WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave optical potential

  1. Coherent transport of matter waves in disordered optical potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Robert

    2007-07-01

    The development of modern techniques for the cooling and the manipulation of atoms in recent years, and the possibility to create Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases and to load them into regular optical lattices or disordered optical potentials, has evoked new interest for the disorder-induced localization of ultra-cold atoms. This work studies the transport properties of matter waves in disordered optical potentials, which are also known as speckle potentials. The effect of correlated disorder on localization is first studied numerically in the framework of the Anderson model. The relevant transport parameters in the configuration average over many different realizations of the speckle potential are then determined analytically, using self-consistent diagrammatic perturbation techniques. This allows to make predictions for a possible experimental observation of coherent transport phenomena for cold atoms in speckle potentials. Of particular importance are the spatial correlations of the speckle fluctuations, which are responsible for the anisotropic character of the single scattering processes in the effective medium. Coherent multiple scattering leads to quantum interference effects, which entail a renormalization of the diffusion constant as compared to the classical description. This so-called weak localization of matter waves is studied as the underlying mechanism for the disorder-driven transition to the Anderson-localization regime, explicitly taking into account the correlations of the speckle fluctuations. (orig.)

  2. Coherent transport of matter waves in disordered optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The development of modern techniques for the cooling and the manipulation of atoms in recent years, and the possibility to create Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases and to load them into regular optical lattices or disordered optical potentials, has evoked new interest for the disorder-induced localization of ultra-cold atoms. This work studies the transport properties of matter waves in disordered optical potentials, which are also known as speckle potentials. The effect of correlated disorder on localization is first studied numerically in the framework of the Anderson model. The relevant transport parameters in the configuration average over many different realizations of the speckle potential are then determined analytically, using self-consistent diagrammatic perturbation techniques. This allows to make predictions for a possible experimental observation of coherent transport phenomena for cold atoms in speckle potentials. Of particular importance are the spatial correlations of the speckle fluctuations, which are responsible for the anisotropic character of the single scattering processes in the effective medium. Coherent multiple scattering leads to quantum interference effects, which entail a renormalization of the diffusion constant as compared to the classical description. This so-called weak localization of matter waves is studied as the underlying mechanism for the disorder-driven transition to the Anderson-localization regime, explicitly taking into account the correlations of the speckle fluctuations. (orig.)

  3. On the imaginary part of the S-wave pion-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germond, J.F.; Lombard, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of pion absorption to the imaginary part of the S-wave pion-nucleus optical potential is calculated with Slater determinantal antisymmetrized nuclear wave funtions, taking fully into accout the spin and isospin degrees of freedom. The potential obtained has an explicit dependence on the proton and neutron nuclear densities whose coefficients are directly related to the two-nucleon absorption coupling constants. The values of these coefficients extracted from mesic atoms data are in good agreement with those deduced from exclusive pion absorption experiments in 3 He, but larger than the predictions of the pion rescattering model. (orig.)

  4. Localization of Matter Waves in Two-Dimensional Disordered Optical Potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, R.C.; Miniatura, C.; Delande, D.; Sigwarth, O.; Mueller, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    We consider ultracold atoms in 2D disordered optical potentials and calculate microscopic quantities characterizing matter wave quantum transport in the noninteracting regime. We derive the diffusion constant as a function of all relevant microscopic parameters and show that coherent multiple scattering induces significant weak localization effects. In particular, we find that even the strong localization regime is accessible with current experimental techniques and calculate the corresponding localization length

  5. Distorted-wave Born approximation in the case of an optical scattering potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mytnichenko, Sergey V.

    2005-01-01

    Application of the distorted-wave Born approximation in the conventional form developed for the case of a real scattering potential is shown to cause significant errors in calculating X-ray diffuse scattering from non-ideal crystals, superlattices, multilayers and other objects if energy dissipation (photoabsorption, inelastic scattering, and so on) is not negligible, or in other words, in the case of an optical (complex) scattering potential. We show how a correct expression for the X-ray diffuse-scattering cross-section can be obtained in this case. Generally, the diffuse-scattering cross-section from an optical potential is not T-invariant, i.e. the reciprocity principle is violated. Violations of T-invariance are more evident when the dynamical nature of the diffraction is more critical

  6. Elementary wave optics

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Robert H

    2005-01-01

    This undergraduate textbook presents thorough coverage of the standard topics of classical optics and optical instrument design; it also offers significant details regarding the concepts of modern optics. Its survey of the mathematical tools of optics grants students insights into the physical principles of quantum mechanics.Two principal concepts occur throughout: a treatment of scattering from real scatterers (leading to Huygens' principles, diffraction theory, the index of refraction, and related topics); and the difference between coherent and noncoherent wave phenomena. Examinations of su

  7. Freezing optical rogue waves by Zeno dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayındır, Cihan; Ozaydin, Fatih

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the Zeno dynamics of the optical rogue waves. Considering their usage in modeling rogue wave dynamics, we analyze the Zeno dynamics of the Akhmediev breathers, Peregrine and Akhmediev-Peregrine soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We show that frequent measurements of the wave inhibits its movement in the observation domain for each of these solutions. We analyze the spectra of the rogue waves under Zeno dynamics. We also analyze the effect of observation frequency on the rogue wave profile and on the probability of lingering of the wave in the observation domain. Our results can find potential applications in optics including nonlinear phenomena.

  8. Guided-Wave Optical Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M. N.; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Casamassima, Biagio; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Guided-wave optical biosensors are reviewed in this paper. Advantages related to optical technologies are presented and integrated architectures are investigated in detail. Main classes of bio receptors and the most attractive optical transduction mechanisms are discussed. The possibility to use Mach-Zehnder and Young interferometers, microdisk and microring resonators, surface plasmon resonance, hollow and antiresonant waveguides, and Bragg gratings to realize very sensitive and selective, ultra-compact and fast biosensors is discussed. Finally, CMOS-compatible technologies are proved to be the most attractive for fabrication of guided-wave photonic biosensors.

  9. Neutron optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmore, D.; Hodgson, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a guide to the use of optical model computer programs to analyse and calculate neutron data. After a brief discussion of the physical basis of the optical model a survey is given of the most widely used optical model and Hauser-Feshbach computer programs. The range of applicability and reliability of the major optical potentials proposed is assessed by comparison with available experimental data and some observations and suggestions are made for the optimum choice of optical potentials for given purposes of neutron data calculations. (author)

  10. Fiber optic evanescent wave biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duveneck, Gert L.; Ehrat, Markus; Widmer, H. M.

    1991-09-01

    The role of modern analytical chemistry is not restricted to quality control and environmental surveillance, but has been extended to process control using on-line analytical techniques. Besides industrial applications, highly specific, ultra-sensitive biochemical analysis becomes increasingly important as a diagnostic tool, both in central clinical laboratories and in the doctor's office. Fiber optic sensor technology can fulfill many of the requirements for both types of applications. As an example, the experimental arrangement of a fiber optic sensor for biochemical affinity assays is presented. The evanescent electromagnetic field, associated with a light ray guided in an optical fiber, is used for the excitation of luminescence labels attached to the biomolecules in solution to be analyzed. Due to the small penetration depth of the evanescent field into the medium, the generation of luminescence is restricted to the close proximity of the fiber, where, e.g., the luminescent analyte molecules combine with their affinity partners, which are immobilized on the fiber. Both cw- and pulsed light excitation can be used in evanescent wave sensor technology, enabling the on-line observation of an affinity assay on a macroscopic time scale (seconds and minutes), as well as on a microscopic, molecular time scale (nanoseconds or microseconds).

  11. Matter-wave bright solitons in effective bichromatic lattice potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Matter-wave bright solitons in bichromatic lattice potentials are considered and their dynamics for different lattice environments are studied. Bichromatic potentials are created from superpositions of (i) two linear optical lattices and (ii) a linear and a nonlinear optical lattice. Effective potentials are found for the solitons in both ...

  12. Pion nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, J. de.

    1981-01-01

    The main goal of the investigations, presented is to establish the contributions to the optical potential, coming from scattering processes which involve 1p-1h nuclear states in the intermediate scattering system. The effects of the Pauli principle corrections and the binding corrections are studied in detail. A phenomenological study of pion absorption effects is also presented. The calculations all concern π- 4 He scattering. The simplicity of the 4 He structure makes the π- 4 He system quite an ideal tool for studying the reaction mechanism. (Auth.)

  13. Multi-component optical solitary waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivshar, Y. S.; Sukhorukov, A. A.; Ostrovskaya, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss several novel types of multi-component (temporal and spatial) envelope solitary waves that appear in fiber and waveguide nonlinear optics. In particular, we describe multi-channel solitary waves in bit-parallel-wavelength fiber transmission systems for highperformance computer networks......, multi-color parametric spatial solitary waves due to cascaded nonlinearities of quadratic materials, and quasiperiodic envelope solitons due to quasi-phase-matching in Fibonacci optical superlattices. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  14. Matter-Wave Solitons In Optical Superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, Pearl J. Y.; Ostrovskaya, Elena A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we show that the properties of both bright and dark Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons trapped in optical superlattices can be controlled by changing the shape of the trapping potential whilst maintaining a constant periodicity and lattice height. Using this method we can control the properties of bright gap solitons by dispersion management. We can also control the interactions between dark lattice solitons. In addition we demonstrate a method for controlled generation of matter-wave gap solitons in stationary optical lattices by interfering two condensate wavepackets, producing a single wavepacket at a gap edge with properties similar to a gap soliton. As this wavepacket evolves, it forms a bright gap soliton

  15. Optical Rogue Waves: Theory and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, M.; Mussot, A.; Kudlinski, A.; Louvergneaux, E.; Kolobov, M.

    2010-05-01

    In the ocean, giant waves (also called killer waves, freak or rogue waves) are extremely rare and strong events. They are not well understood yet and the conditions which favour their emergence are unclear. Very recently, it was shown that the governing equations [1] as well as the statistical properties of an optical pulse propagating inside an optical fibre [2] mimic very well these gigantic surface waves in the ocean. Here we generate both experimentally and numerically optical rogue waves in a photonic crystal fiber (microstructured fiber) with continuous wave (CW) pumps. This is relevant for establishing an analogy with rogue waves in an open ocean. After recalling fundamental rogue waves [3] known as Akhmediev breathers that are solutions of pure nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, we analytically demonstrate that a generalized NLS equation, which governs the propagation of light in the fiber, exhibits convective modulationnal instability [4]. The latter provides one of the main explanations of the optical rogue wave extreme sensitivity to noisy initial conditions at the linear stage of their formation [5]. In the highly nonlinear regime, we provide the evidence that optical rogue waves result from soliton collisions leading to the rapid appearance/disappearance of a powerful optical pulse [6]. REFERENCES [1] C. Kharif, E. Pelinovsky, and A. Slunyaev, "Rogue Waves in the ocean", Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2009 [2] D. R. Solli, C. Ropers, P. Koonath, and B. Jalali, "Optical rogue waves" Nature 450, 1054-1058, (2008). [3] N. Akhmediev, A. Ankiewicz, and M. Taki, "Waves that appear from nowhere and disappear without a trace", Phys. Lett. A 373, 675 (2009). [4] A. Mussot, E. Louvergneaux, N. Akhmediev, F. Reynaud, Delage, and M. Taki, "Optical fiber systems are convectively unstable", Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 113904 (2008). [5] M. Taki, A. Mussot, A. Kudlinski, E. Louvergneaux, M. Kolobov, M. Douay, "Third-order dispersion for generating optical rogue solitons

  16. Microscopic optical potential at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malecki, A.

    1979-01-01

    The problems concerning a microscopic optical model for the elastic nuclear collisions at medium energies are discussed. We describe the method for constructing the optical potential which makes use of the particular properties of quantum scattering in the eikonal limit. The resulting potential is expressed in terms of the nuclear wave functions and the nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitudes. This potential has a dynamic character since by including the effects of multiple scattering it allows for the possibility of intermediate excitations of the projectile and target nuclei. The use of the potential in the exact wave equation accounts for the most important mechanisms present in the collisions between composite particles. The microscopic optical model was successfully applied in the analysis of elastic scattering of protons and α-particles on atomic nuclei in the energy range of 300-1000 MeV/nucleon. The dynamic optical potential in this case represents a considerable improvement over the eikonal Glauber model and the static optical potential of Watson. The possibilities to extend the microscopic description of the proton-nucleus interaction by considering the spin dependence of the elementary amplitude and the Majorana exchange effects were investigated. (author)

  17. Optical rogue waves and soliton turbulence in nonlinear fibre optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genty, G.; Dudley, J. M.; de Sterke, C. M.

    2009-01-01

    We examine optical rogue wave generation in nonlinear fibre propagation in terms of soliton turbulence. We show that higher-order dispersion is sufficient to generate localized rogue soliton structures, and Raman scattering effects are not required.......We examine optical rogue wave generation in nonlinear fibre propagation in terms of soliton turbulence. We show that higher-order dispersion is sufficient to generate localized rogue soliton structures, and Raman scattering effects are not required....

  18. Wave-guided optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Vizsnyiczai, George

    2012-01-01

    This work primarily aims to fabricate and use two photon polymerization (2PP) microstructures capable of being optically manipulated into any arbitrary orientation. We have integrated optical waveguides into the structures and therefore have freestanding waveguides, which can be positioned anywhe...... bridge the diffraction barrier. This structure-mediated paradigm may be carried forward to open new possibilities for exploiting beams from far-field optics down to the subwavelength domain....

  19. The deuteron microscopic optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Congshan; Zhang Jingshang; Shen Qingbiao

    1991-01-01

    The two particle Green's function is introduced. When the direct interaction between two nucleons is neglected, the first and second order mass operators of two particles are the sum of those for each particle. The nucleon microscopic optical potential is calculated by applying nuclear matter approximation and effective Skyrme interaction. Then the deuteron microscopic optical potential (DMOP) is calculated by using fold formula. For improvement of the theory, the two particle polarization diagram contribution to the imaginary part of the deuteron microscopic optical potential is studied

  20. Development of evanescent wave absorbance-based fibre-optic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    potential human health risk and may lead to death in young children and adults ... tive measures for disease outbreak are necessary, because of the recent biothreat, ... optical fibres in chemical sensing and biosensing are reviewed in detail in [12–19]. ... systematic development of these evanescent wave absorbance-based ...

  1. Deuteron microscopic optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hairui; Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Xu Yongli

    2010-01-01

    A deuteron microscopic optical model potential is obtained by the Green function method through nuclear-matter approximation and local-density approximation based on the effective Skyrme interaction. The microscopic optical model potential is used to calculate the deuteron reaction cross sections and the elastic scattering angular distributions for some target nuclei in the mass range 6≤A≤208 with incident deuteron energies up to 200 MeV. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data.

  2. BROADBAND TRAVELLING WAVE SEMICONDUCTOR OPTICAL AMPLIFIER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Broadband travelling wave semiconductor optical amplifier (100, 200, 300, 400, 800) for amplification of light, wherein the amplifier (100, 200, 300, 400, 800) comprises a waveguide region (101, 201, 301, 401, 801) for providing confinement of the light in transverse directions and adapted...

  3. Optical bistability without the rotating wave approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharaby, Yasser A., E-mail: Yasser_Sharaby@hotmail.co [Physics Department, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Suez Canal University, Suez (Egypt); Joshi, Amitabh, E-mail: ajoshi@eiu.ed [Department of Physics, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL 61920 (United States); Hassan, Shoukry S., E-mail: Shoukryhassan@hotmail.co [Mathematics Department, College of Science, University of Bahrain, P.O. Box 32038 (Bahrain)

    2010-04-26

    Optical bistability for two-level atomic system in a ring cavity is investigated outside the rotating wave approximation (RWA) using non-autonomous Maxwell-Bloch equations with Fourier decomposition up to first harmonic. The first harmonic output field component exhibits reversed or closed loop bistability simultaneously with the usual (anti-clockwise) bistability in the fundamental field component.

  4. Optical bistability without the rotating wave approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharaby, Yasser A.; Joshi, Amitabh; Hassan, Shoukry S.

    2010-01-01

    Optical bistability for two-level atomic system in a ring cavity is investigated outside the rotating wave approximation (RWA) using non-autonomous Maxwell-Bloch equations with Fourier decomposition up to first harmonic. The first harmonic output field component exhibits reversed or closed loop bistability simultaneously with the usual (anti-clockwise) bistability in the fundamental field component.

  5. Standing waves in fiber-optic interferometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, V.; Santbergen, R.; Tijssen, M.; Zeman, M.

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented giving the response of three types of fiber-optic interferometers by which a standing wave through an object is investigated. The three types are a Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder and Michelson–Morley interferometer. The response of the Mach–Zehnder interferometer is similar to the Sagnac

  6. Wave Energy Potential in the Latvian EEZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beriņš, J.; Beriņš, J.; Kalnačs, J.; Kalnačs, A.

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with one of the alternative forms of energy - sea wave energy potential in the Latvian Exclusice Economic Zone (EEZ). Results have been achieved using a new method - VEVPP. Calculations have been performed using the data on wave parameters over the past five years (2010-2014). We have also considered wave energy potential in the Gulf of Riga. The conclusions have been drawn on the recommended methodology for the sea wave potential and power calculations for wave-power plant pre-design stage.

  7. Geometrical and wave optics of paraxial beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meron, M; Viccaro, P J; Lin, B

    1999-06-01

    Most calculational techniques used to evaluate beam propagation are geared towards either fully coherent or fully incoherent beams. The intermediate partial-coherence regime, while in principle known for a long time, has received comparably little attention so far. The resulting shortage of adequate calculational techniques is currently being felt in the realm of x-ray optics where, with the advent of third generation synchrotron light sources, partially coherent beams become increasingly common. The purpose of this paper is to present a calculational approach which, utilizing a "variance matrix" representation of paraxial beams, allows for a straightforward evaluation of wave propagation through an optical system. Being capable of dealing with an arbitrary degree of coherence, this approach covers the whole range from wave to ray optics, in a seamless fashion.

  8. Process monitoring using optical ultrasonic wave detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telschow, K.L.; Walter, J.B.; Garcia, G.V.; Kunerth, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Optical ultrasonic wave detection techniques are being developed for process monitoring. An important limitation on optical techniques is that the material surface, in materials processing applications, is usually not a specular reflector and in many cases is totally diffusely reflecting. This severely degrades the light collected by the detection optics, greatly reducing the intensity and randomly scattering the phase of the reflected light. A confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer, which is sensitive to the Doppler frequency shift resulting from the surface motion and not to the phase of the collected light, is well suited to detecting ultrasonic waves in diffusely reflecting materials. This paper describes the application of this detector to the real-time monitoring of the sintering of ceramic materials. 8 refs., 5 figs

  9. The neutron optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The present status of optical model calculations of neutron scattering and interactions is reviewed, with special emphasis on more recent developments and the more promising lines of research. The use of dispersion relations to provide an extra constraint on the potential is discussed, together with their application to studies of the Fermi surface anomaly. The application of potential inversion techniques to determine the form of the potential is also considered. (author). 39 refs, figs

  10. Beam splitter phase shifts: Wave optics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, Antonio; Degiorgio, Vittorio

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the phase relationships between transmitted and reflected waves in a lossless beam splitter having a multilayer structure, using the matrix approach as outlined in classical optics books. Contrarily to the case of the quantum optics formalism generally employed to describe beam splitters, these matrices are not unitary. In this note we point out the existence of general relations among the elements of the transfer matrix that describes the multilayer beam splitter. Such relations, which are independent of the detailed structure of the beam splitter, fix the phase shifts between reflected and transmitted waves. It is instructive to see how the results obtained by Zeilinger by using spinor algebra and Pauli matrices can be easily derived from our general relations.

  11. Gravitational Waves from Oscillons with Cuspy Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Cai, Rong-Gen; Shiu, Gary

    2018-01-19

    We study the production of gravitational waves during oscillations of the inflaton around the minimum of a cuspy potential after inflation. We find that a cusp in the potential can trigger copious oscillon formation, which sources a characteristic energy spectrum of gravitational waves with double peaks. The discovery of such a double-peak spectrum could test the underlying inflationary physics.

  12. Comparing Different Approaches to Visualizing Light Waves: An Experimental Study on Teaching Wave Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mešic, Vanes; Hajder, Erna; Neumann, Knut; Erceg, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that students have tremendous difficulties developing a qualitative understanding of wave optics, at all educational levels. In this study, we investigate how three different approaches to visualizing light waves affect students' understanding of wave optics. In the first, the conventional, approach light waves are represented…

  13. Wave energy potential in Galicia (NW Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, G.; Lopez, M.; Carballo, R.; Castro, A. [University of Santiago de Compostela, Hydraulic Engineering, E.P.S., Campus Universitario s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Fraguela, J.A. [University of A Coruna, E.P.S., Campus de Esteiro s/n, Ferrol (Spain); Frigaard, P. [University of Aalborg, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, DK 9000 (Denmark)

    2009-11-15

    Wave power presents significant advantages with regard to other CO{sub 2}-free energy sources, among which the predictability, high load factor and low visual and environmental impact stand out. Galicia, facing the Atlantic on the north-western corner of the Iberian Peninsula, is subjected to a very harsh wave climate; in this work its potential for energy production is assessed based on three-hourly data from a third generation ocean wave model (WAM) covering the period 1996-2005. Taking into account the results of this assessment along with other relevant considerations such as the location of ports, navigation routes, and fishing and aquaculture zones, an area is selected for wave energy exploitation. The transformation of the offshore wave field as it propagates into this area is computed by means of a nearshore wave model (SWAN) in order to select the optimum locations for a wave farm. Two zones emerge as those with the highest potential for wave energy exploitation. The large modifications in the available wave power resulting from relatively small changes of position are made apparent in the process. (author)

  14. Energy independent optical potentials: construction and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.; Moniz, E.J.

    1983-11-01

    Properties of the energy-independent potential U sup(-) which is wave-function-equivalent to the usual optical potential U(E) are constructed and examined. A simple procedure is presented for constructing U sup(-) in the uniform medium, and physical examples are discussed. The general result for finite systems, a recursive expansion in powers of U(E), is used to investigate the multiple scattering expansion of U sup(-); the energy-independent potential is found to have serious short-comings for direct microscopic construction or phenomenological parametrization. The microscopic theory, as exemplified here by the multiple scattering approach, does not lead to a reliable approximation scheme. Phenomenological approaches to U sup(-) are unattractive because the physics does not guide the parametrization effectively: the structure of the nonlocality is not tied directly to the dynamics; Im U sup(-) changes sign; different elements of the physics, separate in U(E), are completely entangled in U sup(-). (Author) [pt

  15. Quasi-optical millimeter wave rotating TE62 mode generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shaopu; Zhang Conghui; Wang Zhong; Guo Feng; Chen Hongbin; Hu Linlin; Pan Wenwu

    2011-01-01

    The design,measurement technique and experimental results of rotating TE 6 2 mode generator are presented. The source includes millimeter wave optical system and open coaxial wave guide system. The millimeter wave optical system consists of pyramid antenna, hyperbolical reflector, parabolic reflector and quasi parabolic reflector. The open coaxial wave guide system contains open coaxial wave guide cavity, cylinder wave guide and output antenna. It is tested by network analyser and millimeter wave near field pattern auto-test system, and the purity of rotating TE 6 2 mode at 96.4 GHz is about 97%. (authors)

  16. Dirac equation and optical wave propagation in one dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Gabriel [Catedras CONACYT, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Coordinacion para la Innovacion y la Aplicacion de la Ciencia y la Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2018-02-15

    We show that the propagation of transverse electric (TE) polarized waves in one-dimensional inhomogeneous settings can be written in the form of the Dirac equation in one space dimension with a Lorentz scalar potential, and consequently perform photonic simulations of the Dirac equation in optical structures. In particular, we propose how the zero energy state of the Jackiw-Rebbi model can be generated in an optical set-up by controlling the refractive index landscape, where TE-polarized waves mimic the Dirac particles and the soliton field can be tuned by adjusting the refractive index. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Neutron and proton optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.F.

    1985-11-01

    The neutron and proton optical model potentials (OMP) are discussed in terms of microscopic (MOMP) and phenomenological (POMP) models. For the MOMP, two approaches are discussed, the nucleus matter approach [Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux (JLM) and Brieva-Rook-von Geramb (BRVG), potentials] and the finite nuclei approach (Osterfeld and Madsen). For the POMP, the Lane charge-exchange potential and its validity over a wide mass range is reviewed. In addition to the Lane symmetry term, the Coulomb correction to both the real and imaginary parts of the OMP is discussed for the above models. The use of the OMP to calculate collective inelastic scattering and observed differences between the neutron- and proton-deformation parameters is also illustrated. 25 refs., 3 figs

  18. Acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity with Lamb waves in microwave K band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadesse, Semere A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Li, Huan; Liu, Qiyu; Li, Mo, E-mail: moli@umn.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Integrating nanoscale electromechanical transducers and nanophotonic devices potentially can enable acousto-optic devices to reach unprecedented high frequencies and modulation efficiency. Here, we demonstrate acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity using Lamb waves with frequency up to 19 GHz, reaching the microwave K band. The devices are fabricated in suspended aluminum nitride membrane. Excitation of acoustic waves is achieved with interdigital transducers with period as small as 300 nm. Confining both acoustic wave and optical wave within the thickness of the membrane leads to improved acousto-optic modulation efficiency in these devices than that obtained in previous surface acoustic wave devices. Our system demonstrates a scalable optomechanical platform where strong acousto-optic coupling between cavity-confined photons and high frequency traveling phonons can be explored.

  19. Probing molecular potentials with an optical centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, A. A.; Korobenko, A.; Hepburn, J. W.; Milner, V.

    2017-09-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to excite coherent rotational wave packets in N2O, OCS, and CS2 molecules with rotational quantum numbers reaching up to J ≈465 , 690, and 1186, respectively. Time-resolved rotational spectroscopy at such ultra-high levels of rotational excitation can be used as a sensitive tool to probe the molecular potential energy surface at internuclear distances far from their equilibrium values. Significant bond stretching in the centrifuged molecules results in the growing period of the rotational revivals, which are experimentally detected using coherent Raman scattering. We measure the revival period as a function of the centrifuge-induced rotational frequency and compare it with the numerical calculations based on the known Morse-cosine potentials.

  20. Collisions and turbulence in optical rogue wave formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genty, G.; de Sterke, C.M.; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    We discuss optical rogue wave generation in terms of collisions and turbulence processes. Simulations of picosecond pulse propagation in optical fibres show rogue soliton generation from either third-order dispersion or Raman scattering independently. Simulations of rogue soliton emergence...

  1. Wave power potential in Malaysian territorial waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmida Mohd Nasir, Nor; Maulud, Khairul Nizam Abdul

    2016-06-01

    Up until today, Malaysia has used renewable energy technology such as biomass, solar and hydro energy for power generation and co-generation in palm oil industries and also for the generation of electricity, yet, we are still far behind other countries which have started to optimize waves for similar production. Wave power is a renewable energy (RE) transported by ocean waves. It is very eco-friendly and is easily reachable. This paper presents an assessment of wave power potential in Malaysian territorial waters including waters of Sabah and Sarawak. In this research, data from Malaysia Meteorology Department (MetMalaysia) is used and is supported by a satellite imaginary obtained from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Malaysia Remote Sensing Agency (ARSM) within the time range of the year 1992 until 2007. There were two types of analyses conducted which were mask analysis and comparative analysis. Mask analysis of a research area is the analysis conducted to filter restricted and sensitive areas. Meanwhile, comparative analysis is an analysis conducted to determine the most potential area for wave power generation. Four comparative analyses which have been carried out were wave power analysis, comparative analysis of wave energy power with the sea topography, hot-spot area analysis and comparative analysis of wave energy with the wind speed. These four analyses underwent clipping processes using Geographic Information System (GIS) to obtain the final result. At the end of this research, the most suitable area to develop a wave energy converter was found, which is in the waters of Terengganu and Sarawak. Besides that, it was concluded that the average potential energy that can be generated in Malaysian territorial waters is between 2.8kW/m to 8.6kW/m.

  2. Wave energy potential in Galicia (NW Spain)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Gregorio; López, Mario; Carballo, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Wave power presents significant advantages with regard to other CO2-free energy sources, among which the predictability, high load factor and low visual and environmental impact stand out. Galicia, facing the Atlantic on the north-western corner of the Iberian Peninsula, is subjected to a very...... harsh wave climate; in this work its potential for energy production is assessed based on three-hourly data from a third generation ocean wave model (WAM) covering the period 1996 - 2005. Taking into account the results of this assessment along with other relevant considerations such as the location...

  3. A fast method for linear waves based on geometrical optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    We develop a fast method for solving the one-dimensional wave equation based on geometrical optics. From geometrical optics (e.g., Fourier integral operator theory or WKB approximation) it is known that high-frequency waves split into forward and backward propagating parts, each propagating with the

  4. Optical rectification, circular photogalvanic effect, and five-wave mixing in optically active liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroteev, Nikolai I.

    1996-05-01

    A phenomenological analysis is carried out of novel nonlinear optical processes taking place in macroscopically noncentrosymmetric isotropic solutions of chiral (lift-ring mirror asymmetric) macromolecules, which are the primary elements of living organisms and their metabolic products. Among the most interesting and potentially useful for spectroscopic purposes are: optical rectification/photogalvanic effects consisting in electrostatic field/direct electrical current generation in such liquids under irradiation with the intense circularly polarized laser beam and the five-wave mixing phase-matched process of BioCARS to selectively record, background-free, vibrational spectra of chiral molecules.

  5. Controlling the plasmonic surface waves of metallic nanowires by transformation optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yichao; Yuan, Jun; Yin, Ge; Ma, Yungui, E-mail: yungui@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Centre for Optical and Electromagnetic Research, College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); He, Sailing [State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Centre for Optical and Electromagnetic Research, College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Electromagnetic Engineering, School of Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, S-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-07-06

    In this letter, we introduce the technique of using transformation optics to manipulate the mode states of surface plasmonic waves of metallic nanowire waveguides. As examples we apply this technique to design two optical components: a three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic mode rotator and a mode convertor. The rotator can rotate the polarization state of the surface wave around plasmonic nanowires by arbitrarily desired angles, and the convertor can transform the surface wave modes from one to another. Full-wave simulation is performed to verify the design and efficiency of our devices. Their potential application in photonic circuits is envisioned.

  6. Bragg diffraction of fermions at optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deh, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the Bragg diffraction of ultracold fermions at an optical potential. A moving optical lattice was created, by overlaying two slightly detuned lasers. Atoms can be diffracted at this lattice if the detuning fulfills the Bragg condition for resting atoms. This Bragg diffraction is analyzed systematically in this thesis. To this end Rabi oscillations between the diffraction states were driven, as well in the weakly interacting Bragg regime, as in the strongly interacting Kapitza-Dirac regime. Simulations, based on a driven two-, respectively multilevel-system describe the observed effects rather well. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of the diffracted states in the magnetic trapping potential was studied. The anharmonicity of the trap in use and the scattering cross section for p-wave collisions in a 6 Li system was determined from the movement of these states. Moreover the momentum distribution of the fermions was measured with Bragg spectroscopy and first signs of Fermi degeneracy were found. Finally an interferometer with fermions was build, exhibiting a coherence time of more than 100 μs. With this, the possibility for measurement and manipulation of ultracold fermions with Bragg diffraction could bee shown. (orig.)

  7. The Watanabe model for 6Li-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abul-Magd, A.Y.; Rabie, A.; El-Gazzar, M.A.

    1980-09-01

    Optical potentials for the scattering of 6 Li projectiles are calculated using the Watanabe model and an α+d cluster model wave function for 6 Li. Reasonable fits to the elastic differential cross-section and vector polarization are obtained. (author)

  8. Theoretical study on optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Hung Gi.

    1984-08-01

    The optical model potential of non-local effect on the rounded edge of the potential is derived. On the basis of this potential the functional form of the optical model potential, the energy dependence and relationship of its parameters, and the dependency of the values of the parameters on energy change are shown in this paper. (author)

  9. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-06-01

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (Veff(NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well Veff(LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of Veff(LOL) increases as k increases and that of Veff(NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter τ drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation indicates that during evolution

  10. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-01-01

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (V eff (NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well V eff (LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of V eff (LOL) increases as k increases and that of V eff (NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter τ drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation indicates that during

  11. Roadmap on optical rogue waves and extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmediev, Nail; Kibler, Bertrand; Baronio, Fabio; Belić, Milivoj; Zhong, Wei-Ping; Zhang, Yiqi; Chang, Wonkeun; Soto-Crespo, Jose M.; Vouzas, Peter; Grelu, Philippe; Lecaplain, Caroline; Hammani, K.; Rica, S.; Picozzi, A.; Tlidi, Mustapha; Panajotov, Krassimir; Mussot, Arnaud; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Genty, Goery; Dudley, John; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Demircan, Ayhan; Morgner, Uwe; Amiraranashvili, Shalva; Bree, Carsten; Steinmeyer, Günter; Masoller, C.; Broderick, Neil G. R.; Runge, Antoine F. J.; Erkintalo, Miro; Residori, S.; Bortolozzo, U.; Arecchi, F. T.; Wabnitz, Stefan; Tiofack, C. G.; Coulibaly, S.; Taki, M.

    2016-06-01

    The pioneering paper ‘Optical rogue waves’ by Solli et al (2007 Nature 450 1054) started the new subfield in optics. This work launched a great deal of activity on this novel subject. As a result, the initial concept has expanded and has been enriched by new ideas. Various approaches have been suggested since then. A fresh look at the older results and new discoveries has been undertaken, stimulated by the concept of ‘optical rogue waves’. Presently, there may not by a unique view on how this new scientific term should be used and developed. There is nothing surprising when the opinion of the experts diverge in any new field of research. After all, rogue waves may appear for a multiplicity of reasons and not necessarily only in optical fibers and not only in the process of supercontinuum generation. We know by now that rogue waves may be generated by lasers, appear in wide aperture cavities, in plasmas and in a variety of other optical systems. Theorists, in turn, have suggested many other situations when rogue waves may be observed. The strict definition of a rogue wave is still an open question. For example, it has been suggested that it is defined as ‘an optical pulse whose amplitude or intensity is much higher than that of the surrounding pulses’. This definition (as suggested by a peer reviewer) is clear at the intuitive level and can be easily extended to the case of spatial beams although additional clarifications are still needed. An extended definition has been presented earlier by N Akhmediev and E Pelinovsky (2010 Eur. Phys. J. Spec. Top. 185 1-4). Discussions along these lines are always useful and all new approaches stimulate research and encourage discoveries of new phenomena. Despite the potentially existing disagreements, the scientific terms ‘optical rogue waves’ and ‘extreme events’ do exist. Therefore coordination of our efforts in either unifying the concept or in introducing alternative definitions must be continued. From

  12. Continuous-wave terahertz light from optical parametric oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowade, Rosita

    2010-12-15

    Continuous-wave (cw) optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) are working horses for spectroscopy in the near and mid infrared. However, in the terahertz frequency range (0.1 to 10 THz), the pump threshold is more than 100 W due to the high absorption in nonlinear crystals and thus exceeds the power of standard cw single-frequency pump sources. In this thesis the first cw OPO capable of generating terahertz radiation is demonstrated. To overcome the high threshold, the signal wave of a primary infrared process is resonantly enhanced to serve as the pump wave for a cascaded parametric process with one wave being at the terahertz frequency level. A terahertz output power of more than two microwatts is measured and tuning is achieved from 1.3 to 1.7 THz. This terahertz source emits a narrow-band, diffraction-limited beam which remains mode-hop free over more than one hour. Such a device inhibits high potential for applications in areas like astronomy, telecommunications or high-resolution spectroscopy. (orig.)

  13. Continuous-wave terahertz light from optical parametric oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowade, Rosita

    2010-12-01

    Continuous-wave (cw) optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) are working horses for spectroscopy in the near and mid infrared. However, in the terahertz frequency range (0.1 to 10 THz), the pump threshold is more than 100 W due to the high absorption in nonlinear crystals and thus exceeds the power of standard cw single-frequency pump sources. In this thesis the first cw OPO capable of generating terahertz radiation is demonstrated. To overcome the high threshold, the signal wave of a primary infrared process is resonantly enhanced to serve as the pump wave for a cascaded parametric process with one wave being at the terahertz frequency level. A terahertz output power of more than two microwatts is measured and tuning is achieved from 1.3 to 1.7 THz. This terahertz source emits a narrow-band, diffraction-limited beam which remains mode-hop free over more than one hour. Such a device inhibits high potential for applications in areas like astronomy, telecommunications or high-resolution spectroscopy. (orig.)

  14. Dynamical equations for the optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    Dynamical equations for the optical potential are obtained starting from a wide class of N-particle equations. This is done with arbitrary multiparticle interactions to allow adaptation to few-body models of nuclear reactions and including all effects of nucleon identity. Earlier forms of the optical potential equations are obtained as special cases. Particular emphasis is placed upon obtaining dynamical equations for the optical potential from the equations of Kouri, Levin, and Tobocman including all effects of particle identity

  15. Optical bulk and surface waves with negative refraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agranovich, V.M.; Shen, Y.R.; Baughman, R.H.; Zakhidov, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    In materials with negative refraction, the direction of wave propagation is opposite to the direction of the wave vector. Using an approach that characterizes the optical response of a medium totally by a generalized dielectric permittivity, ε-bar (ω,k-bar), we discuss the possibility of seeing negative refraction for optical waves in a number of nonmagnetic media. These include bulk waves in organic materials and in gyrotropic materials where additional exciton-polariton waves can have a negative group velocity. It is known that dispersion of surface waves can be engineered by tailoring a surface transition layer. We show how this effect can be used to obtain surface waves with negative refraction

  16. Matter-wave solitons and finite-amplitude Bloch waves in optical lattices with a spatially modulated nonlinearity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jie-Fang; Li, Yi-Shen; Meng, Jianping; Wu, Lei; Malomed, Boris A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate solitons and nonlinear Bloch waves in Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in optical lattices. By introducing specially designed localized profiles of the spatial modulation of the attractive nonlinearity, we construct an infinite number of exact soliton solutions in terms of the Mathieu and elliptic functions, with the chemical potential belonging to the semi-infinite bandgap of the optical-lattice-induced spectrum. Starting from the exact solutions, we employ the relaxation met...

  17. Guided-wave acousto-optics interactions, devices, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    The field of integrated- or guided-wave optics has experienced significant and continuous growth since its inception in the late 1960s. There has been a considerable increase in research and development activity in this field worldwide and some significant advances in the realization of working in­ tegrated optic devices and modules have been made in recent years. In fact, there have already been some commercial manufacturing and technical ap­ plications of such devices and modules. The guided-wave-acoustooptics involving Bragg interactions between guided optical waves and surface acoustic waves is one of the areas of in­ tegrated-optics that has reached some degree of scientific and technological maturity. This topical volume is devoted to an in-depth treatment of this emerging branch of science and technology. Presented in this volume are concise treatments on bulk-wave acoustooptics, guided-wave optics, and surface acoustic waves, and detailed studies of guided-wave acoustooptic Bragg diffraction in thr...

  18. Wave-optics modeling of the optical-transport line for passive optical stochastic cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorf, M. B.; Lebedev, V. A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsystemcritical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the SYNCHROTRON RADIATION WORKSHOP (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  19. Wave-Optics Modeling of the Optical-Transport Line for Passive Optical Stochastic Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andorf, M. B. [NICADD, DeKalb; Lebedev, V. A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsytem critical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the {\\sc Synchrotron Radiation Workshop} (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  20. Propagation-invariant waves in acoustic, optical, and radio-wave fields

    OpenAIRE

    Salo, Janne

    2003-01-01

    The physical phenomena considered in this thesis are associated with electromagnetic and acoustic waves that propagate in free space or in homogeneous media without diffraction. The concept of rotationally periodic wave propagation is introduced in the first journal article included in the thesis and it is subsequently used to analyse waves that avoid diffractive deterioration by repeatedly returning to their initial shape, possibly rotated around the optical axis. Such waves constitute an es...

  1. Evanescent waves in optics an introduction to plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolotti, Mario; M Guzman, Angela

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introductory discussion of evanescent waves and plasmons, describes their properties and uses, and shows how they are fundamental when operating with nanoscale optics. Far field optics is not suitable for the design, description, and operation of devices at this nanometre scale. Instead one must work with models based on near-field optics and surface evanescent waves. The new discipline of plasmonics has grown to encompass the generation and application of plasmons both as a travelling excitation in a nanostructure and as a stationary enhancement of the electrical field near metal nanosurfaces. The book begins with a brief review of the basic concepts of electromagnetism, then introduces evanescent waves through reflection and refraction, and shows how they appear in diffraction problems, before discussing the role that they play in optical waveguides and sensors. The application of evanescent waves in super-resolution devices is briefly presented, before plasmons are introduced. Th...

  2. Perspective and potential of smart optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.; Duzik, Adam J.; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yeonjoon; Kim, Jaehwan; Ko, Hyun-U.; Kim, Hyun-Chan; Yun, Sungryul; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2017-09-01

    The increasing requirements of hyperspectral imaging optics, electro/photo-chromic materials, negative refractive index metamaterial optics, and miniaturized optical components from micro-scale to quantum-scale optics have all contributed to new features and advancements in optics technology. Development of multifunctional capable optics has pushed the boundaries of optics into new fields that require new disciplines and materials to maximize the potential benefits. The purpose of this study is to understand and show the fundamental materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics (referred to as smart optics) that are essential for future industrial, scientific, military, and space applications, such as membrane optics, filters, windows for sensors and probes, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras, light valves, light switches, and flat-panel displays. The proposed smart optics are based on the Stark and Zeeman effects in materials tailored with quantum dot arrays and thin films made from readily polarizable materials via ferroelectricity or ferromagnetism. Bound excitonic states of organic crystals are also capable of optical adaptability, tunability, and reconfigurability. To show the benefits of smart optics, this paper reviews spectral characteristics of smart optical materials and device technology. Experiments testing the quantum-confined Stark effect, arising from rare earth element doping effects in semiconductors, and applied electric field effects on spectral and refractive index are discussed. Other bulk and dopant materials were also discovered to have the same aspect of shifts in spectrum and refractive index. Other efforts focus on materials for creating field-controlled spectrally smart active optics on a selected spectral range. Surface plasmon polariton transmission of light through apertures is also discussed, along with potential applications. New breakthroughs in micro scale multiple zone plate optics as a micro

  3. Midinfrared optical rogue waves in soft glass photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buccoliero, Daniel; Steffensen, Henrik; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike

    2011-01-01

    We investigate numerically the formation of extreme events or rogue waves in soft glass tellurite fibers and demonstrate that optical loss drastically diminishes shot-to-shot fluctuations characteristic of picosecond pumped supercontinuum (SC). When loss is neglected these fluctuations include...... distributions. Our results thus implicitly show that rogue waves will not occur in any SC spectrum that is limited by loss, such as commercial silica fiber based SC sources. © 2011 Optical Society of America....

  4. Matter-wave dark solitons in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, Pearl J Y; Ostrovskaya, Elena A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2004-01-01

    We analyse the Floquet-Bloch spectrum of matter waves in Bose-Einstein condensates loaded into single-periodic optical lattices and double-periodic superlattices. In the framework of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, we describe the structure and analyse the mobility properties of matter-wave dark solitons residing on backgrounds of extended nonlinear Bloch-type states. We demonstrate that interactions between dark solitons can be effectively controlled in optical superlattices

  5. Surface Plasmon Wave Adapter Designed with Transformation Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiao, Sanshui; Wubs, Martijn

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of transformation optics, we propose the design of a surface plasmon wave adapter which confines surface plasmon waves on non-uniform metal surfaces and enables adiabatic mode transformation of surface plasmon polaritons with very short tapers. This adapter can be simply achieved...... with homogeneous anisotropic naturally occurring materials or subwavelength grating-structured dielectric materials. Full wave simulations based on a finite-element method have been performed to validate our proposal....

  6. Nonresonant approximations to the optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    A new class of approximations to the optical potential, which includes those of the multiple-scattering variety, is investigated. These approximations are constructed so that the optical potential maintains the correct unitarity properties along with a proper treatment of nucleon identity. The special case of nucleon-nucleus scattering with complete inclusion of Pauli effects is studied in detail. The treatment is such that the optical potential receives contributions only from subsystems embedded in their own physically correct antisymmetrized subspaces. It is found that a systematic development of even the lowest-order approximations requires the use of the off-shell extension due to Alt, Grassberger, and Sandhas along with a consistent set of dynamical equations for the optical potential. In nucleon-nucleus scattering a lowest-order optical potential is obtained as part of a systematic, exact, inclusive connectivity expansion which is expected to be useful at moderately high energies. This lowest-order potential consists of an energy-shifted (trho)-type term with three-body kinematics plus a heavy-particle exchange or pickup term. The natural appearance of the exchange term additivity in the optical potential clarifies the role of the elastic distortion in connection with the treatment of these processes. The relationship of the relevant aspects of the present analysis of the optical potential to conventional multiple scattering methods is discussed

  7. Acousto-optic interaction in polyimide coated optical fibers with flexural waves

    OpenAIRE

    ALCUSA-SÁEZ, E. P.; Díez, A.; Rivera-Pérez, E.; Margulis, W.; Norin, L.; Andrés, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    Acousto-optic coupling in polyimide-coated single-mode optical fibers using flexural elastic waves is demonstrated. The effect of the polyimide coating on the acousto-optic interaction process is analyzed in detailed. Theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement. Although the elastic attenuation is significant, we show that acousto-optic coupling can be produced with a reasonably good efficiency. To our knowledge, it is the first experimental demonstration of acousto-optic coupl...

  8. Neutron wave optics studied with ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyerl, A.

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses experiments demonstrating or utilizing the wave properties of neutrons with wavelengths of about 100 nm. In particular the 'UCN gravity diffractometer' and the gravity spectrometer NESSIE (Neutronen-Schwerkraft-Spectrometrie) are illustrated. (Auth.)

  9. Linear ray and wave optics in phase space bridging ray and wave optics via the Wigner phase-space picture

    CERN Document Server

    Torre, Amalia

    2005-01-01

    Ray, wave and quantum concepts are central to diverse and seemingly incompatible models of light. Each model particularizes a specific ''manifestation'' of light, and then corresponds to adequate physical assumptions and formal approximations, whose domains of applicability are well-established. Accordingly each model comprises its own set of geometric and dynamic postulates with the pertinent mathematical means.At a basic level, the book is a complete introduction to the Wigner optics, which bridges between ray and wave optics, offering the optical phase space as the ambience and the Wigner f

  10. How to detect the gravitationally induced phase shift of electromagnetic waves by optical-fiber interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.

    1983-01-01

    Attention is called to a laboratory experiment of an optical-fiber interferometer which can show the gravitationally induced phase shift of optical waves. A phase shift of approx.10 -6 rad is anticipated for the Earth's gravitational potential difference of 1 m when a He-Ne laser and two multiple-turn optical-fiber loops of length 5 km are used. The phase shift can be varied by rotating the loops about an axis parallel to the Earth's surface. This order of phase shifts can be detected by current optical-fiber interferometric techniques

  11. Metamaterials for light rays: ray optics without wave-optical analog in the ray-optics limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Alasdair C; Courtial, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Volumes of sub-wavelength electromagnetic elements can act like homogeneous materials: metamaterials. In analogy, sheets of optical elements such as prisms can act ray-optically like homogeneous sheet materials. In this sense, such sheets can be considered to be metamaterials for light rays (METATOYs). METATOYs realize new and unusual transformations of the directions of transmitted light rays. We study here, in the ray-optics and scalar-wave limits, the wave-optical analog of such transformations, and we show that such an analog does not always exist. Perhaps, this is the reason why many of the ray-optical possibilities offered by METATOYs have never before been considered.

  12. Holograms for power-efficient excitation of optical surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatov, Anton I.; Merzlikin, Alexander M.

    2018-02-01

    A method for effective excitation of optical surface waves based on holography principles has been proposed. For a particular example of excitation of a plasmonic wave in a dielectric layer on metal the efficiency of proposed volume holograms in the dielectric layer has been analyzed in comparison with optimized periodic gratings in the dielectric layer. Conditions when the holograms are considerably more efficient than the gratings have been found out. In addition, holograms recorded in two iterations have been proposed and studied. Such holograms are substantially more efficient than the optimized periodic gratings for all incidence angles of an exciting Gaussian beam. The proposed method is universal: it can be extended for efficient excitation of different types of optical surface waves and optical waveguide modes.

  13. Skin optical clearing potential of disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Shi, Rui; Ma, Ning; Tuchina, Daria K.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zhu, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Skin optical clearing can significantly enhance the ability of biomedical optical imaging. Some alcohols and sugars have been selected to be optical clearing agents (OCAs). In this work, we paid attention to the optical clearing potential of disaccharides. Sucrose and maltose were chosen as typical disaccharides to compare with fructose, an excellent monosaccharide-OCA, by using molecular dynamics simulation and an ex vivo experiment. The experimental results indicated that the optical clearing efficacy of skin increases linearly with the concentration for each OCA. Both the theoretical predication and experimental results revealed that the two disaccharides exerted a better optical clearing potential than fructose at the same concentration, and sucrose is optimal. Since maltose has an extremely low saturation concentration, the other two OCAs with saturation concentrations were treated topically on rat skin in vivo, and optical coherence tomography imaging was applied to monitor the optical clearing process. The results demonstrated that sucrose could cause a more significant increase in imaging depth and signal intensity than fructose.

  14. Thermal noise from optical coatings in gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Gregory M; Armandula, Helena; Black, Eric; Crooks, D R M; Cagnoli, Gianpietro; Hough, Jim; Murray, Peter; Reid, Stuart; Rowan, Sheila; Sneddon, Peter; Fejer, Martin M; Route, Roger; Penn, Steven D

    2006-03-01

    Gravitational waves are a prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity. These waves are created by massive objects, like neutron stars or black holes, oscillating at speeds appreciable to the speed of light. The detectable effect on the Earth of these waves is extremely small, however, creating strains of the order of 10(-21). There are a number of basic physics experiments around the world designed to detect these waves by using interferometers with very long arms, up to 4 km in length. The next-generation interferometers are currently being designed, and the thermal noise in the mirrors will set the sensitivity over much of the usable bandwidth. Thermal noise arising from mechanical loss in the optical coatings put on the mirrors will be a significant source of noise. Achieving higher sensitivity through lower mechanical loss coatings, while preserving the crucial optical and thermal properties, is an area of active research right now.

  15. Contribution to coherent atom optics - Design of multiple wave devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impens, F.

    2008-03-01

    The theoretical work presented in this manuscript addresses two complementary issues in coherent atom optics. The first part addresses the perspectives offered by coherent atomic sources through the design of two experiment involving the levitation of a cold atomic sample in a periodic series of light pulses, and for which coherent atomic clouds are particularly well-suited. These systems appear as multiple wave atom interferometers. A striking feature of these experiments is that a unique system performs both the sample trapping and interrogation. To obtain a transverse confinement, a novel atomic lens is proposed, relying on the interaction between an atomic wave with a spherical light wave. The sensitivity of the sample trapping towards the gravitational acceleration and towards the pulse frequencies is exploited to perform the desired measurement. These devices constitute atomic wave resonators in momentum space, which is a novel concept in atom optics. A second part develops new theoretical tools - most of which inspired from optics - well-suited to describe the propagation of coherent atomic sources. A phase-space approach of the propagation, relying on the evolution of moments, is developed and applied to study the low-energy dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates. The ABCD method of propagation for atomic waves is extended beyond the linear regime to account perturbatively for mean-field atomic interactions in the atom-optical aberration-less approximation. A treatment of the atom laser extraction enabling one to describe aberrations in the atomic beam, developed in collaboration with the Atom Optics group at the Institute of Optics, is exposed. Last, a quality factor suitable for the characterization of diluted matter waves in a general propagation regime has been proposed. (author)

  16. Improved optical ranging for space based gravitational wave detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, Andrew J; Shaddock, Daniel A; McKenzie, Kirk; Ware, Brent; De Vine, Glenn; Spero, Robert E; Klipstein, W

    2013-01-01

    The operation of 10 6  km scale laser interferometers in space will permit the detection of gravitational waves at previously unaccessible frequency regions. Multi-spacecraft missions, such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), will use time delay interferometry to suppress the otherwise dominant laser frequency noise from their measurements. This is accomplished by performing sub-sample interpolation of the optical phase measurements recorded at each spacecraft for synchronization and cancellation of the otherwise dominant laser frequency noise. These sub-sample interpolation time shifts are dependent upon the inter-spacecraft range and will be measured using a pseudo-random noise ranging modulation upon the science laser. One limit to the ranging performance is mutual interference between the outgoing and incoming ranging signals upon each spacecraft. This paper reports on the demonstration of a noise cancellation algorithm which is shown to providing a factor of ∼8 suppression of the mutual interference noise. Demonstration of the algorithm in an optical test bed showed an rms ranging error of 0.06 m, improved from 0.19 m in previous results, surpassing the 1 m RMS LISA specification and potentially improving the cancellation of laser frequency noise. (paper)

  17. Optical wave microphone measurement during laser ablation of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsugi, Fumiaki, E-mail: mitsugi@cs.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Ide, Ryota; Ikegami, Tomoaki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Nakamiya, Toshiyuki; Sonoda, Yoshito [Graduate School of Industrial Engineering, Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto, 862-8652 (Japan)

    2012-10-30

    Pulsed laser irradiation is used for surface treatment of a solid and ablation for particle formation in gas, liquid or supercritical phase media. When a pulsed laser is used to irradiate a solid, spatial refractive index variations (including photothermal expansion, shockwaves and particles) occur, which vary depending on the energy density of the pulsed laser. We focused on this phenomenon and applied an unique method for detection of refractive index variation using an optical wave microphone based on Fraunhofer diffraction. In this research, we analyzed the waveforms and frequencies of refractive index variations caused by pulsed laser irradiation of silicon in air and measured with an optical wave microphone.

  18. Observation of three dimensional optical rogue waves through obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonetti, Marco; Conti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We observe three-dimensional rogue waves in the speckle distribution of a spatially modulated optical beam. Light is transmitted beyond a partially reflecting obstacle generating optical rogue waves at a controlled position in the shadow of the barrier. When the barrier transmits only 0.07% of the input laser power, we observe the mostly localized event. These results demonstrate that an optimum amount of spatial non-homogeneity maximizes the probability of a gigantic event while the technique we exploit enables to control light behind a fully reflective wall

  19. Geometrical aspects in optical wave-packet dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Masaru; Murakami, Shuichi; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2006-12-01

    We construct a semiclassical theory for propagation of an optical wave packet in a nonconducting medium with a periodic structure of dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability, i.e., a nonconducting photonic crystal. We employ a quantum-mechanical formalism in order to clarify its link to those of electronic systems. It involves the geometrical phase, i.e., Berry's phase, in a natural way, and describes an interplay between orbital motion and internal rotation. Based on the above theory, we discuss the geometrical aspects of the optical Hall effect. We also consider a reduction of the theory to a system without periodic structure and apply it to the transverse shift of an optical beam at an interface reflection or refraction. For a generic incident beam with an arbitrary polarization, an identical result for the transverse shift of each reflected or transmitted beam is given by the following different approaches: (i) analytic evaluation of wave-packet dynamics, (ii) total angular momentum (TAM) conservation for individual photons, and (iii) numerical simulation of wave-packet dynamics. It is consistent with a result by classical electrodynamics. This means that the TAM conservation for individual photons is already taken into account in wave optics, i.e., classical electrodynamics. Finally, we show an application of our theory to a two-dimensional photonic crystal, and propose an optimal design for the enhancement of the optical Hall effect in photonic crystals.

  20. Neutron relativistic phenomenological and microscopic optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qing-biao; Feng Da-chun; Zhuo Yi-zhong

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, both the phenomenological and microscopic neutron relativistic optical potentials are presented. The global neutron relativistic phenomenological optical potential (RPOP) based on the available experimental data for various nuclei ranging from C to U with incident energies E n =20--1000 MeV has been obtained through an automatic search of the best parameters by computer. Then the nucleon relativistic microscopic optical potential (RMOP) is studied by utilizing the effective Lagrangian based on the popular Walecka model. Through comparison between the theoretical results and experimental data we shed some insight into both the RMOP and RPOP. Further improvement concerning how to combine the phenomenological potential with the microscopic one in order to reduce the number of free parameters appearing in the RPOP is suggested

  1. Numerical simulation methods for wave propagation through optical waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of the field propagation through waveguides requires numerical solutions of the Helmholtz equation. For this purpose a method based on the principle of orthogonal collocation was recently developed. The method is also applicable to nonlinear pulse propagation through optical fibers. Some of the salient features of this method and its application to both linear and nonlinear wave propagation through optical waveguides are discussed in this report. 51 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Autoresonant four-wave mixing in optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaakobi, O.; Friedland, L.

    2010-01-01

    A theory of autoresonant four-wave mixing in tapered fibers is developed in application to optical parametric amplification (OPA). In autoresonance, the interacting waves (two pump waves, a signal, and an idler) stay phase-locked continuously despite variation of system parameters (spatial tapering). This spatially extended phase-locking allows complete pump depletion in the system and uniform amplification spectrum in a wide frequency band. Different aspects of autoresonant OPA are described including the automatic initial phase-locking, conditions for autoresonant transition, stability, and spatial range of the autoresonant interaction.

  3. Detecting high-frequency gravitational waves with optically levitated sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2013-02-15

    We propose a tunable resonant sensor to detect gravitational waves in the frequency range of 50-300 kHz using optically trapped and cooled dielectric microspheres or microdisks. The technique we describe can exceed the sensitivity of laser-based gravitational wave observatories in this frequency range, using an instrument of only a few percent of their size. Such a device extends the search volume for gravitational wave sources above 100 kHz by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude, and could detect monochromatic gravitational radiation from the annihilation of QCD axions in the cloud they form around stellar mass black holes within our galaxy due to the superradiance effect.

  4. Dispersive shock waves in nonlinear and atomic optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamchatnov Anatoly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief review is given of dispersive shock waves observed in nonlinear optics and dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates. The theory of dispersive shock waves is developed on the basis of Whitham modulation theory for various situations taking place in these two fields. In particular, the full classification is established for types of wave structures evolving from initial discontinuities for propagation of long light pulses in fibers with account of steepening effect and for dynamics of the polarization mode in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates.

  5. Diffractive Optics for Gravitational Wave Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunkowski, A; Burmeister, O; Clausnitzer, T; Kley, E-B; Tuennermann, A; Danzmann, K; Schnabel, R

    2006-01-01

    All-reflective interferometry based on nano-structured diffraction gratings offers new possibilities for gravitational wave detection. We investigate an all-reflective Fabry-Perot interferometer concept in 2nd order Littrow mount. The input-output relations for such a resonator are derived treating the grating coupler by means of a scattering matrix formalism. A low loss dielectric reflection grating has been designed and manufactured to test the properties of such a grating cavity

  6. Square well approximation to the optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.K.; Gupta, M.C.; Marwadi, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    Approximations for obtaining T-matrix elements for a sum of several potentials in terms of T-matrices for individual potentials are studied. Based on model calculations for S-wave for a sum of two separable non-local potentials of Yukawa type form factors and a sum of two delta function potentials, it is shown that the T-matrix for a sum of several potentials can be approximated satisfactorily over all the energy regions by the sum of T-matrices for individual potentials. Based on this, an approximate method for finding T-matrix for any local potential by approximating it by a sum of suitable number of square wells is presented. This provides an interesting way to calculate the T-matrix for any arbitary potential in terms of Bessel functions to a good degree of accuracy. The method is applied to the Saxon-Wood potentials and good agreement with exact results is found. (author)

  7. A semiclassical study of optical potentials - potential resonances -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Takigawa, N.; Marty, C.

    1977-01-01

    A semiclassical method is used to analyze resonances produced by complex potentials. The absorption plays a central role: when it is not too great, resonances manifest themselves by enhancement of cross sections near π. The reverse is not necessarily true, for instance the anomalous large angle scattering for α-Ca is due to a coherent superposition of many partial waves

  8. Nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor based on four-wave mixing in microstructured optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Scott Wu; Frosz, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor, which uses the shifts of four-wave mixing Stokes and anti-Stokes peaks caused by the strain-induced changes in the structure and refractive index of a microstructured optical fiber. The sensor thus uses the inherent nonlinearity of the fiber a...

  9. Measurements using optic and RF waves

    CERN Document Server

    De Fornel, Frederique

    2013-01-01

    Scientific and technical knowledge for measurements in modern electromagnetism must be vast as our electromagnetic environment covers all frequencies and wavelengths. These measurements must be applied to fields as varied as nanotechnologies, telecommunications, meteorology, geolocalization, radioastronomy, health, biology, etc. In order to cover the multiple facets of the topic, this book sweeps the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from several hertz to terahertz; considers distances ranging from nanometers to light-years in optics; before extending towards the various measurement techniques

  10. Matter-Wave Optics of Diatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    81.013802 10/11/2012 32.00 Swati Singh , Pierre Meystre. Atomic probe Wigner tomography of a nanomechanical system, Physical Review A, (04 2010): 41804...PhysRevA.78.041801 10/11/2012 3.00 S. Singh , M. Bhattacharya, O. Dutta, P. Meystre. Coupling Nanomechanical Cantilevers to Dipolar Molecules...degenerate matter waves, Physical Review A, (02 2009): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.79.023622 10/11/2012 10.00 M. Bhattacharya, S. Singh , P. -L. Giscard

  11. Generalized dispersive wave emission in nonlinear fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We show that the emission of dispersive waves in nonlinear fiber optics is not limited to soliton-like pulses propagating in the anomalous dispersion regime. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regime can excite resonant dispersive radiation across the zero-dispersion wavelength into the anomalous regime.

  12. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagci, Tolga; Simonsen, A; Schmid, Silvan

    2013-01-01

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency (rf) and microwave signals is an ubiquitous technological challenge, crucial in fields as diverse as radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation and communication, including those of quantum states. Efficient upconversion of rf-signals...... to an optical carrier would allow transmitting them via optical fibers instead of copper wires dramatically reducing losses, and give access to the mature toolbox of quantum optical techniques, routinely enabling quantum-limited signal detection. Research in the field of cavity optomechanics [1, 2] has shown...... reflected off its metallized surface. The circuit acts as an antenna; the voltage signals it induces are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity. The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude below that of standard optical modulators...

  13. Achieving nonlinear optical modulation via four-wave mixing in a four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Chao; Ge, Guo-Qin; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2018-05-01

    We propose an accessible scheme for implementing tunable nonlinear optical amplification and attenuation via a synergetic mechanism of four-wave mixing (FWM) and optical interference in a four-level ladder-type atomic system. By constructing a cyclic atom-field interaction, we show that two reverse FWM processes can coexist via optical transitions in different branches. In the suitable input-field conditions, strong interference effects between the input fields and the generated FWM fields can be induced and result in large amplification and deep attenuation of the output fields. Moreover, such an optical modulation from enhancement to suppression can be controlled by tuning the relative phase. The quantum system can be served as a switchable optical modulator with potential applications in quantum nonlinear optics.

  14. Performing derivative and integral operations for optical waves with optical metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Cun-Li [College of Engineering, Nanjing Agriculture University, Nanjing Jiangsu, 210031 (China); College of Science, Nanjing Agriculture University, Nanjing Jiangsu, 210095 (China); Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Li, Xiao-Lin [College of Engineering, Nanjing Agriculture University, Nanjing Jiangsu, 210031 (China); Yang, Hong-Wei, E-mail: phd_hwyang@njau.edu.cn [College of Science, Nanjing Agriculture University, Nanjing Jiangsu, 210095 (China)

    2016-12-01

    The graded refractive index waveguides can perform Fourier transform for an optical wave. According to this characteristic, simpler optical metamaterials with three waveguides are theoretically proposed, in which all of the waveguides are materials with a positive refractive index. By selecting the appropriate refractive index and structure size, the theory and simulations demonstrated that these metamaterials can perform mathematical operations for the outline of incident optical waves, including the first-order derivative, second-order derivative and the integral. - Highlights: • The derivative and integral operations of optical waves are achieved with a simpler model. • Both negative and positive refractive index boast the same functions. • The mathematical operations can be implemented only by changing the refractive index of the intermediate material. • The results will greatly expand the possible applications, including photon computers, picture processing, video displays and data storage.

  15. Coherent matter wave optics on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2006-01-01

    Coherent manipulation of matter waves in microscopic trapping potentials facilitates both fundamental and technological applications. Here we focus on experiments with a microscopic integrated interferometer that demonstrate coherent operation on an atom chip.......Coherent manipulation of matter waves in microscopic trapping potentials facilitates both fundamental and technological applications. Here we focus on experiments with a microscopic integrated interferometer that demonstrate coherent operation on an atom chip....

  16. Particles and waves in electron optics and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials, Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. * Contains contributions from leading authorities on the subject matter* Informs and updates all the latest developments in the field of imaging and electron physics* Provides practitioners interested in microscopy, optics, image processing, mathematical morphology, electromagnetic fields, electron, and ion emission with a valuable resource* Features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, and digital image pro...

  17. Energy dependence of nonlocal optical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, A. E.; Bacq, P.-L.; Capel, P.; Nunes, F. M.; Titus, L. J.

    2017-11-01

    Recently, a variety of studies have shown the importance of including nonlocality in the description of reactions. The goal of this work is to revisit the phenomenological approach to determining nonlocal optical potentials from elastic scattering. We perform a χ2 analysis of neutron elastic scattering data off 40Ca, 90Zr, and 208Pb at energies E ≈5 -40 MeV, assuming a Perey and Buck [Nucl. Phys. 32, 353 (1962), 10.1016/0029-5582(62)90345-0] or Tian et al. [Int. J. Mod. Phys. E 24, 1550006 (2015), 10.1142/S0218301315500068] nonlocal form for the optical potential. We introduce energy and asymmetry dependencies in the imaginary part of the potential and refit the data to obtain a global parametrization. Independently of the starting point in the minimization procedure, an energy dependence in the imaginary depth is required for a good description of the data across the included energy range. We present two parametrizations, both of which represent an improvement over the original potentials for the fitted nuclei as well as for other nuclei not included in our fit. Our results show that, even when including the standard Gaussian nonlocality in optical potentials, a significant energy dependence is required to describe elastic-scattering data.

  18. Photonic Crystal Biosensor Based on Optical Surface Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Dietler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A label-free biosensor device based on registration of photonic crystal surface waves is described. Angular interrogation of the optical surface wave resonance is used to detect changes in the thickness of an adsorbed layer, while an additional simultaneous detection of the critical angle of total internal reflection provides independent data of the liquid refractive index. The abilities of the device are demonstrated by measuring of biotin molecule binding to a streptavidin monolayer, and by measuring association and dissociation kinetics of immunoglobulin G proteins. Additionally, deposition of PSS / PAH polyelectrolytes is recorded in situ resulting calculation of PSS and PAH monolayer thicknesses separately.

  19. The Potential for Ambient Plasma Wave Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.

    2016-01-01

    A truly robust space exploration program will need to make use of in-situ resources as much as possible to make the endeavor affordable. Most space propulsion concepts are saddled with one fundamental burden; the propellant needed to produce momentum. The most advanced propulsion systems currently in use utilize electric and/or magnetic fields to accelerate ionized propellant. However, significant planetary exploration missions in the coming decades, such as the now canceled Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, are restricted by propellant mass and propulsion system lifetimes, using even the most optimistic projections of performance. These electric propulsion vehicles are inherently limited in flexibility at their final destination, due to propulsion system wear, propellant requirements, and the relatively low acceleration of the vehicle. A few concepts are able to utilize the environment around them to produce thrust: Solar or magnetic sails and, with certain restrictions, electrodynamic tethers. These concepts focus primarily on using the solar wind or ambient magnetic fields to generate thrust. Technically immature, quasi-propellantless alternatives lack either the sensitivity or the power to provide significant maneuvering. An additional resource to be considered is the ambient plasma and magnetic fields in solar and planetary magnetospheres. These environments, such as those around the Sun or Jupiter, have been shown to host a variety of plasma waves. Plasma wave propulsion takes advantage of an observed astrophysical and terrestrial phenomenon: Alfven waves. These are waves that propagate in the plasma and magnetic fields around and between planets and stars. The generation of Alfven waves in ambient magnetic and plasma fields to generate thrust is proposed as a truly propellantless propulsion system which may enable an entirely new matrix of exploration missions. Alfven waves are well known, transverse electromagnetic waves that propagate in magnetized plasmas at

  20. Spatial confinement of acoustic and optical waves in stubbed slab structure as optomechanical resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changsheng, E-mail: lcs135@163.com; Huang, Dan; Guo, Jierong

    2015-02-20

    We theoretically demonstrate that acoustic waves and optical waves can be spatially confined in the same micro-cavity by specially designed stubbed slab structure. The proposed structure presents both phononic and photonic band gaps from finite element calculation. The creation of cavity mode inside the band gap region provides strong localization of phonon and photon in the defect region. The practical parameters to inject cavity and work experimentally at telecommunication range are discussed. This structure can be precisely fabricated, hold promises to enhance acousto-optical interactions and design new applications as optomechanical resonator. - Highlights: • A resonator simultaneously supports acoustic and optical modes. • Strong spatial confinement and slow group velocity. • Potential to work as active optomechanical resonator.

  1. RPA correction to the optical potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauge E.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In studies of nucleon elastic scattering, a correction to the microscopic optical potential built from Melbourne g-matrix was found to be necessary at low nucleon incident energy [1,2]. Indeed, at energies lower than 60 MeV, the absorption generated from Melbourne g-matrix is too weak within 25%. Coupling to collective excited states of the target nucleus are not included in the g-matrix and could explain the missing absorption. We propose to calculate this correction to the optical potential using the Gogny D1S effective nucleon-nucleon interaction in the coupling to excited states of the target. We use the Random Phase Approximation (RPA description of the excited states of the target with the same interaction.

  2. Covariant single-hole optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, J. de

    1982-01-01

    In this investigation a covariant optical potential model is constructed for scattering processes of mesons from nuclei in which the meson interacts repeatedly with one of the target nucleons. The nuclear binding interactions in the intermediate scattering state are consistently taken into account. In particular for pions and K - projectiles this is important in view of the strong energy dependence of the elementary projectile-nucleon amplitude. Furthermore, this optical potential satisfies unitarity and relativistic covariance. The starting point in our discussion is the three-body model for the optical potential. To obtain a practical covariant theory I formulate the three-body model as a relativistic quasi two-body problem. Expressions for the transition interactions and propagators in the quasi two-body equations are found by imposing the correct s-channel unitarity relations and by using dispersion integrals. This is done in such a way that the correct non-relativistic limit is obtained, avoiding clustering problems. Corrections to the quasi two-body treatment from the Pauli principle and the required ground-state exclusion are taken into account. The covariant equations that we arrive at are amenable to practical calculations. (orig.)

  3. Optical rogue waves generation in a nonlinear metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onana Essama, Bedel Giscard; Atangana, Jacques; Biya-Motto, Frederick; Mokhtari, Bouchra; Cherkaoui Eddeqaqi, Noureddine; Kofane, Timoleon Crepin

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the behavior of electromagnetic wave which propagates in a metamaterial for negative index regime. The optical pulse propagation is described by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with cubic-quintic nonlinearities, second- and third-order dispersion effects. The behavior obtained for negative index regime is compared to that observed for positive index regime. The characterization of electromagnetic wave uses some pulse parameters obtained analytically and called collective coordinates such as amplitude, temporal position, width, chirp, frequency shift and phase. Six frequency ranges have been pointed out where a numerical evolution of collective coordinates and their stability are studied under a typical example to verify our analysis. It appears that a robust soliton due to a perfect compensation process between second-order dispersion and cubic-nonlinearity is presented at each frequency range for both negative and positive index regimes. Thereafter, the stability of the soliton pulse and physical conditions leading to optical rogue waves generation are discussed at each frequency range for both regimes, when third-order dispersion and quintic-nonlinearity come into play. We have demonstrated that collective coordinates give much useful information on external and internal behavior of rogue events. Firstly, we determine at what distance begins the internal excitation leading to rogue waves. Secondly, what kind of internal modification and how it modifies the system in order to build-up rogue events. These results lead to a best comprehension of the mechanism of rogue waves generation. So, it clearly appears that the rogue wave behavior strongly depends on nonlinearity strength of distortion, frequency and regime considered.

  4. Study of the potential of wave energy in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wan Ching; Chan, Keng Wai; Ooi, Heivin

    2017-07-01

    Renewable energy is generally defined as energy harnessed from resources which are naturally replenished. It is an alternative to the current conventional energy sources such as natural gas, oil and coal, which are nonrenewable. Besides being nonrenewable, the harnessing of these resources generally produce by-products which could be potentially harmful to the environment. On the contrary, the generation from renewable energy does not pose environmental degradation. Some examples of renewable energy sources are sunlight, wind, tides, waves and geothermal heat. Wave energy is considered as one of the most promising marine renewable resources and is becoming commercially viable quicker than other renewable technologies at an astonishing growth rate. This paper illustrates the working principle of wave energy converter (WEC) and the availability of wave energy in Malaysia oceans. A good understanding of the behaviour of ocean waves is important for designing an efficient WEC as the characteristics of the waves in shallow and deep water are different. Consequently, wave energy converters are categorized into three categories on shore, near shore and offshore. Therefore, the objectives of this study is ought to be carried out by focusing on the formation of waves and wave characteristics in shallow as well as in deep water. The potential sites for implementation of wave energy harvesting technology in Malaysia and the wave energy available in the respective area were analysed. The potential of wave energy in Malaysia were tabulated and presented with theoretical data. The interaction between motion of waves and heave buoys for optimum phase condition by using the mass and diameter as the variables were investigated.

  5. Electromagnetic waves in dusty magnetoplasmas using two-potential theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubia, K.; Jamil, M.; Salimullah, M.

    2009-01-01

    The low-frequency long wavelength electromagnetic waves, viz., shear Alfven waves in a cold dusty plasma, have been examined employing two-potential theory and plasma fluid model. The presence of the unmagnetized dust particles and magnetized plasma components gives rise to a new ion-dust lower hybrid cutoff frequency for the electromagnetic shear Alfven wave propagation. The importance and relevance of the present work to the space dusty plasma environments are also pointed out.

  6. Universal potential-barrier penetration by initially confined wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granot, Er'el; Marchewka, Avi

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of an initially sharp-boundary wave packet in the presence of an arbitrary potential barrier is investigated. It is shown that the penetration through the barrier is universal in the sense that it depends only on the values of the wave function and its derivatives at the boundary. The dependence on the derivatives vanishes at long distances from the barrier, where the dynamics is governed solely by the initial value of the wave function at the boundary

  7. Universal potential-barrier penetration by initially confined wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Er'El; Marchewka, Avi

    2007-07-01

    The dynamics of an initially sharp-boundary wave packet in the presence of an arbitrary potential barrier is investigated. It is shown that the penetration through the barrier is universal in the sense that it depends only on the values of the wave function and its derivatives at the boundary. The dependence on the derivatives vanishes at long distances from the barrier, where the dynamics is governed solely by the initial value of the wave function at the boundary.

  8. Vector potential quantization and the photon wave-particle representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meis, C; Dahoo, P R

    2016-01-01

    The quantization procedure of the vector potential is enhanced at a single photon state revealing the possibility for a simultaneous representation of the wave-particle nature of the photon. Its relationship to the quantum vacuum results naturally. A vector potential amplitude operator is defined showing the parallelism with the Hamiltonian of a massless particle. It is further shown that the quantized vector potential satisfies both the wave propagation equation and a linear time-dependent Schrödinger-like equation. (paper)

  9. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagci, T.; Simonsen, A.; Schmid, Silvan

    2014-01-01

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency and microwave signals is a ubiquitous challenge, crucial in radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation, and classical and quantum communication. Efficient up-conversion of radio-frequency signals to an optical carrier would...... strong coupling between the voltage fluctuations in a radio-frequency resonance circuit and the membrane's displacement, which is simultaneously coupled to light reflected off its surface. The radio-frequency signals are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity....... The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude less than that of standard optical modulators. The noise of the transducer--beyond the measured 800 pV Hz-1/2 Johnson noise of the resonant circuit--consists of the quantum noise of light and thermal fluctuations of the membrane...

  10. High speed all optical shear wave imaging optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shaozhen; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Wei, Wei; Shen, Tueng; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) is a non-invasive testing modality that maps the mechanical property of soft tissues with high sensitivity and spatial resolution using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT). Shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) is a leading technique that relies on the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative elastography. Previous shear wave imaging OCT techniques are based on repeated M-B scans, which have several drawbacks such as long acquisition time and repeated wave stimulations. Recent developments of Fourier domain mode-locked high-speed swept-source OCT system has enabled enough speed to perform KHz B-scan rate OCT imaging. Here we propose ultra-high speed, single shot shear wave imaging to capture single-shot transient shear wave propagation to perform SW-OCE. The frame rate of shear wave imaging is 16 kHz, at A-line rate of ~1.62 MHz, which allows the detection of high-frequency shear wave of up to 8 kHz. The shear wave is generated photothermal-acoustically, by ultra-violet pulsed laser, which requires no contact to OCE subjects, while launching high frequency shear waves that carries rich localized elasticity information. The image acquisition and processing can be performed at video-rate, which enables real-time 3D elastography. SW-OCE measurements are demonstrated on tissue-mimicking phantoms and porcine ocular tissue. This approach opens up the feasibility to perform real-time 3D SW-OCE in clinical applications, to obtain high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  11. Rainbow-shift mechanism behind discrete optical-potential ambiguities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandan, M.E.; McVoy, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    Some years ago, Drisko et al. suggested that the discrete ambiguity often encountered for elastic scattering optical potentials could be understood as being due to the interior or small-l S-matrix elements for two ''equivalent'' potentials differing in phase by 2π, l-by-l. We point out that the absence of this phase change for peripheral partial waves is equally essential, and suggest that a deeper understanding of the ambiguity may be achieved by viewing it as a consequence of a farside interference between interior and peripheral partial waves. It is this interference which produces the broad ''Airy maxima'' of a nuclear rainbow, and we show that a Drisko-type phase-shift increment δ l →(δ l +π) for low-l phases relative to the high-l ones is exactly what is needed to shift a farside rainbow pattern by one Airy maximum, thus providing an equivalent ''rainbow-shift'' interpretation of the discrete ambiguity. The physical importance of both interpretations lies in the fact that the existence of discrete ambiguities (as well as of nuclear rainbows) is explicit evidence for low-l transparency in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The essential role played by low partial waves explains why peripheral reactions have generally not proven helpful in resolving this ambiguity

  12. Determination of wave energy potential of black sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bingölbali, Bilal; Akpınar, Adem; van Vledder, G.P.; Lynett, P.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess wave energy potential and its long-term spatial and temporal characteristics in the Black Sea within the TUBITAK research project (Akpınar et al., 2015). With this purpose, a wave model (SWAN model version 41.01 driven by the CFSR winds) over the entire Black Sea was

  13. Surface-wave potential for triggering tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Source processes commonly posed to explain instances of remote dynamic triggering of tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor by surface waves include frictional failure and various modes of fluid activation. The relative potential for Love- and Rayleigh-wave dynamic stresses to trigger tectonic tremor through failure on critically stressed thrust and vertical strike-slip faults under the Coulomb-Griffith failure criteria as a function of incidence angle is anticorrelated over the 15- to 30-km-depth range that hosts tectonic tremor. Love-wave potential is high for strike-parallel incidence on low-angle reverse faults and null for strike-normal incidence; the opposite holds for Rayleigh waves. Love-wave potential is high for both strike-parallel and strike-normal incidence on vertical, strike-slip faults and minimal for ~45?? incidence angles. The opposite holds for Rayleigh waves. This pattern is consistent with documented instances of tremor triggered by Love waves incident on the Cascadia mega-thrust and the San Andreas fault (SAF) in central California resulting from shear failure on weak faults (apparent friction, ????? 0.2). However, documented instances of tremor triggered by surface waves with strike-parallel incidence along the Nankai megathrust beneath Shikoku, Japan, is associated primarily with Rayleigh waves. This is consistent with the tremor bursts resulting from mixed-mode failure (crack opening and shear failure) facilitated by near-lithostatic ambient pore pressure, low differential stress, with a moderate friction coefficient (?? ~ 0.6) on the Nankai subduction interface. Rayleigh-wave dilatational stress is relatively weak at tectonic tremor source depths and seems unlikely to contribute significantly to the triggering process, except perhaps for an indirect role on the SAF in sustaining tremor into the Rayleigh-wave coda that was initially triggered by Love waves.

  14. Isospin-dependent term in the relativistic microscopic optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Jian; Ma Zhongyu; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2005-01-01

    The isospin-dependence of the relativistic microscopic optical potential is investigated in the Dirac Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach. The isospin part of the microscopic optical potential is emphasized. A local density approximation is adopted for finite nuclei. Taking 208 Pb as example, the difference between proton and neutron optical potentials is studied and compared with the phenomenological Lane Model potential. (authors)

  15. Parametrization of the scattering wave functions of the Paris potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loiseau, B.; Mathelitsch, L.

    1996-10-01

    The neutron-proton scattering wave functions of the Paris nucleon-nucleon potential are parametrized for partial waves of total angular momenta less than 5. The inner parts of the wave functions are approximated by polynomials with a continuous transition to the outer parts, which are given by the asymptotic regime and determined by the respective phase shifts. The scattering wave functions can then be calculated at any given energy below 400 MeV. Special attention is devoted to the zero-energy limit of the low partial waves. An easy-to-use FORTRAN program, which allows the user to calculate these parametrized wave functions, is available via electronic mail. (author)

  16. Assessment of wave propagation on surfaces of crystalline lens with phase sensitive optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manapuram, R K; Larin, K V; Baranov, S A; Manne, V G R; Mashiatulla, M; Sudheendran, N; Aglyamov, S; Emelianov, S

    2011-01-01

    We propose a real-time technique based on phase-sensitive swept source optical coherence tomography (PhS-SSOCT) modality for noninvasive quantification of very small optical path length changes produced on the surface of a mouse crystalline lens. Propagation of submicron mechanical waves on the surface of the lens was induced by periodic mechanical stimulation. Obtained results demonstrate that the described method is capable of detecting minute damped vibrations with amplitudes as small as 30 nanometers on the lens surface and hence, PhS-SSOCT could be potentially used to assess biomechanical properties of a crystalline lens with high accuracy and sensitivity

  17. Continuous wave protocol for simultaneous polarization and optical detection of P1-center electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, E. J.; Carvajal, B.; Samarth, N.

    2018-01-01

    The ready optical detection and manipulation of bright nitrogen vacancy center spins in diamond plays a key role in contemporary quantum information science and quantum metrology. Other optically dark defects such as substitutional nitrogen atoms (`P1 centers') could also become potentially useful in this context if they could be as easily optically detected and manipulated. We develop a relatively straightforward continuous wave protocol that takes advantage of the dipolar coupling between nitrogen vacancy and P1 centers in type 1b diamond to detect and polarize the dark P1 spins. By combining mutual spin flip transitions with radio frequency driving, we demonstrate the simultaneous optical polarization and detection of the electron spin resonance of the P1 center. This technique should be applicable to detecting and manipulating a broad range of dark spin populations that couple to the nitrogen vacancy center via dipolar fields, allowing for quantum metrology using these spin populations.

  18. Evanescent Wave Fiber Optic Biosensor for Salmonella Detection in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Bhunia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a major food-borne pathogen of world-wide concern. Sensitive and rapid detection methods to assess product safety before retail distribution are highly desirable. Since Salmonella is most commonly associated with poultry products, an evanescent wave fiber-optic assay was developed to detect Salmonella in shell egg and chicken breast and data were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF assay. Anti-Salmonella polyclonal antibody was immobilized onto the surface of an optical fiber using biotin-avidin interactions to capture Salmonella. Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated antibody (MAb 2F-11 was used as the reporter. Detection occurred when an evanescent wave from a laser (635 nm excited the Alexa Fluor and the fluorescence was measured by a laser-spectrofluorometer at 710 nm. The biosensor was specific for Salmonella and the limit of detection was established to be 103 cfu/mL in pure culture and 104 cfu/mL with egg and chicken breast samples when spiked with 102 cfu/mL after 2–6 h of enrichment. The results indicate that the performance of the fiber-optic sensor is comparable to TRF, and can be completed in less than 8 h, providing an alternative to the current detection methods.

  19. On wave-packet dynamics in a decaying quadratic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We consider the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for a quadratic potential with an exponentially decaying force constant. General analytical solutions are presented and we highlight in particular, the signatures of classical mechanics in the wave packet dynamics.......We consider the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for a quadratic potential with an exponentially decaying force constant. General analytical solutions are presented and we highlight in particular, the signatures of classical mechanics in the wave packet dynamics....

  20. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  1. Wave power potential along the Indian coasts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, V.K.; Ramesh, B A.; Varkey, M.J.

    monlh a. lhe v;Ruolly ob.ervell wnve heighl. have been con.idered at equivalent to llle RigniliclUlt wave heigh!. Average of .11 period. repolted in thai DJ'Ca ia laken IIR T. The

  2. Matter-wave solitons and finite-amplitude Bloch waves in optical lattices with spatially modulated nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie-Fang; Li, Yi-Shen; Meng, Jianping; Wu, Lei; Malomed, Boris A.

    2010-09-01

    We investigate solitons and nonlinear Bloch waves in Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in optical lattices (OLs). By introducing specially designed localized profiles of the spatial modulation of the attractive nonlinearity, we construct an infinite set of exact soliton solutions in terms of Mathieu and elliptic functions, with the chemical potential belonging to the semi-infinite gap of the OL-induced spectrum. Starting from the particular exact solutions, we employ the relaxation method to construct generic families of soliton solutions in a numerical form. The stability of the solitons is investigated through the computation of the eigenvalues for small perturbations, and also by direct simulations. Finally, we demonstrate a virtually exact (in the numerical sense) composition relation between nonlinear Bloch waves and solitons.

  3. Matter-wave solitons and finite-amplitude Bloch waves in optical lattices with spatially modulated nonlinearity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiefang; Meng Jianping; Wu Lei; Li Yishen; Malomed, Boris A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate solitons and nonlinear Bloch waves in Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in optical lattices (OLs). By introducing specially designed localized profiles of the spatial modulation of the attractive nonlinearity, we construct an infinite set of exact soliton solutions in terms of Mathieu and elliptic functions, with the chemical potential belonging to the semi-infinite gap of the OL-induced spectrum. Starting from the particular exact solutions, we employ the relaxation method to construct generic families of soliton solutions in a numerical form. The stability of the solitons is investigated through the computation of the eigenvalues for small perturbations, and also by direct simulations. Finally, we demonstrate a virtually exact (in the numerical sense) composition relation between nonlinear Bloch waves and solitons.

  4. Multifocal visual evoked potential in optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathy and compressive optic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Manju; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar; Ravi, Priya; Sen, Parveen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of optic neuritis (ON), ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) and compressive optic neuropathy (CON) on multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) amplitudes and latencies, and to compare the parameters among three optic nerve disorders. Materials and Methods: mfVEP was recorded for 71 eyes of controls and 48 eyes of optic nerve disorders with subgroups of optic neuritis (ON, n = 21 eyes), ischemic optic neuropathy (ION, n = 14 eyes), and compressive optic neuropathy (CON, n = 13 eyes). The size of defect in mfVEP amplitude probability plots and relative latency plots were analyzed. The pattern of the defect in amplitude probability plot was classified according to the visual field profile of optic neuritis treatment trail (ONTT). Results: Median of mfVEP amplitude (log SNR) averaged across 60 sectors were reduced in ON (0.17 (0.13-0.33)), ION (0.14 (0.12-0.21)) and CON (0.21 (0.14-0.30)) when compared to controls. The median mfVEP relative latencies compared to controls were significantly prolonged in ON and CON group of 10.53 (2.62-15.50) ms and 5.73 (2.67-14.14) ms respectively compared to ION group (2.06 (-4.09-13.02)). The common mfVEP amplitude defects observed in probability plots were diffuse pattern in ON, inferior altitudinal defect in ION and temporal hemianopia in CON eyes. Conclusions: Optic nerve disorders cause reduction in mfVEP amplitudes. The extent of delayed latency noted in ischemic optic neuropathy was significantly lesser compared to subjects with optic neuritis and compressive optic neuropathy. mfVEP amplitudes can be used to objectively assess the topography of the visual field defect. PMID:24088641

  5. Wave optics simulation of statistically rough surface scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanari, Ann M.; Butler, Samuel D.; Marciniak, Michael; Spencer, Mark F.

    2017-09-01

    The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) describes optical scatter from surfaces by relating the incident irradiance to the exiting radiance over the entire hemisphere. Laboratory verification of BRDF models and experimentally populated BRDF databases are hampered by sparsity of monochromatic sources and ability to statistically control the surface features. Numerical methods are able to control surface features, have wavelength agility, and via Fourier methods of wave propagation, may be used to fill the knowledge gap. Monte-Carlo techniques, adapted from turbulence simulations, generate Gaussian distributed and correlated surfaces with an area of 1 cm2 , RMS surface height of 2.5 μm, and correlation length of 100 μm. The surface is centered inside a Kirchhoff absorbing boundary with an area of 16 cm2 to prevent wrap around aliasing in the far field. These surfaces are uniformly illuminated at normal incidence with a unit amplitude plane-wave varying in wavelength from 3 μm to 5 μm. The resultant scatter is propagated to a detector in the far field utilizing multi-step Fresnel Convolution and observed at angles from -2 μrad to 2 μrad. The far field scatter is compared to both a physical wave optics BRDF model (Modified Beckmann Kirchhoff) and two microfacet BRDF Models (Priest, and Cook-Torrance). Modified Beckmann Kirchhoff, which accounts for diffraction, is consistent with simulated scatter for multiple wavelengths for RMS surface heights greater than λ/2. The microfacet models, which assume geometric optics, are less consistent across wavelengths. Both model types over predict far field scatter width for RMS surface heights less than λ/2.

  6. Bi-directional ultrasonic wave coupling to FBGs in continuously bonded optical fiber sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Junghyun; Hackney, Drew; Bradford, Philip; Peters, Kara

    2017-09-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are typically spot-bonded onto the surface of a structure to detect ultrasonic waves in laboratory demonstrations. However, to protect the rest of the optical fiber from any environmental damage during real applications, bonding the entire length of fiber, called continuous bonding, is commonly done. In this paper, we investigate the impact of continuously bonding FBGs on the measured Lamb wave signal. In theory, the ultrasonic wave signal can bi-directionally transfer between the optical fiber and the plate at any adhered location, which could potentially produce output signal distortion for the continuous bonding case. Therefore, an experiment is performed to investigate the plate-to-fiber and fiber-to-plate signal transfer, from which the signal coupling coefficient of each case is theoretically estimated based on the experimental data. We demonstrate that the two coupling coefficients are comparable, with the plate-to-fiber case approximately 19% larger than the fiber-to-plate case. Finally, the signal waveform and arrival time of the output FBG responses are compared between the continuous and spot bonding cases. The results indicate that the resulting Lamb wave signal output is only that directly detected at the FBG location; however, a slight difference in signal waveform is observed between the two bonding configurations. This paper demonstrates the practicality of using continuously bonded FBGs for ultrasonic wave detection in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications.

  7. [Mechanisms of primary reception of electromagnetic waves of optical range].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huliar, S O; Lymans'kyĭ, Iu P

    2003-01-01

    An existence of separate functional system of regulation of electromagnetic balance of organism has been substantiated and a working conception of light therapy has been formulated. As a basis, there is a possibility to use the acupuncture points for input of biologically necessary electromagnetic waves into the system of their conductors in a body that might be considered as a transport facility for energy of the polarized electromagnetic waves. Zones-recipients are organs having an electromagnetic disbalance due to excess of biologically inadequate radiation and being the targets for peroxide oxidation. Foremost, a body has the neurohormonal and immune regulatory systems. Electromagnetic stimulation or modification of functions of the zones-recipients determines the achievement of therapeutic and useful effects, and their combination with local reparative processes allows to attain a clinical goal. We represent own and literary experimental data about the development of physiological responses (analgesia) to BIOPTRON-light exposure on the acupuncture points or biologically active zones. We show the experimental facts in support of a hypothesis that a living organism can perceive an action of the electromagnetic fields of optical range not only via the visual system, but also through the off-nerve receptors (specific energy-sensitive proteins detecting critical changes of energy in cells and functioning as the "sensory" cell systems), as well as via the acupuncture points. It confirms an important role of the electromagnetic waves of optical range in providing normal vital functions of living organisms. A current approach to BIOPTRON light therapy (by polarized polychromatic coherent low energy light) consists in combined (local and system) exposure of the electromagnetic waves within the biologically necessary range.

  8. Ray and wave optics of integrable and stochastic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, S.W.; Kaufman, A.N.

    1979-07-01

    The generalization of WKB methods to more than one dimension is discussed in terms of the integrability or non-integrability of the geometrical optics (ray Hamiltonian) system derived in the short-wave approximation. In the two-dimensional case the ray trajectories are either regular or stochastic, and the qualitative differences between these types of motion are manifested in the characteristics of the spectra and eigenfunctions. These are examined for a model system which may be integrable or stochastic, depending on a single parameter

  9. Multiple projection optical diffusion tomography with plane wave illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markel, Vadim A; Schotland, John C

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new data collection scheme for optical diffusion tomography in which plane wave illumination is combined with multiple projections in the slab imaging geometry. Multiple projection measurements are performed by rotating the slab around the sample. The advantage of the proposed method is that the measured data are more compatible with the dynamic range of most commonly used detectors. At the same time, multiple projections improve image quality by mutually interchanging the depth and transverse directions, and the scanned (detection) and integrated (illumination) surfaces. Inversion methods are derived for image reconstructions with extremely large data sets. Numerical simulations are performed for fixed and rotated slabs

  10. Electromagnetic Wave Chaos in Gradient Refractive Index Optical Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, P. B.; Fromhold, T. M.; Taylor, R. P.; Micolich, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave chaos is investigated using two-dimensional optical cavities formed in a cylindrical gradient refractive index lens with reflective surfaces. When the planar ends of the lens are cut at an angle to its axis, the geometrical ray paths are chaotic. In this regime, the electromagnetic mode spectrum of the cavity is modulated by both real and ghost periodic ray paths, which also 'scar' the electric field intensity distributions of many modes. When the cavity is coupled to waveguides, the eigenmodes generate complex series of resonant peaks in the electromagnetic transmission spectrum

  11. Dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates in novel optical potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueber, Johannes

    2014-07-21

    Matter wave interferometry offers a novel approach for high precision measurements, such as the determination of physical constants like the local gravity constant g or the fine-structure constant. Since its early demonstration, it has become an important tool in the fields of fundamental and applied physics. The present work covers the implementation of matter wave interferometers as well as the creation of novel guiding potentials for ultra-cold ensembles of atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates for this purpose. In addition, novel techniques for the manipulation of atoms with Bragg lattices are presented, serving as elements for interferometry. The measurements in this work are performed with a Bose-Einstein condensate of 25000 {sup 87}rubidium atoms created in a crossed optical dipole trap. The crossed optical dipole trap is loaded from a magneto-optical trap and allows a measurement every 25 s. This work introduces the novel technique of double Bragg diffraction as a tool for atom optics for the first time experimentally. The creation of beamsplitters and mirrors for advanced interferometric measurements is characterized. An in depth discussion on the momentum distribution of atomic clouds and its influence on double Bragg diffraction is given. Additionally experimental results for higher-order Bragg diffraction are explained and double Bragg diffraction is used to implement a full Ramsey-type interferometer. A second central result of this work is the implementation of novel guiding structures for ultra-cold atoms. These structures are created with conical refraction, an effect that occurs when light is guided along one of the optical axis of a bi-axial crystal. The conical refraction crystal used to operate the novel trapping geometries is a KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystal that has been specifically cut orthogonal to one of the optical axis. Two regimes are discussed in detail: the creation of a toroidal matter wave guide and the implementation of a three

  12. Wave and offshore wind potential for the island of Tenerife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veigas, M.; Iglesias, G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The island aims to reduce its carbon footprint by developing renewable energy. • The substantial wave and offshore wind resources around the island are examined. • One area is appropriate for installing a hybrid wave–offshore wind farm. - Abstract: The island of Tenerife, a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in the Atlantic Ocean, aims to be energy self-sufficient in order to reduce its carbon footprint. To accomplish this goal it should develop the renewable sources, in particular wave and offshore wind energy. The objectives of this work are twofold; (i) to characterize the wave and offshore wind power distribution around the island and (ii) to determine which offshore area is best suited for their exploitation, taking into account the resource and other conditioning factors such as the bathymetry, distance to the coastline and ports, and offshore zoning. To carry out this research, hindcast wave and wind data obtained with numerical models are used alongside observations from meteorological stations. One area, in the vicinity of Puerto de la Cruz, is identified as having great potential for installing a hybrid floating wave–wind farm. Both resources are characterized for the area selected: the wave resource in terms of wave directions, significant wave heights and energy periods; the offshore wind resource in terms of directions and speeds in addition to the seasonality for the both resources. It is found that most of the wave resource is provided by N and NNW waves with significant wave heights between 1.5 m and 3.0 m and energy periods between 10 s and 14 s. It follows that the Wave Energy Converters deployed in the area should have maximum efficiency in those ranges. As for the offshore wind resource, most of the energy corresponds to NNE and NE winds with speeds between 9 and 14 m s −1 , which should be taken into account when selecting the offshore wind turbines

  13. Multi-Channel Optical Coherence Elastography Using Relative and Absolute Shear-Wave Time of Flight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elyas, Eli; Grimwood, Alex; Erler, Janine Terra

    2017-01-01

    a commercial four-channel swept-source OCT system. Shear-wave time of arrival (TOA) was detected by tracking the axial OCT-speckle motion using cross-correlation methods. Shear-wave speed was then calculated from inter-channel differences of TOA for a single burst (the relative TOA method) and compared......Elastography, the imaging of elastic properties of soft tissues, is well developed for macroscopic clinical imaging of soft tissues and can provide useful information about various pathological processes which is complementary to that provided by the original modality. Scaling down...... of this technique should ply the field of cellular biology with valuable information with regard to elastic properties of cells and their environment. This paper evaluates the potential to develop such a tool by modifying a commercial optical coherence tomography (OCT) device to measure the speed of shear waves...

  14. Study on the nonlocality effects for generalized optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurbanovich, I.S.; Zelenskaya, N.S.

    1981-01-01

    In previous studies the authors have ihown that the generalized optic potential (GOP) of particles interaction is a superposition of local and non local potentials (LP, NLP). On the example of α- particles scattering on the 8 Be nucleus at about 10-15 MeV the GOP nonlocal part is considered. For obtaining NLP the spectral decomposition of the Green function taking into account only contribution of relative motion of two α-particles in S-state is used. The locally-equivalent addition to central potential of α-particles scattering at 8 Be previously calculated is obtained. In a graphical form a total locally-equivalent potential and local GOP part are presented. It is shown that taking into account the nonlocallity effect in a locally energy approximation for precise wave function in S-state widen a potential hole without changing its depth. Such widening corresponds to the general character of behaviour of non local potentials calculated in the microscopic approach [ru

  15. Quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography for noncontact mechanical characterization of myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging low-coherence imaging technique that provides noninvasive assessment of tissue biomechanics with high spatial resolution. Among various OCE methods, the capability of quantitative measurement of tissue elasticity is of great importance for tissue characterization and pathology detection across different samples. Here we report a quantitative OCE technique, termed quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (Q-SWI-OCT), which enables noncontact measurement of tissue Young's modulus based on the ultra-fast imaging of the shear wave propagation inside the sample. A focused air-puff device is used to interrogate the tissue with a low-pressure short-duration air stream that stimulates a localized displacement with the scale at micron level. The propagation of this tissue deformation in the form of shear wave is captured by a phase-sensitive OCT system running with the scan of the M-mode imaging over the path of the wave propagation. The temporal characteristics of the shear wave is quantified based on the cross-correlation of the tissue deformation profiles at all the measurement locations, and linear regression is utilized to fit the data plotted in the domain of time delay versus wave propagation distance. The wave group velocity is thus calculated, which results in the quantitative measurement of the Young's modulus. As the feasibility demonstration, experiments are performed on tissuemimicking phantoms with different agar concentrations and the quantified elasticity values with Q-SWI-OCT agree well with the uniaxial compression tests. For functional characterization of myocardium with this OCE technique, we perform our pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with two studies, including 1) elasticity difference of cardiac muscle under relaxation and contract conditions and 2) mechanical heterogeneity of the heart introduced by the muscle fiber orientation. Our results suggest the

  16. Optical Production and Detection of Ultrasonic Waves in Metals for Nondestructive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves were produced by striking the surface of a metal with the focused one-joule pulse of a Q-switched ruby laser. Rayleigh (surface) waves and longitudinal waves were detected with conventional transducers. Optical methods of detection were tested and developed. Rayleigh waves were produced with an oscillator and transducer. They were optically detected on curved polished surfaces, and on unpolished surfaces. The technique uses a knife edge to detect small angle changes of the surface as the wave pulse passes the illuminated spot. Optical flaw detection using pulse echo and attenuation is demonstrated.

  17. Phenomenological dirac optical potential for neutron cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Shin-ichi; Kitsuki, Hirohiko; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Ishibashi, Kenji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    Because of limitation on neutron-incident data, it is difficult to obtain global optical model potential for neutrons. In contrast, there are some global optical model potentials for proton in detail. It is interesting to convert the proton-incident global optical potentials into neutron-incident ones. In this study we introduce (N-Z)/A dependent symmetry potential terms into the global proton-incident optical potentials, and then obtain neutron-incident ones. The neutron potentials reproduce total cross sections in an acceptable degree. However, a comparison with potentials proposed by other authors brings about a confused situation in the sign of the symmetry terms. (author)

  18. Effects of acoustic radiation force and shear waves for absorption and stiffness sensing in ultrasound modulated optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Elson, Daniel S; Dunsby, Chris; Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2011-04-11

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) combines optical contrast with ultrasound spatial resolution and has great potential for soft tissue functional imaging. One current problem with this technique is the weak optical modulation signal, primarily due to strong optical scattering in diffuse media and minimal acoustically induced modulation. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) can create large particle displacements in tissue and has been shown to be able to improve optical modulation signals. However, shear wave propagation induced by the ARF can be a significant source of nonlocal optical modulation which may reduce UOT spatial resolution and contrast. In this paper, the time evolution of shear waves was examined on tissue mimicking-phantoms exposed to 5 MHz ultrasound and 532 nm optical radiation and measured with a CCD camera. It has been demonstrated that by generating an ARF with an acoustic burst and adjusting both the timing and the exposure time of the CCD measurement, optical contrast and spatial resolution can be improved by ~110% and ~40% respectively when using the ARF rather than 5 MHz ultrasound alone. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that this technique simultaneously detects both optical and mechanical contrast in the medium and the optical and mechanical contrast can be distinguished by adjusting the CCD exposure time. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  19. Solitary wave exchange potential and nucleon-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prema, K.; Raghavan, S.S.; Sekhar Raghavan

    1986-11-01

    Nucleon-nucleon interaction is studied using a phenomenological potential model called solitary wave exchange potential model. It is shown that this simple model reproduces the singlet and triplet scattering data and the deuteron parameters reasonably well. (author). 6 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  20. Optical Effects Induced by Bloch Surface Waves in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Soboleva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The review considers the influence of Bloch surface waves on the optical and magneto-optical effects observed in photonic crystals; for example, the Goos–Hänchen effect, the Faraday effect, optical trapping and so on. Prospects for using Bloch surface waves for spatial light modulation, for controlling the polarization of light, for optical trapping and control of micro-objects are discussed.

  1. A universal matter-wave interferometer with optical gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslinger, P.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics was initially developed to describe microscopic processes but scientists quickly came to far-reaching predictions, such as the wave-particle dualism of matter [1,2] or the entanglement of particles [3,4], which often contradict our classical intuition. However, not even a single experiment could falsify any theoretical prediction of quantum mechanics. Today it is the most tested theory in physics. The question of the range and limits of its validity arises. To which extend can systems be macroscopic, complex and massive while retaining their quantum features? Is there a spatial and temporal restriction to the separation of wave functions? Which decoherence mechanisms force systems at macroscopic scales to appear classical? During my thesis I focused theoretically as well as experimentally on matter-wave interferometry with atoms, molecules and molecular clusters. During my 3 month exchange stay in the group of Prof. Müller at the University of California at Berkeley we have carried out an experiment to show the largest space-time area interferometer at that time [5]. Here, matter waves of caesium atoms have been coherently split and recombined up to 8.8 mm and for 500 ms. Key to run this experiment was to compensate for earth´s rotation. Without this compensation the Coriolis force would have prevented the split matter-waves from a precise recombination. The main subject of my thesis at the University of Vienna was the experimental realization of the (first) all Optical Time-domain Ionizing Matter-wave (OTIMA) interferometer [6,7]. It consists of three pulsed nanosecond standing light waves which act on the particles with a well-defined timing sequence. Interference in the time-domain is independent of the particles’ velocities and of their de Broglie wavelengths. This has been demonstrated earlier for atoms by addressing laser light to certain atomic levels [8]. In contrast to that, the OTIMA interferometer uses optical ionization gratings [9

  2. Potential harmonic expansion for atomic wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre de la Ripelle, M.; Larsen, S.Y.

    1991-01-01

    One way to reduce the large degeneracy of the Hyperspherical Harmonic basis for solving few- and many-body bound state problems is to introduce an optimal basis truncation called the Potential Harmonic (PH) basis. Various PH truncation schemes are introduced, and their accuracies are evaluated in predicting the energies of the Helium and H - ground states , and the excited 2 1 S level of the Helium atom. It was found that the part of the PH basis that accounts for one-body correlations gives a better ground state energy for He than the Hartree-Fock approximation. When an orthogonal complement is introduced to the basis to account for e-e correlations, the error in the binding energy is found to be .00025 au and .00015 au for ground and excited helium, resp., and .00035 au for H - . Furthermore, the PH truncation is about 99.9% accurate in accounting for contributions coming from large values of the global angular momentum. This PH scheme is also much more accurate than previous versions based on the Faddeev equations. The present results indicate that the PH truncation can render the Hyperspherical Harmonic method useful for systems with N>3. (R.P.) 14 refs., 4 tabs

  3. Multi-sample immunoassay inside optical fiber capillary enabled by evanescent wave detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel evanescent wave-based (EW microfluidic capillary fiber-optic biosensor (MCFOB has been developed using capillaries as a transducer embedded in a multichannel device to enhance the collection efficiency of the fluorescence signal. The capillary serves dual roles as a waveguide and a container, enabling more straightforward, consistent, and compact biosensor packaging compared to conventional optical fiber biosensors and microfluidic systems. In order to detect multiple samples in one device, the biosensor incorporates a polydimethysiloxane (PDMS multi-channel device, which also serves as cladding for the biosensor. In addition, this biosensor only consumes 10 μl of a sample and does not require hydrofluoric acid etching in the fabrication process. The orientation for signal collection is optimized by comparing the lateral and normal signal directions for detected glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH. C-reactive protein (CRP is used to validate the MCFOB, and the limit of detection (LOD for CRP in the MCFOB is 1.94 ng/ml (74 pM. Moreover, the real-time measurement is demonstrated to verify that the evanescent wave is the only exciting light source in the MCFOB, which gives the potential for real-time measurement applications. Keywords: C-reactive protein, Capillary, Fiber-optic, Microfluidic, Evanescent wave, Immunoassay

  4. Phenomenological optical potentials and optical model computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, A.

    1980-01-01

    An introduction to the Optical Model is presented. Starting with the purpose and nature of the physical problems to be analyzed, a general formulation and the various phenomenological methods of solution are discussed. This includes the calculation of observables based on assumed potentials such as local and non-local and their forms, e.g. Woods-Saxon, folded model etc. Also discussed are the various calculational methods and model codes employed to describe nuclear reactions in the spherical and deformed regions (e.g. coupled-channel analysis). An examination of the numerical solutions and minimization techniques associated with the various codes, is briefly touched upon. Several computer programs are described for carrying out the calculations. The preparation of input, (formats and options), determination of model parameters and analysis of output are described. The class is given a series of problems to carry out using the available computer. Interpretation and evaluation of the samples includes the effect of varying parameters, and comparison of calculations with the experimental data. Also included is an intercomparison of the results from the various model codes, along with their advantages and limitations. (author)

  5. Optical negative refraction by four-wave mixing in thin metallic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Stefano; Zhang, Shuang; Park, Yongshik; Bartal, Guy; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2011-10-30

    The law of refraction first derived by Snellius and later introduced as the Huygens-Fermat principle, states that the incidence and refracted angles of a light wave at the interface of two different materials are related to the ratio of the refractive indices in each medium. Whereas all natural materials have a positive refractive index and therefore exhibit refraction in the positive direction, artificially engineered negative index metamaterials have been shown capable of bending light waves negatively. Such a negative refractive index is the key to achieving a perfect lens that is capable of imaging well below the diffraction limit. However, negative index metamaterials are typically lossy, narrow band, and require complicated fabrication processes. Recently, an alternative approach to obtain negative refraction from a very thin nonlinear film has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated in the microwave region. However, such approaches use phase conjugation, which makes optical implementations difficult. Here, we report a simple but different scheme to demonstrate experimentally nonlinear negative refraction at optical frequencies using four-wave mixing in nanostructured metal films. The refractive index can be designed at will by simply tuning the wavelengths of the interacting waves, which could have potential impact on many important applications, such as superlens imaging.

  6. Fiber Optic Detection of Action Potentials in Axons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smela, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    In prior exploratory research, we had designed a fiber optic sensor utilizing a long period Bragg grating for the purpose of detecting action potentials in axons optically, through a change in index...

  7. Transfer of a wave packet in double-well potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai-Feng; Hu, Yao-Hua; Tan, Yong-Gang

    2018-04-01

    Energy potentials with double-well structures are typical in atoms and molecules systems. A manipulation scheme using Half Cycles Pulses (HCPs) is proposed to transfer a Gaussian wave packet between the two wells. On the basis of quantum mechanical simulations, the time evolution and the energy distribution of the wave packet are evaluated. The effect of time parameters, amplitude, and number of HCPs on spatial and energy distribution of the final state and transfer efficiency are investigated. After a carefully tailored HCPs sequence is applied to the initial wave packet localized in one well, the final state is a wave packet localized in the other well and populated at the lower energy levels with narrower distribution. The present scheme could be used to control molecular reactions and to prepare atoms with large dipole moments.

  8. Experiments with BECs in a Painted Potential: Atom SQUID, Matter Wave Bessel Beams, and Matter Wave Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshier, Malcolm; Ryu, Changhyun; Blackburn, Paul; Blinova, Alina; Henderson, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    The painted potential is a time-averaged optical dipole potential which is able to create arbitrary and dynamic two dimensional potentials for Bose Einstein condensates (BECs). This poster reports three recent experiments using this technique. First, we have realized the dc atom SQUID geometry of a BEC in a toroidal trap with two Josephson junctions. We observe Josephson effects, measure the critical current of the junctions, and find dynamic behavior that is in good agreement with the simple Josephson equations for a tunnel junction with the ideal sinusoidal current-phase relation expected for the parameters of the experiment. Second, we have used free expansion of a rotating toroidal BEC to create matter wave Bessel beams, which are of interest because perfect Bessel beams (plane waves with amplitude profiles described by Bessel functions) propagate without diffraction. Third, we have realized the basic circuit elements necessary to create complex matter wave circuits. We launch BECs at arbitrary velocity along straight waveguides, propagate them around curved waveguides and stadium-shaped waveguide traps, and split them coherently at y-junctions that can also act as switches. Supported by LANL/LDRD.

  9. Wave Optics Based LEO-LEO Radio Occultation Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2016-01-01

    of the atmospheric products such as the correct water vapor content in the atmosphere. These limitations can be overcome when a proper selected range of high frequency waves are used to probe the atmosphere. Probing frequencies close to the absorption line of water vapor have been included, thus allowing...... the retrieval of the water vapor content. Selecting the correct probing frequencies would make it possible to retrieve other information such as the content of ozone. The retrieval is performed through a number of processing steps which are based on the Full Spectrum Inversion (FSI) technique. The retrieval...... optics based retrieval chain is used on a number of examples and the retrieved atmospheric parameters are compared to the parameters from a global ECMWF analysis model. This model is used in a forward propagator that simulates the electromagnetic field amplitudes and phases at the receiver on board...

  10. Fourier synthesis of asymmetrical optical potentials for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritt, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this work a dissipationless asymmetrical optical potential for cold atoms was produced. In a first step a new type of optical lattice was generated, whose spatial periodicity only corresponds to a quarter of the wavelength of the light used for the generation. This corresponds to the half of the periodicity of a conventional optical lattice, which is formed by the light of the same wavelength. The generation of this new type of optical lattice was reached by the use of two degenerated raman transitions. Virtual processes occur, in which four photons are involved. In conventional optical lattices however virtual two-photon processes occur. By spatially superimposing this optical lattice with a conventional optical lattice an asymmetrical optical potential could be formed. By diffraction of a Bose Einstein condensate of rubidium atoms at the transient activated asymmetrical potential the asymmetrical structure was proven. (orig.)

  11. A Wave-Optics Approach to Paraxial Geometrical Laws Based on Continuity at Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, J.; Nistal, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a derivation of the paraxial geometrical laws starting from a wave-optics approach, in particular by using simple continuity conditions of paraxial spherical waves at boundaries (discontinuities) between optical media. Paraxial geometrical imaging and magnification laws, under refraction and reflection at boundaries, are derived for…

  12. Development of fiber optic sensors at TNO for explosion and shock wave measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Bouma, R.H.B.; Meer, B.J. van der; Prinse, W.C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Fiber Optic sensors are found to be very suitable for explosion and shock wave measurements because they are immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). In the past few years, TNO has developed a number of sensor systems for explosion and shock wave measurements in which the optical fiber is a

  13. The linear potential propagator via wave function expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassar, Antonio B.; Cattani, Mauro S.D.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluate the quantum propagator for the motion of a particle in a linear potential via a recently developed formalism [A.B. Nassar et al., Phys. Rev. E56, 1230, (1997)]. In this formalism, the propagator comes about as a type of expansion of the wave function over the space of the initial velocities. (author)

  14. Solitary wave dynamics in time-dependent potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Salem, Walid K.

    2008-01-01

    The long time dynamics of solitary wave solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation in time-dependent external potentials is rigorously studied. To set the stage, the well-posedness of the Cauchy problem for a generalized nonautonomous nonlinear Schroedinger equation with time-dependent nonlinearities and potential is established. Afterward, the dynamics of NLS solitary waves in time-dependent potentials is studied. It is shown that in the space-adiabatic regime where the external potential varies slowly in space compared to the size of the soliton, the dynamics of the center of the soliton is described by Hamilton's equations, plus terms due to radiation damping. Finally, two physical applications are discussed: the first is adiabatic transportation of solitons and the second is the Mathieu instability of trapped solitons due to time-periodic perturbations

  15. Spontaneous emergence of rogue waves in partially coherent waves: A quantitative experimental comparison between hydrodynamics and optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Koussaifi, R; Tikan, A; Toffoli, A; Randoux, S; Suret, P; Onorato, M

    2018-01-01

    Rogue waves are extreme and rare fluctuations of the wave field that have been discussed in many physical systems. Their presence substantially influences the statistical properties of a partially coherent wave field, i.e., a wave field characterized by a finite band spectrum with random Fourier phases. Their understanding is fundamental for the design of ships and offshore platforms. In many meteorological conditions waves in the ocean are characterized by the so-called Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. Here we compare two unique experimental results: the first one has been performed in a 270 m wave tank and the other in optical fibers. In both cases, waves characterized by a JONSWAP spectrum and random Fourier phases have been launched at the input of the experimental device. The quantitative comparison, based on an appropriate scaling of the two experiments, shows a very good agreement between the statistics in hydrodynamics and optics. Spontaneous emergence of heavy tails in the probability density function of the wave amplitude is observed in both systems. The results demonstrate the universal features of rogue waves and provide a fundamental and explicit bridge between two important fields of research. Numerical simulations are also compared with experimental results.

  16. Spontaneous emergence of rogue waves in partially coherent waves: A quantitative experimental comparison between hydrodynamics and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Koussaifi, R.; Tikan, A.; Toffoli, A.; Randoux, S.; Suret, P.; Onorato, M.

    2018-01-01

    Rogue waves are extreme and rare fluctuations of the wave field that have been discussed in many physical systems. Their presence substantially influences the statistical properties of a partially coherent wave field, i.e., a wave field characterized by a finite band spectrum with random Fourier phases. Their understanding is fundamental for the design of ships and offshore platforms. In many meteorological conditions waves in the ocean are characterized by the so-called Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. Here we compare two unique experimental results: the first one has been performed in a 270 m wave tank and the other in optical fibers. In both cases, waves characterized by a JONSWAP spectrum and random Fourier phases have been launched at the input of the experimental device. The quantitative comparison, based on an appropriate scaling of the two experiments, shows a very good agreement between the statistics in hydrodynamics and optics. Spontaneous emergence of heavy tails in the probability density function of the wave amplitude is observed in both systems. The results demonstrate the universal features of rogue waves and provide a fundamental and explicit bridge between two important fields of research. Numerical simulations are also compared with experimental results.

  17. Optical tsunamis: shoaling of shallow water rogue waves in nonlinear fibers with normal dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In analogy with ocean waves running up towards the beach, shoaling of pre-chirped optical pulses may occur in the normal group-velocity dispersion regime of optical fibers. We present exact Riemann wave solutions of the optical shallow water equations and show that they agree remarkably well with the numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, at least up to the point where a vertical pulse front develops. We also reveal that extreme wave events or optical tsunamis may be generated in dispersion tapered fibers in the presence of higher-order dispersion. (paper)

  18. Biobeam—Multiplexed wave-optical simulations of light-sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Martin; Bundschuh, Sebastian T.

    2018-01-01

    Sample-induced image-degradation remains an intricate wave-optical problem in light-sheet microscopy. Here we present biobeam, an open-source software package that enables simulation of operational light-sheet microscopes by combining data from 105–106 multiplexed and GPU-accelerated point-spread-function calculations. The wave-optical nature of these simulations leads to the faithful reproduction of spatially varying aberrations, diffraction artifacts, geometric image distortions, adaptive optics, and emergent wave-optical phenomena, and renders image-formation in light-sheet microscopy computationally tractable. PMID:29652879

  19. A simple system for 160GHz optical terahertz wave generation and data modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yihan; He, Jingsuo; Sun, Xueming; Shi, Zexia; Wang, Ruike; Cui, Hailin; Su, Bo; Zhang, Cunlin

    2018-01-01

    A simple system based on two cascaded Mach-Zehnder modulators, which can generate 160GHz optical terahertz waves from 40GHz microwave sources, is simulated and tested in this paper. Fiber grating filter is used in the system to filter out optical carrier. By properly adjusting the modulator DC bias voltages and the signal voltages and phases, 4-tupling optical terahertz wave can be generated with fiber grating. This notch fiber grating filter is greatly suitable for terahertz over fiber (TOF) communication system. This scheme greatly reduces the cost of long-distance terahertz communication. Furthermore, 10Gbps digital signal is modulated in the 160GHz optical terahertz wave.

  20. Guided Acoustic and Optical Waves in Silicon-on-Insulator for Brillouin Scattering and Optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    APL PHOTONICS 1, 071301 (2016) Guided acoustic and optical waves in silicon-on- insulator for Brillouin scattering and optomechanics Christopher J...is possible to simultaneously guide optical and acoustic waves in the technologically important silicon on insulator (SOI) material system. Thin...high sound velocity — makes guiding acoustic waves difficult, motivating the use of soft chalcogenide glasses and partial or complete releases (removal

  1. Structure of the real part of the nucleon optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadmensky, S.G.; Lyuboshitz, V.V.; Shaikina, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The components of the nucleon optical potential V(l, E) in the 208 Pb and 40 Ca nuclei are calculated on the basis of the generalized Hartree-Fock potential and using typical sets of vacuum NN forces. The parameters of the isoscalar component of V(1, E) are found to agree well with those of phenomenological optical potentials and of the optical potentials in the Skyrme model. The isovector component of V(1, E) strongly depends on energy, and its value at E = 0 is considerably less than the corresponding values of the phenomenological and Skyrme optical potentials. This points to the necessity of additional tests of the underlying pair NN potentials. The radial distribution of V(1, E) is more complicated than the radial dependence of phenomenological optical potentials. 6 refs., 5 figs

  2. All optical detection of picosecond spin-wave dynamics in 2D annular antidot lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porwal, Nikita; Mondal, Sucheta; Choudhury, Samiran; De, Anulekha; Sinha, Jaivardhan; Barman, Anjan; Datta, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    Novel magnetic structures with precisely controlled dimensions and shapes at the nanoscale have potential applications in spin logic, spintronics and other spin-based communication devices. We report the fabrication of 2D bi-structure magnonic crystal in the form of embedded nanodots in a periodic Ni80Fe20 antidot lattice structure (annular antidot) by focused ion-beam lithography. The spin-wave spectra of the annular antidot sample, studied for the first time by a time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect microscopy show a remarkable variation with bias field, which is important for the above device applications. The optically induced spin-wave spectra show multiple modes in the frequency range 14.7 GHz-3.5 GHz due to collective interactions between the dots and antidots as well as the annular elements within the whole array. Numerical simulations qualitatively reproduce the experimental results, and simulated mode profiles reveal the spatial distribution of the spin-wave modes and internal magnetic fields responsible for these observations. It is observed that the internal field strength increases by about 200 Oe inside each dot embedded within the hole of annular antidot lattice as compared to pure antidot lattice and pure dot lattice. The stray field for the annular antidot lattice is found to be significant (0.8 kOe) as opposed to the negligible values of the same for the pure dot lattice and pure antidot lattice. Our findings open up new possibilities for development of novel artificial crystals.

  3. The radial shapes of intermediate energy microscopic optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qingbiao; Wang Chang; Tian Ye; Zhuo Yizhong

    1984-01-01

    The radial shapes of intermediate energy proton microscopic optical potentials of 40 Ca are calculated with nuclear matter approach by Skyrme interactions. The calculated results show that the real central potential in central region of nucleus changes from attractive to repulsive when the energy of incident nucleon is above 150 MeV and appears apparently a 'wine-bottle-bottom' shape in the transition energy region (from 150 MeV to 300 MeV). This tendency is consistent with empirical optical potential obtained through fitting experiments and microscopic optical potential calculated with relativistic mean field theory as well as with the BHF theory. The calculated imaginary part of the microscopic optical potential changes from the dominant surface absorption into the volume absorption and its absolute value become larger as energy increases. The effects of Skyrme force parameters to the radial shape of the calculated microscopic optical potential are analysed in detail

  4. Depth-of-field effects in wiggler radiation sources: Geometrical versus wave optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Walker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis is carried out of the optical properties of synchrotron radiation emitted by multipole wigglers, concentrating on the effective source size and brightness and the so-called “depth of field” effects, concerning which there has been some controversy in the literature. By comparing calculations made with both geometrical optics and wave optics methods we demonstrate that the two approaches are not at variance, and that the wave optics results tend towards those of geometrical optics under well-defined conditions.

  5. Imaging of propagation dynamics of optically-excited spin waves in a garnet film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Yusuke; Saitoh, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the direct imaging of the propagation dynamics of the optically-excited spin waves in a garnet film observed with an all-optical pump-and-probe magneto-optical imaging technique having sub-pico second time-resolution, sub-micrometer spatial resolution, and milli-degrees of accuracy in the rotation angle of the light polarization. (author)

  6. Higher-order rogue wave-like solutions for a nonautonomous nonlinear Schrödinger equation with external potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Tian, Bo; Wu, Xiao-Yu; Sun, Yan

    2018-02-01

    Under investigation in this paper is the higher-order rogue wave-like solutions for a nonautonomous nonlinear Schrödinger equation with external potentials which can be applied in the nonlinear optics, hydrodynamics, plasma physics and Bose-Einstein condensation. Based on the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili hierarchy reduction, we construct the Nth order rogue wave-like solutions in terms of the Gramian under the integrable constraint. With the help of the analytic and graphic analysis, we exhibit the first-, second- and third-order rogue wave-like solutions through the different dispersion, nonlinearity and linear potential coefficients. We find that only if the dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients are proportional to each other, heights of the background of those rogue waves maintain unchanged with time increasing. Due to the existence of complex parameters, such nonautonomous rogue waves in the higher-order cases have more complex features than those in the lower.

  7. s -wave scattering length of a Gaussian potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeszenszki, Peter; Cherny, Alexander Yu.; Brand, Joachim

    2018-04-01

    We provide accurate expressions for the s -wave scattering length for a Gaussian potential well in one, two, and three spatial dimensions. The Gaussian potential is widely used as a pseudopotential in the theoretical description of ultracold-atomic gases, where the s -wave scattering length is a physically relevant parameter. We first describe a numerical procedure to compute the value of the s -wave scattering length from the parameters of the Gaussian, but find that its accuracy is limited in the vicinity of singularities that result from the formation of new bound states. We then derive simple analytical expressions that capture the correct asymptotic behavior of the s -wave scattering length near the bound states. Expressions that are increasingly accurate in wide parameter regimes are found by a hierarchy of approximations that capture an increasing number of bound states. The small number of numerical coefficients that enter these expressions is determined from accurate numerical calculations. The approximate formulas combine the advantages of the numerical and approximate expressions, yielding an accurate and simple description from the weakly to the strongly interacting limit.

  8. Optical follow-up of gravitational wave triggers with DECam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herner, K.; Annis, J.; Berger, E.; Brout, D.; Butler, R.; Chen, H.; Cowperthwaite, P.; Diehl, H.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Farr, B.; Finley, D.; Frieman, J.; Holz, D.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Marriner, J.; Nielsen, E.; Palmese, A.; Sako, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Yanny, B.

    2017-10-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) events have several possible progenitors, including black hole mergers, cosmic string cusps, supernovae, neutron star mergers, and black hole{neutron star mergers. A subset of GW events are expected to produce electromagnetic (EM) emission that, once detected, will provide complementary information about their astrophysical context. To that end, the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration has partnered with other teams to send GW candidate alerts so that searches for their EM counterparts can be pursued. One such partner is the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and Dark Energy Camera (DECam) Gravitational Waves Program (DES- GW). Situated on the 4m Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, DECam is an ideal instrument for optical followup observations of GW triggers in the southern sky. The DES-GW program performs subtraction of new search images with respect to preexisting overlapping images to select candidate sources. Due to the short decay timescale of the expected EM counterparts and the need to quickly eliminate survey areas with no counterpart candidates, it is critical to complete the initial analysis of each night's images within 24 hours. The computational challenges in achieving this goal include maintaining robust I/O pipelines during the processing, being able to quickly acquire template images of new sky regions outside of the typical DES observing regions, and being able to rapidly provision additional batch computing resources with little advance notice. We will discuss the search area determination, imaging pipeline, general data transfer strategy, and methods to quickly increase the available amount of batch computing. We will present results from the rst season of observations from September 2015 to January 2016 and conclude by presenting improvements planned for the second observing season.

  9. Analysis of the normal optical, Michel and molecular potentials on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    6. — journal of. June 2016 physics pp. 1275–1286. Analysis of the normal ... the levels are obtained for the three optical potentials to estimate the quality ... The experimental angular distribution data for the 40Ca(6Li, d)44Ti reaction .... analysed using the normal optical, Michel and molecular potentials within the framework.

  10. Mismatch management for optical and matter-wave quadratic solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driben, R.; Oz, Y.; Malomed, B. A.; Gubeskys, A.; Yurovsky, V. A.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a way to control solitons in χ (2) (quadratically nonlinear) systems by means of periodic modulation imposed on the phase-mismatch parameter ('mismatch management', MM). It may be realized in the cotransmission of fundamental-frequency (FF) and second-harmonic (SH) waves in a planar optical waveguide via a long-period modulation of the usual quasi-phase-matching pattern of ferroelectric domains. In an altogether different physical setting, the MM may also be implemented by dint of the Feshbach resonance in a harmonically modulated magnetic field in a hybrid atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), with the atomic and molecular mean fields (MFs) playing the roles of the FF and SH, respectively. Accordingly, the problem is analyzed in two different ways. First, in the optical model, we identify stability regions for spatial solitons in the MM system, in terms of the MM amplitude and period, using the MF equations for spatially inhomogeneous configurations. In particular, an instability enclave is found inside the stability area. The robustness of the solitons is also tested against variation of the shape of the input pulse, and a threshold for the formation of stable solitons is found in terms of the power. Interactions between stable solitons are virtually unaffected by the MM. The second method (parametric approximation), going beyond the MF description, is developed for spatially homogeneous states in the BEC model. It demonstrates that the MF description is valid for large modulation periods, while, at smaller periods, non-MF components acquire gain, which implies destruction of the MF under the action of the high-frequency MM

  11. Stability of matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk. Golam; Roy, S. K.; Talukdar, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider localized states of both single- and two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) confined in a potential resulting from the superposition of linear and nonlinear optical lattices and make use of Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion to investigate the effect of nonlinear lattice on the stability of the soliton solutions in the linear optical lattice (LOL). For the single-component case we show that a weak nonlinear lattice has very little effect on the stability of such solitons while sufficiently strong nonlinear optical lattice (NOL) squeezes them to produce narrow bound states. For two-component condensates we find that when the strength of the NOL (γ1) is less than that of the LOL (V0) a relatively weak intra-atomic interaction (IAI) has little effect on the stability of the component solitons. This is true for both attractive and repulsive IAI. A strong attractive IAI, however, squeezes the BEC solitons while a similar repulsive IAI makes the component solitons wider. For γ1 > V0, only a strong attractive IAI squeezes the BEC solitons but the squeezing effect is less prominent than that found for γ1 < V0. We make useful checks on the results of our semianalytical stability analysis by solving the appropriate Gross-Pitaevskii equations numerically.

  12. Heavy-ion optical potential for sub-barrier fusion deduced from a dispersion relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.T.; Kim, H.C.; Park, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    The heavy-ion energy-dependent optical potentials for the 16 O+ 208 Pb system are deduced from a dispersion relation. These potentials are used to analyze the elastic scattering, fusion, and spin distributions of compound nuclei for the system in a unified way based on the direct reaction theory. It turns out that the energy dependence of the optical potential is essential in explaining the data at near- and sub-barrier energies. The real part of the energy-dependent optical potential deduced was also used in calculating the elastic and fusion cross sections by the conventional barrier penetration model using an incoming wave boundary condition. The predictions of the elastic scattering, fusion cross sections, and the spin distributions of compound nuclei are not satisfactory compared with those from the direct reaction approach. It seems to originate from the fact that this model neglects absorption around the Coulomb barrier region

  13. Focusing optical waves with a rotationally symmetric sharp-edge aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanwen; Fu, Shenhe; Li, Zhen; Yin, Hao; Zhou, Jianying; Chen, Zhenqiang

    2018-04-01

    While there has been various kinds of patterned structures proposed for wave focusing, these patterned structures usually involve complicated lithographic techniques since the element size of the patterned structures should be precisely controlled in microscale or even nanoscale. Here we propose a new and straightforward method for focusing an optical plane wave in free space with a rotationally symmetric sharp-edge aperture. The focusing phenomenon of wave is realized by superposition of a portion of the higher-order symmetric plane waves generated from the sharp edges of the apertures, in contrast to previously focusing techniques which usually depend on a curved phase. We demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically the focusing effect with a series of apertures having different rotational symmetry, and find that the intensity of the hotspots could be controlled by the symmetric strength of the sharp-edge apertures. The presented results would advance the conventional wisdom that light would diffract in all directions and become expanding when it propagates through an aperture. The proposed method is easy to be processed, and might open potential applications in interferometry, image, and superresolution.

  14. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  15. Optical properties of two-dimensional charge density wave materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Charles; Karbassi, Sara; Friedemann, Sven; da Como, Enrico

    Titanium diselenide (TiSe2) is a member of the layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials. It exhibits unusual chiral charge ordering below 190 K after undergoing an initial phase transition to a commensurate (2 x 2 x 2) charge density wave (CDW) at 200 K which is enhanced further in the monolayer. Recently, the first evidence of chirality in a CDW system was discovered in this material by scanning tunneling microscopy and time-resolved reflectivity experiments, where separate left and right handed charge-ordered domains were found to exist within a single sample. We have prepared single crystals of 1T-TiSe2 using iodine vapour transport, and confirmed their quality by x-ray analysis and charge transport measurements. Using a combination of polarised optical spectroscopy techniques in the mid to far infrared (4 to 700 meV photon energy), we have measured an anisotropy relating to the CDW gap. We discuss the results on the basis of chiral domains with different handedness and the nature of the CDW transition.

  16. Optical Spectroscopy Measurements of Shock Waves Driven by Intense Z-Pinch Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, J.; Bernard, M.; Bailey, J.E.; Carlson, A.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Hall, C.A.; Hanson, D.; Johnston, R.; Lake, P.; Lawrence, J.

    1999-01-01

    Z-pinches created using the Z accelerator generate approximately220 TW, 1.7 MJ radiation pulses that heat large (approximately10 cm 3 ) hohlraums to 100-150 eV temperatures for times of order 10 nsec. We are performing experiments exploiting this intense radiation to drive shock waves for equation of state studies. The shock pressures are typically 1-10 Mbar with 10 nsec duration in 6-mm-diameter samples. In this paper we demonstrate the ability to perform optical spectroscopy measurements on shocked samples located in close proximity to the z-pinch. These experiments are particularly well suited to optical spectroscopy measurements because of the relatively large sample size and long duration. The optical emission is collected using fiber optics and recorded with a streaked spectrograph. Other diagnostics include VISAR and active shock breakout measurements of the shocked sample and a suite of diagnostics that characterize the radiation drive. Our near term goal is to use the spectral emission to obtain the temperature of the shocked material. Longer term objectives include the examination of deviations of the spectrum from blackbody, line emission from lower density regions, determination of kinetic processes in molecular systems, evaluation of phase transitions such as the onset of metalization in transparent materials, and characterization of the plasma formed when the shock exits the rear surface. An initial set of data illustrating both the potential and the challenge of these measurements is described

  17. Wave-optics description of self-healing mechanism in Bessel beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Andrea; Agarwal, Girish S

    2014-12-15

    Bessel beams' great importance in optics lies in that these propagate without spreading and can reconstruct themselves behind an obstruction placed across their path. However, a rigorous wave-optics explanation of the latter property is missing. In this work, we study the reconstruction mechanism by means of a wave-optics description. We obtain expressions for the minimum distance beyond the obstruction at which the beam reconstructs itself, which are in close agreement with the traditional one determined from geometrical optics. Our results show that the physics underlying the self-healing mechanism can be entirely explained in terms of the propagation of plane waves with radial wave vectors lying on a ring.

  18. Combined effects of nonparaxiality, optical activity, and walk-off on rogue wave propagation in optical fibers filled with chiral materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temgoua, D. D. Estelle; Tchokonte, M. B. Tchoula; Kofane, T. C.

    2018-04-01

    The generalized nonparaxial nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in optical fibers filled with chiral materials is reduced to the higher-order integrable Hirota equation. Based on the modified Darboux transformation method, the nonparaxial chiral optical rogue waves are constructed from the scalar model with modulated coefficients. We show that the parameters of nonparaxiality, third-order dispersion, and differential gain or loss term are the main keys to control the amplitude, linear, and nonlinear effects in the model. Moreover, the influence of nonparaxiality, optical activity, and walk-off effect are also evidenced under the defocusing and focusing regimes of the vector nonparaxial NLS equations with constant and modulated coefficients. Through an algorithm scheme of wider applicability on nonparaxial beam propagation methods, the most influential effect and the simultaneous controllability of combined effects are underlined, showing their properties and their potential applications in optical fibers and in a variety of complex dynamical systems.

  19. Millimeter-wave generation and characterization of a GaAs FET by optical mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, David C.; Fetterman, Harold R.; Chew, Wilbert

    1990-01-01

    Coherent mixing of optical radiation from a tunable continuous-wave dye laser and a stabilized He-Ne laser was used to generate millimeter-wave signals in GaAs FETs attached to printed-circuit millimeter-wave antennas. The generated signal was further down-converted to a 2-GHz IF by an antenna-coupled millimeter-wave local oscillator at 62 GHz. Detailed characterizations of power and S/N under different bias conditions have been performed. This technique is expected to allow signal generation and frequency-response evaluation of millimeter-wave devices at frequencies as high as 100 GHz.

  20. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and ex-vivo carotid artery samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razani, Marjan; Luk, Timothy W.H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Siegler, Peter; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kolios, Michael C.; Yang, Victor X.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) in an inhomogeneous phantom and carotid artery samples based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs duration, applying acoustic radiation force (ARF) to inhomogeneous phantoms and carotid artery samples, synchronized with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) imaging system. The phantoms were composed of gelatin and titanium dioxide whereas the carotid artery samples were embedded in gel. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, detected the microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms and samples of different stiffness. We present the technique for calculating tissue mechanical properties by propagating shear waves in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and carotid artery samples using the ARF of an ultrasound transducer, and measuring the shear wave speed and its associated properties in the different layers with OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future in-vitro and in-vivo studies of mechanical property measurements of biological tissues such as vascular tissues, where normal and pathological structures may exhibit significant contrast in the shear modulus. PMID:24688822

  1. Electro-optic transceivers for terahertz-wave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q.; Tani, M.; Jiang, Zhiping; Zhang, X.-C.

    2001-01-01

    Because of the reciprocal behavior of the optical rectification and the electro-optic effect in a nonlinear optical crystal, an electro-optic transceiver can alternately transmit pulsed electromagnetic radiation (optical rectification) and detect the return signal (electro-optic effect) in the same crystal. However, the optimal condition of the electro-optic transceiver may be very different from that of the spatially separated emitter and receiver. We present a detailed description of the crystal-orientation dependence of the electro-optic terahertz devices (transmitter, receiver, and transceiver). It is found that for a (110) zinc-blende electro-optical crystal, the efficiency of the electro-optic transceiver will be optimized when the angle between the polarization of the optical pump beam and the crystallographic z axis [0,0,1] is 26 degree. Meanwhile, for a (111) crystal, the angle between the optical beam and the crystallographic direction [-1,-1,2] should be 23 degree. The experimental results from a (110) ZnTe transceiver verify theoretical calculations and demonstrate a direct way to optimize the working efficiency of an electro-optic terahertz transceiver. [copyright] 2001 Optical Society of America

  2. Bit rate and pulse width dependence of four-wave mixing of short optical pulses in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diez, S.; Mecozzi, A.; Mørk, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the saturation properties of four-wave mixing of short optical pulses in a semiconductor optical amplifier. By varying the gain of the optical amplifier, we find a strong dependence of both conversion efficiency and signal-to-background ratio on pulse width and bit rate....... In particular, the signal-to-background ratio can be optimized for a specific amplifier gain. This behavior, which is coherently described in experiment and theory, is attributed to the dynamics of the amplified spontaneous emission, which is the main source of noise in a semiconductor optical amplifier....

  3. The optical potential for 6Li-6Li elastic scattering at 156 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micek, S.; Majka, Z.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Rebel, H.; Gils, H.J.

    1984-10-01

    Elastic scattering of 6 Li from 6 Li has been studied for the beam energy of 156 MeV. The experimental differential cross section has been analysed on the basis of the optical model using various phenomenological forms. The spin-orbit interaction proves to be less significant. A semi-microscopic double-folding cluster model which generates the real part of the optical potential by an antisymmetrized d-α cluster wave function of 6 Li and α-α, d-d and d-α interactions is well able to describe the experimental data. (orig.) [de

  4. Optical wave microphone measurements of laser ablation of copper in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsugi, Fumiaki, E-mail: mitsugi@cs.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Ikegami, Tomoaki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Nakamiya, Toshiyuki; Sonoda, Yoshito [Graduate School of Industrial Engineering, Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Laser ablation plasma in a supercritical fluid has attracted much attention recently due to its usefulness in forming nanoparticles. Observation of the dynamic behavior of the supercritical fluid after laser irradiation of a solid is necessary for real-time monitoring and control of laser ablation. In this study, we utilized an optical wave microphone to monitor pulsed laser irradiation of a solid in a supercritical fluid. The optical wave microphone works based on Fraunhofer diffraction of phase modulation of light by changes in refractive index. We hereby report on our measurements for pulsed laser irradiation of a Cu target in supercritical carbon dioxide using an optical wave microphone. Photothermal acoustic waves which generated after single pulsed laser irradiation of a Cu target were detectable in supercritical carbon dioxide. The speed of sound around the critical point of supercritical carbon dioxide was clearly slower than that in gas. The optical wave microphone detected a signal during laser ablation of Cu in supercritical carbon dioxide that was caused by shockwave degeneration. - Highlights: • Photothermal acoustic wave in supercritical fluid was observed. • Sound speed around the critical point was slower than that in gas. • Optical wave microphone detected degeneration of a shockwave. • Ablation threshold of a solid in supercritical fluid can be estimated. • Generation of the second shockwave in supercritical phase was suggested.

  5. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  6. Trapping of a microsphere pendulum resonator in an optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J. M.; Wu, Y.; Nic Chormaic, S.; Minogin, V. G.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a method to spatially confine or corral the movements of a micropendulum via the optical forces produced by two simultaneously excited optical modes of a photonic molecule comprising two microspherical cavities. We discuss how the cavity-enhanced optical force generated in the photonic molecule can create an optomechanical potential of about 10 eV deep and 30 pm wide, which can be used to trap the pendulum at any given equilibrium position by a simple choice of laser frequencies. This result presents opportunities for very precise all-optical self-alignment of microsystems.

  7. Rapidly tunable continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator pumped by a fiber laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, M.E.; Gross, P.; Boller, Klaus J.; Auerbach, M.; Wessels, P.; Fallnich, C.

    2003-01-01

    We report on rapid, all-electronically controlled wavelength tuning of a continuous-wave (cw) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by an ytterbium fiber laser. The OPO is singly resonant for the signal wave and consists of a 40-mm-long periodically poled lithium niobate crystal in a

  8. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  9. The unification of the nuclear optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    The nuclear mean field is defined for bound and scattering states and its parameters shown to vary continuously over the whole energy range. The real and imaginary parts of the potential are connected by dispersion relations, and this unifies the potential from negative to positive energies. Recent analyses of experimental data using dispersion relations are reviewed. (author)

  10. Linear and nonlinear intersubband optical absorption in a disk-shaped quantum dot with a parabolic potential plus an inverse squared potential in a static magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Guanghui [Department of Physics, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guo Kangxian, E-mail: axguo@sohu.com [Department of Physics, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang Chao [Institute of Public Administration, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-06-15

    The linear and nonlinear optical absorption in a disk-shaped quantum dot (DSQD) with parabolic potential plus an inverse squared potential in the presence of a static magnetic field are theoretically investigated within the framework of the compact-density-matrix approach and iterative method. The energy levels and the wave functions of an electron in the DSQD are obtained by using the effective mass approximation. Numerical calculations are presented for typical GaAs/AlAs DSQD. It is found that the optical absorption coefficients are strongly affected not only by a static magnetic field, but also by the strength of external field, the confinement frequency and the incident optical intensity.

  11. Linear and nonlinear intersubband optical absorption in a disk-shaped quantum dot with a parabolic potential plus an inverse squared potential in a static magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guanghui; Guo Kangxian; Wang Chao

    2012-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear optical absorption in a disk-shaped quantum dot (DSQD) with parabolic potential plus an inverse squared potential in the presence of a static magnetic field are theoretically investigated within the framework of the compact-density-matrix approach and iterative method. The energy levels and the wave functions of an electron in the DSQD are obtained by using the effective mass approximation. Numerical calculations are presented for typical GaAs/AlAs DSQD. It is found that the optical absorption coefficients are strongly affected not only by a static magnetic field, but also by the strength of external field, the confinement frequency and the incident optical intensity.

  12. Application of Tietz potential to study optical properties of spherical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    c Indian Academy of Sciences. Vol. 85, No. 4. — journal of. October 2015 ... The physical properties of semiconductors such as optical, electronic, and thermodynamic .... can be used to reproduce the interaction potential energy curve of the A1.

  13. One-nucleon transfer reactions and the optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Nunes, F M; Ross, A; Titus, L J; Charity, R J; Dickhoff, W H; Mahzoon, M H; Sarich, J; Wild, S M

    2015-01-01

    We provide a summary of new developments in the area of direct reaction theory with a particular focus on one-nucleon transfer reactions. We provide a status of the methods available for describing (d,p) reactions. We discuss the effects of nonlocality in the optical potential in transfer reactions. The results of a purely phenomenological potential and the optical potential obtained from the dispersive optical model are compared; both point toward the importance of including nonlocality in transfer reactions explicitly. Given the large ambiguities associated with optical potentials, we discuss some new developments toward the quantification of this uncertainty. We conclude with some general comments and a brief account of new advances that are in the pipeline.

  14. Unitarity constraints in the construction of optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannata, F.; Deponder, J.P.; Lenz, F.

    1982-01-01

    We first review the unitarity properties of the first order optical potential theory which arise from the one-body nature of both the single scattering approximation and of the single particle model for the nucleus. We construct optical potentials relaxing either the independent particle guided by the requirement of incorporating the minimal unitary of the first order theory and extending it to more complex situations. Our investigation of the effects of nucleon-nucleon residual interaction results in a description of the quasifree mechanism modified by final state unitarity requires the inclusion of all possible scattering processes on a given pair of target nucleons. This naturally leads to a formation of the optical potential in terms of three-body rather than two-body amplitudes. We discuss various approximation which make, in combination with phenomenological ingredients, an evaluation of these optical potentials feasible

  15. Catching the right wave: evaluating wave energy resources and potential compatibility with existing marine and coastal uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Toft, Jodie E; Papenfus, Michael; Verutes, Gregory; Guerry, Anne D; Ruckelshaus, Marry H; Arkema, Katie K; Guannel, Gregory; Wood, Spencer A; Bernhardt, Joanna R; Tallis, Heather; Plummer, Mark L; Halpern, Benjamin S; Pinsky, Malin L; Beck, Michael W; Chan, Francis; Chan, Kai M A; Levin, Phil S; Polasky, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Many hope that ocean waves will be a source for clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy, yet wave energy conversion facilities may affect marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms, including competition with other human uses. We developed a decision-support tool to assist siting wave energy facilities, which allows the user to balance the need for profitability of the facilities with the need to minimize conflicts with other ocean uses. Our wave energy model quantifies harvestable wave energy and evaluates the net present value (NPV) of a wave energy facility based on a capital investment analysis. The model has a flexible framework and can be easily applied to wave energy projects at local, regional, and global scales. We applied the model and compatibility analysis on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada to provide information for ongoing marine spatial planning, including potential wave energy projects. In particular, we conducted a spatial overlap analysis with a variety of existing uses and ecological characteristics, and a quantitative compatibility analysis with commercial fisheries data. We found that wave power and harvestable wave energy gradually increase offshore as wave conditions intensify. However, areas with high economic potential for wave energy facilities were closer to cable landing points because of the cost of bringing energy ashore and thus in nearshore areas that support a number of different human uses. We show that the maximum combined economic benefit from wave energy and other uses is likely to be realized if wave energy facilities are sited in areas that maximize wave energy NPV and minimize conflict with existing ocean uses. Our tools will help decision-makers explore alternative locations for wave energy facilities by mapping expected wave energy NPV and helping to identify sites that provide maximal returns yet avoid spatial competition with existing ocean uses.

  16. Catching the Right Wave: Evaluating Wave Energy Resources and Potential Compatibility with Existing Marine and Coastal Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Toft, Jodie E.; Papenfus, Michael; Verutes, Gregory; Guerry, Anne D.; Ruckelshaus, Marry H.; Arkema, Katie K.; Guannel, Gregory; Wood, Spencer A.; Bernhardt, Joanna R.; Tallis, Heather; Plummer, Mark L.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Pinsky, Malin L.; Beck, Michael W.; Chan, Francis; Chan, Kai M. A.; Levin, Phil S.; Polasky, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Many hope that ocean waves will be a source for clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy, yet wave energy conversion facilities may affect marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms, including competition with other human uses. We developed a decision-support tool to assist siting wave energy facilities, which allows the user to balance the need for profitability of the facilities with the need to minimize conflicts with other ocean uses. Our wave energy model quantifies harvestable wave energy and evaluates the net present value (NPV) of a wave energy facility based on a capital investment analysis. The model has a flexible framework and can be easily applied to wave energy projects at local, regional, and global scales. We applied the model and compatibility analysis on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada to provide information for ongoing marine spatial planning, including potential wave energy projects. In particular, we conducted a spatial overlap analysis with a variety of existing uses and ecological characteristics, and a quantitative compatibility analysis with commercial fisheries data. We found that wave power and harvestable wave energy gradually increase offshore as wave conditions intensify. However, areas with high economic potential for wave energy facilities were closer to cable landing points because of the cost of bringing energy ashore and thus in nearshore areas that support a number of different human uses. We show that the maximum combined economic benefit from wave energy and other uses is likely to be realized if wave energy facilities are sited in areas that maximize wave energy NPV and minimize conflict with existing ocean uses. Our tools will help decision-makers explore alternative locations for wave energy facilities by mapping expected wave energy NPV and helping to identify sites that provide maximal returns yet avoid spatial competition with existing ocean uses. PMID:23144824

  17. Deep Rapid Optical Follow-Up of Gravitational Wave Sources with the Dark Energy Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowperthwaite, Philip

    2018-01-01

    The detection of an electromagnetic counterpart associated with a gravitational wave detection by the Advanced LIGO and VIRGO interferometers is one of the great observational challenges of our time. The large localization regions and potentially faint counterparts require the use of wide-field, large aperture telescopes. As a result, the Dark Energy Camera, a 3.3 sq deg CCD imager on the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO in Chile is the most powerful instrument for this task in the Southern Hemisphere. I will report on the results from our joint program between the community and members of the dark energy survey to conduct rapid and efficient follow-up of gravitational wave sources. This includes systematic searches for optical counterparts, as well as developing an understanding of contaminating sources on timescales not normally probed by traditional untargeted supernova surveys. I will additionally comment on the immense science gains to be made by a joint detection and discuss future prospects from the standpoint of both next generation wide-field telescopes and next generation gravitational wave detectors.

  18. Linking optical and infrared observations with gravitational wave sources through transient variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbs, C W

    2008-01-01

    Optical and infrared observations have thus far detected more celestial cataclysms than have been seen in gravity waves (GW). This argues that we should search for gravity wave signatures that correspond to transient variables seen at optical wavelengths, at precisely known positions. There is an unknown time delay between the optical and gravitational transient, but knowing the source location precisely specifies the corresponding time delays across the gravitational antenna network as a function of the GW-to-optical arrival time difference. Optical searches should detect virtually all supernovae that are plausible gravitational radiation sources. The transient optical signature expected from merging compact objects is not as well understood, but there are good reasons to expect detectable transient optical/IR emission from most of these sources as well. The next generation of deep wide-field surveys (for example PanSTARRS and LSST) will be sensitive to subtle optical variability, but we need to fill the 'blind spots' that exist in the galactic plane, and for optically bright transient sources. In particular, a galactic plane variability survey at λ∼ 2 μm seems worthwhile. Science would benefit from closer coordination between the various optical survey projects and the gravity wave community

  19. Geometric and potential dynamics interpretation of the optic ring resonator bistability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiangga, S.; Chittha, T.; Frank, T. D.

    2015-07-01

    The optical bistability is a fundamental nonlinear feature of the ring resonator. A geometric and potential dynamics interpretation of the bistability is given. Accordingly, the bistability of the nonlinear system is shown to be a consequence of geometric laws of vector calculus describing the resonator ring. In contrast, the so-called transcendental relations that have been obtained in the literature in order to describe the optical wave are interpreted in terms of potential dynamical systems. The proposed novel interpretation provides new insights into the nature of the ring resonator optical bistability. The fundamental work by Rukhlenko, Premaratne and Agrawal (2010) as well as a more recent study by Chiangga, Pitakwongsaporn, Frank and Yupapin (2013) are considered.

  20. Experimental Demonstration of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Recurrence in a Modulationally Unstable Optical Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Simaeys, G.; Emplit, Ph.; Haelterman, M.

    2001-01-01

    Through a detailed spectral analysis of the propagation of square-shaped laser pulses in optical fibers, we provide the experimental demonstration of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam recurrence phenomenon in modulationally unstable optical waves ruled by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation

  1. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadhira, Vebi, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Kurniadi, Deddy, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Juliastuti, E., E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Sutiswan, Adeline, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id [Instrumentation and Control Research Group, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institute Technology of Bandung, Ganesha 10 40132 Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  2. Resonating rays in ion-ion scattering from an optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhan, A.R.; Stoyanov, B.J.; Nagl, A.; Uberall, H.; de Llano, M.

    1986-01-01

    The amplitude of ion-ion scattering, described, e.g., by an optical potential, separates into a ''surface-wave'' part (which, as shown before, may give rise to resonances) and a ''geometrical-ray'' part. The amplitude as alternately expressed here by the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation resolves into an externally reflected ''barrier wave'' and into ''internal'' or ''penetrating rays'' that undergo an internal reflection together with possible additional multiple reflections. Our numerical calculations show that resonances also occur in the penetrating rays, which take place when a characteristic equation is satisfied. The geometrical meaning of the latter is determined by the optical path length of penetration being an integer multiple of π, plus a 1/2π caustic phase jump, and an extra phase shift due to barrier penetration

  3. Quantum degenerate atomic gases in controlled optical lattice potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemelke, Nathan D.

    2007-12-01

    Since the achievement of Bose Einstein condensation in cold atomic gases, mean-field treatments of the condensed phase have provided an excellent description for the static and dynamic properties observed in experiments. Recent experimental efforts have focused on studying deviations from mean-field behavior. I will describe work on two experiments which introduce controlled single particle degeneracies with time-dependent optical potentials, aiming to induce correlated motion and nontrivial statistics in the gas. In the first experiment, an optical lattice with locally rotating site potentials is produced to investigate fractional quantum Hall effects (FQHE) in rotating Bose gases. Here, the necessary gauge potential is provided by the rotating reference frame of the gas, which, in direct analogy to the electronic system, organizes single particle states into degenerate Landau levels. At low temperatures the repulsive interaction provided by elastic scattering is expected to produce ground states with structure nearly identical to those in the FQHE. I will discuss how these effects are made experimentally feasible by working at small particle numbers in the tight trapping potentials of an optical lattice, and present first results on the use of photoassociation to probe correlation in this system. In the second experiment, a vibrated optical lattice potential alters the single-particle dispersion underlying a condensed Bose gas and offers tailored phase-matching for nonlinear atom optical processes. I will demonstrate how this leads to parametric instability in the condensed gas, and draw analogy to an optical parametric oscillator operating above threshold.

  4. Dynamic ultraslow optical-matter wave analog of an event horizon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C J; Deng, L; Hagley, E W; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2014-08-29

    We investigate theoretically the effects of a dynamically increasing medium index on optical-wave propagation in a rubidium condensate. A long pulsed pump laser coupling a D2 line transition produces a rapidly growing internally generated field. This results in a significant optical self-focusing effect and creates a dynamically growing medium index anomaly that propagates ultraslowly with the internally generated field. When a fast probe pulse injected after a delay catches up with the dynamically increasing index anomaly, it is forced to slow down and is prohibited from crossing the anomaly, thereby realizing an ultraslow optical-matter wave analog of a dynamic white-hole event horizon.

  5. Counter-rotating standing spin waves: A magneto-optical illusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihab, S.; Thevenard, L.; Lemaître, A.; Gourdon, C.

    2017-04-01

    We excite perpendicular standing spin waves by a laser pulse in a GaMnAsP ferromagnetic layer and detect them using time-resolved magneto-optical effects. Quite counterintuitively, we find the first two excited modes to be of opposite chirality. We show that this can only be explained by taking into account absorption and optical phase shift inside the layer. This optical illusion is particularly strong in weakly absorbing layers. These results provide a correct identification of spin waves modes, enabling a trustworthy estimation of their respective weight as well as an unambiguous determination of the spin stiffness parameter.

  6. Negative optical inertia for enhancing the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili, Farid; Danilishin, Stefan; Mueller-Ebhardt, Helge; Miao Haixing; Zhao Chunnong; Chen Yanbei

    2011-01-01

    We consider enhancing the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors by using double optical spring. When the power, detuning and bandwidth of the two carriers are chosen appropriately, the effect of the double optical spring can be described as a 'negative inertia', which cancels the positive inertia of the test masses and thus increases their response to gravitational waves. This allows us to surpass the free-mass standard quantum limit (SQL) over a broad frequency band, through signal amplification, rather than noise cancellation, which has been the case for all broadband SQL-beating schemes so far considered for gravitational-wave detectors. The merit of such signal amplification schemes lies in the fact that they are less susceptible to optical losses than noise-cancellation schemes. We show that it is feasible to demonstrate such an effect with the Gingin High Optical Power Test Facility, and it can eventually be implemented in future advanced GW detectors.

  7. Travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing breaks the limits of cavity-enhanced all-optical wavelength conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morichetti, Francesco; Canciamilla, Antonio; Ferrari, Carlo; Samarelli, Antonio; Sorel, Marc; Melloni, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Wave mixing inside optical resonators, while experiencing a large enhancement of the nonlinear interaction efficiency, suffers from strong bandwidth constraints, preventing its practical exploitation for processing broad-band signals. Here we show that such limits are overcome by the new concept of travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing (FWM). This approach combines the efficiency enhancement provided by resonant propagation with a wide-band conversion process. Compared with conventional FWM in bare waveguides, it exhibits higher robustness against chromatic dispersion and propagation loss, while preserving transparency to modulation formats. Travelling-wave resonant FWM has been demonstrated in silicon-coupled ring resonators and was exploited to realize a 630-μm-long wavelength converter operating over a wavelength range wider than 60 nm and with 28-dB gain with respect to a bare waveguide of the same physical length. Full compatibility of the travelling-wave resonant FWM with optical signal processing applications has been demonstrated through signal retiming and reshaping at 10 Gb s(-1).

  8. The potential-free approach to the construction of the NN-wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troitsky, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    The traditional approaches to the nonrelativistic NN-interaction use local and nonlocal potentials of the kind defined by different dynamical speculations. The wave functions are obtained then from the Schroedinger equation with the chosen potential. Here the author obtains the wave functions (scattering wave function and bound state wave function) directly from the scattering phases in the frame of a dispersion approach without use of potential. (Auth.)

  9. Electromagnetic waves in optical fibres in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, V S; Burdanova, M G

    2016-01-01

    A new method is reported of recording the secondary radiation of luminescent substances based on the use of capillary fibres of great length. Theoretical analysis of the dispersion curves of electromagnetic radiation in capillary fibres doped with erbium ions Er 3+ has been established. The Lorentz model is used for describing the dispersion properties of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous medium doped with rare-earth ions. The dispersion dependencies of polariton and axion–polariton waves in erbium nitrate hydrate are determined on the basis of the model of the interaction between electromagnetic waves and the resonance electronic states of erbium ions in the absence and presence of a magnetic field. (paper)

  10. Optical Remote Sensing Potentials for Looting Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athos Agapiou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Looting of archaeological sites is illegal and considered a major anthropogenic threat for cultural heritage, entailing undesirable and irreversible damage at several levels, such as landscape disturbance, heritage destruction, and adverse social impact. In recent years, the employment of remote sensing technologies using ground-based and/or space-based sensors has assisted in dealing with this issue. Novel remote sensing techniques have tackled heritage destruction occurring in war-conflicted areas, as well as illicit archeological activity in vast areas of archaeological interest with limited surveillance. The damage performed by illegal activities, as well as the scarcity of reliable information are some of the major concerns that local stakeholders are facing today. This study discusses the potential use of remote sensing technologies based on the results obtained for the archaeological landscape of Ayios Mnason in Politiko village, located in Nicosia district, Cyprus. In this area, more than ten looted tombs have been recorded in the last decade, indicating small-scale, but still systematic, looting. The image analysis, including vegetation indices, fusion, automatic extraction after object-oriented classification, etc., was based on high-resolution WorldView-2 multispectral satellite imagery and RGB high-resolution aerial orthorectified images. Google Earth© images were also used to map and diachronically observe the site. The current research also discusses the potential for wider application of the presented methodology, acting as an early warning system, in an effort to establish a systematic monitoring tool for archaeological areas in Cyprus facing similar threats.

  11. Optical mapping of optogenetically shaped cardiac action potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sarah A.; Lee, Shin-Rong; Tung, Leslie; Yue, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Light-mediated silencing and stimulation of cardiac excitability, an important complement to electrical stimulation, promises important discoveries and therapies. To date, cardiac optogenetics has been studied with patch-clamp, multielectrode arrays, video microscopy, and an all-optical system measuring calcium transients. The future lies in achieving simultaneous optical acquisition of excitability signals and optogenetic control, both with high spatio-temporal resolution. Here, we make progress by combining optical mapping of action potentials with concurrent activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) or halorhodopsin (eNpHR3.0), via an all-optical system applied to monolayers of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM). Additionally, we explore the capability of ChR2 and eNpHR3.0 to shape action-potential waveforms, potentially aiding the study of short/long QT syndromes that result from abnormal changes in action potential duration (APD). These results show the promise of an all-optical system to acquire action potentials with precise temporal optogenetics control, achieving a long-sought flexibility beyond the means of conventional electrical stimulation. PMID:25135113

  12. Conservation laws of wave action and potential enstrophy for Rossby waves in a stratified atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of wave energy, enstrophy, and wave motion for atmospheric Rossby waves in a variable mean flow are discussed from a theoretical and pedagogic standpoint. In the absence of mean flow gradients, the wave energy density satisfies a local conservation law, with the appropriate flow velocity being the group velocity. In the presence of mean flow variations, wave energy is not conserved, but wave action is, provided the mean flow is independent of longitude. Wave enstrophy is conserved for arbitrary variations of the mean flow. Connections with Eliassen-Palm flux are also discussed.

  13. Potential and limitations of wave intensity analysis in coronary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebes, M.; Kolyva, C.; Verhoeff, B.J.; Piek, J.J.; Spaan, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) is beginning to be applied to the coronary circulation both to better understand coronary physiology and as a diagnostic tool. Separation of wave intensity (WI) into forward and backward traveling components requires knowledge of pulse wave velocity at the point of

  14. Optical potential approach to the electron-atom impact ionization threshold problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, A.; Hahn, Y.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of the threshold law for electron-atom impact ionization is reconsidered as an extrapolation of inelastic cross sections through the ionization threshold. The cross sections are evaluated from a distorted wave matrix element, the final state of which describes the scattering from the Nth excited state of the target atom. The actual calculation is carried for the e-H system, and a model is introduced which is shown to preserve the essential properties of the problem while at the same time reducing the dimensionability of the Schrodinger equation. Nevertheless, the scattering equation is still very complex. It is dominated by the optical potential which is expanded in terms of eigen-spectrum of QHQ. It is shown by actual calculation that the lower eigenvalues of this spectrum descend below the relevant inelastic thresholds; it follows rigorously that the optical potential contains repulsive terms. Analytical solutions of the final state wave function are obtained with several approximations of the optical potential.

  15. The imaginary part of the nucleus - nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phatak, S.C.; Sinha, B.

    1978-01-01

    The contribution to the imaginary nucleus - nucleus optical potential has been estimated by evaluating the energy - conserving seocond-order term in the perturbation series. The incoming nuclear field is supposed to excite nucleons in a nucleus in this calculation and the nuclear excitations are approximated by particle-hole excitations in a Fermi gas. The resulting imaginary potential compares favourably with phenomenological potentials. (author)

  16. OSSIM wave-optics toolbox and its use to simulate AEOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carey A.; Forgham, James L.; Jones, Bruce W.; Jones, Kenneth D.

    2001-12-01

    OSSim (Optical System Simulation) is a simulation toolbox of optical and processing components. By using full wave-optics in the time-domain, OSSim simulates diffractive effects and control loop interactions missed by simpler analyses. OSSim also models the atmosphere, with user customizable turbulence strength, wind, and slew. This paper first presents 2 introductory examples: a simple 2-lens imaging system and a simple tilt-control system. Then it presents a simulation of the 3.67-meter AEOS (Advanced Electro-Optics System) telescope on Maui. The OSSim simulation agrees well with the AEOS experimental results.

  17. Optical Techniques for Millimeter-Wave Phased Array Communications Antennas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edge, Colin

    1998-01-01

    The scope of this program was to study the application of optical techniques to signal distribution and beamforming networks in phased array antennas for Army mobile tactical communications systems...

  18. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  19. Metallic nanoparticles in a standing wave: Optical force and heating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Chvátal, Lukáš; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 126, September (2013), s. 84-90 ISSN 0022-4073 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP205/12/P868; GA MŠk LH12018; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Metallic nanoparticles * Optical trapping * Heating * Generalized Lorenz-Mie theory Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.288, year: 2013

  20. Focus on modern frontiers of matter wave optics and interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, Markus; Ekers, Aigars; Klitzing, Wolf von; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    The level of experimental control and the detailed theoretical understanding of matter wave physics have led to a renaissance of experiments testing the very foundations of quantum mechanics and general relativity, as well as to applications in metrology. A variety of interferometric quantum sensors surpasses, or will surpass, the limits of their classical counterparts, for instance in the measurement of frequency and time or forces such as accelerations due to rotation and gravity with applications in basic science, navigation and the search for natural resources. The collection of original articles published in this focus issue of New Journal of Physics is intended as a snapshot of the current research pursued by a number of leading teams working on the development of new matter wave physics, devices and techniques. A number of contributions also stress the close relation between the historic roots of quantum mechanics and aspects of modern quantum information science which are relevant for matter wave physics. (editorial)

  1. Wave-particle duality? not in optical computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2011-09-01

    Metaphysics has only one absolute requirement: It must account for the known physics. But many metaphysics account for light and they cannot all be right. We have only one metaphysical principle that is widely accepted (Einstein's minimum simplicity rule) and it gives no one answer. Even if we could enforce it, how would we prove its validity without a (meta)3principle? People like me who work with light are never confused about whether we are dealing with a particle or a wave. I find it useful to view light in terms even broader than the usual wave-particle description. I add a third kind of wave that is not measurable but also not restricted by the physics of the measurable. I find it difficult to account for light any other way.

  2. Optical-potential model for electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaway, J.; Oza, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    It is proposed that the addition of a matrix optical potential to a close-coupling calculation should lead to improved results in studies of electron-atom scattering. This procedure is described with use of a pseudostate expansion to evaluate the optical potential. The integro-differential equations are solved by a linear-algebraic method. As a test case, applications are made to electron-hydrogen scattering, and the results are compared with those obtained by other calculational procedures, and with experiment

  3. Potential of OFDM for next generation optical access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Daniel; Weis, Erik; Breuer, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows the requirements for next generation optical access (NGOA) networks and analyzes the potential of OFDM (orthogonal frequency division multiplexing) for the use in such network scenarios. First, we show the motivation for NGOA systems based on the future requirements on FTTH access systems and list the advantages of OFDM in such scenarios. In the next part, the basics of OFDM and different methods to generate and detect optical OFDM signals are explained and analyzed. At the transmitter side the options include intensity modulation and the more advanced field modulation of the optical OFDM signal. At the receiver there is the choice between direct detection and coherent detection. As the result of this discussion we show our vision of the future use of OFDM in optical access networks.

  4. State-dependent fluorescence of neutral atoms in optical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Dorantes, M.; Alt, W.; Gallego, J.; Ghosh, S.; Ratschbacher, L.; Meschede, D.

    2018-02-01

    Recently we have demonstrated scalable, nondestructive, and high-fidelity detection of the internal state of 87Rb neutral atoms in optical dipole traps using state-dependent fluorescence imaging [M. Martinez-Dorantes, W. Alt, J. Gallego, S. Ghosh, L. Ratschbacher, Y. Völzke, and D. Meschede, Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 180503 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.180503]. In this paper we provide experimental procedures and interpretations to overcome the detrimental effects of heating-induced trap losses and state leakage. We present models for the dynamics of optically trapped atoms during state-dependent fluorescence imaging and verify our results by comparing Monte Carlo simulations with experimental data. Our systematic study of dipole force fluctuations heating in optical traps during near-resonant illumination shows that off-resonant light is preferable for state detection in tightly confining optical potentials.

  5. Assessing the standard Molybdenum projector augmented wave VASP potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Ann E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Multi-Scale Science

    2014-07-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) based Equation of State (EOS) construction is a prominent part of Sandia’s capabilities to support engineering sciences. This capability is based on augmenting experimental data with information gained from computational investigations, especially in those parts of the phase space where experimental data is hard, dangerous, or expensive to obtain. A key part of the success of the Sandia approach is the fundamental science work supporting the computational capability. Not only does this work enhance the capability to perform highly accurate calculations but it also provides crucial insight into the limitations of the computational tools, providing high confidence in the results even where results cannot be, or have not yet been, validated by experimental data. This report concerns the key ingredient of projector augmented-wave (PAW) potentials for use in pseudo-potential computational codes. Using the tools discussed in SAND2012-7389 we assess the standard Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) PAWs for Molybdenum.

  6. Matter-wave interference, Josephson oscillation and its disruption in a Bose-Einstein condensate on an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, Sadhan K.

    2004-01-01

    Using the axially-symmetric time-dependent mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation we study the Josephson oscillation in a repulsive Bose-Einstein condensate trapped by a harmonic plus an one-dimensional optical-lattice potential to describe the experiments by Cataliotti et al. [Science 293 (2001) 843, New J. Phys. 5 (2003) 71.1]. After a study of the formation of matter-wave interference upon releasing the condensate from the optical trap, we directly investigate the alternating atomic superfluid Josephson current upon displacing the harmonic trap along the optical axis. The Josephson current is found to be disrupted upon displacing the harmonic trap through a distance greater than a critical distance signaling a superfluid to a classical insulator transition in the condensate

  7. A wave optics approach to the theory of the Michelson-Morley experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    A consistent classical wave optics approach to the theory of the Michelson-Morley experiment shows that the original theory as applied by Michelson and Morley and others does not calculate the optical paths of the two beams correctly, primarily because of incorrectly assuming a right angle reflection in the instrument’s reference frame for the transverse beam, but also because of the incorrect assumption of aberration for the wave fronts. The theory presented in this work proves the expected variation of the phase difference when rotating the interferometer to be more than twice as large and also strongly asymmetrical around the zero line.

  8. Development of Embedded Fiber-Optic Evanescent Wave Sensors for Optical Characterization of Graphite Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, AbdulRahman; Nieva, Patricia; Yu, Aiping; Khajepour, Amir

    2017-11-29

    The development, fabrication, and embedment of fiber-optic evanescent wave sensors (FOEWSs) to monitor the state of charge (SOC) and the state of health (SOH) of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are presented. Etching of FOEWSs is performed using a solution of 40 wt % ammonium fluoride (NH 4 F) and 49 wt % hydrofluoric acid (HF) (6:1), which is found to be superior to an etching solution containing just 49 wt % HF. FOEWSs were characterized using glycerol and found to have the highest sensitivity in a lithium-ion battery when they lose 92% of their transmittance in the presence of glycerol on their sensing region. The physical effect that the FOEWS has on the graphite anode is also investigated and is found to be much more significant in Swagelok cells compared to that in in-house-fabricated pouch cells, mainly due to pressure variation. The FOEWS was found to be most sensitive to the changes in the LIB when it was completely embedded using a slurry of graphite anode material within a pouch cell. The optimized fabrication process of the embedded FOEWS demonstrates the potential of using such sensors commercially for real-time monitoring of the SOC and SOH of LIBs while in operation.

  9. Experimental study of neutron-optical potential with absorption using Fabry-Perot magnetic resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, M.; Tasaki, S.; Ebisawa, T.; Kawai, T.; Achiwa, N.; Yamazaki, D.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Recently spin precession angles of neutrons tunneling and non-tunneling through [Permalloy45(PA)-germanium(Ge)]-PA Fabry-Perot magnetic resonator have been observed [1]. The spin precession angle is well reproduced by the theoretical phase difference of up and down spin neutron wave function based on one-dimensional Schroedinger equation using optical potential model [2]. Spin precession angle and transmission probability of neutron through PA-(Ge/Gd)-PA Fabry-Perot magnetic resonator are presented, where the gap(Ge/Gd) layer consists of germanium and gadolinium atoms, and the optical potential model for magnetic multilayer system with absorption is discussed. (author) [1] M. Hino, et al., Physica B 241-243, 1083 (1998).; [2] S. Yamada, et al., Annu. Rep. Res. Reactor Inst. Kyoto Univ. 11, 8 (1978)

  10. 10 GHz Standing-Wave Coplanar Stripline on LiNbO3 Crystal for Radio to Optical-Wave Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwis, F.; Wijayanto, Y. N.; Setiawan, A.; Mahmudin, D.; Rahman, A. N.; Daud, P.

    2018-04-01

    Recently, X-band radar systems are used widely for surveillance and navigation applications. Especially in archipelago or maritime country, the surveillance/navigation radar systems are required to monitoring critical areas and managing marine traffic. Accurate detection and fast analysis should be improved furthermore to provide security and safety condition. Therefore, several radar systems should be installed in many places to coverage the critical areas within radar networks. The radar network can be connected using optical fibers since it has extremely low propagation loss with optical-wave to carry-out the radar-wave. One important component in the scenario is a radio to optical-wave conversion component. In this paper, we report a 10 GHz radio to optical-wave conversion component using standing-wave coplanar stripline (CPS) on LiNbO3 optical crystal as the substrate. The standing-wave CPS electrodes with narrow slot are arranged in an array structure. An optical waveguide is located close to the narrow slot. The CPS electrodes were analysed using electromagnetic analysis software for 10 GHz operational frequency. Responses for slot width and electrode length variation are reported. As results, return loss of -14.580 dB and -19.517 dB are obtained for single and array CPS electrodes respectively. Optimization of the designed radio to optical-wave conversion devices was also done.

  11. Optical potential study of electron scattering by rubidium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, J. H.; Ratnavelu, K. [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Zhou, Y. [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2011-10-15

    The coupled-channel optical method (CCOM) has been implemented in a study of electronrubidium scattering. This method includes the continuum effect in the calculation via an ab-initio optical potential. Eight atomic states (5s, 5p, 4d, 6s, 6p, 5d, 7s, 7p) were used together with the continuum optical potential in the 5s-5s, 5s-5p, and 5p-5p coupling. The elastic, inelastic and total cross sections for electron-rubidium scattering at low and intermediate energies, ranging from 10 eV to 100 eV, are reported. The results are compared with available experimental and theoretical data.

  12. The effects of scattering on the relative LPI performance of optical and mm-wave systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetting, John; Hampton, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    Previous results comparing the LPI performance of optical and millimeter-wave satellite systems is extended to include the effects of scattering on optical LPI performance. The LPI figure of merit used to compare the two media is the circular equivalent vulnerability radius (CEVR). The CEVR is calculated for typical optical and spread spectrum millimeter-wave systems, and the LPI performance tradeoffs available with each medium are compared. Attention is given to the possibility that light will be scattered into the interceptor's FOV and thereby enable detection in geometries in which interception of the main beam is impossible. The effects of daytime vs. nighttime operation of the optical LPI system are also considered. Some illustrative results for the case of a ground-to-space uplink to a low earth orbit satellite are presented, along with some conclusions and unresolved issues for further study.

  13. Frequency modulation and compression of optical pulses in an optical fibre with a travelling refractive-index wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotovskii, I O; Lapin, V A; Sementsov, D I [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-31

    We have studied the conditions for spectral broadening, frequency modulation and compression (both temporal and spectral) of Gaussian pulses propagating in a fibre with a travelling refractive-index wave. Analytical expressions have been derived for the dependences of pulse duration, chirp and spectral width on the distance travelled through the fibre, parameters of the fibre and radiation launched into it. Based on the numerical analysis we have studied the behaviour of these characteristics by changing the coefficient of the refractive-index modulation and other parameters of the travelling refractive-index wave. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  14. Diagnostics of gas behind shock waves by refractive optical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaha, J.

    In a brief outline of optical methods for measuring neutral gas and plasma parameters, techniques are specifically dealt with based on the interferometric measurement of the refractive index. The investigation is shown of gas density changes in a shock tube using the optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer. While in a neutral gas the refractive index is determined by gas density, in a plasma the effects of all components, ie., electrons, ions and atoms are additive. The contributions to refraction from the various components may, in view of the different character and frequencies of the components, be resolved by measurement on more than one wavelength. (J.U.)

  15. The Potential for Wave Energy in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H. C.; Chozas, Julia Fernandez

    2010-01-01

    The North Sea has not yet been regarded as prime area for wave energy development in Europe except in Denmark, Benelux and Germany. The reason is the relatively low intensity of waves (12-17kW/m) compared to the Atlantic with a wave climate of 24-48kW/m. Further on the design wave load is almost ...... is resulting in a prediction of a yearly production of 23TWh; the latter is estimating a yearly production of 77TWh. This equals to 6% of the electricity demand around the North Sea, where the annual electricity consumption is about 1,300TWh.......The North Sea has not yet been regarded as prime area for wave energy development in Europe except in Denmark, Benelux and Germany. The reason is the relatively low intensity of waves (12-17kW/m) compared to the Atlantic with a wave climate of 24-48kW/m. Further on the design wave load is almost...... as in the Atlantic and the distance to shore relatively long compared to sites with good wave climate like Ireland, Portugal, Spain and the west coast of UK. The increasing activities within offshore wind in the North Sea and the attempt to build a super grid connecting the wind sites with the major consumers around...

  16. The optical potential for thermal neutrons in second approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, E.

    1980-01-01

    After the construction of an expansion of the transfer operator for neutron scattering in terms of the scattering length the optical potential for coherent scattering is derived whereby the corrections due to the dynamic properties of the scattering system are discussed. (HSI) [de

  17. Wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth and associated radiative impacts over the central Himalayan region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Kumar, K.  Niranjan; Reddy, Kishore; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Newsom, Rob K.; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-10-01

    Doppler Lidar and Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) observations are utilized to show wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth (AOD) during daytime boundary layer evolution over the Himalayan region. Fourier analysis depicted 60–80 min periods dominant during afternoon hours, implying that observed modulations could be plausible reason for the AOD forenoon–afternoon asymmetry which was previously reported. Inclusion of wave amplitude in diurnal variation of aerosol radiative forcing estimates showed ~40% additional warming in the atmosphere relative to mean AOD. The present observations emphasize the importance of wave induced variations in AOD and radiation budget over the site.

  18. PIPIT: a momentum space optical potential code for pions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenstein, R A [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Physics; Tabakin, F [Pittsburgh Univ., Pa. (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1976-11-01

    Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of pions are generated by summing a partial wave series. The elastic T-matrix elements for each partial wave are obtained by solving a relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equation in momentum space using a matrix inversion technique. Basically the Coulomb interaction is included exactly using the method of Vincent and Phatak. The ..pi..N amplitude is obtained from phase shift information on-shell and incorporates a separable off-shell form factor to ensure a physically reasonable off-shell extrapolation. The ..pi..N interaction is of finite range and a kinematic transformation procedure is used to express the ..pi..N amplitude in the ..pi.. nucleus frame. A maximum of 30 partial waves can be used in the present version of the program to calculate the cross section. The Lippmann-Schwinger equation is presently solved for each partial wave by inverting a 34x34 supermatrix. At very high energies, larger dimensions may be required. The present version of the code uses a separable non-local ..pi..N potential of finite range; other types of non-localities, or non-separable potentials, may be of physical interest.

  19. Fast neutron capture and the microscopic isovector optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarty, D.R.; Gupta, S.K.

    Neutron capture cross-sections are calculated with the direct-semidirect model employing the complex microscopic optical potential recently calculated by Jeukenne, Lejoune and Mahaux. The data for 89 Y, Ce and 208 Pb for Esub(n)=6-16 MeV agree well with the calculation for a twofold increase in the magnitude of the isovector part of the microscopic potential. (auth.)

  20. Shock wave propagation in soda lime glass using optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-16

    Jun 16, 2016 ... probe beam in the transverse direction coupled with an optical streak .... (650 ps) was split using a beam splitter after the fifth amplifier stage in the ..... [17] A S Joshi et al, Fusion Engg. Design 44, 067 (1999). [18] A K Sharma ...

  1. Switching waves dynamics in optical bistable cavity-free system at femtosecond laser pulse propagation in semiconductor under light diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Egorenkov, Vladimir A.; Loginova, Maria M.

    2018-02-01

    We consider a propagation of laser pulse in a semiconductor under the conditions of an occurrence of optical bistability, which appears due to a nonlinear absorption of the semiconductor. As a result, the domains of high concentration of free charged particles (electrons and ionized donors) occur if an intensity of the incident optical pulse is greater than certain intensity. As it is well-known, that an optical beam must undergo a diffraction on (or reflection from) the domains boundaries. Usually, the beam diffraction along a coordinate of the optical pulse propagation does not take into account by using the slowly varying envelope approximation for the laser pulse interaction with optical bistable element. Therefore, a reflection of the beam from the domains with abrupt boundary does not take into account under computer simulation of the laser pulse propagation. However, the optical beams, reflected from nonhomogeneities caused by the domains of high concentration of free-charged particles, can essentially influence on a formation of switching waves in a semiconductor. We illustrate this statement by computer simulation results provided on the base of nonlinear Schrödinger equation and a set of PDEs, which describe an evolution of the semiconductor characteristics (concentrations of free-charged particles and potential of an electric field strength), and taking into account the longitudinal and transverse diffraction effects.

  2. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MC 0407, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0407 (United States)

    2017-02-12

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained. - Highlights: • High frequency electrostatic wave propagation is investigated in a dense semi-bounded quantum plasma. • The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. • The quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. • The frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave. • The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  3. Continuous-wave optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Liu, Zhixiong; Alatawi, Abdullah; Ng, Tien Khee; Wu, Tao; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    We report an optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter operating in continuous-wave (CW) with a power density threshold of ~89 kW/cm2. The device has an active region of CH3NH3PbBr3 embedded in a dielectric microcavity

  4. Scaling relations for soliton compression and dispersive-wave generation in tapered optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, scaling relations for soliton compression in tapered optical fibers are derived and discussed. The relations allow simple and semi-accurate estimates of the compression point and output noise level, which is useful, for example, for tunable dispersive-wave generation with an agile ...

  5. Short-period AM CVn systems as optical, X-ray and gravitational-wave sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelemans, G.; Yungelson, L.; Portegies Zwart, S.F.

    2004-01-01

    We model the population of AM CVn systems in the Galaxy and discuss the detectability of these systems with optical, X-ray and gravitational-wave detectors. We concentrate on the short-period (P < 1500 s) systems, some of which are expected to be in a phase of direct-impact accretion. Using a

  6. Equivalent circuit modelling of integrated traveling-wave optical modulator in InP foundry platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, W.; Gilardi, G.; Smit, M.K.; Wale, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an electro-optical model for traveling-wave modulator devices utilizing measurement-based equivalent circuit model extraction in conjunction with microwave CAD simulation techniques. Model verification is performed with frequencydomain and time-domain characterization of an

  7. Continuous-wave Optically Pumped Lasing of Hybrid Perovskite VCSEL at Green Wavelength

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2017-05-08

    We demonstrate the lasing of a perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser at green wavelengths, which operates under continuous-wave optical pumping at room-temperature by embedding hybrid perovskite between dielectric mirrors deposited at low-temperature.

  8. Continuous-wave Optically Pumped Lasing of Hybrid Perovskite VCSEL at Green Wavelength

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Liu, Zhixiong; Alatawi, Abdullah; Ng, Tien Khee; Wu, Tao; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the lasing of a perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser at green wavelengths, which operates under continuous-wave optical pumping at room-temperature by embedding hybrid perovskite between dielectric mirrors deposited at low-temperature.

  9. Strain Wave Acquisition by a Fiber Optic Coherent Sensor for Impact Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarufatti, Claudio; Beligni, Alessio; Gilioli, Andrea; Ferrario, Maddalena; Mattarei, Marco; Martinelli, Mario; Giglio, Marco

    2017-07-13

    A novel fiber optic sensing technology for high frequency dynamics detection is proposed in this paper, specifically tailored for structural health monitoring applications based on strain wave analysis, for both passive impact identification and active Lamb wave monitoring. The sensing solution relies on a fiber optic-based interferometric architecture associated to an innovative coherent detection scheme, which retrieves in a completely passive way the high-frequency phase information of the received optical signal. The sensing fiber can be arranged into different layouts, depending on the requirement of the specific application, in order to enhance the sensor sensitivity while still ensuring a limited gauge length if punctual measures are required. For active Lamb wave monitoring, this results in a sensing fiber arranged in multiple loops glued on an aluminum thin panel in order to increase the phase signal only in correspondence to the sensing points of interest. Instead, for passive impact identification, the required sensitivity is guaranteed by simply exploiting a longer gauge length glued to the structure. The fiber optic coherent (FOC) sensor is exploited to detect the strain waves emitted by a piezoelectric transducer placed on the aluminum panel or generated by an impulse hammer, respectively. The FOC sensor measurements have been compared with both a numerical model based on Finite Elements and traditional piezoelectric sensors, confirming a good agreement between experimental and simulated results for both active and passive impact monitoring scenarios.

  10. Energy-Dependent microscopic optical potential for p+{sup 9}Be elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maridi, H. M., E-mail: h.maridi@gmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt); Physics Department, Faculty of Applied Science, Taiz University, Taiz (Yemen); Farag, M. Y. H., E-mail: yehiafarag@cu.edu.eg; Esmael, E. H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Applied Science, Taiz University, Taiz (Yemen)

    2016-06-10

    The p+{sup 9}Be elastic scattering at an energy range up to 200 MeV/nucleon is analyzed using the single-folding model. The density- and isospin-dependent M3Y-Paris nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is used for the real part and the NN-scattering amplitude of the high-energy approximation for the imaginary one. The analysis reveals that the cross-section data are reproduced well at energies up to 100 MeV/nucleon by use of the partial-wave expansion. For higher energies, the eikonal approximation give results better than the partial-wave expansion calculations. The volume integrals of the optical-potential parts have systematic energy dependencies, and they are parameterized in empirical formulas.

  11. Wave energy potential: A forecasting system for the Mediterranean basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carillo, Adriana; Sannino, Gianmaria; Lombardi, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    ENEA is performing ocean wave modeling activities with the aim of both characterizing the Italian sea energy resource and providing the information necessary for the experimental at sea and operational phases of energy converters. Therefore a forecast system of sea waves and of the associated energy available has been developed and has been operatively running since June 2013. The forecasts are performed over the entire Mediterranean basin and, at a higher resolution, over ten sub-basins around the Italian coasts. The forecast system is here described along with the validation of the wave heights, performed by comparing them with the measurements from satellite sensors. [it

  12. Wave optics modeling of real-time holographic wavefront compensation systems using OSSim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Margarita A.; Guthals, Dennis M.; Logan, Jerry D.

    2005-08-01

    OSSim (Optical System Simulation) is a wave-optics, time-domain simulation toolbox with both optical and data processing components developed for adaptive optics (AO) systems. Diffractive wavefront control elements have recently been added that accurately model optically and electrically addressed spatial light modulators as real time holographic (RTH) devices in diffractive wavefront control systems. The developed RTH toolbox has found multiple applications for a variety of Boeing programs in solving problems of AO system analysis and design. Several complex diffractive wavefront control systems have been modeled for compensation of static and dynamic aberrations such as imperfect segmented primary mirrors and atmospheric and boundary layer turbulence. The results of OSSim simulations of RTH wavefront compensation show very good agreement with available experimental data.

  13. Three-body approach to the nucleon-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandy, P.C.; Redish, E.F.; Bolle, D.

    1976-01-01

    In the Watson single scattering theory of the optical potential it is customary to approximate the propagation by two-body Green functions in order to simplify calculations. The reaction mechanism being described, however, is decidedly three-body in character. The central difficulty in building three-body models for nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering is to find the proper way of imbedding the superposed three-body reaction mechanism in the many-body problem without introducing serious overcounting effects. One would also like an explicit description of the intermediate state processes responsible for absorption. In this paper a three-body approximation to the optical potential theory is presented which overcomes the overcounting problem and is capable of including the following effects: (1) the proper kinematics of the struck nucleon, (2) its binding potential, (3) the identity of target nucleons, and (4) realistic wave functions and spectroscopic factors. The three-body model for the optical potential can be extended using unitarity methods to yield a unified three-body-like model of elastic scattering, pickup, and single nucleon knockout. (Auth.)

  14. How deep is the antinucleon optical potential at FAIR energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaitanos, T.; Kaskulov, M.; Lenske, H.

    2011-01-01

    The key question in the interaction of antinucleons in the nuclear medium concerns the deepness of the antinucleon-nucleus optical potential. In this work we study this task in the framework of the non-linear derivative (NLD) model which describes consistently bulk properties of nuclear matter and Dirac phenomenology of nucleon-nucleus interactions. We apply the NLD model to antinucleon interactions in nuclear matter and find a strong decrease of the vector and scalar self-energies in energy and density and thus a strong suppression of the optical potential at zero momentum and, in particular, at FAIR energies. This is in agreement with available empirical information and, therefore, resolves the issue concerning the incompatibility of G-parity arguments in relativistic mean-field (RMF) models. We conclude the relevance of our results for the future activities at FAIR.

  15. New exact travelling wave solutions for two potential coupled KdV equations with symbolic computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zonghang

    2007-01-01

    We find new exact travelling wave solutions for two potential KdV equations which are presented by Foursov [Foursov MV. J Math Phys 2000;41:6173-85]. Compared with the extended tanh-function method, the algorithm used in our paper can obtain some new kinds of exact travelling wave solutions. With the aid of symbolic computation, some novel exact travelling wave solutions of the potential KdV equations are constructed

  16. Intermediate-energy nuclear photoabsorption and the pion optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christillin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear photoabsorption around the pion threshold is schematised as photoproduction of a pion which undergoes final-stae interaction with the nucleus, accounted for by the pion optical potential. It is shown that real pion photoproduction and exchange effects are naturally described by the same mechanism with a non-static pion. The complementarity of photoabsorption to pion physics and its usefulness in gaining new information about pion-nucleus dynamics are stressed. (author)

  17. Assessment of wave energy potential along the south coast of Java Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qingyang; Mayerle, Roberto

    2018-04-01

    The south coast of Java Island has a great potential for wave energy. A long-term analysis of a 10-year wave dataset obtained from the ERA-Interim database is performed for preliminary wave energy assessment in this area, and it was seen that the annual median power is expected to exceed 20kW/m along the coast. A coastal wave model with an unstructured grid was run to reveal the wave conditions and to assess the wave energy potential along the coast in detail. The effect of swells and local wind on the wave conditions is investigated. Annual median wave power, water depth and distance from the coast are selected as criteria for the identification of suitable locations for wave energy conversion. Two zones within the study area emerge to be suitable for wave energy extraction. Swells from the southwest turned out to be the major source of wave energy and highest monthly median wave power reached about 33kW/m.

  18. Photonic synthesis of continuous‐wave millimeter‐wave signals using a passively mode‐locked laser diode and selective optical filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acedo, P.; Carpintero, G.; Criado, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    We report a photonic synthesis scheme for continuous wave millimeter‐wave signal generation using a single passively mode‐locked laser diode (PMLLD), optical filtering and photomixing in a fast photodiode.The phase noise of the photonically synthesized signals is evaluated and inherits...

  19. 320-to-40-Gb/s optical demultiplexing using four-wave mixing in a quantum-dot soa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsuura, M.; Gomez-Agis, F.; Calabretta, N.; Raz, O.; Dorren, H.J.S.

    2012-01-01

    We report, for the first time, the optical demultiplexing of a 320-Gb/s intensity-modulated signal using four-wave mixing in a quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier. Error-free operations were successfully achieved for all the 40-Gb/s channels extracted by the optical demultiplexer.

  20. Conversion of optical wave polarizations in 1D finite anisotropic photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchani, N.; Nougaoui, N.; Daoudi, A.; Bria, D.

    2006-07-01

    We show that by using one dimensional anisotropic photonic structures, it is possible to realize optical wave polarization conversion by transmission or by reflection. Thus a single incident S(P) polarized plane wave can produce a single reflected P(S) polarized wave and a single transmitted P(S) polarized wave. This polarization conversion property can be fulfilled with a simple finite superlattice constituted by anisotropic dielectric materials. We discuss the appropriate choices of the material and geometrical properties to realize such structures. The transmission and reflection coefficients are discussed in relation with the dispersion curves of the finite structure embedded between two isotropic substrates. Both transmission and reflection coefficients are calculated in the framework of Green's function method. The amplitude and the polarization characteristics of reflected and transmitted waves are determined as function of frequency ω , and wave vector k parallel ( parallel to the interface) and the orientations of the principal axes of the layers constituting the SL. Moreover, this structure exhibits a coupling between S and P waves that does not exist in SL composed only of isotropic materials. Specific applications of these results are given for a superlattice consisting of alternating biaxial anisotropic layers NaNO 2 /SbSi sandwiched between two identical semi-infinite isotropic media. (author)

  1. Sound waves and dynamics of superfluid Fermi gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Aixia; Xue Jukui

    2009-01-01

    The sound waves, the stability of Bloch waves, the Bloch oscillation, and the self-trapping phenomenon in interacting two-component Fermi gases throughout the BEC-BCS crossover in one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) optical lattices are discussed in detail. Within the hydrodynamical theory and by using the perturbative and tight-binding approximation, sound speed in both weak and tight 1D, 2D, 3D optical lattices, and the criteria for occurrences of instability of Bloch waves and self-trapping of Fermi gases along the whole BEC-BCS crossover in tight 1D, 2D, 3D optical lattices are obtained analytically. The results show that the sound speed, the criteria for occurrences of instability of Bloch waves and self-trapping, and the destruction of Bloch oscillation are modified dramatically by the lattice parameters (lattice dimension and lattice strength), the atom density or atom number, and the atom interaction.

  2. Black-hole quasinormal resonances: Wave analysis versus a geometric-optics approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2009-01-01

    It has long been known that null unstable geodesics are related to the characteristic modes of black holes--the so-called quasinormal resonances. The basic idea is to interpret the free oscillations of a black hole in the eikonal limit in terms of null particles trapped at the unstable circular orbit and slowly leaking out. The real part of the complex quasinormal resonances is related to the angular velocity at the unstable null geodesic. The imaginary part of the resonances is related to the instability time scale (or the inverse Lyapunov exponent) of the orbit. While this geometric-optics description of the black-hole quasinormal resonances in terms of perturbed null rays is very appealing and intuitive, it is still highly important to verify the validity of this approach by directly analyzing the Teukolsky wave equation which governs the dynamics of perturbation waves in the black-hole spacetime. This is the main goal of the present paper. We first use the geometric-optics technique of perturbing a bundle of unstable null rays to calculate the resonances of near-extremal Kerr black holes in the eikonal approximation. We then directly solve the Teukolsky wave equation (supplemented by the appropriate physical boundary conditions) and show that the resultant quasinormal spectrum obtained directly from the wave analysis is in accord with the spectrum obtained from the geometric-optics approximation of perturbed null rays.

  3. Resonant tunneling of spin-wave packets via quantized states in potential wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ulf-Hendrik; Gatzen, Marius; Demidov, Vladislav E; Demokritov, Sergej O

    2007-09-21

    We have studied the tunneling of spin-wave pulses through a system of two closely situated potential barriers. The barriers represent two areas of inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field, where the existence of spin waves is forbidden. We show that for certain values of the spin-wave frequency corresponding to the quantized spin-wave states existing in the well formed between the barriers, the tunneling has a resonant character. As a result, transmission of spin-wave packets through the double-barrier structure is much more efficient than the sequent tunneling through two single barriers.

  4. Modeling of open quantum dots and wave billiards using imaginary potentials for the source and the sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berggren, Karl-Fredrik; Yakimenko, Irina I; Hakanen, Jani

    2010-01-01

    A heuristic model for particle states and current flow in open ballistic two-dimensional (2D) quantum dots/wave billiards is proposed. The model makes use of complex potentials first introduced in phenomenological nuclear inelastic scattering theory (the optical model). Here we assume that external input and output leads connecting the system to the source and the drain regions may be represented by complex potentials. In this way, a current may be set up between the two 'pseudo-leads'. Probability densities and current flows for an open quantum dot are analyzed here numerically and the results are compared with the microwave measurements used to emulate the system. The model is of conceptual as well as practical interest. In addition to quantum billiards, it may be used as a tool per se to analyze transport in classical wave analogues, such as microwave resonators, acoustic resonators, effects of leakage on such systems, etc.

  5. The potential for very high-frequency gravitational wave detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruise, A M

    2012-01-01

    The science case for observing gravitational waves at frequencies in the millihertz-kilohertz range using LIGO, VIRGO, GEO600 or LISA is very strong and the first results are expected at these frequencies. However, as gravitational wave astronomy progresses beyond the first detections, other frequency bands may be worth exploring. Early predictions of gravitational wave emission from discrete sources at very much higher frequencies (megahertz and above) have been published and more recent studies of cosmological signals from inflation, Kaluza-Klein modes from gravitational interactions in brane worlds and plasma instabilities surrounding violent astrophysical events, are all possible sources. This communication examines current observational possibilities and the detector technology required to make meaningful observations at these frequencies. (paper)

  6. Integration of LCoS-SLM and LabVIEW based software to simulate fundamental optics, wave optics, and Fourier optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Bo-Han; Wang, Chen; Tsai, Chun-Wei

    2017-08-01

    Jasper Display Corp. (JDC) offer high reflectivity, high resolution Liquid Crystal on Silicon - Spatial Light Modulator (LCoS-SLM) which include an associated controller ASIC and LabVIEW based modulation software. Based on this LCoS-SLM, also called Education Kit (EDK), we provide a training platform which includes a series of optical theory and experiments to university students. This EDK not only provides a LabVIEW based operation software to produce Computer Generated Holograms (CGH) to generate some basic diffraction image or holographic image, but also provides simulation software to verity the experiment results simultaneously. However, we believe that a robust LCoSSLM, operation software, simulation software, training system, and training course can help students to study the fundamental optics, wave optics, and Fourier optics more easily. Based on these fundamental knowledges, they could develop their unique skills and create their new innovations on the optoelectronic application in the future.

  7. Contrast improvement of continuous wave diffuse optical tomography reconstruction by hybrid approach using least square and genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Rusha; Dutta, Pranab K.

    2015-07-01

    Reconstruction of the absorption coefficient of tissue with good contrast is of key importance in functional diffuse optical imaging. A hybrid approach using model-based iterative image reconstruction and a genetic algorithm is proposed to enhance the contrast of the reconstructed image. The proposed method yields an observed contrast of 98.4%, mean square error of 0.638×10-3, and object centroid error of (0.001 to 0.22) mm. Experimental validation of the proposed method has also been provided with tissue-like phantoms which shows a significant improvement in image quality and thus establishes the potential of the method for functional diffuse optical tomography reconstruction with continuous wave setup. A case study of finger joint imaging is illustrated as well to show the prospect of the proposed method in clinical diagnosis. The method can also be applied to the concentration measurement of a region of interest in a turbid medium.

  8. Current use and potential of additive manufacturing for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelle, Matthew; Ferralli, Ian; Whitsitt, Rebecca; Medicus, Kate

    2017-10-01

    Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, has become widely used in recent years for the creation of both prototype and end-use parts. Because the parts are created in a layer-by-layer manner, the flexibility of additive manufacturing is unparalleled and has opened the design space to enable features like undercuts and internal channels which cannot exist on traditional, subtractively manufactured parts. This flexibility can also be leveraged for optical applications. This paper outlines some of the current uses of 3D printing in the optical manufacturing process at Optimax. Several materials and additive technologies are utilized, including polymer printing through fused deposition modeling, which creates parts by depositing a softened thermoplastic filament in a layerwise fashion. Stereolithography, which uses light to cure layers of a photopolymer resin, will also be discussed. These technologies are used to manufacture functional prototypes, fixtures, sealed housings, and other components. Additionally, metal printing through selective laser melting, which uses a laser to melt metal powder layers into a dense solid, will be discussed due to the potential to manufacture thermally stable opticalmechanical assembly frameworks and functional optics. Examples of several additively manufactured optical components will be shown.

  9. Metamaterials, from electromagnetic waves to water waves, bending waves and beyond

    KAUST Repository

    Dupont, G.

    2015-08-04

    We will review our recent work on metamaterials for different types of waves. Transposition of transform optics to water waves and bending waves on plates will be considered with potential applications of cloaking to water waves protection and anti-vibrating systems.

  10. Extended Bose Hubbard model of interacting bosonic atoms in optical lattices: From superfluidity to density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzarella, G.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2006-01-01

    For systems of interacting, ultracold spin-zero neutral bosonic atoms, harmonically trapped and subject to an optical lattice potential, we derive an Extended Bose Hubbard (EBH) model by developing a systematic expansion for the Hamiltonian of the system in powers of the lattice parameters and of a scale parameter, the lattice attenuation factor. We identify the dominant terms that need to be retained in realistic experimental conditions, up to nearest-neighbor interactions and nearest-neighbor hoppings conditioned by the on-site occupation numbers. In the mean field approximation, we determine the free energy of the system and study the phase diagram both at zero and at finite temperature. At variance with the standard on site Bose Hubbard model, the zero-temperature phase diagram of the EBH model possesses a dual structure in the Mott insulating regime. Namely, for specific ranges of the lattice parameters, a density wave phase characterizes the system at integer fillings, with domains of alternating mean occupation numbers that are the atomic counterparts of the domains of staggered magnetizations in an antiferromagnetic phase. We show as well that in the EBH model, a zero-temperature quantum phase transition to pair superfluidity is, in principle, possible, but completely suppressed at the lowest order in the lattice attenuation factor. Finally, we determine the possible occurrence of the different phases as a function of the experimentally controllable lattice parameters

  11. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-16

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  12. Matter-wave two-dimensional solitons in crossed linear and nonlinear optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, H. L. F. da; Gammal, A.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Salerno, M.; Tomio, Lauro

    2010-01-01

    The existence of multidimensional matter-wave solitons in a crossed optical lattice (OL) with a linear optical lattice (LOL) in the x direction and a nonlinear optical lattice (NOL) in the y direction, where the NOL can be generated by a periodic spatial modulation of the scattering length using an optically induced Feshbach resonance is demonstrated. In particular, we show that such crossed LOLs and NOLs allow for stabilizing two-dimensional solitons against decay or collapse for both attractive and repulsive interactions. The solutions for the soliton stability are investigated analytically, by using a multi-Gaussian variational approach, with the Vakhitov-Kolokolov necessary criterion for stability; and numerically, by using the relaxation method and direct numerical time integrations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Very good agreement of the results corresponding to both treatments is observed.

  13. Matter-wave two-dimensional solitons in crossed linear and nonlinear optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, H. L. F.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Gammal, A.; Salerno, M.; Tomio, Lauro

    2010-10-01

    The existence of multidimensional matter-wave solitons in a crossed optical lattice (OL) with a linear optical lattice (LOL) in the x direction and a nonlinear optical lattice (NOL) in the y direction, where the NOL can be generated by a periodic spatial modulation of the scattering length using an optically induced Feshbach resonance is demonstrated. In particular, we show that such crossed LOLs and NOLs allow for stabilizing two-dimensional solitons against decay or collapse for both attractive and repulsive interactions. The solutions for the soliton stability are investigated analytically, by using a multi-Gaussian variational approach, with the Vakhitov-Kolokolov necessary criterion for stability; and numerically, by using the relaxation method and direct numerical time integrations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Very good agreement of the results corresponding to both treatments is observed.

  14. Near-to-eye electroholography via guided-wave acousto-optics for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Sundeep; Savidis, Nickolaos; Datta, Bianca; Smalley, Daniel; Bove, V. Michael

    2017-03-01

    Near-to-eye holographic displays act to directly project wavefronts into a viewer's eye in order to recreate 3-D scenes for augmented or virtual reality applications. Recently, several solutions for near-to-eye electroholography have been proposed based on digital spatial light modulators in conjunction with supporting optics, such as holographic waveguides for light delivery; however, such schemes are limited by the inherent low space-bandwidth product available with current digital SLMs. In this paper, we depict a fully monolithic, integrated optical platform for transparent near-to-eye holographic display requiring no supporting optics. Our solution employs a guided-wave acousto-optic spatial light modulator implemented in lithium niobate in conjunction with an integrated Bragg-regime reflection volume hologram.

  15. Vortex algebra by multiply cascaded four-wave mixing of femtosecond optical beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansinger, Peter; Maleshkov, Georgi; Garanovich, Ivan L; Skryabin, Dmitry V; Neshev, Dragomir N; Dreischuh, Alexander; Paulus, Gerhard G

    2014-05-05

    Experiments performed with different vortex pump beams show for the first time the algebra of the vortex topological charge cascade, that evolves in the process of nonlinear wave mixing of optical vortex beams in Kerr media due to competition of four-wave mixing with self-and cross-phase modulation. This leads to the coherent generation of complex singular beams within a spectral bandwidth larger than 200nm. Our experimental results are in good agreement with frequency-domain numerical calculations that describe the newly generated spectral satellites.

  16. A high-resolution assessment of wind and wave energy potentials in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Langodan, Sabique

    2016-08-24

    This study presents an assessment of the potential for harvesting wind and wave energy from the Red Sea based on an 18-year high-resolution regional atmospheric reanalysis recently generated using the Advanced Weather Research Forecasting model. This model was initialized with ERA-Interim global data and the Red Sea reanalysis was generated using a cyclic three-dimensional variational approach assimilating available data in the region. The wave hindcast was generated using WAVEWATCH III on a 5 km resolution grid, forced by the Red Sea reanalysis surface winds. The wind and wave products were validated against data from buoys, scatterometers and altimeters. Our analysis suggests that the distribution of wind and wave energy in the Red Sea is inhomogeneous and is concentrated in specific areas, characterized by various meteorological conditions including weather fronts, mesoscale vortices, land and sea breezes and mountain jets. A detailed analysis of wind and wave energy variation was performed at three hotspots representing the northern, central and southern parts of the Red Sea. Although there are potential sites for harvesting wind energy from the Red Sea, there are no potential sites for harvesting wave energy because wave energy in the Red Sea is not strong enough for currently available wave energy converters. Wave energy should not be completely ignored, however, at least from the perspective of hybrid wind-wave projects. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Electromagnetic Lead Screw for Potential Wave Energy Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Wu, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type electromagnetic lead screw (EMLS) intended for wave energy application. Similar to the mechanical lead screw, this electromagnetic version can transfer slow linear motion to high-rotational motion, offering gearing effects. Compared with the existing pure magnetic...

  18. Semiconductor Laser Complex Dynamics: From Optical Neurons to Optical Rogue Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-11

    completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or   any other aspect of this collection of...Fisica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Colom 11, E-08222 Terrassa, Spain (Dated: February 11, 2017) ∗ cristina.masoller@upc.edu...optics communi- cations, optical data storage, life sciences applications, material processing and sensing. They have a huge economic impact and are

  19. Accuracy of Alcon WaveLight® EX500 optical pachymetry during LASIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mifflin MD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mark D Mifflin,1 Xavier M Mortensen,1 Brent S Betts,1 Cole Gross,2 Brian Zaugg1 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 2University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, USA Purpose: To study the accuracy and reliability of optical pachymetry using the Alcon WaveLight EX500 during laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective chart review of 90 eyes from 45 patients who had undergone LASIK (mean age 35.2±8.2 years; 19 males, 26 females. The WaveLight FS200 femtosecond laser was programmed to cut LASIK flaps at a desired depth of 120 µm. Optical low-coherence reflectometry (WaveLight EX500 was used to measure central corneal thickness prior to lifting the flap, and the residual stromal bed immediately after excimer ablation. Flap thickness (FT was calculated using simple subtraction. Optical coherence tomography (OCT was used to measure central corneal thickness, flap thickness, and residual stromal bed in the postoperative period and the results compared to intraoperative measurements. Results: Mean programmed FS200 FT was 119 µm. Mean FT using EX500 optical pachymetry was 109 µm. The difference between FS200- programmed and EX500-measured FT was 9 µm (P<0.001. There was also a significant difference between the EX500 and OCT FT (109 µm vs 119 µm, respectively; P<0.001. Conclusion: FT values calculated using intraoperative EX500 optical pachymetry were significantly lower than programmed FS200 values or OCT measurements. Keywords: flap thickness, optical coherence tomography, femtosecond laser

  20. Potential applications of optical coherence tomography angiography in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastiridou, Anna; Chopra, Vikas

    2018-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a novel, noninvasive imaging modality that allows assessment of the retinal and choroidal vasculature. The scope of this review is to summarize recent studies using OCTA in glaucoma and highlight potential applications of this new technology in the field of glaucoma. OCTA studies have shown that retinal vascular changes may not develop solely as a result of advanced glaucoma damage. OCTA-derived measurements have provided evidence for lower retinal vascular densities at the optic nerve head, peripapillary and macula in preperimetric-glaucoma and early-glaucoma, as well as, in more advanced glaucoma, in comparison to with normal eyes. OCTA is a novel imaging modality that has already started to expand our knowledge base regarding the role of ocular blood flow in glaucoma. Future studies will better elucidate the role of OCTA-derived measurements in clinical practice, research, and clinical trials in glaucoma.

  1. One step linear reconstruction method for continuous wave diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhrowiyah, N.; Yasin, M.

    2017-09-01

    The method one step linear reconstruction method for continuous wave diffuse optical tomography is proposed and demonstrated for polyvinyl chloride based material and breast phantom. Approximation which used in this method is selecting regulation coefficient and evaluating the difference between two states that corresponding to the data acquired without and with a change in optical properties. This method is used to recovery of optical parameters from measured boundary data of light propagation in the object. The research is demonstrated by simulation and experimental data. Numerical object is used to produce simulation data. Chloride based material and breast phantom sample is used to produce experimental data. Comparisons of results between experiment and simulation data are conducted to validate the proposed method. The results of the reconstruction image which is produced by the one step linear reconstruction method show that the image reconstruction almost same as the original object. This approach provides a means of imaging that is sensitive to changes in optical properties, which may be particularly useful for functional imaging used continuous wave diffuse optical tomography of early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  2. Contribution to the study of the optical potentials used at low energy for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Nadine.

    1980-12-01

    The object of this work is essentially to determine optical potentials by simultaneous analysis of elastic and inelastic scattering. The theoretical concepts required for analyzing experimental results are introduced, then the optical model, the coupled equation as well as the double convolution potential are presented. The transfer of a nucleon will be studied by Born's approximation of distorted waves if the process is direct and in one single stage. But if the process occurs in two stages, it is Born's approximation of coupled paths that enables the inelastic collective excitations to be taken into account. The two stage process plays a significant part in peopling the highly collective states of the residual nucleus. The experimental techniques employed in order to obtain angular distributions are dealt with in Chapter III. Three types of different detections were utilized: a semi-conducting junction, a Buechner analysis magnet, then a magnetic spectrometer composed of a quadripole and three dipoles in succession, so as to better the energy resolutions. The analysis of the experimental results is divided into two chapters, chapters IV and V. The first is devoted to the heavier systems, namely the pair-pair isotopes of Ge and Ni, and deals exclusively with the problem of determining optical potentials and its ambiguities. The second one deals with the lighter systems relative to 28 Si. On the one hand, it aims to study the elastic and inelastic angular distributions at the intermediate angles with 16 O and 18 O ions and, on the other hand, to make use of the optical potentials in the study of the transfer of a nucleon, to wit the pick-up of a 28 Si( 15 N, 16 O) 27 Al proton and the stripping of a 28 Si( 15 N, 14 N) 29 Si neutron [fr

  3. Guided acoustic and optical waves in silicon-on-insulator for Brillouin scattering and optomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Sarabalis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We numerically study silicon waveguides on silica showing that it is possible to simultaneously guide optical and acoustic waves in the technologically important silicon on insulator (SOI material system. Thin waveguides, or fins, exhibit geometrically softened mechanical modes at gigahertz frequencies with phase velocities below the Rayleigh velocity in glass, eliminating acoustic radiation losses. We propose slot waveguides on glass with telecom optical frequencies and strong radiation pressure forces resulting in Brillouin gains on the order of 500 and 50 000 W−1m−1 for backward and forward Brillouin scattering, respectively.

  4. Influence of wavelength-dependent-loss on dispersive wave in nonlinear optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Rodrigo Acuna

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we study numerically the influence of wavelength-dependent loss on the generation of dispersive waves (DWs) in nonlinear fiber. This kind of loss can be obtained, for instance, by the acousto-optic effect in fiber optics. We show that this loss lowers DW frequency in an opposite way that the Raman effect does. Also, we see that the Raman effect does not change the DW frequency too much when wavelength-dependent loss is included. Finally, we show that the DW frequency is not practically affected by fiber length.

  5. Optical phase locking of two infrared continuous wave lasers separated by 100 THz

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chiodo, N.; Du-Burck, F.; Hrabina, Jan; Lours, M.; Chea, E.; Acef, O.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 10 (2014), s. 2936-2939 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P820; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk EE2.4.31.0016; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14FR040 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Continuous wave lasers * Frequency allocation * Harmonic generation * Laser optics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2014

  6. Wave function analysis of type-II self-assembled quantum dot structures using magneto-optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, Marcio Peron Franco de; Nakaema, Marcelo K.K.; Gomes, Paulo F.; Iikawa, Fernando; Brasil, Maria Jose S.P.; Bortoleto, Jose Roberto R.; Cotta, Monica A.; Ribeiro, Evaldo; Medeiros-Ribeiro, Gilberto; Marques, Gilmar E.; Bittencourt, A.C.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Recently, self-assembled quantum dots have attracted considerable attention for their potential for device applications. Type II interface, in particular, present interesting properties due to the space separation of the carriers. One of the carriers is confined at the lower band gap layer and the other remains at the barrier layers and is only localized by the Coulomb attraction. An essential information for using type II quantum wells and quantum dots on technological applications is the localization of the carrier wave function, which is an experimentally difficult parameter to be measured. Some techniques have been proposed to map the wave functions in quantum dots such as magneto-tunneling spectroscopy and near- field scanning optical microscopy. These techniques involve however a very complex experimental apparatus and sample processing. The magneto-exciton transition can be used as an alternative tool to investigate the exciton wave function distribution, since this distribution has a strong influence on the diamagnetic shift and Zeeman splitting. In this work, we present magneto-optical studies of In P/GaAs type II self-assembled quantum dots, where the electron is strongly confined at the In P, while the hole is weakly localized at the GaAs barrier due to the Coulombic attraction from the electrons. This scenery is very distinct from type I systems. The weaker hole confinement should alter the valence band mixing resulting in a different valence band contribution on the Zeeman splitting as compared to type I systems. Based on the results of the magneto-exciton emission from the wetting layer and from the individual dots, we obtained interesting results concerning the wave function distribution in our system. We discuss the localization of the hole wave function along the growth direction based on the measured Zeeman splitting and the in-plane wave function distribution, based on the observed diamagnetic shift. A remarkable result is that the

  7. Constant-intensity waves and their modulation instability in non-Hermitian potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, K. G.; Musslimani, Z. H.; Christodoulides, D. N.; Rotter, S.

    2015-07-01

    In all of the diverse areas of science where waves play an important role, one of the most fundamental solutions of the corresponding wave equation is a stationary wave with constant intensity. The most familiar example is that of a plane wave propagating in free space. In the presence of any Hermitian potential, a wave's constant intensity is, however, immediately destroyed due to scattering. Here we show that this fundamental restriction is conveniently lifted when working with non-Hermitian potentials. In particular, we present a whole class of waves that have constant intensity in the presence of linear as well as of nonlinear inhomogeneous media with gain and loss. These solutions allow us to study the fundamental phenomenon of modulation instability in an inhomogeneous environment. Our results pose a new challenge for the experiments on non-Hermitian scattering that have recently been put forward.

  8. Wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth and associated radiative impacts over the central Himalayan region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Kumar, K.  Niranjan; Reddy, Kishore; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Newsom, Rob K.; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we present a case study on 16 October 2011 to show the first observational evidence of the influence of short period gravity waves in aerosol transport during daytime over the central Himalayan region. The Doppler lidar data has been utilized to address the daytime boundary layer evolution and related aerosol dynamics over the site. Mixing layer height is estimated by wavelet covariance transform method and found to be ~ 0.7 km, AGL. Aerosol optical depth observations during daytime revealed an asymmetry showing clear enhancement during afternoon hours as compared to forenoon. Interestingly, Fourier and wavelet analysis of vertical velocity and attenuated backscatter showed similar 50-90 min short period gravity wave signatures during afternoon hours. Moreover, our observations showed that gravity waves are dominant within the boundary layer implying that the daytime boundary layer dynamics is playing a vital role in transporting the aerosols from surface to the top of the boundary layer. Similar modulations are also evident in surface parameters like temperature, relative humidity and wind speed indicating these waves are associated with the dynamical aspects over Himalayan region. Finally, time evolution of range-23 height indicator snapshots during daytime showed strong upward velocities especially during afternoon hours implying that convective processes through short period gravity waves plays a significant role in transporting aerosols from the nearby valley region to boundary layer top over the site. These observations also establish the importance of wave induced daytime convective boundary layer dynamics in the lower Himalayan region.

  9. Assessment of the Joint Development Potential of Wave and Wind Energy in the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The South China Sea is a major shipping hub between the West Pacific and Indian Oceans. In this region, the demand for energy is enormous, both for residents’ daily lives and for economic development. Wave energy and wind energy are two major clean and low-cost ocean sources of renewable energy. The reasonable development and utilization of these energy sources can provide a stable energy supply for coastal cities and remote islands of China. Before wave energy and wind energy development, however, we must assess the potential of each of these sources. Based on high-resolution and high-accuracy wave field data and wind field data obtained by ERA-Interim reanalysis for the recent 38-year period from 1979–2016, the joint development potential of wave energy and wind energy was assessed in detail for offshore and nearshore areas in the South China Sea. Based on potential installed capacity, the results revealed three promising areas for the joint development of nearshore wave energy and wind energy, including the Taiwan Strait, Luzon Strait and the sea southeast of the Indo-China Peninsula. For these three dominant areas (key stations, the directionality of wave energy and wind energy propagation were good in various seasons; the dominant wave conditions and the dominant wind conditions were the same, which is advantageous for the joint development of wave and wind energy. Existing well-known wave energy converters (WECs are not suitable for wave energy development in the areas of interest. Therefore, we must consider the distributions of wave conditions and develop more suitable WECs for these areas. The economic and environmental benefits of the joint development of wave and wind energy are high in these promising areas. The results described in this paper can provide references for the joint development of wave and wind energy in the South China Sea.

  10. Graphene based chalcogenide fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor for detection of hemoglobin in human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj K.; Gupta, Jyoti

    2018-03-01

    Fiber optic evanescent wave sensor with graphene as an absorption-enhancing layer to measure hemoglobin concentration in human blood is proposed. Previous modal functions and experimental results describing the variation of optical constants of human blood with different hemoglobin concentrations in the near-infrared spectral region are considered for sensor design simulation. The sensor's performance is closely analyzed in terms of its absorption coefficient, sensitivity, and detection limit. It is found that the proposed sensor should be operated at longer light wavelength to get more enhanced sensitivity and smaller detection limit. At 1000 nm wavelength, a detection limit of 18 μg/dL and sensitivity of 6.71 × 10-4 per g/dL is achievable with the proposed sensor. The sensitivity is found to be better for larger hemoglobin concentrations. The results are correlated with the evanescent wave penetration depth.

  11. Simplified description of optical forces acting on a nanoparticle in the Gaussian standing wave

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemánek, Pavel; Jonáš, Alexandr; Liška, M.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 5 (2002), s. 1025 - 1034 ISSN 0740-3232 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/98/P106; GA ČR GA202/99/0959; GA ČR GA101/00/0974 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : Gaussian tanding wave Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.688, year: 2002

  12. Soliton radiation beat analysis of optical pulses generated from two continuous-wave lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajnulina, M.; Böhm, M.; Blow, K.; Rieznik, A. A.; Giannone, D.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a fibre-based approach for generation of optical frequency combs (OFCs) with the aim of calibration of astronomical spectrographs in the low and medium-resolution range. This approach includes two steps: in the first step, an appropriate state of optical pulses is generated and subsequently moulded in the second step delivering the desired OFC. More precisely, the first step is realised by injection of two continuous-wave (CW) lasers into a conventional single-mode fibre, whereas the second step generates a broad OFC by using the optical solitons generated in step one as initial condition. We investigate the conversion of a bichromatic input wave produced by two initial CW lasers into a train of optical solitons, which happens in the fibre used as step one. Especially, we are interested in the soliton content of the pulses created in this fibre. For that, we study different initial conditions (a single cosine-hump, an Akhmediev breather, and a deeply modulated bichromatic wave) by means of soliton radiation beat analysis and compare the results to draw conclusion about the soliton content of the state generated in the first step. In case of a deeply modulated bichromatic wave, we observed the formation of a collective soliton crystal for low input powers and the appearance of separated solitons for high input powers. An intermediate state showing the features of both, the soliton crystal and the separated solitons, turned out to be most suitable for the generation of OFC for the purpose of calibration of astronomical spectrographs.

  13. Improved optical properties and detectivity of an uncooled silicon carbide mid-wave infrared optical detector with increased dopant concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Geunsik; Kar, Aravinda; Manzur, Tariq

    2012-01-01

    An n-type 4H-SiC substrate is doped with gallium using a laser doping technique and its optical response is investigated at the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) wavelength 4.21 μm as a function of the dopant concentration. The dopant creates a p-type energy level of 0.3 eV, which is the energy of a photon corresponding to the MWIR wavelength 4.21 μm. Therefore, Ga-doped SiC can be used as an uncooled MWIR detector because an optical signal was obtained at this wavelength when the sample was at room temperature. The energy level of the Ga dopant in the substrate was confirmed by optical absorption spectroscopy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) of the doped samples revealed an enhancement in the solid solubility of Ga in the substrate when doping is carried out by increasing the number of laser scans. A higher dopant concentration increases the number of holes in the dopant energy level, enabling photoexcitation of more electrons from the valence band by the incident MWIR photons. The detector performance improves as the dopant concentration increases from 1.15 × 10 19 to 6.25 × 10 20 cm −3 . The detectivity of the optical photodetector is found to be 1.07 × 10 10 cm Hz 1/2 W −1 for the case of doping with four laser passes. (paper)

  14. Infrared autofluorescence, short-wave autofluorescence and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of optic disk melanocytomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the findings of infrared fundus autofluorescence (IR-AF and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT in eyes with optic disc melanocytoma (ODM. METHODS: IR-AF findings and those of other ophthalmologic imaging examinations, including short-wave autofluorescence (SW-AF, fluorescein angiography (FA, fundus color photography, and SD-OCT of 8 eyes of 8 consecutive cases with ODM were assessed. RESULTS: The ODMs in all cases (100% presented similar IR-AF, SW-AF, and FA findings. On IR-AF images, ODMs showed outstanding hyper-AF with well-defined outline. On SW-AF images, the area of ODMs presented as hypo-AF. FA images revealed the leaking retinal telangiectasia on the surface of the ODMs. On SD-OCT images in 8 cases (100%, the ODMs were sloped with highly reflective surface, which were disorganized retina and optic nerve layers. In 7 cases (87.5%, peripapillary choroids were involved. The melanocytomas of 8 cases (100% presented as optically empty spaces. Vitreous seeds were found in one case (12.5%. CONCLUSION: IR-AF imaging may provide a new modality to evaluate the pathologic features of ODMs, and together with SW-AF imaging, offers a new tool to study biological characteristics associated with ODMs. SD-OCT is a valuable tool in delimitating the tumor extension and providing morphological information about the adjacent retinal tissue.

  15. Building better optical model potentials for nuclear astrophysics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauge, Eric; Dupuis, Marc

    2004-01-01

    In nuclear astrophysics, optical model potentials play an important role, both in the nucleosynthesis models, and in the interpretation of astrophysics related nuclear physics measurements. The challenge of nuclear astrophysics resides in the fact that it involves many nuclei far from the stability line, implying than very few (if any) experimental results are available for these nuclei. The answer to this challenge is a heavy reliance on microscopic optical models with solid microscopic physics foundations that can predict the relevant physical quantities with good accuracy. This use of microscopic information limits the likelihood of the model failing spectacularly (except if some essential physics was omitted in the modeling) when extrapolating away from the stability line, in opposition to phenomenological models which are only suited for interpolation between measured data points and not for extrapolating towards unexplored areas of the chart of the nuclides.We will show how these microscopic optical models are built, how they link to our present knowledge of nuclear structure, and how they affect predictions of nuclear astrophysics models and the interpretation of some key nuclear physics measurements for astrophysics

  16. A Tutorial on Optical Feeding of Millimeter-Wave Phased Array Antennas for Communication Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Aldaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the interference avoidance capacity, high gain, and dynamical reconfigurability, phased array antennas (PAAs have emerged as a key enabling technology for future broadband mobile applications. This is especially important at millimeter-wave (mm-wave frequencies, where the high power consumption and significant path loss impose serious range constraints. However, at mm-wave frequencies the phase and amplitude control of the feeding currents of the PAA elements is not a trivial issue because electrical beamforming requires bulky devices and exhibits relatively narrow bandwidth. In order to overcome these limitations, different optical beamforming architectures have been presented. In this paper we review the basic principles of phased arrays and identify the main challenges, that is, integration of high-speed photodetectors with antenna elements and the efficient optical control of both amplitude and phase of the feeding current. After presenting the most important solutions found in the literature, we analyze the impact of the different noise sources on the PAA performance, giving some guidelines for the design of optically fed PAAs.

  17. On geometric optics and surface waves for light scattering by spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liou, K.N.; Takano, Y.; Yang, P.

    2010-01-01

    A geometric optics approach including surface wave contributions has been developed for homogeneous and concentrically coated spheres. In this approach, a ray-by-ray tracing program was used for efficient computation of the extinction and absorption cross sections. The present geometric-optics surface-wave (GOS) theory for light scattering by spheres considers the surface wave contribution along the edge of a particle as a perturbation term to the geometric-optics core that includes Fresnel reflection-refraction and Fraunhofer diffraction. Accuracies of the GOS approach for spheres have been assessed through comparison with the results determined from the exact Lorenz-Mie (LM) theory in terms of the extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor in the size-wavelength ratio domain. In this quest, we have selected a range of real and imaginary refractive indices representative of water/ice and aerosol species and demonstrated close agreement between the results computed by GOS and LM. This provides the foundation to conduct physically reliable light absorption and scattering computations based on the GOS approach for aerosol aggregates associated with internal and external mixing states employing spheres as building blocks.

  18. Dynamical control of matter-wave splitting using time-dependent optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sung Jong; Andersen, Henrik Kjær; Mai, Sune

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of splitting Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) by using a time-dependent optical lattice potential. First, we demonstrate the division of a BEC into a set of equally populated components by means of time-dependent control of Landau-Zener tunneling in a vertical lattice....... Finally, a combination of multiple Bragg reflections and Landau-Zener tunneling allows for the generation of macroscopic arrays of condensates with potential applications in atom optics and atom interferometry....

  19. Wave Energy Potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An Integrated 10-year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    SUBTITLE Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An integrated 10-year study 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c... Cardone CV, Ewing JA, et al. The WAM model e a third generation ocean wave prediction model. J Phys Oceanogr 1988;18(12):1775e810. [70] Varinou M

  20. Theoretical comparison of light scattering and guided wave coupling in multilayer coated optical components with random interface roughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elson, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    In this work, we use first-order perturbation theory to calculate and then compare the (1) angular distribution of incident light scattered from a multilayer-coated optical component and (2) the angular distribution of incident light coupled into guided waves supported by the multilayer component. The incident beam is assumed to be a monochromatic plane wave and the scattering/coupling is assumed to be caused by roughness at the interfaces of the optical component. Numerical results show that for high quality (low root mean square roughness) optical components, comparison of the relative amounts of incident energy (1) scattered out of the specular beam and (2) coupled into guided waves are comparable. It follows that the guided wave energy will further contribute to the scattered field via radiative decay or be converted to heat. Thus, this work can help provide an estimation of when guided wave coupling can occur along with the expected magnitude. (orig.)

  1. Wave-power potential along the coast of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanfredi, N.W. (Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CIC), La Plata (Argentina) Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo, UNLP, La Plata (Argentina)); Pousa, J.L. (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina) Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo, UNLP, La Plata (Argentina)); Mazio, C.A.; Dragani, W.C. (Servicio de Hidrografia Naval, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. Oceanografia)

    1992-11-01

    The coast of the Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, has been studied to determine the wave-power potential. Using wave data (4 yr) from accelerometers, pressure sensors (1 yr) and a visual observation program (10 yr), the wave-power density was calculated at five locations. The annual average increases southwards, ranging between 2.3 kW/m at Mar de Ajo and 7.5 kW/m at Puerto Quequen. Annual averages of maximum wave power give 69 and 61.3 kW/m for Punta Medanos and Puerto Quequen, respectively. (Author).

  2. Cryogenic Q-factor measurement of optical substrates for optimization of gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietzsche, S [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Nawrodt, R [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Zimmer, A [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Schnabel, R [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Universitaet Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Vodel, W [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Future generations of gravitational wave interferometers are likely to be operated at cryogenic temperatures because one of the sensitivity limiting factors of the present generation is the thermal noise of end mirrors and beam splitters that occurs in the optical substrates as well as in the dielectric coatings. A possible method for minimizing thermal noise is cooling to cryogenic temperatures, maximizing the mechanical quality factor Q, and maximizing the eigenfrequencies of the substrate. We present experimental details of a new cryogenic apparatus that is suitable for the measurement of the temperature-dependent Q-factor of reflective, transmissive as well as nano-structured grating optics down to 5 K. In particular, the SQUID-based and the optical interferometric approaches to the measurement of the amplitude of vibrating test bodies are compared and the method of ring-down recording is described.

  3. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Just Agbodjan Prince

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment’s shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object.

  4. Detection of Cadmium Ion by Evanescent Wave Based Chitosan Coated Optical Fiber Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulianti, I; Edy, S S; Saputra, B A; Aji, M P; Susanto; Kurdi, O

    2017-01-01

    Evanescent wave based-optical fiber sensor to detect cadmium ion is proposed. Chitosan was used by using the dip-coating method. The sensor was fabricated in U-bent shape. U-bent optical sensor at aconcentration of 2ppm and 5ppm had asensitivity of 0.2067 dBm/ppm and -0.7995 dBm/ppm, respectively. At a level of 2ppm - 5ppm, the optical sensor has a linear response with asensitivity of -0.283 dBm/ppm. The sensor takes 9.5 minutes to reach steady stateat aconcentration of 1 ppm. Atalevel of 2ppm - 5ppm, the sensor takes 5 minutes to 10.45 minutes to reach steady state. (paper)

  5. Plasmonic Dimer Metamaterials and Metasurfaces for Polarization Control of Terahertz and Optical Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Malureanu, Radu

    2013-01-01

    We explore the capabilities of planar metamaterials and metasurfaces to control and transform the polarization of electromagnetic radiation, and present a detailed covariant multipole theory of dimer-based metamaterials. We show that various optical properties, such as optical activity, elliptical...... dichroism or polarization conversion can be achieved in metamaterials made of simple shapes, such as nanorods, just by varying their geometrical arrangement. By virtue of the Babinet principle, the proposed theory is extended to inverted structures (membranes) where rods are replaced by slots. Such free......-standing “metasurface membranes” can act as thin-film spectrally sensitive polarization shapers for THz radiation. Proof-of-principle devices (a linear polarizer and a structure with giant optical activity) are fabricated and characterized. Experimental results coincide with those of full-wave numerical simulations...

  6. Continuous-wave optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2017-09-11

    We report an optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter operating in continuous-wave (CW) with a power density threshold of ~89 kW/cm2. The device has an active region of CH3NH3PbBr3 embedded in a dielectric microcavity; this feat was achieved with a combination of optimal spectral alignment of the optical cavity modes with the perovskite optical gain, an adequate Q-factor of the microcavity, adequate thermal stability, and improved material quality with a smooth, passivated, and annealed thin active layer. Our results signify a way towards efficient CW perovskite emitter operation and electrical injection using low-cost fabrication methods for addressing monolithic optoelectronic integration and lasing in the green gap.

  7. Evolution of a wave packet scattered by a one-dimensional potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatrian, A Zh; Alexanyan, Al G; Khoetsyan, V A; Alexanyan, N A

    2013-06-30

    We consider the evolution of a wave packet that is made up of a group of the wave functions describing the stationary scattering process and tunnels through a one-dimensional potential of arbitrary form. As the main characteristics of the time difference of the tunnelling process, use is made of the propagation speed of the wave-packet maximum. We show that the known Hartman formula for the tunnelling time corresponds to the wave packet with a wavenumber-uniform spectral composition in the case, when the phase and transmission coefficient modulus dispersions are taken into account only in the linear approximation. The amplitude of the main peak of the transmitted wave intensity is proven to be independent of the tunnelling time and is determined by the transmission coefficient of the spectral component at the carrier frequency and the spectral width of the wave packet. In the limit of an infinitely wide potential barrier the amplitude of the wave-packet maximum is shown to tend to zero slower than the tunnelling time tends to its asymptotic value, i.e., indeed we deal with the paradox of an infinitely large propagation speed of a wave disturbance through the barrier. (propagation of wave fronts)

  8. Evolution of a wave packet scattered by a one-dimensional potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachatrian, A Zh; Alexanyan, Al G; Khoetsyan, V A; Alexanyan, N A

    2013-01-01

    We consider the evolution of a wave packet that is made up of a group of the wave functions describing the stationary scattering process and tunnels through a one-dimensional potential of arbitrary form. As the main characteristics of the time difference of the tunnelling process, use is made of the propagation speed of the wave-packet maximum. We show that the known Hartman formula for the tunnelling time corresponds to the wave packet with a wavenumber-uniform spectral composition in the case, when the phase and transmission coefficient modulus dispersions are taken into account only in the linear approximation. The amplitude of the main peak of the transmitted wave intensity is proven to be independent of the tunnelling time and is determined by the transmission coefficient of the spectral component at the carrier frequency and the spectral width of the wave packet. In the limit of an infinitely wide potential barrier the amplitude of the wave-packet maximum is shown to tend to zero slower than the tunnelling time tends to its asymptotic value, i.e., indeed we deal with the paradox of an infinitely large propagation speed of a wave disturbance through the barrier. (propagation of wave fronts)

  9. ORBITALES. A program for the calculation of wave functions with an analytical central potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunta Carretero; Rodriguez Mayquez, E.

    1974-01-01

    In this paper is described the objective, basis, carrying out in FORTRAN language and use of the program ORBITALES. This program calculate atomic wave function in the case of ths analytical central potential (Author) 8 refs

  10. A high-resolution assessment of wind and wave energy potentials in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Langodan, Sabique; Viswanadhapalli, Yesubabu; Dasari, Hari Prasad; Knio, Omar; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    This study presents an assessment of the potential for harvesting wind and wave energy from the Red Sea based on an 18-year high-resolution regional atmospheric reanalysis recently generated using the Advanced Weather Research Forecasting model

  11. Continuity Conditions on Schrodinger Wave Functions at Discontinuities of the Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, David

    1979-01-01

    Several standard arguments which attempt to show that the wave function and its derivative must be continuous across jump discontinuities of the potential are reviewed and their defects discussed. (Author/HM)

  12. Wave-guided Optical Waveguides tracked and coupled using dynamic diffractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael

    With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro-actuation requ......With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro...... waveguides (WOWs) [2]. As the WOWs are optically trapped and maneuvered in 3D-space, it is important to maintain efficient light-coupling through these free-standing waveguides within their operating volume [3]. We propose the use ofdynamic diffractive techniques to create focal spots that will track...... and couple to the WOWs during full volume operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking...

  13. Dynamical behavior of the wave packets on adiabatic potential surfaces observed by femtosecond luminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suemoto, Tohru; Nakajima, Makoto; Matsuoka, Taira; Yasukawa, Keizo; Koyama, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    The wave packet dynamics on adiabatic potential surfaces studied by means of time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy is reviewed and the advantages of this method are discussed. In quasi-one-dimensional bromine-bridged platinum complexes, a movie representing the time evolution of the wave packet motion and shape was constructed. A two-dimensional Lissajous-like motion of the wave packet was suggested in the same material at low temperature. In F-centers in KI, evidence for tunneling of the wave packet between the adjacent adiabatic potential surfaces was found. Selective observation of the wave packet motion on the excited state was demonstrated for F-centers in KBr and compared with the results from pump-and-probe experiments in literature

  14. Novel optical solitary waves and modulation instability analysis for the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation in monomode step-index optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inc, Mustafa; Aliyu, Aliyu Isa; Yusuf, Abdullahi; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2018-01-01

    This paper addresses the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation (CNLSE) in monomode step-index in optical fibers which describes the nonlinear modulations of two monochromatic waves, whose group velocities are almost equal. A class of dark, bright, dark-bright and dark-singular optical solitary wave solutions of the model are constructed using the complex envelope function ansatz. Singular solitary waves are also retrieved as bye products of the in integration scheme. This naturally lead to some constraint conditions placed on the solitary wave parameters which must hold for the solitary waves to exist. The modulation instability (MI) analysis of the model is studied based on the standard linear-stability analysis. Numerical simulation and physical interpretations of the obtained results are demonstrated. It is hoped that the results reported in this paper can enrich the nonlinear dynamical behaviors of the CNLSE.

  15. Multifocal visual evoked potentials for quantifying optic nerve dysfunction in patients with optic disc drusen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmqvist, Lasse; de Santiago, Luis; Boquete, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    and 22 control subjects were examined. Mean amplitude, mean inner ring (IR) amplitude (0.87-5.67° of visual field) and mean outer ring amplitude (5.68-24° of visual field) were calculated using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and peak-to-peak analysis. Monocular latency was calculated using second peak......PURPOSE: To explore the applicability of multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEPs) for research and clinical diagnosis in patients with optic disc drusen (ODD). This is the first assessment of mfVEP amplitude in patients with ODD. METHODS: MfVEP amplitude and latency from 33 patients with ODD......, full eye and IR. In the control group, SNR intersubject variability was 17.6% and second peak latency intersubject variability was 2.8%. CONCLUSION: Decreased mfVEP amplitude in patients with ODD suggests a direct mechanical compression of the optic nerve axons. Our results suggest that mfVEP amplitude...

  16. Prospects for Observing Ultracompact Binaries with Space-Based Gravitational Wave Interferometers and Optical Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littenberg, T. B.; Larson, S. L.; Nelemans, G.; Cornish, N. J.

    2012-01-01

    Space-based gravitational wave interferometers are sensitive to the galactic population of ultracompact binaries. An important subset of the ultracompact binary population are those stars that can be individually resolved by both gravitational wave interferometers and electromagnetic telescopes. The aim of this paper is to quantify the multimessenger potential of space-based interferometers with arm-lengths between 1 and 5 Gm. The Fisher information matrix is used to estimate the number of binaries from a model of the Milky Way which are localized on the sky by the gravitational wave detector to within 1 and 10 deg(exp 2) and bright enough to be detected by a magnitude-limited survey.We find, depending on the choice ofGW detector characteristics, limiting magnitude and observing strategy, that up to several hundred gravitational wave sources could be detected in electromagnetic follow-up observations.

  17. Compact solitary waves in linearly elastic chains with non-smooth on-site potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeta, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Milano, Via Saldini 50, 20133 Milan (Italy); Gramchev, Todor [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita di Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari (Italy); Walcher, Sebastian [Lehrstuhl A Mathematik, RWTH Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2007-04-27

    It was recently observed by Saccomandi and Sgura that one-dimensional chains with nonlinear elastic interaction and regular on-site potential can support compact solitary waves, i.e. travelling solitary waves with strictly compact support. In this paper, we show that the same applies to chains with linear elastic interaction and an on-site potential which is continuous but non-smooth at minima. Some different features arise; in particular, the speed of compact solitary waves is not uniquely fixed by the equation. We also discuss several generalizations of our findings.

  18. Coherent wave packet dynamics in a double-well potential in cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li; Li, Gang; Ding, Ming-Song; Wang, Yong-Liang; Zhang, Yun-Cui

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the coherent wave packet dynamics of a two-level atom trapped in a symmetric double-well potential in a near-resonance cavity. Prepared on one side of the double-well potential, the atom wave packet oscillates between the left and right wells, while recoil induced by the emitted photon from the atom entangles the atomic internal and external degrees of freedom. The collapse and revival of the tunneling occurs. Adjusting the width of the wave packets, one can modify the tunneling frequency and suppress the tunneling.

  19. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties Using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, A. W.; Owano, T.; Castaneda, R.; Baer, D. S.; Paldus, B. A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This abstract describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5/Mm). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  20. Microscopic kaonic-atom optical potential in finite nuclei with Λ(1405) and Σ(1385) resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Masaki; Hirenzaki, Satoru; Toki, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    We derive kaonic-atom optical potentials in finite nuclei microscopically by taking into account the K - NΛ(1405) and K - NΣ(1385) interactions. Using the microscopic optical potentials we solve kaonic atoms with the Klein-Gordon equation in momentum space and obtain the kaonic-atom level shifts and the widths. The experimental data are reproduced well. We discuss also phenomenological optical potentials and compare them with the microscopic ones. In addition, we derive optical potentials in the local-density approximation with the use of the finite-matter kaon self-energy. We find a similarity with the microscopic optical potential derived with finite geometry. (orig.)

  1. The sea surface currents as a potential factor in the estimation and monitoring of wave energy potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Stylianoy, Stavros; Liakatas, Aristotelis

    2015-04-01

    The use of wave energy as an alternative renewable is receiving attention the last years under the shadow of the economic crisis in Europe and in the light of the promising corresponding potential especially for countries with extended coastline. Monitoring and studying the corresponding resources is further supported by a number of critical advantages of wave energy compared to other renewable forms, like the reduced variability and the easier adaptation to the general grid, especially when is jointly approached with wind power. Within the framework, a number of countries worldwide have launched research and development projects and a significant number of corresponding studies have been presented the last decades. However, in most of them the impact of wave-sea surface currents interaction on the wave energy potential has not been taken into account neglecting in this way a factor of potential importance. The present work aims at filling this gap for a sea area with increased scientific and economic interest, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Based on a combination of high resolution numerical modeling approach with advanced statistical tools, a detailed analysis is proposed for the quantification of the impact of sea surface currents, which produced from downscaling the MyOcean-FO regional data, to wave energy potential. The results although spatially sensitive, as expected, prove beyond any doubt that the wave- sea surface currents interaction should be taken into account for similar resource analysis and site selection approaches since the percentage of impact to the available wave power may reach or even exceed 20% at selected areas.

  2. Dynamic optical routing and simultaneous generation of millimeter-wave signals for in-building access network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zou, S.; Okonkwo, C.M.; Cao, Z.; Tran, N.C.; Tangdiongga, E.; Koonen, A.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Two-stage optical routing using SOA and integrated micro-ring resonator, and remote generation of millimeter-wave signals by optical frequency multiplication is demonstrated for inbuilding network. Both 150Mb/s 64-QAM and 802.11a WLAN signal at 38GHz are transmitted.

  3. Precise optical observation of 0.5-GPa shock waves in condensed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Kunihito; Mori, Yasuhito

    1999-06-01

    Precision optical observation method was developed to study impact-generated high-pressure shock waves in condensed materials. The present method makes it possible to sensitively detect the shock waves of the relatively low shock stress around 0.5 GPa. The principle of the present method is based on the use of total internal reflection by triangular prisms placed on the free surface of a target assembly. When a plane shock wave arrives at the free surface, the light reflected from the prisms extinguishes instantaneously. The reason is that the total internal reflection changes to the reflection depending on micron roughness of the free surface after the shock arrival. The shock arrival at the bottom face of the prisms can be detected here by two kinds of methods, i.e., a photographic method and a gauge method. The photographic method is an inclined prism method of using a high-speed streak camera. The shock velocity and the shock tilt angle can be estimated accurately from an obtained streak photograph. While in the gauge method, an in-material PVDF stress gauge is combined with an optical prism-pin. The PVDF gauge records electrically the stress profile behind the shockwave front, and the Hugoniot data can be precisely measured by combining the prism pin with the PVDF gauge.

  4. Non-contact radio frequency shielding and wave guiding by multi-folded transformation optics method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madni, Hamza Ahmad; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-11-14

    Compared with conventional radio frequency (RF) shielding methods in which the conductive coating material encloses the circuits design and the leakage problem occurs due to the gap in such conductive material, non-contact RF shielding at a distance is very promising but still impossible to achieve so far. In this paper, a multi-folded transformation optics method is proposed to design a non-contact device for RF shielding. This "open-shielded" device can shield any object at a distance from the electromagnetic waves at the operating frequency, while the object is still physically open to the outer space. Based on this, an open-carpet cloak is proposed and the functionality of the open-carpet cloak is demonstrated. Furthermore, we investigate a scheme of non-contact wave guiding to remotely control the propagation of surface waves over any obstacles. The flexibilities of such multi-folded transformation optics method demonstrate the powerfulness of the method in the design of novel remote devices with impressive new functionalities.

  5. Quasi-cylindrical wave contribution in experiments on extraordinary optical transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beijnum, Frerik; Rétif, Chris; Smiet, Chris B; Liu, Haitao; Lalanne, Philippe; van Exter, Martin P

    2012-12-20

    A metal film perforated by a regular array of subwavelength holes shows unexpectedly large transmission at particular wavelengths, a phenomenon known as the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) of metal hole arrays. EOT was first attributed to surface plasmon polaritons, stimulating a renewed interest in plasmonics and metallic surfaces with subwavelength features. Experiments soon revealed that the field diffracted at a hole or slit is not a surface plasmon polariton mode alone. Further theoretical analysis predicted that the extra contribution, from quasi-cylindrical waves, also affects EOT. Here we report the experimental demonstration of the relative importance of surface plasmon polaritons and quasi-cylindrical waves in EOT by considering hole arrays of different hole densities. From the measured transmission spectra, we determine microscopic scattering parameters which allow us to show that quasi-cylindrical waves affect EOT only for high densities, when the hole spacing is roughly one wavelength. Apart from providing a deeper understanding of EOT, the determination of microscopic scattering parameters from the measurement of macroscopic optical properties paves the way to novel design strategies.

  6. Modelling the performance of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors with realistically imperfect optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Brett

    1998-12-01

    The LIGO project is part of a world-wide effort to detect the influx of Gravitational Waves upon the earth from astrophysical sources, via their interaction with laser beams in interferometric detectors that are designed for extraordinarily high sensitivity. Central to the successful performance of LIGO detectors is the quality of their optical components, and the efficient optimization of interferometer configuration parameters. To predict LIGO performance with optics possessing realistic imperfections, we have developed a numerical simulation program to compute the steady-state electric fields of a complete, coupled-cavity LIGO interferometer. The program can model a wide variety of deformations, including laser beam mismatch and/or misalignment, finite mirror size, mirror tilts, curvature distortions, mirror surface roughness, and substrate inhomogeneities. Important interferometer parameters are automatically optimized during program execution to achieve the best possible sensitivity for each new set of perturbed mirrors. This thesis includes investigations of two interferometer designs: the initial LIGO system, and an advanced LIGO configuration called Dual Recycling. For Initial-LIGO simulations, the program models carrier and sideband frequency beams to compute the explicit shot-noise-limited gravitational wave sensitivity of the interferometer. It is demonstrated that optics of exceptional quality (root-mean-square deformations of less than ~1 nm in the central mirror regions) are necessary to meet Initial-LIGO performance requirements, but that they can be feasibly met. It is also shown that improvements in mirror quality can substantially increase LIGO's sensitivity to selected astrophysical sources. For Dual Recycling, the program models gravitational- wave-induced sidebands over a range of frequencies to demonstrate that the tuned and narrow-banded signal responses predicted for this configuration can be achieved with imperfect optics. Dual Recycling

  7. Wave front engineering by means of diffractive optical elements for applications in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojoc, Dan; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Cabrini, Stefano; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Prasciolu, Mauro; Businaro, Luca; Kaulich, Burchard; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2006-05-01

    We present a unified view regarding the use of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for microscopy applications a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and fabrication of DOE through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular we show applications ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that beside focusing perform also other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of spherical micro beads and for direct trapping and manipulation of biological cells with non-spherical shapes. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gaussian mode conversion, which allows to trap and transfer orbital angular momentum of light to micro particles with high refractive index and to trap and manipulate low index particles. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for DOEs implementation. High resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in X-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field X-ray microscopy.

  8. Nano-structured Fabry–Pérot resonators in neutron optics and tunneling of neutron wave-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maaza, M.; Hamidi, D.

    2012-01-01

    Correlated to the quantum mechanics wave-particle duality, the optical analogy between electromagnetic waves and cold neutrons manifests itself through several interference phenomena particularly the so called Frustrated Total Reflection i.e., the tunneling process in Fabry–Pérot nano-structured cavities. Prominent resonant situations offered by this configuration allow the attainment of numerous fundamental investigations and surface-interface studies as well as to devise new kinds of neutron optics devices. This review contribution reports such possibilities in addition to the recently observed peculiar Goos–Hänchen longitudinal shift of neutron wave-particles which was predicted by Sir Isaac Newton as early as 1730.

  9. CRAPONE, Optical Model Potential Fit of Neutron Scattering Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, F.; Fratamico, G.; Reffo, G.

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: Automatic search for local and non-local optical potential parameters for neutrons. Total, elastic, differential elastic cross sections, l=0 and l=1 strength functions and scattering length can be considered. 2 - Method of solution: A fitting procedure is applied to different sets of experimental data depending on the local or non-local approximation chosen. In the non-local approximation the fitting procedure can be simultaneously performed over the whole energy range. The best fit is obtained when a set of parameters is found where CHI 2 is at its minimum. The solution of the system equations is obtained by diagonalization of the matrix according to the Jacobi method

  10. Wave packet interferometry and quantum state reconstruction by acousto-optic phase modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekavec, Patrick F.; Dyke, Thomas R.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2006-01-01

    Studies of wave packet dynamics often involve phase-selective measurements of coherent optical signals generated from sequences of ultrashort laser pulses. In wave packet interferometry (WPI), the separation between the temporal envelopes of the pulses must be precisely monitored or maintained. Here we introduce a new (and easy to implement) experimental scheme for phase-selective measurements that combines acousto-optic phase modulation with ultrashort laser excitation to produce an intensity-modulated fluorescence signal. Synchronous detection, with respect to an appropriately constructed reference, allows the signal to be simultaneously measured at two phases differing by 90 deg. Our method effectively decouples the relative temporal phase from the pulse envelopes of a collinear train of optical pulse pairs. We thus achieve a robust and high signal-to-noise scheme for WPI applications, such as quantum state reconstruction and electronic spectroscopy. The validity of the method is demonstrated, and state reconstruction is performed, on a model quantum system - atomic Rb vapor. Moreover, we show that our measurements recover the correct separation between the absorptive and dispersive contributions to the system susceptibility

  11. The general optics structure of millimeter-wave imaging diagnostic on TOKAMAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.; Xie, J.; Liu, W.D.; Luo, C.; Zhao, Z.; Chen, D.; Domier, C.W.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Chen, M.; Hu, X.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced imaging optics techniques have significantly improved the performance of millimeter-wave imaging diagnostics, such as Electron Cyclotron Emission imaging and Microwave Imaging of Reflectometry. The fundamental functions of millimeter-wave imaging optics are focusing, collecting the emission or reflected microwave signal from the target area in the plasma and focusing the emitted (reflected) signal on the detector array. The location of the observation area can be changed using the focus lens. Another important function of the imaging optics is zooming. The size of the observation area in poloidal direction can be adjusted by the zoom lenses and the poloidal spatial resolution is determined by the level of zoom. The field curvature adjustment lenses are employed to adjust the shape of the image plane in the poloidal direction to reduce crosstalk between neighboring channels. The incident angle on each channel is controlled using the specific surface type of the front-side lenses to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. All functions are decoupled with the minimum number of lenses. Successful applications are given

  12. Impact of wave propagation delay on latency in optical communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Kanno, Atsushi; Yoshida, Yuki; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2012-12-01

    Latency is an important figure to describe performance of transmission systems for particular applications, such as data transfer for earthquake early warning, transaction for financial businesses, interactive services such as online games, etc. Latency consists of delay due to signal processing at nodes and transmitters, and of signal propagation delay due to propagation of electromagnetic waves. The lower limit of the latency in transmission systems using conventional single mode fibers (SMFs) depends on wave propagation speed in the SMFs which is slower than c. Photonic crystal fibers, holly fibers and large core fibers can have low effective refractive indices, and can transfer light faster than in SMFs. In free-space optical systems, signals propagate with the speed c, so that the latency could be smaller than in optical fibers. For example, LEO satellites would transmit data faster than optical submarine cables, when the transmission distance is longer than a few thousand kilometers. This paper will discuss combination of various transmission media to reduce negative impact of the latency, as well as applications of low-latency systems.

  13. Coherent coupling between radio frequency, optical, and acoustic waves in piezo-optomechanical circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Krishna C.; Davanço, Marcelo I.; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanical cavities have been studied for applications ranging from sensing to quantum information science. Here, we develop a platform for nanoscale cavity optomechanical circuits in which optomechanical cavities supporting co-localized 1550 nm photons and 2.4 GHz phonons are combined with photonic and phononic waveguides. Working in GaAs facilitates manipulation of the localized mechanical mode either with a radio frequency (RF) field through the piezo-electric effect, which produces acoustic waves that are routed and coupled to the optomechanical cavity by phononic crystal waveguides, or optically through the strong photoelastic effect. Along with mechanical state preparation and sensitive readout, we use this to demonstrate an acoustic wave interference effect, similar to atomic coherent population trapping, in which RF-driven coherent mechanical motion is cancelled by optically-driven motion. Manipulating cavity optomechanical systems with equal facility through both photonic and phononic channels enables new architectures for signal transduction between the optical, electrical, and mechanical domains. PMID:27446234

  14. Omnidirectional piezo-optical ring sensor for enhanced guided wave structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Roman, Catalin; Lin, Bin; Frankforter, Erik

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the detection of ultrasonic waves from acoustic emission events using piezoelectric wafer ac3tive sensors (PWAS) and optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing combined with mechanical resonance amplification principles. The method is best suited for detecting the out-of-plane motion of the AE wave with preference for a certain frequency that can be adjusted by design. Several issues are discussed: (a) study the mode shapes of the sensors under different resonance frequencies in order to understand the behavior of the ring in a frequency band of interest; (b) comparison of analytical results and mode shapes with FEM predictions; (c) choice of the final piezo-optical ring sensor shape; (d) testing of the piezo-optical ring sensor prototype; (e) discussion of the ring-sensor test results in comparison with conventional results from PWAS and FBG sensors mounted directly on the test structure. The paper ends with summary, conclusions, and suggestions for further work. (paper)

  15. Bragg diffraction of fermions at optical potentials; Braggbeugung von Fermionen an optischen Potentialen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deh, Benjamin

    2008-10-27

    This thesis describes the Bragg diffraction of ultracold fermions at an optical potential. A moving optical lattice was created, by overlaying two slightly detuned lasers. Atoms can be diffracted at this lattice if the detuning fulfills the Bragg condition for resting atoms. This Bragg diffraction is analyzed systematically in this thesis. To this end Rabi oscillations between the diffraction states were driven, as well in the weakly interacting Bragg regime, as in the strongly interacting Kapitza-Dirac regime. Simulations, based on a driven two-, respectively multilevel-system describe the observed effects rather well. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of the diffracted states in the magnetic trapping potential was studied. The anharmonicity of the trap in use and the scattering cross section for p-wave collisions in a {sup 6}Li system was determined from the movement of these states. Moreover the momentum distribution of the fermions was measured with Bragg spectroscopy and first signs of Fermi degeneracy were found. Finally an interferometer with fermions was build, exhibiting a coherence time of more than 100 {mu}s. With this, the possibility for measurement and manipulation of ultracold fermions with Bragg diffraction could bee shown. (orig.)

  16. Domain-Reversed Lithium Niobate Single-Crystal Fibers are Potentially for Efficient Terahertz Wave Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Lu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear frequency conversion remains one of the dominant approaches to efficiently generate THz waves. Significant material absorption in the THz range is the main factor impeding the progress towards this direction. In this research, a new multicladding nonlinear fiber design was proposed to solve this problem, and as the major experimental effort, periodic domain structure was introduced into lithium niobate single-crystal fibers by electrical poling. The introduced periodic domain structures were nondestructively revealed using a crossly polarized optical microscope and a confocal scanning optical microscope for quality assurance.

  17. An optical potential for the statically deformed actinide nuclei derived from a global spherical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawashdeh, S. M.; Jaghoub, M. I.

    2018-04-01

    In this work we test the hypothesis that a properly deformed spherical optical potential, used within a channel-coupling scheme, provides a good description for the scattering data corresponding to neutron induced reactions on the heavy, statically deformed actinides and other lighter deformed nuclei. To accomplish our goal, we have deformed the Koning-Delaroche spherical global potential and then used it in a channel-coupling scheme. The ground-state is coupled to a sufficient number of inelastic rotational channels belonging to the ground-state band to ensure convergence. The predicted total cross sections, elastic and inelastic angular distributions are in good agreement with the experimental data. As a further test, we compare our results to those obtained by a global channel-coupled optical model whose parameters were obtained by fitting elastic and inelastic angular distributions in addition to total cross sections. Our results compare quite well with those obtained by the fitted, channel-coupled optical model. Below neutron incident energies of about 1MeV, our results show that scattering into the rotational excited states of the ground-state band plays a significant role in the scattering process and must be explicitly accounted for using a channel-coupling scheme.

  18. Triangulation of the monophasic action potential causes flattening of the electrocardiographic T-wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhuiyan, Tanveer Ahmed; Graff, Claus; Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard

    2012-01-01

    of the action potential under the effect of the IKr blocker sertindole and associated these changes to concurrent changes in the morphology of electrocardiographic T-waves in dogs. We show that, under the effect of sertindole, the peak changes in the morphology of action potentials occur at time points similar......It has been proposed that triangulation on the cardiac action potential manifests as a broadened, more flat and notched T-wave on the ECG but to what extent such morphology characteristics are indicative of triangulation is more unclear. In this paper, we have analyzed the morphological changes...... to those observed for the peak changes in T-wave morphology on the ECG. We further show that the association between action potential shape and ECG shape is dose-dependent and most prominent at the time corresponding to phase 3 of the action potential....

  19. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images based on wave atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yongzhao; Liu, Gangjun; Feng, Guoying; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique, which is based on low-coherence interferometry. OCT images suffer from speckle noise, which reduces image contrast. A shrinkage filter based on wave atoms transform is proposed for speckle reduction in OCT images. Wave atoms transform is a new multiscale geometric analysis tool that offers sparser expansion and better representation for images containing oscillatory patterns and textures than other traditional transforms, such as wavelet and curvelet transforms. Cycle spinning-based technology is introduced to avoid visual artifacts, such as Gibbs-like phenomenon, and to develop a translation invariant wave atoms denoising scheme. The speckle suppression degree in the denoised images is controlled by an adjustable parameter that determines the threshold in the wave atoms domain. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively remove the speckle noise and improve the OCT image quality. The signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, average equivalent number of looks, and cross-correlation (XCOR) values are obtained, and the results are also compared with the wavelet and curvelet thresholding techniques. PMID:24825507

  20. Open source acceleration of wave optics simulations on energy efficient high-performance computing platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey; Bos, Jeremy P.

    2017-05-01

    We compare several modifications to the open-source wave optics package, WavePy, intended to improve execution time. Specifically, we compare the relative performance of the Intel MKL, a CPU based OpenCV distribution, and GPU-based version. Performance is compared between distributions both on the same compute platform and between a fully-featured computing workstation and the NVIDIA Jetson TX1 platform. Comparisons are drawn in terms of both execution time and power consumption. We have found that substituting the Fast Fourier Transform operation from OpenCV provides a marked improvement on all platforms. In addition, we show that embedded platforms offer some possibility for extensive improvement in terms of efficiency compared to a fully featured workstation.

  1. Optimised frequency modulation for continuous-wave optical magnetic resonance sensing using nitrogen-vacancy ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Ella, Haitham; Ahmadi, Sepehr; Wojciechowski, Adam

    2017-01-01

    transitions, we experimentally show that when the ratio between the hyperfine linewidth and their separation is ≥ 1=4, square-wave based frequency modulation generates the steepest slope at modulation depths exceeding the separation of the hyperfine lines, compared to sine-wave based modulation. We formulate......Magnetometers based on ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centres are a promising platform for continuously sensing static and low-frequency magnetic fields. Their combination with phase-sensitive (lock-in) detection creates a highly versatile sensor with a sensitivity that is proportional...... to the derivative of the optical magnetic resonance lock-in spectrum, which is in turn dependant on the lock-in modulation parameters. Here we study the dependence of the lock-in spectral slope on the modulation of the spin-driving microwave field. Given the presence of the intrinsic nitrogen hyperfine spin...

  2. Manipulation of the polarization of intense laser beams via optical wave mixing in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Pierre; Divol, Laurent; Turnbull, David; Moody, John

    2014-10-01

    When intense laser beams overlap in plasmas, the refractive index modulation created by the beat wave via the ponderomotive force can lead to optical wave mixing phenomena reminiscent of those used in crystals and photorefractive materials. Using a vector analysis, we present a full analytical description of the modification of the polarization state of laser beams crossing at arbitrary angles in a plasma. We show that plasmas can be used to provide full control of the polarization state of a laser beam, and give simple analytical estimates and practical considerations for the design of novel photonics devices such as plasma polarizers and plasma waveplates. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Accelerated two-wave mixing response in erbium-doped fibers with saturable optical absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Eliseo; Stepanov, Serguei; Plata Sanchez, Marcos

    2016-08-01

    The contribution of the spatially uniform variation of average optical absorption to the dynamics of the transient two-wave mixing (TWM) response is considered. It is shown theoretically and confirmed experimentally that this transient effect, via dynamic population gratings in erbium-doped fibers (EDFs) can ensure a response nearly two times faster in such gratings as compared to the growth rate of fluorescence uniformly excited under similar conditions, and can also result in an additional overshot in the tail of the TWM response. This additional ‘accelerating’ contribution is of even type, and does not influence the odd transient TWM response for the refractive index component of such gratings in the EDFs reported earlier. It is also shown that this effect can be utilized to monitor the formation of the dynamic grating with an auxiliary probe wave of the essentially different non-Bragg wavelength.

  4. In-medium P-wave quarkonium from the complex lattice QCD potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnier, Yannis; Kaczmarek, Olaf; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We extend our lattice QCD potential based study http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP12(2015)101 of the in-medium properties of heavy quark bound states to P-wave bottomonium and charmonium. Similar to the behavior found in the S-wave channel their spectra show a characteristic broadening, as well as mass shifts to lower energy with increasing temperature. In contrast to the S-wave states, finite angular momentum leads to the survival of spectral peaks even at temperatures, where the continuum threshold reaches below the bound state remnant mass. We elaborate on the ensuing challenges in defining quarkonium dissolution and present estimates of melting temperatures for the spin averaged χ b and χ c states. As an application to heavy-ion collisions we further estimate the contribution of feed down to S-wave quarkonium through the P-wave states after freezeout.

  5. Wave Energy Potential in the North-West of Sardinia (Italy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicinanza, Diego; Contestabile, P.; Ferrante, V.

    2013-01-01

    Sardinia (Italy) is the second largest island in the Mediterranean Sea and its economy is penalized by high costs of electricity, which is double compared to the continental Italian regions, and triple compared to the EU average. In this research, the wave energy potential of the north......, a Wave Energy Converter with maximum efficiency in the ranges of significant wave heights between 3.5 and 4.5 m (energy periods 9.5-11 s) and 4-6 m (energy periods 9.5-11.5 s) respectively should be selected. In order to find a concrete solution to the problem of harvesting wave energy in this area......, the characterization of waves providing energy is considered along with additional considerations, such as installation and operational costs, institutional factors, environmental sensitivity and interferences with others human activities. On the basis of the information available and the identified circumstances...

  6. In-medium P-wave quarkonium from the complex lattice QCD potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnier, Yannis [Institute of Theoretical Physics, EPFL,CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kaczmarek, Olaf [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Bielefeld,D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Rothkopf, Alexander [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg University,Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-10-07

    We extend our lattice QCD potential based study http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP12(2015)101 of the in-medium properties of heavy quark bound states to P-wave bottomonium and charmonium. Similar to the behavior found in the S-wave channel their spectra show a characteristic broadening, as well as mass shifts to lower energy with increasing temperature. In contrast to the S-wave states, finite angular momentum leads to the survival of spectral peaks even at temperatures, where the continuum threshold reaches below the bound state remnant mass. We elaborate on the ensuing challenges in defining quarkonium dissolution and present estimates of melting temperatures for the spin averaged χ{sub b} and χ{sub c} states. As an application to heavy-ion collisions we further estimate the contribution of feed down to S-wave quarkonium through the P-wave states after freezeout.

  7. Axonal electrovisiogram as an electrophysiological test to evaluate optic nerve and inner retina electrical potentials: findings in normal subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wener Passarinho Cella

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To standardize and validate the technique of axonal electrovisiogram (AxEvg, defining its normative values and parameters and characterizing its findings in normal individuals. METHODS: We enrolled 140 normal individuals (280 eyes divided into seven groups according to age, each one with 10 males and 10 females. The technique was based on monocular visual stimulation by a 0 dB intensity bright flash on Ganzfeld bowl at a presentation rate of 1.4 Hz. Golden cup electrodes were used and electrical waves were acquired after artifact rejection. For each amplitude and implicit time peak we calculated the mean, median, pattern deviation, minimum and maximum values and 95% confidence interval. RESULTS: Monocular visual stimulation with bright flash under mesopic conditions was the standard technical procedure established. The normal AxEvg waveform consists of an initial positive wave (named P1, with mean amplitude of 2.0 mV and mean implicit time peak of 23.1 ms followed by a negative wave (named N1, with mean amplitude of -3.9 mV and mean implicit time peak of 41.4 ms. No significant differences were observed between males and females or between right and left eyes, but there was an increased P1 and N1 implicit time peaks according to age. Implicit time characteristics suggest that P1 wave represents an optic nerve electrical potential and N1 wave represents an inner retinal layers potential. CONCLUSIONS: AxEvg can be considered a pre-chiasmatic visual evoked potential capable to reliably record the electrical activity of optic nerve and inner retina. The findings suggest that AxEvg may be useful as an electrophysiological test in the diagnosis of neuroretinal diseases.

  8. Diffractive beam shaping, tracking and coupling for wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    techniques to create multiple focal spots that can be coupled into light manipulated WOWs. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to project the necessary phase to generate the multiple coupling light spots. We incorporate a diffractive setup in our Biophotonics Workstation (BWS) and demonstrate......We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). The full strength of this structure-mediated paradigm can be harnessed by addressing multiple WOWs and manipulating them to work in tandem. We propose the use of diffractive...

  9. Geographic and Annual Influences on Optical Follow-up of Gravitational Wave Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Varun [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Pune, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Bhalerao, Varun; Bose, Sukanta [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Ravi, Aravind P. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Mohanpur, West Bengal 741252 (India); Ghosh, Archisman, E-mail: varun.srivastava@students.iiserpune.ac.in [International Centre for Theoretical Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Survey No. 151, Shivakote, Hesaraghatta Hobli, Bengaluru North 560089 (India)

    2017-03-20

    We investigate the effects of observatory location on the probability of discovering optical/infrared (OIR) counterparts of gravitational wave sources. We show that, for the LIGO–Virgo network, the odds of discovering OIR counterparts show some latitude dependence. A stronger effect is seen to arise from the timing of LIGO–Virgo observing runs during the year, with northern OIR observatories having a better chance of finding the counterparts in northern winters. Assuming identical technical capabilities, the tentative mid-2017 three-detector network observing run favors southern OIR observatories for the discovery of electromagnetic counterparts.

  10. Splitting of quantum information in travelling wave fields using only linear optical elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, W B; De Almeida, N G; Avelar, A T; Baseia, B [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Goias, 74.001-970, Goiania-GO (Brazil)

    2011-02-28

    In this paper we present a feasible post-selection scheme to split quantum information in the realm of travelling waves with success probability of 50%. Taking advantage of this scheme we have also proposed the generation of a class of W states useful for perfect teleportation and superdense coding. The scheme employs only linear optical elements as beam splitters (BS) and phase shifters, plus two photon counters and a source of two spontaneous parametric down-conversion photons. It is shown that splitting of quantum information with high fidelity is possible, even when using inefficient detectors and photoabsorption BS.

  11. Geographic and Annual Influences on Optical Follow-up of Gravitational Wave Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Varun; Bhalerao, Varun; Bose, Sukanta; Ravi, Aravind P.; Ghosh, Archisman

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effects of observatory location on the probability of discovering optical/infrared (OIR) counterparts of gravitational wave sources. We show that, for the LIGO–Virgo network, the odds of discovering OIR counterparts show some latitude dependence. A stronger effect is seen to arise from the timing of LIGO–Virgo observing runs during the year, with northern OIR observatories having a better chance of finding the counterparts in northern winters. Assuming identical technical capabilities, the tentative mid-2017 three-detector network observing run favors southern OIR observatories for the discovery of electromagnetic counterparts.

  12. Epoxy-based broadband anti-reflection coating for millimeter-wave optics

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Darin; Suzuki, Aritoki; Keating, Brian; Krantz, William; Lee, Adrian T.; Quealy, Erin; Richards, Paul L.; Siritanasak, Praween; Walker, William

    2013-01-01

    We have developed epoxy-based, broadband anti-reflection coatings for millimeter-wave astrophysics experiments with cryogenic optics. By using multiple-layer coatings where each layer steps in dielectric constant, we achieved low reflection over a wide bandwidth. We suppressed the reflection from an alumina disk to 10% over fractional bandwidths of 92% and 104% using two-layer and three-layer coatings, respectively. The dielectric constants of epoxies were tuned between 2.06 and 7.44 by mixin...

  13. Highly directive Fabry-Perot leaky-wave nanoantennas based on optical partially reflective surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorente-Crespo, M.; Mateo-Segura, C., E-mail: C.Mateo-Segura@hw.ac.uk [Institute of Sensors, Signals and Systems, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-04

    Nanoantennas enhance the conversion between highly localized electromagnetic fields and far-field radiation. Here, we investigate the response of a nano-patch partially reflective surface backed with a silver mirror to an optical source embedded at the centre of the structure. Using full wave simulations, we demonstrate a two orders of magnitude increased directivity compared to the isotropic radiator, 50% power confinement to a 13.8° width beam and a ±16 nm bandwidth. Our antenna does not rely on plasmonic phenomena thus reducing non-radiative losses and conserving source coherence.

  14. Measurement of optical properties of nano-cement using THz electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heon Young; Kang, Dong Hoon; Joo, Chulmin; Oh, Seung Jae

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing mechanical strength of concrete has been fascinated using carbon-based nanomaterials such as CNT and graphene. The key to improving strength is a dispersion of nanomaterials. A novel method is required to investigate the dispersion inner concrete nondestructively. In this study, the optical optical properties such as refractive index and absorption coefficient are measured in nano-cement mortar specimens containing MWCNT and GO using THz electro-magnetic waves. From the results, the properties of nano-cement mortar are confirmed to be 1.0% to 2.5% higher in refractive index, and -14% to 28% higher in absorption coefficient than those of cement mortar at the average values. Using these characteristics, visualizing the dispersion of nano-concrete structures seems possible in future

  15. Generalized prolate spheroidal wave functions for optical finite fractional Fourier and linear canonical transforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Soo-Chang; Ding, Jian-Jiun

    2005-03-01

    Prolate spheroidal wave functions (PSWFs) are known to be useful for analyzing the properties of the finite-extension Fourier transform (fi-FT). We extend the theory of PSWFs for the finite-extension fractional Fourier transform, the finite-extension linear canonical transform, and the finite-extension offset linear canonical transform. These finite transforms are more flexible than the fi-FT and can model much more generalized optical systems. We also illustrate how to use the generalized prolate spheroidal functions we derive to analyze the energy-preservation ratio, the self-imaging phenomenon, and the resonance phenomenon of the finite-sized one-stage or multiple-stage optical systems.

  16. Transition operators in electromagnetic-wave diffraction theory. II - Applications to optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    The theory developed by Hahne (1992) for the diffraction of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from fixed obstacles is briefly summarized and extended. Applications of the theory are considered which comprise, first, a spherical harmonic expansion of the so-called radiation impedance operator in the theory, for a spherical surface, and second, a reconsideration of familiar short-wavelength approximation from the new standpoint, including a derivation of the so-called physical optics method on the basis of quasi-planar approximation to the radiation impedance operator, augmented by the method of stationary phase. The latter includes a rederivation of the geometrical optics approximation for the complete Green's function for the electromagnetic field in the presence of a smooth- and a convex-surfaced perfectly electrically conductive obstacle.

  17. ASYMPTOTICAL CALCULATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES SCATTERED FROM A DIELECTRIC COATED CYLINDRICAL SURFACE WITH PHYSICAL OPTICS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur YALÇIN

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, quasi-optical scattering of finite source electromagnetic waves from a dielectric coated cylindrical surface is analysed with Physical Optics (PO approach. A linear electrical current source is chosen as the finite source. Reflection coefficient of the cylindrical surface is derived by using Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD. Then, with the help of this coefficient, fields scattered from the surface are obtained. These field expressions are used in PO approach and surface scattering integral is determined. Evaluating this integral asymptotically, fields reflected from the surface and surface divergence coefficient are calculated. Finally, results obtained in this study are evaluated numerically and effects of the surface impedance to scattered fields are analysed. The time factor is taken as j te? in this study.

  18. Bifurcation of space-charge wave in a plasma waveguide including the wake potential effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588, South Korea and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The wake potential effects on the propagation of the space-charge dust ion-acoustic wave are investigated in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma with the ion flow. The results show that the wake potential would generate the double frequency modes in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma. It is found that the upper mode of the wave frequency with the root of higher-order is smaller than that with the root of lower-order in intermediate wave number domains. However, the lower mode of the scaled wave frequency with the root of higher-order is found to be greater than that with the root of lower-order. It is found that the influence in the order of the root of the Bessel function on the wave frequency of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave in a cylindrically confined dusty plasma decreases with an increase in the propagation wave number. It is also found that the double frequency modes increase with increasing Mach number due to the ion flow in a cylindrical dusty plasma. In addition, it is found that the upper mode of the group velocity decreases with an increase in the scaled radius of the plasma cylinder. However, it is shown that the lower mode of the scaled group velocity of the space-charge dust ion acoustic wave increases with an increase in the radius of the plasma cylinder. The variation of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave due to the wake potential and geometric effects is also discussed.

  19. Features of the non-collinear one-phonon anomalous light scattering controlled by elastic waves with elevated linear losses: potentials for multi-frequency parallel spectrum analysis of radio-wave signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Alexandre S; Arellanes, Adan Omar

    2017-12-01

    During subsequent development of the recently proposed multi-frequency parallel spectrometer for precise spectrum analysis of wideband radio-wave signals, we study potentials of new acousto-optical cells exploiting selected crystalline materials at the limits of their capabilities. Characterizing these wide-aperture cells is non-trivial due to new features inherent in the chosen regime of an advanced non-collinear one-phonon anomalous light scattering by elastic waves with significantly elevated acoustic losses. These features can be observed simpler in uniaxial, tetragonal, and trigonal crystals possessing linear acoustic attenuation. We demonstrate that formerly studied additional degree of freedom, revealed initially for multi-phonon regimes of acousto-optical interaction, can be identified within the one-phonon geometry as well and exploited for designing new cells. We clarify the role of varying the central acoustic frequency and acoustic attenuation using the identified degree of freedom. Therewith, we are strongly restricted by a linear regime of acousto-optical interaction to avoid the origin of multi-phonon processes within carrying out a multi-frequency parallel spectrum analysis of radio-wave signals. Proof-of-principle experiments confirm the developed approaches and illustrate their applicability to innovative technique for an advanced spectrum analysis of wideband radio-wave signals with the improved resolution in an extended frequency range.

  20. A Preliminary Test for Skin Gas Assessment Using a Porphyrin Based Evanescent Wave Optical Fiber Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman SELYANCHYN

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An evanescent-wave optical fibre sensor modified with tetrakis-(4-sulfophenyl porphine (TSPP and poly(allylamine hydrochloride (PAH bilayers using layer-by-layer (LbL electrostatic self-assembly was tested to measure the gas emitted from human skin. Optical intensity changes at different wavelengths in the transmission spectrum of the porphyrin-based film were induced by the human skin gas and measured as sensor response. Influence of relative humidity, which can be a major interference to sensor response, was thoroughly studied and shown to be significantly different when compared to the influence of skin emanations. Responses of the current optical sensor system could be considered as composite sensor array, where different optical wavelengths act as channels that have selective response to specific volatile compounds. Data obtained from the sensor system was analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA. This approach enabled to distinguish skin odors of different people and their altered physiological conditions after alcohol consumption.

  1. Entanglement near the optical instability point in damped four wave mixing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiangga, S.; Temnuch, W.; Frank, T. D.

    2018-06-01

    Entanglement of electromagnetic field modes of signal and idler photons generated by four-wave mixing (FWM) devices is a quantum phenomenon that has been examined in various experimental and theoretical studies. The focus of this theoretical study is on two aspects of this phenomenon: the emergence of signal and idler photons due to an optical instability and the entanglement of the signal and idler modes above the instability threshold. For simple FWM devices that are subjected to damping it is shown that the signal and idler modes are entangled close to the point of optical instability at which the signal and idler photons emerges. The degree of entanglement as measured by a particular entanglement function proposed earlier in the literature assumes at the point of optical instability a unique value that is independent of the model parameters of the devices. The value is slightly higher than the value reported in a FWM experiment by Boyer et al (2008 Science 321 544). Numerical simulations suggest that the aforementioned entanglement function is U-shaped such that the degree of entanglement at the instability point is the maximal possible one and represents the optimal value. A similar U-shaped pattern was observed in an FWM experiment conducted by Lawrie et al (2016 Appl. Phys. Lett. 108 151107). Our semi-analytical findings are derived within the framework of the positive P representation of quantum optical processes and are compared with the aforementioned experimental observations by Boyer et al and Lawrie et al.

  2. Realization of a video-rate distributed aperture millimeter-wave imaging system using optical upconversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Christopher; Martin, Richard; Dillon, Thomas; Yao, Peng; Mackrides, Daniel; Harrity, Charles; Zablocki, Alicia; Shreve, Kevin; Bonnett, James; Curt, Petersen; Prather, Dennis

    2013-05-01

    Passive imaging using millimeter waves (mmWs) has many advantages and applications in the defense and security markets. All terrestrial bodies emit mmW radiation and these wavelengths are able to penetrate smoke, fog/clouds/marine layers, and even clothing. One primary obstacle to imaging in this spectrum is that longer wavelengths require larger apertures to achieve the resolutions desired for many applications. Accordingly, lens-based focal plane systems and scanning systems tend to require large aperture optics, which increase the achievable size and weight of such systems to beyond what can be supported by many applications. To overcome this limitation, a distributed aperture detection scheme is used in which the effective aperture size can be increased without the associated volumetric increase in imager size. This distributed aperture system is realized through conversion of the received mmW energy into sidebands on an optical carrier. This conversion serves, in essence, to scale the mmW sparse aperture array signals onto a complementary optical array. The side bands are subsequently stripped from the optical carrier and recombined to provide a real time snapshot of the mmW signal. Using this technique, we have constructed a real-time, video-rate imager operating at 75 GHz. A distributed aperture consisting of 220 upconversion channels is used to realize 2.5k pixels with passive sensitivity. Details of the construction and operation of this imager as well as field testing results will be presented herein.

  3. Effect of exchange correlation potential on dispersion properties of lower hybrid wave in degenerate plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimza, Tripti; Sharma, Prerana

    2017-05-01

    The dispersion properties of lower hybrid wave are studied in electron-iondegenerate plasma with exchange effect in non-relativistic regime. It is found that the combined effect of Bohm potential and exchange correlation potential significantly modifies the dispersion properties of lower hybrid wave. The graphical results explicitly show the influence of degeneracy pressure, Bohm force and exchange correlation potential on the frequency of the lower hybrid mode. Present work should be of relevance for the dense astrophysical environments like white dwarfs and for laboratory experiments.

  4. Analytic plane wave solutions for the quaternionic potential step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leo, Stefano; Ducati, Gisele C.; Madureira, Tiago M.

    2006-01-01

    By using the recent mathematical tools developed in quaternionic differential operator theory, we solve the Schroedinger equation in the presence of a quaternionic step potential. The analytic solution for the stationary states allows one to explicitly show the qualitative and quantitative differences between this quaternionic quantum dynamical system and its complex counterpart. A brief discussion on reflected and transmitted times, performed by using the stationary phase method, and its implication on the experimental evidence for deviations of standard quantum mechanics is also presented. The analytic solution given in this paper represents a fundamental mathematical tool to find an analytic approximation to the quaternionic barrier problem (up to now solved by numerical method)

  5. Elliptical optical solitary waves in a finite nematic liquid crystal cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minzoni, Antonmaria A.; Sciberras, Luke W.; Smyth, Noel F.; Worthy, Annette L.

    2015-05-01

    The addition of orbital angular momentum has been previously shown to stabilise beams of elliptic cross-section. In this article the evolution of such elliptical beams is explored through the use of an approximate methodology based on modulation theory. An approximate method is used as the equations that govern the optical system have no known exact solitary wave solution. This study brings to light two distinct phases in the evolution of a beam carrying orbital angular momentum. The two phases are determined by the shedding of radiation in the form of mass loss and angular momentum loss. The first phase is dominated by the shedding of angular momentum loss through spiral waves. The second phase is dominated by diffractive radiation loss which drives the elliptical solitary wave to a steady state. In addition to modulation theory, the "chirp" variational method is also used to study this evolution. Due to the significant role radiation loss plays in the evolution of an elliptical solitary wave, an attempt is made to couple radiation loss to the chirp variational method. This attempt furthers understanding as to why radiation loss cannot be coupled to the chirp method. The basic reason for this is that there is no consistent manner to match the chirp trial function to the generated radiating waves which is uniformly valid in time. Finally, full numerical solutions of the governing equations are compared with solutions obtained using the various variational approximations, with the best agreement achieved with modulation theory due to its ability to include both mass and angular momentum losses to shed diffractive radiation.

  6. Temperature dependent relativistic microscopic optical potential and mean free paths of nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Zhuo Yizhong

    1993-01-01

    The relativistic microscopic optical potential, mean free paths and Schroedinger equivalent potential of nucleons at finite temperature in nuclear matter are studied based on Walecka's model and thermo field dynamics. We let only the Hartree-Fock self-energy of nucleon represent to be the real part of the microscopic optical potential and the fourth order of meson exchange diagrams, i.e. the core polarization represent the imaginary part of microscopic optical potential in nuclear matter. The microscopic optical potential of finite nuclei is obtained with the local density approximation

  7. A novel method for surface defect inspection of optic cable with short-wave infrared illuminance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Ning; You, Bo; Xiao, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Intelligent on-line detection of cable quality is a crucial issue in optic cable factory, and defects on the surface of optic cable can dramatically depress cable grade. Manual inspection in optic cable quality cannot catch up with the development of optic cable industry due to its low detection efficiency and huge human cost. Therefore, real-time is highly demanded by industry in order to replace the subjective and repetitive process of manual inspection. For this reason, automatic cable defect inspection has been a trend. In this paper, a novel method for surface defect inspection of optic cable with short-wave infrared illuminance is presented. The special condition of short-wave infrared cannot only provide illumination compensation for the weak illumination environment, but also can avoid the problem of exposure when using visible light illuminance, which affects the accuracy of inspection algorithm. A series of image processing algorithms are set up to analyze cable image for the verification of real-time and veracity of the detection method. Unlike some existing detection algorithms which concentrate on the characteristics of defects with an active search way, the proposed method removes the non-defective areas of the image passively at the same time of image processing, which reduces a large amount of computation. OTSU algorithm is used to convert the gray image to the binary image. Furthermore, a threshold window is designed to eliminate the fake defects, and the threshold represents the considered minimum size of defects ε . Besides, a new regional suppression method is proposed to deal with the edge burrs of the cable, which shows the superior performance compared with that of Open-Close operation of mathematical morphological in the boundary processing. Experimental results of 10,000 samples show that the rates of miss detection and false detection are 2.35% and 0.78% respectively when ε equals to 0.5 mm, and the average processing period of one frame

  8. Potential Hydrodynamic Loads on Coastal Bridges in the Greater New York Area due to Extreme Storm Surge and Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-18

    This project makes a computer modeling study on vulnerability of coastal bridges in New York City (NYC) metropolitan region to storm surges and waves. Prediction is made for potential surges and waves in the region and consequent hydrodynamic load an...

  9. On the Quantum Potential and Pulsating Wave Packet in the Harmonic Oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental mathematical formalism related to the Quantum Potential factor, Q, is presented in this paper. The Schroedinger equation can be transformed to two equations depending on a group velocity and a density of presence of the particle. A factor, in these equations, was called ''Quantum Potential'' by D. Bohm and B. Hiley. In 1999, I demonstrated that this Quantum Potential, Q, can be split in two Quantum Potentials, Q 1 , and Q 2 , for which the relation, Q=Q 1 +Q 2 , holds. These two Quantum Potentials depend on a fundamental new variable, what I called a phase velocity, u, directly related to the probability density of presence of the wave-particle, given by the modulus of the wave function. This paper gives some further developments for explaining the Quantum Potential for oscillating and pulsating Gaussian wave packets in the Harmonic Oscillator. It is shown that the two Quantum Potentials play a central role in the interpretation of quantum mechanics. A breakthrough in the formalism of the Quantum Mechanics could be provoked by the physical properties of these Quantum Potentials. The probability density of presence of the oscillating and pulsating Gaussian wave packets in the Harmonic Oscillator is directly depending on the ratio Q 2 /Q 1 of the two Quantum Potentials. In the general case, the energy of these Gaussian wave packets is not constant, but is oscillating. The energy is given by the sum of the kinetic energy, T, the potential energy, V, and the two Quantum Potentials: E=T+V+Q 1 +Q 2 . For some conditions, given in the paper, the energy can be a constant. The first remarkable result is the fact that the first Quantum Potential, Q 1 , is related to the ground state energy, E 0 , of the Quantum Harmonic Oscillator: Q 1 =h-bar ω/2=E 0 . The second result is related to the property of the second Quantum Potential, Q 2 , which plays the role of an anti-potential, Q 2 =-V(x), where V is the harmonic oscillator potential. This Quantum Potential

  10. Optical Follow-up of Gravitational-wave Events with Las Cumbres Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcavi, Iair; McCully, Curtis; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Howell, D. Andrew; Vasylyev, Sergiy [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Poznanski, Dovi; Zaltzman, Michael; Maoz, Dan [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Singer, Leo [Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Valenti, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-5270 (United States); Kasen, Daniel [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8169 (United States); Barnes, Jennifer [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10027 (United States); Piran, Tsvi [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Fong, Wen-fai, E-mail: arcavi@ucsb.edu [CIERA and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2017-10-20

    We present an implementation of the Gehrels et al. galaxy-targeted strategy for gravitational-wave (GW) follow-up using the Las Cumbres Observatory global network of telescopes. We use the Galaxy List for the Advanced Detector Era (GLADE) galaxy catalog, which we show is complete (with respect to a Schechter function) out to ∼300 Mpc for galaxies brighter than the median Schechter function galaxy luminosity. We use a prioritization algorithm to select the galaxies with the highest chance of containing the counterpart given their luminosity, their position, and their distance relative to a GW localization, and in which we are most likely to detect a counterpart given its expected brightness compared to the limiting magnitude of our telescopes. This algorithm can be easily adapted to any expected transient parameters and telescopes. We implemented this strategy during the second Advanced Detector Observing Run (O2) and followed the black hole merger GW170814 and the neutron star merger GW170817. For the latter, we identified an optical kilonova/macronova counterpart thanks to our algorithm selecting the correct host galaxy fifth in its ranked list among the 182 galaxies we identified in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo localization. This also allowed us to obtain some of the earliest observations of the first optical transient ever triggered by a GW detection (as presented in a companion paper).

  11. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  12. Optical Follow-up of Gravitational-wave Events with Las Cumbres Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, Iair; McCully, Curtis; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Howell, D. Andrew; Vasylyev, Sergiy; Poznanski, Dovi; Zaltzman, Michael; Maoz, Dan; Singer, Leo; Valenti, Stefano; Kasen, Daniel; Barnes, Jennifer; Piran, Tsvi; Fong, Wen-fai

    2017-10-01

    We present an implementation of the Gehrels et al. galaxy-targeted strategy for gravitational-wave (GW) follow-up using the Las Cumbres Observatory global network of telescopes. We use the Galaxy List for the Advanced Detector Era (GLADE) galaxy catalog, which we show is complete (with respect to a Schechter function) out to ˜300 Mpc for galaxies brighter than the median Schechter function galaxy luminosity. We use a prioritization algorithm to select the galaxies with the highest chance of containing the counterpart given their luminosity, their position, and their distance relative to a GW localization, and in which we are most likely to detect a counterpart given its expected brightness compared to the limiting magnitude of our telescopes. This algorithm can be easily adapted to any expected transient parameters and telescopes. We implemented this strategy during the second Advanced Detector Observing Run (O2) and followed the black hole merger GW170814 and the neutron star merger GW170817. For the latter, we identified an optical kilonova/macronova counterpart thanks to our algorithm selecting the correct host galaxy fifth in its ranked list among the 182 galaxies we identified in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo localization. This also allowed us to obtain some of the earliest observations of the first optical transient ever triggered by a GW detection (as presented in a companion paper).

  13. Photonic Rutherford scattering: A classical and quantum mechanical analogy in ray and wave optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmke, Markus; Cichos, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Using Fermat's least-optical-path principle, the family of ray trajectories through a special (but common) type of a gradient refractive index lens n(r)=n0+ΔnR /r is solved analytically. The solution gives a ray equation r(ϕ) that is closely related to Rutherford scattering trajectories; we therefore refer to this refraction process as "photonic Rutherford scattering." It is shown that not only do the classical limits correspond but also the wave-mechanical pictures coincide—the time-independent Schrödingier equation and the Helmholtz equation permit the same mapping between the scattering of massive particles and optical scalar waves. Scattering of narrow beams of light finally recovers the classical trajectories. The analysis suggests that photothermal single-particle microscopy measures photonic Rutherford scattering in specific limits and allows for an individual single-scatterer probing. A macroscopic experiment is demonstrated to directly measure the scattering angle to impact parameter relation, which is otherwise accessible only indirectly in Rutherford-scattering experiments.

  14. Marine Planning for Potential Wave Energy Facility Placement Amongst a Crowded Sea of Existing Resource Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, B. E.; Fuller, E.; Plummer, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Conversion to renewable energy sources is a logical response to increasing pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean wave energy is the least developed renewable energy source, despite having the highest energy per unit area. While many hurdles remain in developing wave energy, assessing potential conflicts and evaluating tradeoffs with existing uses is essential. Marine planning encompasses a broad array of activities that take place in and affect large marine ecosystems, making it an ideal tool for evaluating wave energy resource use conflicts. In this study, we focus on the potential conflicts between wave energy conversion (WEC) facilities and existing marine uses in the context of marine planning, within the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. First, we evaluated wave energy facility development using the Wave Energy Model (WEM) of the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Trade-offs (InVEST) toolkit. Second, we ran spatial analyses on model output to identify conflicts with existing marine uses including AIS based vessel traffic, VMS and observer based measures of commercial fishing effort, and marine conservation areas. We found that regions with the highest wave energy potential were distant from major cities and that infrastructure limitations (cable landing sites) restrict integration with existing power grids. We identified multiple spatial conflicts with existing marine uses; especially shipping vessels and various commercial fishing fleets, and overlap with marine conservation areas varied by conservation designation. While wave energy generation facilities may be economically viable in the California Current, this viability must be considered within the context of the costs associated with conflicts that arise with existing marine uses. Our analyses can be used to better inform placement of WEC devices (as well as other types of renewable energy facilities) in the context of marine planning by accounting for economic tradeoffs

  15. Thermally induced micro-motion by inflection in optical potential

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Jákl, Petr; Brzobohatý, Oto; Ryabov, A.; Filip, R.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAY (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 1697. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : molecular motors * brownian-motion * manipulation * efficiency * tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  16. The potential of optical coherence tomography for diagnosing meniscal pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang-Yin Ling, Carrie; Pozzi, Antonio; Thieman, Kelley M.; Tonks, Catherine A.; Guo, Shuguang; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2010-04-01

    Meniscal tears are often associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may lead to pain and discomfort in humans. Maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is highly desirable to mitigate the progression of osteoarthritis. Guidelines of which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and what part of damaged tissues should be removed are elusive and lacking consensus. Images of microstructural changes in meniscus would potentially guide the surgeons to manage the meniscal tears better, but the resolution of current diagnostic techniques is limited for this application. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of meniscal pathology. Torn medial menisci were collected from dogs with ACL insufficiency. The torn meniscus was divided into three tissue samples and scanned by OCT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). OCT and SEM images of torn menisci were compared. Each sample was evaluated for gross and microstructural abnormalities and reduction or loss of birefringence from the OCT images. The abnormalities detected with OCT were described for each type of tear. OCT holds promise in non-destructive and fast assessment of microstructural changes and tissue birefringence of meniscal tears. Future development of intraoperative OCT may help surgeons in the decision making of meniscal treatment.

  17. The potential of optical coherence tomography for diagnosing meniscal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Carrie Hang-Yin; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Pozzi, Antonio; Thieman, Kelley M; Tonks, Catherine A; Guo, Shuguang; Xie, Huikai

    2010-01-01

    Meniscal tears are often associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may lead to pain and discomfort in humans. Maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is highly desirable to mitigate the progression of osteoarthritis. Guidelines of which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and what part of damaged tissues should be removed are elusive and lacking consensus. Images of microstructural changes in meniscus would potentially guide the surgeons to manage the meniscal tears better, but the resolution of current diagnostic techniques is limited for this application. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of meniscal pathology. Torn medial menisci were collected from dogs with ACL insufficiency. The torn meniscus was divided into three tissue samples and scanned by OCT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). OCT and SEM images of torn menisci were compared. Each sample was evaluated for gross and microstructural abnormalities and reduction or loss of birefringence from the OCT images. The abnormalities detected with OCT were described for each type of tear. OCT holds promise in non-destructive and fast assessment of microstructural changes and tissue birefringence of meniscal tears. Future development of intraoperative OCT may help surgeons in the decision making of meniscal treatment

  18. AN INVESTIGATION OF WAVE ENERGY POTENTIAL IN WESTERN BLACK SEA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlyas UYGUR

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The main energy sources which are natural, clean, environmentally friendly, and renewable are wind power, solar energy, biomass energy, hydro energy, and wave energy. The wave energy has no cost except for the first investment and maintenance. There is also no cost for input energy. Besides these, it has no pollution effect on the environment, it is cheap and there is a huge potential all around the world. Wave energy is a good opportunity to solve the energy problem for Turkey which is surrounded by seas. Concerning all these facts, it has been conducted some studies which included five years of observation in the Western Black Sea Region (Akçakoca. The wave energy potential has also been calculated. From this sutdy results, it can be concluded that the wave energy potential of this region is inefficient. It is believed that by the improvement of the new energy converter devices in future, this low potential can be used more efficiently and as a result this study might be used as a basis for the future researches.

  19. Generation of continuous-wave 194 nm laser for mercury ion optical frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hongxin; Wu, Yue; Chen, Guozhu; Shen, Yong; Liu, Qu; Precision measurement; atomic clock Team

    2015-05-01

    194 nm continuous-wave (CW) laser is an essential part in mercury ion optical frequency standard. The continuous-wave tunable radiation sources in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) region of the spectrum is also serviceable in high-resolution spectroscopy with many atomic and molecular lines. We introduce a scheme to generate continuous-wave 194 nm radiation with SFM in a Beta Barium Borate (BBO) crystal here. The two source beams are at 718 nm and 266 nm, respectively. Due to the property of BBO, critical phase matching (CPM) is implemented. One bow-tie cavity is used to resonantly enhance the 718 nm beam while the 266 nm makes a single pass, which makes the configuration easy to implement. Considering the walk-off effect in CPM, the cavity mode is designed to be elliptical so that the conversion efficiency can be promoted. Since the 266 nm radiation is generated by a 532 nm laser through SHG in a BBO crystal with a large walk-off angle, the output mode is quite non-Gaussian. To improve mode matching, we shaped the 266 nm beam into Gaussian modes with a cylindrical lens and iris diaphragm. As a result, 2.05 mW 194 nm radiation can be generated. As we know, this is the highest power for 194 nm CW laser using SFM in BBO with just single resonance. The work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91436103 and No. 11204374).

  20. iPTF SEARCH FOR AN OPTICAL COUNTERPART TO GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENT GW150914

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Barlow, T.; Bellm, E.; Cook, D.; Duggan, G. E.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Lunnan, R. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. B.; Singer, L. P. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Corsi, A.; Palliyaguru, N. [Texas Tech University, Physics Department, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Bhalerao, V. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Ferretti, R. [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Frail, D. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); Horesh, A.; Manulis, I. [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Kendrick, R. [Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Laher, R. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, M/S 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Masci, F. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2016-06-20

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) autonomously responded to and promptly tiled the error region of the first gravitational-wave event GW150914 to search for an optical counterpart. Only a small fraction of the total localized region was immediately visible in the northern night sky, due both to Sun-angle and elevation constraints. Here, we report on the transient candidates identified and rapid follow-up undertaken to determine the nature of each candidate. Even in the small area imaged of 126 deg{sup 2}, after extensive filtering, eight candidates were deemed worthy of additional follow-up. Within two hours, all eight were spectroscopically classified by the Keck II telescope. Curiously, even though such events are rare, one of our candidates was a superluminous supernova. We obtained radio data with the Jansky Very Large Array and X-ray follow-up with the Swift satellite for this transient. None of our candidates appear to be associated with the gravitational-wave trigger, which is unsurprising given that GW150914 came from the merger of two stellar-mass black holes. This end-to-end discovery and follow-up campaign bodes well for future searches in this post-detection era of gravitational waves.

  1. Quantum variational measurement and the optical lever intracavity topology of gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili, F. Ya.

    2007-01-01

    The intracavity topologies of laser gravitational-wave detectors proposed several years ago are the promising way to obtain sensitivity of these devices significantly better than the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL). In essence, the intracavity detector is a two-stage device where the end mirrors displacement created by the gravitational wave is transferred to the displacement of an additional local mirror by means of the optical rigidity. The local mirror positions have to be monitored by an additional local meter. It is evident that the local meter precision defines the sensitivity of the detector. To overcome the SQL, the quantum variational measurement can be used in the local meter. In this method a frequency-dependent correlation between the meter backaction noise and measurement noise is introduced, which allows us to eliminate the backaction noise component from the meter output signal. This correlation is created by means of an additional filter cavity. In this article the sensitivity limitations of this scheme imposed by the optical losses both in the local meter itself and in the filter cavity are estimated. It is shown that the main sensitivity limitation stems from the filter cavity losses. In order to overcome it, it is necessary to increase the filter cavity length. In a preliminary prototype experiment, an approximate 10 m long filter cavity can be used to obtain sensitivity approximately 2-3 times better than the SQL. For future Quantum Non-Demolition (QND) gravitational-wave detectors with sensitivity about 10 times better than the SQL, the filter cavity length should be within kilometer range

  2. Characteristics of electron cyclotron waves creating field-aligned and transverse plasma-potential structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K; Kaneko, T; Hatakeyama, R; Fukuyama, A

    2009-01-01

    Characteristics of electromagnetic waves of azimuthal mode number m = ±1 are investigated experimentally, analytically and numerically when the waves triggering the field-aligned and transverse plasma-potential structure modification near an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) point are injected into an inhomogeneously magnetized plasma with high-speed ion flow. The waves of m = +1 and -1 modes generate an electric double layer near the ECR point at the radially central and peripheral areas of the plasma column, respectively, and the transverse electric fields are consequently formed. At these areas the waves have a right-handed polarization and are absorbed through the ECR mechanism, where the experimental and analytical results do show the polarization reversal along the radial axis. The numerical results by plasma analysis by finite element method (FEM)/wave analysis by FEM (PAF/WF) code show that the wave-absorption area is localized at the radially central and peripheral areas for m = +1 and -1 mode waves, respectively, being consistent with the experimental and analytical ones.

  3. Review on Millimeter Wave Antennas- Potential Candidate for 5G Enabled Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Matin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The millimeter wave (mmWave band is considered as the potential candidate for high speed communication services in 5G networks due to its huge bandwidth. Moreover, mmWave frequencies lead to miniaturization of RF front end including antennas. In this article, we provide an overview of recent research achievements of millimeter-wave antenna design along with the design considerations for compact antennas and antennas in package/on chip, mostly in the 60 GHz band is described along with their inherent benefits and challenges. A comparative analysis of various designs is also presented. The antennas with wide bandwidth, high-gain, compact size and low profile with easiness of integration in-package or on-chip with other components are required for 5G enabled applications.

  4. The investigation of relativistic microscopic optical potential based on RBBG equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Baoqiu; Ma Zhongyu

    1992-01-01

    The relativistic microscopic optical potential is derived from the RBBG equation. The nucleon complex effective mass is determined phenomenologically by a fit to 200 MeV proton-nucleus scattering data. Then the relativistic microscopic optical potentials of proton scattered from different targets: 16 O, 40 Ca, 90 Zr and 208 Pb in the energies range from 160 to 800 MeV have been got. The relativistic microscopic optical potentials have been used to study proton- 40 Ca scattering at 200 MeV. Theoretical predictions for cross section and spin observables are compared with experimental data and phenomenological Dirac optical potential

  5. Optical resonator for a standing wave dipole trap for fermionic lithium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsaesser, T.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis reports on the the construction of an optical resonator for a new resonator dipole trap to store the fermionic 6 Li-isotope and to investigate its scattering properties. It was demonstrated that the resonator enhances the energy density of a (1064 nm and 40 mW) laser beam by a factor of more than 100. A fused silica vacuum cell is positioned inside the resonator under Brewster's angle. The losses of the resonator depend mainly on the optical quality of the cell. The expected trap depth of the dipole trap is 200 μK and the photon scattering rate is expected to be about 0.4 s -1 . The resonator is stabilized by means of a polarization spectroscopy method. Due to high trap frequencies, which are produced by the tight enclosure of the standing wave in the resonator, the axial motion must be quantized. A simple model to describe this quantization has been developed. A magneto-optical trap, which serves as a source of cold lithium atoms, was put in operation. (orig.)

  6. Utilizing strongly absorbing materials for low-loss surface-wave nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Nicolai B.; Franz, Philipp; Heckmann, Jan; Pufahl, Karsten; Woggon, Ulrike

    2018-04-01

    Optical media endowed with large nonlinear susceptibilities are highly prized for their employment in frequency conversion and the generation of nonclassical states of light. Although the presence of an optical resonance can greatly increase the nonlinear response (e.g., in epsilon-near-zero materials), the non-negligible increase in linear absorption often precludes the application of such materials in nonlinear optics. Absorbing materials prepared as thin films, however, can support a low-loss surface wave: the long-range surface exciton polariton (LRSEP). Its propagation lifetime increases with greater intrinsic absorption and reduced film thickness, provided that the film is embedded in a transparent medium (symmetric cladding). We explore LRSEP propagation in a molybdenum film by way of a prism-coupling configuration. Our observations show that excitation of the LRSEP mode leads to a dramatic increase in the yield of second-harmonic generation. This implies that the LRSEP mode is an effective vehicle for utilizing the nonlinear response of absorbing materials.

  7. All-optical switching via four-wave mixing Bragg scattering in a silicon platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We employ the process of non-degenerate four-wave mixing Bragg scattering to demonstrate all-optical control in a silicon platform. In our configuration, a strong, non-information-carrying pump is mixed with a weak control pump and an input signal in a silicon-on-insulator waveguide. Through the optical nonlinearity of this highly confining waveguide, the weak pump controls the wavelength conversion process from the signal to an idler, leading to a controlled depletion of the signal. The strong pump, on the other hand, plays the role of a constant bias. In this work, we show experimentally that it is possible to implement this low-power switching technique as a first step towards universal optical logic gates, and test the performance with random binary data. Even at very low powers, where the signal and control pump levels are almost equal, the eye-diagrams remain open, indicating a successful operation of the logic gates.

  8. Developmental impairment of compound action potential in the optic nerve of myelin mutant taiep rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncagliolo, Manuel; Schlageter, Carol; León, Claudia; Couve, Eduardo; Bonansco, Christian; Eguibar, José R

    2006-01-05

    The taiep rat is a myelin mutant with an initial hypomyelination, followed by a progressive demyelination of the CNS. The neurological correlates start with tremor, followed by ataxia, immobility episodes, epilepsy and paralysis. The optic nerve, an easily-isolable central tract fully myelinated by oligodendrocytes, is a suitable preparation to evaluate the developmental impairment of central myelin. We examined the ontogenic development of optic nerve compound action potentials (CAP) throughout the first 6 months of life of control and taiep rats. Control optic nerves (ON) develop CAPs characterized by three waves. Along the first month, the CAPs of taiep rats showed a delayed maturation, with lower amplitudes and longer latencies than controls; at P30, the conduction velocity has only a third of the normal value. Later, as demyelination proceeds, the conduction velocity of taiep ONs begins to decrease and CAPs undergo a gradual temporal dispersion. CAPs of control and taiep showed differences in their pharmacological sensitivity to TEA and 4-AP, two voltage dependent K+ channel-blockers. As compared with TEA, 4-AP induced a significant increase of the amplitudes and a remarkable broadening of CAPs. After P20, unlike controls, the greater sensitivity to 4-AP exhibited by taiep ONs correlates with the detachment and retraction of paranodal loops suggesting that potassium conductances could regulate the excitability as demyelination of CNS axons progresses. It is concluded that the taiep rat, a long-lived mutant, provides a useful model to study the consequences of partial demyelination and the mechanisms by which glial cells regulate the molecular organization and excitability of axonal membranes during development and disease.

  9. Bound and scattering wave functions for a velocity-dependent Kisslinger potential for l>0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaghoub, M.I.

    2002-01-01

    Using formal scattering theory, the scattering wave functions are extrapolated to negative energies corresponding to bound-state poles. It is shown that the ratio of the normalized scattering and the corresponding bound-state wave functions, at a bound-state pole, is uniquely determined by the bound-state binding energy. This simple relation is proved analytically for an arbitrary angular momentum quantum number l>0, in the presence of a velocity-dependent Kisslinger potential. The extrapolation relation is tested analytically by solving the Schroedinger equation in the p-wave case exactly for the scattering and the corresponding bound-state wave functions when the Kisslinger potential has the form of a square well. A numerical resolution of the Schroedinger equation in the p-wave case and of a square-well Kisslinger potential is carried out to investigate the range of validity of the extrapolated connection. It is found that the derived relation is satisfied best at low energies and short distances. (orig.)

  10. The interpretation of resonance formation in coupled-channel models of positron scattering by atomic hydrogen using localized optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bransden, B.H.; Hewitt, R.N.

    1997-01-01

    Above-threshold resonances can occur in coupled-channel models of the e + + H system when Ps formation is taken into account (although it should be pointed out that, in this specific system, resonances do not occur in an exact theory). In general, to understand the mechanism of resonance formation it is useful to obtain the exact optical potential in a given channel in a localized form. The methods of achieving this localization are discussed with reference to a specific application to the resonance found in the two-state approximation for the l = 0 partial wave. (author)

  11. The relationship between wave and geometrical optics models of coded aperture type x-ray phase contrast imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Peter R T; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Speller, Robert D; Olivo, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is a very promising technique which may lead to significant advancements in medical imaging. One of the impediments to the clinical implementation of the technique is the general requirement to have an x-ray source of high coherence. The radiation physics group at UCL is currently developing an x-ray phase contrast imaging technique which works with laboratory x-ray sources. Validation of the system requires extensive modelling of relatively large samples of tissue. To aid this, we have undertaken a study of when geometrical optics may be employed to model the system in order to avoid the need to perform a computationally expensive wave optics calculation. In this paper, we derive the relationship between the geometrical and wave optics model for our system imaging an infinite cylinder. From this model we are able to draw conclusions regarding the general applicability of the geometrical optics approximation.

  12. Detection of Ultrasonic Stress Waves in Structures Using 3D Shaped Optic Fiber Based on a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chengming; Zhou, Wensong; Xie, Yawen

    2018-04-16

    This work proposes a 3D shaped optic fiber sensor for ultrasonic stress waves detection based on the principle of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer. This sensor can be used to receive acoustic emission signals in the passive damage detection methods and other types of ultrasonic signals propagating in the active damage detection methods, such as guided wave-based methods. The sensitivity of an ultrasonic fiber sensor based on the Mach–Zehnder interferometer mainly depends on the length of the sensing optical fiber; therefore, the proposed sensor achieves the maximum possible sensitivity by wrapping an optical fiber on a hollow cylinder with a base. The deformation of the optical fiber is produced by the displacement field of guided waves in the hollow cylinder. The sensor was first analyzed using the finite element method, which demonstrated its basic sensing capacity, and the simulation signals have the same characteristics in the frequency domain as the excitation signal. Subsequently, the primary investigations were conducted via a series of experiments. The sensor was used to detect guided wave signals excited by a piezoelectric wafer in an aluminum plate, and subsequently it was tested on a reinforced concrete beam, which produced acoustic emission signals via impact loading and crack extension when it was loaded to failure. The signals obtained from a piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor were used for comparison, and the results indicated that the proposed 3D fiber optic sensor can detect ultrasonic signals in the specific frequency response range.

  13. Detection of Ultrasonic Stress Waves in Structures Using 3D Shaped Optic Fiber Based on a Mach–Zehnder Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yawen

    2018-01-01

    This work proposes a 3D shaped optic fiber sensor for ultrasonic stress waves detection based on the principle of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer. This sensor can be used to receive acoustic emission signals in the passive damage detection methods and other types of ultrasonic signals propagating in the active damage detection methods, such as guided wave-based methods. The sensitivity of an ultrasonic fiber sensor based on the Mach–Zehnder interferometer mainly depends on the length of the sensing optical fiber; therefore, the proposed sensor achieves the maximum possible sensitivity by wrapping an optical fiber on a hollow cylinder with a base. The deformation of the optical fiber is produced by the displacement field of guided waves in the hollow cylinder. The sensor was first analyzed using the finite element method, which demonstrated its basic sensing capacity, and the simulation signals have the same characteristics in the frequency domain as the excitation signal. Subsequently, the primary investigations were conducted via a series of experiments. The sensor was used to detect guided wave signals excited by a piezoelectric wafer in an aluminum plate, and subsequently it was tested on a reinforced concrete beam, which produced acoustic emission signals via impact loading and crack extension when it was loaded to failure. The signals obtained from a piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor were used for comparison, and the results indicated that the proposed 3D fiber optic sensor can detect ultrasonic signals in the specific frequency response range. PMID:29659540

  14. Tunable error-free optical frequency conversion of a 4ps optical short pulse over 25 nm by four-wave mixing in a polarisation-maintaining optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, T.; Kawanishi, S.; Saruwatari, M.

    1994-05-01

    Error-free, tunable optical frequency conversion of a transform-limited 4.0 ps optical pulse signalis demonstrated at 6.3 Gbit/s using four-wave mixing in a polarization-maintaining optical fibre. The process generates 4.0-4.6 ps pulses over a 25nm range with time-bandwidth products of 0.31-0.43 and conversion power penalties of less than 1.5 dB.

  15. A theoretical investigation of the collective acceleration of cluster ions with accelerated potential waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Enjoji, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Motoichi; Noritake, Toshiya

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical treatment of the acceleration of cluster ions for additional heating of fusion plasma using the trapping effect in an accelerated potential wave is described. The conceptual design of the accelerator is the same as that by Enjoji, and the potential wave used is sinusoidal. For simplicity, collisions among cluster ions and the resulting breakups are neglected. The masses of the cluster ions are specified to range from 100 m sub(D) to 1000 m sub(D) (m sub(D): mass of a deuterium atom). Theoretical treatment is carried out only for the injection velocity which coincides with the phase velocity of the applied wave at the entrance of the accelerator. An equation describing the rate for successful acceleration of ions with a certain mass is deduced for the continuous injection of cluster ions. Computation for a typical mass distribution shows that more than 70% of the injected particles are effectively accelerated. (author)

  16. Time-Averaged Adiabatic Potentials: Versatile Matter-Wave Guides and Atom Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesanovsky, Igor; Klitzing, Wolf von

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel class of trapping potentials, time-averaged adiabatic potentials (TAAP), which allows the generation of a large variety of traps for quantum gases and matter-wave guides for atom interferometers. Examples include stacks of pancakes, rows of cigars, and multiple rings or sickles. The traps can be coupled through controllable tunneling barriers or merged altogether. We present analytical expressions for pancake-, cigar-, and ring-shaped traps. The ring geometry is of particular interest for guided matter-wave interferometry as it provides a perfectly smooth waveguide of widely tunable diameter and thus adjustable sensitivity of the interferometer. The flexibility of the TAAP would make possible the use of Bose-Einstein condensates as coherent matter waves in large-area atom interferometers

  17. The main postulates of adaptive correction of distortions of the wave front in large-size optical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sychev

    2014-01-01

    medium on the transmitted radiation WF;•  the lack of a reference source at the wavelength of trasnmitted laser radiation, which is required to implement methods for adaptive correction of the distorted WF;•  the unique to laser systems additional distorting factors available in transmission systems.These distorting factors include:• length of the optical path due to need in spatial diversity of high power laser source with a large number of matching optical elements;• thermal self-action of power laser radiation in the transport path of the radiation before its entry into forming optical system;• instability of spatio-temporal characteristics of the laser radiation source itself to take a turn for the worse conditions of radiation transmission both inside the optical path, and in the free atmosphere;• thermal irregularities and thermal deformation.It is shown that the adaptive systems differ from the active optics in that radiation wave front distortion is corrected in real time per totality of distorting factors (not only on the effect of the atmosphere with the speed ten times exceeding the effect of distortion itself. Here, the correction quality is estimated by criterion of the primary image quality.In this case, the correction continuously takes into account data about optical system parameters such as current space, temperature, time, and adjusting, thereby supporting the high quality of images under the action of distorting factors.The paper formulates and proposes the basic postulates of adaptive correction.Postulates are a set of statements and assertions, allowing us to implement effective means of adaptive correction of distortions.The paper also shows the real capabilities the methods and means of adaptive optics offer in case of efficient use of laser radiation power and what ways are possible to solve these tasks. First of all, these are:- forming a system of assumptions and minimization of distortions in the optical path, which includes a

  18. Rain attenuation measurement and prediction on parallel 860-nm free space optical and 58-GHz millimeter-wave paths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grábner, M.; Kvičera, V.; Fišer, Ondřej

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2012), 031206/1-031206/6 ISSN 0091-3286 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP102/11/1376 Grant - others:MŠMT(CZ) OC09076 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : optical communications * propagation * atmospheric optics * millimeter waves * rain attenuation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.880, year: 2012 http://opticalengineering.spiedigitallibrary.org/article.aspx?articleid=1183343

  19. Acousto-optical interaction of surface acoustic and optical waves in a two-dimensional phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian-Xue; Zou, Kui; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Su, Xiao-Xing

    2014-11-17

    Phoxonic crystal is a promising material for manipulating sound and light simultaneously. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate the propagation of acoustic and optical waves along the truncated surface of a two-dimensional square-latticed phoxonic crystal. Further, a phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity is proposed, which can simultaneously confine surface acoustic and optical waves. The interface motion and photoelastic effects are taken into account in the acousto-optical coupling. The results show obvious shifts in eigenfrequencies of the photonic cavity modes induced by different phononic cavity modes. The symmetry of the phononic cavity modes plays a more important role in the single-phonon exchange process than in the case of the multi-phonon exchange. Under the same deformation, the frequency shift of the photonic transverse electric mode is larger than that of the transverse magnetic mode.

  20. Geometrical and wave-optical effects on the performance of a bent-crystal dispersive X-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, J.P.; Amboage, M.; Hayama, S.; Diaz-Moreno, S.

    2010-01-01

    The X-ray focusing properties of a bent single crystal diffracting in Bragg geometry are discussed. First, it is assumed that a polychromatic point source is focused to a point image. The elliptical arc that the crystal must trace and the aberrations caused by bending the crystal cylindrically are derived from the ray paths. For a source of finite size, the magnification is found to vary over the crystal's length, so that rays of different wavelength produce images of different size. More realistic treatments of penetration and diffraction are performed with spherical monochromatic incident waves, using Takagi-Taupin calculations to create the diffracted wave and the Fresnel integral to trace the diffracted wave's evolution. Such 'wave-optical' calculations on a symmetric Si (1 1 1) crystal with 7 keV X-rays predict beam sizes different from those found in ray traces. Optimal sample and detector placement therefore requires wave effects to be considered.

  1. Solitary heat waves in nonlinear lattices with squared on-site potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A model Hamiltonian is proposed for heat conduction in a nonlinear lattice with squared on-site potential using the second quantized operators and averaging the same using a suitable wave function, equations are derived in discrete form for the field amplitude and the properties of heat transfer are examined theoretically.

  2. Solitary heat waves in nonlinear lattices with squared on-site potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A model Hamiltonian is proposed for heat conduction in a nonlinear lattice with squared on-site potential using the second quantized operators and averaging the same using a suitable wave function, equations are derived in discrete form for the field amplitude and the prop- erties of heat transfer are examined ...

  3. Wave packet dynamics and photofragmentation in time-dependent quadratic potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1996-01-01

    We study the dynamics of generalized harmonic oscillator states in time-dependent quadratic potentials and derive analytical expressions for the momentum space and the Wigner phase space representation of these wave packets. Using these results we consider a model for the rotational excitation...

  4. The Potential Energy Density in Transverse String Waves Depends Critically on Longitudinal Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The question of the correct formula for the potential energy density in transverse waves on a taut string continues to attract attention (e.g. Burko 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 L71), and at least three different formulae can be found in the literature, with the classic text by Morse and Feshbach ("Methods of Theoretical Physics" pp 126-127) stating…

  5. Electrochemical Oxidation by Square-Wave Potential Pulses in the Imitation of Oxidative Drug Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouri-Nigjeh, Eslam; Permentier, Hjalmar P.; Bischoff, Rainer; Bruins, Andries P.

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemistry combined with mass spectrometry (EC-MS) is an emerging analytical technique in the imitation of oxidative drug metabolism at the early stages of new drug development. Here, we present the benefits of electrochemical oxidation by square-wave potential pulses for the oxidation of

  6. Stimulated Brillouin scattering continuous wave phase conjugation in step-index fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Steven M; Spring, Justin B; Russell, Timothy H

    2008-07-21

    Continuous wave (CW) stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation in step-index optical fibers was studied experimentally and modeled as a function of fiber length. A phase conjugate fidelity over 80% was measured from SBS in a 40 m fiber using a pinhole technique. Fidelity decreases with fiber length, and a fiber with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.06 was found to generate good phase conjugation fidelity over longer lengths than a fiber with 0.13 NA. Modeling and experiment support previous work showing the maximum interaction length which yields a high fidelity phase conjugate beam is inversely proportional to the fiber NA(2), but find that fidelity remains high over much longer fiber lengths than previous models calculated. Conditions for SBS beam cleanup in step-index fibers are discussed.

  7. Plasma-wave effect on the optical properties of multilayered metallic Fibonacci superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Weiguo; Liu Nianhua; Wu Xiang

    1990-06-01

    Within the hydrodynamic model of electron dynamics, the optical properties of the metallic Fibonacci superlattice have been studied for the region of p-polarized soft x-rays and extreme ultraviolet. By using the 4 x 4 transfer-matrix formalism and taking into account retardation effects, and the coupling between transverse and longitudinal waves at the metal boundaries, we have discussed the electromagnetic normal modes for the quasisuperlattice in the rational approximation. We found that the dispersion curves are mainly of two types, and similar to the reflectivities, both real part and imaginary parts of the dispersion relation pattern has a rich structure of self-similarity. With the increasing of the generation number, all the electromagnetic modes become critical. (author). 13 refs, 6 figs

  8. Four-Wave Optical Parametric Amplification in a Raman-Active Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Kida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Four-wave optical parametric amplification (FWOPA in a Raman-active medium is experimentally investigated by use of an air-filled hollow fiber. A femtosecond pump pulse shorter than the period of molecular motion excites the coherent molecular motion of the Raman-active molecules during the parametric amplification of a signal pulse. The excited coherent motion modulates the frequency of the signal pulse during the parametric amplification, and shifts it to lower frequencies. The magnitude of the frequency redshift depends on the pump intensity, resulting in intensity-dependent spectral characteristics that are different from those in the FWOPA induced in a noble-gas-filled hollow fiber.

  9. Far-field high resolution effects and manipulating of electromagnetic waves based on transformation optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, XueBin; Zang, XiaoFei; Li, Zhou; Shi, Cheng; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing

    2015-05-01

    Based on the transformation optics (TO) and the effective medium theory (EMT), a new illusion media with homogeneous and isotropic materials is proposed to realize the far-field high resolution effects. When two point sources with the separation distance of λ0 / 4 are covered with the illusion media (λ0 is the free-space wavelength), the corresponding far-field pattern is equivalent to the case of two point sources with the separation distance larger than λ0 / 2 in free space, leading to the far-field high resolution effects (in free space, the separation distance of λ0 / 4 is less than half-wavelength, and thus the two point sources cannot be distinguished from each other). Furthermore, such illusion media can be applied to design tunable high-directivity antenna and an angle-dependent floating carpet cloak. Full wave simulations are carried out to verify the performance of our device.

  10. Epoxy-based broadband antireflection coating for millimeter-wave optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Darin; Suzuki, Aritoki; Keating, Brian; Krantz, William; Lee, Adrian T; Quealy, Erin; Richards, Paul L; Siritanasak, Praween; Walker, William

    2013-11-20

    We have developed epoxy-based, broadband antireflection coatings for millimeter-wave astrophysics experiments with cryogenic optics. By using multiple-layer coatings where each layer steps in dielectric constant, we achieved low reflection over a wide bandwidth. We suppressed the reflection from an alumina disk to 10% over fractional bandwidths of 92% and 104% using two-layer and three-layer coatings, respectively. The dielectric constants of epoxies were tuned between 2.06 and 7.44 by mixing three types of epoxy and doping with strontium titanate powder required for the high dielectric mixtures. At 140 K, the band-integrated absorption loss in the coatings was suppressed to less than 1% for the two-layer coating, and below 10% for the three-layer coating.

  11. Generalized laws of refraction that can lead to wave-optically forbidden light-ray fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtial, Johannes; Tyc, Tomáš

    2012-07-01

    The recent demonstration of a metamaterial phase hologram so thin that it can be classified as an interface in the effective-medium approximation [Science 334, 333 (2011)] has dramatically increased interest in generalized laws of refraction. Based on the fact that scalar wave optics allows only certain light-ray fields, we divide generalized laws of refraction into two categories. When applied to a planar cross section through any allowed light-ray field, the laws in the first category always result in a cross section through an allowed light-ray field again, whereas the laws in the second category can result in a cross section through a forbidden light-ray field.

  12. Localization of metastable atom beams with optical standing waves: nanolithography at the heisenberg limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson; Thywissen; Dekker; Berggren; Chu; Younkin; Prentiss

    1998-06-05

    The spatially dependent de-excitation of a beam of metastable argon atoms, traveling through an optical standing wave, produced a periodic array of localized metastable atoms with position and momentum spreads approaching the limit stated by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Silicon and silicon dioxide substrates placed in the path of the atom beam were patterned by the metastable atoms. The de-excitation of metastable atoms upon collision with the surface promoted the deposition of a carbonaceous film from a vapor-phase hydrocarbon precursor. The resulting patterns were imaged both directly and after chemical etching. Thus, quantum-mechanical steady-state atom distributions can be used for sub-0.1-micrometer lithography.

  13. Neutron optical potential of 28Si derived from the dispersion relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, H.; Igarasi, S.; Katsuragi, D.; Harima, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Based upon the dispersion theory, an optical potential of 28 Si was determined at the neutron energies from the Fermi energy to 20 MeV. In particular, discussion was given on a characteristic behavior of the optical potential for low-energy neutrons. Moreover, the validity of the dispersion theory was investigated for neutron single-particle bound states in 29 Si. (orig.)

  14. The use of dispersion relations to construct unified nucleon optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1991-01-01

    The dispersion relations provide a simple and accurate way of parametrizing the optical potential for a particular nucleus over a range of energies. A method is proposed for obtaining a global nucleon optical potential incorporating the dispersion relations. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs

  15. Preconditioned conjugate gradient wave-front reconstructors for multiconjugate adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Luc; Ellerbroek, Brent L.; Vogel, Curtis R.

    2003-09-01

    Multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems with 104-105 degrees of freedom have been proposed for future giant telescopes. Using standard matrix methods to compute, optimize, and implement wave-front control algorithms for these systems is impractical, since the number of calculations required to compute and apply the reconstruction matrix scales respectively with the cube and the square of the number of adaptive optics degrees of freedom. We develop scalable open-loop iterative sparse matrix implementations of minimum variance wave-front reconstruction for telescope diameters up to 32 m with more than 104 actuators. The basic approach is the preconditioned conjugate gradient method with an efficient preconditioner, whose block structure is defined by the atmospheric turbulent layers very much like the layer-oriented MCAO algorithms of current interest. Two cost-effective preconditioners are investigated: a multigrid solver and a simpler block symmetric Gauss-Seidel (BSGS) sweep. Both options require off-line sparse Cholesky factorizations of the diagonal blocks of the matrix system. The cost to precompute these factors scales approximately as the three-halves power of the number of estimated phase grid points per atmospheric layer, and their average update rate is typically of the order of 10-2 Hz, i.e., 4-5 orders of magnitude lower than the typical 103 Hz temporal sampling rate. All other computations scale almost linearly with the total number of estimated phase grid points. We present numerical simulation results to illustrate algorithm convergence. Convergence rates of both preconditioners are similar, regardless of measurement noise level, indicating that the layer-oriented BSGS sweep is as effective as the more elaborated multiresolution preconditioner.

  16. Optimised frequency modulation for continuous-wave optical magnetic resonance sensing using nitrogen-vacancy ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ella, Haitham A R; Ahmadi, Sepehr; Wojciechowski, Adam M; Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik L

    2017-06-26

    Magnetometers based on ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centres are a promising platform for continuously sensing static and low-frequency magnetic fields. Their combination with phase-sensitive (lock-in) detection creates a highly versatile sensor with a sensitivity that is proportional to the derivative of the optical magnetic resonance lock-in spectrum, which is in turn dependant on the lock-in modulation parameters. Here we study the dependence of the lock-in spectral slope on the modulation of the spin-driving microwave field. Given the presence of the intrinsic nitrogen hyperfine spin transitions, we experimentally show that when the ratio between the hyperfine linewidth and their separation is ≳ 1/4, square-wave based frequency modulation generates the steepest slope at modulation depths exceeding the separation of the hyperfine lines, compared to sine-wave based modulation. We formulate a model for calculating lock-in spectra which shows excellent agreement with our experiments, and which shows that an optimum slope is achieved when the linewidth/separation ratio is ≲ 1/4 and the modulation depth is less then the resonance linewidth, irrespective of the modulation function used.

  17. Optical Properties and Wave Propagation in Semiconductor-Based Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mario Agio

    2002-01-01

    This work is a theoretical investigation on the physical properties of semiconductor-based two-dimensional photonic crystals, in particular for what concerns systems embedded in planar dielectric waveguides (GaAs/AlGaAs, GaInAsP/InP heterostructures, and self-standing membranes) or based on macro-porous silicon. The photonic-band structure of photonic crystals and photonic-crystal slabs is numerically computed and the associated light-line problem is discussed, which points to the issue of intrinsic out-of-lane diffraction losses for the photonic bands lying above the light line. The photonic states are then classified by the group theory formalism: each mode is related to an irreducible representation of the corresponding small point group. The optical properties are investigated by means of the scattering matrix method, which numerically implements a variable-angle-reflectance experiment; comparison with experiments is also provided. The analysis of surface reflectance proves the existence of selection rules for coupling an external wave to a certain photonic mode. Such rules can be directly derived from symmetry considerations. Lastly, the control of wave propagation in weak-index contrast photonic-crystal slabs is tackled in view of designing building blocks for photonic integrated circuits. The proposed designs are found to comply with the major requirements of low-loss propagation, high and single-mode transmission. These notions are then collected to model a photonic-crystal combiner for an integrated multi-wavelength-source laser

  18. Broadband Enhancement of Optical Frequency Comb Using Cascaded Four-Wave Mixing in Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfig Eltaif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A cascaded intensity modulator (IM and phase modulator (PM are used to modulate a continuous-wave (CW laser and generate an optical frequency comb (OFC. Thus, the generated comb is utilized as an initial seed and combined with another CW-laser to generate four-wave mixing (FWM in photonic crystal fiber (PCF. Results show that an initial flat 30 GHz OFC of 29, 55 lines within power fluctuation of 0.8 dB and 2 dB, respectively, can be achieved by setting the ratio of the DC bias to amplitude of sinusoidal signal at 0.1 and setting the modulation indices of both IM and PM at 10. Moreover, the 1st order of FWM created through 14 m of PCF has over 68 and 94 lines with fluctuation of 0.8 dB and 2 dB, respectively. Hence, the generated wavelengths of 1st left and right order of FWM can be tuned in a range from ~1500 nm to ~1525 nm and ~1590 nm to ~1604 nm, respectively.

  19. Characterizing shock waves in hydrogel using high speed imaging and a fiber-optic probe hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Phillip A.; Betney, M. R.; Doyle, H. W.; Tully, B.; Ventikos, Y.; Hawker, N. A.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2017-05-01

    The impact of a stainless steel disk-shaped projectile launched by a single-stage light gas gun is used to generate planar shock waves with amplitudes on the order of 102MPa in a hydrogel target material. These shock waves are characterized using ultra-high-speed imaging as well as a fiber-optic probe hydrophone. Although the hydrogel equation of state (EOS) is unknown, the combination of these measurements with conservation of mass and momentum allows us to calculate pressure. It is also shown that although the hydrogel behaves similarly to water, the use of a water EOS underpredicts pressure amplitudes in the hydrogel by ˜10 % at the shock front. Further, the water EOS predicts pressures approximately 2% higher than those determined by conservation laws for a given value of the shock velocity. Shot to shot repeatability is controlled to within 10%, with the shock speed and pressure increasing as a function of the velocity of the projectile at impact. Thus the projectile velocity may be used as an adequate predictor of shock conditions in future work with a restricted suite of diagnostics.

  20. Optical Properties and Wave Propagation in Semiconductor-Based Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agio, Mario [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-12-31

    This work is a theoretical investigation on the physical properties of semiconductor-based two-dimensional photonic crystals, in particular for what concerns systems embedded in planar dielectric waveguides (GaAs/AlGaAs, GaInAsP/InP heterostructures, and self-standing membranes) or based on macro-porous silicon. The photonic-band structure of photonic crystals and photonic-crystal slabs is numerically computed and the associated light-line problem is discussed, which points to the issue of intrinsic out-of-lane diffraction losses for the photonic bands lying above the light line. The photonic states are then classified by the group theory formalism: each mode is related to an irreducible representation of the corresponding small point group. The optical properties are investigated by means of the scattering matrix method, which numerically implements a variable-angle-reflectance experiment; comparison with experiments is also provided. The analysis of surface reflectance proves the existence of selection rules for coupling an external wave to a certain photonic mode. Such rules can be directly derived from symmetry considerations. Lastly, the control of wave propagation in weak-index contrast photonic-crystal slabs is tackled in view of designing building blocks for photonic integrated circuits. The proposed designs are found to comply with the major requirements of low-loss propagation, high and single-mode transmission. These notions are then collected to model a photonic-crystal combiner for an integrated multi-wavelength-source laser.

  1. Quantum mechanics of lattice gas automata: One-particle plane waves and potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Classical lattice gas automata effectively simulate physical processes, such as diffusion and fluid flow (in certain parameter regimes), despite their simplicity at the microscale. Motivated by current interest in quantum computation we recently defined quantum lattice gas automata; in this paper we initiate a project to analyze which physical processes these models can effectively simulate. Studying the single particle sector of a one-dimensional quantum lattice gas we find discrete analogs of plane waves and wave packets, and then investigate their behavior in the presence of inhomogeneous potentials. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. Chaotic transport of a matter-wave soliton in a biperiodically driven optical superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zheng; Hai Wenhua; Deng Yan; Xie Qiongtao

    2012-01-01

    Under the effective particle approximation, we study the temporal ratchet effect for chaotic transport of a matter-wave soliton consisting of an attractive Bose–Einstein condensate held in a quasi-one-dimensional symmetric optical superlattice with biperiodic driving. It is known that chaos can substitute for disorder in Anderson’s scenario [Wimberger S, Krug A, Buchleitner A. Phys Rev Lett 2002;89:263601] and only a higher level of disorder can induce Anderson localization for some special systems [Schwartz T, Bartal G, Fishman S, Segev M. Nature 2007;46:52], and a matter-wave soliton can transit to chaos with high or low probability in a high- or low-chaoticity region [Zhu Q, Hai W, Rong S. Phys Rev E 2009;80:016203]. Here we demonstrate that varying the driving phase to break the time reversal symmetry of the system can increase the size of the high-chaoticity region for low- and moderate-frequency regions. Consequently, the parameter region of the exponential spatial localization increases to the same size, and the low-chaoticity and delocalization region, which includes subregions of the ratchet effect and its inverse effect, correspondingly decreases. The positive dependence of the localization on the driving frequency is also revealed. The results indicate that a high-chaoticity region could replace higher disorder and assists in Anderson localization. From the results we suggest a method for controlling directed motion of a matter-wave soliton by adjusting the driving frequency and amplitude to strengthen or suppress, or even reverse, the temporal ratchet effect.

  3. Four-Wave Mixing of a Laser and Its Frequency-Doubled Version in a Multimode Optical Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Pourbeyram

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that it is possible to couple a laser beam and its frequency-doubled daughter into a multimode optical fiber through the four-wave mixing nonlinear process and generate a new wavelength. The frequency-doubled daughter can be generated in an external crystal with a large second order nonlinearity. It is argued that while this possibility is within the design parameter range of conventional multimode optical fibers, it necessitates a lower-bound for the core-cladding refractive index contrast of the multimode optical fiber.

  4. Potential for integrated optical circuits in advanced aircraft with fiber optic control and monitoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1991-02-01

    Fiber optic technology is expected to be used in future advanced weapons platforms as well as commercial aerospace applications. Fiber optic waveguides will be used to transmit noise free high speed data between a multitude of computers as well as audio and video information to the flight crew. Passive optical sensors connected to control computers with optical fiber interconnects will serve both control and monitoring functions. Implementation of fiber optic technology has already begun. Both the military and NASA have several programs in place. A cooperative program called FOCSI (Fiber Optic Control System Integration) between NASA Lewis and the NAVY to build environmentally test and flight demonstrate sensor systems for propul sion and flight control systems is currently underway. Integrated Optical Circuits (IOC''s) are also being given serious consideration for use in advanced aircraft sys tems. IOC''s will result in miniaturization and localization of components to gener ate detect optical signals and process them for use by the control computers. In some complex systems IOC''s may be required to perform calculations optically if the technology is ready replacing some of the electronic systems used today. IOC''s are attractive because they will result in rugged components capable of withstanding severe environments in advanced aerospace vehicles. Manufacturing technology devel oped for microelectronic integrated circuits applied to IOC''s will result in cost effective manufacturing. This paper reviews the current FOCSI program and describes the role of IOC''s in FOCSI applications.

  5. Combined application of ultrasonic waves, magnetic fields and optical flow in the rehabilitation of patients and disabled people

    OpenAIRE

    Chukhraiev, N.; Vladimirov, A.; Vilcahuaman, L.; Zukow, W.; Samosyuk, N.; Chukhraieva, E.; Butskaya, L.

    2016-01-01

    SHUPYK NATIONAL MEDICAL ACADEMY OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION PONTIFICAL CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF PERU RADOM UNIVERSITY SCM «MEDICAL INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES» Chukhraiev N., Vladimirov А., Vilcahuamаn L., Zukow W., Samosyuk N., Chukhraieva E., Butskaya L. COMBINED APPLICATION OF ULTRASONIC WAVES, MAGNETIC FIELDS AND OPTICAL FLOW IN THE REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS AND DISABLED PEOPLE Edited by Chukh...

  6. Demonstrations of Wave Optics (Interference and Diffraction of Light) for Large Audiences Using a Laser and a Multimedia Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new technique for performing most well-known demonstrations of wave optics. Demonstrations which are normally very hard to show to more than a few people can be presented easily to very large audiences with excellent visibility for everyone. The proposed setup is easy to put together and use and can be very useful for…

  7. Rapid and sensitive trace gas detection with continuous wave Optical Parametric Oscillator-based Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arslanov, D.D.; Spunei, M.; Ngai, A.K.Y.; Cristescu, S.M.; Lindsay, I.D.; Lindsay, I.D.; Boller, Klaus J.; Persijn, S.T.; Harren, F.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-amplified Distributed Bragg Reflector diode laser is used to pump a continuous wave, singly resonant Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO). The output radiation covers the 3–4 μm with ability of rapid (100 THz/s) and broad mode-hop-free tuning (5 cm−1). Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy is

  8. Limitations in distance and frequency due to chromatic dispersion in fibre-optic microwave and millimeter-wave links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Nielsen, Søren Nørskov; Nielsen, Søren Nørskov

    1996-01-01

    Chromatic dispersion significantly limits the distance and/or frequency in fibre-optic microwave and millimeter-wave links based on direct detection due to a decrease of the carrier to noise ratio. The limitations in links based on coherent remote heterodyne detection, however, are far less...

  9. Optimisation of 40 Gb/s wavelength converters based on four-wave mixing in a semiconductor optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, K.; Petersen, Martin Nordal; Herrera, J.

    2007-01-01

    The optimum operating powers and wavelengths for a 40 Gb/s wavelength converter based on four-wave mixing in a semiconductor 14 optical amplifier are inferred from experimental results. From these measurements, some general rules of thumb are derived for this kind of devices. Generally, the optim...

  10. Axon-Axon Interactions Regulate Topographic Optic Tract Sorting via CYFIP2-Dependent WAVE Complex Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioni, Jean-Michel; Wong, Hovy Ho-Wai; Bressan, Dario; Kodama, Lay; Harris, William A; Holt, Christine E

    2018-03-07

    The axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are topographically sorted before they arrive at the optic tectum. This pre-target sorting, typical of axon tracts throughout the brain, is poorly understood. Here, we show that cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting proteins (CYFIPs) fulfill non-redundant functions in RGCs, with CYFIP1 mediating axon growth and CYFIP2 specifically involved in axon sorting. We find that CYFIP2 mediates homotypic and heterotypic contact-triggered fasciculation and repulsion responses between dorsal and ventral axons. CYFIP2 associates with transporting ribonucleoprotein particles in axons and regulates translation. Axon-axon contact stimulates CYFIP2 to move into growth cones where it joins the actin nucleating WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) in the periphery and regulates actin remodeling and filopodial dynamics. CYFIP2's function in axon sorting is mediated by its binding to the WRC but not its translational regulation. Together, these findings uncover CYFIP2 as a key regulatory link between axon-axon interactions, filopodial dynamics, and optic tract sorting. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Excitation of density waves at the Lindblad and corotation resonances by an external potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.

    1979-01-01

    We calculate the linear response of a differentially rotating two-dimensional gas disk to a rigidly rotating external potential. The main assumptions are that the sound speed is much smaller than the orbital velocity and that the external potential varies on the scale of the disk radius. We investigate disks both with and without self-gravity.The external potential exerts torques on the disk only at the Lindblad and corotation resonances. The torque is positive at the outer Lindblad resonance and negative at the inner Lindblad resonance; at corotation the torque has the sign of the radial gradient of vorticity per unit surface density. The torques are of the same order of magnitude at both types of resonance and are independent of the sound speed in the disk.The external potential also excites density waves in the vicinity of the Lindblad and corotation resonances. The long trailing wave is excited at a Lindblad resonance. It transports away from the resonance all of the angular momentum which is deposited there by the external torque. Short trailing waves are excited at the corotation resonance. The amplitudes of the excited waves are the same on both sides of the resonance and are small unless the disk is almost gravitationally unstable. No net angular momentum is transported away from the corotation region by the waves. Thus the angular momentum deposited there by the external torque accumulates in the gas.We briefly discuss the behavior of particle disks and prove that the external torques on particle disks are identical to those on gas disks

  12. Intracavity Cr3+:LiCAF + PPSLT optical parametric oscillator with self-injection-locked pump wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maestre, H; Torregrosa, A J; Capmany, J

    2013-01-01

    In this letter we present an intracavity pumped continuous wave (CW) doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on Cr 3+ :LiCaAlF 6 (Cr:LiCAF) as the material generating the OPO pump wave and periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate (PPSLT) as the nonlinear material. The OPO pump wave is spectrally narrowed and tuned by means of an external cavity, thus allowing self-injection locking of the OPO pump wavelength. When operated near degeneracy, the constructed OPO enables a fast tuning of the parametrically generated wavelengths in response to small perturbations of the phase-matching condition. The Cr:LiCAF emission band is especially well suited to provide dual-wavelength oscillation in the optical communications 1550 nm band as a result of the parametric oscillation in PPSLT. (letter)

  13. Demonstration and optimisation of an ultrafast all-optical AND logic gate using four-wave mixing in a semiconductor optical amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razaghi, M; Nosratpour, A; Das, N K

    2013-01-01

    We have proposed an all-optical AND logic gate based on four-wave mixing (FWM) in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) integrated with an optical filter. In the scheme proposed, the preferred logical function can be performed without using a continuous-wave (cw) signal. The modified nonlinear Schroedinger equation (MNLSE) is used for the modelling wave propagation in a SOA. The MNLSE takes into account all nonlinear effects relevant to pico- and sub-picosecond pulse durations and is solved by the finite-difference beam-propagation method (FD-BPM). Based on the simulation results, the optimal output signal with a 40-fJ energy can be obtained at a bit rate of 50 Gb s -1 . In the simulations, besides the nonlinearities included in the model, the pattern effect of the signals propagating in the SOA medium and the effect of the input signal bit rate are extensively investigated to optimise the system performance. (optical logic elements)

  14. Stimulated Brillouin scattering phase-locking using a transient acoustic standing wave excited through an optical interference field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrej Slezak; Milan Kalal; Hon Jin Kong

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Analytical description of an experimentally verified scheme leading to a phase-locked stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), used in a laser beam combination systems, is presented. The essential condition for the phase-locking effect for SBS is the fixation of the starting position and time of the acoustic Brillouin wave. It is shown that the starting position fixation of this acoustic wave may have its origin in a transient acoustic standing wave initiated by an arising optical interference field produced by the back-seeding concave mirror. This interference field leads to a stationary density modulation of the medium. However, the way to the formation of this density modulation leads via the acoustic standing wave. An appropriate solution, in the form of the standing wave, was obtained from solving the acoustic wave-equation using the electrostriction as a driving force. As a consequence of the damping term included in this equation the acoustic standing wave becomes gradually attenuated and contrary to the undamped solution published earlier, thus constitutes a truly transient phenomenon. Using a mathematical formalism similar to that which is used for the SBS description in the case of a random phase, the coupled equations describing the phase-locked SBS were derived. Contrary to the case without the back-seeding mirror, where the wave chosen from the thermal noise background subsequently plays the role of a trigger of the stimulated process, in this case it is replaced by the transient standing wave produced as a consequence of the presence of an optical interference field arisen in the focal region of the back-seeding concave mirror.

  15. Advanced magneto-optical microscopy: Imaging from picoseconds to centimeters - imaging spin waves and temperature distributions (invited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necdet Onur Urs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in the observation of magnetic domains and domain walls by wide-field optical microscopy based on the magneto-optical Kerr, Faraday, Voigt, and Gradient effect are reviewed. Emphasis is given to the existence of higher order magneto-optical effects for advanced magnetic imaging. Fundamental concepts and advances in methodology are discussed that allow for imaging of magnetic domains on various length and time scales. Time-resolved imaging of electric field induced domain wall rotation is shown. Visualization of magnetization dynamics down to picosecond temporal resolution for the imaging of spin-waves and magneto-optical multi-effect domain imaging techniques for obtaining vectorial information are demonstrated. Beyond conventional domain imaging, the use of a magneto-optical indicator technique for local temperature sensing is shown.

  16. Peroperative optical autofluorescence biopsy-verification of its diagnostic potential

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ducháč, V.; Zavadil, Jiří; Vránová, J.; Jirásek, T.; Štukavec, J.; Horák, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2011), s. 325-333 ISSN 0268-8921 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Autofluorescence spectroscopy * Colorectal cancer * Optical fibres Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.004, year: 2011

  17. Optical fibre temperature sensor technology and potential application in absorbed dose calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P.D.; Hargrave, N.J.

    1992-09-01

    Optical fibre based sensors are proposed as a potential alternative to the thermistors traditionally used as temperature sensors in absorbed dose calorimetry. The development of optical fibre temperature sensor technology over the last ten years is reviewed. The potential resolution of various optical techniques is assessed with particular reference to the requirements of absorbed dose calorimetry. Attention is drawn to other issues which would require investigation before the development of practical optical fibre sensors for this purpose could occur. 192 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs

  18. A mechanical wave system to show waveforms similar to quantum mechanical wavefunctions in a potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faletič, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Interviews with students suggest that even though they understand the formalism and the formal nature of quantum theory, they still often desire a mental picture of what the equations describe and some tangible experience with the wavefunctions. Here we discuss a mechanical wave system capable of reproducing correctly a mechanical equivalent of a quantum system in a potential, and the resulting waveforms in principle of any form. We have successfully reproduced the finite potential well, the potential barrier and the parabolic potential. We believe that these mechanical waveforms can provide a valuable experience base for introductory students to start from. We aim to show that mechanical systems that are described with the same mathematics as quantum mechanical, indeed behave in the same way. We believe that even if treated purely as a wave phenomenon, the system provides much insight into wave mechanics. This can be especially useful for physics teachers and others who often need to resort to concepts and experience rather than mathematics when explaining physical phenomena. (paper)

  19. Assessment of theoretical near-shore wave power potential along the Lithuanian coast of the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasiulis, E; Punys, P; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2015-01-01

    is evaluated using available multi-year visual observation data. A brief review of European wave energy resources, focusing more on semi-enclosed seas, is provided, as well as a comparison between wave energy potential and conventional hydropower potential in European countries. A conventional hydrological...

  20. Directional and dynamic modulation of the optical emission of an individual GaAs nanowire using surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Jörg B; Rudolph, Daniel; Bichler, Max; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J; Koblmüller, Gregor; Wixforth, Achim; Krenner, Hubert J

    2011-04-13

    We report on optical experiments performed on individual GaAs nanowires and the manipulation of their temporal emission characteristics using a surface acoustic wave. We find a pronounced, characteristic suppression of the emission intensity for the surface acoustic wave propagation aligned with the axis of the nanowire. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this quenching is dynamical as it shows a pronounced modulation as the local phase of the surface acoustic wave is tuned. These effects are strongly reduced for a surface acoustic wave applied in the direction perpendicular to the axis of the nanowire due to their inherent one-dimensional geometry. We resolve a fully dynamic modulation of the nanowire emission up to 678 MHz not limited by the physical properties of the nanowires.

  1. Green function iterative solution of ground state wave function for Yukawa potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    The newly developed single trajectory quadrature method is applied to solve central potentials. First, based on the series expansion method an exact analytic solution of the ground state for Hulthen potential and an approximate solution for Yukawa potential are obtained respectively. Second, the newly developed iterative method based on Green function defined by quadratures along the single trajectory is applied to solve Yukawa potential using the Coulomb solution and Hulthen solution as the trial functions respectively. The results show that a more proper choice of the trial function will give a better convergence. To further improve the convergence the iterative method is combined with the variational method to solve the ground state wave function for Yukawa potential, using variational solutions of the Coulomb and Hulthen potentials as the trial functions. The results give much better convergence. Finally, the obtained critical screen coefficient is applied to discuss the dissociate temperature of J/ψ in high temperature QGP

  2. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the propagation of weakly nonlinear waves in optical fibers and on the water surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabchoub, A., E-mail: achabchoub@swin.edu.au [Centre for Ocean Engineering Science and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Kibler, B.; Finot, C.; Millot, G. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS, Université de Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon (France); Onorato, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Dudley, J.M. [Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR 6174 CNRS- Université de Franche-Comté, 25030 Besançon (France); Babanin, A.V. [Centre for Ocean Engineering Science and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    The dynamics of waves in weakly nonlinear dispersive media can be described by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). An important feature of the equation is that it can be derived in a number of different physical contexts; therefore, analogies between different fields, such as for example fiber optics, water waves, plasma waves and Bose–Einstein condensates, can be established. Here, we investigate the similarities between wave propagation in optical Kerr media and water waves. In particular, we discuss the modulation instability (MI) in both media. In analogy to the water wave problem, we derive for Kerr-media the Benjamin–Feir index, i.e. a nondimensional parameter related to the probability of formation of rogue waves in incoherent wave trains.

  3. Optimal reflection-free complex absorbing potentials for quantum propagation of wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemer, Oded; Brisker, Daria; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2005-01-01

    The conditions for optimal reflection-free complex-absorbing potentials (CAPs) are discussed. It is shown that the CAPs as derived from the smooth-exterior-scaling transformation of the Hamiltonian [J. Phys. B 31, 1431 (1998)] serve as optimal reflection-free CAPs (RF CAPs) in wave-packet propagation calculations of open systems. The initial wave packet, Φ(t=0), can be located in the interaction region (as in half collision experiments) where the CAPs have vanished or in the asymptote where V CAP ≠0. As we show, the optimal CAPs can be introduced also in the region where the physical potential has not vanished. The unavoided reflections due to the use of a finite number of grid points (or basis functions) are discussed. A simple way to reduce the 'edge-grid' reflection effect is described

  4. The imaginary part of the local potential equivalent to the non-local α-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassaut, M.; Vinh Mau, N.

    1982-01-01

    A simple expression of the α-nucleus optical potential has been derived from the Feshbach formula by using a closure approximation for summing over the excited states of the target nucleus. It has been shown that the correction to the real folding model potential is small. The imaginary local potential equivalent to the non-local Feshbach potential has been studied in detail for Ca nuclei and shown to reproduce quite well the gross properties of empirical potentials above 100 MeV with, however, a lack of absorption in the surface region. The A-dependence of the imaginary potential volume integral has also been investigated. (orig.)

  5. Polaron effects on nonlinear optical rectification in asymmetrical Gaussian potential quantum wells with applied electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jinghe; Guo, Kangxian; Liu, Guanghui

    2014-01-01

    Polaron effects on nonlinear optical rectification in asymmetrical Gaussian potential quantum wells are studied by the effective mass approximation and the perturbation theory. The numerical results show that nonlinear optical rectification coefficients are strongly dependent on the barrier hight V 0 of the Gaussian potential quantum wells, the range L of the confinement potential and the electric field F. Besides, the numerical results show that no matter how V 0 , L and F change, taking into consideration polaron effects, the optical rectification coefficients χ 0 (2) get greatly enhanced.

  6. Possible Experiment for the Demonstration of Neutron Waves Interaction with Spatially Oscillating Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloi Mădălina Mihaela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of problems in neutron optics is well described by a theory based on application of the effective potential model. It was assumed that the concept of the effective potential in neutron optics have a limited region of validity and ceases to be correct in the case of the giant acceleration of a matter. To test this hypothesis a new Ultra Cold neutron experiment for the observation neutron interaction with potential structure oscillating in space was proposed. The report is focused on the model calculations of the topography of sample surface that oscillate in space. These calculations are necessary to find an optimal parameters and geometry of the planned experiment.

  7. Preconditioned conjugate gradient wave-front reconstructors for multiconjugate adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Luc; Ellerbroek, Brent L; Vogel, Curtis R

    2003-09-10

    Multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems with 10(4)-10(5) degrees of freedom have been proposed for future giant telescopes. Using standard matrix methods to compute, optimize, and implement wavefront control algorithms for these systems is impractical, since the number of calculations required to compute and apply the reconstruction matrix scales respectively with the cube and the square of the number of adaptive optics degrees of freedom. We develop scalable open-loop iterative sparse matrix implementations of minimum variance wave-front reconstruction for telescope diameters up to 32 m with more than 10(4) actuators. The basic approach is the preconditioned conjugate gradient method with an efficient preconditioner, whose block structure is defined by the atmospheric turbulent layers very much like the layer-oriented MCAO algorithms of current interest. Two cost-effective preconditioners are investigated: a multigrid solver and a simpler block symmetric Gauss-Seidel (BSGS) sweep. Both options require off-line sparse Cholesky factorizations of the diagonal blocks of the matrix system. The cost to precompute these factors scales approximately as the three-halves power of the number of estimated phase grid points per atmospheric layer, and their average update rate is typically of the order of 10(-2) Hz, i.e., 4-5 orders of magnitude lower than the typical 10(3) Hz temporal sampling rate. All other computations scale almost linearly with the total number of estimated phase grid points. We present numerical simulation results to illustrate algorithm convergence. Convergence rates of both preconditioners are similar, regardless of measurement noise level, indicating that the layer-oriented BSGS sweep is as effective as the more elaborated multiresolution preconditioner.

  8. Applications and Optimization of Optical Time Lenses based on Four-Wave Mixing in Highly Nonlinear Fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillieholm, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Optical Fourier transformations enabled by the versatile time lens (quadratic phase modulator), have been demonstrated for numerous optical signal processing applications. Applications include ultrafast optical oscilloscopes, high resolution spectralanalysers, and the processing of ultrahigh......-speed communication signals, to enable e.g. such varied applications as phase regeneration for wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) signals, conversion between spectrally efficient formats and receivers with reduced complexity for advanced optical multiplexing formats. Four-wave mixing (FWM) is showing promise...... of HNLF for different applications, and to a novel generic method based on only two tunable CW lasers, which allows for accurate prediction of the FWM performance in HNLF with chirped pump pulses.Then, a composite dispersion-flattened HNLF (DF-HNLF) is proposed and assembled to mitigate the effects...

  9. Rotating and standing waves in a diffractive nonlinear optical system with delayed feedback under O(2) Hopf bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinskiy, S. S.; Razgulin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we study one-dimensional rotating and standing waves in a model of an O(2)-symmetric nonlinear optical system with diffraction and delay in the feedback loop whose dynamics is governed by a system of coupled delayed parabolic equation and linear Schrodinger-type equation. We elaborate a two-step approach: transition to a rotating coordinate system to obtain the profiles of the waves as small parameter expansions and the normal form technique to study their qualitative dynamic behavior and stability. Theoretical results stand in a good agreement with direct computer simulations presented.

  10. Arbitrary l-wave solutions of the Schroedinger equation for the screen Coulomb potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Shishan; Sun, Guohua; Dong, Shihai

    2013-01-01

    Using improved approximate schemes for centrifugal term and the singular factor 1/r appearing in potential itself, we solve the Schroedinger equation with the screen Coulomb potential for arbitrary angular momentum state l. The bound state energy levels are obtained. A closed form of normalization constant of the wave functions is also found. The numerical results show that our results are in good agreement with those obtained by other methods. The key issue is how to treat two singular points in this quantum system. (author)

  11. Energy spectra and wave function of trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential as an effective quantum chromodynamics potential in D-dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deta, U. A., E-mail: utamaalan@yahoo.co.id [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department of Post Graduate Program, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Indonesia and Physics Department, State University of Surabaya, Jl. Ketintang, Surabaya 60231 (Indonesia); Suparmi,; Cari,; Husein, A. S.; Yuliani, H.; Khaled, I. K. A.; Luqman, H.; Supriyanto [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department of Post Graduate Program, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    The Energy Spectra and Wave Function of Schrodinger equation in D-Dimensions for trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential were investigated analytically using Nikiforov-Uvarov method. This potential captures the essential traits of the quark-gluon dynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics. The approximate energy spectra are given in the close form and the corresponding approximate wave function for arbitrary l-state (l ≠ 0) in D-dimensions are formulated in the form of differential polynomials. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The existence of extra dimensions (centrifugal factor) and this potential increase the energy spectra of system.

  12. Contribution to the heavy-ion optical potential from coupling to vibrational states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donangelo, R; Canto, L F; Hussein, M S

    1978-11-01

    The component of the optical potential in the elastic channel due to the coupling to vibrational states in Coulomb excitation is derived using a previously developed semiclassical method. Several numerical examples are worked out.

  13. An investigation of relativistic microscopic optical potential in terms of relativistic Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Baoqiu; Ma Zhongyu

    1992-01-01

    Relativistic microscopic optical potential of nucleon-nucleus is derived from the relativistic Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone (RBBG) equation. The complex effective mass of a nucleon is determined by a fit to 200 MeV p- 40 Ca scattering data. The relativistic microscopic optical potentials with this effective mass are obtained from RBBG for p- 16O , 40 Ca, 90 Zr and 208 Pb scattering in energy range from 160 to 800 MeV. The microscopic optical potential is used to study the proton- 40 Ca scattering problem at 200 MeV. The results, such as differential cross section, analyzing power and spin rotation function are compared with those calculated from phenomenological relativistic optical potential

  14. A Potential Method for Body and Surface Wave Propagation in Transversely Isotropic Half- and Full-Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Raoofian Naeeni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of propagation of plane wave including body and surface waves propagating in a transversely isotropic half-space with a depth-wise axis of material symmetry is investigated in details. Using the advantage of representation of displacement fields in terms of two complete scalar potential functions, the coupled equations of motion are uncoupled and reduced to two independent equations for potential functions. In this paper, the secular equations for determination of body and surface wave velocities are derived in terms of both elasticity coefficients and the direction of propagation. In particular, the longitudinal, transverse and Rayleigh wave velocities are determined in explicit forms. It is also shown that in transversely isotropic materials, a Rayleigh wave may propagate in different manner from that of isotropic materials. Some numerical results for synthetic transversely isotropic materials are also illustrated to show the behavior of wave motion due to anisotropic nature of the problem.

  15. MRI findings and correlative study of MRI and visual evoked potentials in optic neuritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Fei; Li Jing; Wang Zhenchang; Liu Shoubin; Zhang Xiaojun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effective MRI sequences and describe the correlation between MRI and visual evoked potential (VEP) in diagnosing optic neuritis. Methods: One hundred and fifty-four eyes with visual impairment of 98 patients with diagnoses of optic neuritis, papillitis, multiple sclerosis and Devic's disease underwent MRI and VEP examination. The MRI findings were analyzed and correlated with VEP results and clinical presentation by using X 2 test, wilco xon test and Kappa test. Results Out of the 154 sick eyes, 56 eyes presented thickened optic nerves, 76 eyes had normal diameter of the optic nerve, and 22 eyes had thin optic nerves. A total of 132 optic nerves showed abnormally high signal in STIR sequences, including involvement of intraocular segment in 7, intraorbital segment in 1.35, intracanalicular segment in 109, intracranial segment in 97, optic chiasm in 56, and optic tract in 23. A total of 54 patients underwent postcontrast MRI. Seventy-four optic nerves of 87 eyes showed enhancement. Among the 196 eyes of 98 patients, 132 eyes presented visual impairment and simultaneous abnormal MR signal of the optic nerve, and 26 eyes had both normal vision and normal MR signal of optic nerve. The consistency of MRI findings and vision status was 80. 61% (Kappa 0.453,P 1 -weighted MR sequence combined with fat- suppression are helpful in diagnosis of optic neuritis. VEP is helpful in diagnosing optic neuritis and in finding subclinical visual problem. The MRI combined with VEP could improve the diagnostic accuracy of optic neuritis. (authors)

  16. Extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and optical waves propagation in turbulence: discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2015-07-01

    Extended Huygens-Fresnel principle (EHF) currently is the most common technique used in theoretical studies of the optical propagation in turbulence. A recent review paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A31, 2038 (2014)JOAOD60740-323210.1364/JOSAA.31.002038] cites several dozens of papers that are exclusively based on the EHF principle. We revisit the foundations of the EHF, and show that it is burdened by very restrictive assumptions that make it valid only under weak scintillation conditions. We compare the EHF to the less-restrictive Markov approximation and show that both theories deliver identical results for the second moment of the field, rendering the EHF essentially worthless. For the fourth moment of the field, the EHF principle is accurate under weak scintillation conditions, but is known to provide erroneous results for strong scintillation conditions. In addition, since the EHF does not obey the energy conservation principle, its results cannot be accurate for scintillations of partially coherent beam waves.

  17. Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four wave mixing correlation time gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappey, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    A novel method for detection of ballistic light and rejection of unwanted diffusive light to image structures inside highly scattering media is demonstrated. Degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in Rhodamine 6G is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore lost memory of the structures inside the scattering medium. We present preliminary results that determine the nature of the DFWM grating, confirm the coherence time of the laser, prove the phase-conjugate nature of the signal beam, and determine the dependence of the signal (reflectivity) on dye concentration and laser intensity. Finally, we have obtained images of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye. These imaging experiments demonstrate the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Based on our results, the use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic light in optical mammography appears to hold great promise for improving the current state of the art

  18. Threshold response using modulated continuous wave illumination for multilayer 3D optical data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, A.; Christenson, C. W.; Khattab, T. A.; Wang, R.; Twieg, R. J.; Singer, K. D.

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve a high capacity 3D optical data storage medium, a nonlinear or threshold writing process is necessary to localize data in the axial dimension. To this end, commercial multilayer discs use thermal ablation of metal films or phase change materials to realize such a threshold process. This paper addresses a threshold writing mechanism relevant to recently reported fluorescence-based data storage in dye-doped co-extruded multilayer films. To gain understanding of the essential physics, single layer spun coat films were used so that the data is easily accessible by analytical techniques. Data were written by attenuating the fluorescence using nanosecond-range exposure times from a 488 nm continuous wave laser overlapping with the single photon absorption spectrum. The threshold writing process was studied over a range of exposure times and intensities, and with different fluorescent dyes. It was found that all of the dyes have a common temperature threshold where fluorescence begins to attenuate, and the physical nature of the thermal process was investigated.

  19. Electro-optically Induced and Manipulated Terahertz Waves from Fe-doped InGaAs Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, O.

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate the presence of dual simultaneous nonlinear mechanisms: field-induced optical rectification (FIOR) and field-induced surge current (FISC) for the generation of terahertz (THz) pulses from p-type and n-type Fe:In0.53Ga0.47As surfaces upon excitation with femtosecond laser pulses centered at 800 nm wavelength. Experimental investigations of the dependence of the generated THz waves on the incident angular optical polarization, optical irradiance, and the direction and magnitude of applied electric DC fields give confirming results to the proposed THz generation mechanisms. Applying external DC electric fields in the plane of the incident optical field shows efficient capability in manipulating the direction and phase of the generated THz waves, and controlling the refractive index of Fe:In0.53Ga0.47As material in the THz range, in addition to enhancing the emitted THz power up to two orders of magnitude. The fast and reliable response of Fe:In0.53Ga0.47As to the changes in the direction and magnitude of the optical and electrical fields suggests its use in amplitude and phase modulators, and ultrafast optoelectronic systems.

  20. Measurement of optical-beat frequency in a photoconductive terahertz-wave generator using microwave higher harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murasawa, Kengo; Sato, Koki; Hidaka, Takehiko

    2011-05-01

    A new method for measuring optical-beat frequencies in the terahertz (THz) region using microwave higher harmonics is presented. A microwave signal was applied to the antenna gap of a photoconductive (PC) device emitting a continuous electromagnetic wave at about 1 THz by the photomixing technique. The microwave higher harmonics with THz frequencies are generated in the PC device owing to the nonlinearity of the biased photoconductance, which is briefly described in this article. Thirteen nearly periodic peaks in the photocurrent were observed when the microwave was swept from 16 to 20 GHz at a power of -48 dBm. The nearly periodic peaks are generated by the homodyne detection of the optical beat with the microwave higher harmonics when the frequency of the harmonics coincides with the optical-beat frequency. Each peak frequency and its peak width were determined by fitting a Gaussian function, and the order of microwave harmonics was determined using a coarse (i.e., lower resolution) measurement of the optical-beat frequency. By applying the Kalman algorithm to the peak frequencies of the higher harmonics and their standard deviations, the optical-beat frequency near 1 THz was estimated to be 1029.81 GHz with the standard deviation of 0.82 GHz. The proposed method is applicable to a conventional THz-wave generator with a photomixer.

  1. Multifocal visual evoked potentials in optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl-Jensen, Gorm; Schmidt, Mathias Falck; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2017-01-01

    published studies were retrieved). Mf-VEP provides direct topographical information of specific lesions and facilitates investigations on structural-functional correlations thus providing new methods for exploring the interplay between demyelination, atrophy and remyelination in MS. Good correlation...... was shown between mf-VEP and OCT, ff-VEP, MRI (MTR, DTI), 30-2 standard automated perimetry and low-contrast-visual acuity. All but one study showed superior sensitivity and specificity compared to ff-VEP, especially with regards to small, peripheral lesions or lesions of the upper visual field. Mf-VEP has...... shown superior sensitivity and specificity than established methods in diagnosing optic nerve lesions and tracking functional recovery following lesions. Abnormal mf-VEP responses in the fellow, non-ON afflicted eye may predict MS risk in ON patients. No standardization currently exists and no direct...

  2. Assessment on the capability of quasi-optical grill to launch lower hybrid waves in iter plasma. UE contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini, F.; Preinhaelter, J.

    1998-12-01

    The quasi-optical grill has been considered as a convenient system to launch Lower Hybrid Waves in a reactor-like plasma. In recent years, efforts to study the capability and the efficiency of this launcher have been done in Europe with the intent to test it in a large experimental device. Even if this test is still missing, a wide analysis of different schemes of such a launcher is now available in the literature. This report is devoted to critically review this theoretical analysis and consequently to assess the convenience of using quasi-optical grill in future Tokamaks [it

  3. Optical properties of potential condensates in exoplanetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, Daniel; Heng, Kevin

    2018-03-01

    The prevalence of clouds in currently observable exoplanetary atmospheres motivates the compilation and calculation of their optical properties. First, we present a new open-source Mie scattering code known as LX-MIE, which is able to consider large-size parameters (˜107) using a single computational treatment. We validate LX-MIE against the classical MIEVO code as well as previous studies. Secondly, we embark on an expanded survey of the published literature for both the real and imaginary components of the refractive indices of 32 condensate species. As much as possible, we rely on experimental measurements of the refractive indices and resort to obtaining the real from the imaginary component (or vice versa), via the Kramers-Kronig relation, only in the absence of data. We use these refractive indices as input for LX-MIE to compute the absorption, scattering and extinction efficiencies of all 32 condensate species. Finally, we use a three-parameter function to provide convenient fits to the shape of the extinction efficiency curve. We show that the errors associated with these simple fits in the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), J, H, and K wavebands are ˜ 10 per cent. These fits allow for the extinction cross-section or opacity of the condensate species to be easily included in retrieval analyses of transmission spectra. We discuss prospects for future experimental work. The compilation of the optical constants and LX-MIE is publicly available as part of the open-source Exoclime Simulation Platform (http://www.exoclime.org).

  4. Demonstration of optical rogue waves using a laser diode emitting at 980  nm and a fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Won; Baladi, Fadwa; Burie, Jean-René; Bettiati, Mauro A; Boudrioua, Azzedine; Fischer, Alexis P A

    2016-10-01

    Rogue waves are observed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in a 980 nm laser diode subject to filtered optical feedback via a fiber Bragg grating. By counting the number of rogue waves in a fixed time window, a rogue wave map is established experimentally as a function of both the optical feedback ratio and the laser current. The comparison with low frequency fluctuations (LFFs) reveals that the rogue waves observed in our system are, in fact, LFF jump-ups.

  5. Density wave induced star formation: The optical surface brightness of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bash, F.N.

    1979-01-01

    A model for the galactic orbits of molecular clouds has been devised. The molecular clouds are assumed to be launched from the two-armed spiral-shock wave, to orbit in the Galaxy like ballistic particles with gravitational perturbations due to the density-wave spiral-potential, and each cloud is assumed to produce a cluster of stars. Each cloud radiates detectable 12 C 16 O (J=0→1) spectral line radiation from birth for 40 million years. Stars are seen in the cloud about 25 million years after birth, and the star cluster is assumed to continue in ballistic orbit around the Galaxy.The model has been tested by comparing its predicted velocity-longitude diagram for CO against that observed for the Galaxy and by comparing the model's predicted distribution of light in the UBV photometric bands against observed surface photometry for Sb and SC galaxies. The interpolation of the initial velocities in the model was corrected, and the model was examined to see whether preshock or postshock initial velocities better fit the observations. The model gives very good general agreement and reproduces many of the features observed in the CO velocity-longitude diagram

  6. Potential for the Vishniac instability in ionizing shock waves propagating into cold gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Pasley, J.

    2018-05-01

    The Vishniac instability was posited as an instability that could affect supernova remnants in their late stage of evolution when subject to strong radiative cooling, which can drive the effective ratio of specific heats below 1.3. The potential importance of this instability to these astrophysical objects has motivated a number of laser-driven laboratory studies. However, the Vishniac instability is essentially a dynamical instability that should operate independently of whatever physical processes happen to reduce the ratio of specific heats. In this paper, we examine the possibility that ionization and molecular dissociation processes can achieve this, and we show that this is possible for a certain range of shock wave Mach numbers for ionizing/dissociating shock waves propagating into cold atomic and molecular gases.

  7. Basic modelling of transport in 2D wave-mechanical nanodots and billiards with balanced gain and loss mediated by complex potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Karl-Fredrik; Tellander, Felix; Yakimenko, Irina

    2018-05-01

    Non-Hermitian quantum mechanics with parity-time (PT) symmetry is presently gaining great interest, especially within the fields of photonics and optics. Here, we give a brief overview of low-dimensional semiconductor nanodevices using the example of a quantum dot with input and output leads, which are mimicked by imaginary potentials for gain and loss, and how wave functions, particle flow, coalescence of levels and associated breaking of PT symmetry may be analysed within such a framework. Special attention is given to the presence of exceptional points and symmetry breaking. Related features for musical string instruments and ‘wolf-notes’ are outlined briefly with suggestions for further experiments.

  8. Fear Extinction Memory Consolidation Requires Potentiation of Pontine-Wave Activity during REM Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; O'Malley, Matthew W .

    2013-01-01

    Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation within multiple memory systems including contextual fear extinction memory, but little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this process. Here, we show that fear extinction training in rats, which extinguished conditioned fear, increased both slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Surprisingly, 24 h later, during memory testing, only 57% of the fear-extinguished animals retained fear extinction memory. We found that these animals exhibited an increase in phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity during post-training REM sleep, which was absent in the 43% of animals that failed to retain fear extinction memory. The results of this study provide evidence that brainstem activation, specifically potentiation of phasic P-wave activity, during post-training REM sleep is critical for consolidation of fear extinction memory. The results of this study also suggest that, contrary to the popular hypothesis of sleep and memory, increased sleep after training alone does not guarantee consolidation and/or retention of fear extinction memory. Rather, the potentiation of specific sleep-dependent physiological events may be a more accurate predictor for successful consolidation of fear extinction memory. Identification of this unique mechanism will significantly improve our present understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the sleep-dependent regulation of emotional memory. Additionally, this discovery may also initiate development of a new, more targeted treatment method for clinical disorders of fear and anxiety in humans that is more efficacious than existing methods such as exposure therapy that incorporate only fear extinction. PMID:23467372

  9. Matter waves of Bose-Fermi mixtures in one-dimensional optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bludov, Yu. V.; Santhanam, J.; Kenkre, V. M.; Konotop, V. V.

    2006-01-01

    We describe solitary wave excitations in a Bose-Fermi mixture loaded in a one-dimensional and strongly elongated lattice. We focus on the mean-field theory under the condition that the fermion number significantly exceeds the boson number, and limit our consideration to lattice amplitudes corresponding to the order of a few recoil energies or less. In such a case, the fermionic atoms display 'metallic' behavior and are well-described by the effective mass approximation. After classifying the relevant cases, we concentrate on gap solitons and coupled gap solitons in the two limiting cases of large and small fermion density, respectively. In the former, the fermionic atoms are distributed almost homogeneously and thus can move freely along the lattice. In the latter, the fermionic density becomes negligible in the potential maxima, and this leads to negligible fermionic current in the linear regime

  10. Density of states in an optical speckle potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falco, G. M.; Fedorenko, A. A.; Giacomelli, J.; Modugno, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the single-particle density of states of a one-dimensional speckle potential, which is correlated and non-Gaussian. We consider both the repulsive and the attractive cases. The system is controlled by a single dimensionless parameter determined by the mass of the particle, the correlation length, and the average intensity of the field. Depending on the value of this parameter, the system exhibits different regimes, characterized by the localization properties of the eigenfunctions. We calculate the corresponding density of states using the statistical properties of the speckle potential. We find good agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  11. Flattening of the electrocardiographic T-wave is a sign of proarrhythmic risk and a reflection of action potential triangulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhuiyan, Tanveer Ahmed; Graff, Claus; Kanters, J.K.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced triangulation of the cardiac action potential is associated with increased risk of arrhythmic events. It has been suggested that triangulation causes a flattening of the electrocardiographic T-wave but the relationship between triangulation, T-wave flattening and onset of arrhythmia ...

  12. Thermally Stable Heterocyclic Imines as New Potential Nonlinear Optical Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, Volodymyr V.; Antipin, Mikhail Y.; Nesterov, Vladimir N.; Moore, Craig E.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Timofeeva, Tatiana V.

    2004-01-01

    In the course of a search for new thermostable acentric nonlinear optical crystalline materials, several heterocyclic imine derivatives were designed, with the general structure D-pi-A(D'). Introduction of a donor amino group (D') into the acceptor moiety was expected to bring H-bonds into their crystal structures, and so to elevate their melting points and assist in an acentric molecular packing. Six heterocycle-containing compounds of this type were prepared, single crystals were grown for five of them, and these crystals were characterized by X-ray analysis. A significant melting temperature elevation was found for all of the synthesized compounds. Three of the compounds were also found to crystallize in acentric space groups. One of the acentric compounds is built as a three-dimensional H-bonded molecular network. In the other two compounds, with very similar molecular structure, the molecules form one-dimensional H-bonded head-to-head associates (chains). These chains are parallel in two different crystallographic directions and form very unusual interpenetrating chain patterns in an acentric crystal. Two of the compounds crystallized with centrosymmetric molecular packing.

  13. Theoretical analysis of four wave mixing in quantum dot optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    The four wave mixing properties of semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers have been investigated. The combination of strong non-equilibrium depletion of dot levels and a small linewidth enhancement factor results in efficient and symmetric four wave mixing.......The four wave mixing properties of semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers have been investigated. The combination of strong non-equilibrium depletion of dot levels and a small linewidth enhancement factor results in efficient and symmetric four wave mixing....

  14. Information on pion-nucleus optical potentials from elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, E.

    1983-02-01

    Data on the elastic scattering of pions by nuclei between 20 and 230 MeV is analyzed in an almost model-independent fashion. The real part of the potential, which is described by a bias-free Fourier-Bessel series, is found to have the typical Kisslinger or Laplacian-like shape between 30 and 80 MeV

  15. Exact modelling of the optical bistability in ferroelectics via two-wave mixing: A system with full nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushaini, Muhammad Asif A.; Ibrahim, Abdel-Baset M. A.; Choudhury, P. K.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we provide a complete mathematical model of the phenomenon of optical bistability (OB) resulting from the degenerate two-wave mixing (TWM) process of laser beams interacting with a single nonlinear layer of ferroelectric material. Starting with the electromagnetic wave equation for optical wave propagating in nonlinear media, a nonlinear coupled wave (CW) system with both self-phase modulation (SPM) and cross-phase modulation (XPM) sources of nonlinearity are derived. The complete CW system with full nonlinearity is solved numerically and a comparison between both the cases of with and without SPM at various combinations of design parameters is given. Furthermore, to provide a reliable theoretical model for the OB via TWM process, the results obtained theoretically are compared with the available experimental data. We found that the nonlinear system without SPM fails to predict the bistable response at lower combinations of the input parameters. However, at relatively higher values, the solution without SPM shows a reduction in the switching contrast and period in the OB response. A comparison with the experimental results shows better agreement with the system with full nonlinearity.

  16. Fabrication of novel structures to enhance the performance of microwave, millimeter wave and optical radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbele, Kokou

    This dissertation has three parts which are distinctive from the perspective of their frequency regime of operation and from the nature of their contributions to the science and engineering communities. The first part describes work that was conducted on a vertical-external-cavity surface emitting-laser (VECSEL) in the optical frequency regime. We designed, fabricated, and tested a hybrid distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirror for a VECSEL sub-cavity operating at the laser emission wavelength of 1057 nm. The DBR mirror was terminated with a highly reflecting gold surface and integrated with an engineered pattern of titanium. This hybrid mirror achieved a reduction in half of the number of DBR layer pairs in comparison to a previously reported, successful VECSEL chip. Moreover, the output power of our VECSEL chip was measured to be beyond 4.0Wwith an optical-to-optical efficiency of 19.4%. Excellent power output stability was demonstrated; a steady 1.0 W output at 15.0 W pump power was measured for over an hour. The second part reports on an ultrafast in situ pump-probing of the nonequlibrium dynamics of the gain medium of a VECSEL under mode-locked conditions. We proposed and successfully tested a novel approach to measure the response of the inverted carriers in the active region of a VECSEL device while it was operating under passively mode-locked conditions. We employed the dual-frequency-comb spectroscopy (DFCS) technique using an asynchronous optical sampling (ASOPS) method based on modified time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) to measure the nonequilibrium dynamics of the gain medium of a phase-locked VECSEL that we designed and fabricated to operate at the 1030 nm emission wavelength. Our spectroscopic studies used a probe pulse of 100 fs and an in situ pump pulse of 13 ps. We probed the gain medium of the VECSEL and recorded a depletion time of 13 ps, a fast recovery period of 17 ps, and 110 ps for the slow recovery time. Our scans thus demonstrated a 140 ps

  17. Physical optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Il Gon; Lee, Seong Su; Jang, Gi Wan

    2012-07-01

    This book indicates physical optics with properties and transmission of light, mathematical expression of wave like harmonic wave and cylindrical wave, electromagnetic theory and light, transmission of light with Fermat principle and Fresnel equation, geometrical optics I, geometrical optics II, optical instrument such as stops, glasses and camera, polarized light like double refraction by polarized light, interference, interference by multiple reflections, diffraction, solid optics, crystal optics such as Faraday rotation and Kerr effect and measurement of light. Each chapter has an exercise.

  18. Physical optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim Il Gon; Lee, Seong Su; Jang, Gi Wan

    2012-07-15

    This book indicates physical optics with properties and transmission of light, mathematical expression of wave like harmonic wave and cylindrical wave, electromagnetic theory and light, transmission of light with Fermat principle and Fresnel equation, geometrical optics I, geometrical optics II, optical instrument such as stops, glasses and camera, polarized light like double refraction by polarized light, interference, interference by multiple reflections, diffraction, solid optics, crystal optics such as Faraday rotation and Kerr effect and measurement of light. Each chapter has an exercise.

  19. Explicit and exact nontraveling wave solutions of the (3+1)-dimensional potential Yu-Toda-Sasa-Fukuyama equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Na

    2018-04-01

    With the aid of the symbolic computation, we present an improved ( G ‧ / G ) -expansion method, which can be applied to seek more types of exact solutions for certain nonlinear evolution equations. In illustration, we choose the (3 + 1)-dimensional potential Yu-Toda-Sasa-Fukuyama equation to demonstrate the validity and advantages of the method. As a result, abundant explicit and exact nontraveling wave solutions are obtained including two solitary waves solutions, nontraveling wave solutions and dromion soliton solutions. Some particular localized excitations and the interactions between two solitary waves are researched. The method can be also applied to other nonlinear partial differential equations.

  20. Asymmetry dependence of Gogny-based optical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchon, G.; Dupuis, M.; Bernard, R.N. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Arellano, H.F. [University of Chile, Department of Physics - FCFM, Santiago (Chile); CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2017-05-15

    An analysis of neutron and proton scattering off {sup 40,48}Ca has been carried out. Real and imaginary potentials have been generated using the Nuclear Structure Method (NSM) for scattering with the Gogny D1S nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. Observables are well described by NSM for neutron and proton elastic scattering off {sup 40}Ca and for neutron scattering off {sup 48}Ca. For proton scattering off {sup 48}Ca, NSM yields a lack of absorption. This discrepancy is attributed to two-fold charge exchange (p, n, p) contribution and coupling to Gamow-Teller mode which are not included in the present version of NSM. A recipe based on a Perey-Buck fit of the NSM imaginary potential and Lane model is proposed to overcome this issue in an approximate way. (orig.)

  1. Lamina-specific contribution of glutamatergic and GABAergic potentials to hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberger, Jan; Draguhn, Andreas; Both, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian hippocampus expresses highly organized patterns of neuronal activity which form a neuronal correlate of spatial memories. These memory-encoding neuronal ensembles form on top of different network oscillations which entrain neurons in a state- and experience-dependent manner. The mechanisms underlying activation, timing and selection of participating neurons are incompletely understood. Here we studied the synaptic mechanisms underlying one prominent network pattern called sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-R) which are involved in memory consolidation during sleep. We recorded SPW-R with extracellular electrodes along the different layers of area CA1 in mouse hippocampal slices. Contribution of glutamatergic excitation and GABAergic inhibition, respectively, was probed by local application of receptor antagonists into s. radiatum, pyramidale and oriens. Laminar profiles of field potentials show that GABAergic potentials contribute substantially to sharp waves and superimposed ripple oscillations in s. pyramidale. Inhibitory inputs to s. pyramidale and s. oriens are crucial for action potential timing by ripple oscillations, as revealed by multiunit-recordings in the pyramidal cell layer. Glutamatergic afferents, on the other hand, contribute to sharp waves in s. radiatum where they also evoke a fast oscillation at ~200 Hz. Surprisingly, field ripples in s. radiatum are slightly slower than ripples in s. pyramidale, resulting in a systematic shift between dendritic and somatic oscillations. This complex interplay between dendritic excitation and perisomatic inhibition may be responsible for the precise timing of discharge probability during the time course of SPW-R. Together, our data illustrate a complementary role of spatially confined excitatory and inhibitory transmission during highly ordered network patterns in the hippocampus.

  2. Analytic structure of the wave function for a hydrogen atom in an analytic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    The rate of convergence of an approximate method for solving Schroedinger's equation depends on the ability of the approximating sequence to mimic the analytic structure of the unknown exact wave function. Thus a knowledge of the analytic structure of the wave function can be of great value when approximation schemes are designed. Consider the Schroedinger equation [- 1/2 del 2 -r -1 +V(r)]Psi(r) = EPsi(r) for a hydrogen atom in a potential V(r). The general theory of elliptic partial differential equations implies that Psi is analytic at regular points, but no general theory is available at singular points. The present paper investigates the Coulomb singular point at r = 0 and shows that, if V(r) = V 1 (x, y, z)+rV 2 (x, y, z) where V 1 and V 2 are analytic functions of x, y, z at x = y = z = 0, then the wave function has the form Psi(r) = Psi 1 (x, y, z)+rPsi 2 (x, y, z) where Psi 1 and Psi 2 are analytic functions of x, y, z at x = y = z = 0

  3. Networks of triboelectric nanogenerators for harvesting water wave energy: a potential approach toward blue energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yang, Jin; Li, Zhaoling; Fan, Xing; Zi, Yunlong; Jing, Qingshen; Guo, Hengyu; Wen, Zhen; Pradel, Ken C; Niu, Simiao; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-03-24

    With 70% of the earth's surface covered with water, wave energy is abundant and has the potential to be one of the most environmentally benign forms of electric energy. However, owing to lack of effective technology, water wave energy harvesting is almost unexplored as an energy source. Here, we report a network design made of triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) for large-scale harvesting of kinetic water energy. Relying on surface charging effect between the conventional polymers and very thin layer of metal as electrodes for each TENG, the TENG networks (TENG-NW) that naturally float on the water surface convert the slow, random, and high-force oscillatory wave energy into electricity. On the basis of the measured output of a single TENG, the TENG-NW is expected to give an average power output of 1.15 MW from 1 km(2) surface area. Given the compelling features, such as being lightweight, extremely cost-effective, environmentally friendly, easily implemented, and capable of floating on the water surface, the TENG-NW renders an innovative and effective approach toward large-scale blue energy harvesting from the ocean.

  4. Exploring the Potential for Increased Production from the Wave Energy Converter Lifesaver by Reactive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Molinas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fred Olsen is currently testing their latest wave energy converter (WEC, Lifesaver, outside of Falmouth Bay in England, preparing it for commercial operation at the Wavehub test site. Previous studies, mostly focusing on hydrodynamics and peak to average power reduction, have shown that this device has potential for increased power extraction using reactive control. This article extends those analyses, adding a detailed model of the all-electric power take-off (PTO system, consisting of a permanent magnet synchronous generator, inverter and DC-link. Time domain simulations are performed to evaluate the PTO capabilities of the modeled WEC. However, when tuned towards reactive control, the generator losses become large, giving a very low overall system efficiency. Optimal control with respect to electrical output power is found to occur with low added mass, and when compared to pure passive loading, a 1% increase in annual energy production is estimated. The main factor reducing the effect of reactive control is found to be the minimum load-force constraint of the device. These results suggest that the Lifesaver has limited potential for increased production by reactive control. This analysis is nevertheless valuable, as it demonstrates how a wave-to-wire model can be used for investigation of PTO potential, annual energy production estimations and evaluations of different control techniques for a given WEC device.

  5. Experiments on pumping of liquids using arrays of microelectrodes subjected to travelling wave potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sanchez, P; Ramos, A [Dpto. de Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Green, Nicolas G; Morgan, H [School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: pablogarcia@us.es

    2008-12-01

    Net fluid flow of electrolytes driven on an array of microelectrodes subjected to a travelling-wave potential is presented. Two sizes of platinum microelectrodes have been studied. In both arrays, at low voltages the liquid flows according to the prediction given by ac electroosmotic theory. At voltages above a threshold the fluid flow is reversed. Measurements of the electrical current when the microelectrode array is pumping the liquid are also reported. Transient behaviours in both electrical current and fluid velocity have been observed.

  6. Experiments on pumping of liquids using arrays of microelectrodes subjected to travelling wave potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sanchez, P; Ramos, A; Green, Nicolas G; Morgan, H

    2008-01-01

    Net fluid flow of electrolytes driven on an array of microelectrodes subjected to a travelling-wave potential is presented. Two sizes of platinum microelectrodes have been studied. In both arrays, at low voltages the liquid flows according to the prediction given by ac electroosmotic theory. At voltages above a threshold the fluid flow is reversed. Measurements of the electrical current when the microelectrode array is pumping the liquid are also reported. Transient behaviours in both electrical current and fluid velocity have been observed.

  7. Resonances and analyticity of scattering wave function for square-well-type potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, T.A.; Hammer, C.L.; Zidell, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper we extend our previous analysis of the scattering of wave packets in one dimension to the case of the square-well potential. The analytic properties of the general scattering solution are emphasized thereby making the analysis useful as introductory material for a more sophisticated S-matrix treatment. The square-well model is particularly interesting because of its application to the deuteron problem. Resonance scattering, barrier penetration, time delay, and line shape are discussed at the level of the first-year graduate student

  8. Wind Profiles and Wave Spectra for Potential Wind Farms in South China Sea. Part II: Wave Spectrum Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the commercialization of offshore wind energy in China, the South China Sea has been identified as ideal for constructing offshore wind farms, especially for farms consisting of floating wind turbines over deep waters. Since the wind profiles and wave spectra are somewhat primitive for the design of an offshore wind turbine, engineering models describing the wind and wave characteristics in the South China Sea area are necessary for the offshore wind energy exploitation given the meteorological, hydrological, and geographical differences between the South China Sea and the North/Norwegian Sea, where the commonly used wind profile and wave spectrum models were designated. In the present study; a series of numerical simulations were conducted to reveal the wave characteristics in the South China Sea under both typhoon and non-typhoon conditions. By analyzing the simulation results; the applicability of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP spectrum model; in terms of characterizing the wind-induced wave fields in the South China Sea; was discussed. In detail; the key parameters of the JONSWAP spectrum model; such as the Phillips constant; spectral width parameter; peak-enhancement factor, and high frequency tail decay; were investigated in the context of finding suitable values.

  9. Potential-vorticity inversion and the wave-turbulence jigsaw: some recent clarifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. McIntyre

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Two key ideas stand out as crucial to understanding atmosphere-ocean dynamics, and the dynamics of other planets including the gas giants. The first key idea is the invertibility principle for potential vorticity (PV. Without it, one can hardly give a coherent account of even so important and elementary a process as Rossby-wave propagation, going beyond the simplest textbook cases. Still less can one fully understand nonlinear processes like the self-sharpening or narrowing of jets – the once-mysterious "negative viscosity" phenomenon. The second key idea, also crucial to understanding jets, might be summarized in the phrase "there is no such thing as turbulence without waves", meaning Rossby waves especially. Without this idea one cannot begin to make sense of, for instance, momentum budgets and eddy momentum transports in complex large-scale flows. Like the invertibility principle the idea has long been recognized, or at least adumbrated. However, it is worth articulating explicitly if only because it can be forgotten when, in the usual way, we speak of "turbulence" and "turbulence theory" as if they were autonomous concepts. In many cases of interest, such as the well-studied terrestrial stratosphere, reality is more accurately described as a highly inhomogeneous "wave-turbulence jigsaw puzzle" in which wavelike and turbulent regions fit together and crucially affect each other's evolution. This modifies, for instance, formulae for the Rhines scale interpreted as indicating the comparable importance of wavelike and turbulent dynamics. Also, weakly inhomogeneous turbulence theory is altogether inapplicable. For instance there is no scale separation. Eddy scales are not much smaller than the sizes of the individual turbulent regions in the jigsaw. Here I review some recent progress in clarifying these ideas and their implications.

  10. Effect of environmental temperature on diffraction efficiency for multilayer diffractive optical elements in Mid-wave infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Mingxu; Cui, Qingfeng; Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of environmental temperature change on multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) is evaluated from the viewpoint of the diffraction efficiency and the polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE). As environmental temperature changes, the microstructure heights of MLDOEs expand or contract, and refractive indices of substrate materials also change. Based on the changes in microstructure height and substrate material index with environmental temperature, the theoretical relation between diffraction efficiency of MLDOEs and environmental temperature is deduced. A practical 3-5μm Mid-wave infrared (MWIR) optical system designed with a MLDOE, which made of ZNSE and GE, is discussed to illustrate the influence of environmental temperature change. The result shows that diffraction efficiency reduction is no more than 85% and PIDE reduction is less than 50% when environmental temperature ranges from -20°C to 60°C. According to the calculated diffraction efficiency in different environmental temperatures, the MTF of hybrid optical system is modified and the modified MTF curve is compared with the original MTF curve. Although the hybrid optical system achieved passive athermalization in above environmental temperature range, the modified MTF curve also remarkably decline in environmental temperature extremes after the consideration of diffraction efficiency change of MLDOE. It is indicated that the image quality of hybrid optical system with ZNSE-GE MLDOE is significantly sensitive to environmental temperature change. The analysis result can be used for optical engineering design with MLDOEs in MWIR.

  11. Dynamic analysis of optical soliton pair and four-wave mixing via Fano interference in multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Wei; Qu, Junle; Niu, H B

    2014-01-01

    We perform a time-dependent analysis of the formation and stable propagation of an ultraslow optical soliton pair, and four-wave mixing (FWM) via tunable Fano interference in double-cascade type semiconductor multiple quantum wells (SMQWs). By using the probability amplitude method to describe the interaction of the system, we demonstrate that the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) can be controlled by Fano interference in the linear case and the strength of Fano interference has an important effect on the group velocity and amplitude of the soliton pair in the nonlinear case. Then, when the signal field is removed, the dynamic FWM process is analyzed in detail, and we find that the strength of Fano interference also has an important effect on the FWM’s efficiency: the maximum FWM efficiency is ∼28% in appropriate conditions. The investigations are promising for practical applications in optical devices and optical information processing for solid systems. (paper)

  12. A SEARCH FOR AN OPTICAL COUNTERPART TO THE GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE EVENT GW151226

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, S. J.; Smith, K. W.; Young, D. R.; Inserra, C.; Wright, D. E.; Jerkstrand, A.; Maguire, K.; Mueller, B. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Chambers, K. C.; Huber, M. E.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Heinze, A.; Magnier, E. A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Schultz, A. S. B. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Chen, T.-W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Coughlin, M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rest, A., E-mail: s.smartt@qub.ac.uk [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2016-08-20

    We present a search for an electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational-wave source GW151226. Using the Pan-STARRS1 telescope we mapped out 290 square degrees in the optical i {sub P1} filter, starting 11.5 hr after the LIGO information release and lasting for an additional 28 days. The first observations started 49.5 hr after the time of the GW151226 detection. We typically reached sensitivity limits of i {sub P1} = 20.3–20.8 and covered 26.5% of the LIGO probability skymap. We supplemented this with ATLAS survey data, reaching 31% of the probability region to shallower depths of m ≃ 19. We found 49 extragalactic transients (that are not obviously active galactic nuclei), including a faint transient in a galaxy at 7 Mpc (a luminous blue variable outburst) plus a rapidly decaying M-dwarf flare. Spectral classification of 20 other transient events showed them all to be supernovae. We found an unusual transient, PS15dpn, with an explosion date temporally coincident with GW151226, that evolved into a type Ibn supernova. The redshift of the transient is secure at z = 0.1747 ± 0.0001 and we find it unlikely to be linked, since the luminosity distance has a negligible probability of being consistent with that of GW151226. In the 290 square degrees surveyed we therefore do not find a likely counterpart. However we show that our survey strategy would be sensitive to NS–NS mergers producing kilonovae at D{sub L} ≲ 100 Mpc, which is promising for future LIGO/Virgo searches.

  13. Some exact solutions to the potential Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation and to a system of shallow water wave equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inan, Ibrahim E.; Kaya, Dogan

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter by considering an improved tanh function method, we found some exact solutions of the potential Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation. Some exact solutions of the system of the shallow water wave equation were also found

  14. Investigation of shock waves in explosive blasts using fibre optic pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, S [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); MacPherson, W N [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Barton, J S [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Jones, J D C [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Tyas, A [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Pichugin, A V [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Hindle, A [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Parkes, W [Scottish Microelectronics Centre, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JF (United Kingdom); Dunare, C [Scottish Microelectronics Centre, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JF (United Kingdom); Stevenson, T [Scottish Microelectronics Centre, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JF (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    We describe miniature all-optical pressure sensors, fabricated by wafer etching techniques, less than 1mm{sup 2} in overall cross-section with rise times in the {mu}s regime and pressure ranges typically 600 kPa. Their performance is suitable for experimental studies of the pressure-time history for test models exposed to shocks initiated by an explosive charge. The small size and fast response of the sensors promises higher quality data than has been previously available from conventional electrical sensors, with potential improvements to numerical models of blast effects. Provisional results from blast tests will be presented in which up to 6 sensors were multiplexed, embedded within test models in a range of orientations relative to the shock front.

  15. Investigation of shock waves in explosive blasts using fibre optic pressure sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, S; MacPherson, W N; Barton, J S; Jones, J D C; Tyas, A; Pichugin, A V; Hindle, A; Parkes, W; Dunare, C; Stevenson, T

    2005-01-01

    We describe miniature all-optical pressure sensors, fabricated by wafer etching techniques, less than 1mm 2 in overall cross-section with rise times in the μs regime and pressure ranges typically 600 kPa. Their performance is suitable for experimental studies of the pressure-time history for test models exposed to shocks initiated by an explosive charge. The small size and fast response of the sensors promises higher quality data than has been previously available from conventional electrical sensors, with potential improvements to numerical models of blast effects. Provisional results from blast tests will be presented in which up to 6 sensors were multiplexed, embedded within test models in a range of orientations relative to the shock front

  16. Wavelength-tunable laser based on nonlinear dispersive-wave generation in a tapered optical waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a wavelength tunable laser comprising a first laser source configured to emit a first optical pulse having a pump wavelength, the first optical pulse being emitted in a first longitudinal direction. Furthermore, the wavelength tunable laser comprises...... a waveguide extending in the first longitudinal direction, the waveguide having longitudinally varying phase matching conditions, the waveguide being configured to generate a second optical pulse with a centre wavelength upon receiving the first optical pulse, wherein the wavelength tunable laser...... is configured to tune the centre wavelength of the second optical pulse by varying at least one pulse property of the first optical pulse....

  17. Coulomb effect in the tri nucleon system in an optical potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.; Delfino, A.; Maryland Univ., College Park, MD

    1993-02-01

    A Saxon-Woods type nucleon-deuteron optical potential in suggested and applied numerically to the study of the static Coulomb effect in the low-energy tri nucleon system. In particular, the observed correlations between the static Coulomb energy of 3 He and the triton binding energy, and that between the neutron-deuteron and the proton-deuteron scattering lengths are simulated with this optical potential. In view of this study and a previous one employing two other effective potentials its is unlikely that a a study of the usual static Coulomb effect in the tri nucleon system will reveal new and meaningful physics. (author). 12 refs, 2 figs

  18. Microscopic optical potential for 208Pb in the nuclear structure approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, V.; Nguyen Van Gai.

    1979-04-01

    The optical potential for nucleon- 208 Pb scattering below 30 MeV is calculated microscopically as the sum of a real Hartree-Fock term and a complex correction term arising from the coupling to excited states of the target. The Skyrme effective interaction is used to generate the Hartree-Fock field, the RPA excited states and the coupling. A complex local equivalent potential is defined and used to calculate scattering and absorption cross-sections. The real part of the optical potential is reasonably well described in this approach while the imaginary part is too weak. Inclusion of rearrangement processes could improve the agreement with experiment

  19. Phenomenological and microscopic optical potentials for 88 MeV 7Li scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steeden, M.F.; Coopersmith, J.; Cartwright, S.J.; Cohler, M.D.; Clarke, N.M.; Griffiths, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The elastic scattering cross sections for 88 MeV 7 Li ions have been measured for targets of 24 26 Mg and 40 48 Ca. Analyses using both phenomenological and microscopic optical potentials provide information on the energy dependence of optical parameters, and the extent to which the potentials are determined for these light ions. The use of a double-folding microscopic model demonstrates the need for normalisation of the real potential by a factor of 0.5 in contrast to measurements at lower energies. The contribution of exchange effects, density dependence and break-up are discussed. (author)

  20. Semiclassical derivation of a local optical potential for heavy-ion plastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donangelo, R.; Qanto, L.F.; Hussein, M.S.

    A semiclassical method to determine the contribution to the optical potential in the elastic channel due to the coupling to other processes taking place in heavy-ion collisions is developed. An application is made to the case of coulomb excitation. The lowest order term of our potential is shown to be identical to the quantum mechanical expression of Baltz et al