated with different eigenvalues as well as compare such functions for some degenerate states, which helps us to visualize the physics of the problem. We also present a semiclassical model which gives a physical insight regarding the paradoxical fact that eigenfunctions associated with opposite angular momenta and different energy eigenvalues have the same probability density. Finally, by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation we obtain the time evolution of a wave packet that at time zero was considered to be localized in a definite region of the lattice. The centroid of such a packet performs an orbit similar to that obtained in the classical treatment of a particle in a magnetic field

  4. A comparison of three time-dependent wave packet methods for calculating electron--atom elastic scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, R.S.; McGarrah, D.B.; Sharafeddin, O.A.; Kouri, D.J.; Hoffman, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    We compare three time-dependent wave packet methods for performing elastic scattering calculations from screened Coulomb potentials. The three methods are the time-dependent amplitude density method (TDADM), what we term a Cayley-transform method (CTM), and the Chebyshev propagation method of Tal-Ezer and Kosloff. Both the TDADM and the CTM are based on a time-dependent integral equation for the wave function. In the first, we propagate the time-dependent amplitude density, |ζ(t)right-angle=U|ψ(t)right-angle, where U is the interaction potential and |ψ(t)right-angle is the usual time-dependent wave function. In the other two, the wave function is propagated. As a numerical example, we calculate phase shifts and cross sections using a screened Coulomb, Yukawa type potential over the range 200--1000 eV. One of the major advantages of time-dependent methods such as these is that we get scattering information over this entire range of energies from one propagation. We find that in most cases, all three methods yield comparable accuracy and are about equally efficient computationally. However for l=0, where the Coulomb well is not screened by the centrifugal potential, the TDADM requires smaller grid spacings to maintain accuracy

  5. Numerical study of the time evolution of a wave packet in quantum mechanics. Estudio numerico de la evolucion de un paquete de ondas en mecanica cuantica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segura, J.; Fernandez de Cordoba, P.

    1993-01-01

    We solve the Schrodinger equation in order to study the time evolution of a wave packet in different situations of physical interest. This work illustrates, with pedagogical aim, some quantum phenomena which shock our classical conception of the universe: propagation in classically forbidden regions, energy quantization. (Author)

  6. Instability of nonplanar modulated dust acoustic wave packets in a strongly coupled nonthermal dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Labany, S. K., E-mail: skellabany@hotmail.com; Zedan, N. A., E-mail: nesreenplasma@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta, P.O. 34517 (Egypt); El-Taibany, W. F., E-mail: eltaibany@hotmail.com, E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta, P.O. 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science for Girls in Abha, King Khalid University, P.O. 960 Abha (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-15

    Cylindrical and spherical amplitude modulations of dust acoustic (DA) solitary wave envelopes in a strongly coupled dusty plasma containing nonthermal distributed ions are studied. Employing a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation including the geometrical effect is derived. The influences of nonthermal ions, polarization force, and the geometries on the modulational instability conditions are analyzed and the possible rogue wave structures are discussed in detail. It is found that the spherical DA waves are more structurally stable to perturbations than the cylindrical ones. Possible applications of these theoretical findings are briefly discussed.

  7. Energy dissipation of Alfven wave packets deformed by irregular magnetic fields in solar-coronal arches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Similon, Philippe L.; Sudan, R. N.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of field line geometry for shear Alfven wave dissipation in coronal arches is demonstrated. An eikonal formulation makes it possible to account for the complicated magnetic geometry typical in coronal loops. An interpretation of Alfven wave resonance is given in terms of gradient steepening, and dissipation efficiencies are studied for two configurations: the well-known slab model with a straight magnetic field, and a new model with stochastic field lines. It is shown that a large fraction of the Alfven wave energy flux can be effectively dissipated in the corona.

  8. Delay-time distribution in the scattering of time-narrow wave packets (II)—quantum graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilansky, Uzy; Schanz, Holger

    2018-02-01

    We apply the framework developed in the preceding paper in this series (Smilansky 2017 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 50 215301) to compute the time-delay distribution in the scattering of ultra short radio frequency pulses on complex networks of transmission lines which are modeled by metric (quantum) graphs. We consider wave packets which are centered at high wave number and comprise many energy levels. In the limit of pulses of very short duration we compute upper and lower bounds to the actual time-delay distribution of the radiation emerging from the network using a simplified problem where time is replaced by the discrete count of vertex-scattering events. The classical limit of the time-delay distribution is also discussed and we show that for finite networks it decays exponentially, with a decay constant which depends on the graph connectivity and the distribution of its edge lengths. We illustrate and apply our theory to a simple model graph where an algebraic decay of the quantum time-delay distribution is established.

  9. Determination of the effective transverse coherence of the neutron wave packet as employed in reflectivity investigations of condensed-matter structures. II. Analysis of elastic scattering using energy-gated wave packets with an application to neutron reflection from ruled gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, N. F.

    2014-03-01

    We present a general approach to analyzing elastic scattering for those situations where the incident beam is prepared as an incoherent ensemble of wave packets of a given arbitrary shape. Although wave packets, in general, are not stationary solutions of the Schrödinger equation, the analysis of elastic scattering data treats the scattering as a stationary-state problem. We thus must gate the wave packet, coherently distorting its shape in a manner consistent with the elastic condition. The resulting gated scattering amplitudes (e.g., reflection coefficients) thus are weighted coherent sums of the constituent plane-wave scattering amplitudes, with the weights determined by the shape of the incident wave packet as "filtered" by energy gating. We develop the gating formalism in general and apply it to the problem of neutron scattering from ruled gratings described by Majkrzak et al. in a companion paper. The required exact solution of the associated problem of plane-wave reflection from gratings also is derived.

  10. Numerical Simulation of 3-D Wave Crests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dingyong; ZHANG Hanyuan

    2003-01-01

    A clear definition of 3-D wave crest and a description of the procedures to detect the boundary of wave crest are presented in the paper. By using random wave theory and directional wave spectrum, a MATLAB-platformed program is designed to simulate random wave crests for various directional spectral conditions in deep water. Statistics of wave crests with different directional spreading parameters and different directional functions are obtained and discussed.

  11. Monte Carlo wave-packet approach to trace nuclear dynamics in molecular excited states by XUV-pump-IR-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Qingli; Bello, Roger Y.; Martín, Fernando; Palacios, Alicia; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2018-04-01

    Recent research interests have been raised in uncovering and controlling ultrafast dynamics in excited neutral molecules. In this work we generalize the Monte Carlo wave packet (MCWP) approach to XUV-pump-IR-probe schemes to simulate the process of dissociative double ionization of H2 where singly excited states in H2 are involved. The XUV pulse is chosen to resonantly excite the initial ground state of H2 to the lowest excited electronic state of 1Σu + symmetry in H2 within the Franck-Condon region. The delayed intense IR pulse couples the excited states of 1Σu + symmetry with the nearby excited states of 1Σg + symmetry. It also induces the first ionization from H2 to H2 + and the second ionization from H2 + to H++H+. To reduce the computational costs in the MCWP approach, a sampling method is proposed to determine in time the dominant ionization events from H2 to H2+. By conducting a trajectory analysis, which is a unique possibility within the MCWP approach, the origins of the characteristic features in the nuclear kinetic energy release spectra are identified for delays ranging from 0 to 140 fs and the nuclear dynamics in the singly excited states in H2 is mapped out.

  12. Fractional conductance oscillations in quantum rings: wave packet picture of transport in a few-electron system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chwiej, T; Szafran, B

    2013-01-01

    We study electron transfer across a two-terminal quantum ring using a time-dependent description of the scattering process. For the considered scattering event the quantum ring is initially charged with one or two electrons, with another electron incident to the ring from the input channel. We study the electron transfer probability (T) as a function of the external magnetic field. We determine the periodicity of T for a varied number of electrons confined within the ring. For that purpose we develop a method to describe the wave packet dynamics for a few electrons participating in the scattering process, taking into full account the electron–electron correlations. We find that electron transfer across the quantum ring initially charged by a single electron acquires a distinct periodicity of half of the magnetic flux quantum (Φ 0 /2), corresponding to the formation of a transient two-electron state inside the ring. In the case of a three-electron scattering problem with two electrons initially occupying the ring, a period of Φ 0 /3 for T is formed in the limit of thin channels. The effect of disorder present in the confinement potential of the ring is also discussed. (paper)

  13. Fractional conductance oscillations in quantum rings: wave packet picture of transport in a few-electron system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwiej, T; Szafran, B

    2013-04-17

    We study electron transfer across a two-terminal quantum ring using a time-dependent description of the scattering process. For the considered scattering event the quantum ring is initially charged with one or two electrons, with another electron incident to the ring from the input channel. We study the electron transfer probability (T) as a function of the external magnetic field. We determine the periodicity of T for a varied number of electrons confined within the ring. For that purpose we develop a method to describe the wave packet dynamics for a few electrons participating in the scattering process, taking into full account the electron-electron correlations. We find that electron transfer across the quantum ring initially charged by a single electron acquires a distinct periodicity of half of the magnetic flux quantum (Φ0/2), corresponding to the formation of a transient two-electron state inside the ring. In the case of a three-electron scattering problem with two electrons initially occupying the ring, a period of Φ0/3 for T is formed in the limit of thin channels. The effect of disorder present in the confinement potential of the ring is also discussed.

  14. Probing the ionization wave packet and recollision dynamics with an elliptically polarized strong laser field in the nondipole regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, J.; Willenberg, B.; Daněk, J.; Mayer, B. W.; Phillips, C. R.; Gallmann, L.; Klaiber, M.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.; Keller, U.

    2018-01-01

    We explore ionization and rescattering in strong mid-infrared laser fields in the nondipole regime over the full range of polarization ellipticity. In three-dimensional photoelectron momentum distributions (3D PMDs) measured with velocity map imaging spectroscopy, we observe the appearance of a sharp ridge structure along the major polarization axis. Within a certain range of ellipticity, the electrons in this ridge are clearly separated from the two lobes that commonly appear in the PMD with elliptically polarized laser fields. In contrast to the well-known lobes of direct electrons, the sharp ridge is created by Coulomb focusing of the softly recolliding electrons. These ridge electrons are directly related to a counterintuitive shift of the PMD peak opposite to the laser beam propagation direction when the dipole approximation breaks down. The ellipticity-dependent 3D PMDs give access to different ionization and recollision dynamics with appropriate filters in the momentum space. For example, we can extract information about the spread of the initial wave packet and the Coulomb momentum transfer of the rescattering electrons.

  15. Modelling and Simulation of Wave Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    velocity can be approximated by a Gaussian Markov process. Known approximate results for the first-passage density or equivalently, the distribution of the extremes of wave loads are presented and compared with rather precise simulation results. It is demonstrated that the approximate results......A simple model of the wave load on slender members of offshore structures is described. The wave elevation of the sea state is modelled by a stationary Gaussian process. A new procedure to simulate realizations of the wave loads is developed. The simulation method assumes that the wave particle...

  16. Modelling and Simulation of Wave Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1985-01-01

    velocity can be approximated by a Gaussian Markov process. Known approximate results for the first passage density or equivalently, the distribution of the extremes of wave loads are presented and compared with rather precise simulation results. It is demonstrated that the approximate results......A simple model of the wave load on stender members of offshore structures is described . The wave elevation of the sea stateis modelled by a stationary Gaussian process. A new procedure to simulate realizations of the wave loads is developed. The simulation method assumes that the wave particle...

  17. Wave packet autocorrelation functions for quantum hard-disk and hard-sphere billiards in the high-energy, diffraction regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goussev, Arseni; Dorfman, J R

    2006-07-01

    We consider the time evolution of a wave packet representing a quantum particle moving in a geometrically open billiard that consists of a number of fixed hard-disk or hard-sphere scatterers. Using the technique of multiple collision expansions we provide a first-principle analytical calculation of the time-dependent autocorrelation function for the wave packet in the high-energy diffraction regime, in which the particle's de Broglie wavelength, while being small compared to the size of the scatterers, is large enough to prevent the formation of geometric shadow over distances of the order of the particle's free flight path. The hard-disk or hard-sphere scattering system must be sufficiently dilute in order for this high-energy diffraction regime to be achievable. Apart from the overall exponential decay, the autocorrelation function exhibits a generally complicated sequence of relatively strong peaks corresponding to partial revivals of the wave packet. Both the exponential decay (or escape) rate and the revival peak structure are predominantly determined by the underlying classical dynamics. A relation between the escape rate, and the Lyapunov exponents and Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of the counterpart classical system, previously known for hard-disk billiards, is strengthened by generalization to three spatial dimensions. The results of the quantum mechanical calculation of the time-dependent autocorrelation function agree with predictions of the semiclassical periodic orbit theory.

  18. Shock wave interaction with turbulence: Pseudospectral simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    Shock waves amplify pre-existing turbulence. Shock tube and shock wave boundary layer interaction experiments provide qualitative confirmation. However, shock pressure, temperature, and rapid transit complicate direct measurement. Computational simulations supplement the experimental data base and help isolate the mechanisms responsible. Simulations and experiments, particularly under reflected shock wave conditions, significantly influence material mixing. In these pseudospectral Navier-Stokes simulations the shock wave is treated as either a moving (tracked or fitted) domain boundary. The simulations assist development of code mix models. Shock Mach number and pre-existing turbulence intensity initially emerge as key parameters. 20 refs., 8 figs

  19. Impulse response and spatio-temporal wave-packets: The common feature of rogue waves, tsunami, and transition to turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Swagata; Sengupta, Tapan K.

    2017-12-01

    Here, we present the impulse response of the canonical zero pressure gradient boundary layer from the dynamical system approach. The fundamental physical mechanism of the impulse response is in creation of a spatio-temporal wave-front (STWF) by a localized, time-impulsive wall excitation of the boundary layer. The present research is undertaken to explain the unit process of diverse phenomena in geophysical fluid flows and basic hydrodynamics. Creation of a tsunami has been attributed to localized events in the ocean-bed caused by earthquakes, landslides, or volcanic eruptions, whose manifestation is in the run up to the coast by surface waves of massive amplitude but of very finite fetch. Similarly rogue waves have often been noted; a coherent account of the same is yet to appear, although some explanations have been proposed. Our studies in both two- and three-dimensional frameworks in Sengupta and Bhaumik ["Onset of turbulence from the receptivity stage of fluid flows," Phys. Rev. Lett. 107(15), 154501 (2011)] and Bhaumik and Sengupta ["Precursor of transition to turbulence: Spatiotemporal wave front," Phys. Rev. E 89(4), 043018 (2014)] have shown that the STWF provides the central role for causing transition to turbulence by reproducing carefully conducted transition experiments. Here, we furthermore relax the condition of time behavior and use a Dirac-delta wall excitation for the impulse response. The present approach is not based on any simplification of the governing Navier-Stokes equation (NSE), which is unlike solving a nonlinear shallow water equation and/or nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The full nonlinear Navier-Stokes equation (NSE) is solved here using high accuracy dispersion relation preserving numerical schemes and using appropriate formulation of the NSE which minimizes error. The adopted numerical methods and formulation have been extensively validated with respect to various external and internal 2D and 3D flow problems. We also present

  20. Computer simulation of ultrasonic waves in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibault, G.A.; Chaplin, K.

    1992-01-01

    A computer model that simulates the propagation of ultrasonic waves has been developed at AECL Research, Chalk River Laboratories. This program is called EWE, short for Elastic Wave Equations, the mathematics governing the propagation of ultrasonic waves. This report contains a brief summary of the use of ultrasonic waves in non-destructive testing techniques, a discussion of the EWE simulation code explaining the implementation of the equations and the types of output received from the model, and an example simulation showing the abilities of the model. (author). 2 refs., 2 figs

  1. Computer simulation of driven Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geary, J.L. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The first particle simulation study of shear Alfven wave resonance heating is presented. Particle simulation codes self-consistently follow the time evolution of the individual and collective aspects of particle dynamics as well as wave dynamics in a fully nonlinear fashion. Alfven wave heating is a possible means of increasing the temperature of magnetized plasmas. A new particle simulation model was developed for this application that incorporates Darwin's formulation of the electromagnetic fields with a guiding center approximation for electron motion perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The implementation of this model and the examination of its theoretical and computational properties are presented. With this model, several cases of Alfven wave heating is examined in both uniform and nonuniform simulation systems in a two dimensional slab. For the inhomogeneous case studies, the kinetic Alfven wave develops in the vicinity of the shear Alfven resonance region

  2. Spontaneous wave packet reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    There are taken into account the main conceptual difficulties met by standard quantum mechanics in dealing with physical processes involving macroscopic system. It is stressed how J.A.Wheeler's remarks and lucid analysis have been relevant to pinpoint and to bring to its extreme consequences the puzzling aspects of quantum phenomena. It is shown how the recently proposed models of spontaneous dynamical reduction represent a consistent way to overcome the conceptual difficulties of the standard theory. Obviously, many nontrivial problems remain open, the first and more relevant one being that of generalizing the model theories considered to the relativistic case. This is the challenge of the dynamical reduction program. 43 refs, 2 figs

  3. Large eddy simulation of breaking waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Deigaard, Rolf

    2001-01-01

    A numerical model is used to simulate wave breaking, the large scale water motions and turbulence induced by the breaking process. The model consists of a free surface model using the surface markers method combined with a three-dimensional model that solves the flow equations. The turbulence....... The incoming waves are specified by a flux boundary condition. The waves are approaching in the shore-normal direction and are breaking on a plane, constant slope beach. The first few wave periods are simulated by a two-dimensional model in the vertical plane normal to the beach line. The model describes...... the steepening and the overturning of the wave. At a given instant, the model domain is extended to three dimensions, and the two-dimensional flow field develops spontaneously three-dimensional flow features with turbulent eddies. After a few wave periods, stationary (periodic) conditions are achieved...

  4. A survey of elementary plasma instabilities and ECH wave noise properties relevant to plasma sounding by means of particle in cell simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckmann, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the emission of high amplitude wave packets into a plasma is examined. The plasma is modelled by an 1 1/2D electromagnetic and relativistic particle in cell code. The antenna is modelled by applying forced electrostatic field oscillations to a subset of the simulation grid cells. The emitted wave packets are followed in space and time. It is investigated how the wave packets are affected by instabilities. The detected instabilities affecting ECH waves have been identified as wave decay, nonlinear damping due to trapping and modulational instabilities. These instabilities have been discussed with hindsight to the plasma sounding experiment. A plasma sounder is an experiment emitting short wave packets into the ambient plasma and then it listens to the response. The assumption that the emitted waves are linear waves then allows to determine the plasma magnetic field strength, the electron density and possibly the electron thermal velocity from the response spectrum. The impact of the non-linear instabilities on the plasma wave response spectrum provided by a sounder have been predicted in this work and the predictions have been shown to match a wide range of experimental observations. A dependence of the instabilities on the simulation noise levels, for example the dependence of the wave interaction time in a wave decay on the noise electric field amplitudes, required it to investigate the simulation noise properties (spectral distribution) and to compare it to real plasma thermal noise. It has also been examined how a finite length antenna would filter the simulation noise. (author)

  5. Packet reversed packet combining scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhunia, C.T.

    2006-07-01

    The packet combining scheme is a well defined simple error correction scheme with erroneous copies at the receiver. It offers higher throughput combined with ARQ protocols in networks than that of basic ARQ protocols. But packet combining scheme fails to correct errors when the errors occur in the same bit locations of two erroneous copies. In the present work, we propose a scheme that will correct error if the errors occur at the same bit location of the erroneous copies. The proposed scheme when combined with ARQ protocol will offer higher throughput. (author)

  6. Possibility to Probe Negative Values of a Wigner Function in Scattering of a Coherent Superposition of Electronic Wave Packets by Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlovets, Dmitry V; Serbo, Valeriy G

    2017-10-27

    Within a plane-wave approximation in scattering, an incoming wave packet's Wigner function stays positive everywhere, which obscures such purely quantum phenomena as nonlocality and entanglement. With the advent of the electron microscopes with subnanometer-sized beams, one can enter a genuinely quantum regime where the latter effects become only moderately attenuated. Here we show how to probe negative values of the Wigner function in scattering of a coherent superposition of two Gaussian packets with a nonvanishing impact parameter between them (a Schrödinger's cat state) by atomic targets. For hydrogen in the ground 1s state, a small parameter of the problem, a ratio a/σ_{⊥} of the Bohr radius a to the beam width σ_{⊥}, is no longer vanishing. We predict an azimuthal asymmetry of the scattered electrons, which is found to be up to 10%, and argue that it can be reliably detected. The production of beams with the not-everywhere-positive Wigner functions and the probing of such quantum effects can open new perspectives for noninvasive electron microscopy, quantum tomography, particle physics, and so forth.

  7. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyi Li

    Full Text Available Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates.

  8. Nonlinear self-modulation of ion-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezi, H.; Schwarzenegger, K.; Simons, A.L.; Ohsawa, Y.; Kamimura, T.

    1978-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of an ion-acoustic wave packet is studied. Experimentally, it is found that (i) nonlinear phase modulation develops in the wave packet; (ii) the phase modulation, together with the dispersion effect, causes expansion and breaking of the wave packet; (iii) the ions trapped in the troughs of the wave potential introduce self-phase modulation; and (iv) the ion-acoustic wave is stable with respect to the modulational instability. Computer simulations have reproduced the experimental results. The physical picture and the model equation describing the wave evolution are discussed

  9. Numerical simulation of electrostatic waves in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erz, U.

    1981-08-01

    In this paper the propagation of electrostatic waves in plasmas and the non-linear interactions, which occur in the case of large wave amplitudes, are studied using a new numerical method for plasma simulation. This mathematical description is based on the Vlasov-model. Changes in the distribution-function are taken into account and thus plasma kinetic effects can be treated. (orig./HT) [de

  10. Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E.; Harvey, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons at (2.5-3)xv te , where v te ≡ (2T e /m e ) 1/2 is the electron thermal speed. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron temperature is lower, making LH current drive (LHCD) a promising technique for off-axis (r/a≥0.60) current profile control in reactor grade plasmas. Established techniques for computing wave propagation and absorption use WKB expansions with non-Maxwellian self-consistent distributions.In typical plasma conditions with electron densities of several 10 19 m -3 and toroidal magnetic fields strengths of 4 Telsa, the perpendicular wavelength is of the order of 1 mm and the parallel wavelength is of the order of 1 cm. Even in a relatively small device such as Alcator C-Mod with a minor radius of 22 cm, the number of wavelengths that must be resolved requires large amounts of computational resources for the full wave treatment. These requirements are met with a massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave code that has been adapted specifically for the simulation of LH waves [J. C. Wright, et al., Commun. Comput. Phys., 4, 545 (2008), J. C. Wright, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16 July (2009)]. This model accurately represents the effects of focusing and diffraction that occur in LH propagation. It is also coupled with a Fokker-Planck solver, CQL3D, to provide self-consistent distribution functions for the plasma dielectric as well as a synthetic hard X-ray (HXR) diagnostic for direct comparisons with experimental measurements of LH waves.The wave solutions from the TORIC-LH zero FLR model will be compared to the results from ray tracing from the GENRAY/CQL3D code via the synthetic HXR diagnostic and power deposition.

  11. Numerical simulations of convectively excited gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Magneto-convection and gravity waves are numerically simulated with a nonlinear, three-dimensional, time-dependent model of a stratified, rotating, spherical fluid shell heated from below. A Solar-like reference state is specified while global velocity, magnetic field, and thermodynamic perturbations are computed from the anelastic magnetohydrodynamic equations. Convective overshooting from the upper (superadiabatic) part of the shell excites gravity waves in the lower (subadiabatic) part. Due to differential rotation and Coriolis forces, convective cell patterns propagate eastward with a latitudinally dependent phase velocity. The structure of the excited wave motions in the stable region is more time-dependent than that of the convective motions above. The magnetic field tends to be concentrated over giant-cell downdrafts in the convective zone but is affected very little by the wave motion in the stable region

  12. Internally driven inertial waves in geodynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, A.; Davidson, P. A.; Christensen, U. R.; Wicht, J.

    2018-05-01

    Inertial waves are oscillations in a rotating fluid, such as the Earth's outer core, which result from the restoring action of the Coriolis force. In an earlier work, it was argued by Davidson that inertial waves launched near the equatorial regions could be important for the α2 dynamo mechanism, as they can maintain a helicity distribution which is negative (positive) in the north (south). Here, we identify such internally driven inertial waves, triggered by buoyant anomalies in the equatorial regions in a strongly forced geodynamo simulation. Using the time derivative of vertical velocity, ∂uz/∂t, as a diagnostic for traveling wave fronts, we find that the horizontal movement in the buoyancy field near the equator is well correlated with a corresponding movement of the fluid far from the equator. Moreover, the azimuthally averaged spectrum of ∂uz/∂t lies in the inertial wave frequency range. We also test the dispersion properties of the waves by computing the spectral energy as a function of frequency, ϖ, and the dispersion angle, θ. Our results suggest that the columnar flow in the rotation-dominated core, which is an important ingredient for the maintenance of a dipolar magnetic field, is maintained despite the chaotic evolution of the buoyancy field on a fast timescale by internally driven inertial waves.

  13. Fast-forward scaling theory for phase imprinting on a BEC: creation of a wave packet with uniform momentum density and loading to Bloch states without disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shumpei; Nakamura, Katsuhiro; Nakahara, Mikio

    2018-02-01

    We study phase imprinting on Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with the fast-forward scaling theory revealing a nontrivial scaling property in quantum dynamics. We introduce a wave packet with uniform momentum density (WPUM) which has peculiar properties but is short-lived. The fast-forward scaling theory is applied to derive the driving potential for creation of the WPUMs in a predetermined time. Fast manipulation is essential for the creation of WPUMs because of the instability of the state. We also study loading of a BEC into a predetermined Bloch state in the lowest band from the ground state of a periodic potential. Controlled linear potential is not sufficient for creation of the Bloch state with large wavenumber because the change in the amplitude of the order parameter is not negligible. We derive the exact driving potential for creation of predetermined Bloch states using the obtained theory.

  14. User's Manual for the Simulating Waves Nearshore Model (SWAN)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allard, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) model is a numerical wave model used to obtain realistic estimates of wave parameters in coastal areas, lakes, and estuaries from given wind, bottom, and current conditions...

  15. Extensible packet processing architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Hamlet, Jason R.; Pierson, Lyndon G.; Olsberg, Ronald R.; Chun, Guy D.

    2013-08-20

    A technique for distributed packet processing includes sequentially passing packets associated with packet flows between a plurality of processing engines along a flow through data bus linking the plurality of processing engines in series. At least one packet within a given packet flow is marked by a given processing engine to signify by the given processing engine to the other processing engines that the given processing engine has claimed the given packet flow for processing. A processing function is applied to each of the packet flows within the processing engines and the processed packets are output on a time-shared, arbitered data bus coupled to the plurality of processing engines.

  16. Simulation of dust-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winske, D.; Murillo, M.S.; Rosenberg, M.

    1998-01-01

    The authors use molecular dynamics (MD) and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation methods to investigate the dispersion relation of dust-acoustic waves in a one-dimensional, strongly coupled (Coulomb coupling parameter Λ = ratio of the Coulomb energy to the thermal energy = 120) dusty plasma. They study both cases where the dust is represented by a small number of simulation particles that form into a regular array structure (crystal limit) as well as where the dust is represented by a much larger number of particles (fluid limit)

  17. Computer simulations of collisionless shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    A review of the contributions of particle computer simulations to the understanding of the physics of magnetic shock waves in collisionless plasmas is presented. The emphasis is on the relation between the computer simulation results, spacecraft observations of shocks in space, and related theories, rather than on technical aspects of the numerics. It is shown that much has been learned from the comparison of ISEE spacecraft observations of the terrestrial bow shock and particle computer simulations concerning the quasi-perpendicular, supercritical shock (ion scale structure, ion reflection mechanism and ultimate dissipation processes). Particle computer simulations have also had an appreciable prospective role in the investigation of the physics of quasi-parallel shocks, about which still little is known observationally. Moreover, these numerical techniques have helped to clarify the process of suprathermal ion rejection by the shock into the foreshock, and the subsequent evolution of the ions in the foreshock. 95 references

  18. Photodissociation of water. II. Wave packet calculations for the photofragmentation of H2O and D2O in the B˜ band

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harrevelt, Rob; van Hemert, Marc C.

    2000-04-01

    A complete three-dimensional quantum mechanical description of the photodissociation of water in the B˜ band, starting from its rotational ground state, is presented. In order to include B˜-X˜ vibronic coupling and the B˜-Ã Renner-Teller coupling, diabatic electronic states have been constructed from adiabatic electronic states and matrix elements of the electronic angular momentum operators, following the procedure developed by A. J. Dobbyn and P. J. Knowles [Mol. Phys. 91, 1107 (1997)], using the ab initio results discussed in the preceding paper. The dynamics is studied using wave packet methods, and the evolution of the time-dependent wave function is discussed in detail. Results for the H2O and D2O absorption spectra, OH(A)/OH(X) and OD(A)/OD(X) branching ratios, and rovibrational distributions of the OH and OD fragments are presented and compared with available experimental data. The present theoretical results agree at least qualitatively with the experiments. The calculations show that the absorption spectrum and the product state distributions are strongly influenced by long-lived resonances on the adiabatic B˜ state. It is also shown that molecular rotation plays an important role in the photofragmentation process, due to both the Renner-Teller B˜-X˜ mixing, and the strong effect of out-of-plane molecular rotations (K>0) on the dynamics at near linear HOH and HHO geometries.

  19. Controlled Quantum Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMartino, Salvatore; DeSiena, Silvio

    1996-01-01

    We look at time evolution of a physical system from the point of view of dynamical control theory. Normally we solve motion equation with a given external potential and we obtain time evolution. Standard examples are the trajectories in classical mechanics or the wave functions in Quantum Mechanics. In the control theory, we have the configurational variables of a physical system, we choose a velocity field and with a suited strategy we force the physical system to have a well defined evolution. The evolution of the system is the 'premium' that the controller receives if he has adopted the right strategy. The strategy is given by well suited laboratory devices. The control mechanisms are in many cases non linear; it is necessary, namely, a feedback mechanism to retain in time the selected evolution. Our aim is to introduce a scheme to obtain Quantum wave packets by control theory. The program is to choose the characteristics of a packet, that is, the equation of evolution for its centre and a controlled dispersion, and to give a building scheme from some initial state (for example a solution of stationary Schroedinger equation). It seems natural in this view to use stochastic approach to Quantum Mechanics, that is, Stochastic Mechanics [S.M.]. It is a quantization scheme different from ordinary ones only formally. This approach introduces in quantum theory the whole mathematical apparatus of stochastic control theory. Stochastic Mechanics, in our view, is more intuitive when we want to study all the classical-like problems. We apply our scheme to build two classes of quantum packets both derived generalizing some properties of coherent states.

  20. Ising model for packet routing control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Keisuke; Yamaguchi, Chiaki

    2004-01-01

    For packet routing control in computer networks, we propose an Ising model which is defined in order to express competition among a queue length and a distance from a node with a packet to its destination node. By introducing a dynamics for a mean-field value of an Ising spin, we show by computer simulations that effective control of packet routing through priority links is possible

  1. Slamming Simulations in a Conditional Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seng, Sopheak; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2012-01-01

    A study of slamming events in conditional waves is presented in this paper. The ship is sailing in head sea and the motion is solved for under the assumption of rigid body motion constrained to two degree-of-freedom i.e. heave and pitch. Based on a time domain non-linear strip theory most probable...... surface NS/VOF CFD simulations under the same wave conditions. In moderate seas and no occurrence of slamming the structural responses predicted by the methods agree well. When slamming occurs the strip theory overpredicts VBM but the peak values of VBM occurs at approximately the same time as predicted...... by the CFD method implying the possibility to use the more accurate CFD results to improve the estimation of slamming loads in the strip theory through a rational correction coefficient....

  2. Reality of a bounce motion model of the wave packets of Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feygin, F. Z.; Prikner, Karel; Nekrasov, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 6 (2003), s. 701-707 ISSN 0016-7932 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK3012103 Grant - others:INTAS(XE) 99-0335; RFFR(RU) 02-05-64610; RFFR(RU) 02-05-64612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : Pc1 bounce effect * inosphere reflection coefficient * EMIC-wave Poynting vector Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.342, year: 2003

  3. 2D full wave simulation on electromagnetic wave propagation in toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, Hitoshi; Uruta, Go; Nakayama, Kazunori; Mase, Atsushi

    2002-01-01

    Global full-wave simulation on electromagnetic wave propagation in toroidal plasma with an external magnetic field imaging a tokamak configuration is performed in two dimensions. The temporal behavior of an electromagnetic wave launched into plasma from a wave-guiding region is obtained. (author)

  4. Non-Hermitian wave packet approximation for coupled two-level systems in weak and intense fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puthumpally-Joseph, Raiju; Charron, Eric [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay (ISMO), CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91405 Orsay (France); Sukharev, Maxim [Science and Mathematics Faculty, College of Letters and Sciences, Arizona State University, Mesa, Arizona 85212 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We introduce a non-Hermitian Schrödinger-type approximation of optical Bloch equations for two-level systems. This approximation provides a complete and accurate description of the coherence and decoherence dynamics in both weak and strong laser fields at the cost of losing accuracy in the description of populations. In this approach, it is sufficient to propagate the wave function of the quantum system instead of the density matrix, providing that relaxation and dephasing are taken into account via automatically adjusted time-dependent gain and decay rates. The developed formalism is applied to the problem of scattering and absorption of electromagnetic radiation by a thin layer comprised of interacting two-level emitters.

  5. Rapid Monte Carlo Simulation of Gravitational Wave Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.

    2015-01-01

    With the detection of gravitational waves on the horizon, astrophysical catalogs produced by gravitational wave observatories can be used to characterize the populations of sources and validate different galactic population models. Efforts to simulate gravitational wave catalogs and source populations generally focus on population synthesis models that require extensive time and computational power to produce a single simulated galaxy. Monte Carlo simulations of gravitational wave source populations can also be used to generate observation catalogs from the gravitational wave source population. Monte Carlo simulations have the advantes of flexibility and speed, enabling rapid galactic realizations as a function of galactic binary parameters with less time and compuational resources required. We present a Monte Carlo method for rapid galactic simulations of gravitational wave binary populations.

  6. Waves and particles in the Fermi accelerator model. Numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meplan, O.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to a numerical study of the quantum dynamics of the Fermi accelerator which is classically chaotic: it is particle in a one dimensional box with a oscillating wall. First, we study the classical dynamics: we show that the time of impact of the particle with the moving wall and its energy in the wall frame are conjugated variables and that Poincare surface of sections in these variables are more understandable than the usual stroboscopic sections. Then, the quantum dynamics of this systems is studied by the means of two numerical methods. The first one is a generalization of the KKR method in the space-time; it is enough to solve an integral equation on the boundary of a space-time billiard. The second method is faster and is based on successive free propagations and kicks of potential. This allows us to obtain Floquet states which we can on one hand, compare to the classical dynamics with the help of Husimi distributions and on the other hand, study as a function of parameters of the system. This study leads us to nice illustrations of phenomenons such as spatial localizations of a wave packet in a vibrating well or tunnel effects. In the adiabatic situation, we give a formula for quasi-energies which exhibits a phase term independent of states. In this regime, there exist some particular situations where the quasi-energy spectrum presents a total quasi-degeneracy. Then, the wave packet energy can increase significantly. This phenomenon is quite surprising for smooth motion of the wall. The third part deals with the evolution of a classical wave in the Fermi accelerator. Using generalized KKR method, we show a surprising phenomenon: in most of situations (so long as the wall motion is periodic), a wave is localized exponentially in the well and its energy increases in a geometric way. (author). 107 refs., 66 figs., 5 tabs. 2 appends

  7. Effects of reagent rotational excitation on the H + CHD3 → H2 + CD3 reaction: A seven dimensional time-dependent wave packet study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Dong H.

    2014-01-01

    Seven-dimensional time-dependent wave packet calculations have been carried out for the title reaction to obtain reaction probabilities and cross sections for CHD 3 in J 0 = 1, 2 rotationally excited initial states with k 0 = 0 − J 0 (the projection of CHD 3 rotational angular momentum on its C 3 axis). Under the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation, the initial states with the projection of the total angular momentum on the body fixed axis (K 0 ) equal to k 0 are found to be much more reactive, indicating strong dependence of reactivity on the orientation of the reagent CHD 3 with respect to the relative velocity between the reagents H and CHD 3 . However, at the coupled-channel (CC) level this dependence becomes much weak although in general the K 0 specified cross sections for the K 0 = k 0 initial states remain primary to the overall cross sections, implying the Coriolis coupling is important to the dynamics of the reaction. The calculated CS and CC integral cross sections obtained after K 0 averaging for the J 0 = 1, 2 initial states with all different k 0 are essentially identical to the corresponding CS and CC results for the J 0 = 0 initial state, meaning that the initial rotational excitation of CHD 3 up to J 0 = 2, regardless of its initial k 0 , does not have any effect on the total cross sections for the title reaction, and the errors introduced by the CS approximation on integral cross sections for the rotationally excited J 0 = 1, 2 initial states are the same as those for the J 0 = 0 initial state

  8. Accurate Quantum Wave Packet Study of the Deep Well D+ + HD Reaction: Product Ro-vibrational State-Resolved Integral and Differential Cross Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haixiang; Zhu, Weimin; Su, Wenli; Dong, Lihui; Li, Bin

    2018-03-08

    The H + + H 2 reaction and its isotopic variants as the simplest triatomic ion-molecule reactive system have been attracting much interests, however there are few studies on the titled reaction at state-to-state level until recent years. In this work, accurate state-to-state quantum dynamics studies of the titled reaction have been carried out by a reactant Jacobi coordinate-based time-dependent wave packet approach on diabatic potential energy surfaces constructed by Kamisaka et al. Product ro-vibrational state-resolved information has been calculated for collision energies up to 0.2 eV with maximal total angular momentum J = 40. The necessity of including all K-component for accounting the Coriolis coupling for the reaction has been illuminated. Competitions between the two product channels, (D + + HD' → D' + + HD and D + + HD' → H + + DD') were investigated. Total integral cross sections suggest that resonances enhance the reactivity of channel D + + HD'→ H + + DD', however, resonances depress the reactivity of the another channel D + + HD' → D' + + HD. The structures of the differential cross sections are complicated and depend strongly on collision energies of the two channels and also on the product rotational states. All of the product ro-vibrational state-resolved differential cross sections for this reaction do not exhibit rigorous backward-forward symmetry which may indicate that the lifetimes of the intermediate resonance complexes should not be that long. The dynamical observables of this deuterated isotopic reaction are quite different from the reaction of H + + H 2 → H 2 + H + reported previously.

  9. Time-Dependent Quantum Wave Packet Study of the Si + OH → SiO + H Reaction: Cross Sections and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero Santamaría, Alejandro; Dayou, Fabrice; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesus; Monnerville, Maurice

    2017-03-02

    The dynamics of the Si( 3 P) + OH(X 2 Π) → SiO(X 1 Σ + ) + H( 2 S) reaction is investigated by means of the time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) approach using an ab initio potential energy surface recently developed by Dayou et al. ( J. Chem. Phys. 2013 , 139 , 204305 ) for the ground X 2 A' electronic state. Total reaction probabilities have been calculated for the first 15 rotational states j = 0-14 of OH(v=0,j) at a total angular momentum J = 0 up to a collision energy of 1 eV. Integral cross sections and state-selected rate constants for the temperature range 10-500 K were obtained within the J-shifting approximation. The reaction probabilities display highly oscillatory structures indicating the contribution of long-lived quasibound states supported by the deep SiOH/HSiO wells. The cross sections behave with collision energies as expected for a barrierless reaction and are slightly sensitive to the initial rotational excitation of OH. The thermal rate constants show a marked temperature dependence below 200 K with a maximum value around 15 K. The TDWP results globally agree with the results of earlier quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations carried out by Rivero-Santamaria et al. ( Chem. Phys. Lett. 2014 , 610-611 , 335 - 340 ) with the same potential energy surface. In particular, the thermal rate constants display a similar temperature dependence, with TDWP values smaller than the QCT ones over the whole temperature range.

  10. Design of wave breaking experiments and A-Posteriori Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurnia, R.; Kurnia, Ruddy; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results of 30 wave breaking experiments conducted in the long wave tank of TU Delft, Department of Maritime and Transport Technology (6,7 and 10-12 March 2014), together with simulations performed before the experiment to determine the required wave maker motion and a-posteriori

  11. Design of wave breaking experiments and A-Posteriori Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurnia, Ruddy; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    This report presents results of 30 wave breaking experiments conducted in the long wave tank of TU Delft, Department of Maritime and Transport Technology (6,7 and 10-12 March 2014), together with simulations performed before the experiment to determine the required wave maker motion and a-posteriori

  12. Q FUNCTION AWARE OPTICAL PACKET SWITCH WITH LOW PACKET LOSS RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OMPAL SINGH

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical packet switching (OPS is a very promising technology for the next generation data transfer due to the very large bandwidth of the optical fiber. The success of the OPS relies heavily on design of the node architecture which supports comparatively larger buffering capacity without detiorating signal quality too much and it should provide very low packet loss probability with reasonably low average delay. In this paper, a design analysis of low complexity OPS node architecture is discussed along-with its advantages. The presented architecture support both fixed and variable length packets. The packets are stored in a single piece of fiber using the WDM technology. Physical layer analysis presented in this paper is to obtain the Q function (Bit Error Rate. Finally, the Monte Carlo simulation is done to obtain the packet loss. The average delay performance of the switch and effect of Q values on packet loss rates are discussed.

  13. Design of Packet-Based Block Codes with Shift Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Ilow

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces packet-oriented block codes for the recovery of lost packets and the correction of an erroneous single packet. Specifically, a family of systematic codes is proposed, based on a Vandermonde matrix applied to a group of k information packets to construct r redundant packets, where the elements of the Vandermonde matrix are bit-level right arithmetic shift operators. The code design is applicable to packets of any size, provided that the packets within a block of k information packets are of uniform length. In order to decrease the overhead associated with packet padding using shift operators, non-Vandermonde matrices are also proposed for designing packet-oriented block codes. An efficient matrix inversion procedure for the off-line design of the decoding algorithm is presented to recover lost packets. The error correction capability of the design is investigated as well. The decoding algorithm, based on syndrome decoding, to correct a single erroneous packet in a group of n=k+r received packets is presented. The paper is equipped with examples of codes using different parameters. The code designs and their performance are tested using Monte Carlo simulations; the results obtained exhibit good agreement with the corresponding theoretical results.

  14. Design of Packet-Based Block Codes with Shift Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilow Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces packet-oriented block codes for the recovery of lost packets and the correction of an erroneous single packet. Specifically, a family of systematic codes is proposed, based on a Vandermonde matrix applied to a group of information packets to construct redundant packets, where the elements of the Vandermonde matrix are bit-level right arithmetic shift operators. The code design is applicable to packets of any size, provided that the packets within a block of information packets are of uniform length. In order to decrease the overhead associated with packet padding using shift operators, non-Vandermonde matrices are also proposed for designing packet-oriented block codes. An efficient matrix inversion procedure for the off-line design of the decoding algorithm is presented to recover lost packets. The error correction capability of the design is investigated as well. The decoding algorithm, based on syndrome decoding, to correct a single erroneous packet in a group of received packets is presented. The paper is equipped with examples of codes using different parameters. The code designs and their performance are tested using Monte Carlo simulations; the results obtained exhibit good agreement with the corresponding theoretical results.

  15. Multiscale Simulation of Breaking Wave Impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Ole

    compare reasonably well. The incompressible and inviscid ALE-WLS model is coupled with the potential flow model of Engsig-Karup et al. [2009], to perform multiscale calculation of breaking wave impacts on a vertical breakwater. The potential flow model provides accurate calculation of the wave...... with a potential flow model to provide multiscale calculation of forces from breaking wave impacts on structures....

  16. Quantum dynamics through a wave packet method to study electron-hydrogen and atom-dihydrogen collisions; Dynamique quantique par une methode de paquets d'ondes. Etude des collisions electron-hydrogene et atome-dihydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, L

    2002-11-01

    The thesis concerns the development and implementation of numerical methods for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We first considered the case of electron-hydrogen scattering. The originality of our method is the use of a non-uniform radial grid defined by a Schwarz interpolation based on a Coulomb reference function. This grid allows many hydrogen bound states and associated matrix elements of various operators to be reproduced to machine accuracy. The wave function is propagated in time using a Split-Operator method. The efficiency of our method allows the wave function to be propagated out to large distances for all partial waves. We obtain excitation and ionization cross sections in excellent agreement with the best experimental and theoretical data. We subsequently adapted the method and the program package to study reactive atom-dihydrogen scattering. The wave packet is described using product Jacobi coordinates on a regular grid of radial coordinates combined with a basis of Legendre polynomials for the angular part (partial wave S). The wave function is analysed using a time-to-energy Fourier transform, which provides results over the energy range covered by the initial wave packet in one calculation. The method was first tested on the quasi-direct (F,H2) reaction and then applied to the indirect (C(1D),H2)reaction. The state-to-state reaction probabilities are in good agreement with those obtained by a time-independent approach. In particular, the strongly resonant structure of the (C(1D),H2) reaction probabilities is well reproduced. (author)

  17. Quantum dynamics through a wave packet method to study electron-hydrogen and atom-dihydrogen collisions; Dynamique quantique par une methode de paquets d'ondes. Etude des collisions electron-hydrogene et atome-dihydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, L

    2002-11-01

    The thesis concerns the development and implementation of numerical methods for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We first considered the case of electron-hydrogen scattering. The originality of our method is the use of a non-uniform radial grid defined by a Schwarz interpolation based on a Coulomb reference function. This grid allows many hydrogen bound states and associated matrix elements of various operators to be reproduced to machine accuracy. The wave function is propagated in time using a Split-Operator method. The efficiency of our method allows the wave function to be propagated out to large distances for all partial waves. We obtain excitation and ionization cross sections in excellent agreement with the best experimental and theoretical data. We subsequently adapted the method and the program package to study reactive atom-dihydrogen scattering. The wave packet is described using product Jacobi coordinates on a regular grid of radial coordinates combined with a basis of Legendre polynomials for the angular part (partial wave S). The wave function is analysed using a time-to-energy Fourier transform, which provides results over the energy range covered by the initial wave packet in one calculation. The method was first tested on the quasi-direct (F,H2) reaction and then applied to the indirect (C(1D),H2)reaction. The state-to-state reaction probabilities are in good agreement with those obtained by a time-independent approach. In particular, the strongly resonant structure of the (C(1D),H2) reaction probabilities is well reproduced. (author)

  18. Simulation of Wave Overtopping of Maritime Structures in a Numerical Wave Flume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago C. A. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical wave flume based on the particle finite element method (PFEM is applied to simulate wave overtopping for impermeable maritime structures. An assessment of the performance and robustness of the numerical wave flume is carried out for two different cases comparing numerical results with experimental data. In the first case, a well-defined benchmark test of a simple low-crested structure overtopped by regular nonbreaking waves is presented, tested in the lab, and simulated in the numerical wave flume. In the second case, state-of-the-art physical experiments of a trapezoidal structure placed on a sloping beach overtopped by regular breaking waves are simulated in the numerical wave flume. For both cases, main overtopping events are well detected by the numerical wave flume. However, nonlinear processes controlling the tests proposed, such as nonlinear wave generation, energy losses along the wave propagation track, wave reflection, and overtopping events, are reproduced with more accuracy in the first case. Results indicate that a numerical wave flume based on the PFEM can be applied as an efficient tool to supplement physical models, semiempirical formulations, and other numerical techniques to deal with overtopping of maritime structures.

  19. Design of a bounded wave EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevat, P. A. A.

    1989-06-01

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) simulators are used to simulate the EMP generated by a nuclear weapon and to harden equipment against the effects of EMP. At present, DREO has a 1 m EMP simulator for testing computer terminal size equipment. To develop the R and D capability for testing larger objects, such as a helicopter, a much bigger threat level facility is required. This report concerns the design of a bounded wave EMP simulator suitable for testing large size equipment. Different types of simulators are described and their pros and cons are discussed. A bounded wave parallel plate type simulator is chosen for it's efficiency and the least environmental impact. Detailed designs are given for 6 m and 10 m parallel plate type wire grid simulators. Electromagnetic fields inside and outside the simulators are computed. Preliminary specifications for a pulse generator required for the simulator are also given. Finally, the electromagnetic fields radiated from the simulator are computed and discussed.

  20. Analysis of Measured and Simulated Supraglottal Acoustic Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, Rubén; Evdokimova, Vera V; Evgrafova, Karina V; Godino-Llorente, Juan I; Skrelin, Pavel A

    2016-09-01

    To date, although much attention has been paid to the estimation and modeling of the voice source (ie, the glottal airflow volume velocity), the measurement and characterization of the supraglottal pressure wave have been much less studied. Some previous results have unveiled that the supraglottal pressure wave has some spectral resonances similar to those of the voice pressure wave. This makes the supraglottal wave partially intelligible. Although the explanation for such effect seems to be clearly related to the reflected pressure wave traveling upstream along the vocal tract, the influence that nonlinear source-filter interaction has on it is not as clear. This article provides an insight into this issue by comparing the acoustic analyses of measured and simulated supraglottal and voice waves. Simulations have been performed using a high-dimensional discrete vocal fold model. Results of such comparative analysis indicate that spectral resonances in the supraglottal wave are mainly caused by the regressive pressure wave that travels upstream along the vocal tract and not by source-tract interaction. On the contrary and according to simulation results, source-tract interaction has a role in the loss of intelligibility that happens in the supraglottal wave with respect to the voice wave. This loss of intelligibility mainly corresponds to spectral differences for frequencies above 1500 Hz. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of packet retransmission with finite packet lifetime on traffic capacity in scale-free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhong-Yuan; Ma, Jian-Feng

    Existing routing strategies such as the global dynamic routing [X. Ling, M. B. Hu, R. Jiang and Q. S. Wu, Phys. Rev. E 81, 016113 (2010)] can achieve very high traffic capacity at the cost of extremely long packet traveling delay. In many real complex networks, especially for real-time applications such as the instant communication software, extremely long packet traveling time is unacceptable. In this work, we propose to assign a finite Time-to-Live (TTL) parameter for each packet. To guarantee every packet to arrive at its destination within its TTL, we assume that a packet is retransmitted by its source once its TTL expires. We employ source routing mechanisms in the traffic model to avoid the routing-flaps induced by the global dynamic routing. We compose extensive simulations to verify our proposed mechanisms. With small TTL, the effects of packet retransmission on network traffic capacity are obvious, and the phase transition from flow free state to congested state occurs. For the purpose of reducing the computation frequency of the routing table, we employ a computing cycle Tc within which the routing table is recomputed once. The simulation results show that the traffic capacity decreases with increasing Tc. Our work provides a good insight into the understanding of effects of packet retransmission with finite packet lifetime on traffic capacity in scale-free networks.

  2. Optical packet switched networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Bukhave

    1999-01-01

    Optical packet switched networks are investigated with emphasis on the performance of the packet switch blocks. Initially, the network context of the optical packet switched network is described showing that a packet network will provide transparency, flexibility and bridge the granularity gap...... in interferometric wavelength converters is investigated showing that a 10 Gbit/s 19 4x4 swich blocks can be cascaded at a BER of 10-14. An analytical traffic model enables the calculation of the traffice performance of a WDM packet network. Hereby the importance of WDM and wavelegth conversion in the switch blocks...... is established as a flexible means to reduce the optical buffer, e.g., the number of fibre delay lines for a 16x16 switch block is reduced from 23 to 6 by going from 2 to 8 wavelength channels pr. inlet. Additionally, a component count analysis is carried out to illustrate the trade-offs in the switch block...

  3. Stress Wave Propagation in Larch Plantation Trees-Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenglu Liu; Fang Jiang; Xiping Wang; Houjiang Zhang; Wenhua Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we attempted to simulate stress wave propagation in virtual tree trunks and construct two dimensional (2D) wave-front maps in the longitudinal-radial section of the trunk. A tree trunk was modeled as an orthotropic cylinder in which wood properties along the fiber and in each of the two perpendicular directions were different. We used the COMSOL...

  4. Heat waves over Central Europe in regional climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotka, Ondřej; Kyselý, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Regional climate models (RCMs) have become a powerful tool for exploring impacts of global climate change on a regional scale. The aim of the study is to evaluate the capability of RCMs to reproduce characteristics of major heat waves over Central Europe in their simulations of the recent climate (1961-2000), with a focus on the most severe and longest Central European heat wave that occurred in 1994. We analyzed 7 RCM simulations with a high resolution (0.22°) from the ENSEMBLES project, driven by the ERA-40 reanalysis. In observed data (the E-OBS 9.0 dataset), heat waves were defined on the basis of deviations of daily maximum temperature (Tmax) from the 95% quantile of summer Tmax distribution in grid points over Central Europe. The same methodology was applied in the RCM simulations; we used corresponding 95% quantiles (calculated for each RCM and grid point) in order to remove the bias of modelled Tmax. While climatological characteristics of heat waves are reproduced reasonably well in the RCM ensemble, we found major deficiencies in simulating heat waves in individual years. For example, METNOHIRHAM simulated very severe heat waves in 1996, when no heat wave was observed. Focusing on the major 1994 heat wave, considerable differences in simulated temperature patterns were found among the RCMs. The differences in the temperature patterns were clearly linked to the simulated amount of precipitation during this event. The 1994 heat wave was almost absent in all RCMs that did not capture the observed precipitation deficit, while it was by far most pronounced in KNMI-RACMO that simulated virtually no precipitation over Central Europe during the 15-day period of the heat wave. By contrast to precipitation, values of evaporative fraction in the RCMs were not linked to severity of the simulated 1994 heat wave. This suggests a possible major contribution of other factors such as cloud cover and associated downward shortwave radiation. Therefore, a more detailed

  5. Compaction wave profiles: Simulations of gas gun experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    Mesoscale simulations of a compaction wave in a granular bed of HMX have been performed. The grains are fully resolved in order that the compaction, i.e., the porosity behind the wave front, is determined by the elastic-plastic response of the grains rather than by an empirical law for the porosity as a function of pressure. Numerical wave profiles of the pressure and velocity are compared with data from a gas gun experiment. The experiment used an initial porosity of 36%, and the wave had a pressure comparable to the yield strength of the grains. The profiles are measured at the front and back of the granular bed. The transit time for the compaction wave to propagate between the gauges determines the wave speed. The wave speed depends on the porosity behind the wave and is affected by the strength model. The yield strength needed to match the experimental wave speed is discussed. Analysis of the lead wave through the granular bed, based on impedance matches using the Hugoniot loci, indicates that the compaction wave triggers a small amount of burn, less than 1% mass fraction, on the microsecond time scale of the experiment. copyright 2001 American Institute of Physics

  6. Design of full scale wave simulator for testing Power Take Off systems for wave energy converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, H. C.; Hansen, R. H.; Hansen, Anders Hedegaard

    2016-01-01

    is therefore on the design and commissioning of a full scale wave simulator for testing PTO-systems for point absorbers. The challenge is to be able to design a system, which mimics the behavior of a wave when interacting with a given PTO-system – especially when considering discrete type PTO...

  7. Advanced radiometric and interferometric milimeter-wave scene simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauss, B. I.; Moffa, P. J.; Steele, W. G.; Agravante, H.; Davidheiser, R.; Samec, T.; Young, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Smart munitions and weapons utilize various imaging sensors (including passive IR, active and passive millimeter-wave, and visible wavebands) to detect/identify targets at short standoff ranges and in varied terrain backgrounds. In order to design and evaluate these sensors under a variety of conditions, a high-fidelity scene simulation capability is necessary. Such a capability for passive millimeter-wave scene simulation exists at TRW. TRW's Advanced Radiometric Millimeter-Wave Scene Simulation (ARMSS) code is a rigorous, benchmarked, end-to-end passive millimeter-wave scene simulation code for interpreting millimeter-wave data, establishing scene signatures and evaluating sensor performance. In passive millimeter-wave imaging, resolution is limited due to wavelength and aperture size. Where high resolution is required, the utility of passive millimeter-wave imaging is confined to short ranges. Recent developments in interferometry have made possible high resolution applications on military platforms. Interferometry or synthetic aperture radiometry allows the creation of a high resolution image with a sparsely filled aperture. Borrowing from research work in radio astronomy, we have developed and tested at TRW scene reconstruction algorithms that allow the recovery of the scene from a relatively small number of spatial frequency components. In this paper, the TRW modeling capability is described and numerical results are presented.

  8. 2D full-wave simulation of waves in space and tokamak plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Eun-Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation results using a 2D full-wave code (FW2D for space and NSTX fusion plasmas are presented. The FW2D code solves the cold plasma wave equations using the finite element method. The wave code has been successfully applied to describe low frequency waves in planetary magnetospheres (i.e., dipole geometry and the results include generation and propagation of externally driven ultra-low frequency waves via mode conversion at Mercury and mode coupling, refraction and reflection of internally driven field-aligned propagating left-handed electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC waves at Earth. In this paper, global structure of linearly polarized EMIC waves is examined and the result shows such resonant wave modes can be localized near the equatorial plane. We also adopt the FW2D code to tokamak geometry and examine radio frequency (RF waves in the scape-off layer (SOL of tokamaks. By adopting the rectangular and limiter boundary, we compare the results with existing AORSA simulations. The FW2D code results for the high harmonic fast wave heating case on NSTX with a rectangular vessel boundary shows excellent agreement with the AORSA code.

  9. 2D full-wave simulation of waves in space and tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Bertelli, Nicola; Johnson, Jay; Valeo, Ernest; Hosea, Joel

    2017-10-01

    Simulation results using a 2D full-wave code (FW2D) for space and NSTX fusion plasmas are presented. The FW2D code solves the cold plasma wave equations using the finite element method. The wave code has been successfully applied to describe low frequency waves in planetary magnetospheres (i.e., dipole geometry) and the results include generation and propagation of externally driven ultra-low frequency waves via mode conversion at Mercury and mode coupling, refraction and reflection of internally driven field-aligned propagating left-handed electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves at Earth. In this paper, global structure of linearly polarized EMIC waves is examined and the result shows such resonant wave modes can be localized near the equatorial plane. We also adopt the FW2D code to tokamak geometry and examine radio frequency (RF) waves in the scape-off layer (SOL) of tokamaks. By adopting the rectangular and limiter boundary, we compare the results with existing AORSA simulations. The FW2D code results for the high harmonic fast wave heating case on NSTX with a rectangular vessel boundary shows excellent agreement with the AORSA code.

  10. Simulation of Detecting Damage in Composite Stiffened Panel Using Lamb Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John T.; Ross, Richard W.; Huang, Guo L.; Yuan, Fuh G.

    2013-01-01

    Lamb wave damage detection in a composite stiffened panel is simulated by performing explicit transient dynamic finite element analyses and using signal imaging techniques. This virtual test process does not need to use real structures, actuators/sensors, or laboratory equipment. Quasi-isotropic laminates are used for the stiffened panels. Two types of damage are studied. One type is a damage in the skin bay and the other type is a debond between the stiffener flange and the skin. Innovative approaches for identifying the damage location and imaging the damage were developed. The damage location is identified by finding the intersection of the damage locus and the path of the time reversal wave packet re-emitted from the sensor nodes. The damage locus is a circle that envelops the potential damage locations. Its center is at the actuator location and its radius is computed by multiplying the group velocity by the time of flight to damage. To create a damage image for estimating the size of damage, a group of nodes in the neighborhood of the damage location is identified for applying an image condition. The image condition, computed at a finite element node, is the zero-lag cross-correlation (ZLCC) of the time-reversed incident wave signal and the time reversal wave signal from the sensor nodes. This damage imaging process is computationally efficient since only the ZLCC values of a small amount of nodes in the neighborhood of the identified damage location are computed instead of those of the full model.

  11. Design and Control of Full Scale Wave Energy Simulator System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik C.; Hansen, Anders Hedegaard; Hansen, Rico Hjerm

    2012-01-01

    For wave energy to become feasible it is a requirement that the efficiency and reliability of the power take-off (PTO) systems are significantly improved. The cost of installing and testing PTO-systems at sea are however very high, and the focus of the current paper is therefore on the design...... of a full scale wave simulator for testing PTO-systems for point absorbers. The main challenge is here to design a system, which mimics the behavior of a wave when interacting with a given PTO-system. The paper includes a description of the developed system, located at Aalborg University......, and the considerations behind the design. Based on the description a model of the system is presented, which, along with a description of the wave theory applied, makes the foundation for the control strategy. The objective of the control strategy is to emulate not only the wave behavior, but also the dynamic wave...

  12. Coupling atmospheric and ocean wave models for storm simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting

    the atmosphere must, by conservation, result in the generation of the surface waves and currents. The physics-based methods are sensitive to the choice of wind-input source function (Sin), parameterization of high-frequency wave spectra tail, and numerical cut-off frequencies. Unfortunately, literature survey......This thesis studies the wind-wave interactions through the coupling between the atmospheric model and ocean surface wave models. Special attention is put on storm simulations in the North Sea for wind energy applications in the coastal zones. The two aspects, namely storm conditions and coastal...... shows that in most wind-wave coupling systems, either the Sin in the wave model is different from the one used for the momentum flux estimation in the atmospheric model, or the methods are too sensitive to the parameterization of high-frequency spectra tail and numerical cut-off frequencies. To confront...

  13. Slamming Simulations in a Conditional Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seng, Sopheak; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2012-01-01

    A study of slamming events in conditional waves is presented in this paper. The ship is sailing in head sea and the motion is solved for under the assumption of rigid body motion constrained to two degree-of-freedom i.e. heave and pitch. Based on a time domain non-linear strip theory most probable...

  14. Rotating quantum Gaussian packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, V V

    2015-01-01

    We study two-dimensional quantum Gaussian packets with a fixed value of mean angular momentum. This value is the sum of two independent parts: the ‘external’ momentum related to the motion of the packet center and the ‘internal’ momentum due to quantum fluctuations. The packets minimizing the mean energy of an isotropic oscillator with the fixed mean angular momentum are found. They exist for ‘co-rotating’ external and internal motions, and they have nonzero correlation coefficients between coordinates and momenta, together with some (moderate) amount of quadrature squeezing. Variances of angular momentum and energy are calculated, too. Differences in the behavior of ‘co-rotating’ and ‘anti-rotating’ packets are shown. The time evolution of rotating Gaussian packets is analyzed, including the cases of a charge in a homogeneous magnetic field and a free particle. In the latter case, the effect of initial shrinking of packets with big enough coordinate-momentum correlation coefficients (followed by the well known expansion) is discovered. This happens due to a competition of ‘focusing’ and ‘de-focusing’ in the orthogonal directions. (paper)

  15. Simulation of Irregular Waves and Wave Induced Loads on Wind Power Plants in Shallow Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumars, Jenny [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Water Environment Transport

    2004-05-01

    The essay gives a short introduction to waves and discusses the problem with non-linear waves in shallow water and how they effect an offshore wind energy converter. The focus is on the realisation of non-linear waves in the time domain from short-term statistics in the form of a variance density spectrum of the wave elevation. For this purpose the wave transformation from deep water to the near to shore site of a wind energy farm at Bockstigen has been calculated with the use of SWAN (Simulating Waves Near Shore). The result is a wave spectrum, which can be used as input to the realisation. The realisation of waves is done by perturbation theory to the first and second-order. The properties calculated are the wave elevation, water particle velocity and acceleration. The wave heights from the second order perturbation equations are higher than those from the first order perturbation equations. This is also the case for the water particle kinematics. The increase of variance is significant between the first order and the second order realisation. The calculated wave elevation exhibits non-linear features as the peaks become sharper and the troughs flatter. The resulting forces are calculated using Morison's equation. For second order force and base moment there is an increase in the maximum values. The force and base moment are largest approximately at the zero up and down crossing of the wave elevation. This indicates an inertia dominated wave load. So far the flexibility and the response of the structure have not been taken into account. They are, however, of vital importance. For verification of the wave model the results will later on be compared with measurements at Bockstigen off the coast of Gotland in the Baltic Sea.

  16. Wave-Kinetic Simulations of the Nonlinear Generation of Electromagnetic VLF Waves through Velocity Ring Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, G.; Crabtree, C. E.; Rudakov, L.; Mithaiwala, M.

    2014-12-01

    Velocity ring instabilities are a common naturally occuring magnetospheric phenomenon that can also be generated by man made ionospheric experiments. These instabilities are known to generate lower-hybrid waves, which generally cannot propagte out of the source region. However, nonlinear wave physics can convert these linearly driven electrostatic lower-hybrid waves into electromagnetic waves that can escape the source region. These nonlinearly generated waves can be an important source of VLF turbulence that controls the trapped electron lifetime in the radiation belts. We develop numerical solutions to the wave-kinetic equation in a periodic box including the effects of nonlinear (NL) scattering (nonlinear Landau damping) of Lower-hybrid waves giving the evolution of the wave-spectra in wavenumber space. Simultaneously we solve the particle diffusion equation of both the background plasma particles and the ring ions, due to both linear and nonlinear Landau resonances. At initial times for cold ring ions, an electrostatic beam mode is excited, while the kinetic mode is stable. As the instability progresses the ring ions heat, the beam mode is stabilized, and the kinetic mode destabilizes. When the amplitude of the waves becomes sufficient the lower-hybrid waves are scattered (by either nearly unmagnetized ions or magnetized electrons) into electromagnetic magnetosonic waves [Ganguli et al 2010]. The effect of NL scattering is to limit the amplitude of the waves, slowing down the quasilinear relaxation time and ultimately allowing more energy from the ring to be liberated into waves [Mithaiwala et al. 2011]. The effects of convection out of the instability region are modeled, additionally limiting the amplitude of the waves, allowing further energy to be liberated from the ring [Scales et al., 2012]. Results are compared to recent 3D PIC simulations [Winske and Duaghton 2012].

  17. Shock Mechanism Analysis and Simulation of High-Power Hydraulic Shock Wave Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiu Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of regular shock wave (e.g., half-sine can be achieved by the traditional rubber shock simulator, but the practical high-power shock wave characterized by steep prepeak and gentle postpeak is hard to be realized by the same. To tackle this disadvantage, a novel high-power hydraulic shock wave simulator based on the live firing muzzle shock principle was proposed in the current work. The influence of the typical shock characteristic parameters on the shock force wave was investigated via both theoretical deduction and software simulation. According to the obtained data compared with the results, in fact, it can be concluded that the developed hydraulic shock wave simulator can be applied to simulate the real condition of the shocking system. Further, the similarity evaluation of shock wave simulation was achieved based on the curvature distance, and the results stated that the simulation method was reasonable and the structural optimization based on software simulation is also beneficial to the increase of efficiency. Finally, the combination of theoretical analysis and simulation for the development of artillery recoil tester is a comprehensive approach in the design and structure optimization of the recoil system.

  18. SIMULATION OF ANALYTICAL TRANSIENT WAVE DUE TO DOWNWARD BOTTOM THRUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugih Sudharma Tjandra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Generation process is an important part of understanding waves, especially tsunami. Large earthquake under the sea is one major cause of tsunamis. The sea surface deforms as a response from the sea bottom motion caused by the earthquake. Analytical description of surface wave generated by bottom motion can be obtained from the linearized dispersive model. For a bottom motion in the form of a downward motion, the result is expressed in terms of improper integral. Here, we focus on analyzing the convergence of this integral, and then the improper integral is approximated into a finite integral so that the integral can be evaluated numerically. Further, we simulate free surface elevation for three different type of bottom motions, classified as impulsive, intermediate, and slow  movements. We demonstrate that the wave propagating to the right, with a depression as the leading wave, followed with subsequent wave crests. This phenomena is often observed in most tsunami events.

  19. Waveform and packet structure of lion roars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Baumjohann

    Full Text Available The Equator-S magnetometer is very sensitive and has a sampling rate of normally 128 Hz. The high sampling rate allows for the first time fluxgate magnetometer measurements of ELF waves between the ion cyclotron and the lower hybrid frequencies in the equatorial dayside magnetosheath. The so-called lion roars, typically seen by the Equator-S magnetometer at the bottom of the magnetic troughs of magnetosheath mirror waves, are near-monochromatic packets of electron whistler waves lasting for a few wave cycles only, typically 0.25 s. They are right-hand circularly polarized waves with typical amplitudes of 0.5–1 nT at around one tenth of the electron gyrofrequency. The cone angle between wave vector and ambient field is usually smaller than 1.5°.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (MHD waves and turbulence; plasma waves and turbulence

  20. Waveform and packet structure of lion roars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Baumjohann

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The Equator-S magnetometer is very sensitive and has a sampling rate of normally 128 Hz. The high sampling rate allows for the first time fluxgate magnetometer measurements of ELF waves between the ion cyclotron and the lower hybrid frequencies in the equatorial dayside magnetosheath. The so-called lion roars, typically seen by the Equator-S magnetometer at the bottom of the magnetic troughs of magnetosheath mirror waves, are near-monochromatic packets of electron whistler waves lasting for a few wave cycles only, typically 0.25 s. They are right-hand circularly polarized waves with typical amplitudes of 0.5–1 nT at around one tenth of the electron gyrofrequency. The cone angle between wave vector and ambient field is usually smaller than 1.5°.Key words. Interplanetary physics (MHD waves and turbulence; plasma waves and turbulence

  1. Simulating Freak Waves in the Ocean with CFD Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolidis, M.; Orzech, M.; Simeonov, J.

    2017-12-01

    Rogue, or freak, waves constitute an active topic of research within the world scientific community, as various maritime authorities around the globe seek to better understand and more accurately assess the risks that the occurrence of such phenomena entail. Several experimental studies have shed some light on the mechanics of rogue wave formation. In our work we numerically simulate the formation of such waves in oceanic conditions by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. For this purpose we implement the NHWAVE and OpenFOAM software packages. Both are non-hydrostatic, turbulent flow solvers, but NHWAVE implements a shock-capturing scheme at the free surface-interface, while OpenFOAM utilizes the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) method. NHWAVE has been shown to accurately reproduce highly nonlinear surface wave phenomena, such as soliton propagation and wave shoaling. We conducted a range of tests simulating rogue wave formation and horizontally varying currents to evaluate and compare the capabilities of the two software packages. Then we used each model to investigate the effect of ocean currents and current gradients on the formation of rogue waves. We present preliminary results.

  2. Nonlinear time-dependent simulation of helix traveling wave tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Wei-Feng; Yang Zhong-Hai; Hu Yu-Lu; Li Jian-Qing; Lu Qi-Ru; Li Bin

    2011-01-01

    A one-dimensional nonlinear time-dependent theory for helix traveling wave tubes is studied. A generalized electromagnetic field is applied to the expression of the radio frequency field. To simulate the variations of the high frequency structure, such as the pitch taper and the effect of harmonics, the spatial average over a wavelength is substituted by a time average over a wave period in the equation of the radio frequency field. Under this assumption, the space charge field of the electron beam can be treated by a space charge wave model along with the space charge coefficient. The effects of the radio frequency and the space charge fields on the electrons are presented by the equations of the electron energy and the electron phase. The time-dependent simulation is compared with the frequency-domain simulation for a helix TWT, which validates the availability of this theory. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  3. CFD Simulations of Floating Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Arrays Subjected to Regular Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brecht Devolder

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD toolbox OpenFOAM to perform numerical simulations of multiple floating point absorber wave energy converters (WECs arranged in a geometrical array configuration inside a numerical wave tank (NWT. The two-phase Navier-Stokes fluid solver is coupled with a motion solver to simulate the hydrodynamic flow field around the WECs and the wave-induced rigid body heave motion of each WEC within the array. In this study, the numerical simulations of a single WEC unit are extended to multiple WECs and the complexity of modelling individual floating objects close to each other in an array layout is tackled. The NWT is validated for fluid-structure interaction (FSI simulations by using experimental measurements for an array of two, five and up to nine heaving WECs subjected to regular waves. The validation is achieved by using mathematical models to include frictional forces observed during the experimental tests. For all the simulations presented, a good agreement is found between the numerical and the experimental results for the WECs’ heave motions, the surge forces on the WECs and the perturbed wave field around the WECs. As a result, our coupled CFD–motion solver proves to be a suitable and accurate toolbox for the study of fluid-structure interaction problems of WEC arrays.

  4. Evaluation of the numerical wave model (SWAN) for wave simulation in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpınar, Adem; van Vledder, Gerbrant Ph.; Kömürcü, Murat İhsan; Özger, Mehmet

    2012-12-01

    This study summaries the implementation of the SWAN model forced by the ECMWF ERA Interim dataset reanalyzed 10 m winds over the Black Sea which will be used to study the wind-wave climate and wave energy potential in the region, and its verification. The SWAN model results were compared with directional buoy measurements at three locations along the north and south coasts of the Black Sea, parametric model results based on the JONSWAP growth relations, and the results of previous studies. The SWAN model has been applied in a third generation and non-stationary mode with spherical coordinates. The linear and exponential growth from wind input, depth-induced wave breaking, bottom friction, whitecapping, four-wave (for deep water) and triad-wave (for shallow water) nonlinear interactions have been activated in the simulations. The results of this study indicate that agreement between simulated and observed wave parameters is satisfactory and it is slightly more accurate than the results of the previous studies. However, it still has lower estimates for the maximum values of both wave parameters. These lower estimates are probably due to too low wind speeds in the applied ECMWF wind fields, which is probably caused by orographic effects, and due to the relatively course resolution in time and space of the ECMWF (ERA-Interim) wind fields for the Black Sea.

  5. Advanced computational simulations of water waves interacting with wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Freniere, Cole; Raessi, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Wave energy converter (WEC) devices harness the renewable ocean wave energy and convert it into useful forms of energy, e.g. mechanical or electrical. This paper presents an advanced 3D computational framework to study the interaction between water waves and WEC devices. The computational tool solves the full Navier-Stokes equations and considers all important effects impacting the device performance. To enable large-scale simulations in fast turnaround times, the computational solver was developed in an MPI parallel framework. A fast multigrid preconditioned solver is introduced to solve the computationally expensive pressure Poisson equation. The computational solver was applied to two surface-piercing WEC geometries: bottom-hinged cylinder and flap. Their numerically simulated response was validated against experimental data. Additional simulations were conducted to investigate the applicability of Froude scaling in predicting full-scale WEC response from the model experiments.

  6. Full wave simulations of fast wave mode conversion and lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, J.C.; Bonoli, P.T.; Brambilla, M.

    2004-01-01

    Fast wave (FW) studies of mode conversion (MC) processes at the ion-ion hybrid layer in toroidal plasmas must capture the disparate scales of the FW and mode converted ion Bernstein and ion cyclotron waves. Correct modeling of the MC layer requires resolving wavelengths on the order of k...

  7. Numerical Simulation of Cylindrical Solitary Waves in Periodic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Quezada de Luna, Manuel; Ketcheson, David I.

    2013-01-01

    We study the behavior of nonlinear waves in a two-dimensional medium with density and stress relation that vary periodically in space. Efficient approximate Riemann solvers are developed for the corresponding variable-coefficient first-order hyperbolic system. We present direct numerical simulations of this multiscale problem, focused on the propagation of a single localized perturbation in media with strongly varying impedance. For the conditions studied, we find little evidence of shock formation. Instead, solutions consist primarily of solitary waves. These solitary waves are observed to be stable over long times and to interact in a manner approximately like solitons. The system considered has no dispersive terms; these solitary waves arise due to the material heterogeneity, which leads to strong reflections and effective dispersion.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Cylindrical Solitary Waves in Periodic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Quezada de Luna, Manuel

    2013-07-14

    We study the behavior of nonlinear waves in a two-dimensional medium with density and stress relation that vary periodically in space. Efficient approximate Riemann solvers are developed for the corresponding variable-coefficient first-order hyperbolic system. We present direct numerical simulations of this multiscale problem, focused on the propagation of a single localized perturbation in media with strongly varying impedance. For the conditions studied, we find little evidence of shock formation. Instead, solutions consist primarily of solitary waves. These solitary waves are observed to be stable over long times and to interact in a manner approximately like solitons. The system considered has no dispersive terms; these solitary waves arise due to the material heterogeneity, which leads to strong reflections and effective dispersion.

  9. Simulation of Wave-Plus-Current Scour beneath Submarine Pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltard-Larsen, Bjarke; Fuhrman, David R.; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2016-01-01

    A fully coupled hydrodynamic and morphologic numerical model was utilized for the simulation of wave-plus-current scour beneath submarine pipelines. The model was based on incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations, coupled with k-ω turbulence closure, with additional bed and suspen......A fully coupled hydrodynamic and morphologic numerical model was utilized for the simulation of wave-plus-current scour beneath submarine pipelines. The model was based on incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations, coupled with k-ω turbulence closure, with additional bed...... and suspended load descriptions forming the basis for seabed morphology. The model was successfully validated against experimental measurements involving scour development and eventual equilibrium in pure-current flows over a range of Shields parameters characteristic of both clear-water and live-bed regimes....... This validation complements previously demonstrated accuracy for the same model in simulating pipeline scour processes in pure-wave environments. The model was subsequently utilized to simulate combined wave-plus-current scour over a wide range of combined Keulegan–Carpenter numbers and relative current strengths...

  10. Turbulence Simulation of Laboratory Wind-Wave Interaction in High Winds and Upscaling to Ocean Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    Oceanogr., 46, 1377-1397 Cebeci, T. & P. Bradshaw, 1988: physical and computational aspects of convective heat transfer , Springer-Verlag, p.487...on surface properties and flow separation. Strongly-forced wind seas are characterized by enhanced group modulation , as significant additional...energy flux from the wind augments the hydrodynamic modulations . Using compact steep chirped wave packets, we investigated for the first time the

  11. One and two dimensional simulations on beat wave acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, W.; Joshi, C.; Dawson, J.M.; Forslund, D.W.; Kindel, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of fast-large-amplitude plasma waves as the basis for a high energy particle accelerator. In these schemes, lasers are used to create the plasma wave. To date the few simulation studies on this subject have been limited to one-dimensional, short rise time simulations. Here the authors present results from simulations in which more realistic parameters are used. In addition, they present the first two dimensional simulations on this subject. One dimensional simulations on a 2 1/2-D relativistic electromagnetic particle code, in which only a few cells were used in one direction, on colinear optical mixing are presented. In these simulations the laser rise time, laser intensity, plasma density, plasma temperature and system size were varied. The simulations indicate that the theory of Rosenbluth and Liu is applicable over a wide range of parameters. In addition, simulations with a DC magnetic field are presented in order to study the ''Surfatron'' concept

  12. Simulation of flooding waves in vertical churn flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tekavčič, Matej, E-mail: matej.tekavcic@ijs.si; Končar, Boštjan; Kljenak, Ivo

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • Flooding waves in air–water churn flow in a vertical pipe were studied. • Simulations using two-fluid model with interface sharpening were performed. • Calculated wave amplitudes agree with existing experimental data. • Contributions of force terms in the liquid momentum balance equation are presented. - Abstract: A transient simulation of flooding waves in the churn flow of air and water in a vertical pipe is performed by the means of two-fluid modelling approach with interface sharpening. The gas and liquid phases are considered immiscible and incompressible with no mass transfer between them. Inter-phase coupling of momentum is realized via interface drag force which is based on the interface area density and the relative velocity between the phases. Surface tension effects are modelled with the Continuum Surface Model. The flow is assumed isothermal. Turbulence is modelled for each phase separately using the two-equation eddy viscosity approach. Results are compared with the reported experimental data for churn flow regime in a vertical pipe (Wang et al., 2011a). Reynolds numbers of the gas flow are in the range from 6000 to 10,000, while the liquid mass flow rate upwards ranges from 25 to 32 g/s. Prediction of critical and maximum amplitudes of the flooding waves show good agreement with experimental values. Results for wave frequencies indicate significant deviations, which can be attributed to the choice of the liquid inlet model.

  13. Simulation of flooding waves in vertical churn flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekavčič, Matej; Končar, Boštjan; Kljenak, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Flooding waves in air–water churn flow in a vertical pipe were studied. • Simulations using two-fluid model with interface sharpening were performed. • Calculated wave amplitudes agree with existing experimental data. • Contributions of force terms in the liquid momentum balance equation are presented. - Abstract: A transient simulation of flooding waves in the churn flow of air and water in a vertical pipe is performed by the means of two-fluid modelling approach with interface sharpening. The gas and liquid phases are considered immiscible and incompressible with no mass transfer between them. Inter-phase coupling of momentum is realized via interface drag force which is based on the interface area density and the relative velocity between the phases. Surface tension effects are modelled with the Continuum Surface Model. The flow is assumed isothermal. Turbulence is modelled for each phase separately using the two-equation eddy viscosity approach. Results are compared with the reported experimental data for churn flow regime in a vertical pipe (Wang et al., 2011a). Reynolds numbers of the gas flow are in the range from 6000 to 10,000, while the liquid mass flow rate upwards ranges from 25 to 32 g/s. Prediction of critical and maximum amplitudes of the flooding waves show good agreement with experimental values. Results for wave frequencies indicate significant deviations, which can be attributed to the choice of the liquid inlet model.

  14. An improved packet structure

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    A multihop network transmits a packet including a RACH area and a hop number. The RACH area includes a list of subcarriers. A source node in the network dynamically determines the size of the RACH area. A node in the network performs an open-loop transmit power control.

  15. Election '88: Teacher Packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Social Studies Education.

    This materials packet contains information on teaching about the electoral process and the elections of 1988, and on participation in a mock election for students whose schools would take part in the 1988 North Carolina Mock Election. Suggestions for teachers' preparations are given, including a classroom skit and a mock candidates' election…

  16. An improved packet structure

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2014-05-22

    A multihop network transmits a packet including a RACH area and a hop number. The RACH area includes a list of subcarriers. A source node in the network dynamically determines the size of the RACH area. A node in the network performs an open-loop transmit power control.

  17. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves. I. Simulation model and monochromatic wave propagtion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matda, Y.; Crawford, F.W.

    1974-12-01

    An economical low noise plasma simulation model is applied to a series of problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. The model is described and tested, first in the absence of an applied signal, and then with a small amplitude perturbation, to establish the low noise features and to verify the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as 0.000,001 of the plasma thermal energy. The method is then used to study propagation of an essentially monochromatic plane wave. Results on amplitude oscillation and nonlinear frequency shift are compared with available theories. The additional phenomena of sideband instability and satellite growth, stimulated by large amplitude wave propagation and the resulting particle trapping, are described. (auth)

  18. Numerical Simulation of Floating Bodies in Extreme Free Surface Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zheng Zheng; Causon, Derek; Mingham, Clive; Qiang, Ling

    2010-05-01

    and efficient. Firstly, extreme design wave conditions are generated in an empty NWT and compared with physical experiments as a precursor to calculations to investigate the survivability of the Bobber device operating in a challenging wave climate. Secondly, we consider a bench-mark test case involving in a first order regular wave maker acting on a fixed cylinder and Pelamis. Finally, a floating Bobber has been simulated under extreme wave conditions. These results will be reported at the meeting. Causon D.M., Ingram D.M., Mingham C.G., Yang G. Pearson R.V. (2000). Calculation of shallow water flows using a Cartesian cut cell approach. Advances in Water resources, 23: 545-562. Causon D.M., Ingram D.M., Mingham C.G. (2000). A Cartesian cut cell method for shallow water flows with moving boundaries. Advances in Water resources, 24: 899-911. Dalzell J.F. 1999 A note on finite depth second-order wave-wave interactions. Appl. Ocean Res. 21, 105-111. Ning D.Z., Zang J., Liu S.X. Eatock Taylor R. Teng B. & Taylor P.H. 2009 Free surface and wave kinematics for nonlinear focused wave groups. J. Ocean Engineering. Accepted. Hu Z.Z., Causon D.M., Mingham C.M. and Qian L.(2009). Numerical wave tank study of a wave energy converter in heave. Proceedlings 19th ISOPE conference, Osaka, Japan Qian L., Causon D.M. & Mingham C.G., Ingram D.M. 2006 A free-surface capturing method for two fluid flows with moving bodies. Proc. Roy. Soc. London, Vol. A 462 21-42.

  19. Fair packet scheduling in Wireless Mesh Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Nawab, Faisal

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we study the interactions of TCP and IEEE 802.11 MAC in Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs). We use a Markov chain to capture the behavior of TCP sessions, particularly the impact on network throughput due to the effect of queue utilization and packet relaying. A closed form solution is derived to numerically determine the throughput. Based on the developed model, we propose a distributed MAC protocol called Timestamp-ordered MAC (TMAC), aiming to alleviate the unfairness problem in WMNs. TMAC extends CSMA/CA by scheduling data packets based on their age. Prior to transmitting a data packet, a transmitter broadcasts a request control message appended with a timestamp to a selected list of neighbors. It can proceed with the transmission only if it receives a sufficient number of grant control messages from these neighbors. A grant message indicates that the associated data packet has the lowest timestamp of all the packets pending transmission at the local transmit queue. We demonstrate that a loose ordering of timestamps among neighboring nodes is sufficient for enforcing local fairness, subsequently leading to flow rate fairness in a multi-hop WMN. We show that TMAC can be implemented using the control frames in IEEE 802.11, and thus can be easily integrated in existing 802.11-based WMNs. Our simulation results show that TMAC achieves excellent resource allocation fairness while maintaining over 90% of maximum link capacity across a large number of topologies.

  20. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves. I. Simulation model and monochromatic wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Crawford, F.W.

    1975-01-01

    An economical low-noise plasma simulation model originated by Denavit is applied to a series of problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. The model is described and tested, first in the absence of an applied signal, and then with a small amplitude perturbation. These tests serve to establish the low-noise features of the model, and to verify the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as 10 -6 of the plasma thermal energy: Better quantitative results are obtained, for comparable computing time, than can be obtained by conventional particle simulation models, or direct solution of the Vlasov equation. The method is then used to study propagation of an essentially monochromatic plane wave. Results on amplitude oscillation and nonlinear frequency shift are compared with available theories

  1. Numerical Simulations of Upstream Propagating Solitary Waves and Wave Breaking In A Stratified Fjord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stastna, M.; Peltier, W. R.

    In this talk we will discuss ongoing numerical modeling of the flow of a stratified fluid over large scale topography motivated by observations in Knight Inlet, a fjord in British Columbia, Canada. After briefly surveying the work done on the topic in the past we will discuss our latest set of simulations in which we have observed the gener- ation and breaking of three different types of nonlinear internal waves in the lee of the sill topography. The first type of wave observed is a large lee wave in the weakly strat- ified main portion of the water column, The second is an upward propagating internal wave forced by topography that breaks in the strong, near-surface pycnocline. The third is a train of upstream propagating solitary waves that, in certain circumstances, form as breaking waves consisting of a nearly solitary wave envelope and a highly unsteady core near the surface. Time premitting, we will comment on the implications of these results for our long term goal of quantifying tidally driven mixing in Knight Inlet.

  2. Wide-band slow-wave systems simulation and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Staras, Stanislovas

    2012-01-01

    The field of electromagnetics has seen considerable advances in recent years, based on the wide applications of numerical methods for investigating electromagnetic fields, microwaves, and other devices. Wide-Band Slow-Wave Systems: Simulation and Applications presents new technical solutions and research results for the analysis, synthesis, and design of slow-wave structures for modern electronic devices with super-wide pass-bands. It makes available, for the first time in English, significant research from the past 20 years that was previously published only in Russian and Lithuanian. The aut

  3. Simulation tools for guided wave based structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesnil, Olivier; Imperiale, Alexandre; Demaldent, Edouard; Baronian, Vahan; Chapuis, Bastien

    2018-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a thematic derived from Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) based on the integration of sensors onto or into a structure in order to monitor its health without disturbing its regular operating cycle. Guided wave based SHM relies on the propagation of guided waves in plate-like or extruded structures. Using piezoelectric transducers to generate and receive guided waves is one of the most widely accepted paradigms due to the low cost and low weight of those sensors. A wide range of techniques for flaw detection based on the aforementioned setup is available in the literature but very few of these techniques have found industrial applications yet. A major difficulty comes from the sensitivity of guided waves to a substantial number of parameters such as the temperature or geometrical singularities, making guided wave measurement difficult to analyze. In order to apply guided wave based SHM techniques to a wider spectrum of applications and to transfer those techniques to the industry, the CEA LIST develops novel numerical methods. These methods facilitate the evaluation of the robustness of SHM techniques for multiple applicative cases and ease the analysis of the influence of various parameters, such as sensors positioning or environmental conditions. The first numerical tool is the guided wave module integrated to the commercial software CIVA, relying on a hybrid modal-finite element formulation to compute the guided wave response of perturbations (cavities, flaws…) in extruded structures of arbitrary cross section such as rails or pipes. The second numerical tool is based on the spectral element method [2] and simulates guided waves in both isotropic (metals) and orthotropic (composites) plate like-structures. This tool is designed to match the widely accepted sparse piezoelectric transducer array SHM configuration in which each embedded sensor acts as both emitter and receiver of guided waves. This tool is under development and

  4. A Coupled Atmospheric and Wave Modeling System for Storm Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Bolanos, R.

    2015-01-01

    to parametrize z0. The results are validated through QuikScat data and point measurements from an open ocean site Ekosk and a coastal, relatively shallow water site Horns Rev. It is found that the modeling system captures in general better strong wind and strong wave characteristics for open ocean condition than......This study aims at improving the simulation of wind and waves during storms in connection with wind turbine design and operations in coastal areas. For this particular purpose, we investigated the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System which couples the Weather...... resolution ranging from 25km to 2km. Meanwhile, the atmospheric forcing data of dierent spatial resolution, with one about 100km (FNL) and the other about 38km (CFSR) are both used. In addition, bathymatry data of diferent resolutions (1arc-minute and 30arc-seconds) are used. We used three approaches...

  5. Simulation of wind wave growth with reference source functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badulin, Sergei I.; Zakharov, Vladimir E.; Pushkarev, Andrei N.

    2013-04-01

    We present results of extensive simulations of wind wave growth with the so-called reference source function in the right-hand side of the Hasselmann equation written as follows First, we use Webb's algorithm [8] for calculating the exact nonlinear transfer function Snl. Second, we consider a family of wind input functions in accordance with recent consideration [9] ( )s S = ?(k)N , ?(k) = ? ? ?- f (?). in k 0 ?0 in (2) Function fin(?) describes dependence on angle ?. Parameters in (2) are tunable and determine magnitude (parameters ?0, ?0) and wave growth rate s [9]. Exponent s plays a key role in this study being responsible for reference scenarios of wave growth: s = 4-3 gives linear growth of wave momentum, s = 2 - linear growth of wave energy and s = 8-3 - constant rate of wave action growth. Note, the values are close to ones of conventional parameterizations of wave growth rates (e.g. s = 1 for [7] and s = 2 for [5]). Dissipation function Sdiss is chosen as one providing the Phillips spectrum E(?) ~ ?5 at high frequency range [3] (parameter ?diss fixes a dissipation scale of wind waves) Sdiss = Cdissμ4w?N (k)θ(? - ?diss) (3) Here frequency-dependent wave steepness μ2w = E(?,?)?5-g2 makes this function to be heavily nonlinear and provides a remarkable property of stationary solutions at high frequencies: the dissipation coefficient Cdiss should keep certain value to provide the observed power-law tails close to the Phillips spectrum E(?) ~ ?-5. Our recent estimates [3] give Cdiss ? 2.0. The Hasselmann equation (1) with the new functions Sin, Sdiss (2,3) has a family of self-similar solutions of the same form as previously studied models [1,3,9] and proposes a solid basis for further theoretical and numerical study of wave evolution under action of all the physical mechanisms: wind input, wave dissipation and nonlinear transfer. Simulations of duration- and fetch-limited wind wave growth have been carried out within the above model setup to check its

  6. Full wave simulation of waves in ECRIS plasmas based on the finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania, Italy and Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell' Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Via Graziella, I (Italy); Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Patti, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania (Italy); Di Donato, L. [Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica (DIEEI), Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Sorbello, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania, Italy and Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica (DIEEI), Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Isernia, T. [Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell' Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2014-02-12

    This paper describes the modeling and the full wave numerical simulation of electromagnetic waves propagation and absorption in an anisotropic magnetized plasma filling the resonant cavity of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The model assumes inhomogeneous, dispersive and tensorial constitutive relations. Maxwell's equations are solved by the finite element method (FEM), using the COMSOL Multiphysics{sup ®} suite. All the relevant details have been considered in the model, including the non uniform external magnetostatic field used for plasma confinement, the local electron density profile resulting in the full-3D non uniform magnetized plasma complex dielectric tensor. The more accurate plasma simulations clearly show the importance of cavity effect on wave propagation and the effects of a resonant surface. These studies are the pillars for an improved ECRIS plasma modeling, that is mandatory to optimize the ion source output (beam intensity distribution and charge state, especially). Any new project concerning the advanced ECRIS design will take benefit by an adequate modeling of self-consistent wave absorption simulations.

  7. Simulations of nonlinear continuous wave pressure fields in FOCUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Hamilton, Mark F.; McGough, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    The Khokhlov - Zabolotskaya - Kuznetsov (KZK) equation is a parabolic approximation to the Westervelt equation that models the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and nonlinearity. Although the KZK equation is only valid in the far field of the paraxial region for mildly focused or unfocused transducers, the KZK equation is widely applied in medical ultrasound simulations. For a continuous wave input, the KZK equation is effectively modeled by the Bergen Code [J. Berntsen, Numerical Calculations of Finite Amplitude Sound Beams, in M. F. Hamilton and D. T. Blackstock, editors, Frontiers of Nonlinear Acoustics: Proceedings of 12th ISNA, Elsevier, 1990], which is a finite difference model that utilizes operator splitting. Similar C++ routines have been developed for FOCUS, the `Fast Object-Oriented C++ Ultrasound Simulator' (http://www.egr.msu.edu/˜fultras-web) to calculate nonlinear pressure fields generated by axisymmetric flat circular and spherically focused ultrasound transducers. This new routine complements an existing FOCUS program that models nonlinear ultrasound propagation with the angular spectrum approach [P. T. Christopher and K. J. Parker, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 488-499 (1991)]. Results obtained from these two nonlinear ultrasound simulation approaches are evaluated and compared for continuous wave linear simulations. The simulation results match closely in the farfield of the paraxial region, but the results differ in the nearfield. The nonlinear pressure field generated by a spherically focused transducer with a peak surface pressure of 0.2MPa radiating in a lossy medium with β = 3.5 is simulated, and the computation times are also evaluated. The nonlinear simulation results demonstrate acceptable agreement in the focal zone. These two related nonlinear simulation approaches are now included with FOCUS to enable convenient simulations of nonlinear pressure fields on desktop and laptop computers.

  8. Numerical simulation of ultrasonic wave propagation in elastically anisotropic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Victoria Cristina Cheade; Jospin, Reinaldo Jacques; Bittencourt, Marcelo de Siqueira Queiroz

    2013-01-01

    The ultrasonic non-destructive testing of components may encounter considerable difficulties to interpret some inspections results mainly in anisotropic crystalline structures. A numerical method for the simulation of elastic wave propagation in homogeneous elastically anisotropic media, based on the general finite element approach, is used to help this interpretation. The successful modeling of elastic field associated with NDE is based on the generation of a realistic pulsed ultrasonic wave, which is launched from a piezoelectric transducer into the material under inspection. The values of elastic constants are great interest information that provide the application of equations analytical models, until small and medium complexity problems through programs of numerical analysis as finite elements and/or boundary elements. The aim of this work is the comparison between the results of numerical solution of an ultrasonic wave, which is obtained from transient excitation pulse that can be specified by either force or displacement variation across the aperture of the transducer, and the results obtained from a experiment that was realized in an aluminum block in the IEN Ultrasonic Laboratory. The wave propagation can be simulated using all the characteristics of the material used in the experiment valuation associated to boundary conditions and from these results, the comparison can be made. (author)

  9. Fully resolved simulations of expansion waves propagating into particle beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Goran; Hackl, Jason; Annamalai, Subramanian; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    There is a tremendous amount of research that has been done on compression waves and shock waves moving over particles but very little concerning expansion waves. Using 3-D direct numerical simulations, this study will explore expansion waves propagating into fully resolved particle beds of varying volume fractions and geometric arrangements. The objectives of these simulations are as follows: 1) To fully resolve all (1-way coupled) forces on the particles in a time varying flow and 2) to verify state-of-the-art drag models for such complex flows. We will explore a range of volume fractions, from very low ones that are similar to single particle flows, to higher ones where nozzling effects are observed between neighboring particles. Further, we will explore two geometric arrangements: body centered cubic and face centered cubic. We will quantify the effects that volume fraction and geometric arrangement plays on the drag forces and flow fields experienced by the particles. These results will then be compared to theoretical predictions from a model based on the generalized Faxen's theorem. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  10. Simple simulation training system for short-wave radio station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xianglin; Shao, Zhichao; Tu, Jianhua; Qu, Fuqi

    2018-04-01

    The short-wave radio station is a most important transmission equipment of our signal corps, but in the actual teaching process, which exist the phenomenon of fewer equipment and more students, making the students' short-wave radio operation and practice time is very limited. In order to solve the above problems, to carry out shortwave radio simple simulation training system development is very necessary. This project is developed by combining hardware and software to simulate the voice communication operation and signal principle of shortwave radio station, and can test the signal flow of shortwave radio station. The test results indicate that this system is simple operation, human-machine interface friendly and can improve teaching more efficiency.

  11. Simulation and Analysis of Converging Shock Wave Test Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-21

    Results and analysis pertaining to the simulation of the Guderley converging shock wave test problem (and associated code verification hydrodynamics test problems involving converging shock waves) in the LANL ASC radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE are presented. One-dimensional (1D) spherical and two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric geometric setups are utilized and evaluated in this study, as is an instantiation of the xRAGE adaptive mesh refinement capability. For the 2D simulations, a 'Surrogate Guderley' test problem is developed and used to obviate subtleties inherent to the true Guderley solution's initialization on a square grid, while still maintaining a high degree of fidelity to the original problem, and minimally straining the general credibility of associated analysis and conclusions.

  12. Simulation of the acoustic wave propagation using a meshless method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajko J.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents numerical simulations of the acoustic wave propagation phenomenon modelled via Linearized Euler equations. A meshless method based on collocation of the strong form of the equation system is adopted. Moreover, the Weighted least squares method is used for local approximation of derivatives as well as stabilization technique in a form of spatial ltering. The accuracy and robustness of the method is examined on several benchmark problems.

  13. Simulations of ICRF-fast wave current drive on DIIID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    Self-consistent calculations of MHD equilibria, generated by fast wave current drive and including the bootstrap effect, were done to guide and anticipate the results of upcoming experiments on the DIIID tokamak. The simulations predict that 2 MW of ICRF power is more than adequate to create several hundred kiloamperes in steady state; the total current increases with the temperature and density of the target plasma. 12 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  14. Simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianvashrad, N.; Knight, D.

    2017-06-01

    The capability of the Navier-Stokes equations with a perfect gas model for simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions is assessed. The configuration is a hollow cylinder flare. The experimental data were obtained by Calspan-University of Buffalo (CUBRC) for total enthalpies ranging from 5.07 to 21.85 MJ/kg. Comparison of the computed and experimental surface pressure and heat transfer is performed and the computed §ow¦eld structure is analyzed.

  15. Numerical simulation methods for wave propagation through optical waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of the field propagation through waveguides requires numerical solutions of the Helmholtz equation. For this purpose a method based on the principle of orthogonal collocation was recently developed. The method is also applicable to nonlinear pulse propagation through optical fibers. Some of the salient features of this method and its application to both linear and nonlinear wave propagation through optical waveguides are discussed in this report. 51 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Computer simulations on the nonlinear frequency shift and nonlinear modulation of ion-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsawa, Yukiharu; Kamimura, Tetsuo.

    1976-11-01

    The nonlinear behavior of ion-acoustic waves with rather short wave-length, k lambda sub(De) asymptotically equals 1, is investigated by computer sumulations. It is observed that the nonlinear frequency shift is negative and is proportional to square root of the initial wave amplitude when the amplitude is not too large. This proportionality breaks down and the frequency shift can become positive (for large Te/Ti), when (n tilde sub(i)/n 0 )sup(1/2)>0.25, where n tilde sub(i) is the ion density perturbation and n 0 the average plasma density. Nonlinear modulation of the wave-packet is clearly seen; however, modulational instability was not observed. The importance of the effects of trapped ions to these phenomena is emphasized. (auth.)

  17. SIMULATION OF NEGATIVE PRESSURE WAVE PROPAGATION IN WATER PIPE NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Van Lam

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject: factors such as pipe wall roughness, mechanical properties of pipe materials, physical properties of water affect the pressure surge in the water supply pipes. These factors make it difficult to analyze the transient problem of pressure evolution using simple programming language, especially in the studies that consider only the magnitude of the positive pressure surge with the negative pressure phase being neglected. Research objectives: determine the magnitude of the negative pressure in the pipes on the experimental model. The propagation distance of the negative pressure wave will be simulated by the valve closure scenarios with the help of the HAMMER software and it is compared with an experimental model to verify the quality the results. Materials and methods: academic version of the Bentley HAMMER software is used to simulate the pressure surge wave propagation due to closure of the valve in water supply pipe network. The method of characteristics is used to solve the governing equations of transient process of pressure change in the pipeline. This method is implemented in the HAMMER software to calculate the pressure surge value in the pipes. Results: the method has been applied for water pipe networks of experimental model, the results show the affected area of negative pressure wave from valve closure and thereby we assess the largest negative pressure that may appear in water supply pipes. Conclusions: the experiment simulates the water pipe network with a consumption node for various valve closure scenarios to determine possibility of appearance of maximum negative pressure value in the pipes. Determination of these values in real-life network is relatively costly and time-consuming but nevertheless necessary for identification of the risk of pipe failure, and therefore, this paper proposes using the simulation model by the HAMMER software. Initial calibration of the model combined with the software simulation results and

  18. Whistler Observations on DEMETER Compared with Full Electromagnetic Wave Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compston, A. J.; Cohen, M.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U.; Linscott, I.; Said, R.; Parrot, M.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic radiation, which strongly impacts the Van Allen radiation belt electron dynamics, is injected across the ionosphere into the Earth's plasmasphere from two primary sources: man-made VLF transmitters and lightning discharges. Numerical models of trans-ionospheric propagation of such waves remain unvalidated, and early models may have overestimated the absorption, hindering a comprehensive understanding of the global impact of VLF waves in the loss of radiation belt electrons. In an attempt to remedy the problem of a lack of accurate trans-ionospheric propagation models, we have used a full electromagnetic wave method (FWM) numerical code to simulate the propagation of lightning-generated whistlers into the magnetosphere and compared the results with whistlers observed on the DEMETER satellite and paired with lightning stroke data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). We have identified over 20,000 whistlers occuring in 14 different passes of DEMETER over the central United States during the summer of 2009, and 14,000 of those occured within the 2000 km x 2000 km simulation grid we used. As shown in the attached figure, which shows a histogram of the ratio of the simulated whistler energy to the measured whistler energy for the 14,000 whistlers we compared, the simulation tends to slightly underestimate the total whistler energy injected by about 5 dB. However, the simulation underestimates the DEMETER measurements more as one gets further from the source lightning stroke, so since the signal to noise ratio of more distant whistlers will be smaller, possibly additive noise in the DEMETER measurements (which of course is not accounted for in the model) may explain some of the observed discrepancy.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Wave Propagation and Phase Transition of Tin under Shock-Wave Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai-Feng, Song; Hai-Feng, Liu; Guang-Cai, Zhang; Yan-Hong, Zhao

    2009-01-01

    We undertake a numerical simulation of shock experiments on tin reported in the literature, by using a multiphase equation of state (MEOS) and a multiphase Steinberg Guinan (MSG) constitutive model for tin in the β, γ and liquid phases. In the MSG model, the Bauschinger effect is considered to better describe the unloading behavior. The phase diagram and Hugoniot of tin are calculated by MEOS, and they agree well with the experimental data. Combined with the MEOS and MSG models, hydrodynamic computer simulations are successful in reproducing the measured velocity profile of the shock wave experiment. Moreover, by analyzing the mass fraction contour as well as stress and temperature profiles of each phase for tin, we further discuss the complex behavior of tin under shock-wave loading. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  20. Numerical Simulation of Internal Waves in the Andaman Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sachiko; Devendra Rao, Ambarukhana

    2017-04-01

    The interactions of barotropic tides with irregular bottom topography generate internal waves with high amplitude known as large-amplitude internal waves (LAIW) in the Andaman Sea. These waves are an important phenomena in the ocean due to their influence on the density structure and energy transfer into the region. These waves are also important in submarine acoustics, underwater navigation, offshore structures, ocean mixing, biogeochemical processes, etc. over the shelf-slope region. In the present study, energetics analysis of M2 internal tides over the Andaman Sea is carried out in detail by using a three-dimensional MIT general circulation ocean model (MITgcm). In-situ observations of temperature, conductivity and currents with high temporal resolution are used to validate the model simulations. From the spectral energy estimate of density, it is found that the peak estimate is associated with the semi-diurnal frequency at all the depths in both observations and model simulations. The baroclinic velocity characteristics, suggests that a multi-mode features of baroclinic tides are present at the buoy location. To understand the generation and propagation of internal tides over this region, energy flux and barotropic-to-baroclinic M2 tidal energy conversion rates are examined. The model simulation suggests that the internal tide is generated at multiple sites and propagate off of their respective generation sources. Most of the energy propagation in the Andaman Sea follows the 1000m isobath. The maximum horizontal kinetic energy follows the energy flux pattern over the domain and the available potential energy is found to be maximum in the north of the Andaman Sea.

  1. Wave tank to simulate the movement of oil under breaking waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botrus, D.; Wickley-Olsen, E.; Boufadel, M.C.; Weaver, J.W.; Weggle, R.; Lee, K.; Venosa, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Methods to mitigate offshore oil spills before they reach the shoreline have been investigated in order to reduce environmental impacts. Artificial dispersants are commonly used on offshore oil spills to decrease the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The wave action helps break the slick into droplets that penetrate into the sea. This paper presented the results of wave tank tests in which the effectiveness of dispersants was evaluated. The focus was on the transport of oil during the breakup of a wave. In this study, the energy dissipation rate per unit mass was evaluated at various depths in the tank for regular and breaking waves. It was shown that breaking waves play an important role in the dispersion of oil at sea. Contrary to previous studies which suggested that the plume moves forward following the breaker, the results of this study showed that the plume splits into two parts, with one part going upstream. Understanding how the plume travels will provide insight as to where to add the dispersant with respect to the location of the breaker. The addition of the dispersant should take place before the location of the breaker. It was concluded that future work should include computational fluid dynamics simulation, as well as the use of a higher resolution camera. 9 refs., 17 figs

  2. SELF-DESTRUCTING SPIRAL WAVES: GLOBAL SIMULATIONS OF A SPIRAL-WAVE INSTABILITY IN ACCRETION DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Nelson, Richard P.; Richard, Samuel, E-mail: jaehbae@umich.edu, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu, E-mail: r.p.nelson@qmul.ac.uk, E-mail: samuel.richard@qmul.ac.uk [Astronomy Unit, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-20

    We present results from a suite of three-dimensional global hydrodynamic simulations that shows that spiral density waves propagating in circumstellar disks are unstable to the growth of a parametric instability that leads to break down of the flow into turbulence. This spiral wave instability (SWI) arises from a resonant interaction between pairs of inertial waves, or inertial-gravity waves, and the background spiral wave. The development of the instability in the linear regime involves the growth of a broad spectrum of inertial modes, with growth rates on the order of the orbital time, and results in a nonlinear saturated state in which turbulent velocity perturbations are of a similar magnitude to those induced by the spiral wave. The turbulence induces angular momentum transport and vertical mixing at a rate that depends locally on the amplitude of the spiral wave (we obtain a stress parameter α ∼ 5 × 10{sup −4} in our reference model). The instability is found to operate in a wide range of disk models, including those with isothermal or adiabatic equations of state, and in viscous disks where the dimensionless kinematic viscosity ν ≤ 10{sup −5}. This robustness suggests that the instability will have applications to a broad range of astrophysical disk-related phenomena, including those in close binary systems, planets embedded in protoplanetary disks (including Jupiter in our own solar system) and FU Orionis outburst models. Further work is required to determine the nature of the instability and to evaluate its observational consequences in physically more complete disk models than we have considered in this paper.

  3. SELF-DESTRUCTING SPIRAL WAVES: GLOBAL SIMULATIONS OF A SPIRAL-WAVE INSTABILITY IN ACCRETION DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Nelson, Richard P.; Richard, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a suite of three-dimensional global hydrodynamic simulations that shows that spiral density waves propagating in circumstellar disks are unstable to the growth of a parametric instability that leads to break down of the flow into turbulence. This spiral wave instability (SWI) arises from a resonant interaction between pairs of inertial waves, or inertial-gravity waves, and the background spiral wave. The development of the instability in the linear regime involves the growth of a broad spectrum of inertial modes, with growth rates on the order of the orbital time, and results in a nonlinear saturated state in which turbulent velocity perturbations are of a similar magnitude to those induced by the spiral wave. The turbulence induces angular momentum transport and vertical mixing at a rate that depends locally on the amplitude of the spiral wave (we obtain a stress parameter α ∼ 5 × 10 −4 in our reference model). The instability is found to operate in a wide range of disk models, including those with isothermal or adiabatic equations of state, and in viscous disks where the dimensionless kinematic viscosity ν ≤ 10 −5 . This robustness suggests that the instability will have applications to a broad range of astrophysical disk-related phenomena, including those in close binary systems, planets embedded in protoplanetary disks (including Jupiter in our own solar system) and FU Orionis outburst models. Further work is required to determine the nature of the instability and to evaluate its observational consequences in physically more complete disk models than we have considered in this paper.

  4. Discrete event simulation of Maglev transport considering traffic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo Hyun Cha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A magnetically levitated vehicle (Maglev system is under commercialization as a new transportation system in Korea. The Maglev is operated by an unmanned automatic control system. Therefore, the plan of train operation should be carefully established and validated in advance. In general, when making a train operation plan, statistically predicted traffic data is used. However, a traffic wave often occurs in real train service, and demand-driven simulation technology is required to review a train operation plan and service quality considering traffic waves. We propose a method and model to simulate Maglev operation considering continuous demand changes. For this purpose, we employed a discrete event model that is suitable for modeling the behavior of railway passenger transportation. We modeled the system hierarchically using discrete event system specification (DEVS formalism. In addition, through implementation and an experiment using the DEVSim++ simulation environment, we tested the feasibility of the proposed model. Our experimental results also verified that our demand-driven simulation technology can be used for a priori review of train operation plans and strategies.

  5. RF Wave Simulation Using the MFEM Open Source FEM Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillerman, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Green, D. L.; Kolev, T.

    2016-10-01

    A new plasma wave simulation environment based on the finite element method is presented. MFEM, a scalable open-source FEM library, is used as the basis for this capability. MFEM allows for assembling an FEM matrix of arbitrarily high order in a parallel computing environment. A 3D frequency domain RF physics layer was implemented using a python wrapper for MFEM and a cold collisional plasma model was ported. This physics layer allows for defining the plasma RF wave simulation model without user knowledge of the FEM weak-form formulation. A graphical user interface is built on πScope, a python-based scientific workbench, such that a user can build a model definition file interactively. Benchmark cases have been ported to this new environment, with results being consistent with those obtained using COMSOL multiphysics, GENRAY, and TORIC/TORLH spectral solvers. This work is a first step in bringing to bear the sophisticated computational tool suite that MFEM provides (e.g., adaptive mesh refinement, solver suite, element types) to the linear plasma-wave interaction problem, and within more complicated integrated workflows, such as coupling with core spectral solver, or incorporating additional physics such as an RF sheath potential model or kinetic effects. USDoE Awards DE-FC02-99ER54512, DE-FC02-01ER54648.

  6. Modified Aggressive Packet Combining Scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhunia, C.T.

    2010-06-01

    In this letter, a few schemes are presented to improve the performance of aggressive packet combining scheme (APC). To combat error in computer/data communication networks, ARQ (Automatic Repeat Request) techniques are used. Several modifications to improve the performance of ARQ are suggested by recent research and are found in literature. The important modifications are majority packet combining scheme (MjPC proposed by Wicker), packet combining scheme (PC proposed by Chakraborty), modified packet combining scheme (MPC proposed by Bhunia), and packet reversed packet combining (PRPC proposed by Bhunia) scheme. These modifications are appropriate for improving throughput of conventional ARQ protocols. Leung proposed an idea of APC for error control in wireless networks with the basic objective of error control in uplink wireless data network. We suggest a few modifications of APC to improve its performance in terms of higher throughput, lower delay and higher error correction capability. (author)

  7. Potential energy surfaces for electron dynamics modeled by floating and breathing Gaussian wave packets with valence-bond spin-coupling: An analysis of high-harmonic generation spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koji

    2018-03-01

    A model of localized electron wave packets (EWPs), floating and breathing Gaussians with non-orthogonal valence-bond spin-coupling, is applied to compute the high-harmonic generation (HHG) spectrum from a LiH molecule induced by an intense laser pulse. The characteristic features of the spectrum, a plateau up to 50 harmonic-order and a cutoff, agreed well with those from the previous time-dependent complete active-space self-consistent-field calculation [T. Sato and K. L. Ishikawa, Phys. Rev. A 91, 023417 (2015)]. In contrast to the conventional molecular orbital picture in which the Li 2s and H 1s atomic orbitals are strongly mixed, the present calculation indicates that an incoherent sum of responses of single electrons reproduces the HHG spectrum, in which the contribution from the H 1s electron dominates the plateau and cutoff, whereas the Li 2s electron contributes to the lower frequency response. The results are comprehensive in terms of the shapes of single-electron potential energy curves constructed from the localized EWP model.

  8. Alpha-particle simulation using NBI beam and ICRF wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Hamada, Y.

    1984-07-01

    A new idea to produce the distribution function similar to that of alpha-particles in an ignited plasma has been proposed. This concept is attributed to the acceleration of the injected beam up to about 1 MeV/nucleon by the ICRF wave with cyclotron higher harmonics. This new method makes it possible to perform the simulation experiments for alpha-particles under the condition of moderate plasma parameters (e.g., Tsub(e) = 4 keV, nsub(e) = 3.5x10 19 m -3 and B sub(T) = 3 T). And it is found that 3ωsub(ci) ICRF wave is preferable compared with other cyclotron harmonics, from the viewpoints of the effective tail formation with smaller bulk ion heating and lower amplitude of the applied electric field. The formula for the maximum energy of the extended beam is also derived. (author)

  9. Frustrated Brownian Motion of Nonlocal Solitary Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folli, V.; Conti, C.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of solitary waves in a nonlocal medium in the presence of disorder. By using a perturbational approach, we show that an increasing degree of nonlocality may largely hamper the Brownian motion of self-trapped wave packets. The result is valid for any kind of nonlocality and in the presence of nonparaxial effects. Analytical predictions are compared with numerical simulations based on stochastic partial differential equations.

  10. Simulations of Shock Wave Interaction with a Particle Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneru, Rahul; Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S.'Bala'

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of a shock wave interacting with a cloud of particles are performed in an attempt to understand similar phenomena observed in dispersal of solid particles under such extreme environment as an explosion. We conduct numerical experiments in which a particle curtain fills only 87% of the shock tube from bottom to top. As such, the particle curtain upon interaction with the shock wave is expected to experience Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. In this study, the initial volume fraction profile matches with that of Sandia Multiphase Shock Tube experiments, and the shock Mach number is limited to M =1.66. In these simulations we use a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach along with state-of-the-art point-particle force and heat transfer models. Measurements of particle dispersion are made at different initial volume fractions of the particle cloud. A detailed analysis of the evolution of the particle curtain with respect to the initial conditions is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  11. Modeling and Simulation of a Wave Energy Converter INWAVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Kwan Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available INGINE Inc. developed its own wave energy converter (WEC named INWAVE and has currently installed three prototype modules in Jeju Island, Korea. This device is an on-shore-type WEC that consists of a buoy, pulleys fixed to the sea-floor and a power take off module (PTO. Three ropes are moored tightly on the bottom of the buoy and connected to the PTO via the pulleys, which are moving back and forth according to the motion of the buoy. Since the device can harness wave energy from all six degrees of movement of the buoy, it is possible to extract energy efficiently even under low energy density conditions provided in the coastal areas. In the PTO module, the ratchet gears convert the reciprocating movement of the rope drum into a uni-directional rotation and determine the transmission of power from the relation of the angular velocities between the rope drum and the generator. In this process, the discontinuity of the power transmission occurs and causes the modeling divergence. Therefore, we introduce the concept of the virtual torsion spring in order to prevent the impact error in the ratchet gear module, thereby completing the PTO modeling. In this paper, we deal with dynamic analysis in the time domain, based on Newtonian mechanics and linear wave theory. We derive the combined dynamics of the buoy and PTO modules via geometric relation between the buoy and mooring ropes, then suggest the ratchet gear mechanism with the virtual torsion spring element to reduce the dynamic errors during the phase transitions. Time domain simulation is carried out under irregular waves that reflect the actual wave states of the installation area, and we evaluate the theoretical performance using the capture width ratio.

  12. Technology Corner: Internet Packet Sniffers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Flor

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A packet sniffer is a piece of software that allows a person to eavesdrop on computer communications over the internet.  A packet sniffer can be used as a diagnostic tool by network administrators or as a spying tool by hackers who can use it to steal passwords and other private information from computer users.  Whether you are a network administrator or information assurance specialist, it helps to have a detailed understanding of how packet sniffers work.  And one of the best ways to acquire such an understanding is to build and modify an actual packet sniffer.

  13. Random access with adaptive packet aggregation in LTE/LTE-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kaijie; Nikaein, Navid

    While random access presents a promising solution for efficient uplink channel access, the preamble collision rate can significantly increase when massive number of devices simultaneously access the channel. To address this issue and improve the reliability of the random access, an adaptive packet aggregation method is proposed. With the proposed method, a device does not trigger a random access for every single packet. Instead, it starts a random access when the number of aggregated packets reaches a given threshold. This method reduces the packet collision rate at the expense of an extra latency, which is used to accumulate multiple packets into a single transmission unit. Therefore, the tradeoff between packet loss rate and channel access latency has to be carefully selected. We use semi-Markov model to derive the packet loss rate and channel access latency as functions of packet aggregation number. Hence, the optimal amount of aggregated packets can be found, which keeps the loss rate below the desired value while minimizing the access latency. We also apply for the idea of packet aggregation for power saving, where a device aggregates as many packets as possible until the latency constraint is reached. Simulations are carried out to evaluate our methods. We find that the packet loss rate and/or power consumption are significantly reduced with the proposed method.

  14. Nonlinear Wave Simulation on the Xeon Phi Knights Landing Processor

    OpenAIRE

    Hristov Ivan; Goranov Goran; Hristova Radoslava

    2018-01-01

    We consider an interesting from computational point of view standing wave simulation by solving coupled 2D perturbed Sine-Gordon equations. We make an OpenMP realization which explores both thread and SIMD levels of parallelism. We test the OpenMP program on two different energy equivalent Intel architectures: 2× Xeon E5-2695 v2 processors, (code-named “Ivy Bridge-EP”) in the Hybrilit cluster, and Xeon Phi 7250 processor (code-named “Knights Landing” (KNL). The results show 2 times better per...

  15. Large Blast and Thermal Simulator Reflected Wave Eliminator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    it delays the passage of this wave through the test section until after the test is complete. The required length of extra duct depends on the strength...tube axis, which acts like an additional contraction effect since Se = Sj/[Cqsin(aj)]. Tii extra area is illustrated best by plotting (Se-Ae)/Ac versus...34Simulation de Choc et de Soaffie. Comimpensateur d’Ondes de Detente de Bouche pour tube a Choc de 2400 mm de diametre de Veine. Description, Compte- Renda

  16. Nonlinear Wave Simulation on the Xeon Phi Knights Landing Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, Ivan; Goranov, Goran; Hristova, Radoslava

    2018-02-01

    We consider an interesting from computational point of view standing wave simulation by solving coupled 2D perturbed Sine-Gordon equations. We make an OpenMP realization which explores both thread and SIMD levels of parallelism. We test the OpenMP program on two different energy equivalent Intel architectures: 2× Xeon E5-2695 v2 processors, (code-named "Ivy Bridge-EP") in the Hybrilit cluster, and Xeon Phi 7250 processor (code-named "Knights Landing" (KNL). The results show 2 times better performance on KNL processor.

  17. Nonlinear Wave Simulation on the Xeon Phi Knights Landing Processor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristov Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider an interesting from computational point of view standing wave simulation by solving coupled 2D perturbed Sine-Gordon equations. We make an OpenMP realization which explores both thread and SIMD levels of parallelism. We test the OpenMP program on two different energy equivalent Intel architectures: 2× Xeon E5-2695 v2 processors, (code-named “Ivy Bridge-EP” in the Hybrilit cluster, and Xeon Phi 7250 processor (code-named “Knights Landing” (KNL. The results show 2 times better performance on KNL processor.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of the ventilated wave boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmann, Iris P.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2006-01-01

    A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of (1) a fully developed turbulent wave boundary layer and (2) case 1 subject to ventilation (i.e., suction and injection varying alternately in phase) has been performed, using the Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model to express the subgrid viscosity. The model was found...... slows down the flow in the full vertical extent of the boundary layer, destabilizes the flow and decreases the mean bed shear stress significantly; whereas suction generally speeds up the flow in the full vertical extent of the boundary layer, stabilizes the flow and increases the mean bed shear stress...

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SHOCK WAVE REFRACTION ON INCLINED CONTACT DISCONTINUITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider numerical simulation of shock wave refraction on plane contact discontinuity, separating two gases with different density. Discretization of Euler equations is based on finite volume method and WENO finite difference schemes, implemented on unstructured meshes. Integration over time is performed with the use of the third-order Runge–Kutta stepping procedure. The procedure of identification and classification of gas dynamic discontinuities based on conditions of dynamic consistency and image processing methods is applied to visualize and interpret the results of numerical calculations. The flow structure and its quantitative characteristics are defined. The results of numerical and experimental visualization (shadowgraphs, schlieren images, and interferograms are compared.

  20. Simulations of short-crested harbour waves with variational Boussinesq modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adytia, D.

    2014-01-01

    Waves propagating from the deep ocean to the coast show large changes in wave height, wave length and direction. The challenge to simulate the essential wave characteristics is in particular to model the speed and nonlinear interaction correctly. All these physical phenomena are present, but hidden,

  1. Particle simulations of nonlinear whistler and Alfven wave instabilities - Amplitude modulation, decay, soliton and inverse cascading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omura, Yoshiharu; Matsumoto, Hiroshi.

    1989-01-01

    Past theoretical and numerical studies of the nonlinear evolution of electromagnetic cyclotron waves are reviewed. Such waves are commonly observed in space plasmas such as Alfven waves in the solar wind or VLF whistler mode waves in the magnetosphere. The use of an electromagnetic full-particle code to study an electron cyclotron wave and of an electromagnetic hybrid code to study an ion cyclotron wave is demonstrated. Recent achievements in the simulations of nonlinear revolution of electromagnetic cyclotron waves are discussed. The inverse cascading processes of finite-amplitude whistler and Alfven waves is interpreted in terms of physical elementary processes. 65 refs

  2. Simulations of drift waves in 3D magnetic configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, G.

    2000-06-01

    Drift waves are commonly held responsible for anomalous transport in tokamak configurations and in particular for the anomalously high heat loss. The next generation of stellarators on the other hand are hoped to be characterized by a much smaller neo-classical transport and by particle confinement close to that of tokamaks. There is nevertheless a strong interest in the stellarator community to study the properties of drift waves in 3D magnetic configurations. To serve this interest we have developed the first global gyrokinetic code, EUTERPE, aimed at the investigation of linear drift wave stability in general toroidal geometry. The physical model assumes electrostatic waves and adiabatic electrons. EUTERPE is a particle-in-cell (PIC) code in which the gyrokinetic Poisson equation is discretized with the finite element method defined in the PEST -1 system of magnetic coordinates. The magnetic geometry is provided by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium code VMEC. The complete 3D model has been successfully validated in toroidal axisymmetric and straight helical geometries and has permitted the first simulation of unstable global ITG driven modes in non-axisymmetric toroidal configurations. As a first application, two configurations have been studied, the Quasi-Axially symmetric Stellarator with three fields periods (QAS3) currently one system under consideration at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and the Helically Symmetric experiment (HSX) which has recently started operation at the University of Wisconsin. QAS3 is characterized by a tokamak-Iike field in the outer part of the torus. In this structure the drift waves are mainly affected by the magnetic shear and barely by the shape of the plasma. Also, the results are very close to those obtained for a tokamak. On the other hand, results for the HSX configuration, which is characterized by a dominant helical magnetic field, show a clear 3D effect, namely a strong toroidal variation of the drift wave

  3. Wave Energy Converter Annual Energy Production Uncertainty Using Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton E. Hiles

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Critical to evaluating the economic viability of a wave energy project is: (1 a robust estimate of the electricity production throughout the project lifetime and (2 an understanding of the uncertainty associated with said estimate. Standardization efforts have established mean annual energy production (MAEP as the metric for quantification of wave energy converter (WEC electricity production and the performance matrix approach as the appropriate method for calculation. General acceptance of a method for calculating the MAEP uncertainty has not yet been achieved. Several authors have proposed methods based on the standard engineering approach to error propagation, however, a lack of available WEC deployment data has restricted testing of these methods. In this work the magnitude and sensitivity of MAEP uncertainty is investigated. The analysis is driven by data from simulated deployments of 2 WECs of different operating principle at 4 different locations. A Monte Carlo simulation approach is proposed for calculating the variability of MAEP estimates and is used to explore the sensitivity of the calculation. The uncertainty of MAEP ranged from 2%–20% of the mean value. Of the contributing uncertainties studied, the variability in the wave climate was found responsible for most of the uncertainty in MAEP. Uncertainty in MAEP differs considerably between WEC types and between deployment locations and is sensitive to the length of the input data-sets. This implies that if a certain maximum level of uncertainty in MAEP is targeted, the minimum required lengths of the input data-sets will be different for every WEC-location combination.

  4. Wave optics simulation of statistically rough surface scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanari, Ann M.; Butler, Samuel D.; Marciniak, Michael; Spencer, Mark F.

    2017-09-01

    The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) describes optical scatter from surfaces by relating the incident irradiance to the exiting radiance over the entire hemisphere. Laboratory verification of BRDF models and experimentally populated BRDF databases are hampered by sparsity of monochromatic sources and ability to statistically control the surface features. Numerical methods are able to control surface features, have wavelength agility, and via Fourier methods of wave propagation, may be used to fill the knowledge gap. Monte-Carlo techniques, adapted from turbulence simulations, generate Gaussian distributed and correlated surfaces with an area of 1 cm2 , RMS surface height of 2.5 μm, and correlation length of 100 μm. The surface is centered inside a Kirchhoff absorbing boundary with an area of 16 cm2 to prevent wrap around aliasing in the far field. These surfaces are uniformly illuminated at normal incidence with a unit amplitude plane-wave varying in wavelength from 3 μm to 5 μm. The resultant scatter is propagated to a detector in the far field utilizing multi-step Fresnel Convolution and observed at angles from -2 μrad to 2 μrad. The far field scatter is compared to both a physical wave optics BRDF model (Modified Beckmann Kirchhoff) and two microfacet BRDF Models (Priest, and Cook-Torrance). Modified Beckmann Kirchhoff, which accounts for diffraction, is consistent with simulated scatter for multiple wavelengths for RMS surface heights greater than λ/2. The microfacet models, which assume geometric optics, are less consistent across wavelengths. Both model types over predict far field scatter width for RMS surface heights less than λ/2.

  5. Tropical Animal Tour Packet. Metro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metro Washington Park Zoo, Portland, OR. Educational Services Div.

    This packet is designed to assist teachers in creating a tropical animals lesson plan that centers around a visit to the zoo. A teacher packet is divided into eight parts: (1) goals and objectives; (2) what to expect at the zoo; (3) student activities (preparatory activities, on-site activities, and follow-up activities); (4) background…

  6. Full-wave simulations of current profiles for fast magnetosonic wave current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrieva, M.V.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Gambier, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    Numerical simulations of current drive in tokamaks by fast waves (FWCD) have been performed in the range of the ion cyclotron and at lower frequencies via 3-Dimensional numerical code ICTOR. Trapped particles effects were taken into account in the calculation of the fast wave current drive efficiency and the bootstrap current generation. The global efficiency of FWCD if found to be γ∼ 0.1 x 10 20 AW -1 m -2 for the Joint European Torus tokamak (JET) parameters at a central electron temperature of ∼ 10 kev. The efficiency of FWCD for reactor-like plasmas is found to be γ∼0.3 x 10 20 AW -1 m -2 for ∼ 100% of FWCD and γ∼ 1 x 10 20 AW -1 m -2 for FWCD and ∼ 65% of bootstrap in a total current of ∼ 25MA at a 25kev central temperature with a density of ∼10 20 m -3 and major radius R ∼ 8m. Non-inductive current density profiles are studied. Broad FWCD current profiles are obtained for flat reactor temperature and density profiles with bootstrap current concentrated at the plasma edge. The possibility of a steady-state reactor on full wave (FW) with a large fraction of bootstrap current is discussed. It appears to be impractical to rely on such an external current driven (CD) scheme for a reactor as long a γ is less than 2 x 10 20 AW -1 m -2 . (Author)

  7. Beyond Born-Oppenheimer theory for ab initio constructed diabatic potential energy surfaces of singlet H3+ to study reaction dynamics using coupled 3D time-dependent wave-packet approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sandip; Mukherjee, Saikat; Mukherjee, Bijit; Mandal, Souvik; Sharma, Rahul; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Adhikari, Satrajit

    2017-08-21

    The workability of beyond Born-Oppenheimer theory to construct diabatic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of a charge transfer atom-diatom collision process has been explored by performing scattering calculations to extract accurate integral cross sections (ICSs) and rate constants for comparison with most recent experimental quantities. We calculate non-adiabatic coupling terms among the lowest three singlet states of H 3 + system (1 1 A ' , 2 1 A ' , and 3 1 A ' ) using MRCI level of calculation and solve the adiabatic-diabatic transformation equation to formulate the diabatic Hamiltonian matrix of the same process [S. Mukherjee et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 204306 (2014)] for the entire region of nuclear configuration space. The nonadiabatic effects in the D + + H 2 reaction has been studied by implementing the coupled 3D time-dependent wave packet formalism in hyperspherical coordinates [S. Adhikari and A. J. C. Varandas, Comput. Phys. Commun. 184, 270 (2013)] with zero and non-zero total angular momentum (J) on such newly constructed accurate (ab initio) diabatic PESs of H 3 + . We have depicted the convergence profiles of reaction probabilities for the reactive non-charge transfer, non-reactive charge transfer, and reactive charge transfer processes for different collisional energies with respect to the helicity (K) and total angular momentum (J) quantum numbers. Finally, total and state-to-state ICSs are calculated as a function of collision energy for the initial rovibrational state (v = 0, j = 0) of the H 2 molecule, and consequently, those quantities are compared with previous theoretical and experimental results.

  8. Further Results on Extended Delivery Time for Secondary Packet Transmission

    KAUST Repository

    Usman, Muneer

    2017-07-10

    Cognitive radio transceiver can opportunistically access the underutilized spectrum resource of primary systems for new wireless services. With interweave cognitive implementation, secondary transmission may be interrupted by primary transmission. To facilitate the packet delay analysis of such secondary transmission, we study the extended delivery time of secondary packet transmission. In particular, we derive the exact distribution function of extended delivery time of a fixed-size secondary packet with non-work-preserving strategy, where interrupted packets must be repeated. We also analyze the effect of imperfect periodic sensing, i.e., the secondary user periodically senses the spectrum for availability, with a chance of missing an available channel on a certain sensing attempt. These results complement previous work on work-preserving strategy with perfect sensing. Selected numerical and simulation results are presented for verifying the mathematical formulation.

  9. Implicit finite-difference simulations of seismic wave propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei; Stoffa, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new finite-difference modeling method, implicit both in space and in time, for the scalar wave equation. We use a three-level implicit splitting time integration method for the temporal derivative and implicit finite-difference operators of arbitrary order for the spatial derivatives. Both the implicit splitting time integration method and the implicit spatial finite-difference operators require solving systems of linear equations. We show that it is possible to merge these two sets of linear systems, one from implicit temporal discretizations and the other from implicit spatial discretizations, to reduce the amount of computations to develop a highly efficient and accurate seismic modeling algorithm. We give the complete derivations of the implicit splitting time integration method and the implicit spatial finite-difference operators, and present the resulting discretized formulas for the scalar wave equation. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis on grid dispersions of this new implicit modeling method. We show that implicit spatial finite-difference operators greatly improve the accuracy of the implicit splitting time integration simulation results with only a slight increase in computational time, compared with explicit spatial finite-difference operators. We further verify this conclusion by both 2D and 3D numerical examples. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  10. Implicit finite-difference simulations of seismic wave propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-03-01

    We propose a new finite-difference modeling method, implicit both in space and in time, for the scalar wave equation. We use a three-level implicit splitting time integration method for the temporal derivative and implicit finite-difference operators of arbitrary order for the spatial derivatives. Both the implicit splitting time integration method and the implicit spatial finite-difference operators require solving systems of linear equations. We show that it is possible to merge these two sets of linear systems, one from implicit temporal discretizations and the other from implicit spatial discretizations, to reduce the amount of computations to develop a highly efficient and accurate seismic modeling algorithm. We give the complete derivations of the implicit splitting time integration method and the implicit spatial finite-difference operators, and present the resulting discretized formulas for the scalar wave equation. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis on grid dispersions of this new implicit modeling method. We show that implicit spatial finite-difference operators greatly improve the accuracy of the implicit splitting time integration simulation results with only a slight increase in computational time, compared with explicit spatial finite-difference operators. We further verify this conclusion by both 2D and 3D numerical examples. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  11. ALFVÉN WAVES IN SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR PHOTOSPHERIC VORTICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelyag, S.; Cally, P. S. [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Reid, A.; Mathioudakis, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-10

    Using advanced numerical magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the magnetized solar photosphere, including non-gray radiative transport and a non-ideal equation of state, we analyze plasma motions in photospheric magnetic vortices. We demonstrate that apparent vortex-like motions in photospheric magnetic field concentrations do not exhibit 'tornado'-like behavior or a 'bath-tub' effect. While at each time instance the velocity field lines in the upper layers of the solar photosphere show swirls, the test particles moving with the time-dependent velocity field do not demonstrate such structures. Instead, they move in a wave-like fashion with rapidly changing and oscillating velocity field, determined mainly by magnetic tension in the magnetized intergranular downflows. Using time-distance diagrams, we identify horizontal motions in the magnetic flux tubes as torsional Alfvén perturbations propagating along the nearly vertical magnetic field lines with local Alfvén speed.

  12. Discrete-State Simulated Annealing For Traveling-Wave Tube Slow-Wave Circuit Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Bulson, Brian A.; Kory, Carol L.; Williams, W. Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Algorithms based on the global optimization technique of simulated annealing (SA) have proven useful in designing traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits for high RF power efficiency. The characteristic of SA that enables it to determine a globally optimized solution is its ability to accept non-improving moves in a controlled manner. In the initial stages of the optimization, the algorithm moves freely through configuration space, accepting most of the proposed designs. This freedom of movement allows non-intuitive designs to be explored rather than restricting the optimization to local improvement upon the initial configuration. As the optimization proceeds, the rate of acceptance of non-improving moves is gradually reduced until the algorithm converges to the optimized solution. The rate at which the freedom of movement is decreased is known as the annealing or cooling schedule of the SA algorithm. The main disadvantage of SA is that there is not a rigorous theoretical foundation for determining the parameters of the cooling schedule. The choice of these parameters is highly problem dependent and the designer needs to experiment in order to determine values that will provide a good optimization in a reasonable amount of computational time. This experimentation can absorb a large amount of time especially when the algorithm is being applied to a new type of design. In order to eliminate this disadvantage, a variation of SA known as discrete-state simulated annealing (DSSA), was recently developed. DSSA provides the theoretical foundation for a generic cooling schedule which is problem independent, Results of similar quality to SA can be obtained, but without the extra computational time required to tune the cooling parameters. Two algorithm variations based on DSSA were developed and programmed into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet graphical user interface (GUI) to the two-dimensional nonlinear multisignal helix traveling-wave amplifier analysis program TWA3

  13. Wave propagation simulation of radio occultations based on ECMWF refractivity profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a complete radio occultation simulation environment, including realistic refractivity profiles, wave propagation modeling, instrument modeling, and bending angle retrieval. The wave propagator is used to simulate radio occultation measurements. The radio waves are propagated...... of radio occultations. The output from the wave propagator simulator is used as input to a Full Spectrum Inversion retrieval module which calculates geophysical parameters. These parameters can be compared to the ECMWF atmospheric profiles. The comparison can be used to reveal system errors and get...... a better understanding of the physics. The wave propagation simulations will in this paper also be compared to real measurements. These radio occultations have been exposed to the same atmospheric conditions as the radio occultations simulated by the wave propagator. This comparison reveals that precise...

  14. Numerical modeling study of the momentum deposition of small amplitude gravity waves in the thermosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Henan Normal Univ., Xinxiang (China). College of Mathematics and Information Science; Xu, J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Yue, J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States). High Altitude Observatory; Hampton Univ., VA (United States). Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences; Vadas, S.L. [North West Research Associates, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    2013-03-01

    We study the momentum deposition in the thermosphere from the dissipation of small amplitude gravity waves (GWs) within a wave packet using a fully nonlinear two-dimensional compressible numerical model. The model solves the nonlinear propagation and dissipation of a GW packet from the stratosphere into the thermosphere with realistic molecular viscosity and thermal diffusivity for various Prandtl numbers. The numerical simulations are performed for GW packets with initial vertical wavelengths ({lambda}{sub z}) ranging from 5 to 50 km. We show that {lambda}{sub z} decreases in time as a GW packet dissipates in the thermosphere, in agreement with the ray trace results of Vadas and Fritts (2005) (VF05). We also find good agreement for the peak height of the momentum flux (z{sub diss}) between our simulations and VF05 for GWs with initial {lambda}{sub z} {<=} 2{pi}H in an isothermal, windless background, where H is the density scale height.We also confirm that z{sub diss} increases with increasing Prandtl number. We include eddy diffusion in the model, and find that the momentum deposition occurs at lower altitudes and has two separate peaks for GW packets with small initial {lambda}{sub z}. We also simulate GW packets in a non-isothermal atmosphere. The net {lambda}{sub z} profile is a competition between its decrease from viscosity and its increase from the increasing background temperature. We find that the wave packet disperses more in the non-isothermal atmosphere, and causes changes to the momentum flux and {lambda}{sub z} spectra at both early and late times for GW packets with initial {lambda}{sub z} {>=} 10 km. These effects are caused by the increase in T in the thermosphere, and the decrease in T near the mesopause. (orig.)

  15. Analysis and implementation of packet preemption for Time Sensitive Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Zifan; Yan, Ying; Ruepp, Sarah Renée

    2017-01-01

    level simulation in Riverbed Modeler. The simulation is complemented by numerical analysis which provides the average queuing delay for both types of traffic (preemptable and express). Furthermore, the paper describes an approach to implement the packet preemption solution on an FPGA in VHDL, which...... illustrates the complexity of hardware implementation....

  16. Langmuir field structures favored in wave collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.A.; Wouters, M.J.; Broderick, N.G.

    1996-01-01

    Study of Langmuir collapse thresholds shows that they have little polarization dependence and that moving packets have the lowest thresholds in the undamped case. However, incorporation of damping into the density response inhibits collapse of packets moving at more than a small fraction of the sound speed. Investigation of energy transfer to packets localized in density wells emdash the nucleation process emdash shows that at most a few trapped states can exist and that energy transfer is most effective when there is a single barely-trapped state. Coupled with an argument that closely packed wave packets have lower collapse thresholds, this argument yields an estimate of the number density of localized nucleating states in a turbulent plasma. It also leads to a simple and direct semiquantitative estimate of the collapse threshold. All these results are in accord with previous numerical simulations incorporating ion-sound damping, which show a preponderance of slow-moving or stationary packets with little or no intrinsic polarization dependence of thresholds. Likewise, the number densities obtained are in good agreement with simulation values, and the simple estimate of the threshold is semiquantitatively correct. The extent of the agreement supports the nucleation scenario with close-packed nucleation sites in the turbulent state. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Sampled-Data Consensus of Linear Multi-agent Systems With Packet Losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenbing; Tang, Yang; Huang, Tingwen; Kurths, Jurgen

    In this paper, the consensus problem is studied for a class of multi-agent systems with sampled data and packet losses, where random and deterministic packet losses are considered, respectively. For random packet losses, a Bernoulli-distributed white sequence is used to describe packet dropouts among agents in a stochastic way. For deterministic packet losses, a switched system with stable and unstable subsystems is employed to model packet dropouts in a deterministic way. The purpose of this paper is to derive consensus criteria, such that linear multi-agent systems with sampled-data and packet losses can reach consensus. By means of the Lyapunov function approach and the decomposition method, the design problem of a distributed controller is solved in terms of convex optimization. The interplay among the allowable bound of the sampling interval, the probability of random packet losses, and the rate of deterministic packet losses are explicitly derived to characterize consensus conditions. The obtained criteria are closely related to the maximum eigenvalue of the Laplacian matrix versus the second minimum eigenvalue of the Laplacian matrix, which reveals the intrinsic effect of communication topologies on consensus performance. Finally, simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed results.In this paper, the consensus problem is studied for a class of multi-agent systems with sampled data and packet losses, where random and deterministic packet losses are considered, respectively. For random packet losses, a Bernoulli-distributed white sequence is used to describe packet dropouts among agents in a stochastic way. For deterministic packet losses, a switched system with stable and unstable subsystems is employed to model packet dropouts in a deterministic way. The purpose of this paper is to derive consensus criteria, such that linear multi-agent systems with sampled-data and packet losses can reach consensus. By means of the Lyapunov function

  18. Aero-Hydro-Elastic Simulation Platform for Wave Energy Systems and floating Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Bjarne Skovmose

    This report present results from the PSO project 2008-1-10092 entitled Aero-Hydro-Elastic Simulation Platform for Wave Energy Systems and floating Wind Turbines that deals with measurements, modelling and simulations of the world’s first combined wave and wind energy platform. The floating energy...

  19. Wave-packet dynamics in quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. V.; Sanders, G. D.; Stanton, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    It has been recently recognized that in bulk semiconductors the displacement current caused by ultrafast optical generation of ''polarized pairs'' in the applied de field is an important mechanism of charge transport in addition to the usual transport current. In quantum-well systems, this polari......It has been recently recognized that in bulk semiconductors the displacement current caused by ultrafast optical generation of ''polarized pairs'' in the applied de field is an important mechanism of charge transport in addition to the usual transport current. In quantum-well systems...... that the carriers in a quantum well can behave as an ensemble of classical particles and produce a transport like photocurrent....

  20. Angularly resolved electron wave packet interferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varju, K; Johnsson, P; Mauritsson, J; Remetter, T; Ruchon, T; Ni, Y; Lepine, F; Kling, M; Khan, J; Schafer, K J; Vrakking, M J J; L'Huillier, A

    2006-01-01

    We study experimentally the ionization of argon atoms by a train of attosecond pulses in the presence of a strong infrared laser field, using a velocity map imaging technique. The recorded momentum distribution strongly depends on the delay between the attosecond pulses and the laser field. We interpret the interference patterns observed for different delays using numerical and analytical calculations within the strong field approximation

  1. Angularly resolved electron wave packet interferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varju, K [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Johnsson, P [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Mauritsson, J [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Remetter, T [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Ruchon, T [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Ni, Y [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lepine, F [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kling, M [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Khan, J [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schafer, K J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Vrakking, M J J [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); L' Huillier, A [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2006-09-28

    We study experimentally the ionization of argon atoms by a train of attosecond pulses in the presence of a strong infrared laser field, using a velocity map imaging technique. The recorded momentum distribution strongly depends on the delay between the attosecond pulses and the laser field. We interpret the interference patterns observed for different delays using numerical and analytical calculations within the strong field approximation.

  2. Nonlinear approximation with general wave packets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Lasse; Nielsen, Morten

    2005-01-01

    We study nonlinear approximation in the Triebel-Lizorkin spaces with dictionaries formed by dilating and translating one single function g. A general Jackson inequality is derived for best m-term approximation with such dictionaries. In some special cases where g has a special structure, a complete...

  3. Nonlocality of a free atomic wave packet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haug, F.; Freyberger, M.; Wodkiewicz, K.

    2004-01-01

    A simple model allows us to study the nonclassical behavior of slowly moving atoms interacting with a quantized field. Atom and field become entangled and their joint state can be identified as a mesoscopic 'Schroedinger cat'. By introducing appropriate observables for atom and field and by analyzing correlations between them based on a Bell-type inequality we can show the corresponding nonclassical behavior

  4. The numerical simulation of Lamb wave propagation in laser welding of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Fang; Liu, Chang; Li, Jingming; Zhang, Baojun; Zhou, Qingxiang; Han, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yang

    2017-12-01

    In order to explore the Lamb wave propagation in laser welding of stainless steel, the numerical simulation is used to show the feature of Lamb wave. In this paper, according to Lamb dispersion equation, excites the Lamb wave on the edge of thin stainless steel plate, and presents the reflection coefficient for quantizing the Lamb wave energy, the results show that the reflection coefficient is increased with the welding width increasing,

  5. Simulating satellite observations of 100 kHz radio waves from relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds

    OpenAIRE

    M. Füllekrug; C. Hanuise; M. Parrot

    2010-01-01

    Relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds emit 100 kHz radio waves which illuminate the Earth's atmosphere and near-Earth space. This contribution aims to clarify the physical processes which are relevant for the spatial spreading of the radio wave energy below and above the ionosphere and thereby enables simulating satellite observations of 100 kHz radio waves from relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds. The simulation uses the DEMETER satellite which observes 100 kHz ...

  6. Thermal responses in a coronal loop maintained by wave heating mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2018-05-01

    A full 3-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation is conducted to investigate the thermal responses of a coronal loop to the dynamic dissipation processes of MHD waves. When the foot points of the loop are randomly and continuously forced, the MHD waves become excited and propagate upward. Then, 1-MK temperature corona is produced naturally as the wave energy dissipates. The excited wave packets become non-linear just above the magnetic canopy, and the wave energy cascades into smaller spatial scales. Moreover, collisions between counter-propagating Alfvén wave packets increase the heating rate, resulting in impulsive temperature increases. Our model demonstrates that the heating events in the wave-heated loops can be nanoflare-like in the sense that they are spatially localized and temporally intermittent.

  7. Effects of Simulated Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Functions in Senile Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the effects of simulated heat waves on cardiovascular disease in senile mice was investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a TEM1880 meteorological environment simulation chamber, according to a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen senile mice were divided into control, heat wave, and heat wave BH4 groups, respectively. Mice in the heat wave and heat wave BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. The levels of ET-1, NO, HSP60, SOD, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α in each group of mice were measured after heat wave simulation. Results show that heat waves decreased SOD activity in the myocardial tissue of senile mice, increased NO, HSP60, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α levels, and slightly decreased ET-1 levels, BH4 can relieve the effects of heat waves on various biological indicators. After a comprehensive analysis of the experiments above, we draw the followings conclusions regarding the influence of heat waves on senile mice: excess HSP60 activated immune cells, and induced endothelial cells and macrophages to secrete large amounts of ICAM-1, TNF-α, and other inflammatory cytokines, it also activated the inflammation response in the body and damaged the coronary endothelial cell structure, which increased the permeability of blood vessel intima and decreased SOD activity in cardiac tissues. The oxidation of lipoproteins in the blood increased, and large amounts of cholesterol were generated. Cholesterol penetrated the intima and deposited on the blood vessel wall, forming atherosclerosis and leading to the occurrence of cardiovascular disease in senile mice. These results maybe are useful for studying the effects of heat waves on elderly humans, which we discussed in the discussion chapter.

  8. Numerical simulation of travelling wave induced electrothermal fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R; Green, Nicolas G; Wolff, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Many microdevices for manipulating particles and cells use electric fields to produce a motive force on the particles. The movement of particles in non-uniform electric fields is called dielectrophoresis, and the usual method of applying this effect is to pass the particle suspension over a microelectrode structure. If the suspension has a noticeable conductivity, one important side effect is that the electric field drives a substantial conduction current through the fluid, causing localized Joule-heating. The resulting thermal gradient produces local conductivity and permittivity changes in the fluid. Dielectrophoretic forces acting upon these pockets of fluid will then produce motion of both the fluid and the particles. This paper presents a numerical solution of the electrical force and the resulting electrothermal driven fluid flow on a travelling wave structure. This common electrode geometry consists of interdigitated electrodes laid down in a long array, with the phase of the applied potential shifted by 90 0 on each subsequent electrode. The resulting travelling electric field was simulated and the thermal field and electrical body force on the fluid calculated, for devices constructed from two typical materials: silicon and glass. The electrothermal fluid flow in the electrolyte over the electrode array was then numerically simulated. The model predicts that the thermal field depends on the conductivity and applied voltage, but more importantly on the geometry of the system and the material used in the construction of the device. The velocity of the fluid flow depends critically on the same parameters, with slight differences in the thermal field for glass and silicon leading to diametrically opposite flow direction with respect to the travelling field for the two materials. In addition, the imposition of slight external temperature gradients is shown to have a large effect on the fluid flow in the device, under certain conditions leading to a reversal of

  9. Harmonic effects on ion-bulk waves and simulation of stimulated ion-bulk-wave scattering in CH plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Q. S.; Zheng, C. Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Cao, L. H.; Xiao, C. Z.; Wang, Q.; Zhang, H. C.; He, X. T.

    2017-08-01

    Ion-bulk (IBk) wave, a novel branch with a phase velocity close to the ion’s thermal velocity, discovered by Valentini et al (2011 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 53 105017), is recently considered as an important electrostatic activity in solar wind, and thus of great interest to space physics and also inertial confinement fusion. The harmonic effects on IBk waves has been researched by Vlasov simulation for the first time. The condition of excitation of the large-amplitude IBk waves is given. The nature of nonlinear IBk waves in the condition of kFeng scattering (SFS) has been proposed and also verified by Vlasov-Maxwell code. In CH plasmas, in addition to the stimulated Brillouin scattering from multi ion-acoustic waves, there exists SIBS simultaneously. This research gives an insight into the SIBS in the field of laser plasma interaction.

  10. Parallelized FDTD simulation for flat-plate bounded wave EMP simulator with lumped terminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiangqin; Chen Weiqing; Chen Zaigao; Cai Libing; Wang Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    A parallelized finite-difference time-domain(FDTD) method for simulating the bounded wave electromagnetic pulse (EMP) simulator with lumped terminator and parallel plate is presented. The effects of several model-parameters on the simulator to the fields in the working volume are simulated and analyzed. The results show that if the width of the lower PEC plate is(or is bigger than)1.5 times that of the upper plate of working volume, the projection length of front transitional section does not have a significant effect on the rise-times of electric fields at the points near the front transitional section, and the rise-times of electric fields at the points near the working volume center decrease as the projection length increases, but the decrement of rise-time decreases. The rise-times of E z at all points also decrease as the lower PEC plate's width increases, but the decrements of rise-time decreases. If the projection length of the front transitional section is fixed, the good results can not be obtained by increasing or decreasing the height of the simulator only, however, which has an optimal value. (authors)

  11. Incorporating information from source simulations into searches for gravitational-wave bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Patrick R; Ray-Majumder, Saikat

    2004-01-01

    The detection of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources of gravitational waves is a realistic goal for the current generation of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. Short duration bursts of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae or mergers of binary black holes may bring a wealth of astronomical and astrophysical information. The weakness of the waves and the rarity of the events urges the development of optimal methods to detect the waves. The waves from these sources are not generally known well enough to use matched filtering however; this drives the need to develop new ways to exploit source simulation information in both detection and information extraction. We present an algorithmic approach to using catalogues of gravitational-wave signals developed through numerical simulation, or otherwise, to enhance our ability to detect these waves. As more detailed simulations become available, it is straightforward to incorporate the new information into the search method. This approach may also be useful when trying to extract information from a gravitational-wave observation by allowing direct comparison between the observation and simulations

  12. An artificial generation of a few specific wave conditions: New simulator design and experimental performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.; Mohamed, M.H.; Marzok, S.Y.; Montasser, O.A.; El Feky, A.; El Baz, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, an amplified global awareness has led to a reawakening of interest in renewable energy technology. In an effort to reduce the worldwide dependence on fossil fuels, cleaner power generation methods are being sought in the field of solar, biomass, wind and wave energy. The importance of wave energy is increased in particular in some countries like UK, Portugal, Spain and Japan. A considerable progress has already been achieved in this field but the available technical designs are not adequate to develop reliable wave energy converters. Wave energy is the most available energy associated in water seas and oceans. Simultaneously, the wave energy has consisted of two types of energies: potential and kinetic energy. Therefore, many attempts have been applied to capture these energies. In the present work, a wave generator device has been designed and manufactured to simulate and generate the heaving motion of sea waves with different specification. A PC based electro-pneumatic control system was designed and implemented to individually control wave height, these heights are 3, 8, 16, 18 and 20 cm and different frequencies to generate these regular and irregular waves. - Highlights: • Wave energy is one of the most promising sources of renewable energy. • Most researchers built huge flume to simulate waves with large size and high budget. • A new simulator design for the direct and indirect wave energy is introduced. • The regular and irregular wave can be obtained for the new wave simulator. • This design is compact, flexible in terms amplitude, frequencies and high accuracy

  13. GLOBAL SIMULATION OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING TELESCOPE WAVE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    We use the observation of an Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) wave in the lower solar corona, seen with the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft in extreme ultraviolet light on 2007 May 19, to model the same event with a three-dimensional (3D) time-depending magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code that includes solar coronal magnetic fields derived with Wilcox Solar Observatory magnetogram data, and a solar wind outflow accelerated with empirical heating functions. The model includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) of Gibson and Low flux rope type above the reconstructed active region with parameters adapted from observations to excite the EIT wave. We trace the EIT wave running as circular velocity enhancement around the launching site of the CME in the direction tangential to the sphere produced by the wave front, and compute the phase velocities of the wave front. We find that the phase velocities are in good agreement with theoretical values for a fast magnetosonic wave, derived with the physical parameters of the model, and with observed phase speeds of an incident EIT wave reflected by a coronal hole and running at about the same location. We also produce in our 3D MHD model the observed reflection of the EIT wave at the coronal hole boundary, triggered by the magnetic pressure difference between the wave front hitting the hole and the boundary magnetic fields of the coronal hole, and the response of the coronal hole, which leads to the generation of secondary reflected EIT waves radiating away in different directions than the incident EIT wave. This is the first 3D MHD model of an EIT wave triggered by a CME that includes realistic solar magnetic field, with results comparing favorably to STEREO Extreme Ultraviolet Imager observations.

  14. Physical simulation technique on the behaviour of oil spills in grease ice under wave actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Hollebone, B.; Fingas, M.; Fieldhouse, B.

    2008-01-01

    Light or medium oil spilled on ice tends to rise and remain the surface in unconsolidated frazil or grease ice. This study looked for a new system for studying the oil emulsion in grease ice under experimental conditions. A physical simulation technique was designed to test the effect of wave energy on the spilled oil grease ice emulsion. The newly developed test system has the ability to perform simulation tests in wave, wave-ice, wave-oil and wave-ice-oil. This paper presented the design concept of the developed test system and introduced the experimental certifications of its capability in terms of temperature control, wave-making and grease ice-making. The key feature of the technique is a mini wave flume which derives its wave making power from an oscillator in a chemical laboratory. Video cameras record the wave action in the flume in order to obtain wave parameters. The wave making capability tests in this study were used to determine the relation of wave height, length and frequency with oscillator power transfer, oscillator frequency and the depth of the water flume. 16 refs., 10 figs

  15. Novel Scheme for Packet Forwarding without Header Modifications in Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessing, Henrik; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Fjelde, Tina

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel scheme for packet forwarding in optical packet-switched networks and we further demonstrate its good scalability through simulations. The scheme requires neither header modification nor any label distribution protocol, thus reducing component cost while simplifying network...

  16. An FMM-FFT Accelerated SIE Simulator for Analyzing EM Wave Propagation in Mine Environments Loaded with Conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Yucel, Abdulkadir C.; Sheng, Weitian; Zhou, Chenming; Liu, Yang Z.; Bagci, Hakan; Michielssen, Eric

    2018-01-01

    A fast and memory efficient 3D full wave simulator for analyzing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in electrically large and realistic mine tunnels/galleries loaded with conductors is proposed. The simulator relies on Muller and combined field

  17. FDTD simulation of EM wave propagation in 3-D media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T.; Tripp, A.C. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1996-01-01

    A finite-difference, time-domain solution to Maxwell`s equations has been developed for simulating electromagnetic wave propagation in 3-D media. The algorithm allows arbitrary electrical conductivity and permittivity variations within a model. The staggered grid technique of Yee is used to sample the fields. A new optimized second-order difference scheme is designed to approximate the spatial derivatives. Like the conventional fourth-order difference scheme, the optimized second-order scheme needs four discrete values to calculate a single derivative. However, the optimized scheme is accurate over a wider wavenumber range. Compared to the fourth-order scheme, the optimized scheme imposes stricter limitations on the time step sizes but allows coarser grids. The net effect is that the optimized scheme is more efficient in terms of computation time and memory requirement than the fourth-order scheme. The temporal derivatives are approximated by second-order central differences throughout. The Liao transmitting boundary conditions are used to truncate an open problem. A reflection coefficient analysis shows that this transmitting boundary condition works very well. However, it is subject to instability. A method that can be easily implemented is proposed to stabilize the boundary condition. The finite-difference solution is compared to closed-form solutions for conducting and nonconducting whole spaces and to an integral-equation solution for a 3-D body in a homogeneous half-space. In all cases, the finite-difference solutions are in good agreement with the other solutions. Finally, the use of the algorithm is demonstrated with a 3-D model. Numerical results show that both the magnetic field response and electric field response can be useful for shallow-depth and small-scale investigations.

  18. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-01-01

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar Ψ 4 , (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by ∼1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by ∼5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse physics.

  19. Nonlinear excitation of electron cyclotron waves by a monochromatic strong microwave: computer simulation analysis of the MINIX results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, H.; Kimura, T.

    1986-01-01

    Triggered by the experimental results of the MINIX, a computer simulation study was initiated on the nonlinear excitation of electrostatic electron cyclotron waves by a monochromatic electromagnetic wave such as the transmitted microwave in the MINIX. The model used assumes that both of the excited waves and exciting (pumping) electromagnetic wave as well as the idler electromagnetic wave propagate in the direction perpendicular to the external magnetic field. The simulation code used for this study was the one-and-two-half dimensional electromagnetic particle code named KEMPO. The simulation result shows the high power electromagnetic wave produces both the backscattered electromagnetic wave and electrostatic electron cyclotron waves as a result of nonlinear parametric instability. Detailed nonlinear microphysics related to the wave excitation is discussed in terms of the nonlinear wave-wave couplings and associated ponderomotive force produced by the high power electromagnetic waves. 2 references, 4 figures.

  20. Nonlinear excitation of electron cyclotron waves by a monochromatic strong microwave: computer simulation analysis of the MINIX results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Kimura, T.

    1986-01-01

    Triggered by the experimental results of the MINIX, a computer simulation study was initiated on the nonlinear excitation of electrostatic electron cyclotron waves by a monochromatic electromagnetic wave such as the transmitted microwave in the MINIX. The model used assumes that both of the excited waves and exciting (pumping) electromagnetic wave as well as the idler electromagnetic wave propagate in the direction perpendicular to the external magnetic field. The simulation code used for this study was the one-and-two-half dimensional electromagnetic particle code named KEMPO. The simulation result shows the high power electromagnetic wave produces both the backscattered electromagnetic wave and electrostatic electron cyclotron waves as a result of nonlinear parametric instability. Detailed nonlinear microphysics related to the wave excitation is discussed in terms of the nonlinear wave-wave couplings and associated ponderomotive force produced by the high power electromagnetic waves. 2 references, 4 figures

  1. Numerical simulation of floating bodies in extreme free surface waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Z. Hu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use the in-house Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD flow code AMAZON-SC as a numerical wave tank (NWT to study wave loading on a wave energy converter (WEC device in heave motion. This is a surface-capturing method for two fluid flows that treats the free surface as contact surface in the density field that is captured automatically without special provision. A time-accurate artificial compressibility method and high resolution Godunov-type scheme are employed in both fluid regions (air/water. The Cartesian cut cell method can provide a boundary-fitted mesh for a complex geometry with no requirement to re-mesh globally or even locally for moving geometry, requiring only changes to cut cell data at the body contour. Extreme wave boundary conditions are prescribed in an empty NWT and compared with physical experiments prior to calculations of extreme waves acting on a floating Bobber-type device. The validation work also includes the wave force on a fixed cylinder compared with theoretical and experimental data under regular waves. Results include free surface elevations, vertical displacement of the float, induced vertical velocity and heave force for a typical Bobber geometry with a hemispherical base under extreme wave conditions.

  2. Wave Simulation in Truncated Domains for Offshore Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellens, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a desire to assess extreme wave loads on offshore structures like Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessels, either for design, or for evaluation when circumstances near the structure change. Design formulae for extreme wave loads are scarce and

  3. Observation and simulation of the ionosphere disturbance waves triggered by rocket exhausts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles C. H.; Chen, Chia-Hung; Matsumura, Mitsuru; Lin, Jia-Ting; Kakinami, Yoshihiro

    2017-08-01

    Observations and theoretical modeling of the ionospheric disturbance waves generated by rocket launches are investigated. During the rocket passage, time rate change of total electron content (rTEC) enhancement with the V-shape shock wave signature is commonly observed, followed by acoustic wave disturbances and region of negative rTEC centered along the trajectory. Ten to fifteen min after the rocket passage, delayed disturbance waves appeared and propagated along direction normal to the V-shape wavefronts. These observation features appeared most prominently in the 2016 North Korea rocket launch showing a very distinct V-shape rTEC enhancement over enormous areas along the southeast flight trajectory despite that it was also appeared in the 2009 North Korea rocket launch with the eastward flight trajectory. Numerical simulations using the physical-based nonlinear and nonhydrostatic coupled model of neutral atmosphere and ionosphere reproduce promised results in qualitative agreement with the characteristics of ionospheric disturbance waves observed in the 2009 event by considering the released energy of the rocket exhaust as the disturbance source. Simulations reproduce the shock wave signature of electron density enhancement, acoustic wave disturbances, the electron density depletion due to the rocket-induced pressure bulge, and the delayed disturbance waves. The pressure bulge results in outward neutral wind flows carrying neutrals and plasma away from it and leading to electron density depletions. Simulations further show, for the first time, that the delayed disturbance waves are produced by the surface reflection of the earlier arrival acoustic wave disturbances.

  4. Simulation and Measurements of Small Arms Blast Wave Overpressure in the Process of Designing a Silencer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristov Nebojša

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulation and measurements of muzzle blast overpressure and its physical manifestations are studied in this paper. The use of a silencer can have a great influence on the overpressure intensity. A silencer is regarded as an acoustic transducer and a waveguide. Wave equations for an acoustic dotted source of directed effect are used for physical interpretation of overpressure as an acoustic phenomenon. Decomposition approach has proven to be suitable to describe the formation of the output wave of the wave transducer. Electroacoustic analogies are used for simulations. A measurement chain was used to compare the simulation results with the experimental ones.

  5. Simulation and Optimization of Surface Acoustic Wave Devises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a method to model the interaction of the mechanical field from a surface acoustic wave and the optical field in the waveguides of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer is presented. The surface acoustic waves are generated by interdigital transducers using a plane strain model...... in effective refractive index introduced in the Mach-Zehnder interferometer arms by the stresses from the surface acoustic wave is calculated. It is shown that the effective refractive index of the fundamental optical mode increases at a surface acoustic wave crest and decreases at a trough. The height...... of a piezoelectric, inhomogeneous material and reflections from the boundaries are avoided by applying perfectly matched layers. The optical modes in the waveguides are modeled by the time-harmonic wave equation for the magnetic field. The two models are coupled using the stress-optical relation and the change...

  6. Disk Operating System--DOS. Teacher Packet. Learning Activity Packets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    The Learning Activity Packets (LAPs) contained in this manual are designed to assist the beginning user in understanding DOS (Disk Operating System). LAPs will not work with any version below DOS Version 3.0 and do not address the enhanced features of versions 4.0 or higher. These elementary activities cover only the DOS commands necessary to…

  7. Full-wave Simulations of LH Wave Propagation in Toroidal Plasma with non-Maxwellian Electron Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeo, E.J.; Phillips, C.K.; Bonoli, P.T.; Wright, J.C.; Brambilla, M.

    2007-01-01

    The generation of energetic tails in the electron distribution function is intrinsic to lower-hybrid (LH) heating and current drive in weakly collisional magnetically confined plasma. The effects of these deformations on the RF deposition profile have previously been examined within the ray approximation. Recently, the calculation of full-wave propagation of LH waves in a thermal plasma has been accomplished using an adaptation of the TORIC code. Here, initial results are presented from TORIC simulations of LH propagation in a toroidal plasma with non-thermal electrons. The required efficient computation of the hot plasma dielectric tensor is accomplished using a technique previously demonstrated in full-wave simulations of ICRF propagation in plasma with non-thermal ions

  8. ICRF Mode Conversion Studies with Phase Contrast Imaging and Comparisons with Full-Wave Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, N.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Porkolab, M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Harvey, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat toka-mak plasmas. In a multi-ion-species plasma, the FW converts to ion cyclotron waves (ICW) and ion Bernstein waves (IBW) around the ion-ion hybrid resonance (mode conversion). The mode converted wave is of interest as an actuator to optimise plasma performance through flow drive and current drive. Numerical simulations are essential to describe these processes accurately, and it is important that these simulation codes be validated. On Alcator C-Mod, direct measurements of the mode converted waves have been performed using Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI), which measures the line-integrated electron density fluctuations. The results were compared to full-wave simulations AORSA and TORIC. AORSA is coupled to a Fokker-Planck code CQL3D for self-consistent simulation of the wave electric field and the minority distribution function. The simulation results are compared to PCI measurements using synthetic diagnostic. The experiments were performed in D-H and D- 3 He plasmas over a wide range of ion species concentrations. The simulations agreed well with the measurements in the strong absorption regime. However, the measured fluctuation intensity was smaller by 1-2 orders of magnitudes in the weakly abosorbing regime, and a realistic description of the plasma edge including dissipation and antenna geometry may be required in these cases.

  9. Energy conversion of orbital motions in gravitational waves: Simulation and test of the Seaspoon wave energy converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Fresco, L.; Traverso, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate an innovative wave energy converter. • We study a robust technology derived from wind power sector. • We increased the performance of a drag type rotor exploiting the motion of ocean waves and a simple flat plate component. • We proved the working principle with a numerical model first and with experimental test in wave flume later. • We aim to obtain a robust large energy harvester able to operate in mild energy sea and with an extended operating range. - Abstract: The conversion of ocean wave power into sustainable electrical power represents a major opportunity to Nations endowed with such a kind of resource. At the present time the most of the technological innovations aiming at converting such resources are at early stage of development, with only a handful of devices close to be at the commercial demonstration stage. The Seaspoon device, thought as a large energy harvester, catches the kinetic energy of ocean waves with promising conversion efficiency, and robust technology, according to specific “wave-motion climate”. University of Genoa aims to develop a prototype to be deployed in medium average energy content seas (i.e. Mediterranean or Eastern Asia seas). This paper presents the first simulation and experimental results carried out on a reduced scale proof-of-concept model tested in the laboratory wave flume

  10. Estimation of numerical uncertainty in computational fluid dynamics simulations of a passively controlled wave energy converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Weizhi; Wu, Minghao; Palm, Johannes

    2018-01-01

    for almost linear incident waves. First, we show that the computational fluid dynamics simulations have acceptable agreement to experimental data. We then present a verification and validation study focusing on the solution verification covering spatial and temporal discretization, iterative and domain......The wave loads and the resulting motions of floating wave energy converters are traditionally computed using linear radiation–diffraction methods. Yet for certain cases such as survival conditions, phase control and wave energy converters operating in the resonance region, more complete...... dynamics simulations have largely been overlooked in the wave energy sector. In this article, we apply formal verification and validation techniques to computational fluid dynamics simulations of a passively controlled point absorber. The phase control causes the motion response to be highly nonlinear even...

  11. Application of biorthogonal eigenfunction system for extraction of Tollmien-Schlichting waves in acoustic receptivity simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Shahriari, Nima; Hanifi, Ardeshir; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic receptivity of a two-dimensional boundary layer on a flat plate with elliptic leading edge is studied through direct numerical simulation (DNS). Sound waves are modelled by a uniform oscillation of freestream boundaries in time which results to an infinite-wavelength acoustic wave. Acoustic disturbances interact with strong streamwise gradients at the leading edge or surface non- homogeneities and create Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves inside the boundary layer. Measuring amplitude o...

  12. Hunger and Development [Issue Packet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Freedom from Hunger Foundation, Washington, DC.

    A variety of informational materials is compiled in this issue packet concentrating on hunger and development. They have been assembled to understand the issues associated with the facts of world hunger and to try to invent new forms of action and thought necessary to find the possibilities hidden in the hunger issue. Items include: (1) a fact and…

  13. SECURE SERVICE DISCOVERY BASED ON PROBE PACKET MECHANISM FOR MANETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pariselvam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In MANETs, Service discovery process is always considered to be crucial since they do not possess a centralized infrastructure for communication. Moreover, different services available through the network necessitate varying categories. Hence, a need arises for devising a secure probe based service discovery mechanism to reduce the complexity in providing the services to the network users. In this paper, we propose a Secure Service Discovery Based on Probe Packet Mechanism (SSDPPM for identifying the DoS attack in MANETs, which depicts a new approach for estimating the level of trust present in each and every routing path of a mobile ad hoc network by using probe packets. Probing based service discovery mechanisms mainly identifies a mobile node’s genuineness using a test packet called probe that travels the entire network for the sake of computing the degree of trust maintained between the mobile nodes and it’s attributed impact towards the network performance. The performance of SSDPPM is investigated through a wide range of network related parameters like packet delivery, throughput, Control overhead and total overhead using the version ns-2.26 network simulator. This mechanism SSDPPM, improves the performance of the network in an average by 23% and 19% in terms of packet delivery ratio and throughput than the existing service discovery mechanisms available in the literature.

  14. Simulations for design and reconstruction of breaking waves in a wavetank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurnia, Ruddy; van den Munckhof, T.; Poot, C.P.; Naaijen, P.; Huijsmans, R.H.M.; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    To determine forces on fixed and flexible structures such as wind mills and oil platforms, experiments in wave tanks are useful to investigate the impacts in various types of environmental waves. In this paper we show that the use of an efficient simulation code can optimize the experiments by

  15. A Coupled VOF-Eulerian Multiphase CFD Model to Simulate Breaking Wave Impacts on Offshore Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomaselli, Pietro; Christensen, Erik Damgaard

    2016-01-01

    Breaking wave-induced loads on offshore structures can be extremely severe. The air entrainment mechanism during the breaking process plays a not well-known role in the exerted forces. This paper present a CFD solver, developed in the Open-FOAM environment, capable of simulating the wave breaking...

  16. A combined ADER-DG and PML approach for simulating wave propagation in unbounded domains

    KAUST Repository

    Amler, Thomas; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Alkhalifah, Tariq A.

    2012-01-01

    cells where waves are amplified by the PML, the contribution of damping terms is neglected and auxiliary variables are reset. Results of 2D simulations in acoustic media with constant and discontinuous material parameters are presented to illustrate

  17. Numerical Simulation of a Breaking Gravity Wave Event Over Greenland Observed During Fastex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doyle, James

    1997-01-01

    Measurements from the NOAA G4 research aircraft and high-resolution numerical simulations are used to study the evolution and dynamics of a large-amplitude gravity wave event over Greenland that took...

  18. Artificial Boundary Conditions for the Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Acoustic Waves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsynkov, S. V

    2003-01-01

    We construct non-local artificial boundary conditions (ABCs) for the numerical simulation of genuinely time-dependent acoustic waves that propagate from a compact source in an unbounded unobstructed space...

  19. Numerical simulation of wave-induced scour and backfilling processes beneath submarine pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Baykal, Cüneyt; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    A fully-coupled hydrodynamic/morphodynamic numerical model is presented and utilized for the simulation of wave-induced scour and backfilling processes beneath submarine pipelines. The model is based on solutions to Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations, coupled with k−ω turbulence closure......≤30 demonstrate reasonable match with previous experiments, both in terms of the equilibrium scour depth as well as the scour time scale. Wave-induced backfilling processes are additionally studied by subjecting initial conditions taken from scour simulations with larger KC to new wave climates...... characterized by lower KC values. The simulations considered demonstrate the ability of the model to predict backfilling toward expected equilibrium scour depths based on the new wave climate, in line with experimental expectations. The simulated backfilling process is characterized by two stages: (1...

  20. Trade Related Reading Packets for Disabled Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Beverly; Woodruff, Nancy S.

    Six trade-related reading packets for disabled readers are provided for these trades: assemblers, baking, building maintenance, data entry, interior landscaping, and warehousing. Each packet stresses from 9 to 14 skills. Those skills common to most packets include context clues, fact or opinion, details, following directions, main idea,…

  1. Numerical simulation of single bubble dynamics under acoustic travelling waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaojian; Huang, Biao; Li, Yikai; Chang, Qing; Qiu, Sicong; Su, Zheng; Fu, Xiaoying; Wang, Guoyu

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to apply CLSVOF method to investigate the single bubble dynamics in acoustic travelling waves. The Naiver-Stokes equation considering the acoustic radiation force is proposed and validated to capture the bubble behaviors. And the CLSVOF method, which can capture the continuous geometric properties and satisfies mass conservation, is applied in present work. Firstly, the regime map, depending on the dimensionless acoustic pressure amplitude and acoustic wave number, is constructed to present different bubble behaviors. Then, the time evolution of the bubble oscillation is investigated and analyzed. Finally, the effect of the direction and the damping coefficient of acoustic wave propagation on the bubble behavior are also considered. The numerical results show that the bubble presents distinct oscillation types in acoustic travelling waves, namely, volume oscillation, shape oscillation, and splitting oscillation. For the splitting oscillation, the formation of jet, splitting of bubble, and the rebound of sub-bubbles may lead to substantial increase in pressure fluctuations on the boundary. For the shape oscillation, the nodes and antinodes of the acoustic pressure wave contribute to the formation of the "cross shape" of the bubble. It should be noted that the direction of the bubble translation and bubble jet are always towards the direction of wave propagation. In addition, the damping coefficient causes bubble in shape oscillation to be of asymmetry in shape and inequality in size, and delays the splitting process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Numerical simulation of multi-directional random wave transformation in a yacht port

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qiaoling; Dong, Sheng; Zhao, Xizeng; Zhang, Guowei

    2012-09-01

    This paper extends a prediction model for multi-directional random wave transformation based on an energy balance equation by Mase with the consideration of wave shoaling, refraction, diffraction, reflection and breaking. This numerical model is improved by 1) introducing Wen's frequency spectrum and Mitsuyasu's directional function, which are more suitable to the coastal area of China; 2) considering energy dissipation caused by bottom friction, which ensures more accurate results for large-scale and shallow water areas; 3) taking into account a non-linear dispersion relation. Predictions using the extended wave model are carried out to study the feasibility of constructing the Ai Hua yacht port in Qingdao, China, with a comparison between two port layouts in design. Wave fields inside the port for different incident wave directions, water levels and return periods are simulated, and then two kinds of parameters are calculated to evaluate the wave conditions for the two layouts. Analyses show that Layout I is better than Layout II. Calculation results also show that the harbor will be calm for different wave directions under the design water level. On the contrary, the wave conditions do not wholly meet the requirements of a yacht port for ship berthing under the extreme water level. For safety consideration, the elevation of the breakwater might need to be properly increased to prevent wave overtopping under such water level. The extended numerical simulation model may provide an effective approach to computing wave heights in a harbor.

  3. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CONVERSION TO ALFVÉN WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomenko, E.; Cally, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    We study the conversion of fast magnetoacoustic waves to Alfvén waves by means of 2.5D numerical simulations in a sunspot-like magnetic configuration. A fast, essentially acoustic, wave of a given frequency and wave number is generated below the surface and propagates upward through the Alfvén/acoustic equipartition layer where it splits into upgoing slow (acoustic) and fast (magnetic) waves. The fast wave quickly reflects off the steep Alfvén speed gradient, but around and above this reflection height it partially converts to Alfvén waves, depending on the local relative inclinations of the background magnetic field and the wavevector. To measure the efficiency of this conversion to Alfvén waves we calculate acoustic and magnetic energy fluxes. The particular amplitude and phase relations between the magnetic field and velocity oscillations help us to demonstrate that the waves produced are indeed Alfvén waves. We find that the conversion to Alfvén waves is particularly important for strongly inclined fields like those existing in sunspot penumbrae. Equally important is the magnetic field orientation with respect to the vertical plane of wave propagation, which we refer to as 'field azimuth'. For a field azimuth less than 90° the generated Alfvén waves continue upward, but above 90° downgoing Alfvén waves are preferentially produced. This yields negative Alfvén energy flux for azimuths between 90° and 180°. Alfvén energy fluxes may be comparable to or exceed acoustic fluxes, depending upon geometry, though computational exigencies limit their magnitude in our simulations.

  4. Three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of linearly polarised Alfven wave dynamics in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies (e.g., Malara et al., Astrophys. J. 533, 523 (2000)) considered small-amplitude Alfven wave (AW) packets in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) magnetic field using WKB approximation. They draw a distinction between 2D AW dissipation via phase mixing and 3D AW dissipation via exponentially divergent magnetic field lines. In the former case, AW dissipation time scales as S 1∕3 and in the latter as log(S), where S is the Lundquist number. In this work, linearly polarised Alfven wave dynamics in ABC magnetic field via direct 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation is studied for the first time. A Gaussian AW pulse with length-scale much shorter than ABC domain length and a harmonic AW with wavelength equal to ABC domain length are studied for four different resistivities. While it is found that AWs dissipate quickly in the ABC field, contrary to an expectation, it is found the AW perturbation energy increases in time. In the case of the harmonic AW, the perturbation energy growth is transient in time, attaining peaks in both velocity and magnetic perturbation energies within timescales much smaller than the resistive time. In the case of the Gaussian AW pulse, the velocity perturbation energy growth is still transient in time, attaining a peak within few resistive times, while magnetic perturbation energy continues to grow. It is also shown that the total magnetic energy decreases in time and this is governed by the resistive evolution of the background ABC magnetic field rather than AW damping. On contrary, when the background magnetic field is uniform, the total magnetic energy decrease is prescribed by AW damping, because there is no resistive evolution of the background. By considering runs with different amplitudes and by analysing the perturbation spectra, possible dynamo action by AW perturbation-induced peristaltic flow and inverse cascade of magnetic energy have been excluded. Therefore, the perturbation energy growth is attributed to

  5. Three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of linearly polarised Alfven wave dynamics in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiklauri, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies (e.g., Malara et al., Astrophys. J. 533, 523 (2000)) considered small-amplitude Alfven wave (AW) packets in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) magnetic field using WKB approximation. They draw a distinction between 2D AW dissipation via phase mixing and 3D AW dissipation via exponentially divergent magnetic field lines. In the former case, AW dissipation time scales as S{sup 1∕3} and in the latter as log(S), where S is the Lundquist number. In this work, linearly polarised Alfven wave dynamics in ABC magnetic field via direct 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation is studied for the first time. A Gaussian AW pulse with length-scale much shorter than ABC domain length and a harmonic AW with wavelength equal to ABC domain length are studied for four different resistivities. While it is found that AWs dissipate quickly in the ABC field, contrary to an expectation, it is found the AW perturbation energy increases in time. In the case of the harmonic AW, the perturbation energy growth is transient in time, attaining peaks in both velocity and magnetic perturbation energies within timescales much smaller than the resistive time. In the case of the Gaussian AW pulse, the velocity perturbation energy growth is still transient in time, attaining a peak within few resistive times, while magnetic perturbation energy continues to grow. It is also shown that the total magnetic energy decreases in time and this is governed by the resistive evolution of the background ABC magnetic field rather than AW damping. On contrary, when the background magnetic field is uniform, the total magnetic energy decrease is prescribed by AW damping, because there is no resistive evolution of the background. By considering runs with different amplitudes and by analysing the perturbation spectra, possible dynamo action by AW perturbation-induced peristaltic flow and inverse cascade of magnetic energy have been excluded. Therefore, the perturbation energy growth is

  6. Long-period ground motions at near-regional distances caused by the PL wave from, inland earthquakes: Observation and numerical simulation of the 2004 Mid-Niigata, Japan, Mw6.6 earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumura, T.; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2017-12-01

    We examine the development of large, long-period ground motions at near-regional distances (D=50-200 km) generated by the PL wave from large, shallow inland earthquakes, based on the analysis of strong motion records and finite-difference method (FDM) simulations of seismic wave propagation. PL wave can be represented as leaking modes of the crustal waveguide and are commonly observed at regional distances between 300 to 1000 km as a dispersed, long-period signal with a dominant period of about 20 s. However, observations of recent earthquakes at the dense K-NET and KiK-net strong motion networks in Japan demonstrate the dominance of the PL wave at near-regional (D=50-200 km) distances as, e.g., for the 2004 Mid Niigata, Japan, earthquake (Mw6.6; h=13 km). The observed PL wave signal between P and S wave shows a large, dispersed wave packet with dominant period of about T=4-10 s with amplitude almost comparable to or larger than the later arrival of the S and surface waves. Thus, the early arrivals of the long-period PL wave immediately after P wave can enhance resonance with large-scale constructions such as high-rise buildings and large oil-storage tanks etc. with potential for disaster. Such strong effects often occurred during the 2004 Mid Niigata earthquakes and other large earthquakes which occurred nearby the Kanto (Tokyo) basin. FDM simulation of seismic wave propagation employing realistic 3-D sedimentary structure models demonstrates the process by which the PL wave develops at near-regional distances from shallow, crustal earthquakes by constructive interference of the P wave in the long-period band. The amplitude of the PL wave is very sensitive to low-velocity structure in the near-surface. Lowered velocities help to develop large SV-to-P conversion and weaken the P-to-SV conversion at the free surface. Both effects enhance the multiple P reflections in the crustal waveguide and prevent the leakage of seismic energy into the mantle. However, a very

  7. Particle simulation of intense electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.I.

    1987-01-01

    High-power free-electron lasers make new methods possible for heating plasmas and driving current in toroidal plasmas with electromagnetic waves. We have undertaken particle simulation studies with one and two dimensional, relativistic particle simulation codes of intense pulsed electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive. The particle simulation methods here are conventional: the algorithms are time-centered, second-order-accurate, explicit, leap-frog difference schemes. The use of conventional methods restricts the range of space and time scales to be relatively compact in the problems addressed. Nevertheless, experimentally relevant simulations have been performed. 10 refs., 2 figs

  8. Generation of attosecond electron packets via conical surface plasmon electron acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, S. R.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for the generation of high kinetic energy attosecond electron packets via magnetostatic and aperture filtering of conical surface plasmon (SP) accelerated electrons. The conical SP waves are excited by coupling an ultrafast radially polarized laser beam to a conical silica lens coated with an Ag film. Electromagnetic and particle tracking models are employed to characterize the ultrafast electron packets. PMID:26764129

  9. Simulation study on cross polarization scattering of ultrashort-pulse electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuragawa, Naoki; Hojo, Hitoshi; Mase, Atushi

    1996-11-01

    Simulation study on cross polarization scattering of ultrashort-pulse electromagnetic waves due to magnetic fluctuations is presented. One-dimensional coupled wave equations for the ordinary and extraordinary modes are solved for incident unipolar sub-cycle pulses in an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma. It is shown that the peak frequencies in the frequency-spectral signals of the mode-converted reflected waves are determined from the Bragg resonance condition in the wave numbers of the ordinary mode, the extraordinary mode and the magnetic fluctuations for relatively short-wavelength localized magnetic fluctuations. (author)

  10. Numerical Simulations for Nonlinear Waves Interaction with Multiple Perforated Quasi-Ellipse Caissons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhong Ren

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional numerical flume is developed to study cnoidal wave interaction with multiple arranged perforated quasi-ellipse caissons. The continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equations are used as the governing equation, and the VOF method is adopted to capture the free surface elevation. The equations are discretized on staggered cells and then solved using a finite difference method. The generation and propagation of cnoidal waves in the numerical flume are tested first. And the ability of the present model to simulate interactions between waves and structures is verified by known experimental results. Then cnoidal waves with varying incident wave height and period are generated and interact with multiple quasi-ellipse caissons with and without perforation. It is found that the perforation plays an effective role in reducing wave runup/rundown and wave forces on the caissons. The wave forces on caissons reduce with the decreasing incident wave period. The influence of the transverse distance of multiple caissons on wave forces is also investigated. A closer transverse distance between caissons can produce larger wave forces. But when relative adjacent distance L/D (L is the transverse distance and D is the width of the quasi-ellipse caisson is larger than 3, the effect of adjacent distance is limited.

  11. Biobeam—Multiplexed wave-optical simulations of light-sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Martin; Bundschuh, Sebastian T.

    2018-01-01

    Sample-induced image-degradation remains an intricate wave-optical problem in light-sheet microscopy. Here we present biobeam, an open-source software package that enables simulation of operational light-sheet microscopes by combining data from 105–106 multiplexed and GPU-accelerated point-spread-function calculations. The wave-optical nature of these simulations leads to the faithful reproduction of spatially varying aberrations, diffraction artifacts, geometric image distortions, adaptive optics, and emergent wave-optical phenomena, and renders image-formation in light-sheet microscopy computationally tractable. PMID:29652879

  12. Visualizing the phenomena of wave interference, phase-shifting and polarization by interactive computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ortega, Uriel; Dirckx, Joris

    2015-09-01

    In this manuscript a computer based simulation is proposed for teaching concepts of interference of light (under the scheme of a Michelson interferometer), phase-shifting and polarization states. The user can change some parameters of the interfering waves, such as their amplitude and phase difference in order to graphically represent the polarization state of a simulated travelling wave. Regarding to the interference simulation, the user is able to change the wavelength and type of the interfering waves by selecting combinations between planar and Gaussian profiles, as well as the optical path difference by translating or tilting one of the two mirrors in the interferometer setup, all of this via a graphical user interface (GUI) designed in MATLAB. A theoretical introduction and simulation results for each phenomenon will be shown. Due to the simulation characteristics, this GUI can be a very good non-formal learning resource.

  13. Identification of slow magnetosonic wave trains and their evolution in 3-D compressible turbulence simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In solar wind, dissipation of slow-mode magnetosonic waves may play a significant role in heating the solar wind, and these modes contribute essentially to the solar wind compressible turbulence. Most previous identifications of slow waves utilized the characteristic negative correlation between δ|B| and δρ. However, that criterion does not well identify quasi-parallel slow waves, for which δ|B| is negligible compared to δρ. Here we present a new method of identification, which will be used in 3-D compressible simulation. It is based on two criteria: (1 that VpB0 (phase speed projected along B0 is around ± cs, and that (2 there exists a clear correlation of δv|| and δρ. Our research demonstrates that if vA > cs, slow waves possess correlation between δv|| and δρ, with δρ / δv|| ≈ ± ρ0 / cs. This method helps us to distinguish slow-mode waves from fast and Alfvén waves, both of which do not have this polarity relation. The criteria are insensitive to the propagation angle θk B, defined as the angle between wave vector k and B0; they can be applied with a wide range of β if only vA > cs. In our numerical simulation, we have identified four cases of slow wave trains with this method. The slow wave trains seem to deform, probably caused by interaction with other waves; as a result, fast or Alfvén waves may be produced during the interaction and seem to propagate bidirectionally away. Our identification and analysis of the wave trains provide useful methods for investigations of compressible turbulence in the solar wind or in similar environments, and will thus deepen understandings of slow waves in the turbulence.

  14. Multiwavelet packets and frame packets of L2( d)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    For a nice exposition of wavelet packets of L2( ) with dilation 2, see [11]. ..... p∈ d hr lm(ξ)cjp. {. ∑ q∈ d. ˆϕm(ξ + 2qπ) ˆϕj (ξ + 2qπ). } ·e−i〈k,Bξ〉 e i〈p, ξ〉 dξ ...... [14] Rudin W, Fourier Analysis on Groups (New York: John Wiley and Sons) (1962).

  15. Numerical simulation of scattering wave imaging in a goaf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Juanjuan; Pan Dongming; Liao Taiping; Hu Mingshun; Wang Linlin

    2011-01-01

    Goafs are threats to safe mining. Their imaging effects or those of other complex geological bodies are often poor in conventional reflected wave images. Hence, accurate detection of goals has become an important problem, to be solved with a sense of urgency. Based on scattering theory, we used an equivalent offset method to extract Common Scattering Point gathers, in order to analyze different scattering wave characteristics between Common Scattering Point and Common Mid Point gathers and to compare stack and migration imaging effects. Our research results show that the scattering wave imaging method is more efficient than the conventional imaging method and is therefore a more effective imaging method for detecting goats and other complex geological bodies. It has important implications for safe mining procedures and infrastructures.

  16. Simulation of Asymmetric Lamb Waves for Sensing and Actuation in Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghoshal

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Two approaches used for monitoring the health of thin aerospace structures are active interrogation and passive monitoring. The active interrogation approach generates and receives diagnostic Lamb waves to detect damage, while the passive monitoring technique listens for acoustic waves caused by damage growth. For the application of both methods, it is necessary to understand how Lamb waves propagate through a structure. In this paper, a Physics-Based Model (PBM using classical plate theory is developed to provide a basic understanding of the actual physical process of asymmetric Lamb mode wave generation and propagation in a plate. The closed-form model uses modal superposition to simulate waves generated by piezoceramic patches and by simulated acoustic emissions. The generation, propagation, reflection, interference, and the sensing of the waves are represented in the model, but damage is not explicitly modeled. The developed model is expected to be a useful tool for the Structural Health Monitoring (SHM community, particularly for studying high frequency acoustic wave generation and propagation in lieu of Finite Element models and other numerical models that require significant computational resources. The PBM is capable of simulating many possible scenarios including a variety of test cases, whereas experimental measurements of all of the cases can be costly and time consuming. The model also incorporates the sensor measurement effect, which is an important aspect in damage detection. Continuous and array sensors are modeled, which are efficient for measuring waves because of their distributed nature.

  17. Simulation of non-hydrostatic gravity wave propagation in the upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Deng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The high-frequency and small horizontal scale gravity waves may be reflected and ducted in non-hydrostatic simulations, but usually propagate vertically in hydrostatic models. To examine gravity wave propagation, a preliminary study has been conducted with a global ionosphere–thermosphere model (GITM, which is a non-hydrostatic general circulation model for the upper atmosphere. GITM has been run regionally with a horizontal resolution of 0.2° long × 0.2° lat to resolve the gravity wave with wavelength of 250 km. A cosine wave oscillation with amplitude of 30 m s−1 has been applied to the zonal wind at the low boundary, and both high-frequency and low-frequency waves have been tested. In the high-frequency case, the gravity wave stays below 200 km, which indicates that the wave is reflected or ducted in propagation. The results are consistent with the theoretical analysis from the dispersion relationship when the wavelength is larger than the cutoff wavelength for the non-hydrostatic situation. However, the low-frequency wave propagates to the high altitudes during the whole simulation period, and the amplitude increases with height. This study shows that the non-hydrostatic model successfully reproduces the high-frequency gravity wave dissipation.

  18. Simulation and analysis of TE wave propagation for measurement of electron cloud densities in particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnad, Kiran G., E-mail: kgs52@cornell.edu [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Hammond, Kenneth C. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schwartz, Robert M. [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Veitzer, Seth A. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The use of transverse electric (TE) waves has proved to be a powerful, noninvasive method for estimating the densities of electron clouds formed in particle accelerators. Results from the plasma simulation program VSim have served as a useful guide for experimental studies related to this method, which have been performed at various accelerator facilities. This paper provides results of the simulation and modeling work done in conjunction with experimental efforts carried out at the Cornell electron storage ring “Test Accelerator” (CESRTA). This paper begins with a discussion of the phase shift induced by electron clouds in the transmission of RF waves, followed by the effect of reflections along the beam pipe, simulation of the resonant standing wave frequency shifts and finally the effects of external magnetic fields, namely dipoles and wigglers. A derivation of the dispersion relationship of wave propagation for arbitrary geometries in field free regions with a cold, uniform cloud density is also provided.

  19. Numerical simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation using time domain meshless method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuno, Soichiro; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Itoh, Taku; Nakata, Susumu; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Kamitani, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    The electromagnetic wave propagation in various shaped wave guide is simulated by using meshless time domain method (MTDM). Generally, Finite Differential Time Domain (FDTD) method is applied for electromagnetic wave propagation simulation. However, the numerical domain should be divided into rectangle meshes if FDTD method is applied for the simulation. On the other hand, the node disposition of MTDM can easily describe the structure of arbitrary shaped wave guide. This is the large advantage of the meshless time domain method. The results of computations show that the damping rate is stably calculated in case with R < 0.03, where R denotes a support radius of the weight function for the shape function. And the results indicate that the support radius R of the weight functions should be selected small, and monomials must be used for calculating the shape functions. (author)

  20. Improving the resolution for Lamb wave testing via a smoothed Capon algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuwei; Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Hua, Jiadong

    2018-04-01

    Lamb wave testing is promising for damage detection and evaluation in large-area structures. The dispersion of Lamb waves is often unavoidable, restricting testing resolution and making the signal hard to interpret. A smoothed Capon algorithm is proposed in this paper to estimate the accurate path length of each wave packet. In the algorithm, frequency domain whitening is firstly used to obtain the transfer function in the bandwidth of the excitation pulse. Subsequently, wavenumber domain smoothing is employed to reduce the correlation between wave packets. Finally, the path lengths are determined by distance domain searching based on the Capon algorithm. Simulations are applied to optimize the number of smoothing times. Experiments are performed on an aluminum plate consisting of two simulated defects. The results demonstrate that spatial resolution is improved significantly by the proposed algorithm.

  1. 3D dynamic simulation of crack propagation in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijerathne, M. L. L.; Hori, Muneo; Sakaguchi, Hide; Oguni, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Some experimental observations of Shock Wave Lithotripsy(SWL), which include 3D dynamic crack propagation, are simulated with the aim of reproducing fragmentation of kidney stones with SWL. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the fragmentation of kidney stones by focusing an ultrasonic pressure pulse onto the stones. 3D models with fine discretization are used to accurately capture the high amplitude shear shock waves. For solving the resulting large scale dynamic crack propagation problem, PDS-FEM is used; it provides numerically efficient failure treatments. With a distributed memory parallel code of PDS-FEM, experimentally observed 3D photoelastic images of transient stress waves and crack patterns in cylindrical samples are successfully reproduced. The numerical crack patterns are in good agreement with the experimental ones, quantitatively. The results shows that the high amplitude shear waves induced in solid, by the lithotriptor generated shock wave, play a dominant role in stone fragmentation.

  2. Variational Boussinesq model for simulation of coastal waves and tsunamis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adytia, D.; Adytia, Didit; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.; Tan, Soon Keat; Huang, Zhenhua

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe the basic ideas of a so-called Variational Boussinesq Model which is based on the Hamiltonian structure of gravity surface waves. By using a rather simple approach to prescribe the profile of vertical fluid potential in the expression for the kinetic energy, we obtain a set

  3. Vlasov simulations of Kinetic Alfven Waves at proton kinetic scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Vasconez; F. Valentini (Francesco); E. Camporeale (Enrico); P. Veltri

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractKinetic Alfv ́en waves represent an important subject in space plasma physics, since they are thought to play a crucial role in the development of the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind plasma at short wavelengths (of the order of the proton inertial length d p and beyond). A

  4. THE SIMULATION OF SCATTERING OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES ON ANGULAR STRUCTURES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Preobrazhensky

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the characteristics of scattering of electromagnetic waves on the angular diffraction structures. The solution of the problem is based on the method of integral equations. A comparative analysis of the scattering characteristics of structures with different shape is carried out.

  5. Using AORSA to simulate helicon waves in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, C.; Blazevski, D.; Green, D. L.; Murakami, M.; Park, J. M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Bertelli, N.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts have shown that helicon waves (fast waves at > 20ω ci ) may be an attractive option for driving efficient off-axis current drive during non-inductive tokamak operation for DIII-D, ITER and DEMO. For DIII-D scenarios, the ray tracing code, GENRAY, has been extensively used to study helicon current drive efficiency and location as a function of many plasma parameters. The full wave code, AORSA, which is applicable to arbitrary Larmor radius and can resolve arbitrary ion cyclotron harmonic order, has been recently used to validate the ray tracing technique at these high cyclotron harmonics. If the SOL is ignored, it will be shown that the GENRAY and AORSA calculated current drive profiles are comparable for the envisioned high beta advanced scenarios for DIII-D, where there is high single pass absorption due to electron Landau damping and minimal ion damping. AORSA is also been used to estimate possible SOL effects on helicon current drive coupling and SOL absorption due to collisional and slow wave effects

  6. Aiding Design of Wave Energy Converters via Computational Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebeli Aqdam, Hejar; Ahmadi, Babak; Raessi, Mehdi; Tootkaboni, Mazdak

    2015-11-01

    With the increasing interest in renewable energy sources, wave energy converters will continue to gain attention as a viable alternative to current electricity production methods. It is therefore crucial to develop computational tools for the design and analysis of wave energy converters. A successful design requires balance between the design performance and cost. Here an analytical solution is used for the approximate analysis of interactions between a flap-type wave energy converter (WEC) and waves. The method is verified using other flow solvers and experimental test cases. Then the model is used in conjunction with a powerful heuristic optimization engine, Charged System Search (CSS) to explore the WEC design space. CSS is inspired by charged particles behavior. It searches the design space by considering candidate answers as charged particles and moving them based on the Coulomb's laws of electrostatics and Newton's laws of motion to find the global optimum. Finally the impacts of changes in different design parameters on the power takeout of the superior WEC designs are investigated. National Science Foundation, CBET-1236462.

  7. Using AORSA to simulate helicon waves in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, C., E-mail: lauch@ornl.gov; Blazevski, D.; Green, D. L.; Murakami, M.; Park, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A. [XCEL Engineering, Inc., 1066 Commerce Park Dr., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bertelli, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Recent efforts have shown that helicon waves (fast waves at > 20ω{sub ci}) may be an attractive option for driving efficient off-axis current drive during non-inductive tokamak operation for DIII-D, ITER and DEMO. For DIII-D scenarios, the ray tracing code, GENRAY, has been extensively used to study helicon current drive efficiency and location as a function of many plasma parameters. The full wave code, AORSA, which is applicable to arbitrary Larmor radius and can resolve arbitrary ion cyclotron harmonic order, has been recently used to validate the ray tracing technique at these high cyclotron harmonics. If the SOL is ignored, it will be shown that the GENRAY and AORSA calculated current drive profiles are comparable for the envisioned high beta advanced scenarios for DIII-D, where there is high single pass absorption due to electron Landau damping and minimal ion damping. AORSA is also been used to estimate possible SOL effects on helicon current drive coupling and SOL absorption due to collisional and slow wave effects.

  8. Application of Cisco Packet Trace in the Inter-VLAN Communication Teaching%浅析Cisco Packet Tracer在Vlan间通信教学的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑耿凡

    2014-01-01

    Cisco Packet Tracer is a network simulation platform developed by Cisco Company. And Cisco packet tracer 5.3 allows three layer switch vlan communication in the experimental teaching. Real equipment is replaced by the analog simulation software, which solves the problem of lacking teaching experimental equipment in practice and im-proves the quality of teaching.%Cisco packet tracer是由思科公司开发的一个网络模拟辅助平台,在实验教学中可以借助Cisco packet tracer5.3实现三层交换机Vlan间通信,通过模拟防真软件来代替现实的设备,以解决在实践教学中实验设备缺乏的问题,提高教学质量。

  9. Structure and parameters dependences of Alfven wave current drive generated in the low-field side of simulated spherical tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuperman, S.; Bruma, C.; Komoshvili, K.

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical results on the wave-plasma interactions in simulated toroidal configurations are presented. The study covers the cases of large to low aspect ratio tokamaks, in the pre-heated stage. Fast waves emitted from an external antenna with different wave numbers and frequencies are considered. The non-inductive Alfven wave current drive is evaluated and discussed. (author)

  10. Structure and parameters dependences of Alfven wave current drive generated in the low-field side of simulated spherical tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuperman, S.; Bruma, C.; Komoshvili, K.

    2001-01-01

    Theoretical results on the wave-plasma interactions in simulated toroidal configurations are presented. The study covers the cases of large to low aspect ratio tokamaks, in the pre-heated stage. Fast waves emitted from an external antenna with different wave numbers and frequencies are considered. The non-inductive Alfven wave current drive is evaluated and discussed. (author)

  11. Scalings, spectra, and statistics of strong wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    A two-component model of strongly nonlinear wave turbulence is developed for a broad class of systems in which high-frequency electrostatic waves interact with low-frequency sound-like waves. In this model coherent nonlinear wave packets form and collapse amid a sea of incoherent background waves. It is shown that three classes of turbulence exist, typified by Langmuir, lower-hybrid, and upper-hybrid turbulence. Balance between power input to incoherent waves, and dissipation at the end of collapse determines power-law scalings of turbulent electrostatic energy density, density fluctuations, length and time scales. Knowledge of the evolution of collapsing packets enables probability distributions of the magnitudes of electric fields and density fluctuations to be calculated, yielding power-law dependences. Wavenumber spectra of collapsing waves and associated density fluctuations are also calculated and shown to have power-law forms. Applications to Langmuir, lower-hybrid, and upper-hybrid waves are discussed. In the Langmuir case the results agree with earlier theory and simulations, with one exception, which is consistent only with earlier simulations. In the lower-hybrid and upper-hybrid cases, the results are consistent with the few simulations to date. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  12. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfven Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M.; Chan, V.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.

    2005-01-01

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfven wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement

  13. Gravity wave generation from jets and fronts: idealized and real-case simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plougonven, Riwal; Arsac, Antonin; Hertzog, Albert; Guez, Lionel; Vial, François

    2010-05-01

    The generation of gravity waves from jets and fronts remains an outstanding issue in the dynamics of the atmosphere. It is important to explain and quantify this emission because of the several impacts of these waves, in particular the induced momentum fluxes towards the middle atmosphere, and their contribution to turbulence and mixing, e.g. in the region of the tropopause. Yet, the mechanisms at the origin of these waves have been difficult to identify, the fundamental reason for this being the separation between the time scales of balanced motions and gravity waves. Recent simulations of idealized baroclinic life cycles and of dipoles have provided insights into the mechanisms determining the characteristics and the amplitude of gravity waves emitted by jets. It has been shown in particular that the environmental strain and shear play a crucial role in determining the characteristics and location of the emitted waves, emphasizing jet exit regions for the appearance of coherent low-frequency waves. It has also been shown how advection of relatively small-scales allow to overcome the separation of time scales alluded to above. Recent results, remaining open questions and ongoing work on these idealized simulations will be briefly summarized. Nevertheless, unavoidable shortcomings of such idealized simulations include the sensitivity of the emitted waves to model setup (resolution, diffusion, parameterizations) and uncertainty regarding the realism of this aspect of the simulations. Hence, it is necessary to compare simulations with observations in order to assess their relevance. Such comparison has been undertaken using the dataset from the Vorcore campaign (Sept. 2005 - Feb. 2006, Hertzog, J. Atmos. Ocean. Techno. 2007) during which 27 superpressure balloons drifted as quasi-Lagrangian tracers in the lower stratosphere above Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. High-resolution simulations (dx = 20 km) have been carried out using the Weather Research and Forecast

  14. Numerical Simulations of Kinetic Alfvén Waves to Study Spectral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Numerical Simulations of Kinetic Alfvén Waves to Study Spectral. Index in Solar Wind Turbulence and Particle Heating. R. P. Sharma. ∗. & H. D. Singh. Center for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi 110 016, India. ∗ e-mail: rpsharma@ces.iitd.ernet.in. Abstract. We present numerical simulations of the ...

  15. Plasma and wave properties downstream of Martian bow shock: Hybrid simulations and MAVEN observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chuanfei; Winske, Dan; Cowee, Misa; Bougher, Stephen W.; Andersson, Laila; Connerney, Jack; Epley, Jared; Ergun, Robert; McFadden, James P.; Ma, Yingjuan; Toth, Gabor; Curry, Shannon; Nagy, Andrew; Jakosky, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid simulation codes are employed to investigate the kinetic properties of plasmas and waves downstream of the Martian bow shock. The simulations are two-dimensional in space but three dimensional in field and velocity components. Simulations show that ion cyclotron waves are generated by temperature anisotropy resulting from the reflected protons around the Martian bow shock. These proton cyclotron waves could propagate downward into the Martian ionosphere and are expected to heat the O+ layer peaked from 250 to 300 km due to the wave-particle interaction. The proton cyclotron wave heating is anticipated to be a significant source of energy into the thermosphere, which impacts atmospheric escape rates. The simulation results show that the specific dayside heating altitude depends on the Martian crustal field orientations, solar cycles and seasonal variations since both the cyclotron resonance condition and the non/sub-resonant stochastic heating threshold depend on the ambient magnetic field strength. The dayside magnetic field profiles for different crustal field orientation, solar cycle and seasonal variations are adopted from the BATS-R-US Mars multi-fluid MHD model. The simulation results, however, show that the heating of O+ via proton cyclotron wave resonant interaction is not likely in the relatively weak crustal field region, based on our simplified model. This indicates that either the drift motion resulted from the transport of ionospheric O+, or the non/sub-resonant stochastic heating mechanism are important to explain the heating of Martian O+ layer. We will investigate this further by comparing the simulation results with the available MAVEN data. These simulated ion cyclotron waves are important to explain the heating of Martian O+ layer and have significant implications for future observations.

  16. Simulation studies of plasma waves in the electron foreshock - The generation of Langmuir waves by a gentle bump-on-tail electron distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dum, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Particle simulation experiments were used to study the basic physical ingredients needed for building a global model of foreshock wave phenomena. In particular, the generation of Langmuir waves by a gentle bump-on-tail electron distribution is analyzed. It is shown that, with appropriately designed simulations experiments, quasi-linear theory can be quantitatively verified for parameters corresponding to the electron foreshock.

  17. An optimization method of relativistic backward wave oscillator using particle simulation and genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zaigao; Wang, Jianguo [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O. Box 69-12, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); Wang, Yue; Qiao, Hailiang; Zhang, Dianhui [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O. Box 69-12, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); Guo, Weijie [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Optimal design method of high-power microwave source using particle simulation and parallel genetic algorithms is presented in this paper. The output power, simulated by the fully electromagnetic particle simulation code UNIPIC, of the high-power microwave device is given as the fitness function, and the float-encoding genetic algorithms are used to optimize the high-power microwave devices. Using this method, we encode the heights of non-uniform slow wave structure in the relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWO), and optimize the parameters on massively parallel processors. Simulation results demonstrate that we can obtain the optimal parameters of non-uniform slow wave structure in the RBWO, and the output microwave power enhances 52.6% after the device is optimized.

  18. Comparison Study on Wind Input and Whitecapping Dissipation Expressions in Numerical Simulation of Typhoon Generated Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of wind input and whitecapping dissipation on the simulation of typhoon-waves, three experiments are conducted with the latest version of SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) model. The three experiments adopt the Komen, Janssens, and Westhuysen expressions for wind input and whitecapping dissipation, respectively. Besides the above-mentioned source terms, other parameterization schemes in these experiments are the same. It shows that the experiment with the Westhuysen expression result in the least simulation errors while that with the Janssens expression has the most. The results from the experiments with Komen and Westhuysen expressions show that the differences in significant wave height (SWH) have a good correlation with the differences in dissipation energy caused by whitecapping. This indicates that the whitecapping dissipation source term plays an important role in the resultant differences of the simulated SWH between the two experiments.

  19. Computational simulations of the interaction of water waves with pitching flap-type ocean wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Using an in-house computational framework, we have studied the interaction of water waves with pitching flap-type ocean wave energy converters (WECs). The computational framework solves the full 3D Navier-Stokes equations and captures important effects, including the fluid-solid interaction, the nonlinear and viscous effects. The results of the computational tool, is first compared against the experimental data on the response of a flap-type WEC in a wave tank, and excellent agreement is demonstrated. Further simulations at the model and prototype scales are presented to assess the validity of the Froude scaling. The simulations are used to address some important questions, such as the validity range of common WEC modeling approaches that rely heavily on the Froude scaling and the inviscid potential flow theory. Additionally, the simulations examine the role of the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) number, which is often used as a measure of relative importance of viscous drag on bodies exposed to oscillating flows. The performance of the flap-type WECs is investigated at various KC numbers to establish the relationship between the viscous drag and KC number for such geometry. That is of significant importance because such relationship only exists for simple geometries, e.g., a cylinder. Support from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Simulating Seismic Wave Propagation in Viscoelastic Media with an Irregular Free Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaobo; Chen, Jingyi; Zhao, Zhencong; Lan, Haiqiang; Liu, Fuping

    2018-05-01

    In seismic numerical simulations of wave propagation, it is very important for us to consider surface topography and attenuation, which both have large effects (e.g., wave diffractions, conversion, amplitude/phase change) on seismic imaging and inversion. An irregular free surface provides significant information for interpreting the characteristics of seismic wave propagation in areas with rugged or rapidly varying topography, and viscoelastic media are a better representation of the earth's properties than acoustic/elastic media. In this study, we develop an approach for seismic wavefield simulation in 2D viscoelastic isotropic media with an irregular free surface. Based on the boundary-conforming grid method, the 2D time-domain second-order viscoelastic isotropic equations and irregular free surface boundary conditions are transferred from a Cartesian coordinate system to a curvilinear coordinate system. Finite difference operators with second-order accuracy are applied to discretize the viscoelastic wave equations and the irregular free surface in the curvilinear coordinate system. In addition, we select the convolutional perfectly matched layer boundary condition in order to effectively suppress artificial reflections from the edges of the model. The snapshot and seismogram results from numerical tests show that our algorithm successfully simulates seismic wavefields (e.g., P-wave, Rayleigh wave and converted waves) in viscoelastic isotropic media with an irregular free surface.

  1. CIMI simulations with newly developed multiparameter chorus and plasmaspheric hiss wave models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Homayon; Sibeck, David G.; Kang, Suk-Bin; Balikhin, Michael A.; Fok, Mei-Ching; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Komar, Colin M.; Kanekal, Shrikanth G.; Nagai, Tsugunobu

    2017-09-01

    Numerical simulation studies of the Earth's radiation belts are important to understand the acceleration and loss of energetic electrons. The Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (CIMI) model considers the effects of the ring current and plasmasphere on the radiation belts to obtain plausible results. The CIMI model incorporates pitch angle, energy, and cross diffusion of electrons, due to chorus and plasmaspheric hiss waves. These parameters are calculated using statistical wave distribution models of chorus and plasmaspheric hiss amplitudes. However, currently, these wave distribution models are based only on a single-parameter, geomagnetic index (AE) and could potentially underestimate the wave amplitudes. Here we incorporate recently developed multiparameter chorus and plasmaspheric hiss wave models based on geomagnetic index and solar wind parameters. We then perform CIMI simulations for two geomagnetic storms and compare the flux enhancement of MeV electrons with data from the Van Allen Probes and Akebono satellites. We show that the relativistic electron fluxes calculated with multiparameter wave models resemble the observations more accurately than the relativistic electron fluxes calculated with single-parameter wave models. This indicates that wave models based on a combination of geomagnetic index and solar wind parameters are more effective as inputs to radiation belt models.

  2. A multi-function IEC 61850 packet generator based on FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Wei; Li, Hong-bin; Cheng, Han-miao

    2016-01-01

    An IEC 61850 packet generator is used to produce IEC 61850-9-2 packets by simulating the merging unit and testing the IEC 61850 digital device. While the existing IEC packet generator can produce ideal digital without any noise, it does not take into account the fact that the merging unit output signal packets will be inevitably superimposed with noise. Since the International Electrical Commission standard of the electronic current transformer specifies the minimum output signal-to-noise ratio of the merging unit to be 30 dB, and the signal superimposed with noise will influence the operation performance of the digital device, it is necessary to design a multi-function IEC 61850-9-2 packet generator for a digital device test. Therefore, in this paper, a multi-function IEC 61850 packet generator has been developed, which not only can output various IEC 61850-9-2 packets, but also can add white Gaussian noise to the signal for digital device testing. By testing three digital electricity meters from different manufacturers, we showed that the error of the digital electricity meter is significantly larger when the signal packet is superimposed with noise. Also when the signal-to-noise ration is 30 dB, the error of one of the meters exceeds the allowed range of the accuracy class. This indicates that the noise testing and the noise setting function of the system has an important role in the testing of a digital device. (paper)

  3. Scalable In-Band Optical Notch-Filter Labeling for Ultrahigh Bit Rate Optical Packet Switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medhin, Ashenafi Kiros; Galili, Michael; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2014-01-01

    We propose a scalable in-band optical notch-filter labeling scheme for optical packet switching of high-bit-rate data packets. A detailed characterization of the notch-filter labeling scheme and its effect on the quality of the data packet is carried out in simulation and verified by experimental...... demonstrations. The scheme is able to generate more than 91 different labels that can be applied to 640-Gb/s optical time division multiplexed packets causing an eye opening penalty of $1.2-dB. Experimental demonstration shows that up to 256 packets can be uniquely labeled by employing up to eight notch filters...... with only 0.9-dB power penalty to achieve BER of 1E-9. Using the proposed labeling scheme, optical packet switching of 640 Gb/s data packets is experimentally demonstrated in which two data packets are labeled by making none and one spectral hole using a notch filter and are switched using a LiNbO$_3...

  4. Dynamics of Number of Packets in Transit in Free Flow State of Data Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shengkun Xie; Lawniczak, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    We study how the dynamics of Number of Packets in Transit (NPT) is affected by the coupling of a routing type with a volume of incoming packet traffic in a data network model of packet switching type. The NPT is a network performance indicator of an aggregate type that measures in '' real time '', how many packets are in the network on their routes to their destinations. We conduct our investigation using a time-discrete simulation model that is an abstraction of the Network Layer of the ISO OSI Seven Layer Reference Model. This model focuses on packets and their routing. We consider a static routing and two different types of dynamic routings coupled with different volumes of incoming packet traffic in the network free flow state. Our study shows that the order of the values of the NPT mean value time series depends on the coupling of a routing type with a volume of incoming packet traffic and changes when the volume of incoming packet traffic increases and is closed to the critical source load values, i.e. when it is closed to the phase transition points from the network free flow state to its congested states. (authors)

  5. FDTD Simulation on Terahertz Waves Propagation Through a Dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maoyan; Zhang, Meng; Li, Guiping; Jiang, Baojun; Zhang, Xiaochuan; Xu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The frequency dependent permittivity for dusty plasmas is provided by introducing the charging response factor and charge relaxation rate of airborne particles. The field equations that describe the characteristics of Terahertz (THz) waves propagation in a dusty plasma sheath are derived and discretized on the basis of the auxiliary differential equation (ADE) in the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Compared with numerical solutions in reference, the accuracy for the ADE FDTD method is validated. The reflection property of the metal Aluminum interlayer of the sheath at THz frequencies is discussed. The effects of the thickness, effective collision frequency, airborne particle density, and charge relaxation rate of airborne particles on the electromagnetic properties of Terahertz waves through a dusty plasma slab are investigated. Finally, some potential applications for Terahertz waves in information and communication are analyzed. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41104097, 11504252, 61201007, 41304119), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Nos. ZYGX2015J039, ZYGX2015J041), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120185120012)

  6. Simplified dynamic simulation of a traveling wave nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez M, H.; Espinosa P, G.; Francois, J. L.; Lopez S, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this work the nuclear fuel burn wave in a fast traveling wave reactor (TWR) is presented, using the reduced model of the neutron diffusion equation, considering only the axial component, and the equations of the transuranic dynamics of U-Pu and a radionuclide of Pu. Two critical zones of the reactor are considered, one enriched with U-Pu called ignition zone and the other impoverished zone or of U-238, named breeding zone. Occupying Na as refrigerant within TWR, and Fe as structural material; both are present in the ignition and breeding zones. Considering as a fissile material the Pu, since by neutron capture the U is transformed into Pu, thus increasing the quantity of Pu more than that of U; in this way the fuel burn stability with the wave dynamics is understood. The calculation of the results was approached numerically to determine the temporal space evolution of the neutron flux in this system and of the main isotopes involved in the burning process. (Author)

  7. Boat, wake, and wave real-time simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świerkowski, Leszek; Gouthas, Efthimios; Christie, Chad L.; Williams, Owen M.

    2009-05-01

    We describe the extension of our real-time scene generation software VIRSuite to include the dynamic simulation of small boats and their wakes within an ocean environment. Extensive use has been made of the programmabilty available in the current generation of GPUs. We have demonstrated that real-time simulation is feasible, even including such complexities as dynamical calculation of the boat motion, wake generation and calculation of an FFTgenerated sea state.

  8. Comparison of Hydrocode Simulations with Measured Shock Wave Velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R.

    2014-01-01

    We have conducted detailed 1- and 2-dimensional hydrodynamics calculations to assess the quality of simulations commonly made to understand various shock processes in a sample and to design shock experiments. We began with relatively simple shock experiments, where we examined the effects of the equation of state and the viscoplastic strength models. Eventually we included spallation in copper and iron and a solid-solid phase transformation in iron to assess the quality of the damage and phase transformation simulations.

  9. OSSIM wave-optics toolbox and its use to simulate AEOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carey A.; Forgham, James L.; Jones, Bruce W.; Jones, Kenneth D.

    2001-12-01

    OSSim (Optical System Simulation) is a simulation toolbox of optical and processing components. By using full wave-optics in the time-domain, OSSim simulates diffractive effects and control loop interactions missed by simpler analyses. OSSim also models the atmosphere, with user customizable turbulence strength, wind, and slew. This paper first presents 2 introductory examples: a simple 2-lens imaging system and a simple tilt-control system. Then it presents a simulation of the 3.67-meter AEOS (Advanced Electro-Optics System) telescope on Maui. The OSSim simulation agrees well with the AEOS experimental results.

  10. Lamb wave propagation modelling and simulation using parallel processing architecture and graphical cards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paćko, P; Bielak, T; Staszewski, W J; Uhl, T; Spencer, A B; Worden, K

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates new parallel computation technology and an implementation for Lamb wave propagation modelling in complex structures. A graphical processing unit (GPU) and computer unified device architecture (CUDA), available in low-cost graphical cards in standard PCs, are used for Lamb wave propagation numerical simulations. The local interaction simulation approach (LISA) wave propagation algorithm has been implemented as an example. Other algorithms suitable for parallel discretization can also be used in practice. The method is illustrated using examples related to damage detection. The results demonstrate good accuracy and effective computational performance of very large models. The wave propagation modelling presented in the paper can be used in many practical applications of science and engineering. (paper)

  11. Simulation of ultrasonic surface waves with multi-Gaussian and point source beam models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Schmerr, Lester W. Jr.; Li, Xiongbing; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, multi-Gaussian beam models have been developed to solve many complicated bulk wave propagation problems. However, to date those models have not been extended to simulate the generation of Rayleigh waves. Here we will combine Gaussian beams with an explicit high frequency expression for the Rayleigh wave Green function to produce a three-dimensional multi-Gaussian beam model for the fields radiated from an angle beam transducer mounted on a solid wedge. Simulation results obtained with this model are compared to those of a point source model. It is shown that the multi-Gaussian surface wave beam model agrees well with the point source model while being computationally much more efficient

  12. 3-D FDTD simulation of shear waves for evaluation of complex modulus imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orescanin, Marko; Wang, Yue; Insana, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The Navier equation describing shear wave propagation in 3-D viscoelastic media is solved numerically with a finite differences time domain (FDTD) method. Solutions are formed in terms of transverse scatterer velocity waves and then verified via comparison to measured wave fields in heterogeneous hydrogel phantoms. The numerical algorithm is used as a tool to study the effects on complex shear modulus estimation from wave propagation in heterogeneous viscoelastic media. We used an algebraic Helmholtz inversion (AHI) technique to solve for the complex shear modulus from simulated and experimental velocity data acquired in 2-D and 3-D. Although 3-D velocity estimates are required in general, there are object geometries for which 2-D inversions provide accurate estimations of the material properties. Through simulations and experiments, we explored artifacts generated in elastic and dynamic-viscous shear modulus images related to the shear wavelength and average viscosity.

  13. Numerical simulation of stress wave propagation from underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, J T; Petersen, F L [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of stress wave propagation (SOC) which uses material properties data from a preshot testing program to predict the stress-induced effects on the rock mass involved in a Plowshare application. SOC calculates stress and particle velocity history, cavity radius, extent of brittle failure, and the rock's efficiency for transmitting stress. The calculations are based on an equation of state for the rock, which is developed from preshot field and laboratory measurements of the rock properties. The field measurements, made by hole logging, determine in situ values of the rock's density, water content, and propagation velocity for elastic waves. These logs also are useful in judging the layering of the rock and in choosing which core samples to test in the laboratory. The laboratory analysis of rock cores includes determination of hydrostatic compressibility to 40 kb, triaxial strength data, tensile strength, Hugoniot elastic limit, and, for the rock near the point of detonation, high-pressure Hugoniot data. Equation-of-state data are presented for rock from three sites subjected to high explosive or underground nuclear shots, including the Hardhat and Gasbuggy sites. SOC calculations of the effects of these two shots on the surrounding rock are compared with the observed effects. In both cases SOC predicts the size of the cavity quite closely. Results of the Gasbuggy calculations indicate that useful predictions of cavity size and chimney height can be made when an adequate preshot testing program is run to determine the rock's equation of state. Seismic coupling is very sensitive to the low-pressure part of the equation of state, and its successful prediction depends on agreement between the logging data and the static compressibility data. In general, it appears that enough progress has been made in calculating stress wave propagation to begin looking at derived numbers, such as number of cracks per zone, for some insight into the

  14. Numerical simulation of stress wave propagation from underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, J.T.; Petersen, F.L.

    1970-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of stress wave propagation (SOC) which uses material properties data from a preshot testing program to predict the stress-induced effects on the rock mass involved in a Plowshare application. SOC calculates stress and particle velocity history, cavity radius, extent of brittle failure, and the rock's efficiency for transmitting stress. The calculations are based on an equation of state for the rock, which is developed from preshot field and laboratory measurements of the rock properties. The field measurements, made by hole logging, determine in situ values of the rock's density, water content, and propagation velocity for elastic waves. These logs also are useful in judging the layering of the rock and in choosing which core samples to test in the laboratory. The laboratory analysis of rock cores includes determination of hydrostatic compressibility to 40 kb, triaxial strength data, tensile strength, Hugoniot elastic limit, and, for the rock near the point of detonation, high-pressure Hugoniot data. Equation-of-state data are presented for rock from three sites subjected to high explosive or underground nuclear shots, including the Hardhat and Gasbuggy sites. SOC calculations of the effects of these two shots on the surrounding rock are compared with the observed effects. In both cases SOC predicts the size of the cavity quite closely. Results of the Gasbuggy calculations indicate that useful predictions of cavity size and chimney height can be made when an adequate preshot testing program is run to determine the rock's equation of state. Seismic coupling is very sensitive to the low-pressure part of the equation of state, and its successful prediction depends on agreement between the logging data and the static compressibility data. In general, it appears that enough progress has been made in calculating stress wave propagation to begin looking at derived numbers, such as number of cracks per zone, for some insight into the

  15. Numerical Simulation of Freak Waves Based on the Four-Order Nonlinear Schr(o)dinger Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yun-qiu; ZHANG Ning-chuan; PEI Yu-guo

    2007-01-01

    A numerical wave model based on the modified four-order nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equation in deep water is developed to simulate freak waves. A standard split-step, pseudo-spectral method is used to solve NLS equation. The validation of the model is firstly verified, and then the simulation of freak waves is performed by changing sideband conditions. Results show that freak waves entirely consistent with the definition in the evolution of wave trains are obtained. The possible occurrence mechanism of freak waves is discussed and the relevant characteristics are also analyzed.

  16. Simulation of nonlinear wave run-up with a high-order Boussinesq model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the numerical simulation of nonlinear wave run-up within a highly accurate Boussinesq-type model. Moving wet–dry boundary algorithms based on so-called extrapolating boundary techniques are utilized, and a new variant of this approach is proposed in two horizontal dimensions....... As validation, computed results involving the nonlinear run-up of periodic as well as transient waves on a sloping beach are considered in a single horizontal dimension, demonstrating excellent agreement with analytical solutions for both the free surface and horizontal velocity. In two horizontal dimensions...... cases involving long wave resonance in a parabolic basin, solitary wave evolution in a triangular channel, and solitary wave run-up on a circular conical island are considered. In each case the computed results compare well against available analytical solutions or experimental measurements. The ability...

  17. Numerical simulation of solitary waves on deep water with constant vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosaev, A. S.; Shishina, M. I.; Troitskaya, Yu I.

    2018-01-01

    Characteristics of solitary deep water waves on a flow with constant vorticity are investigated by numerical simulation within the framework of fully nonlinear equations of motion (Euler equations) using the method of surface-tracking conformal coordinates. To ensure that solutions observed are stable, soliton formation as a result of disintegration of an initial pulse-like disturbance is modeled. Evidence is obtained that solitary waves with height above a certain threshold are unstable.

  18. Drag Coefficient Comparisons Between Observed and Model Simulated Directional Wave Spectra Under Hurricane Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    the Wave Model (WAM; Hasselmann t al., 1988 ), and Simulating Waves Nearshore ( SWAN ; Booij et al., 999...of the circle represents the maximum wind speed of the hurricane. The black lines in the vicinity of the hurricane track represent the aircraft...contour maps and black contour lines for the model spec- ra at the same location. Then, the model spectra energy exceeds RA pk are plotted as

  19. Development of a guided wave simulator and its application to monitoring of pipe wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Akinori; Kojima, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by growing demand for quantitative nondestructive evaluation of pipe wall thinning, the aim of this paper is to develop a simulator for guided wave analysis. First, an inspection system can be represented by a linear elastic system in cylindrical coordinates. Secondly a dynamical numerical scheme for wave propagation on a pipe wall is proposed based on Fourier-Galerkin approach. Finally, the effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are shown in computational experiments. (author)

  20. Attributing anthropogenic impact on regional heat wave events using CAM5 model large ensemble simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, S. H.; Chen, C. T.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme heat waves have serious impacts on society. It was argued that the anthropogenic forcing might substantially increase the risk of extreme heat wave events (e.g. over western Europe in 2003 and over Russia in 2010). However, the regional dependence of such anthropogenic impact and the sensitivity of the attributed risk to the definition of heat wave still require further studies. In our research framework, the change in the frequency and severity of a heat wave event under current conditions is calculated and compared with the probability and magnitude of the event if the effects of particular external forcing, such as due to human influence, had been absent. In our research, we use the CAM5 large ensemble simulation from the CLIVAR C20C+ Detection and Attribution project (http://portal.nersc.gov/c20c/main.html, Folland et al. 2014) to detect the heat wave events occurred in both historical all forcing run and natural forcing only run. The heat wave events are identified by partial duration series method (Huth et al., 2000). We test the sensitivity of heat wave thresholds from daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in warm season (from May to September) between 1959 and 2013. We consider the anthropogenic effect on the later period (2000-2013) when the warming due to human impact is more evident. Using Taiwan and surrounding area as our preliminary research target, We found the anthropogenic effect will increase the heat wave day per year from 30 days to 75 days and make the mean starting(ending) day for heat waves events about 15-30 days earlier(later). Using the Fraction of Attribution Risk analysis to estimate the risk of frequency of heat wave day, our results show the anthropogenic forcing very likely increase the heat wave days over Taiwan by more than 50%. Further regional differences and sensitivity of the attributed risk to the definition of heat wave will be compared and discussed.

  1. Peri-Elastodynamic Simulations of Guided Ultrasonic Waves in Plate-Like Structure with Surface Mounted PZT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subir Patra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Peridynamic based elastodynamic computation tool named Peri-elastodynamics is proposed herein to simulate the three-dimensional (3D Lamb wave modes in materials for the first time. Peri-elastodynamics is a nonlocal meshless approach which is a scale-independent generalized technique to visualize the acoustic and ultrasonic waves in plate-like structure, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS and nanodevices for their respective characterization. In this article, the characteristics of the fundamental Lamb wave modes are simulated in a sample plate-like structure. Lamb wave modes are generated using a surface mounted piezoelectric (PZT transducer which is actuated from the top surface. The proposed generalized Peri-elastodynamics method is not only capable of simulating two dimensional (2D in plane wave under plane strain condition formulated previously but also capable of accurately simulating the out of plane Symmetric and Antisymmetric Lamb wave modes in plate like structures in 3D. For structural health monitoring (SHM of plate-like structures and nondestructive evaluation (NDE of MEMS devices, it is necessary to simulate the 3D wave-damage interaction scenarios and visualize the different wave features due to damages. Hence, in addition, to simulating the guided ultrasonic wave modes in pristine material, Lamb waves were also simulated in a damaged plate. The accuracy of the proposed technique is verified by comparing the modes generated in the plate and the mode shapes across the thickness of the plate with theoretical wave analysis.

  2. Peri-Elastodynamic Simulations of Guided Ultrasonic Waves in Plate-Like Structure with Surface Mounted PZT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Subir; Ahmed, Hossain; Banerjee, Sourav

    2018-01-18

    Peridynamic based elastodynamic computation tool named Peri-elastodynamics is proposed herein to simulate the three-dimensional (3D) Lamb wave modes in materials for the first time. Peri-elastodynamics is a nonlocal meshless approach which is a scale-independent generalized technique to visualize the acoustic and ultrasonic waves in plate-like structure, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and nanodevices for their respective characterization. In this article, the characteristics of the fundamental Lamb wave modes are simulated in a sample plate-like structure. Lamb wave modes are generated using a surface mounted piezoelectric (PZT) transducer which is actuated from the top surface. The proposed generalized Peri-elastodynamics method is not only capable of simulating two dimensional (2D) in plane wave under plane strain condition formulated previously but also capable of accurately simulating the out of plane Symmetric and Antisymmetric Lamb wave modes in plate like structures in 3D. For structural health monitoring (SHM) of plate-like structures and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of MEMS devices, it is necessary to simulate the 3D wave-damage interaction scenarios and visualize the different wave features due to damages. Hence, in addition, to simulating the guided ultrasonic wave modes in pristine material, Lamb waves were also simulated in a damaged plate. The accuracy of the proposed technique is verified by comparing the modes generated in the plate and the mode shapes across the thickness of the plate with theoretical wave analysis.

  3. An FDTD-based computer simulation platform for shock wave propagation in electrohydraulic lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Bülent; Çiftçi, Emre

    2013-06-01

    Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) is based on disintegration of the kidney stone by delivering high-energy shock waves that are created outside the body and transmitted through the skin and body tissues. Nowadays high-energy shock waves are also used in orthopedic operations and investigated to be used in the treatment of myocardial infarction and cancer. Because of these new application areas novel lithotriptor designs are needed for different kinds of treatment strategies. In this study our aim was to develop a versatile computer simulation environment which would give the device designers working on various medical applications that use shock wave principle a substantial amount of flexibility while testing the effects of new parameters such as reflector size, material properties of the medium, water temperature, and different clinical scenarios. For this purpose, we created a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based computational model in which most of the physical system parameters were defined as an input and/or as a variable in the simulations. We constructed a realistic computational model of a commercial electrohydraulic lithotriptor and optimized our simulation program using the results that were obtained by the manufacturer in an experimental setup. We, then, compared the simulation results with the results from an experimental setup in which oxygen level in water was varied. Finally, we studied the effects of changing the input parameters like ellipsoid size and material, temperature change in the wave propagation media, and shock wave source point misalignment. The simulation results were consistent with the experimental results and expected effects of variation in physical parameters of the system. The results of this study encourage further investigation and provide adequate evidence that the numerical modeling of a shock wave therapy system is feasible and can provide a practical means to test novel ideas in new device design procedures

  4. Simulation of Noise in a Traveling Wave Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboncoeur, J. P.; Christenson, P. J.; Smith, H. B.

    1999-11-01

    Low frequency noise, manifested as close-in sidebands, has long been a significant limit to the performance of many traveling wave tubes. In this study, we investigate oscillations in the gun region due to the presence of plasma formed by electron-impact ionization of a background gas. The gun region of a coupled-cavity traveling wave tube is modeled using the two-dimensional XOOPIC particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision code (J. P. Verboncoeur et al. Comput. Phys. Comm.) 87, 199-211 (1995). (available via the web: http://ptsg.eecs.berkeley.edu). The beam is 20.5 kV, 2.8 A, in near-confined flow in a solenoidal magnetic field with peak axial value of 0.263 T. Beam scalloping leads to trapping of plasma generated via electron-impact ionization of a background gas. The trapped plasma periodically leaves the system rapidly, and the density begins regenerating at a slow rate, leading to characteristic sawtooth oscillations. Plasma electrons are observed to exit the system axially about 20 ns before the ions exit primarily radially.

  5. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Hashemiyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort.

  6. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packo, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  7. Packet telemetry and packet telecommand - The new generation of spacecraft data handling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Because of rising costs and reduced reliability of spacecraft and ground network hardware and software customization, standardization Packet Telemetry and Packet Telecommand concepts are emerging as viable alternatives. Autonomous packets of data, within each concept, which are created within ground and space application processes through the use of formatting techniques, are switched end-to-end through the space data network to their destination application processes through the use of standard transfer protocols. This process may result in facilitating a high degree of automation and interoperability because of completely mission-independent-designed intermediate data networks. The adoption of an international guideline for future space telemetry formatting of the Packet Telemetry concept, and the advancement of the NASA-ESA Working Group's Packet Telecommand concept to a level of maturity parallel to the of Packet Telemetry are the goals of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems. Both the Packet Telemetry and Packet Telecommand concepts are reviewed.

  8. Opportunistic Nonorthogonal Packet Scheduling in Fixed Broadband Wireless Access Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohamed H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to mitigate high cochannel interference resulting from dense channel reuse, the interference management issues are often considered as essential part of scheduling schemes in fixed broadband wireless access (FBWA networks. To that end, a series of literature has been published recently, in which a group of base stations forms an interferer group (downlink transmissions from each base station become dominant interference for the users in other in-group base stations, and the scheduling scheme deployed in the group allows only one base station to transmit at a time. As a result of time orthogonality in transmissions, the dominant cochannel interferers are prevented, and hence the packet error rate can be improved. However, prohibiting concurrent transmissions in these orthogonal schemes introduces throughput penalty as well as higher end-to-end packet delay which might not be desirable for real-time services. In this paper, we utilize opportunistic nonorthogonality among the in-group transmissions whenever possible and propose a novel transmission scheduling scheme for FBWA networks. The proposed scheme, in contrast to the proactive interference avoidance techniques, strives for the improvements in delay and throughput efficiency. To facilitate opportunistic nonorthogonal transmissions in the interferer group, estimation of signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR is required at the scheduler. We have observed from simulations that the proposed scheme outperforms the reference orthogonal scheme in terms of spectral efficiency, mean packet delay, and packet dropping rate.

  9. Waves and particles in the Fermi accelerator model. Numerical simulation; Ondes et particules dans le modele de l`accelerateur de Fermi. Simulation numerique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meplan, O

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to a numerical study of the quantum dynamics of the Fermi accelerator which is classically chaotic: it is particle in a one dimensional box with a oscillating wall. First, we study the classical dynamics: we show that the time of impact of the particle with the moving wall and its energy in the wall frame are conjugated variables and that Poincare surface of sections in these variables are more understandable than the usual stroboscopic sections. Then, the quantum dynamics of this systems is studied by the means of two numerical methods. The first one is a generalization of the KKR method in the space-time; it is enough to solve an integral equation on the boundary of a space-time billiard. The second method is faster and is based on successive free propagations and kicks of potential. This allows us to obtain Floquet states which we can on one hand, compare to the classical dynamics with the help of Husimi distributions and on the other hand, study as a function of parameters of the system. This study leads us to nice illustrations of phenomenons such as spatial localizations of a wave packet in a vibrating well or tunnel effects. In the adiabatic situation, we give a formula for quasi-energies which exhibits a phase term independent of states. In this regime, there exist some particular situations where the quasi-energy spectrum presents a total quasi-degeneracy. Then, the wave packet energy can increase significantly. This phenomenon is quite surprising for smooth motion of the wall. The third part deals with the evolution of a classical wave in the Fermi accelerator. Using generalized KKR method, we show a surprising phenomenon: in most of situations (so long as the wall motion is periodic), a wave is localized exponentially in the well and its energy increases in a geometric way. (author). 107 refs., 66 figs., 5 tabs. 2 appends.

  10. SAR Observation and Numerical Simulation of Internal Solitary Wave Refraction and Reconnection Behind the Dongsha Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, T.; Liang, J. J.; Li, X.-M.; Sha, J.

    2018-01-01

    The refraction and reconnection of internal solitary waves (ISWs) around the Dongsha Atoll (DSA) in the northern South China Sea (SCS) are investigated based on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations and numerical simulations. In general, a long ISW front propagating from the deep basin of the northern SCS splits into northern and southern branches when it passes the DSA. In this study, the statistics of Envisat Advanced SAR (ASAR) images show that the northern and southern wave branches can reconnect behind the DSA, but the reconnection location varies. A previously developed nonlinear refraction model is set up to simulate the refraction and reconnection of the ISWs behind the DSA, and the model is used to evaluate the effects of ocean stratification, background currents, and incoming ISW characteristics at the DSA on the variation in reconnection locations. The results of the first realistic simulation agree with consecutive TerraSAR-X (TSX) images captured within 12 h of each other. Further sensitivity simulations show that ocean stratification, background currents, and initial wave amplitudes all affect the phase speeds of wave branches and therefore shift their reconnection locations while shapes and locations of incoming wave branches upstream of the DSA profoundly influence the subsequent propagation paths. This study clarifies the variation in reconnection locations of ISWs downstream of the DSA and reveals the important mechanisms governing the reconnection process, which can improve our understanding of the propagation of ISWs near the DSA.

  11. Fast and local non-linear evolution of steep wave-groups on deep water: A comparison of approximate models to fully non-linear simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adcock, T. A. A.; Taylor, P. H.

    2016-01-01

    The non-linear Schrödinger equation and its higher order extensions are routinely used for analysis of extreme ocean waves. This paper compares the evolution of individual wave-packets modelled using non-linear Schrödinger type equations with packets modelled using fully non-linear potential flow models. The modified non-linear Schrödinger Equation accurately models the relatively large scale non-linear changes to the shape of wave-groups, with a dramatic contraction of the group along the mean propagation direction and a corresponding extension of the width of the wave-crests. In addition, as extreme wave form, there is a local non-linear contraction of the wave-group around the crest which leads to a localised broadening of the wave spectrum which the bandwidth limited non-linear Schrödinger Equations struggle to capture. This limitation occurs for waves of moderate steepness and a narrow underlying spectrum

  12. Detailed Comparisons of COMBAT Data to Wave-Optics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-18

    is currently available. On the other hand, detailed simulation of the transmitter, atmosphere, and receiver can improve agreement and predictive...over 144 km in a Canary Islands experiment,” Appl. Opt. 51, 7374–7383, 2012. 8. R. J. Hill and S. F. Clifford. “Modified spectrum of atmospheric

  13. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D- 3 He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D- 3 He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of ∼50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  14. High intensity surface plasma waves, theory and PIC simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, M.; Héron, A.; Adam, J.-C.

    2018-01-01

    With the development of intense (>1019 W cm-2) short pulses (≤25 fs) laser with very high contrast, surface plasma wave (SPW) can be explored in the relativistic regime. As the SPW propagates with a phase velocity close to the speed of light it may results in a strong acceleration of electron bunches along the surface permitting them to reach relativistic energies. This may be important e.g. for applications in the field of plasma-based accelerators. We investigate in this work the excitation of SPWs on grating preformed over-dense plasmas for laser intensities ranging from 1019 up to 1021 W cm-2. We discuss the nature of the interaction with respect to the solid case in which surface plasmon can be resonantly excited with weak laser intensity. In particular, we show the importance of the pulse duration and focalization of the laser beam on the amplitude of the SPW.

  15. Neutrino wave function and oscillation suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, A.D.; Lychkovskiy, O.V.; Mamonov, A.A.; Okun, L.B.; Schepkin, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    We consider a thought experiment, in which a neutrino is produced by an electron on a nucleus in a crystal. The wave function of the oscillating neutrino is calculated assuming that the electron is described by a wave packet. If the electron is relativistic and the spatial size of its wave packet is much larger than the size of the crystal cell, then the wave packet of the produced neutrino has essentially the same size as the wave packet of the electron. We investigate the suppression of neutrino oscillations at large distances caused by two mechanisms: (1) spatial separation of wave packets corresponding to different neutrino masses; (2) neutrino energy dispersion for given neutrino mass eigenstates. We resolve the contributions of these two mechanisms. (orig.)

  16. Simulation studies of plasma waves in the electron foreshock - The transition from reactive to kinetic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dum, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Particle simulation experiments were used to analyze the electron beam-plasma instability. It is shown that there is a transition from the reactive state of the electron beam-plasma instability to the kinetic instability of Langmuir waves. Quantitative tests, which include an evaluation of the dispersion relation for the evolving non-Maxwellian beam distribution, show that a quasi-linear theory describes the onset of this transition and applies again fully to the kinetic stage. This stage is practically identical to the late stage seen in simulations of plasma waves in the electron foreshock described by Dum (1990).

  17. Three dimensional particle simulation of drift wave fluctuations in a sheared magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydora, R.D.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Thayer, D.R.; Diamond, P.H.; Tajima, T.

    1985-08-01

    Three dimensional particle simulations of collisionless drift waves in sheared magnetic fields were performed in order to determine the nonlinear behavior of inverse electron resonance dynamics in the presence of thermal fluctuations. It is found that stochastic electron diffusion in the electron resonance overlap region can destabilize the drift wave eigenmodes. Numerical evaluations based on a nonlinear electron resonance broadening theory give predictions in accord with the frequency and growth rates found in the simulation of short wavelength modes (k/sub y/rho/sub s/ greater than or equal to1)

  18. Novel types of surface acoustic wave microreflectors - Performance analysis and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, G.; Griffel, G.; Seidman, A.; Croitoru, N.

    1990-06-01

    Surface acoustic waves for micrograting reflectors have been characterized. Based on the perturbation theory, eight different types of structures on an acoustic waveguide were analyzed. Results of simulations of all eight types of corrugation structures were evaluated in order to find the least leaky waveguide, the most efficient reflector (with minimum necessary perturbations), and the optimal mode shape for improved performances. General design curves are presented in order to illustrate the behavior of the incident and reflected waves under a variety of structural conditions. Analytic expressions for the calculations of the mode amplitude and mode shape, and for general acoustic corrugations are derived and then the simulations results are presented.

  19. Analog quantum simulation of gravitational waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo, Tupac; Sabin, Carlos; Fuentes, Ivette

    2015-01-01

    We show how to vary the physical properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in order to mimic an effective gravitational-wave spacetime. In particular, we focus in the simulation of the recently discovered creation of particles by a real spacetime distortion in box-type traps. We show that, by modulating the speed of sound in the BEC, the phonons experience the effects of a simulated spacetime ripple with experimentally amenable parameters. These results will inform the experimental programme of gravitational wave astronomy with cold atoms. (orig.)

  20. Analog quantum simulation of gravitational waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, Tupac; Sabin, Carlos; Fuentes, Ivette [University of Nottingham, School of Mathematical Sciences, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-04

    We show how to vary the physical properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in order to mimic an effective gravitational-wave spacetime. In particular, we focus in the simulation of the recently discovered creation of particles by a real spacetime distortion in box-type traps. We show that, by modulating the speed of sound in the BEC, the phonons experience the effects of a simulated spacetime ripple with experimentally amenable parameters. These results will inform the experimental programme of gravitational wave astronomy with cold atoms. (orig.)

  1. Generation of spiral waves pinned to obstacles in a simulated excitable system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phantu, Metinee; Kumchaiseemak, Nakorn; Porjai, Porramain; Sutthiopad, Malee; Müller, Stefan C.; Luengviriya, Chaiya; Luengviriya, Jiraporn

    2017-09-01

    Pinning phenomena emerge in many dynamical systems. They are found to stabilize extreme conditions such as superconductivity and super fluidity. The dynamics of pinned spiral waves, whose tips trace the boundary of obstacles, also play an important role in the human health. In heart, such pinned waves cause longer tachycardia. In this article, we present two methods for generating pinned spiral waves in a simulated excitable system. In method A, an obstacle is set in the system prior to an ignition of a spiral wave. This method may be suitable only for the case of large obstacles since it often fails when used for small obstacles. In method B, a spiral wave is generated before an obstacle is placed at the spiral tip. With this method, a pinned spiral wave is always obtained, regardless the obstacle size. We demonstrate that after a transient interval the dynamics of the pinned spiral waves generated by the methods A and B are identical. The initiation of pinned spiral waves in both two- and three-dimensional systems is illustrated.

  2. RF wave simulation for cold edge plasmas using the MFEM library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Kolev, T.; Stowell, M.

    2017-10-01

    A newly developed generic electro-magnetic (EM) simulation tool for modeling RF wave propagation in SOL plasmas is presented. The primary motivation of this development is to extend the domain partitioning approach for incorporating arbitrarily shaped SOL plasmas and antenna to the TORIC core ICRF solver, which was previously demonstrated in the 2D geometry [S. Shiraiwa, et. al., "HISTORIC: extending core ICRF wave simulation to include realistic SOL plasmas", Nucl. Fusion in press], to larger and more complicated simulations by including a 3D realistic antenna and integrating RF rectified sheath potential model. Such an extension requires a scalable high fidelity 3D edge plasma wave simulation. We used the MFEM [http://mfem.org], open source scalable C++ finite element method library, and developed a Python wrapper for MFEM (PyMFEM), and then a radio frequency (RF) wave physics module in Python. This approach allows for building a physics layer rapidly, while separating the physics implementation being apart from the numerical FEM implementation. An interactive modeling interface was built on pScope [S Shiraiwa, et. al. Fusion Eng. Des. 112, 835] to work with an RF simulation model in a complicated geometry.

  3. Stochastic Simulation of Cardiac Ventricular Myocyte Calcium Dynamics and Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Williams, George S. B.; Chikando, Aristide C.; Sobie, Eric A.; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Jafri, M. Saleet

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional model of calcium dynamics in the rat ventricular myocyte was developed to study the mechanism of calcium homeostasis and pathological calcium dynamics during calcium overload. The model contains 20,000 calcium release units (CRUs) each containing 49 ryanodine receptors. The model simulates calcium sparks with a realistic spontaneous calcium spark rate. It suggests that in addition to the calcium spark-based leak, there is an invisible calcium leak caused by the stochastic ...

  4. Binary Systematic Network Coding for Progressive Packet Decoding

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Andrew L.; Chatzigeorgiou, Ioannis; Tassi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We consider binary systematic network codes and investigate their capability of decoding a source message either in full or in part. We carry out a probability analysis, derive closed-form expressions for the decoding probability and show that systematic network coding outperforms conventional net- work coding. We also develop an algorithm based on Gaussian elimination that allows progressive decoding of source packets. Simulation results show that the proposed decoding algorithm can achieve ...

  5. Statistics for long irregular wave run-up on a plane beach from direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Senichev, Dmitry; Dutykh, Denys

    2017-04-01

    Very often for global and transoceanic events, due to the initial wave transformation, refraction, diffraction and multiple reflections from coastal topography and underwater bathymetry, the tsunami approaches the beach as a very long wave train, which can be considered as an irregular wave field. The prediction of possible flooding and properties of the water flow on the coast in this case should be done statistically taking into account the formation of extreme (rogue) tsunami wave on a beach. When it comes to tsunami run-up on a beach, the most used mathematical model is the nonlinear shallow water model. For a beach of constant slope, the nonlinear shallow water equations have rigorous analytical solution, which substantially simplifies the mathematical formulation. In (Didenkulova et al. 2011) we used this solution to study statistical characteristics of the vertical displacement of the moving shoreline and its horizontal velocity. The influence of the wave nonlinearity was approached by considering modifications of probability distribution of the moving shoreline and its horizontal velocity for waves of different amplitudes. It was shown that wave nonlinearity did not affect the probability distribution of the velocity of the moving shoreline, while the vertical displacement of the moving shoreline was affected substantially demonstrating the longer duration of coastal floods with an increase in the wave nonlinearity. However, this analysis did not take into account the actual transformation of irregular wave field offshore to oscillations of the moving shoreline on a slopping beach. In this study we would like to cover this gap by means of extensive numerical simulations. The modeling is performed in the framework of nonlinear shallow water equations, which are solved using a modern shock-capturing finite volume method. Although the shallow water model does not pursue the wave breaking and bore formation in a general sense (including the water surface

  6. Numerical simulation of scour and backfilling processes around a circular pile in waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baykal, Cüneyt; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fuhrman, David R.

    2017-01-01

    –Stokes equations. The modelincorporates (1) k-ω turbulence closure, (2) vortex shedding processes, (3) sediment transport (both bed andsuspended load), as well as (4) bed morphology. The numerical simulations are carried out for a selected set oftest conditions of the laboratory experiments of Sumer et al. (1997......, 2013a), and the numerical results arecompared with those of the latter experiments. The simulations are carried out for two kinds of beds: rigid bed,and sediment bed. The rigid-bed simulations indicate that the vortex shedding for waves around the pile occursin a “one-cell” fashion with a uniform...... shedding frequency over the height of the cylinder, unlike the case forsteady current where a two-cell structure prevails. The rigid-bed simulations further show that the horseshoevortex flow also undergoes substantial changes in waves. The amplification of the bed shear stress around thepile (including...

  7. The Vajont disaster: a 3D numerical simulation for the slide and the waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Angelo; Androsov, Alexey; Vacondio, Renato; Zanchettin, Davide; Voltzinger, Naum

    2016-04-01

    A very high resolution O(5 m), 3D hydrostatic nonlinear numerical model was used to simulate the dynamics of both the slide and the surface waves produced during the Vajont disaster (north Italy, 1963), one of the major landslide-induced tsunamis ever documented. Different simulated wave phenomena like, e.g., maximum run-up on the opposite shore, maximum height, and water velocity were analyzed and compared with data available in literature, including the results of a fully 3D simulation obtained with a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic code. The difference between measured and simulated after-slide bathymetries was calculated and used in an attempt to quantify the relative magnitude and extension of rigid and fluid motion components during the event.

  8. Simulating three dimensional wave run-up over breakwaters covered by antifer units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Jilani, A.; Niri, M. Zakiri; Naderi, Nader

    2014-06-01

    The paper presents the numerical analysis of wave run-up over rubble-mound breakwaters covered by antifer units using a technique integrating Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. Direct application of Navier-Stokes equations within armour blocks, is used to provide a more reliable approach to simulate wave run-up over breakwaters. A well-tested Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) Volume of Fluid (VOF) code (Flow-3D) was adopted for CFD computations. The computed results were compared with experimental data to check the validity of the model. Numerical results showed that the direct three dimensional (3D) simulation method can deliver accurate results for wave run-up over rubble mound breakwaters. The results showed that the placement pattern of antifer units had a great impact on values of wave run-up so that by changing the placement pattern from regular to double pyramid can reduce the wave run-up by approximately 30%. Analysis was done to investigate the influences of surface roughness, energy dissipation in the pores of the armour layer and reduced wave run-up due to inflow into the armour and stone layer.

  9. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION MODEL OF ENERGETIC PROTON TRANSPORT THROUGH SELF-GENERATED ALFVEN WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasiev, A.; Vainio, R., E-mail: alexandr.afanasiev@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-08-15

    A new Monte Carlo simulation model for the transport of energetic protons through self-generated Alfven waves is presented. The key point of the model is that, unlike the previous ones, it employs the full form (i.e., includes the dependence on the pitch-angle cosine) of the resonance condition governing the scattering of particles off Alfven waves-the process that approximates the wave-particle interactions in the framework of quasilinear theory. This allows us to model the wave-particle interactions in weak turbulence more adequately, in particular, to implement anisotropic particle scattering instead of isotropic scattering, which the previous Monte Carlo models were based on. The developed model is applied to study the transport of flare-accelerated protons in an open magnetic flux tube. Simulation results for the transport of monoenergetic protons through the spectrum of Alfven waves reveal that the anisotropic scattering leads to spatially more distributed wave growth than isotropic scattering. This result can have important implications for diffusive shock acceleration, e.g., affect the scattering mean free path of the accelerated particles in and the size of the foreshock region.

  10. Simulating three dimensional wave run-up over breakwaters covered by antifer units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Najafi-Jilani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the numerical analysis of wave run-up over rubble-mound breakwaters covered by antifer units using a technique integrating Computer-Aided Design (CAD and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Direct application of Navier-Stokes equations within armour blocks, is used to provide a more reliable approach to simulate wave run-up over breakwaters. A well-tested Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS Volume of Fluid (VOF code (Flow-3D was adopted for CFD computations. The computed results were compared with experimental data to check the validity of the model. Numerical results showed that the direct three dimensional (3D simulation method can deliver accurate results for wave run-up over rubble mound breakwaters. The results showed that the placement pattern of antifer units had a great impact on values of wave run-up so that by changing the placement pattern from regular to double pyramid can reduce the wave run-up by approximately 30%. Analysis was done to investigate the influences of surface roughness, energy dissipation in the pores of the armour layer and reduced wave run-up due to inflow into the armour and stone layer.

  11. Simulation studies of plasma waves in the electron foreshock: The transition from reactive to kinetic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dum, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    The electron beam-plasma instability is analyzed in particle simulation experiments, starting with a beam of small velocity spread. The dispersion relation is solved for snapshots of the actual evolving electron distribution function, rather than for the usual models consisting of Maxwellians. As the beam broadens, the analysis shows a transition from reactive beam modes, with frequencies extending much below the plasma frequency ω e , to kinetic instability of Langmuir waves, ω∼ω e , which is in agreement with the frequencies and growth rates observed in the simulation. Beam evolution is also in agreement with quasi-linear theory, except at the end of the reactive phase when trapping of beam electrons is seen. Although the spectrum temporarily narrows at this stage, there are, in contrast to previous simulations, still many modes present. the system then can proceed to a kinetic phase in which quasi-linear theory is again applicable. This stage is identical with the evolution starting from a gentle broad beam, except that wave levels are several times higher. With higher wave levels, mode coupling effects are also more prominent, but are still unable to prevent plateau formation. In contrast to the Langmuir wave regime, the reactive broadband wave regime lasts only for a relatively short period. In the electron foreshock it could only persist if a narrow beam or a sharp cutoff feature were maintained by continued beam injection and the time-of-flight mechanism

  12. Fluid-structure interaction dynamic simulation of spring-loaded pressure relief valves under seismic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Dongwei; Zhang, Jian; Yu, Xinhai

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a fluid-structure interaction dynamic simulation method of spring-loaded pressure relief valve was established. The dynamic performances of the fluid regions and the stress and strain of the structure regions were calculated at the same time by accurately setting up the contact pairs between the solid parts and the coupling surfaces between the fluid regions and the structure regions. A two way fluid-structure interaction dynamic simulation of a simplified pressure relief valve model was carried out. The influence of vertical sinusoidal seismic waves on the performance of the pressure relief valve was preliminarily investigated by loading sine waves. Under vertical seismic waves, the pressure relief valve will flutter, and the reseating pressure was affected by the amplitude and frequency of the seismic waves. This simulation method of the pressure relief valve under vertical seismic waves can provide effective means for investigating the seismic performances of the valves, and make up for the shortcomings of the experiment.

  13. Gulf of Mexico hurricane wave simulations using SWAN : Bulk formula-based drag coefficient sensitivity for Hurricane Ike

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Y.; Weisberg, R.H.; Zheng, L.; Zijlema, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of wind input parameterizations on wave estimations under hurricane conditions are examined using the unstructured grid, third-generation wave model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Experiments using Hurricane Ike wind forcing, which impacted the Gulf of Mexico in 2008, illustrate

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of shock-wave loading of copper and titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolesta, A. V.; Fomin, V. M.

    2017-10-01

    At extreme pressures and temperatures common materials form new dense phases with compacted atomic arrangements. By classical molecular dynamics simulation we observe that FCC copper undergo phase transformation to BCC structure. The transition occurs under shock wave loading at the pressures above 80 GPa and corresponding temperatures above 2000 K. We calculate phase diagram, show that at these pressures and low temperature FCC phase of copper is still stable and discuss the thermodynamic reason for phase transformation at high temperature shock wave regime. Titanium forms new hexagonal phase at high pressure as well. We calculate the structure of shock wave in titanium and observe that shock front splits in three parts: elastic, plastic and phase transformation. The possibility of using a phase transition behind a shock wave with further unloading for designing nanocrystalline materials with a reduced grain size is also shown.

  15. Spectral features of lightning-induced ion cyclotron waves at low latitudes: DEMETER observations and simulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shklyar, D. R.; Storey, L. R. O.; Chum, Jaroslav; Jiříček, František; Němec, F.; Parrot, M.; Santolík, Ondřej; Titova, E. E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 117, A12 (2012), A12206/1-A12206/16 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1253; GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk ME09107 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GPP209/12/P658 Program:GP Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Plasma waves analysis * ion cyclotron waves * satellite observation and numerical simulation * geometrical optics * multi-component measurements * simulation * spectrogram * wave propagation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.174, year: 2012 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2012JA018016/abstract

  16. A combined ADER-DG and PML approach for simulating wave propagation in unbounded domains

    KAUST Repository

    Amler, Thomas

    2012-09-19

    In this work, we present a numerical approach for simulating wave propagation in unbounded domains which combines discontinuous Galerkin methods with arbitrary high order time integration (ADER-DG) and a stabilized modification of perfectly matched layers (PML). Here, the ADER-DG method is applied to Bérenger’s formulation of PML. The instabilities caused by the original PML formulation are treated by a fractional step method that allows to monitor whether waves are damped in PML region. In grid cells where waves are amplified by the PML, the contribution of damping terms is neglected and auxiliary variables are reset. Results of 2D simulations in acoustic media with constant and discontinuous material parameters are presented to illustrate the performance of the method.

  17. Oral Hygiene. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hime, Kirsten

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on oral hygiene. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, suggested activities, additional resources (student handouts), student performance checklists for both…

  18. German Cultural Packets 13 and 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlanta Public Schools, GA.

    These German culture packets are designed to accompany A-LM Level II and include a statement of the rationale behind the unit, the objectives of the packet, the activities themselves, and a brief evaluation by the student. The activities involve the use of the basic text, the student workbook, corresponding tapes, and fellow students as partners…

  19. Grooming. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Pamela

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on grooming. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, suggested activities, an additional resources list, and student completion cards to issue to students as an…

  20. Two-dimensional numerical simulation of acoustic wave phase conjugation in magnetostrictive elastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinovich, Peter; Merlen, Alain

    2005-12-01

    The effect of parametric wave phase conjugation (WPC) in application to ultrasound or acoustic waves in magnetostrictive solids has been addressed numerically by Ben Khelil et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 75-83 (2001)] using 1-D unsteady formulation. Here the numerical method presented by Voinovich et al. [Shock waves 13(3), 221-230 (2003)] extends the analysis to the 2-D effects. The employed model describes universally elastic solids and liquids. A source term similar to Ben Khelil et al.'s accounts for the coupling between deformation and magnetostriction due to external periodic magnetic field. The compatibility between the isotropic constitutive law of the medium and the model of magnetostriction has been considered. Supplementary to the 1-D simulations, the present model involves longitudinal/transversal mode conversion at the sample boundaries and separate magnetic field coupling with dilatation and shear stress. The influence of those factors in a 2-D geometry on the potential output of a magneto-elastic wave phase conjugator is analyzed in this paper. The process under study includes propagation of a wave burst of a given frequency from a point source in a liquid into the active solid, amplification of the waves due to parametric resonance, and formation of time-reversed waves, their radiation into liquid, and focusing. The considered subject is particularly important for ultrasonic applications in acoustic imaging, nondestructive testing, or medical diagnostics and therapy.