WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave measurement

  1. Aircraft measurements of wave cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Cui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, aircraft measurements are presented of liquid phase (ice-free wave clouds made at temperatures greater than −5 °C that formed over Scotland, UK. The horizontal variations of the vertical velocity across wave clouds display a distinct pattern. The maximum updraughts occur at the upshear flanks of the clouds and the strong downdraughts at the downshear flanks. The cloud droplet concentrations were a couple of hundreds per cubic centimetres, and the drops generally had a mean diameter between 15–45 μm. A small proportion of the drops were drizzle. A new definition of a mountain-wave cloud is given, based on the measurements presented here and previous studies. The results in this paper provide a case for future numerical simulation of wave cloud and the interaction between wave and clouds.

  2. Directional wave measurements and modelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.; Bhat, S.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    Some of the results obtained from analysis of the monsoon directional wave data measured over 4 years in shallow waters off the west coast of India are presented. The directional spectrum computed from the time series data seems to indicate...

  3. Millimeter-wave antenna measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, J.A.G.; Dijk, R. van; Herben, M.H.A.J.

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to accurately measure the scattering parameters as well as the radiation pattern of planar antennas that operate in the millimeter-wave frequency band. To avoid interconnection problems, RF probes have been used to connect to the antenna. These RF probes are normally us

  4. Real time wave measurements and wave hindcasting in deep waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Mandal, S.; SanilKumar, V.; Nayak, B.U.

    Deep water waves off Karwar (lat. 14~'45.1'N, long. 73~'34.8'E) at 75 m water depth pertaining to peak monsoon period have been measured using a Datawell waverider buoy. Measured wave data show that the significant wave height (Hs) predominantly...

  5. Optimal parametric modelling of measured short waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.

    The spectral analysis of measured short waves can efficiently be carried out by the fast Fourier transform technique. Even though many present techniques can be used for the simulation of time series waves, these may not provide accurate...

  6. Wave directional spreading from point field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, M. L.; Venugopal, V.; Borthwick, A. G. L.

    2017-04-01

    Ocean waves have multidirectional components. Most wave measurements are taken at a single point, and so fail to capture information about the relative directions of the wave components directly. Conventional means of directional estimation require a minimum of three concurrent time series of measurements at different spatial locations in order to derive information on local directional wave spreading. Here, the relationship between wave nonlinearity and directionality is utilized to estimate local spreading without the need for multiple concurrent measurements, following Adcock & Taylor (Adcock & Taylor 2009 Proc. R. Soc. A 465, 3361-3381. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2009.0031)), with the assumption that directional spreading is frequency independent. The method is applied to measurements recorded at the North Alwyn platform in the northern North Sea, and the results compared against estimates of wave spreading by conventional measurement methods and hindcast data. Records containing freak waves were excluded. It is found that the method provides accurate estimates of wave spreading over a range of conditions experienced at North Alwyn, despite the noisy chaotic signals that characterize such ocean wave data. The results provide further confirmation that Adcock and Taylor's method is applicable to metocean data and has considerable future promise as a technique to recover estimates of wave spreading from single point wave measurement devices.

  7. Direct measurement of light waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulielmakis, E; Uiberacker, M; Kienberger, R; Baltuska, A; Yakovlev, V; Scrinzi, A; Westerwalbesloh, Th; Kleineberg, U; Heinzmann, U; Drescher, M; Krausz, F

    2004-08-27

    The electromagnetic field of visible light performs approximately 10(15) oscillations per second. Although many instruments are sensitive to the amplitude and frequency (or wavelength) of these oscillations, they cannot access the light field itself. We directly observed how the field built up and disappeared in a short, few-cycle pulse of visible laser light by probing the variation of the field strength with a 250-attosecond electron burst. Our apparatus allows complete characterization of few-cycle waves of visible, ultraviolet, and/or infrared light, thereby providing the possibility for controlled and reproducible synthesis of ultrabroadband light waveforms.

  8. Directional wave measurements using an autonomous vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Lars R.; Fer, Ilker; Peddie, David

    2016-09-01

    An autonomous vessel, the Offshore Sensing Sailbuoy, was used for wave measurements near the Ekofisk oil platform complex in the North Sea (56.5º N, 3.2º E, operated by ConocoPhillips) from 6 to 20 November 2015. Being 100 % wind propelled, the Sailbuoy has two-way communication via the Iridium network and has the capability for missions of 6 months or more. It has previously been deployed in the Arctic, Norwegian Sea and the Gulf of Mexico, but the present study was the first test for wave measurements. During the campaign the Sailbuoy held position about 20 km northeast of Ekofisk (on the lee side) during rough conditions. Mean wind speed measured at Ekofisk during the campaign was 9.8 m/s, with a maximum of 20.4 m/s, with wind mostly from south and southwest. A Datawell MOSE G1000 GPS-based 2 Hz wave sensor was mounted on the Sailbuoy. Mean significant wave height ( H s 1 min) measured was 3 m, whereas maximum H s was 6 m. Mean wave period was 7.7 s, while maximum wave height, H max, was 12.6 m. These measurements have been compared with non-directional Waverider observations at the Ekofisk complex. The agreement between the two data sets was very good, with a mean percent absolute error of 7 % and a linear correlation coefficient of 0.97. The wave frequency spectra measured by the two instruments compared very well, except for low H s (˜1 m), where the motion of the vessel seemed to influence the measurements. Nevertheless, the Sailbuoy performed well during this campaign, and results suggest that it is a suitable platform for wave measurements in a broad range of sea conditions.

  9. Shear wave speed and dispersion measurements using crawling wave chirps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Zaegyoo; Partin, Alexander; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-10-01

    This article demonstrates the measurement of shear wave speed and shear speed dispersion of biomaterials using a chirp signal that launches waves over a range of frequencies. A biomaterial is vibrated by two vibration sources that generate shear waves inside the medium, which is scanned by an ultrasound imaging system. Doppler processing of the acquired signal produces an image of the square of vibration amplitude that shows repetitive constructive and destructive interference patterns called "crawling waves." With a chirp vibration signal, successive Doppler frames are generated from different source frequencies. Collected frames generate a distinctive pattern which is used to calculate the shear speed and shear speed dispersion. A special reciprocal chirp is designed such that the equi-phase lines of a motion slice image are straight lines. Detailed analysis is provided to generate a closed-form solution for calculating the shear wave speed and the dispersion. Also several phantoms and an ex vivo human liver sample are scanned and the estimation results are presented.

  10. Closing the Gap on Measuring Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, S. E.; Alexander, L.

    2012-12-01

    Since the 4th IPCC assessment report, the scientific literature has established that anthropogenic climate change encompasses adverse changes in both mean climate conditions and extreme events, such as heat waves. Indeed, the affects of heat waves are felt across many different sectors, and have high economic, human, and physical impacts over many global regions. The spatial and monetary scale of heat wave impacts emphasizes the necessity of measuring and studying such events in an informative manner, which gives justice to the geographical region affected, the communities impacted, and the climatic fields involved. However, due to such wide interest in heat waves, their definition remains broad in describing a period of consecutive days where conditions are excessively hotter than normal. This has allowed for the employment of a plethora of metrics, which are usually unique to a given sector, or do not appropriately describe some of the important features of heat wave events. As such, it is difficult to ascertain a clear message regarding changes in heat waves, both in the observed record and in projections of future climate. This study addresses this issue by developing a multi-index, multi-aspect framework in which to measure heat waves. The methodology was constructed by assessing a wide range of heat wave and heat wave-related indices, both proposed and employed in the scientific literature. The broad implications of the occurrences, frequency and duration of heat waves and respective changes were also highly considered. The resulting indices measure three or more consecutive days where 1) maximum temperature exceeds the 90th percentile (TX90pct); 2) minimum temperature exceeds the 90th percentile (TN90pct); and 3) daily average temperature has a positive excess heat factor (EHF). The 90th percentiles from which TX90pct and TN90pct are calculated are based on 15-day windows for each calendar day, whereas the EHF is based upon two pre-calculated indices that

  11. Using Kinect to Measure Wave Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, J.; Loose, B.; Lovely, A.

    2012-12-01

    Gas exchange at the air-sea interface is enhanced by aqueous turbulence generated by capillary-gravity waves, affecting the absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide by the ocean. The mean squared wave slope of these waves correlates strongly with the gas transfer velocity. To measure the energy in capillary-gravity waves, this project aims to use the Microsoft Xbox Kinect to measure the short period wave spectrum. Kinect is an input device for the Xbox 360 with an infrared laser and camera that can be used to map objects at high frequency and spatial resolution, similar to a LiDAR sensor. For air-sea gas exchange, we are interested in the short period gravity waves with a wavenumber of 40 to 100 radians per meter. We have successfully recorded data from Kinect at a sample rate of 30 Hz with 640x480 pixel resolution, consistent with the manufacturer specifications for its scanning capabilities. At 0.5 m distance from the surface, this yields a nominal resolution of approximately 0.7 mm with a theoretical vertical precision of 0.24 mm and a practical 1 σ noise level of 0.91 mm. We have found that Kinect has some limitations in its ability to detect the air-water interface. Clean water proved to be a weaker reflector for the Kinect IR source, whereas a relatively strong signal can be received for liquids with a high concentration of suspended solids. Colloids such as milk and Ca(OH)2 in water proved more suitable media from which height and wave spectra were detectable. Moreover, we will show results from monochromatic as well as wind-wave laboratory studies. With the wave field measurements from Kinect, gas transfer velocities at the air-sea interface can be determined.

  12. Wave measurement based on light refraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hequan; QIU Dahong; SHEN Yongming; WANG Yongxue

    2004-01-01

    Some authors have developed a few methods of measuring wave slopes based on light refraction, including the measurement method via the distribution of light intensity or color under water. A new method based on light refraction is specified for the measurement of wave surface elevation in wave flume via imaging technology. A plane painted with black and white stripes is put on the flume floor as an indication plane, which can be arranged easily and cheaply. Compared with the previous methods, the present method is less sensitive to the noise and nonlinear effects of optical process, which can be taken as a digital method. The CCD camera is fixed above the flume with its optical axis arranged vertically to grab the images of stripes modulated by the wave surface. The modulated value can be calculated from the Hilbert transform, and then the wave surface elevation can be obtained. The algorithm and experimental procedure are specified in detail, and some experimental results are provided to show the validity of the present method.

  13. Dielectric Measurements of Millimeter-Wave Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, M. N.

    1984-12-01

    It is no longer necessary to use extrapolated microwave dielectric data when designing millimeter-wave components, devices, and systems. Precision measurements can now be made to generate highly accurate millimeter-wave (5 to 1/2 mm) continuous spectra on complex refractive index, complex dielectric permittivity, and loss tangent for a variety of materials such as common ceramics, semiconductors, crystalline, and glassy materials. The continuous spectra reveal an increase in dielectric loss with increase in frequency in this wavelength range for most materials. Reliable measurements also reveal that the method of preparation of nominally identical specimens can change the dielectric losses by many factors. These broad-band measurements were carried out employing dispersive Fourier transform spectroscopy applied to a modular two-beam polarization interferometer. Data obtained with Fabry-Perot open resonator methods at wavelengths of 5 mm and longer will also be compared.

  14. Radar cross section measurements using terahertz waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-01-01

    Radar cross sections at terahertz frequencies are measured on scale models of aircrafts. A time domain broadband THz system generates freely propagating THz pulses measured with sub-picosecond time resolution. The THz radiation is generated using fs laser pulses by optical rectification in a lith......Radar cross sections at terahertz frequencies are measured on scale models of aircrafts. A time domain broadband THz system generates freely propagating THz pulses measured with sub-picosecond time resolution. The THz radiation is generated using fs laser pulses by optical rectification...... in a lithium niobate crystal with application of the tilted wave front method, resulting in high electric field THz pulses with a broad band spectrum from 100 GHz up to 4 THz. The corresponding wave lengths are two orders of magnitude smaller than normal radars and we therefore use scale models of size 5-10 cm...... in order to measure realistic radar cross sections. RCS polar and azimuthal angle plots of F-16 and F-35 are presented....

  15. Wave directional spectrum from array measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.

    Using the method of Esteva (1976, 1977), whcih assumes that at the frequency band the waves approach from just a single "mean" wave direction, wave direction has been consistently, accurately and unambiguously evaluated as a function of frequency...

  16. Overtopping Measurements on the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the methods used to estimate (calculated from some indirect measurements) the overtopping of the wave energy converter Wave Dragon placed in a real sea environment. The wave energy converter in quistion is the 237-tonne heavy Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype. Comparisons...

  17. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kisner, Roger A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  18. A Scheme of Interferometric Measurement of an Atomic Wave Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zheng-Dong; LIN Yu; ZENG Liang; PAN Qin-Min

    2000-01-01

    A new method to measure an atomic wave function is discussed. It effectively solves the problem of an initially random phase of a travelling-wave laser beam. The relationship between the measured data and the atomic wavefunction is presented, and the wave function's reconstruction procedure is also analyzed.PACS: 03.65. Bz, 03. 75. Dg

  19. The estimate and measurement of longitudinal wave intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisen, Ming

    1996-08-01

    Quasi-longitudinal waves are one type of structural waves, which are important at high frequencies. This paper studies the estimate theory and measurement technique of quasi-longitudinal waves, analyzes the bias error due to the effect of bending waves. In a two-dimensional quasi-longitudinal wave field, the intensity vector is the sum of the effective intensity vector and the intensity variation vector. Its axial component is proportional to two imaginary parts of cross spectral densities and in the measurement, it is measured by a pair of two-transducer arrays. In a onedimensional quasi-longitudinal wave field, the intensity variation is zero, the intensity is proportional to only one imaginary part of a cross spectral density and it can be measured using a two-transducer array. If bending and quasi-longitudinal waves coexist and the contribution from bending waves cannot be eliminated or reduced to a certain extent, the measured quasi-longitudinal wave intensity will contain a large error. The results measured on the three-beam structure show that quasi-longitudinal wave intensity can be accurately measured using the intensity technique when bending waves are negligible in comparison with quasi-longitudinal waves.

  20. Accuracy of Satellite-Measured Wave Heights in the Australian Region for Wave Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meath, Sian E.; Aye, Lu; Haritos, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the accuracy of satellite data, which may then be used in wave power applications. The satellite data are compared to data from wave buoys, which are currently considered to be the most accurate of the devices available for measuring wave characteristics. This article presents an analysis of satellite- (Topex/Poseidon) and…

  1. Measurements Of High Frequency Electromagnetic Waves In Center Of Mus

    OpenAIRE

    etem, taha; ABBASOV, Teymuraz

    2016-01-01

    All electrically powered devices cause electromagnetic wave exposure onhuman body and we use them nearly every moment in a day. Mobile phones,computers, televisions, hair dryers, lighting systems, etc. they all useelectricity and naturally radiate electromagnetic waves. Effects ofelectromagnetic waves are not clear but international organizations definelimit values depending on epidemiological studies in this field. In this studywe measure high frequency electromagnetic waves in city center o...

  2. Measurements of wave speed and reflected waves in elastic tubes and bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khir, A W; Parker, K H

    2002-06-01

    Wave intensity analysis is a time domain method for studying waves in elastic tubes. Testing the ability of the method to extract information from complex pressure and velocity waveforms such as those generated by a wave passing through a mismatched elastic bifurcation is the primary aim of this research. The analysis provides a means for separating forward and backward waves, but the separation requires knowledge of the wave speed. The PU-loop method is a technique for determining the wave speed from measurements of pressure and velocity, and investigating the relative accuracy of this method is another aim of this research. We generated a single semi-sinusoidal wave in long elastic tubes and measured pressure and velocity at the inlet, and pressure at the exit of the tubes. In our experiments, the results of the PU-loop and the traditional foot-to-foot methods for determining the wave speed are comparable and the difference is on the order of 2.9+/-0.8%. A single semi-sinusoidal wave running through a mismatched elastic bifurcation generated complicated pressure and velocity waveforms. By using wave intensity analysis we have decomposed the complex waveforms into simple information of the times and magnitudes of waves passing by the observation site. We conclude that wave intensity analysis and the PU-loop method combined, provide a convenient, time-based technique for analysing waves in elastic tubes.

  3. Radar cross section measurements using terahertz waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-01-01

    in a lithium niobate crystal with application of the tilted wave front method, resulting in high electric field THz pulses with a broad band spectrum from 100 GHz up to 4 THz. The corresponding wave lengths are two orders of magnitude smaller than normal radars and we therefore use scale models of size 5-10 cm...

  4. Measurement of Supersonic Jet Noise with Optical Wave Microphone System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masataka KOSAKA; Kunisato SETO; MD. Tawhidul Islam KHAN; Yoichi NAKAZONO

    2005-01-01

    An optical wave microphone system is a new technique of sound measurement. This technique has been developed as a new plasma diagnostic technique to measure electron density fluctuations in the nuclear fusion research. Because the sound wave is a pressure or a density fluctuation, it is possible for this technique to measure the sound wave, too. The acoustical characteristics of the optical wave microphone system were examined by using a speaker as a first step. Next, feasibility of this device to measure jet noise was examined. It was found that the optical wave microphone system could measure the jet noise as well as a sound from speaker.Hence the optical wave microphone system can be considered one of the devices equivalent to condenser microphone. Because of these reason, this device is very convenient to scan the acoustic filed through jet flow from the inside to the out side and more preferable for not disturbing the observation field.

  5. Correlation techniques and measurements of wave-height statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthart, H.; Taylor, W. C.; Graf, K. A.; Douglas, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Statistical measurements of wave height fluctuations have been made in a wind wave tank. The power spectral density function of temporal wave height fluctuations evidenced second-harmonic components and an f to the minus 5th power law decay beyond the second harmonic. The observations of second harmonic effects agreed very well with a theoretical prediction. From the wave statistics, surface drift currents were inferred and compared to experimental measurements with satisfactory agreement. Measurements were made of the two dimensional correlation coefficient at 15 deg increments in angle with respect to the wind vector. An estimate of the two-dimensional spatial power spectral density function was also made.

  6. Measurements of the vertical correlation in turbulence under broken waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus; Deigaard, Rolf; Sutherland, James

    1998-01-01

    Turbulence measurements have been carried out in the surf zone of a wave flume. The purpose of the measurements is to determine the length scale of the turbulence generated by the wave breaking. The length scale of the turbulence is estimated on basis of the correlation between simultaneous measu...

  7. Representative spectra of the wave resource from real sea wave measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavelle, John; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2013-01-01

    When dealing with the estimation of the power production of Wave Energy Converters (WECs), from either physical laboratory or numerical models, or measured data from real sea testing of prototype, an accurate representation of the wave spectra at the target location is important for accurate power...... for defining representative spectra at a particular location, based on real sea wave measurements, is described, which allows a more accurate characterisation of the WEC performance. The analysis described here has been performed on wave data from a buoy at the location of DanWEC, approximately 1 nautical mile...

  8. Testing THEMIS wave measurements against the cold plasma theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolik, Ondrej; Le Contel, Olivier; Bonnell, John

    2016-04-01

    The THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) mission records a multitude of electromagnetic waves inside Earth's magnetosphere and provides data in the form of high-resolution electric and magnetic waveforms. We use multi-component measurements of whistler mode waves and test them against the theory of wave propagation in a cold plasma. The measured ratio cB/E (c is speed of light in vacuum, B is magnetic wave amplitude, E is electric wave amplitude) is compared to the same quantity calculated from cold plasma theory over linearized Faraday's law. The aim of this study is to get estimates for measurement uncertainties, especially with regard to the electric field and the cold plasma density, as well as evaluating the validity of cold plasma theory inside Earth's radiation belts.

  9. Field Evaluation of Ocean Wave Measurement With GPS Buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    surface waves. In the experiment, conducted off the coast of California near Bodega Bay, clusters off Datawell and prototype GPS buoys were...receivers to measure ocean surface waves. In the experiment, conducted off the coast of California near Bodega Bay, clusters off Datawell and...the coast near Bodega Bay, CA. .............................................................................................17 Figure 4. R/P FLIP

  10. Measurements of the interaction of wave groups with shorter wind-generated waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jacob S.; Long, Steven R.; Phillips, O. M.

    1992-01-01

    Fields of statistically steady wind-generated waves produced in a wind wave facility were perturbed by the injection of groups of longer, mechanically generated waves with various slopes. The time histories of the surface displacements were measured at four fetches in ensembles consisting of 100 realizations of each set of experimental conditions; the data were stored and analyzed digitally. Four distinct stages in the overall interaction are identified and characterized. The properties of the wave energy front are documented, and a preliminary discussion is given of the dynamic processes involved in its formation.

  11. Ocean Wave Separation Using CEEMD-Wavelet in GPS Wave Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring ocean waves plays a crucial role in, for example, coastal environmental and protection studies. Traditional methods for measuring ocean waves are based on ultrasonic sensors and accelerometers. However, the Global Positioning System (GPS has been introduced recently and has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and not requiring calibration in comparison with the traditional methods. Therefore, for accurately measuring ocean waves using GPS, further research on the separation of the wave signals from the vertical GPS-mounted carrier displacements is still necessary. In order to contribute to this topic, we present a novel method that combines complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD with a wavelet threshold denoising model (i.e., CEEMD-Wavelet. This method seeks to extract wave signals with less residual noise and without losing useful information. Compared with the wave parameters derived from the moving average skill, high pass filter and wave gauge, the results show that the accuracy of the wave parameters for the proposed method was improved with errors of about 2 cm and 0.2 s for mean wave height and mean period, respectively, verifying the validity of the proposed method.

  12. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  13. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Jeremiah D. [Physics Department, Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio 45504 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  14. An inexpensive instrument for measuring wave exposure and water velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figurski, J.D.; Malone, D.; Lacy, J.R.; Denny, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean waves drive a wide variety of nearshore physical processes, structuring entire ecosystems through their direct and indirect effects on the settlement, behavior, and survivorship of marine organisms. However, wave exposure remains difficult and expensive to measure. Here, we report on an inexpensive and easily constructed instrument for measuring wave-induced water velocities. The underwater relative swell kinetics instrument (URSKI) is a subsurface float tethered by a short (<1 m) line to the seafloor. Contained within the float is an accelerometer that records the tilt of the float in response to passing waves. During two field trials totaling 358 h, we confirmed the accuracy and precision of URSKI measurements through comparison to velocities measured by an in situ acoustic Doppler velocimeter and those predicted by a standard swell model, and we evaluated how the dimensions of the devices, its buoyancy, and sampling frequency can be modified for use in a variety of environments.

  15. Estimation of waves and ship responses using onboard measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Najmeh

    of measured ship responses, a parametric description of directional wave spectra (a generalised JONSWAP model) and the transfer functions of the ship responses. The difference between the spectral moments of the measured ship responses and the corresponding theoretically calculated moments formulates a cost...... function. A set of wave parameters, characterising the directional wave spectrum, is estimated through an optimisation problem using global search basin with proper constraints. This approach applies a sequential partitioning procedure, which is able to classify swell and wind sea events using wind...

  16. Using Ultrasonic Lamb Waves To Measure Moduli Of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of broad-band ultrasonic Lamb waves in plate specimens of ceramic-matrix/fiber and metal-matrix/fiber composite materials used to determine moduli of elasticity of materials. In one class of potential applications of concept, Lamb-wave responses of specimens measured and analyzed at various stages of thermal and/or mechanical processing to determine effects of processing, without having to dissect specimens. In another class, structural components having shapes supporting propagation of Lamb waves monitored ultrasonically to identify signs of deterioration and impending failure.

  17. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A surface wave elastography technique for measuring tissue viscoelastic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-04-01

    A surface wave elastography method is proposed to study the viscoelastic properties of skin by measuring the surface wave speed and attenuation on the skin. Experiments were carried out on porcine skin tissues. The surface wave speed is measured by the change of phase with distance. The wave attenuation is measured by the decay of wave amplitude with distance. The change of viscoelastic properties with temperature was studied at room and body temperatures. The wave speed was 1.83m/s at 22°C but reduced to 1.52m/s at 33°C. The viscoelastic ratio was almost constant from 22°C to 33°C. Fresh and decayed tissues were studied. The wave speed of the decayed tissue increased from 1.83m/s of fresh state to 2.73m/s. The viscoelastic ratio was 0.412/mm at the decayed state compared to 0.215/mm at the fresh state. More tissue samples are needed to study these viscoelastic parameters according to specific applications.

  19. Measurements using optic and RF waves

    CERN Document Server

    De Fornel, Frederique

    2013-01-01

    Scientific and technical knowledge for measurements in modern electromagnetism must be vast as our electromagnetic environment covers all frequencies and wavelengths. These measurements must be applied to fields as varied as nanotechnologies, telecommunications, meteorology, geolocalization, radioastronomy, health, biology, etc. In order to cover the multiple facets of the topic, this book sweeps the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from several hertz to terahertz; considers distances ranging from nanometers to light-years in optics; before extending towards the various measurement techniques

  20. Measurements of Overtopping Flow Time Series on the Wave Dragon, Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2009-01-01

    A study of overtopping flow series on the Wave Dragon prototype, a low crested device designed to maximise flow, in a real sea, is presented. This study aims to fill the gap in the literature on time series of flow overtopping low crested structures. By comparing to a simulated flow the character......A study of overtopping flow series on the Wave Dragon prototype, a low crested device designed to maximise flow, in a real sea, is presented. This study aims to fill the gap in the literature on time series of flow overtopping low crested structures. By comparing to a simulated flow...... the characteristics of the overtopping flow are discussed and the simulation algorithm is tested. Measured data is shown from a storm build up in October 2006, from theWave Dragon prototype situated in an inland sea in Northern Denmark. This wave energy converter extracts energy from the waves, by funnelling them...

  1. Acoustic measurements above a plate carrying Lamb waves

    CERN Document Server

    Talberg, Andreas Sørbrøden

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a set of acoustic measurements conducted on the Statoil funded Behind Casing Logging Set-Up, designed by SINTEF Petroleum Research to resemble an oil well casing. A set of simple simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics were also conducted and the results compared with the measurements. The experiments consists of measuring the pressure wave radiated of a set of Lamb waves propagating in a 3 mm thick steel plate, using the so called pitch-catch method. The Lamb waves were excited by a broadband piezoelectric immersion transducer with center frequency of 1 MHz. Through measurements and analysis the group velocity of the fastest mode in the plate was found to be 3138.5 m/s. Measuring the wave radiated into the water in a grid consisting of 8x33 measuring points, the spreading of the plate wave normal to the direction of propagation was investigated. Comparing the point where the amplitude had decreased 50 % relative to the amplitude measured at the axis pointing straight forward from the tran...

  2. Measurement of velocity field in parametrically excited solitary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Gordillo, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Paramerically excited solitary waves emerge as localized structures in high-aspect-ratio free surfaces subject to vertical vibrations. Herein, we provide the first experimental characterization of the hydrodynamics of thess waves using Particle Image Velocimetry. We show that the underlying velocity field of parametrically excited solitary waves is mainly composed by an oscillatory velocity field. Our results confirm the accuracy of Hamiltonian models with added dissipation in describing this field. Remarkably, our measurements also uncover the onset of a streaming velocity field which is shown to be as important as other crucial nonlinear terms in the current theory. The observed streaming pattern is particularly interesting due to the presence of oscillatory meniscii.

  3. Gaussian weighting of ocular wave-front measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiegerling, Jim

    2004-11-01

    The measurement of ocular wave-front error gives insight into the optical performance of the eye and possibly a means for assessing visual performance. The visual system responds not only to the quality of the optical image formed on the retina but also to the processing that occurs in the retina and the brain. To develop a metric of visual performance based on wave-front error measurements, these latter processes must somehow be incorporated. In representing the wave-front error in terms of Zernike polynomials, it appears that terms with lower angular frequency have a greater deleterious effect on visual performance than higher-angular-frequency terms. A technique for weighting the pupil function of the eye with a Gaussian filter is demonstrated. It is further demonstrated that the variance of the Gaussian-weighted wave-front error is well correlated with visual performance.

  4. Extracting Information from the Atom-Laser Wave Function UsingInterferometric Measurement with a Laser Standing-Wave Grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正东; 武强; 曾亮; 林宇; 朱诗尧

    2001-01-01

    The reconstruction of the atom-laser wave function is performed using an interferometric measurement with a standing-wave grating, and the results of this scheme are studied. The relations between the measurement data and the atomic wave function are also presented. This scheme is quite applicable and effectively avoids the initial random phase problem of the method that employs the laser running wave. The information which is encoded in the atom-laser wave is extracted.

  5. Radar and Laser Sensors for High Frequency Ocean Wave Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C. R.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental measurement of air-sea fluxes invariably take place using shipbourne instrumentation and simultaneous measurement of wave height and direction is desired. A number of researchers have shown that range measuring sensors combined with inertial motion compensation can be successful on board stationary or very slowly moving ships. In order to measure wave characteristics from ships moving at moderate to full speed the sensors are required to operate at higher frequency so as to overcome the Doppler shift caused by ship motion. This work presents results from some preliminary testing of laser, radar and ultrasonic range sensors in the laboratory and on board ship. The characteristics of the individual sensors are discussed and comparison of the wave spectra produced by each is presented.

  6. Measuring sea surface height with a GNSS-Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Maqueda, Miguel Angel; Penna, Nigel T.; Foden, Peter R.; Martin, Ian; Cipollini, Paolo; Williams, Simon D.; Pugh, Jeff P.

    2017-04-01

    A GNSS-Wave Glider is a novel technique to measure sea surface height autonomously using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It consists of an unmanned surface vehicle manufactured by Liquid Robotics, a Wave Glider, and a geodetic-grade GNSS antenna-receiver system, with the antenna installed on a mast on the vehicle's deck. The Wave Glider uses the differential wave motion through the water column for propulsion, thus guaranteeing an, in principle, indefinite autonomy. Solar energy is collected to power all on-board instrumentation, including the GNSS system. The GNSS-Wave Glider was first tested in Loch Ness in 2013, demonstrating that the technology is capable of mapping geoid heights within the loch with an accuracy of a few centimetres. The trial in Loch Ness did not conclusively confirm the reliability of the technique because, during the tests, the state of the water surface was much more benign than would normally be expect in the open ocean. We now report on a first deployment of a GNSS-Wave Glider in the North Sea. The deployment took place in August 2016 and lasted thirteen days, during which the vehicle covered a distance of about 350 nautical miles in the north western North Sea off Great Britain. During the experiment, the GNSS-Wave Glider experienced sea states between 1 (0-0.1 m wave heights) and 5 (2.5-4 m wave heights). The GNSS-Wave Glider data, recorded at 5 Hz frequency, were analysed using a post-processed kinematic GPS-GLONASS precise point positioning (PPP) approach, which were quality controlled using double difference GPS kinematic processing with respect to onshore reference stations. Filtered with a 900 s moving-average window, the PPP heights reveal geoid patterns in the survey area that are very similar to the EGM2008 geoid model, thus demonstrating the potential use of a GNSS-Wave Glider for marine geoid determination. The residual of subtracting the modelled or measured marine geoid from the PPP signal combines information

  7. Long-term wave measurements in a climate change perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomaro, Angela; Bertotti, Luciana; Cavaleri, Luigi; Lionello, Piero; Portilla-Yandun, Jesus

    2017-04-01

    At present multi-decadal time series of wave data needed for climate studies are generally provided by long term model simulations (hindcasts) covering the area of interest. Examples, among many, at different scales are wave hindcasts adopting the wind fields of the ERA-Interim reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, Reading, U.K.) at the global level and by regional re-analysis as for the Mediterranean Sea (Lionello and Sanna, 2006). Valuable as they are, these estimates are necessarily affected by the approximations involved, the more so because of the problems encountered within modelling processes in small basins using coarse resolution wind fields (Cavaleri and Bertotti, 2004). On the contrary, multi-decadal observed time series are rare. They have the evident advantage of somehow representing the real evolution of the waves, without the shortcomings associated with the limitation of models in reproducing the actual processes and the real variability within the wave fields. Obviously, observed wave time series are not exempt of problems. They represent a very local information, hence their use to describe the wave evolution at large scale is sometimes arguable and, in general, it needs the support of model simulations assessing to which extent the local value is representative of a large scale evolution. Local effects may prevent the identification of trends that are indeed present at large scale. Moreover, a regular maintenance, accurate monitoring and metadata information are crucial issues when considering the reliability of a time series for climate applications. Of course, where available, especially if for several decades, measured data are of great value for a number of reasons and can be valuable clues to delve further into the physics of the processes of interest, especially if considering that waves, as an integrated product of the local climate, if available in an area sensitive to even limited changes of the

  8. Measurements of radiated elastic wave energy from dynamic tensile cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fracture-velocity, microstructure, and fracture-energy barriers in elastic wave radiation during a dynamic fracture was investigated in experiments in which dynamic tensile cracks of two fracture cofigurations of double cantilever beam geometry were propagating in glass samples. The first, referred to as primary fracture, consisted of fractures of intact glass specimens; the second configuration, referred to as secondary fracture, consisted of a refracture of primary fracture specimens which were rebonded with an intermittent pattern of adhesive to produce variations in fracture surface energy along the crack path. For primary fracture cases, measurable elastic waves were generated in 31 percent of the 16 fracture events observed; the condition for radiation of measurable waves appears to be a local abrupt change in the fracture path direction, such as occurs when the fracture intersects a surface flaw. For secondary fractures, 100 percent of events showed measurable elastic waves; in these fractures, the ratio of radiated elastic wave energy in the measured component to fracture surface energy was 10 times greater than for primary fracture.

  9. Fizeau Interferometery for THz-Waves' Frequency and Intensity Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SIDDIQUE Muhammad; YANG Su-hui; LI Zhuo; LI Ping

    2007-01-01

    A terahertz-wave generator based on optical parametric oscillator principle, detection based on combination of Fizeau wedged interferometer and an electro-optical crystal ZnTe has been studied. The analytical solution based on the basic principle of operation of solid wedge Fizeau interferometer has been realized. The mathematical calculations for THz frequency and intensity measurement dependent on wedge angle and fringe spacing have been considered. The efficiency of THz wave detection depends upon optimized wedge angle has been also realized. The feasibility of detection of THz waves' frequency and intensity by solid Fizeau interferometer (THz-waves' range of 1-3THz) has been studied. By optimization of other parameters like thickness of Fizeau film, refractive index, material of Fizeau film, we can proceed towards the design of Fizeau interferometer for required research plans as it is a simple and inexpensive interferometer.

  10. Detecting dark matter waves with precision measurement tools

    CERN Document Server

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Virialized Ultra-Light Fields (VULFs) while being viable cold dark matter candidates can also solve the standard model hierarchy problem. Direct searches for VULFs due to their non-particle nature require low-energy precision measurement tools. Here we consider scalar VULF candidates. While the previous proposals have focused on detecting coherent oscillations of the measured signals at the VULF Compton frequencies at the device location, here we point out that VULFs also have a distinct spatial signature, forming dark matter waves. Thereby the discovery reach can be improved by using distributed networks of precision measurement tools. We find the expected dark-matter wave signal by deriving spatio-temporal two-point VULF correlation function. Based on the developed formalism for coherence properties of dark-matter fields, we propose several experiments for dark matter wave detection. In the most basic version, the modifications to already running experiments are minor and only require GPS-assisted time-stam...

  11. Evaluation of multilayered pavement structures from measurements of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryden, N.; Lowe, M.J.S.; Cawley, P.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    A method is presented for evaluating the thickness and stiffness of multilayered pavement structures from guided waves measured at the surface. Data is collected with a light hammer as the source and an accelerometer as receiver, generating a synthetic receiver array. The top layer properties are evaluated with a Lamb wave analysis. Multiple layers are evaluated by matching a theoretical phase velocity spectrum to the measured spectrum. So far the method has been applied to the testing of pavements, but it may also be applicable in other fields such as ultrasonic testing of coated materials. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Three-wave electron vortex lattices for measuring nanofields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: c.dwyer@fz-juelich.de; Boothroyd, C.B.; Chang, S.L.Y.; Dunin-Borkowski, R.E.

    2015-01-15

    It is demonstrated how an electron-optical arrangement consisting of two electron biprisms can be used to generate three-wave vortex lattices with effective lattice spacings between 0.1 and 1 nm. The presence of vortices in these lattices was verified by using a third biprism to perform direct phase measurements via off-axis electron holography. The use of three-wave lattices for nanoscale electromagnetic field measurements via vortex interferometry is discussed, including the accuracy of vortex position measurements and the interpretation of three-wave vortex lattices in the presence of partial spatial coherence. - Highlights: • We demonstrate how three-wave electron vortex lattices can be generated using two electron biprisms in the TEM. • The optical setup can be used to measure nanoscale electromagnetic fields via vortex interferometry. • The presence of vortices is verified explicitly by using a third biprism to perform phase measurements. • The accuracy of vortex position measurements and the requirements of spatial coherence are discussed.

  13. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuecks, D J; Skiff, F; Kletzing, C A

    2012-08-01

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense (ω(pe) > ω(ce)). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency ω(ce). As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation ω - k([parallel])v([parallel]) = ω(ce). The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  14. Spatiotemporal measurement of surfactant distribution on gravity-capillary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, Stephen L; Daniels, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Materials adsorbed to the surface of a fluid -- for instance, crude oil, biogenic slicks, or industrial/medical surfactants -- will move in response to surface waves. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurement of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface waves and the evolving density field. Here, we report measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the density field of an insoluble surfactant driven by gravity-capillary waves in a shallow cylindrical container. Standing Faraday waves and traveling waves generated by the meniscus are superimposed to create a non-trivial surfactant density field. We measure both the height field of the surface using moir\\'e-imaging, and the density field of the surfactant via the fluorescence of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine, a lipid. Through phase-averaging stroboscopically-acquired images of the density field, we determine that the surfactant accumulates on the leading edge of the traveling menis...

  15. Measurements of overtopping flow time series on the Wave Dragon, wave energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedd, James; Peter Kofoed, Jens [Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardhomsvej 57, Aalborg 9000 (Denmark)

    2009-03-15

    A study of overtopping flow series on the Wave Dragon prototype, a low crested device designed to maximise flow, in a real sea, is presented. This study aims to fill the gap in the literature on time series of flow overtopping low crested structures. By comparing to a simulated flow the characteristics of the overtopping flow are discussed and the simulation algorithm is tested. Measured data is shown from a storm build up in October 2006, from the Wave Dragon prototype situated in an inland sea in Northern Denmark. This wave energy converter extracts energy from the waves, by funnelling them to run-up a ramp and overtop into a reservoir. This water is stored at a higher level than the average sea surface, before being discharged through hydro turbines. The waves, device sea handling and overtopping flow are measured by pressure transducers ahead of, beneath and in the device. Comparisons of the distribution and correlation show that the measurements support the use of the algorithm for generating a simulated flow. (author)

  16. A NEW MEASURE FOR DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE BED SHEAR STRESS OF WAVE BOUNDARY LAYER IN WAVE FLUME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this article, a shear plate was mounted on the bottom in a wave flume and direct measurements of the smooth and rough bed shear stress under regular and irregular waves were conducted with the horizontal force exerted on the shear plates by the bottom shear stress in the wave boundary layer. Under immobile bed condition, grains of sand were glued uniformly and tightly onto the shear plate, being prevented from motion with the fluid flow and generation of sand ripples. The distribution of the bottom mean shear stress varying with time was measured by examining the interaction between the shear plate and shear transducers. The relation between the force measured by the shear transducers and its voltage is a linear one. Simultaneous measurements of the bottom velocity were carried out by an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV), while the whole process was completely controlled by computers, bottom shear stress and velocity were synchronously measured. Based on the experimental results, it can be concluded that (1) the friction coefficient groews considerably with the increase of the Reynolds number, (2) the shear stress is a function varying with time and linearly proportional to the velocity. Compared with theoretical results and previous experimental data, it is shown that the experimental method is feasible and effective, A further study on the bed shear stress under regular or irregular waves can be carried out. And applicability to the laboratory studies on the initiation of sediments and the measurement of the shear stress after sediment imigration.

  17. Estimation of waves and ship responses using onboard measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Najmeh

    This thesis focuses on estimation of waves and ship responses using ship-board measurements. This is useful for development of operational safety and performance efficiency in connection with the broader concept of onboard decision support systems. Estimation of sea state is studied using a set...

  18. Spherical wave rotation in spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian; Larsen, Flemming Holm; Lemanczyk, J.

    1991-01-01

    The rotation of spherical waves in spherical near-field antenna measurement is discussed. Considering the many difficult but interesting features of the rotation coefficients, an efficient rotation scheme is derived. The main feature of the proposed scheme is to ignore the calculation of the very...

  19. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  20. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  1. Measuring Gravitational-Wave Propagation Speed with Multimessenger Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of gravitational wave (GW) propagation speed is one of important tests of gravity in a dynamical regime. We report a method to measure the GW propagation speed by directly comparing arrival times of GWs, neutrinos from supernovae (SN), and photons from short gamma-ray bursts (SGRB). We found that the future multimessenger observations can test the GW propagation speed with the precision of ~ 10^(-16)-10^(-15), improving the previous suggestions by 9 — 10 orders of magnitude. We ...

  2. Particle Velocity Measurement for Spherical Wave in Solid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Xue-feng; WANG Zhan-jiang; LIN Jun-de; SHEN Jun-yi

    2006-01-01

    An experimental technique for research on spherical divergent wave propagation in a solid has been developed,in which the source of generating spherical wave is a center initiating explosive charge designed in a mini-spherical shape with yield equivalent to 0.125 g and 0. 486 g TNT and a set of circular electromagnetic particle velocity gages is used to record the particle velocity histories. By using the circular electromagnetic particle velocity gages, the signal outputs not only are unattenuated due to the geometrical divergence, but also represent the average of the measured dynamic states of the medium over a circle on the wavefront. The distinctive features of this technique are very useful for the study of spherical divergent wave propagation in a solid, especially in an inhomogeneous solid, and the corresponding material dynamics.Many experimental measurements were conducted in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and granite by means of the technique, and the reproducibility of tests was shown to be good. The measurement technique of the circular electromagnetic particle velocity gages is also suitable to the case of cylindrical wave.

  3. Millimeter-wave micro-Doppler measurements of small UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Samiur; Robertson, Duncan A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper discusses the micro-Doppler signatures of small UAVs obtained from a millimeter-wave radar system. At first, simulation results are shown to demonstrate the theoretical concept. It is illustrated that whilst the propeller rotation rate of the small UAVs is quite high, millimeter-wave radar systems are capable of capturing the full micro-Doppler spread. Measurements of small UAVs have been performed with both CW and FMCW radars operating at 94 GHz. The CW radar was used for obtaining micro-Doppler signatures of individual propellers. The field test data of a flying small UAV was collected with the FMCW radar and was processed to extract micro-Doppler signatures. The high fidelity results clearly reveal features such as blade flashes and propeller rotation modulation lines which can be used to classify targets. This work confirms that millimeter-wave radar is suitable for the detection and classification of small UAVs at usefully long ranges.

  4. Vortex induced vibrations of pipe in high waves. Field measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen Ottesen, N.-E.; Pedersen, B.

    1999-07-01

    Vortex induced vibrations have been measured full scale on an instrumented pipe placed vertically in the crest zone of high and steep waves. The Reynolds numbers were in the range 105 to 106. It was found that the vortex induced vibrations in the wave motion were generated within a reduced velocity range of 4 and 8. The vibrations grew intermittently with the passing waves. The vibrations took place in 2-3 modes simultaneously. One mode, however, dominated over the other. The growths of the VIV using a modal analysis were consistent with a basic correlation length of 3 diameters for a stationary pipe with a linear growth of the correlation length of 10 diameter for each 0.1 diameter amplitude. (au)

  5. High-speed measurement of firearm primer blast waves

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael; Eng, Jonathan; Courtney, Amy

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a method and results for direct high-speed measurements of firearm primer blast waves employing a high-speed pressure transducer located at the muzzle to record the blast pressure wave produced by primer ignition. Key findings are: 1) Most of the lead styphnate based primer models tested show 5.2-11.3% standard deviation in the magnitudes of their peak pressure. 2) In contrast, lead-free diazodinitrophenol (DDNP) based primers had standard deviations of the peak blast pressure of 8.2-25.0%. 3) Combined with smaller blast waves, these large variations in peak blast pressure of DDNP-based primers led to delayed ignition and failure to fire in brief field tests.

  6. Doppler Frequency Shift in Ocean Wave Measurements: Frequency Downshift of a Fixed Spectral Wave Number Component by Advection of Wave Orbital Velocity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hwang, Paul

    2006-01-01

    ... expected intrinsic frequency in the frequency spectrum measured by a stationary probe. The advection of the wave number component by the orbital current of background waves produces a net downshift in the encounter frequency...

  7. Autoregressive modelling of measured sea waves off west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; SanilKumar, V.; Nayak, B.U.

    The spectral analysis of measured sea waves can efficiently be carried out by the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) technique. Even though many present techniques can be used for the generation of time series on sea waves from theoretical wave spectra...

  8. Precision measurements in ion traps using slowly moving standing waves

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, A; Singer, K; Schmidt-Kaler, F

    2011-01-01

    The present paper describes the experimental implementation of a measuring technique employing a slowly moving, near resonant, optical standing wave in the context of trapped ions. It is used to measure several figures of merit that are important for quantum computation in ion traps and which are otherwise not easily obtainable. Our technique is shown to offer high precision, and also in many cases using a much simpler setup than what is normally used. We demonstrate here measurements of i) the distance between two crystalline ions, ii) the Lamb-Dicke parameter, iii) temperature of the ion crystal, and iv) the interferometric stability of a Raman setup. The exact distance between two ions, in units of standing wave periods, is very important for motional entangling gates, and our method offers a practical way of calibrating this distance in the typical lab situation.

  9. Signal processing method for shear wave velocity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Xingmin; Qu Shuying; Shi Xiangdong

    2007-01-01

    Soil shear wave velocity (SWV) is an important parameter in geotechnical engineering. To measure the soil SWV, three methods are generally used in China, including the single-hole method, cross-hole method and the surface-wave technique. An optimized approach based on a correlation function for single-hole SWV measurement is presented in this paper. In this approach, inherent inconsistencies of the artificial methods such as negative velocities, and too-large and too-small velocities, are eliminated from the single-hole method, and the efficiency of data processing is improved. In addition, verification using the cross-hole method of upper measuring points shows that the proposed optimized approach yields high precision in signal processing.

  10. Acoustic measurements of a liquefied cohesive sediment bed under waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, R.; Groposo, V.; Pedocchi, F.

    2014-04-01

    In this article the response of a cohesive sediment deposit under the action of water waves is studied with the help of laboratory experiments and an analytical model. Under the same regular wave condition three different bed responses were observed depending on the degree of consolidation of the deposit: no bed motion, bed motion of the upper layer after the action of the first waves, and massive bed motion after several waves. The kinematic of the upper 3 cm of the deposit were measured with an ultrasound acoustic profiler, while the pore-water pressure inside the bed was simultaneously measured using several pore pressure sensors. A poro-elastic model was developed to interpret the experimental observations. The model showed that the amplitude of the shear stress increased down into the bed. Then it is possible that the lower layers of the deposit experience plastic deformations, while the upper layers present just elastic deformations. Since plastic deformations in the lower layers are necessary for pore pressure build-up, the analytical model was used to interpret the experimental results and to state that liquefaction of a self consolidated cohesive sediment bed would only occur if the bed yield stress falls within the range defined by the amplitude of the shear stress inside the bed.

  11. Rapid Response Measurements of Hurricane Waves and Storm Surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravois, U.

    2010-12-01

    Andrew (1992), Katrina (2005), and Ike (2008) are recent examples of extensive damage that resulted from direct hurricane landfall. Some of the worst damages from these hurricanes are caused by wind driven waves and storm surge flooding. The potential for more hurricane disasters like these continues to increase as a result of population growth and real estate development in low elevation coastal regions. Observational measurements of hurricane waves and storm surge play an important role in future mitigation efforts, yet permanent wave buoy moorings and tide stations are more sparse than desired. This research has developed a rapid response method using helicopters to install temporary wave and surge gauges ahead of hurricane landfall. These temporary installations, with target depths from 10-15 m and 1-7 km offshore depending on the local shelf slope, increase the density of measurement points where the worst conditions are expected. The method has progressed to an operational state and has successfully responded to storms Ernesto (2006), Noel (2007), Fay (2008), Gustav (2008), Hanna (2008) and Ike (2008). The temporary gauges are pressure data loggers that measure at 1 Hz continuously for 12 days and are post-processed to extract surge and wave information. For the six storms studied, 45 out of 49 sensors were recovered by boat led scuba diver search teams, with 43 providing useful data for an 88 percent success rate. As part of the 20 sensor Hurricane Gustav response, sensors were also deployed in lakes and bays inLouisiana, east of the Mississippi river delta. Gustav was the largest deployment to date. Generally efforts were scaled back for storms that were not anticipated to be highly destructive. For example, the cumulative total of sensors deployed for Ernesto, Noel, Fay and Hanna was only 20. Measurement locations for Gustav spanned over 800 km of exposed coastline from Louisiana to Florida with sensors in close proximity to landfall near Cocodrie

  12. High-speed measurement of rifle primer blast waves

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a method and results for direct high-speed measurements of rifle primer blast waves employing a high-speed pressure transducer located at the muzzle to record the blast pressure wave produced by primer ignition. Our key findings are: 1) Most of the primer models tested show 5-12% standard deviation in the magnitudes of their peak pressure. 2) For most primer types tested, peak pressure magnitudes are well correlated with measured primer masses so that significant reductions in standard deviation are expected to result from sorting primers by mass. 3) A range of peak pressures from below 200 psi to above 500 psi is available in different primer types.

  13. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Danilishin, Stefan L

    2012-01-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave (GW) detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point, when quantum behaviour of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time, when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is round the corner, and finding the ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned int...

  14. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L. Danilishin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  15. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilishin, Stefan L; Khalili, Farid Ya

    2012-01-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  16. Reflective measurement of water concentration using millimeter wave illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shijun; Bennett, David; Taylor, Zachary; Bajwa, Neha; Tewari, Priyamvada; Maccabi, Ashkan; Culjat, Martin; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-04-01

    THz and millimeter wave technology have shown the potential to become a valuable medical imaging tool because of its sensitivity to water and safe, non-ionizing photon energy. Using the high dielectric constant of water in these frequency bands, reflectionmode THz sensing systems can be employed to measure water content in a target with high sensitivity. This phenomenology may lead to the development of clinical systems to measure the hydration state of biological targets. Such measurements may be useful in fast and convenient diagnosis of conditions whose symptoms can be characterized by changes in water concentration such as skin burns, dehydration, or chemical exposure. To explore millimeter wave sensitivity to hydration, a reflectometry system is constructed to make water concentration measurements at 100 GHz, and the minimum detectable water concentration difference is measured. This system employs a 100 GHz Gunn diode source and Golay cell detector to perform point reflectivity measurements of a wetted polypropylene towel as it dries on a mass balance. A noise limited, minimum detectable concentration difference of less than 0.5% by mass can be detected in water concentrations ranging from 70% to 80%. This sensitivity is sufficient to detect hydration changes caused by many diseases and pathologies and may be useful in the future as a diagnostic tool for the assessment of burns and other surface pathologies.

  17. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  18. A Comparison of Measured and Predicted Wave-Impact Pressures from Breaking and Non-breaking Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Fullerton, Anne M; Brewton, Susan; Brucker, Kyle A; O'Shea, Thomas T; Dommermuth, Douglas G

    2014-01-01

    Impact loads from waves on vessels and coastal structures are complex and may involve wave breaking, which has made these loads difficult to estimate numerically or empirically. Results from previous experiments have shown a wide range of forces and pressures measured from breaking and nonbreaking waves, with no clear trend between wave characteristics and the localized forces and pressures that they generate. In 2008, a canonical breaking wave impact data set was obtained at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, by measuring the distribution of impact pressures of incident nonbreaking and breaking waves on one face of a cube. This experimental effort was sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), under the Dynamics of Interacting Platforms Program, Program Manager Dr. Ron Joslin. The effects of wave height, wavelength, face orientation, face angle, and submergence depth were investigated. Additionally, a limited number of runs were made at low forward speeds, ranging from about 0.5 to 2...

  19. Multi-stage temperature compensation method for Lamb wave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworakowski, Ziemowit; Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2016-11-01

    One of the important issues related to the applications of Lamb waves for structural health monitoring is their undesired sensitivity to variation of environmental conditions. Temperature is the main factor that can affect wave propagation and hence significantly reduce performance of a SHM system. Therefore, there is a need for development of robust monitoring methods with low sensitivity to temperature variations. This paper is aimed at verification of efficiency of four methods designed for damage detection using Lamb wave measurements performed in variable environmental conditions. The methods investigated in the comparison are the following: optimal baseline selection approach, the damage index based on a signal alignment with respect to instantaneous phase, and a group measurement approach capable of distinguishing local damage-related changes from temperature-induced global ones. The fourth method relies on fusion all these solutions simultaneously. The methods' ability to damage detection is compared using a specimen that is subjected to large temperature changes. It is found that although all the methods have their strengths and weaknesses, a cooperation of all solutions allows for significant increase of the damage detection efficiency.

  20. Simultaneous Measurements of Harmonic Waves at Fatigue-Cracked Interfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyunjo Jeong; Dan Barnard

    2011-01-01

    @@ Nonlinear harmonic waves generated at cracked interfaces are investigated theoretically and experimentally.A compact tension specimen is fabricated and the amplitude of the transmitted wave is analyzed as a function of position along the fatigued crack surface.In order to measure as many nonlinear harmonic components as possible, broadband lithium niobate (LiNbO3) transducers are employed together with a calibration technique for making absolute amplitude measurements with fluid-coupled receiving transducers.Cracked interfaces are shown to generate high acoustic nonlinearities, which are manifested as harmonics in the power spectrum of the received signal.The first subharmonic f/2 and the second harmonic 2f waves are found to be dominant nonlinear components for an incident toneburst signal of frequency f .To explain the observed nonlinear behavior,a partially closed crack is modeled by planar half interfaces that can account for crack parameters, such as crack opening displacement and crack surface conditions.The simulation results show reasonable agreement with the experimental results

  1. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stober

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY on the island Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE. These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of a pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g. horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  2. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Rapp, M.; Latteck, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) on the island of Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E) observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE). These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first-order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g., horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  3. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stober

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY on the island of Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE. These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first-order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g., horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  4. Shear Wave Speed Measurements Using Crawling Wave Sonoelastography and Single Tracking Location Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging for Tissue Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormachea, Juvenal; Lavarello, Roberto J; McAleavey, Stephen A; Parker, Kevin J; Castaneda, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Elastography provides tissue stiffness information that attempts to characterize the elastic properties of tissue. However, there is still limited literature comparing elastographic modalities for tissue characterization. This study focuses on two quantitative techniques using different vibration sources that have not been compared to date: crawling wave sonoelastography (CWS) and single tracking location shear wave elasticity imaging (STL-SWEI). To understand each technique's performance, shear wave speed (SWS) was measured in homogeneous phantoms and ex vivo beef liver tissue. Then, the contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and lateral resolution were measured in an inclusion and two-layer phantoms. The SWS values obtained with both modalities were validated with mechanical measurements (MM) which serve as ground truth. The SWS results for the three different homogeneous phantoms (10%, 13%, and 16% gelatin concentrations) and ex vivo beef liver tissue showed good agreement between CWS, STL-SWEI, and MM as a function of frequency. For all gelatin phantoms, the maximum accuracy errors were 2.52% and 2.35% using CWS and STL-SWEI, respectively. For the ex vivo beef liver, the maximum accuracy errors were 9.40% and 7.93% using CWS and STL-SWEI, respectively. For lateral resolution, contrast, and CNR, both techniques obtained comparable measurements for vibration frequencies less than 300 Hz (CWS) and distances between the push beams ( ∆x ) between 3 mm and 5.31 mm (STL-SWEI). The results obtained in this study agree over an SWS range of 1-6 m/s. They are expected to agree in perfectly linear, homogeneous, and isotropic materials, but the SWS overlap is not guaranteed in all materials because each of the three methods have unique features.

  5. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  6. Material measurement method based on femtosecond laser plasma shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dong; Li, Zhongming

    2017-03-01

    The acoustic emission signal of laser plasma shock wave, which comes into being when femtosecond laser ablates pure Cu, Fe, and Al target material, has been detected by using the fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) acoustic emission sensing probe. The spectrum characters of the acoustic emission signals for three kinds of materials have been analyzed and studied by using Fourier transform. The results show that the frequencies of the acoustic emission signals detected from the three kinds of materials are different. Meanwhile, the frequencies are almost identical for the same materials under different ablation energies and detection ranges. Certainly, the amplitudes of the spectral character of the three materials show a fixed pattern. The experimental results and methods suggest a potential application of the plasma shock wave on-line measurement based on the femtosecond laser ablating target by using the fiber F-P acoustic emission sensor probe.

  7. TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT OF REFLECTED SHOCK WAVE BY USING CHEMICAL INDICATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Jiping; He Yuzhong; Wang Su; Wang Jing; Fan Bingcheng

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a new method for measuring the temperature of the gas behind the reflected shock wave in shock tube,corresponding to the reservoir temperature of a shock tunnel,based on the chemical reaction of small amount of CF4 premixed in the test gas.The final product C2F4 is used as the temperature indicator,which is sampled and detected by a gas chromatography in the experiment.The detected concentration of C2F4 is correlated to the temperature of the reflected shock wave with the initial pressure P1 and test time γas parameters in the temperature range 3300K<T<5600K,pressure range 5kPa<P1<12kPa andγ≈0.4ms.

  8. Remote wave measurements using autonomous mobile robotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkin, Andrey; Zeziulin, Denis; Makarov, Vladimir; Belyakov, Vladimir; Tyugin, Dmitry; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    The project covers the development of a technology for monitoring and forecasting the state of the coastal zone environment using radar equipment transported by autonomous mobile robotic systems (AMRS). Sought-after areas of application are the eastern and northern coasts of Russia, where continuous collection of information on topographic changes of the coastal zone and carrying out hydrodynamic measurements in inaccessible to human environment are needed. The intensity of the reflection of waves, received by radar surveillance, is directly related to the height of the waves. Mathematical models and algorithms for processing experimental data (signal selection, spectral analysis, wavelet analysis), recalculation of landwash from data on heights of waves far from the shore, determination of the threshold values of heights of waves far from the shore have been developed. There has been developed the program complex for functioning of the experimental prototype of AMRS, comprising the following modules: data loading module, reporting module, module of georeferencing, data analysis module, monitoring module, hardware control module, graphical user interface. Further work will be connected with carrying out tests of manufactured experimental prototype in conditions of selected routes coastline of Sakhalin Island. Conducting field tests will allow to reveal the shortcomings of development and to identify ways of optimization of the structure and functioning algorithms of AMRS, as well as functioning the measuring equipment. The presented results have been obtained in Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University n.a. R. Alekseev in the framework of the Federal Target Program «Research and development on priority directions of scientific-technological complex of Russia for 2014 - 2020 years» (agreement № 14.574.21.0089 (unique identifier of agreement - RFMEFI57414X0089)).

  9. Advanced sine wave modulation of continuous wave laser system for atmospheric CO2 differential absorption measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Joel F; Nehrir, Amin R

    2014-01-01

    A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate online and offline wavelength transmitted and received channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit optimal autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit with zero off mainlobe values to within numerical precision. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not significantly degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  10. Measuring neutron-star ellipticity with measurements of the stochastic gravitational-wave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Dipongkar; Thrane, Eric; Bose, Sukanta; Regimbau, Tania

    2014-06-01

    Galactic neutron stars are a promising source of gravitational waves in the analysis band of detectors such as Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo. Previous searches for gravitational waves from neutron stars have focused on the detection of individual neutron stars, which are either nearby or highly nonspherical. Here, we consider the stochastic gravitational-wave signal arising from the ensemble of Galactic neutron stars. Using a population synthesis model, we estimate the single-sigma sensitivity of current and planned gravitational-wave observatories to average neutron star ellipticity ɛ as a function of the number of in-band Galactic neutron stars Ntot. For the plausible case of Ntot≈53000, and assuming one year of observation time with colocated initial LIGO detectors, we find it to be σɛ=2.1×10-7, which is comparable to current bounds on some nearby neutron stars. (The current best 95% upper limits are ɛ ≲7×10-8.) It is unclear if Advanced LIGO can significantly improve on this sensitivity using spatially separated detectors. For the proposed Einstein Telescope, we estimate that σɛ=5.6×10-10. Finally, we show that stochastic measurements can be combined with measurements of individual neutron stars in order to estimate the number of in-band Galactic neutron stars. In this way, measurements of stochastic gravitational waves provide a complementary tool for studying Galactic neutron stars.

  11. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  12. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  13. Calibration and validation of measurement system. Wave Dragon, Nissum Bredning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofoed, J.P-; Riemann, S.; Knapp, W.

    2004-03-01

    This report deals with the calibration of the measuring equipment on board the Wave Dragon, Nissum Bredning (WD-NB) prototype. The report covers the following instruments on board WD-NB: 1) Pressure transducers. 2) Force transducers. 3) Accelerometers. 4) Displacement sensors. 5) Strain gauges. 6) Inclinometers. All of these instruments are connected to the HBM MGC+ amplifier and data acquisition unit. In the following the calibration will be dealt with individually. Furthermore, a preliminary calibration of the siphon and dummy turbines has been carried out and this is also described in the following. (au)

  14. Biochemical measurement of bilirubin with an evanescent wave optical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscio, Patrick; Depeursinge, Christian D.; Emery, Y.; Parriaux, Olivier M.; Voirin, Guy

    1991-09-01

    Optical sensing techniques can be considered as powerful information sources on the biochemistry of tissue, blood, and physiological fluids. Various sensing modalities can be considered: spectroscopic determination of the fluorescence or optical absorption of the biological medium itself, or more generally, of a reagent in contact with the biological medium. The principle and realization of the optical sensor developed are based on the use of polished fibers: the cladding of a monomode fiber is removed on a longitudinal section. The device can then be inserted into an hypodermic needle for in-vivo measurements. Using this minute probe, local measurements of the tissue biochemistry or metabolic processes can be obtained. The sensing mechanism is based on the propagation of the evanescent wave in the tissues or reagent: the proximity of the fiber core allows the penetration of the model field tail into the sensed medium, with a uniquely defined field distribution. Single or multi-wavelength analysis of the light collected into the fiber yields the biochemical information. Here an example of this sensing technology is discussed. In-vitro measurement of bilirubin in gastric juice demonstrates that the evanescent wave optical sensor provides a sensitivity which matches the physiological concentrations. A device is proposed for in-vivo monitoring of bilirubin concentration in the gastro-oesophageal tract.

  15. Speech articulator measurements using low power EM-wave sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Burnett, G.C.; Ng, L.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Lea, W.A. [Speech Science Institute, P.O. Box 240428, Apple Valley, Minnesota 55124 (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Very low power electromagnetic (EM) wave sensors are being used to measure speech articulator motions as speech is produced. Glottal tissue oscillations, jaw, tongue, soft palate, and other organs have been measured. Previously, microwave imaging (e.g., using radar sensors) appears not to have been considered for such monitoring. Glottal tissue movements detected by radar sensors correlate well with those obtained by established laboratory techniques, and have been used to estimate a voiced excitation function for speech processing applications. The noninvasive access, coupled with the small size, low power, and high resolution of these new sensors, permit promising research and development applications in speech production, communication disorders, speech recognition and related topics. {copyright} {ital 1998 Acoustical Society of America.}

  16. Probe impedance measurements for millimeter-wave integrated horn antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Chiao, Jung-Chih; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    1993-01-01

    In order to achieve an impedance-matched millimeter-wave integrated horn antenna mixer array, the characteristics of the antenna probes inside the horn must be known. This paper describes impedance measurements for various probes in low-frequency model horns of two different types: (1) a 3 x 3 array made of aluminum by electric discharge machining and (2) a half horn made of copper sheet placed on a big copper-clad circuit board that was used as an image plane. The results of measurements indicate that the presence of the horn increases the effective length of the probe element, in agreement with reports of Guo et al. (1991) and theoretical analysis of Eleftheriades et al. (1991). It was also found that the resonant frequencies can be controlled by changing the length of the probes or by loading the probes.

  17. Diagnostic measures for assessing numerical forecasts of African Easterly Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Sander

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The utility of a number of diagnostic measures for assessing forecasts of the synoptic-scale flow over West Africa and the eastern Atlantic is investigated. The forecasts were carried out using the COSMO Model provided by the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD for a three week period in 2004. During this period a number of African Easterly Waves (AEWs were observed, three of which subsequently developed into the Hurricanes Danielle, Frances and Ivan. A sequence of 72 h forecasts were initialised twice daily from the DWD global analysis, using analyses and 12 h forecasts for the boundary conditions. A variety of diagnostics were used to assess the forecasts including objective analyses of jet and trough axes and Hovmoeller plots. The zonal wind was averaged along the objectively analysed jet axes over West Africa and the Atlantic for the forecasts and analyses. This provides a robust measure of the jet strength that takes into account the spatial variability of the jet location and is not tied to either the maximum wind speed or a particular geographic location. Application of this measure to assess the forecasts showed that overall the jet strength was well represented. The largest errors were associated with local jet variations due to misrepresentation of the African Easterly Waves in the forecasts. The objectively analysed trough axes are used to give a visual indication of the forecast quality. Hovmoeller plots proved useful for assessing the evolution of the AEWs, although the interpretation was difficult when convection in the model produced small-scale but strong vorticity anomalies. The results of this study will be applied to future case studies based on the African Monsoon: Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA special observing periods.

  18. Black hole mass function from gravitational wave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovetz, Ely D.; Cholis, Ilias; Breysse, Patrick C.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2017-05-01

    We examine how future gravitational-wave measurements from merging black holes (BHs) can be used to infer the shape of the black-hole mass function, with important implications for the study of star formation and evolution and the properties of binary BHs. We model the mass function as a power law, inherited from the stellar initial mass function, and introduce lower and upper mass cutoff parametrizations in order to probe the minimum and maximum BH masses allowed by stellar evolution, respectively. We initially focus on the heavier BH in each binary, to minimize model dependence. Taking into account the experimental noise, the mass measurement errors and the uncertainty in the redshift dependence of the merger rate, we show that the mass function parameters, as well as the total rate of merger events, can be measured to years of advanced LIGO observations at its design sensitivity. This can be used to address important open questions such as the upper limit on the stellar mass which allows for BH formation and to confirm or refute the currently observed mass gap between neutron stars and BHs. In order to glean information on the progenitors of the merging BH binaries, we then advocate the study of the two-dimensional mass distribution to constrain parameters that describe the two-body system, such as the mass ratio between the two BHs, in addition to the merger rate and mass function parameters. We argue that several years of data collection can efficiently probe models of binary formation, and show, as an example, that the hypothesis that some gravitational-wave events may involve primordial black holes can be tested. Finally, we point out that in order to maximize the constraining power of the data, it may be worthwhile to lower the signal-to-noise threshold imposed on each candidate event and amass a larger statistical ensemble of BH mergers.

  19. Shear Wave Measurements for Evaluation of Tendon Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia-Lun; Kuo, Po-Ling; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Brum, Javier; Tanter, Mickael; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigated the feasibility of using supersonic shear wave measurements to quantitatively differentiate normal and damaged tendons based on their mechanical properties. Five freshly harvested porcine tendons excised from pig legs were used. Tendon damage was induced by incubating the tendons with a 1% w/v collagenase solution. Values of shear modulus were derived both by a time-of-flight (TOF) approach and a transverse isotropic plate model (TI-model). The results show that as the preload applied to the tendon increased from 0 to 3 N, the mean shear modulus derived based on the TOF approach, the TI-model, and Young's modulus estimated from mechanical testing increased from 14.6 to 89.9 kPa, 53.9 to 348 kPa, and from 1.45 to 10.36 MPa, respectively, in untreated tendons, and from 8.4 to 67 kPa, 28 to 258 kPa, and from 0.93 to 7.2 MPa in collagenase-treated tendons. Both the TOF approach and the TI-model correlated well with the changes in Young's modulus. Although there is bias on the estimation of shear modulus using the TOF approach, it still provides statistical significance to differentiate normal and damaged tendons. Our data indicate that supersonic shear wave imaging is a valuable imaging technique to assess tendon stiffness dynamics and characterize normal and collagenase-damaged tendons.

  20. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  1. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  2. Measurement and modeling of bed shear stress under solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Guard, P.A.; Baldock, T.E.

    convolution integration methods forced with the free stream velocity and incorporating a range of eddy viscosity models. Wave friction factors were estimated from skin shear stress at different instances over the wave (viz., time of maximum positive total...

  3. Comparison of Microwave Backscatter Measurements and Small-scale Surface Wave Measurements Made from the Dutch Ocean Research Tower "Noordwijk"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeij, P.; Halsema, D. van; Oost, W.A.; Calkoen, C.J.; Vogelzang, J.; Waas, S.; Jaehne, B.

    1991-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the interaction between microwaves and water waves the VIERS-l project started in 1986 with the preparation of two wind/wave tank experiments and an ocean tower experiment. In February 1988, combined measurements of microwave backscatter, wind, waves and gas exchange

  4. A comparison of the measured North Sea Andrea rogue wave with numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitner-Gregersen, E. M.; Fernandez, L.; Lefèvre, J. M.; Monbaliu, J.; Toffoli, A.

    2013-09-01

    A coupling of a spectral wave model with a nonlinear phase resolving model is used to reconstruct the evolution of wave statistics during a storm crossing the North Sea on 8-9 November 2007. During this storm a rogue wave (named the Andrea wave) was recorded at the Ekofisk field. The wave has characteristics comparable to the well-known New Year wave measured by Statoil at the Draupner platform the 1 January 1995. Hindcast data of the storm are here applied as input to calculate random realizations of sea surface and evolution of its statistical properties associated with this specific wave event by solving the Euler equations with a Higher Order Spectral Method (HOSM). The numerical results are compared with the Andrea wave profile as well as characteristics of the Andrea wave record measured by the down-looking lasers at the Ekofisk field.

  5. Optical technique for measurement of random water wave surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, F. Y.; Withers, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    An optical system using the refraction of a vertical light ray has been developed for measuring the slope of random wind-generated water waves. The basic elements of the system are photovoltaic cells which are connected to individual amplifiers so that when the refracted light beam is incident on a cell, the output of the cell is amplified and then supplied as input to a comparator. The comparator then provides a specified voltage output, independent of the incident light intensity, as long as it is above a designated background value. The comparators are designed to give output voltages comparable with standard TTL. This arrangement provides a high signal from the cell when it experiences incident light, and a low signal when there is only background light, with the high and low signals at TTL voltage levels.

  6. Primordial gravitational waves measurements and anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yu Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Searching for the signal of primordial gravitational waves in the B-modes (BB power spectrum is one of the key scientific aims of the cosmic microwave background (CMB polarization experiments. However, this could be easily contaminated by several foreground issues, such as the interstellar dust grains and the galactic cyclotron electrons. In this paper we study another mechanism, the cosmic birefringence, which can be introduced by a CPT-violating interaction between CMB photons and an external scalar field. Such kind of interaction could give rise to the rotation of the linear polarization state of CMB photons, and consequently induce the CMB BB power spectrum, which could mimic the signal of primordial gravitational waves at large scales. With the recently released polarization data of BICEP2 and the joint analysis data of BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck, we perform a global fitting analysis on constraining the tensor-to-scalar ratio r by considering the polarization rotation angle [α(nˆ] which can be separated into a background isotropic part [α¯] and a small anisotropic part [Δα(nˆ]. Since the data of BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments have already been corrected by using the “self-calibration” method, here we mainly focus on the effects from the anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation angle. We find that including Δα(nˆ in the analysis could slightly weaken the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, when using current CMB polarization measurements. We also simulate the mock CMB data with the BICEP3-like sensitivity. Very interestingly, we find that if the effects of the anisotropic polarization rotation angle could not be taken into account properly in the analysis, the constraints on r will be dramatically biased. This implies that we need to break the degeneracy between the anisotropies of the CMB polarization rotation angle and the CMB primordial tensor perturbations, in order to measure the signal of primordial

  7. The Black Hole Mass Function from Gravitational Wave Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kovetz, Ely D; Breysse, Patrick C; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We examine how future gravitational-wave measurements from merging black holes (BHs) can be used to infer the shape of the black-hole mass function, with important implications for the study of star formation and evolution and the properties of binary BHs. We model the mass function as a power law, inherited from the stellar initial mass function, and introduce lower and upper mass cutoff parameterizations in order to probe the minimum and maximum BH masses allowed by stellar evolution, respectively. We initially focus on the heavier BH in each binary, to minimize model dependence. Taking into account the experimental noise, the mass measurement errors and the uncertainty in the redshift-dependence of the merger rate, we show that the mass function parameters, as well as the total rate of merger events, can be measured to <10% accuracy within a few years of advanced LIGO observations at its design sensitivity. This can be used to address important open questions such as the upper limit on the stellar mass ...

  8. Measuring finite-frequency body-wave amplitudes and traveltimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigloch, Karin; Nolet, Guust

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a method to measure finite-frequency amplitude and traveltime anomalies of teleseismic P waves. We use a matched filtering approach that models the first 25 s of a seismogram after the P arrival, which includes the depth phases pP and sP. Given a set of broad-band seismograms from a teleseismic event, we compute synthetic Green's functions using published moment tensor solutions. We jointly deconvolve global or regional sets of seismograms with their Green's functions to obtain the broad-band source time function. The matched filter of a seismogram is the convolution of the Green's function with the source time function. Traveltimes are computed by cross-correlating each seismogram with its matched filter. Amplitude anomalies are defined as the multiplicative factors that minimize the RMS misfit between matched filters and data. The procedure is implemented in an iterative fashion, which allows for joint inversion for the source time function, amplitudes, and a correction to the moment tensor. Cluster analysis is used to identify azimuthally distinct groups of seismograms when source effects with azimuthal dependence are prominent. We then invert for one source time function per group. We implement this inversion for a range of source depths to determine the most likely depth, as indicated by the overall RMS misfit, and by the non-negativity and compactness of the source time function. Finite-frequency measurements are obtained by filtering broad-band data and matched filters through a bank of passband filters. The method is validated on a set of 15 events of magnitude 5.8 to 6.9. Our focus is on the densely instrumented Western US. Quasi-duplet events (`quplets') are used to estimate measurement uncertainty on real data. Robust results are achieved for wave periods between 24 and 2 s. Traveltime dispersion is on the order of 0.5 s. Amplitude anomalies are on the order of 1 db in the lowest bands and 3 db in the highest bands, corresponding to

  9. Direct analysis of dispersive wave fields from near-field pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horchens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Flexural waves play a significant role for the radiation of sound from plates. The analysis of flexural wave fields enables the detection of sources and transmission paths in plate-like structures. The measurement of these wave fields can be carried out indirectly by means of near-field acoustic hol

  10. On the local plane wave methods for in situ measurement of acoustic absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnant, Y.H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address a series of so-called local plane wave methods (LPW) to measure acoustic absorption. As opposed to other methods, these methods do not rely on assumptions of the global sound field, like e.g. a plane wave or diffuse field, but are based on a local plane wave assumption. Ther

  11. Quantum analysis of the direct measurement of light waves

    CERN Document Server

    Saldanha, Pablo L

    2014-01-01

    In a beautiful experiment performed about a decade ago, Goulielmakis et al. made a direct measurement of the electric field of light waves [E. Goulielmakis et al., Science 305, 1267-1269 (2004)]. However, they used a laser source to produce the light field, whose quantum state has a null expectation value for the electric field operator, so how was it possible to measure this electric field? Here we present a quantum treatment for the f:2f interferometer used to calibrate the carrier-envelope phase of the light pulses in the experiment. We show how the special nonlinear features of the f:2f interferometer can change the quantum state of the electromagnetic field inside the laser cavity to a state with a definite oscillating electric field, explaining how the "classical" electromagnetic field emerges in the experiment. We discuss that this experiment was, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of an absolute coherent superposition of different photon number states in the optical regime.

  12. The wave vane - A device to measure the breaker angle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.; Anand, N.M.

    was found to give the wave directional information fairly accurate for the open coast where the influence of tidal currents was negligible. INTRODUCTION The usual littoral environmental observation (LEO) programme mainly consists of observations... on the breaking wave height, the wave period, the breaker angle, type of breaker, breaking zone width, longshore current veloc- ity and direction, nearshore slope etc. The LEO data are generally used to evaluate the sediment transport rates in the surf zone...

  13. Typhoon generated surface gravity waves measured by NOMAD-type buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Clarence O., III

    This study examines wind-generated ocean surface waves as measured by NOMAD-type buoys during the ONR-sponsored Impact of Typhoons on the Ocean in the Pacific (ITOP) field experiment in 2010. 1-D measurements from two new Extreme Air-Sea Interaction (EASI) NOMAD-type buoys were validated against measurements from established Air-Sea Interaction Spar (ASIS) buoys. Also, during ITOP, 3 drifting Miniature Wave Buoys, a wave measuring marine radar on the R/V Roger Revelle, and several overpasses of JASON-1 (C- and Ku-band) and -2 (Ku-band) satellite altimeters were within 100 km of either EASI buoy. These additional measurements were compared against both EASI buoys. Findings are in line with previous wave parameter inter-comparisons. A corroborated measurement of mean wave direction and direction at the peak of the spectrum from the EASI buoy is presented. Consequently, this study is the first published account of directional wave information which has been successfully gathered from a buoy with a 6 m NOMAD-type hull. This result may be applied to improve operational coverage of wave direction. In addition, details for giving a consistent estimate of sea surface elevation from buoys using strapped down accelerometers are given. This was found to be particularly important for accurate measurement of extreme waves. These technical studies established a high level of confidence in the ITOP wave measurements. Detailed frequency-direction spectra were analyzed. Structures in the wave field were described during the close passages of 4 major tropical cyclones (TC) including: severe tropical storm Dianmu, Typhoon Fanapi, Super Typhoon Megi, and Typhoon Chaba. In addition, significant swell was measured from a distant 5th TC, Typhoon Malakas. Changes in storm direction and intensity are found to have a profound impact on the wave field. Measurements of extreme waves were explored. More extreme waves were measured during TCs which coincided with times of increased wave

  14. Challenges and Techniques in Measurements of Noise, Cryogenic Noise and Power in Millimeter-Wave and Submillimeter-Wave Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoska, Lorene

    2014-01-01

    We will present the topic of noise measurements, including cryogenic noise measurements, of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) and Sub-Millimeter-Wave Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (S-MMIC) amplifiers, both on-wafer, and interfaced to waveguide modules via coupling probes. We will also present an overview of the state-of-the-art in waveguide probe techniques for packaging amplifier chips, and discuss methods to obtain the lowest loss packaging techniques available to date. Linearity in noise measurements will be discussed, and experimental methods for room temperature and cryogenic noise measurements will be presented. We will also present a discussion of power amplifier measurements for millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave amplifiers, and the tools and hardware needed for this characterization.

  15. Moored and Towed Measurements of Lee Waves at West Mariana Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Moored Profiler and towed LADCP/CTD measurements of flow encountering rough topography in the Samoan Passage. The flow of dense water across a sill in...interested in the general problems of internal waves and ocean mixing. Breaking of internal waves is the main cause for ocean mixing away from surface ...climate models . A special type of internal waves are lee waves, generated as low frequency currents interact with the bottom topography. The research

  16. Intra-plasmaspheric wave power density deduced from long-term DEMETER measurements of terrestrial VLF transmitter wave amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauben, D.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U.

    2012-12-01

    We deduce the 3d intra-plasmaspheric distribution of VLF wave power between conjugate regions of strong VLF wave amplitudes as measured by DEMETER for high-power terrestrial VLF transmitters during its ~6-yr lifetime. We employ a mixed WKB/full-wave technique to solve for the primary and secondary electromagnetic and electrostatic waves which are transmitted and reflected from strong cold-plasma density gradients and posited irregularities, in order to match the respective end-point measured amplitude distributions. Energy arriving in the conjugate region and also escaping to other regions of the magnetosphere is note. The resulting 3d distribution allows improved estimates for the long-term average particle scattering induced by terrestrial VLF transmitters.

  17. An in-ear pulse wave velocity measurement system using heart sounds as time reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusche R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulse wave measurements provide vital information in medical diagnosis. For this reason, a measurement system is developed for determining the transient time of the pulse wave between the heart and the ear. To detect pressure variations in the sealed ear canal, caused by the arriving pulse wave, an in-ear sensor is developed which uses heart sounds as time reference. Furthermore, for extracting the heart sounds from the pressure measurements and calculating the pulse wave transient time, a MATLAB-based algorithm is described. An embedded microcontroller based measurement board is presented, which realizes an interface between the sensor and the computer for signal processing.

  18. An application of Love SH waves for the viscosity measurement of triglycerides at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostocki, A. J.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.

    2010-03-01

    A new ultrasonic method of viscosity measurements at a high-pressure conditions has been presented. The method is based on the Love wave amplitude measurement. The same electronic setup as in the Bleustein-Gulyaev (B-G) wave method applied by the authors recently for a high-pressure measurement was adopted. The new sensors were made of metallic materials, which make them more reliable at high-pressure conditions. The method has been successfully applied for the viscosity measurement of some triglycerides at high-pressure conditions up to 1 GPa. The results have been compared with the earlier results obtained using B-G waves. This comparison has shown that Love wave method sensors are more reliable than B-G wave sensors and are also cheaper in fabrication, although the sensitivity of Love wave sensors is lower. During the measurement, the phase transitions in the investigated liquids were observed.

  19. Detection of Electromechanical Wave Propagation Using Synchronized Phasor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawanshi, Prakash; Dambhare, Sanjay; Pramanik, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Considering electrical network as a continuum has become popular for electromechanical wave analysis. This paper reviews the concept of electromechanical wave propagation. Analysis of large number of generator ring system will be an easy way to illustrate wave propagation. The property of traveling waves is that the maximum and minimum values do not occur at the same time instants and hence the difference between these time delays can be easily calculated. The homogeneous, isotropic 10 generator ring system is modeled using electromagnetic transient simulation programs. The purpose of this study is to investigate the time delays and wave velocities using Power System Computer Aided Design (PSCAD)/Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The disturbances considered here are generator disconnections and line trips.

  20. Elastic constants measurement of anisotropic Olivier wood plates using air-coupled transducers generated Lamb wave and ultrasonic bulk wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Souhail; Ketata, Hassiba; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi; Hosten, Bernard

    2010-04-01

    A hybrid elastic wave method is applied to determine the anisotropic constants of Olive wood specimen considered as an orthotropic solid. The method is based on the measurements of the Lamb wave velocities as well as the bulk ultrasonic wave velocities. Electrostatic, air-coupled, ultrasonic transducers are used to generate and receive Lamb waves which are sensitive to material properties. The variation of phase velocity with frequency is measured for several modes propagating parallel and normal to the fiber direction along a thin Olivier wood plates. A numerical model based mainly on an optimization method is developed; it permits to recover seven out of nine elastic constants with an uncertainty of about 15%. The remaining two elastic constants are then obtained from bulk wave measurements. The experimental Lamb phase velocities are in good agreement with the calculated dispersion curves. The evaluation of Olive wood elastic properties has been performed in the low frequency range where the Lamb length wave is large in comparison with the heterogeneity extent. Within the interval errors, the obtained elastic tensor doesn't reveal a large deviation from a uniaxial symmetry.

  1. Tuning gravitational-wave detector networks to measure compact binary mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Scott A.

    2002-11-01

    Gravitational waves generated by the final merger of compact binary systems depend on the structure of the binary's members. If the binary contains neutron stars, measuring such waves can teach us about the properties of matter at extreme densities. Unfortunately, these waves are typically at high frequency where the sensitivity of broadband detectors is not good. Learning about dense matter from these waves will require networks of broadband detectors combined with narrowband detectors that have good sensitivity at high frequencies. This paper presents an algorithm by which a network can be ``tuned,'' in accordance with the best available information, in order to most effectively measure merger waves. The algorithm is presented in the context of a toy model that captures the qualitative features of narrowband detectors and of certain binary neutron star merger wave models. By using what is learned from a sequence of merger measurements, the network can be gradually tuned in order to accurately measure the waves. The number of measurements needed to reach this stage depends upon the waves' signal strength, the number of narrowband detectors available for the measurement, and the detailed characteristics of the waves that carry the merger information. Future studies will go beyond this toy model, encompassing a more realistic description of both the detectors and the gravitational waves.

  2. Helicon wave field measurements in Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneses, Juan Francisco; Piotrowicz, Pawel; Goulding, Richard; Caughman, John; Showers, Missy; Kafle, Nischal; Rapp, Juergen; Campbell, Ian; Proto-MPEX Team

    2016-10-01

    A high density Deuterium discharge (ne 5e19 m-3, Te 4 eV) has been recently observed in ProtoMPEX (Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment). The discharge (100 kW, 13.56 MHz, D2, 700 G at the source, 1e4 G at the Target) begins with a low density plasma with hollow Te profile and transitions in about 100 ms to a high density mode with flat Te profile. It is believed that the transition to the high density mode is produced by a ``helicon resonance'' as evidenced by the centrally-peaked power deposition profile observed with IR imaging on a 2 mm thick metallic target plate. In this work, we present b-dot probe measurements of the radial helicon wavefields 30 cm downstream of the antenna during both the low and high density modes. In addition, we compare the experimental results with full wave simulations. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Measurement of Wave Electric Fields in Plasmas by Electro-Optic Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Nishiura, M; Mushiake, T; Kawazura, Y; Osawa, R; Fujinami, K; Yano, Y; Saitoh, H; Yamasaki, M; Kashyap, A; Takahashi, N; Nakatsuka, M; Fukuyama, A

    2016-01-01

    Electric field measurement in plasmas permits quantitative comparison between the experiment and the simulation in this study. An electro-optic (EO) sensor based on Pockels effect is demonstrated to measure wave electric fields in the laboratory magnetosphere of the RT-1 device with high frequency heating sources. This system gives the merits that electric field measurements can detect electrostatic waves separated clearly from wave magnetic fields, and that the sensor head is separated electrically from strong stray fields in circumference. The electromagnetic waves are excited at the double loop antenna for ion heating in electron cyclotron heated plasmas. In the air, the measured wave electric fields are in good absolute agreement with those predicted by the TASK/WF2 code. In inhomogeneous plasmas, the wave electric fields in the peripheral region are enhanced compared with the simulated electric fields. The potential oscillation of the antenna is one of the possible reason to explain the experimental resu...

  4. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at Kolhapur (India)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Ghodpage; Devendraa Siingh; R P Singh; G K Mukherjee; P Vohat; A K Singh

    2012-12-01

    Simultaneous photometric measurements of the OI 557.7 nm and OH (7, 2) band from a low latitude station, Kolhapur (16.8°N, 74.2°E) during the period 2004–2007 are analyzed to study the dominant waves present in the 80–100 km altitude region of the atmosphere. The nocturnal intensity variations of different airglow emissions are observed using scanning temperature controlled filter photometers. Waves having period lying between 2 and 12 hours have been recorded. Some of these waves having subharmonic tidal oscillation periods 4, 6, 8 and 12 hours propagate upward with velocity lying in the range 1.6–11.3 m/s and the vertical wave length lying between 28.6 and 163 kms. The other waves may be the upward propagating gravity waves or waves resulting from the interaction of inter-mode tidal oscillations, interaction of tidal waves with planetary waves and gravity waves. Some times, the second harmonic wave has higher vertical velocity than the corresponding fundamental wave. Application of these waves in studying the thermal structure of the region is discussed.

  5. Temperature measurement using ultraviolet laser absorption of carbon dioxide behind shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B

    2005-11-01

    A diagnostic for microsecond time-resolved temperature measurements behind shock waves, using ultraviolet laser absorption of vibrationally hot carbon dioxide, is demonstrated. Continuous-wave laser radiation at 244 and 266 nm was employed to probe the spectrally smooth CO2 ultraviolet absorption, and an absorbance ratio technique was used to determine temperature. Measurements behind shock waves in both nonreacting and reacting (ignition) systems were made, and comparisons with isentropic and constant-volume calculations are reported.

  6. Measurement and modelling of bed shear induced by solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.

    to combined waves and current. Ocean Engineering, 29(7): 753-768. Coussot, P., 1997. Mudflow rheology and dynamics, xvi, Balkema, Rotterdam, 255 pp. DHI, 2009. Mike21 flow model - hydrodynamic module - scientific documentation. DHI, Denmark, 60 pp...

  7. Ultrasonic wave propagation in thermoviscous moving fluid confined by heating pipeline and flow measurement performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Huang, Yiyong; Chen, Xiaoqian

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation in thermoviscous fluid with pipeline shear mean flow in the presence of a temperature gradient is investigated. On the assumption of irrotational and axisymmetric wave propagation, a mathematical formulation of the convected wave equation is proposed without simplification in the manner of Zwikker and Kosten. A method based on the Fourier-Bessel theory, which is complete and orthogonal in Lebesgue space, is introduced to convert the wave equations into homogeneous algebraic equations. Then numerical calculation of the axial wavenumber is presented. In the end, wave attenuation in laminar and turbulent flow is numerically studied. Meanwhile measurement performance of an ultrasonic flow meter is parametrically analyzed.

  8. Wave Induced Stresses Measured at the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corona, L.; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the wave induced loading on the overtopping based wave energy converter Wave Dragon. Focus is put on the junction between the main body and the reflector, also called the "shoulder part", where large cross sectional forces and bending moments acts. There are two main objectives...... for this paper, first to verify the FEM results obtained by Niras, Danish society in charge of the finite element modelling and structural design, and then to make a first experimental fatigue analysis of a particular part of the Wave Dragon. This last part shall be considered as an exercise for the further work...... that is to be done for the fatigue analysis, and which is not part of this paper....

  9. Calibration and Validation of Inertial Measurement Unit for Wave Resolving Drifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    multiple microelectromechanical systems ( MEMS ), including a triaxial accelerometer, a triaxial gyroscope , and a triaxial magnetometer. The...14. SUBJECT TERMS Ocean waves, wave buoys, drifters, inertial measurement units, MEMS , sensor validation, reference frames...GPS-based buoy GPS global positioning system GUI graphical user interface IMU inertial measurement unit MCR mouth of the Columbia River MEMS

  10. Fibre-optical techniques for measuring various properties of shock waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinse, W.C.; Esveld, R.J. van; Oostdam, R. van; Rooijen, M. van; Bouma, R.H.B.

    1999-01-01

    For the past years we have developed several optical techniques to measure properties of shock waves. The fibre optic probe (FOP) is developed to measure the shock-wave velocity and/or the detonation velocity inside an explosive. The space resolution can be as small as 0.5 mm. Single fibres are used

  11. Development of fiber optic sensors at TNO for explosion and shock wave measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Bouma, R.H.B.; Meer, B.J. van der; Prinse, W.C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Fiber Optic sensors are found to be very suitable for explosion and shock wave measurements because they are immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). In the past few years, TNO has developed a number of sensor systems for explosion and shock wave measurements in which the optical fiber is a vit

  12. Walkie-Talkie Measurements for the Speed of Radio Waves in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, Andra; Tunyagi, Arthur; Neda, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    A handheld emitter-receiver device suitable for the direct estimation of the velocity of radio waves in air is presented. The velocity of radio waves is measured using the direct time-of-flight method, without the need for any tedious and precise settings. The results for two measurement series are reported. Both sets of results give an estimate…

  13. Walkie-Talkie Measurements for the Speed of Radio Waves in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, Andra; Tunyagi, Arthur; Neda, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    A handheld emitter-receiver device suitable for the direct estimation of the velocity of radio waves in air is presented. The velocity of radio waves is measured using the direct time-of-flight method, without the need for any tedious and precise settings. The results for two measurement series are reported. Both sets of results give an estimate…

  14. Development of fiber optic sensors at TNO for explosion and shock wave measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Bouma, R.H.B.; Meer, B.J. van der; Prinse, W.C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Fiber Optic sensors are found to be very suitable for explosion and shock wave measurements because they are immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). In the past few years, TNO has developed a number of sensor systems for explosion and shock wave measurements in which the optical fiber is a vit

  15. Lagrangian modelling of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar wave measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouques, Sebastien

    2005-07-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the estimation of the ocean wave spectrum from synthetic aperture radar imaging and the modelling of ocean surface waves using the Lagrangian formalism. The first part gives a short overview of the theories of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) whereas the second part consists of five independent publications. The first two articles investigate the influence of the radar backscatter model on the SAR imaging of ocean waves. In Article I, Monte Carlo simulations of SAR images of the ocean surface are carried out using a nonlinear backscatter model that include both specular reflection and Bragg scattering and the results are compared to simulations from the classical Hasselmann integral transform (Hasselmann and Hasselmann, 1991). It is shown that nonlinearities in the backscatter model strongly influence the imaging of range-travelling waves and that the former can suppress the range-splitting effect (Bruning et al., 1988). Furthermore, in Article II a database of Envisat-ASAR Wave Mode products co-located with directional wave spectra from the numerical model WAM and which contains range-travelling wave cases only, is set up. The WAM spectra are used as input to several ocean-to-SAR integral transforms, with various real aperture radar (RAR) models and the obtained SAR image cross-spectra are compared to the Envisat-ASAR observations. A first result is that the use of a linear backscatter model leads to a high proportion of non-physical negative backscatter values in the RAR image, as suggested by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2001). Then, a comparison between the observed SAR cross-spectra and the ones simulated through Hasselmann's integral transform reveals that only twenty percents of the observations show a range-splitting effect as strong as in the simulations. A much better agreement is obtained when using the integral transform by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2003), which is based on a nonlinear hackscatter model

  16. Coupling between whistler waves and ion-scale solitary waves: cluster measurements in the magnetotail during a substorm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenerani, A; Le Contel, O; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F; Robert, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Sauvaud, J A

    2012-10-12

    We present a new model of self-consistent coupling between low frequency, ion-scale coherent structures with high frequency whistler waves in order to interpret Cluster data. The idea relies on the possibility of trapping whistler waves by inhomogeneous external fields where they can be spatially confined and propagate for times much longer than their characteristic electronic time scale. Here we take the example of a slow magnetosonic soliton acting as a wave guide in analogy with the ducting properties of an inhomogeneous plasma. The soliton is characterized by a magnetic dip and density hump that traps and advects high frequency waves over many ion times. The model represents a new possible way of explaining space measurements often detecting the presence of whistler waves in correspondence to magnetic depressions and density humps. This approach, here given by means of slow solitons, but more general than that, is alternative to the standard approach of considering whistler wave packets as associated with nonpropagating magnetic holes resulting from a mirror-type instability.

  17. Lagrangian modelling of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar wave measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouques, Sebastien

    2005-07-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the estimation of the ocean wave spectrum from synthetic aperture radar imaging and the modelling of ocean surface waves using the Lagrangian formalism. The first part gives a short overview of the theories of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) whereas the second part consists of five independent publications. The first two articles investigate the influence of the radar backscatter model on the SAR imaging of ocean waves. In Article I, Monte Carlo simulations of SAR images of the ocean surface are carried out using a nonlinear backscatter model that include both specular reflection and Bragg scattering and the results are compared to simulations from the classical Hasselmann integral transform (Hasselmann and Hasselmann, 1991). It is shown that nonlinearities in the backscatter model strongly influence the imaging of range-travelling waves and that the former can suppress the range-splitting effect (Bruning et al., 1988). Furthermore, in Article II a database of Envisat-ASAR Wave Mode products co-located with directional wave spectra from the numerical model WAM and which contains range-travelling wave cases only, is set up. The WAM spectra are used as input to several ocean-to-SAR integral transforms, with various real aperture radar (RAR) models and the obtained SAR image cross-spectra are compared to the Envisat-ASAR observations. A first result is that the use of a linear backscatter model leads to a high proportion of non-physical negative backscatter values in the RAR image, as suggested by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2001). Then, a comparison between the observed SAR cross-spectra and the ones simulated through Hasselmann's integral transform reveals that only twenty percents of the observations show a range-splitting effect as strong as in the simulations. A much better agreement is obtained when using the integral transform by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2003), which is based on a nonlinear hackscatter model

  18. Low Energy Particle Oscillations and Correlations with Hydromagnetic Waves in the Jovian Magnetosphere: Ulysses Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, N.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. G.

    1996-01-01

    We report on measurements of energetic particle modulations observed by the HI-SCALE instrument aboard the Ulysses Spacecraft that were associated with the only hydromagnetic wave event measured inside the Jovian magnetosphere by the Ulysses magnetometer investigation.

  19. Offshore Measurement System for Wave Power—Using Current Loop Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Liselotte Ulvgård; Tobias Kamf; Mats Leijon

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of a measurement system for wave power generators. The work is part of a project to build a robust and cheap measurement system for offshore monitoring of wave power farms. Due to the harsh offshore environment, low accessibility and high cost for installation and maintenance, it is of key importance to minimize power consumption, complexity and cost of each measurement unit. For the first prototype, the objective was to measure voltage, current and ...

  20. Cooldown Measurements in a Standing Wave Thermoacoustic Refrigerator

    CERN Document Server

    Dhuley, R C

    2016-01-01

    Thermoacoustic Refrigerators (TARs) use acoustic power to generate cold temperatures. Apart from the operating frequency and the mean temperature of the working medium, the charging pressure and the dynamic pressure in the TAR govern its attainable cold temperature. The effect of charging pressure on the dynamic pressure in a loudspeaker driven gas filled standing wave column has been well understood. The present work aims to investigate the effect of charging pressure on the cold end temperature of a standing wave TAR. The cold end temperature lift and the cooldown for several changing pressures are reported. The effect of vacuum around the cold end on the TAR performance is also presented.

  1. FTS measurements of submillimeter-wave opacity at Pampa la Bola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Akihiro; Matsushita, Satoki

    1998-07-01

    The first measurement of submillimeter-wave atmospheric opacity spectra at the Pampa la Bola site (Northern Chile, Atacama 4800 m altitude) has been performed during the winter season using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Atmospheric emission spectra, as a function of airmass, were measured under various weather conditions. Atmospheric opacity was evaluated from sky temperature at zenith as well as from tipping measurements, which are independent measure but give consistent results. The FTS opacity measurements also show good match with 220 GHz radiometer measurements. Correlations between millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave opacities get worse when 220 GHz opacity is larger than 0.1. Deviations from the opacity correlation at each frequency show good correlations themselves but have different relative variations at each frequency. This indicates that atmospheric transparency cannot be characterized only by millimeter-wave opacity buy requires simultaneous opacity measurements at millimeter and submillimeter-wavelengths.

  2. Aortic pulse wave velocity measurement in systemic sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sebastiani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic sclerosis (SSc is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and widespread microangiopathy. However, a macrovascular damage could be also associated. Aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV is known to be a reliable indicator of arterial stiffness and a useful prognostic predictor of cardiovascular events. Moreover, aPWV may be easily measured by non-invasive, user-friendly tool. Aim of our study was to evaluate aPWV alterations in a series of SSc patients. Methods. The aPWV was evaluated in 35 consecutive female SSc patients and 26 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. aPWV alterations were correlated with cardiopulmonary involvement. Results. A significant increase of aPWV was observed in SSc patients compared to controls (9.4±3.2 m/s vs 7.3±1 m/s; P=0.002. In particular, 14/35 (40% SSc patients and only 1/26 (4% controls (P=0.0009 showed increased aPWV (>9 m/s cut-off value. Moreover, echocardiography evaluation showed an increased prevalence of right atrial and ventricular dilatation (atrial volume: 23.6±6.2 mL vs 20.3±4.3 mL, P=0.026; ventricular diameter 19.5±4.9 mm vs 15.9±1.6 mm; P=0.001 associated to higher values of pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PAPs in SSc patients (31.5±10.4 mmHg vs 21.6±2.9 mmHg; P50 years old. Furthermore, altered aPWV was more frequently associated with limited cutaneous pattern, longer disease duration (≥5 years, and/or presence of anticentromere antibody (ACA. Conclusions. A significantly higher prevalence of abnormally increased aPWV was evidenced in SSc patients compared to healthy controls. The possibility of more pronounced and diffuse vascular damage in a particular SSc subset (ACA-positive subjects with limited cutaneous scleroderma and longer disease duration might be raised.

  3. Third Wave of Measurement in the Self-Regulated Learning Field: When Measurement and Intervention Come Hand in Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panadero, Ernesto; Klug, Julia; Järvelä, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Measurement is a central issue for the self-regulated learning (SRL) field as SRL is a phenomenon difficult to measure in a reliable and valid way. Here, 3 waves in the history of SRL measurement are identified and profiled. Our focus lies on the third and newest one, which combines measurement and intervention within the same tools. The basis for…

  4. Directional wave measurements off Navinal, Gulf of Kachchh, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; KrishnaKumar, V.; Suryanarayana, A.; Antony, M.K.; Swamy, G.N.

    traced. An exercise was carried out to see if any relationship exists between these long period waves and various stages of tides, but no pattern could be noticed. As this study is meant for coastal development activities, occurrence of cyclone is also...

  5. Direct bed stress measurements under solitary tsunami-type waves and breaking tsunami wave fronts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    in the stability of submarine sediments. Laboratory experiments were performed to obtain total shear stresses under tsunami-type breaking and non-breaking solitary waves. The total stress comprises arises from a pressure gradient force and a skin friction shear...

  6. Gravity wave observations by Doppler wind and temperature lidar measurements in the strato- and mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Gerd; Fiedler, Jens; Hildebrand, Jens; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    The observation of wind and temperature perturbations by gravity waves propagating throughout the strato- and mesosphere is a challenging task. Both the kinetic and potential energy density can be derived and yield information about ensemble mean properties of gravity waves. We measure temperatures and winds with the Doppler Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the ALOMAR research station in Northern Norway (69N, 16E). Using two independently steerable telescopes and lasers we are able to measure vertical profiles of two wind components and temperatures simultaneously. The observations can be performed even under sunlit conditions, which is essential for measuring atmospheric perturbations over several days and during summer at this location. We report on the first observation of persistent inertia gravity wave signatures in the horizontal wind and temperature. The measurements cover the altitude range from 20 km to about 80 km during night and to about 70 km during daytime. For one case with observations lasting more than 50 hours, we find amplitudes of 5 to 25 m/s and 1 to 8 K in wind and temperature, respectively. The measured kinetic to potential energy density ratio is about 10, indicating that the majority of variability is due to waves with intrinsic frequencies close to the inertial frequency. The entire wave field is mainly characterized by the presence of multiple waves, however quasi-monochromatic waves can be identified at limited times and allow a more detailed analysis of wave properties like propagation direction, amplitudes and the momentum flux.

  7. Measurement of viscoelastic properties of in vivo swine myocardium using lamb wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (LDUV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Matthew W; Pislaru, Cristina; Nenadic, Ivan Z; Kinnick, Randall R; Greenleaf, James F

    2013-02-01

    Viscoelastic properties of the myocardium are important for normal cardiac function and may be altered by disease. Thus, quantification of these properties may aid with evaluation of the health of the heart. Lamb wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (LDUV) is a shear wave-based method that uses wave velocity dispersion to measure the underlying viscoelastic material properties of soft tissue with plate-like geometries. We tested this method in eight pigs in an open-chest preparation. A mechanical actuator was used to create harmonic, propagating mechanical waves in the myocardial wall. The motion was tracked using a high frame rate acquisition sequence, typically 2500 Hz. The velocities of wave propagation were measured over the 50-400 Hz frequency range in 50 Hz increments. Data were acquired over several cardiac cycles. Dispersion curves were fit with a viscoelastic, anti-symmetric Lamb wave model to obtain estimates of the shear elasticity, μ(1), and viscosity, μ(2) as defined by the Kelvin-Voigt rheological model. The sensitivity of the Lamb wave model was also studied using simulated data. We demonstrated that wave velocity measurements and Lamb wave theory allow one to estimate the variation of viscoelastic moduli of the myocardial walls in vivo throughout the course of the cardiac cycle.

  8. Dual-beam measurements of gravity waves over Arecibo: Reevaluation of wave structure, dynamics, and momentum fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, David C.; Janches, Diego

    2008-03-01

    A previous study by Zhou and Morton (2006) employed dual-beam incoherent scatter radar measurements of radial velocities at the Arecibo Observatory to study the structure, dynamics, and momentum fluxes of gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere for ˜8 h on 28 July 2001. Because of erroneous assumptions about wave character and inferences of the relationship between radial velocities, however, the advertised results of this previous study are largely in error. The purposes of the present study are both to point out these errors to help avoid such pitfalls in the future and to provide a new interpretation of these data, which represent a very interesting case study of gravity wave dynamics at these altitudes. Specific findings of the present study (largely in contradiction to the previous analysis) include (1) the ˜15-min oscillation was apparently a large-amplitude Doppler-ducted gravity wave structure propagating at one or two maxima of the westward large-scale wind present during the event; (2) the gravity wave exhibited a deep and coherent vertical phase structure, except between the two westward wind maxima at later times, entirely inconsistent with proximity to a critical level; (3) the dominant motions within the gravity wavefield were vertical velocities up to ˜10 m s-1, except for inferred horizontal motions where the vertical motions changed phase and above and below the vertical velocity maxima, as dictated by the continuity equation; (4) there were likely no regions of dynamical instability accompanying these ducted wave motions; and (5) momentum fluxes due to this wave motion were small, despite its very large amplitude.

  9. Simultaneous equatorial measurements of waves and precipitating electrons in the outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, W. L.; Robinson, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Anderson, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous wave and precipitating electron measurements near the equator in the outer radiation belt have been made from the CRRES satellite. The electron data of principal concern here were acquired in and about the loss cone with narrow angular resolution spectrometers covering the energy range 340 eV to 5 MeV. The wave data included electric field measurements spanning frequencies from 5 Hz to 400 kHz and magnetic field measurements from 5 Hz to 10 kHz. This paper presents examples in which the variations in electron fluxes in the loss cone and the wave intensities were correlated. These variations in electron flux were confined to pitch angles less than about 30 deg. The association between the flux enhancements and the waves is consistent with wave-induced pitch angle diffusion processes.

  10. Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Surface Breaking Crack Using Rayleigh Wave Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Foo Wei; Chai, Hwa Kian; Lim, Kok Sing

    2016-03-05

    An improved single sided Rayleigh wave (R-wave) measurement was suggested to characterize surface breaking crack in steel reinforced concrete structures. Numerical simulations were performed to clarify the behavior of R-waves interacting with surface breaking crack with different depths and degrees of inclinations. Through analysis of simulation results, correlations between R-wave parameters of interest and crack characteristics (depth and degree of inclination) were obtained, which were then validated by experimental measurement of concrete specimens instigated with vertical and inclined artificial cracks of different depths. Wave parameters including velocity and amplitude attenuation for each case were studied. The correlations allowed us to estimate the depth and inclination of cracks measured experimentally with acceptable discrepancies, particularly for cracks which are relatively shallow and when the crack depth is smaller than the wavelength.

  11. Ground penetrating radar antenna measurements based on plane-wave expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of the system consisting of the ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna and the air-soil interface is measured using a loop buried in the soil. The plane-wave spectrum is used to determine various parameters characterizing the radiation of the GPR antenna...

  12. Wave attenuation model for dephasing and measurement of conditional times

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Jayannavar; Colin Benjamin

    2002-08-01

    Inelastic scattering induces dephasing in mesoscopic systems. An analysis of previous models to simulate inelastic scattering in such systems is presented and a relatively new model based on wave attenuation is introduced. The problem of Aharonov–Bohm (AB) oscillations in conductance of a mesoscopic ring is studied. We show that the conductance is symmetric under flux reversal and the visibility of AB oscillations decays to zero as a function of the incoherence parameter, signaling dephasing. Further the wave attenuation model is applied to a fundamental problem in quantum mechanics, that of the conditional (reflection/transmission) times spent in a given region of space by a quantum particle before scattering off from that region.

  13. Terahertz wave electro-optic measurements with optical spectral filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilyakov, I. E., E-mail: igor-ilyakov@mail.ru; Shishkin, B. V. [Institute of Applied Physic RAS, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Kitaeva, G. Kh. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Akhmedzhanov, R. A. [Institute of Applied Physic RAS, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); N.I. Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-23

    We propose electro-optic detection techniques based on variations of the laser pulse spectrum induced during pulse co-propagation with terahertz wave radiation in a nonlinear crystal. Quantitative comparison with two other detection methods is made. Substantial improvement of the sensitivity compared to the standard electro-optic detection technique (at high frequencies) and to the previously shown technique based on laser pulse energy changes is demonstrated in experiment.

  14. Characteristics of abnormal large waves measured from coastal videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yoo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, tsunami-like sea-level oscillations occurred in a region of the west coast of Korea (i.e. in the eastern part of the Yellow Sea, during a typical rough spring weather episode on 4 May 2008. The analysis of these tsunami-like abnormal waves focuses solely on the videos recorded by a CCTV surveillance system in the directions of the entrance and inside parts of a local coastal pocket beach. Time-series of the vertical and horizontal sea surface oscillations were extracted from the video recordings through calibrating image distortions, accumulating 1-D intensity arrays along the line transects of interest in time, and identifying the trajectories of the oscillations. Frequency and time-domain analysis of the time-series signals revealed that the maximum height of the tsunami-like waves reached 1.3 m, having a dominant period of 185 s (3.1 min. In addition, the results indicate that the celerity of the maximum height wave approximated 7.3 m/s, which lead to the losses of life of several people who could not escape immediately from the fast tsunami flooding the shore.

  15. FTS Measurements of Submillimeter-Wave Atmospheric Opacity at Pampa la Bola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Akihiro; Matsushita, Satoki

    1998-06-01

    The first measurements of submillimeter-wave atmospheric opacity spectra at the Pampa la Bola site (Northern Chile, Atacama, 4800 m altitude) have been performed during the winter season using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Atmospheric emission spectra, as a function of airmass, were measured under various weather conditions. Atmospheric opacity was evaluated from sky temperature at the zenith as well as from tipping measurements, which are independent measures but give consistent results. Correlation diagrams between 220 GHz and 345 GHz, 410 GHz, 492 GHz, 675 GHz, 691 GHz, 809 GHz, 875 GHz are shown. Correlations between millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave opacities get worse when 220 GHz opacity is larger than 0.1. Deviations from the opacity correlation at each frequency show good correlations themselves, but have different relative variations at each frequency. This indicates that atmospheric transparency cannot be characterized only by millimeter-wave opacity, but requires simultaneous opacity measurements at millimeter and submillimeter-wavelengths.

  16. Determination of wave intensity in flexible tubes using measured diameter and velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, J; Khir, A W

    2007-01-01

    Wave intensity (WI) is a hemodynamics index, which is the product of changes in pressure and velocity across the wave-front. Wave Intensity Analysis, which is a time domain technique allows for the separation of running waves into their forward and backward directions and traditionally uses the measured pressure and velocity waveforms. However, due to the possible difficulty in obtaining reliable pressure waveforms non-invasively, investigating the use of wall displacement instead of pressure signals in calculating WI may have clinical merits. In this paper, we developed an algorithm in which we use the measured diameter of flexible tube's wall and flow velocity to separate the velocity waveform into its forward and backward directions. The new algorithm is also used to separate wave intensity into its forward and backward directions. In vitro experiments were carried out in two sized flexible tubes, 12mm and 16mm in diameters, each is of 2 m in length. Pressure, velocity and diameter were taken at three measuring sites. A semi-sinusoidal wave was generated using a piston pump, which ejected 40cc water into each tube. The results show that separated wave intensity into the forward and backward directions of the new algorithm using the measured diameter and velocity are almost identical in shape to those traditionally using the measured pressure and velocity. We conclude that the new algorithm presented in this work, could have clinical advantages since the required information can be obtained non-invasively.

  17. Scattering Matrix for the Interaction between Solar Acoustic Waves and Sunspots. I. Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Hsu; Chou, Dean-Yi; Zhao, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Assessing the interaction between solar acoustic waves and sunspots is a scattering problem. The scattering matrix elements are the most commonly used measured quantities to describe scattering problems. We use the wavefunctions of scattered waves of NOAAs 11084 and 11092 measured in the previous study to compute the scattering matrix elements, with plane waves as the basis. The measured scattered wavefunction is from the incident wave of radial order n to the wave of another radial order n‧, for n=0{--}5. For a time-independent sunspot, there is no mode mixing between different frequencies. An incident mode is scattered into various modes with different wavenumbers but the same frequency. Working in the frequency domain, we have the individual incident plane-wave mode, which is scattered into various plane-wave modes with the same frequency. This allows us to compute the scattering matrix element between two plane-wave modes for each frequency. Each scattering matrix element is a complex number, representing the transition from the incident mode to another mode. The amplitudes of diagonal elements are larger than those of the off-diagonal elements. The amplitude and phase of the off-diagonal elements are detectable only for n-1≤slant n\\prime ≤slant n+1 and -3{{Δ }}k≤slant δ {k}x≤slant 3{{Δ }}k, where δ {k}x is the change in the transverse component of the wavenumber and Δk = 0.035 rad Mm‑1.

  18. Measuring Water Vapor and Ash in Volcanic Eruptions with a Millimeter-Wave Radar/Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Bryan, Sean; Vanderkluysen, Loÿc; Groppi, Christopher; Paine, Scott; Bliss, Daniel W; Aberle, James; Mauskopf, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Millimeter-wave remote sensing technology can significantly improve measurements of volcanic eruptions, yielding new insights into eruption processes and improving forecasts of drifting volcanic ash for aviation safety. Radiometers can measure water vapor density and temperature inside eruption clouds, improving on existing measurements with infrared cameras that are limited to measuring the outer cloud surface. Millimeter-wave radar can measure the 3D mass flow of volcanic ash inside eruption plumes and drifting fine ash clouds, offering better sensitivity than existing weather radar measurements and the unique ability to measure ash particle size in-situ. Here we present sensitivity calculations in the context of developing the WAMS (Water and Ash Millimeter-wave Spectrometer) instrument. WAMS, a radar/radiometer system constructed with off-the-shelf components, would be able to measure water vapor and ash throughout an entire eruption cloud, a unique capability.

  19. Photoacoustic clutter reduction by inversion of a linear scatter model using plane wave ultrasound measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Hans-Martin; Beckmann, Martin F; Schmitz, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging aims to visualize light absorption properties of biological tissue by receiving a sound wave that is generated inside the observed object as a result of the photoacoustic effect. In clinical applications, the strong light absorption in human skin is a major problem. When high amplitude photoacoustic waves that originate from skin absorption propagate into the tissue, they are reflected back by acoustical scatterers and the reflections contribute to the received signal. The artifacts associated with these reflected waves are referred to as clutter or skin echo and limit the applicability of photoacoustic imaging for medical applications severely. This study seeks to exploit the acoustic tissue information gained by plane wave ultrasound measurements with a linear array in order to correct for reflections in the photoacoustic image. By deriving a theory for clutter waves in k-space and a matching inversion approach, photoacoustic measurements compensated for clutter are shown to be recovered.

  20. Measurement of low-frequency ultrasonic wave in water using an acoustic fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Yoshito

    2006-04-01

    An acoustic fiber sensor for measurement of ultrasonic waves, which used the approximate Raman-Nath diffraction effect where light diffraction waves were generated in an optical fiber by strain due to the ultrasonic waves, was proposed and examined. In order to characterize the acoustic fiber sensor as a basic study, measurements of low-frequency ultrasonic waves in water were examined using a step index fiber operating as a detection sensor. The results showed that characteristics of detected signals agreed with the theoretical prediction based on Fraunhofer diffraction. This indicates that our proposed fiber sensor can be used for the detection of low-frequency ultrasonic waves as well as the transmission of light diffraction signals.

  1. Directional spectrum of ocean waves from array measurements using phase/time/path difference methods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.

    Wave direction has for the first time been consistently, accurately and unambiguously evaluated from array measurements using the phase/time/path difference (PTPD) methods of Esteva in case of polygonal arrays and Borgman in case of linear arrays...

  2. Measuring Acoustic Wave Transit Time in Furnace Based on Active Acoustic Source Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Luo; Feng Tian; Xiao-Ping Sun

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurement of transit time for acoustic wave between two sensors installed on two sides of a furnace is a key to implementing the temperature field measurement technique based on acoustical method. A new method for measuring transit time of acoustic wave based on active acoustic source signal is proposed in this paper, which includes the followings: the time when the acoustic source signal arrives at the two sensors is measured first; then, the difference of two arriving time arguments is computed, thereby we get the transit time of the acoustic wave between two sensors installed on the two sides of the furnace. Avoiding the restriction on acoustic source signal and background noise, the new method can get the transit time of acoustic wave with higher precision and stronger ability of resisting noise interference.

  3. A thermistor probe for measuring particle orbital speed in water waves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eagleson, P.S; van de Watering, W.P.M

    1964-01-01

    The development of a thermistor probe and the necessary additional electronic circuitry to measure temporal and spatial distribution of the magnitude of the orbital velocity in water waves is described...

  4. Video measurements of fluid velocities and water levels in breaking waves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cost-effective measurement of the velocity flow fields in breaking water waves, using particle and correlation image velocimetry, is described. The fluid velocities are estimated by tracking the motion of neutrally buoyant particles and aeration...

  5. Measurement of Elastic Properties of Tissue by Shear Wave Propagation Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaru, Marie; Azuma, Takashi; Hashiba, Kunio

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) imaging has been developed as a novel elastography technology to diagnose hepatic disease and breast cancer. The accuracy of shear wave speed estimation, which is one of the applications of ARF elastography, is studied. The Young's moduli of pig liver and foie gras samples estimated from the shear wave speed were compared with those measured the static Young's modulus measurement. The difference in the two methods was 8%. Distance attenuation characteristics of the shear wave were also studied using finite element method (FEM) analysis. We found that the differences in the axial and lateral beam widths in pressure and ARF are 16 and 9% at F-number=0.9. We studied the relationship between two branch points in distance attenuation characteristics and the shape of ARF. We found that the maximum measurable length to estimate shear wave speed for one ARF excitation was 8 mm.

  6. Power performance measurements on Wave Star in Nissum Bredning. Final report; Wave energy converter; Effektmaalinger paa Wave Star i Nissum Bredning. Afsluttende rapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigaard, P.; Lykke Andersen, T.

    2009-04-15

    The Wave Star test machine in Nissum Bredning was put in continuous operation on 24 July 2006. Over the past 2 1/2 years the produced power was measured continuously and with only minor interruptions. The measurements cover operation for all seasons in a very changeable climate. There is thus gaining operational experience under different wave conditions. In the period the machine has been running with a simple form of control and Power Take Off system (PTO), which form the background for effect measurements with the existing control strategy. Calculations have shown that the use of more advanced forms of control can increase the efficiency of Wave Star significantly. New control systems are therefore still under development with the primary objective to increase performance from the wave energy plant. To test and develop the methods, a new mini-hydraulic station with associated second generation PTO was developed and constructed for testing in Nissum Bredning. The mini-hydraulic station is coupled to a single float, while the other machine's 39 floats are still connected to the existing PTO system. As the existing PTO system can be applied to the 39 floats simultaneously with the new PTO used on 1 float, effect can be measured on the two systems simultaneously. The first tentative experiments with the new second generation PTO seem very promising. During the first measurements made in March 2009 the new system achieved an average yield of 3.1 times the average output from a float on the existing machine. In the coming period more experiments will be performed with the mini-hydraulic station to test the new PTO in various sea conditions. Since the mini-hydraulic station can simulate various forms of control, they also will be tested under real wave conditions in Nissum Bredning. The effect optimization should continue to be subject to a greater targeted effort, as improvements in this area can increase energy production and thus reduce the kWh cost of energy

  7. Seam-wave measurements in the pits of Nogrod coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toros, E.; Bodoky, T.

    1988-01-01

    The principle of measuring seismic seam-waves is shortly reviewed and measurement examples are given from the coal mines of Nograd County. Reflection measurements and time sections are exemplified by different figures from different pits. The preliminary results of the method obtained in these mines as well as further application possibilities of the method are described.

  8. S-wave velocity structures of the Taipei Basin, Taiwan, using microtremor array measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huey-Chu; Wu, Cheng-Feng; Lee, Feng-Mei; Hwang, Ruey-Der

    2015-04-01

    The S-wave velocity structures of the Taipei Basin in Taiwan are investigated using the array records of microtremors at 15 sites. Dispersion curves at these sites are calculated using the frequency-wavenumber (F-K) spectrum method. The S-wave velocity structures in the Taipei Basin are then estimated by employing surface wave inversion technique. Harder strata sites have higher phase velocities than softer sites. If the S-wave velocity of the Tertiary Basement is assumed to be 1000 m/s, then the Quaternary alluvial thicknesses in the Taipei Basin are between about 100 m and 650 m. The thickness of the alluvium gradually increases from the southeast to the northwest. The inversion results are also in good agreement with well-logging data and seismic reflection studies of the Taipei Basin. The study concludes that microtremor array measurement is a useful tool for estimating S-wave velocity structure.

  9. Comparison of numerical hindcasted severe waves with Doppler radar measurements in the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce de León, Sonia; Bettencourt, João H.; Dias, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    Severe sea states in the North Sea present a challenge to wave forecasting systems and a threat to offshore installations such as oil and gas platforms and offshore wind farms. Here, we study the ability of a third-generation spectral wave model to reproduce winter sea states in the North Sea. Measured and modeled time series of integral wave parameters and directional wave spectra are compared for a 12-day period in the winter of 2013-2014 when successive severe storms moved across the North Atlantic and the North Sea. Records were obtained from a Doppler radar and wave buoys. The hindcast was performed with the WAVEWATCH III model (Tolman 2014) with high spectral resolution both in frequency and direction. A good general agreement was obtained for integrated parameters, but discrepancies were found to occur in spectral shapes.

  10. On the Interpretation of Gravity Wave Measurements by Ground-Based Lidars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Dörnbrack

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper asks the simple question: How can we interpret vertical time series of middle atmosphere gravity wave measurements by ground-based temperature lidars? Linear wave theory is used to show that the association of identified phase lines with quasi-monochromatic waves should be considered with great care. The ambient mean wind has a substantial effect on the inclination of the detected phase lines. The lack of knowledge about the wind might lead to a misinterpretation of the vertical propagation direction of the observed gravity waves. In particular, numerical simulations of three archetypal atmospheric mountain wave regimes show a sensitivity of virtual lidar observations on the position relative to the mountain and on the scale of the mountain.

  11. Laboratory measurements of the effect of internal waves on sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likun; Swinney, Harry L.; Lin, Ying-Tsong

    2016-11-01

    The fidelity of acoustic signals used in communication and imaging in the oceans is limited by density fluctuations arising from many sources, particularly from internal waves. We present results from laboratory experiments on sound propagation through an internal wave field produced by a wave generator consisting of multiple oscillating plates. The fluid density as a function of height is measured and used to determine the sound speed as a function of the height. Sound pulses from a transducer propagate through the fluctuating stratified density field and are detected to determine sound refraction, pulse arrival time, and sound signal distortion. The results are compared with sound ray model and numerical models of underwater sound propagation. The laboratory experiments can explore the parameter dependence by varying the fluid density profile, the sound pulse signal, and the internal wave amplitude and frequency. The results lead to a better understanding of sound propagation through and scattered by internal waves.

  12. Time series analysis of continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar wind measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Mikkelsen, Torben; Mann, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra simultaneou......The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra...

  13. Nonlinear dynamic acousto-elasticity measurement by Rayleigh wave in concrete cover evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Quang Anh; Garnier, Vincent; Payan, Cédric; Chaix, Jean-François; Lott, Martin; Eiras, Jesús N.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents local non-destructive evaluation of concrete cover by using surface Rayleigh wave in nonlinear Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity (DAE) measurement. Dynamic non classical nonlinear elastic behavior like modulus decrease under applied stress and slow dynamic process has been observed in many varieties of solid, also in concrete. The measurements conducted in laboratory, consist in qualitative evaluation of concrete thermal damage. Nonlinear elastic parameters especially conditioning offset are analyzed for the cover concrete by Rayleigh wave. The results of DAE method show enhanced sensitivity when compared to velocity measurement. Afterward, this technique broadens measurements to the field.

  14. Influence of Tissue Microstructure on Shear Wave Speed Measurements in Plane Shear Wave Elastography: A Computational Study in Lossless Fibrotic Liver Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-07-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) has been used to measure viscoelastic properties for characterization of fibrotic livers. In this technique, external mechanical vibrations or acoustic radiation forces are first transmitted to the tissue being imaged to induce shear waves. Ultrasonically measured displacement/velocity is then utilized to obtain elastographic measurements related to shear wave propagation. Using an open-source wave simulator, k-Wave, we conducted a case study of the relationship between plane shear wave measurements and the microstructure of fibrotic liver tissues. Particularly, three different virtual tissue models (i.e., a histology-based model, a statistics-based model, and a simple inclusion model) were used to represent underlying microstructures of fibrotic liver tissues. We found underlying microstructures affected the estimated mean group shear wave speed (SWS) under the plane shear wave assumption by as much as 56%. Also, the elastic shear wave scattering resulted in frequency-dependent attenuation coefficients and introduced changes in the estimated group SWS. Similarly, the slope of group SWS changes with respect to the excitation frequency differed as much as 78% among three models investigated. This new finding may motivate further studies examining how elastic scattering may contribute to frequency-dependent shear wave dispersion and attenuation in biological tissues.

  15. New ultrasonic Bleustein-Gulyaev wave method for measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, a new method for measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure is presented. To this end the authors have applied an ultrasonic method using the Bleustein-Gulyaev (BG) surface acoustic wave. By applying the perturbation method, we can prove that the change in the complex propagation constant of the BG wave produced by the layer of liquid loading the waveguide surface is proportional to the shear mechanical impedance of the liquid. In the article, a measuring setup employing the BG wave for the purpose of measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure (up to 1GPa) is presented. The results of high-pressure viscosity measurements of triolein and castor oil are also presented. In this paper the model of a Newtonian liquid was applied. Using this new method it is also possible to measure the viscosity of liquids during the phase transition and during the decompression process (hysteresis of the dependence of viscosity on pressure).

  16. Tuning gravitational-wave detector networks to measure compact binary mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, S A

    2002-01-01

    Gravitational waves generated by the final merger of compact binary systems depend on the structure of the binary's members. If the binary contains neutron stars, measuring such waves can teach us about the properties of matter at extreme densities. Unfortunately, these waves are typically at high frequency where the sensitivity of broad-band detectors is not good. Learning about dense matter from these waves will require networks of broad-band detectors combined with narrow-band detectors that have good sensitivity at high frequencies. This paper presents an algorithm by which a network can be ``tuned'', in accordance with the best available information, in order to most effectively measure merger waves. The algorithm is presented in the context of a toy model that captures the qualitative features of narrow-band detectors and of certain binary neutron star merger wave models. By using what is learned from a sequence of merger measurements, the network can be gradually tuned in order to accurately measure th...

  17. Identification of subsurface damage in concrete using one sided wave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelis, D. G.; Matikas, T., E.

    2009-03-01

    Surface deterioration is the most common type of concrete damage. In the case of subsurface damage the difficulty of characterization increases as there is no visual evidence of the crack. Additionally since the close to surface layer of the material is intact, the sensitivity of the longitudinal wave velocity, which is typically measured for inspection purposes, is questionable. In the present paper, cracks were created in steel fiber reinforced concrete specimens by four point bending. Wave characteristics were then measured on the intact surfaces (compression side) using common acoustic emission transducers. It was seen that although there was no visual sign of the crack, Rayleigh as well as longitudinal wave velocities were influenced showing clear decrease relatively to the sound material. Additionally other parameters such as the amplitude or energy of the waves were much more sensitive to damage. In order to explain the results, numerical simulations were conducted making a parametric study between the depth of the sound layer, the propagating wavelength and the measured wave parameters. It is concluded that by scanning a surface with simple acoustic one sided measurements, the identification of the location of the subsurface damage is possible, while the propagating wave gives information about the form and depth of the crack.

  18. On the effect of accelerated winds on the wave growth through detailed laboratory measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Hernández, Aldo

    2013-04-01

    The possible influence of accelerated winds on air-water momentum fluxes is being studied through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Wind stress over the water surface, waves and surface drift are measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. While momentum fluxes are estimated directly through the eddy correlation method in a station about the middle of the tank, they provide information corresponding to rather short non-dimensional fetch not previously reported. Wave evolution along the tank is determined through a series of wave gauges, and the wind-induced surface drift is obtained at one of the first measuring stations at the beginning of the tank. At each experimental run very low wind was on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0. Data from the constant high winds provided us with reference equilibrium conditions for at least 3 different wind speed. We, nevertheless, focus in the recordings while wind was being constantly accelerated expecting some contribution to the understanding of gustiness, the implied wind wave growth and the onset of surface drift. Wind-wave growth is observed to lag behind the wind stress signal, and furthermore, a two regime wind stress is noticed, apparently well correlated with a) the incipient growth and appearance of the first waves and b) the arrival of waves from the up-wind section of the tank. Results of non-dimensional wave energy as a function of non-dimensional fetch represent an extension of at least 2 decades shorter non-dimensional fetch to the wave growth curves typically found in the literature. The linear tendency of wave growth compares very well only when wind is reaching its maximum, while during the accelerated wind

  19. Offshore Measurement System for Wave Power—Using Current Loop Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liselotte Ulvgård

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and testing of a measurement system for wave power generators. The work is part of a project to build a robust and cheap measurement system for offshore monitoring of wave power farms. Due to the harsh offshore environment, low accessibility and high cost for installation and maintenance, it is of key importance to minimize power consumption, complexity and cost of each measurement unit. For the first prototype, the objective was to measure voltage, current and translator position inside the linear wave power generator. For this, two printed circuit boards (PCBs were developed, using a two wire current loop transmitter setup. They were tested separately and in a three phase setup inside a wave power generator during onshore tests. To ensure stability, speed and accuracy in the signal transfer, the PCBs were tested for linearity, frequency response and step response. In addition, power consumption was measured, for operational time evaluation. Results show good agreement between expected and measured performance, with an input range of ±1560 V and ±420 A for alternating current measurements and a bandwidth of 10 kHz and 7 kHz, for voltage and current measurements, respectively. The power consumption was measured to 0.5 W for each measurement unit, at 24 V feed.

  20. Measurement of elastic constants by simultaneously sensing longitudinal and shear waves as an overlapped signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ho Geon; Song, Dong Gi; Jhang, Kyoung Young [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Measurement of elastic constants is crucial for engineering aspects of predicting the behavior of materials under load as well as structural health monitoring of material degradation. Ultrasonic velocity measurement for material properties has been broadly used as a nondestructive evaluation method for material characterization. In particular, pulse-echo method has been extensively utilized as it is not only simple but also effective when only one side of the inspected objects is accessible. However, the conventional technique in this approach measures longitudinal and shear waves individually to obtain their velocities. This produces a set of two data for each measurement. This paper proposes a simultaneous sensing system of longitudinal waves and shear waves for elastic constant measurement. The proposed system senses both these waves simultaneously as a single overlapped signal, which is then analyzed to calculate both the ultrasonic velocities for obtaining elastic constants. Therefore, this system requires just half the number of data to obtain elastic constants compared to the conventional individual measurement. The results of the proposed simultaneous measurement had smaller standard deviations than those in the individual measurement. These results validate that the proposed approach improves the efficiency and reliability of ultrasonic elastic constant measurement by reducing the complexity of the measurement system, its operating procedures, and the number of data.

  1. PROGRESS OF ACOUSTIC WAVE TECHNIQUE AND ITS APPLICATION IN UNDERGROUND PRESSURE MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周楚良; 李新元; 张晓龙

    1994-01-01

    This paper carries out the experiment study on the correlation between full stress-strain process of rock samples and the acoustic parameter change of rock by using the measurement system of KS acoustic wave data processing device. On the spot, the stability of surrounding rock is studied by means of experiments on the relationship between the change process (from elastic to plastic failure zone) in surrounding rock of roadway and the change law of acoustic parameters of rock. These acoustic parameters include wave amplitude, spectral amplitude, spectrum area, spectral density, wave velocity and attenuation coefficient etc.

  2. A Study on Parametric Wave Estimation Based on Measured Ship Motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Iseki, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The paper studies parametric wave estimation based on the ‘wave buoy analogy’, and data and results obtained from the training ship Shioji-maru are compared with estimates of the sea states obtained from other measurements and observations. Furthermore, the estimating characteristics of the param......The paper studies parametric wave estimation based on the ‘wave buoy analogy’, and data and results obtained from the training ship Shioji-maru are compared with estimates of the sea states obtained from other measurements and observations. Furthermore, the estimating characteristics...... of the parametric model are discussed by considering the results of a similar estimation concept based on Bayesian modelling. The purpose of the latter comparison is not to favour the one estimation approach to the other but rather to highlight some of the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches....

  3. Study of Windows Effects for Shock Wave Temperature Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. D. Turley, G. Stevens, L. Veeser, D. Holtkamp, A. Seifter

    2011-05-25

    Temperature measurements of shocked plutonium are needed for improved understanding of its equation of state (EOS) and will enable better understanding and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapon stockpile.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Wave-Induced Ship Hydroelastic Vibrations by Large-Scale Model Measurement in Coastal Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialong Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ship hydroelastic vibration is an issue involving mutual interactions among inertial, hydrodynamic, and elastic forces. The conventional laboratory tests for wave-induced hydroelastic vibrations of ships are performed in tank conditions. An alternative approach to the conventional laboratory basin measurement, proposed in this paper, is to perform tests by large-scale model measurement in real sea waves. In order to perform this kind of novel experimental measurement, a large-scale free running model and the experiment scheme are proposed and introduced. The proposed testing methodology is quite general and applicable to a wide range of ship hydrodynamic experimental research. The testing procedure is presented by illustrating a 5-hour voyage trial of the large-scale model carried out at Huludao harbor of China in August 2015. Hammer tests were performed to identify the natural frequencies of the ship model at the beginning of the tests. Then a series of tests under different sailing conditions were carried out to investigate the vibrational characteristics of the model. As a postvoyage analysis, load, pressure, acceleration, and motion responses of the model are studied with respect to different time durations based on the measured data.

  5. Experimental study of mountain lee—waves by means of satellite photographs and aircraft measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Cruette, Denise

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a summary of a Ph.D. Thesis1 which was a systematic study of the influence of various meteorological factors on the occurrence and characteristics of mountain waves, more specifically of lee-waves of great horizontal extent. The data used are, beside classical meteorological informations, that given by satellite pictures completed by quasi-simultaneous measurements from planes or gliders. The analysis of many satellite pictures received at the french station of Lannion (Brittany...

  6. Linear theory and measurements of electron oscillations in an inertial Alfvén wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, J. W. R.; Skiff, F.; Howes, G. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Carter, T. A.; Dorfman, S.

    2017-03-01

    The physics of the aurora is one of the foremost unsolved problems of space physics. The mechanisms responsible for accelerating electrons that precipitate onto the ionosphere are not fully understood. For more than three decades, particle interactions with inertial Alfvén waves have been proposed as a possible means for accelerating electrons and generating auroras. Inertial Alfvén waves have an electric field aligned with the background magnetic field that is expected to cause electron oscillations as well as electron acceleration. Due to the limitations of spacecraft conjunction studies and other multi-spacecraft approaches, it is unlikely that it will ever be possible, through spacecraft observations alone, to confirm definitively these fundamental properties of the inertial Alfvén wave by making simultaneous measurements of both the perturbed electron distribution function and the Alfvén wave responsible for the perturbations. In this laboratory experiment, the suprathermal tails of the reduced electron distribution function parallel to the mean magnetic field are measured with high precision as inertial Alfvén waves simultaneously propagate through the plasma. The results of this experiment identify, for the first time, the oscillations of suprathermal electrons associated with an inertial Alfvén wave. Despite complications due to boundary conditions and the finite size of the experiment, a linear model is produced that replicates the measured response of the electron distribution function. These results verify one of the fundamental properties of the inertial Alfvén wave, and they are also a prerequisite for future attempts to measure the acceleration of electrons by inertial Alfvén waves.

  7. Measurements of Ocean Surface Turbulence and Wave-Turbulence Interactions (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-19

    SUBTITLE Measurements of ocean surface turbulence and wave-turbulence interactions 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...corrects the directional spreading caused by the conventional MLM technique (Isobe et al., 1984, Capon, 1969), and the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM, Lygre...5245-5248 (1998). Isobe, M., Kondo, K. & Horikawa, K. Extension of MLM for estimating directional wave spec- trum. Symposium on description and

  8. Measuring the correlation of two optical frequencies using four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthur, Aravind P; Watts, Regan T; Huynh, Tam N; Venkitesh, Deepa; Barry, Liam P

    2014-11-10

    We use the physics of four-wave mixing to study the decorrelation of two optical frequencies as they propagate through different fiber delays. The phase noise relationship between the four-wave mixing components is used to quantify and measure the correlation between the two optical frequencies using the correlation coefficient. We show the difference in the evolution of decorrelation between frequency-dependent and frequency-independent components of phase noise.

  9. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  10. "Measuring the Magnetic-Field Strength of the Quiet Solar Corona Using ""EIT Waves"""

    OpenAIRE

    Long, David M.; David R Williams; Régnier, Stéphane; Harra, Louise K.

    2013-01-01

    Variations in the propagation of globally-propagating disturbances (commonly called "EIT waves") through the low solar corona offer a unique opportunity to probe the plasma parameters of the solar atmosphere. Here, high-cadence observations of two "EIT wave" events taken using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are combined with spectroscopic measurements from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) onboard the Hinode spac...

  11. A method of determining dominant wave direction from multipara-meter hydrological gauge measurements and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng'an; LONG Xiaomin; ZHANG Keben; CHEN Junchang; ZHANG Wenjing; CAI Shuqun

    2007-01-01

    Multi-parameter hydrological gauge is an instrument developed by the South China Sea Institute of Oceanology,the Chinese Academy of Sciences to make simultaneous observation of current, wave, tide, water temperature and conductivity.By using the well-known "PUV method", the directional wave spectrum can be calculated and the dominant wave direction is then obtained.The comparison of the dominant wave directions derived from the measurements using both the multi-parameter hydrological gauge and the MARK Ⅱ "Wave-Rider" directional buoy shows that the dominant wave directions derived from the two kinds of measurements are in good agreement.

  12. Measurement and simulation of ICRF wave intensity with a recalibrated phase contrast imaging diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujii, N., E-mail: tsujii@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Green, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, California (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are one of the major tools to heat fusion plasmas. Full-wave simulations are essential to predict the wave propagation and absorption quantitatively, and it is important that these codes be validated against actual experimental measurements. In this work, the absolute intensity of the ICRF waves previously measured with a phase contrast imaging diagnostic was recalibrated and compared once more with full-wave predictions. In the earlier work, significant discrepancies were found between the measured and the simulated mode converted wave intensity [N. Tsujii et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082508]. With the new calibration of the detector array, the measured mode converted wave intensity is now in much better agreement with the full-wave predictions. The agreement is especially good for comparisons performed close to the antenna.

  13. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  14. The ANGWIN Antarctic Research Program: First Results on Coordinated Trans-Antarctic Gravity Wave Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. J.; Pautet, P. D.; Zhao, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Ejiri, M. K.; Murphy, D. J.; Moffat-Griffin, T.; Kavanagh, A. J.; Takahashi, H.; Wrasse, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    ANGWIN (ANrctic Gravity Wave Instrument Network) is a new "scientist driven" research program designed to develop and utilize a network of Antarctic atmospheric gravity wave observatories, operated by different nations working together in a spirit of close scientific collaboration. Our research plan has brought together colleagues from several international institutions, all with a common goal to better understand the large "continental-scale" characteristics and impacts of gravity waves on the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) environment over Antarctica. ANGWIN combines complementary measurements obtained using new and existing aeronomy instrumentation with new modeling capabilities. To date, our activities have focused on developing coordinated airglow image data of gravity waves in the MLT region at the following sites: McMurdo (US), Syowa (Japan), Davis (Australia), Halley (UK), Rothera (UK), and Comandante Ferraz (Brazil). These are all well-established international research stations that are uniformly distributed around the continental perimeter, and together with ongoing measurements at South Pole Station they provide unprecedented coverage of the Antarctic gravity wave field and its variability during the extended polar winter season. This presentation introduces the ANGWIN program and research goals, and presents first results on trans-Antarctic wave propagation using coordinated measurements during the winter season 2011. We also discuss future plans for the development of this exciting program for Antarctic research.

  15. Measurement of the bending wave power flow by the structural intensity technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linjama, Jukka; Lahti, Tapio

    1989-02-01

    Literature on the theory of bending waves and power flow, measurement of the structural intensity, and its applications to machinery and buildings is reviewed. Based on intensity measurement equations, a set of frequency domain expressions is derived for bending wave intensity measurements in a beam. A practical procedure for the general 4-transducer method is developed, using the sequential 1-transducer frequency response technique. Expressions for the determination of the force- and moment-related power components separately are derived. In laboratory experiments the power carried by bending waves was measured in a simple beam, and the developed configurations were tested and compared. The frequency response approach to detect the total power flow is shown to work well. The estimation of the force- and moment-related power components, both in the near and the far field, was also demonstrated.

  16. The measurement of capillary waves on a weldpool formed by a Nd:YAG laser

    CERN Document Server

    Deam, R T; Harris, J

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were performed using an on-line pyrometer to measure the capillary waves on a weldpool formed by a Nd: YAG laser. The surface temperature measurements taken from the weldpool revealed strong temporal fluctuations. Fourier transform of the pyrometer data revealed distinct peaks, consistent with calculated resonant frequencies for capillary surface waves on the weldpool formed by the laser. The possibility of using on-line measurement of surface temperature fluctuations to control weldpool depth in laser welds is discussed. The work forms part of an on-going programme to develop closed loop control for laser processing at Swinburne University

  17. Spatially Homogeneous Entanglement for Matter-Wave Interferometry Created with Time-Averaged Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Kevin C; Wu, Baochen; Thompson, James K

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to generate spatially homogeneous entangled, spin-squeezed states of atoms appropriate for maintaining a large amount of squeezing even after release into the arm of a matter-wave interferometer or other free space quantum sensor. Using an effective intracavity dipole trap, we allow atoms to move along the cavity axis and time average their coupling to the standing wave used to generate entanglement via collective measurements, demonstrating 11(1) dB of directly observed spin squeezing. Our results show that time averaging in collective measurements can greatly reduce the impact of spatially inhomogeneous coupling to the measurement apparatus.

  18. Correlation coefficient measurement of the mode-locked laser tones using four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthur, Aravind P; Panapakkam, Vivek; Vujicic, Vidak; Merghem, Kamel; Lelarge, Francois; Ramdane, Abderrahim; Barry, Liam P

    2016-06-01

    We use four-wave mixing to measure the correlation coefficient of comb tones in a quantum-dash mode-locked laser under passive and active locked regimes. We study the uncertainty in the measurement of the correlation coefficient of the proposed method.

  19. Measurements on the SPS 200 MHz Travelling Wave Cavity towards an Impedance Model

    CERN Document Server

    Roggen, Toon; Caspers, Fritz; Vollinger, Christine; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This note discusses the contribution of the SPS 200 MHz TWC (Travelling Wave Cavity) to the SPS longitudinal impedance model. The measurement method and setup is briefly explained and a comparison with simulations is discussed for both the fundamental pass band (FPB) as well as the Higher Order Modes (HOMs). In addition a number of improvements to the measurement setup are discussed.

  20. Measurements of Intrinsic Ion Bernstein Waves in a Tokamak by Collective Thomson Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Stejner Pedersen, Morten; Bindslev, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter we report measurements of collective Thomson scattering (CTS) spectra with clear signatures of ion Bernstein waves and ion cyclotron motion in tokamak plasmas. The measured spectra are in accordance with theoretical predictions and show clear sensitivity to variation in the density...

  1. Measurements of Electric Field in a Nanosecond Pulse Discharge by 4-WAVE Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratte, Edmond; Adamovich, Igor V.; Simeni Simeni, Marien; Frederickson, Kraig

    2017-06-01

    Picosecond four-wave mixing is used to measure temporally and Picosecond four-wave mixing is used to measure temporally and spatially resolved electric field in a nanosecond pulse dielectric discharge sustained in room air and in an atmospheric pressure hydrogen diffusion flame. Measurements of the electric field, and more precisely the reduced electric field (E/N) in the plasma is critical for determination rate coefficients of electron impact processes in the plasma, as well as for quantifying energy partition in the electric discharge among different molecular energy modes. The four-wave mixing measurements are performed using a collinear phase matching geometry, with nitrogen used as the probe species, at temporal resolution of about 2 ns . Absolute calibration is performed by measurement of a known electrostatic electric field. In the present experiments, the discharge is sustained between two stainless steel plate electrodes, each placed in a quartz sleeve, which greatly improves plasma uniformity. Our previous measurements of electric field in a nanosecond pulse dielectric barrier discharge by picosecond 4-wave mixing have been done in air at room temperature, in a discharge sustained between a razor edge high-voltage electrode and a plane grounded electrode (a quartz plate or a layer of distilled water). Electric field measurements in a flame, which is a high-temperature environment, are more challenging because the four-wave mixing signal is proportional to the to square root of the difference betwen the populations of N2 ground vibrational level (v=0) and first excited vibrational level (v=1). At high temperatures, the total number density is reduced, thus reducing absolute vibrational level populations of N2. Also, the signal is reduced further due to a wider distribution of N2 molecules over multiple rotational levels at higher temperatures, while the present four-wave mixing diagnostics is using spectrally narrow output of a ps laser and a high

  2. S-wave velocity measurements applied to the seismic microzonation of Basel, Upper Rhine Graben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenith, Hans-Balder; Fäh, Donat; Polom, Ulrich; Roullé, Agathe

    2007-07-01

    An extensive S-wave velocity survey had been carried out in the frame of a recent seismic microzonation study of Basel and the border areas between Switzerland, France and Germany. The aim was to better constrain the seismic amplification potential of the surface layers. The survey included single station (H/V spectral ratios) and ambient vibration array measurements carried out by the Swiss team, as well as active S-wave velocity measurements performed by the German and French partners. This paper is focused on the application of the array technique, which consists in recording ambient vibrations with a number of seismological stations. Several practical aspects related to the field measurements are outlined. The signal processing aims to determine the dispersion curves of surface waves contained in the ambient vibrations. The inversion of the dispersion curve provides a 1-D S-wave velocity model for the investigated site down to a depth related to the size of the array. Since the size of arrays is theoretically not limited, arrays are known to be well adapted for investigations in deep sediment basins, such as the Upper Rhine Graben including the area of the city of Basel. In this region, 27 array measurements with varying station configurations have been carried out to determine the S-wave velocity properties of the geological layers down to a depth of 100-250 m. For eight sites, the outputs of the array measurements have been compared with the results of the other investigations using active sources, the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) and S-wave reflection seismics. Borehole information available for a few sites could be used to calibrate the geophysical measurements. By this comparison, the advantages and disadvantages of the array method and the other techniques are outlined with regard to the effectiveness of the methods and the required investigation depth. The dispersion curves measured with the arrays and the SASW technique were also combined

  3. In vivo noninvasive method for measuring local wave velocity in femoral arteries of pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Kinnick, Randall; Pislaru, Cristina; Fatemi, Mostafa; Greenleaf, James

    2005-09-01

    We have proposed generating a bending wave in the arterial wall using ultrasound radiation force and measuring the wave velocity along the arterial wall [Zhang et al., IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 52, 642-652 (2005)]. Here, we report the results of in vivo studies on pigs. The pig was anesthetized, and a micromanometer tip catheter was inserted into the femoral artery to measure luminal pressure. A water bath was created on the animal's groin to allow unimpeded access of the ultrasound beams to the femoral artery. The femoral artery was first located using a 13-MHz linear-array transducer. Then, a vibro-acoustography image was obtained to ensure precise positioning of the excitation force relative to the artery. The artery was excited by the force transducer and the resulting vibration of the arterial wall was measured by a sensing Doppler transceiver. Measured wave velocity was 3.1 m/s at 300 Hz. With this new method wave velocity over a distance of 5 mm, and therefore stiffness of arteries, can be measured locally and non-invasively. Measurement time is short in a few tens of milliseconds, which allows pressure dependence and pharmacological effect on the wall properties to be measured at different cardiac times.

  4. Propagation of Nonlinear Waves in Waveguides and Application to Nondestructive Stress Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucera, Claudio

    Propagation of nonlinear waves in waveguides is a field that has received an ever increasing interest in the last few decades. Nonlinear guided waves are excellent candidates for interrogating long waveguide like structures because they combine high sensitivity to structural conditions, typical of nonlinear parameters, with large inspection ranges, characteristic of wave propagation in bounded media. The primary topic of this dissertation is the analysis of ultrasonic waves, including ultrasonic guided waves, propagating in their nonlinear regime and their application to structural health monitoring problems, particularly the measurement of thermal stress in Continuous Welded Rail (CWR). Following an overview of basic physical principles generating nonlinearities in ultrasonic wave propagation, the case of higher-harmonic generation in multi-mode and dispersive guided waves is examined in more detail. A numerical framework is developed in order to predict favorable higher-order generation conditions (i.e. specific guided modes and frequencies) for waveguides of arbitrary cross-sections. This model is applied to various benchmark cases of complex structures. The nonlinear wave propagation model is then applied to the case of a constrained railroad track (CWR) subjected to thermal variations. This study is a direct response to the key need within the railroad transportation community to develop a technique able to measure thermal stresses in CWR, or determine the rail temperature corresponding to a null thermal stress (Neutral Temperature -- NT). The numerical simulation phase concludes with a numerical study performed using ABAQUS commercial finite element package. These analyses were crucial in predicting the evolution of the nonlinear parameter beta with thermal stress level acting in the rail. A novel physical model, based on interatomic potential, was developed to explain the origin of nonlinear wave propagation under constrained thermal expansion. In fact

  5. Scanning laser vibrometer measurement of guided waves in rails

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 25.72 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.03 3 33.99 0.11 0.06 0.11 0.07 4 35.71 0.52 0.31 0.51 0.31 5 40.51 0.19 0.39 0.19 0.39 6 42.79 0.25 0.18 0.25 0.19 7 43.18 0.50 0.48 0.50 0.48 8 46.60 0.28 0.45 0.29 0.44 9 54.84 0.05 0.08 0.05 0.08 10 56.53 0.25 0.11 0... to measure these modes using only 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 x 10-9 Point Numer Ab s. Di sp la ce m en t ( m ) E = 200 GPa Measured Extracted 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2...

  6. Wave kinematics and response of slender offshore structures. Vol 3: Description of measuring systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riber, H.J.

    1999-08-01

    The report presents the measuring systems used during the measurements in the North Sea at the Tyra field. The report consists of two parts: (1) Description of the wave measuring systems (WMS); (2) Description of the load mesuring system (LMS). The developed Wave Kinematics Measuring Systems (WMS) is an acoustic system based on the pulsed incoherent Doppler technique. Basically it consists of 4 sonar stations and a control and monitoring station. The sonar stations are positioned at the seabed north of the TCP-A platform in a star configuration with one station surrounded by the other three stations in a fixed distance of 37 m. From the central sonar stations an umbilical is routed to the TCP-A platform where the control and monitoring stations is positioned in the satellite communication room. The measurement periods have been concentrated to periods with storms. It was a special emphasis to measure the wave kinematics of extremely high waves. The LMS is described in terms of geometrical data, structural properties, instrumentation, and other characteristics. (LN)

  7. Improved analysis of all-sky meteor radar measurements of gravity wave variances and momentum fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Andrioli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of using a composite day analysis for all-sky interferometric meteor radars when measuring mean winds and tides are widely known. On the other hand, problems arise if this technique is applied to Hocking's (2005 gravity wave analysis for all-sky meteor radars. In this paper we describe how a simple change in the procedure makes it possible to use a composite day in Hocking's analysis. Also, we explain how a modified composite day can be constructed to test its ability to measure gravity wave momentum fluxes. Test results for specified mean, tidal, and gravity wave fields, including tidal amplitudes and gravity wave momentum fluxes varying strongly with altitude and/or time, suggest that the modified composite day allows characterization of monthly mean profiles of the gravity wave momentum fluxes, with good accuracy at least at the altitudes where the meteor counts are large (from 89 to 92.5 km. In the present work we also show that the variances measured with Hocking's method are often contaminated by the tidal fields and suggest a method of empirical correction derived from a simple simulation model. The results presented here greatly increase our confidence because they show that our technique is able to remove the tide-induced false variances from Hocking's analysis.

  8. Numerical Estimation of Incident Wave Parameters Based on the Air Pressure Measurements in Pico OWC Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Crom, I.; Brito-Melo, A.; Newman, F. Sarmento, A. [Wave Energy Centre, Av. Manuel da Maia, 36, r/c D., Lisbon (Portugal)

    2009-07-01

    The present study aims at assessing the key spectral parameters of the incident wave on a fixed oscillating water column (OWC) device, based on the air pressure measurements inside the chamber and on the numerical hydrodynamic coefficients of the device. The methodology is based on the equation of continuity of the air in the time-domain and linear decomposition of the air flow in the usual terms of radiation and diffraction flows. By applying the Fast Fourier Transform, the time-domain equation is transposed to the respective frequency-domain equation. This methodology was applied to the 400 kW OWC power plant, on the Island of Pico, Azores, which has been monitored since 2005 by the Wave Energy Centre. The numerical hydrodynamic coefficients obtained by the 3D radiation-diffraction boundary element code, AQUADYN-OWC, were used in this study. No measurements of the incident wave in front of the plant are available; therefore the results obtained for a set of records are compared with forecast estimations for the site of Pico plant provided by INETI and also with the measurements of two directional wave rider buoys offshore Pico and Terceira islands. These data are provided by the Centre of Climate, Meteorology and Global Changes and propagated via the SWAN spectral wave model to the zone of interest. Final objective is to improve the control of the Pico plant by assessing its performance for a range of sea states.

  9. ‘HANGING TEN’: MEASURING BIG WAVE INTENSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Livingston Potter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The entire world is still feeling the effects of the devastating 2011 Honshu earthquake and tsunami. The Cascadia subduction zone, spanning over 800 miles from Vancouver Island to northern California, is soon expected to complete its 500-year quake cycle with a magnitude 8+ tsunamigenic earthquake. Much attention is being given to planning for this potential disaster and its collateral impacts from landslides, fires, hazardous material spills and infrastructure damages. The devastating impact of future tsunami events in this region and elsewhere, may result in millions of deaths and billions of dollars in damages. Over the years numerous attempts have been made to quantify tsunami severity but none of the devised scales have been completely satisfactory. The present study reviews and discusses the scales of magnitude and intensity that have been developed to describe the severity of tsunami events both qualitatively and quantitatively. Furthermore, it defines a new quantitative scaling measure of tsunami severity which is an improvement over widely reported current scales, by comparing the ‘Top Ten Lists’ of devastating tsunami as calculated by each of the scales.

  10. In-situ measurement of permeability of a porous interface using the ultrasonic slow wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin

    2011-12-01

    Porous materials are an important class of materials. They occur in natural substances such as oil or water bearing rocks, marine sediment, biological tissues (e.g. bones), granular materials and man made materials such as separation membranes, thermal insulators, ceramics and fuel cells. Porous materials have been used in many areas of applied science and engineering. Understanding of porous media plays an important role in areas such as experimental acoustics, geo-mechanics, geophysics, biophysics, material science. Among the number of parameters describing porous materials, the permeability is often the reason the porous structure is of interest. Permeability is a measurement of the ability of a porous material to transmit fluid. At an interface, permeability describes the flow of fluid into or out of a porous media Ultrasound has been widely used for flaw detection and material characterization. Studies show that there are three waves that exist in porous materials: the longitudinal and shear wave that exist in other solid materials and the slow longitudinal wave that only exists in porous materials. This slow longitudinal wave can only be generated and propagated above a critical frequency. Measuring the critical frequency provides information about the intrinsic permeability of a porous interface. This thesis presents a new technique developed for an in-situ permeability measurement using measurement of slow wave. In this work, an exact solution for the critical wave number for the slow wave has been developed and showed suitable for measuring the permeability of porous materials. A computer model of the reflection coefficient at the interface of fluid/porous media has been developed for the acoustic measurement. Ultrasonic experiments confirmed the sensitivity of this technique to changes in permeability and fluid viscosity. A flow cell test has been performed to show one potential industrial application of this technique by showing open pore and closed pore

  11. Measuring the Gouy Phase of Matter Waves using Singular Atom Optics with Spinor BECs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Justin T.; Hansen, Azure; Murphree, Joseph D.; Jayaseelan, Maitreyi; Bigelow, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-01

    The Gouy phase is a propagation-dependent geometric phase found in confined waves as they propagate through a focus. Although it has been observed and studied extensively both in scalar and vector optical beams as well as in electron vortex beams, it has not yet been directly observed in ultracold matter waves. The Schrödinger equation has the same form as the paraxial wave equation from electromagnetism; expansion of a BEC upon release from a trap has the same mathematical form as a beam propagating away from a focus. We employ and extend this analogy between coherent optical beams and coherent matter waves to include spin angular momentum (polarization), which enables us measure the matter wave Gouy phase using coreless vortex spin textures in spinor BECs. Because the Gouy phase is dependent on the orbital angular momentum of the wave, the vortex and core states acquire different Gouy phase shifts. Parameters that are sensitive to the relative phase such as two-dimensional maps of the Stokes parameters rotate during evolution due to this phase difference. Using atom-optic polarimetry we can access the evolution of the atomic Stokes parameters and observe this rotation.

  12. Functional data analytic approach of modeling ECG T-wave shape to measure cardiovascular behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Yingchun; 10.1214/09-AOAS273

    2010-01-01

    The T-wave of an electrocardiogram (ECG) represents the ventricular repolarization that is critical in restoration of the heart muscle to a pre-contractile state prior to the next beat. Alterations in the T-wave reflect various cardiac conditions; and links between abnormal (prolonged) ventricular repolarization and malignant arrhythmias have been documented. Cardiac safety testing prior to approval of any new drug currently relies on two points of the ECG waveform: onset of the Q-wave and termination of the T-wave; and only a few beats are measured. Using functional data analysis, a statistical approach extracts a common shape for each subject (reference curve) from a sequence of beats, and then models the deviation of each curve in the sequence from that reference curve as a four-dimensional vector. The representation can be used to distinguish differences between beats or to model shape changes in a subject's T-wave over time. This model provides physically interpretable parameters characterizing T-wave sh...

  13. Near-surface current meter array measurements of internal gravity waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.B.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    We have developed various processing algorithms used to estimate the wave forms produced by hydrodynamic Internal Waves. Furthermore, the estimated Internal Waves are used to calculate the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) which relates the current and strain rate subsurface fields to surface scattering phenomenon imaged by radar. Following a brief discussion of LLNL`s measurement platform (a 10 sensor current meter array) we described the generation of representative current and strain rate space-time images from measured or simulated data. Then, we present how our simulation capability highlighted limitations in estimating strain rate. These limitations spurred the application of beamforming techniques to enhance our estimates, albeit at the expense of collapsing our space-time images to 1-D estimates. Finally, we discuss progress with regard to processing the current meter array data captured during the recent Loch Linnhe field trials.

  14. Surface-mounted bender elements for measuring horizontal shear wave velocity of soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-guo ZHOU; Yun-min CHEN; Yoshiharu ASAKA; Tohru ABE

    2008-01-01

    The bender element testing features its in-plane directivity,which allows using bender elements to measure the shear wave velocities in a wider range of in-plane configurations besides the standard tip-to-tip alignment.This paper proposed a novel bender element testing technique for measuring the horizontal shear wave velocity of soils,where the bender elements are surface-mounted and the axes of the source and receiver elements are parallel to each other.The preliminary tests performed on model ground of silica sand showed that,by properly determining the travel distance and time of the shear waves,the surface-mounted bender elements can perform as accurately as the conventional "tip-to-tip" configuration.Potentially,the present system provides a promising nondestructive tool for characterizing geomaterials and site conditions both in laboratory and in the fields.

  15. Measurement of Underwater Operational Noise Emitted by Wave and Tidal Stream Energy Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Paul A; Robinson, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    The increasing international growth in the development of marine and freshwater wave and tidal energy harvesting systems has been followed by a growing requirement to understand any associated underwater impact. Radiated noise generated during operation is dependent on the device's physical properties, the sound-propagation environment, and the device's operational state. Physical properties may include size, distribution in the water column, and mechanics/hydrodynamics. The sound-propagation environment may be influenced by water depth, bathymetry, sediment type, and water column acoustic properties, and operational state may be influenced by tidal cycle and wave height among others This paper discusses some of the challenges for measurement of noise characteristics from these devices as well as a case study of the measurement of radiated noise from a full-scale wave energy converter.

  16. Direct numerical experiment on measuring of dispersion relation for gravity waves in the presence of condensate

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    During previous numerical experiments on isotropic turbulence of surface gravity waves we observed formation of the long wave background (condensate). It was shown (Korotkevich, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 101 (7), 074504 (2008)), that presence of the condensate changes a spectrum of direct cascade, corresponding to the flux of energy to the small scales from pumping region (large scales). Recent experiments show that the inverse cascade spectrum is also affected by the condensate. In this case mechanism proposed as a cause for the change of direct cascade spectrum cannot work. But inverse cascade is directly influenced by the linear dispersion relation for waves, as a result direct measurement of the dispersion relation in the presence of condensate is necessary. We performed the measurement of this dispersion relation from the direct numerical experiment. The results demonstrate that in the region of inverse cascade influence of the condensate cannot be neglected.

  17. Temperature dependent E and G measurement of materials using ultrasonic guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Suresh; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2014-02-01

    A novel technique for measuring the moduli of elastic isotropic material as a function of temperature, using ultrasonic guided wave modes is presented here. These techniques can be used for measure the Young's modulus (E) and Shear Modulus (G) of material. Here, the L (0, 1) wave mode is used for measuring E and T(0,1) mode for G. The scope of measurement is made from room temperature to maximum utility temperature of material. In this work, the material is required in the form of a waveguide with an ultrasonic guided wave generator at one end and an embodiment (such as a notch or a bend) at the other end for obtaining reflected signals. The transducer is kept at room temperature while the end (along with the embodiment) is kept inside a heating device such as a temperature controlled furnace. The time of flight difference (δTOF), as a function of temperature, between the guided wave reflections from the embodiment and the end of the waveguide, is used to measure the material properties. The technique is based on the fact that, in addition to elongation of the waveguide, the sound speed in the materials also varies with temperature and is measurable from changes in the time of flight of signals. In addition, the ambient temperature of the waveguide end is measured using a calibrated thermocouple. Several materials were tested and the data was compared with values obtained from literature. For instance, Inconel -690 waveguide with embodiment of a 'L' bend was evaluated from 45°C to 1100°C at a frequency of 0.5 MHz L(0, 1) and T(0, 1) modes. The comparison between the literature values and the measured values were found to be in agreement with a regression correlation factor R=0.999 or better, for both E and G measurements. Advantages of the method over conventional methods of such measurements will also be discussed.

  18. Comparison and error analysis of remotely measured waveheight by high frequency ground wave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    High frequency ground wave radar (HFGWR) has unique advantage in the survey of dynamical factors, such as sea surface current, sea wave, and sea surface wind in marine conditions in coastal sea area.Compared to marine satellite remote sensing, it involves lower cost, has higher measuring accuracy and spatial resolution and sampling frequency. High frequency ground wave radar is a new land based remote sensing instrument with superior vision and greater application potentials. This paper reviews the development history and application status of high frequency wave radar, introduces its remote-sensing principle and method to inverse offshore fluid, and wave and wind field. Based on the author's "863 Project", this paper recounts comparison and verification of radar remote-sensing value, the physical calibration of radar-measured data and methods to control the quality of radar-sensing data. The authors discuss the precision of radar-sensing data's inversing on offshore fluid field and application of the assimilated data on assimilation.

  19. Measuring Tollmien-Schlichting waves using phase-averaged particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, Alexander [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics, Griesheim (Germany); Duchmann, Alexander; Kurz, Armin; Grundmann, Sven [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Center of Smart Interfaces, Griesheim (Germany); Tropea, Cameron [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics, Griesheim (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Center of Smart Interfaces, Griesheim (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    This article addresses the direct experimental measurement of Tollmien-Schlichting waves on a flat plate, when the laminar boundary layer is excited by velocity perturbations; the free stream velocity was 16 m/s, the excitation frequency 250 Hz. The two-dimensional velocity field in proximity of the flat plate was captured using a conventional PIV system; however, the image recording was phase locked with the disturbance source and ensemble averaging was used to obtain characteristics of the Tollmien-Schichting waves. In particular, after subtraction of the mean velocity, the characteristics of the excited waves in terms of streamlines were extracted, revealing that the investigated waves represented velocity deviations with an order of magnitude of 1 % of the undisturbed free stream flow. This study is a prelude to the use of the same technique to visualize the effect of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators on the suppression of such Tollmien-Schlichting waves, which is difficult using other measurement techniques. (orig.)

  20. 0.22 THz wideband sheet electron beam traveling wave tube amplifier: Cold test measurements and beam wave interaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baig, Anisullah; Gamzina, Diana; Barchfeld, Robert; Domier, Calvin; Barnett, Larry R.; Luhmann, Neville C. Jr. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    In this paper, we describe micro-fabrication, RF measurements, and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation modeling analysis of the 0.22 THz double-vane half period staggered traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) circuit. The TWTA slow wave structure comprised of two sections separated by two sever ports loaded by loss material, with integrated broadband input/output couplers. The micro-metallic structures were fabricated using nano-CNC milling and diffusion bonded in a three layer process. The 3D optical microscopy and SEM analysis showed that the fabrication error was within 2-3 {mu}m and surface roughness was measured within 30-50 nm. The RF measurements were conducted with an Agilent PNA-X network analyzer employing WR5.1 T/R modules with a frequency range of 178-228 GHz. The in-band insertion loss (S{sub 21}) for both the short section and long section (separated by a sever) was measured as {approx}-5 dB while the return loss was generally around {approx}-15 dB or better. The measurements matched well with the S-matrix simulation analysis that predicted a 3 dB bandwidth of {approx}45 GHz with an operating frequency at 220 GHz. However, the measured S{sub 21} was {approx}3 dB less than the design values, and is attributed to surface roughness and alignment issues. The confirmation measurements were conducted over the full frequency band up to 270 GHz employing a backward wave oscillator (BWO) scalar network analyzer setup employing a BWO in the frequency range 190 GHz-270 GHz. PIC simulations were conducted for the realistic TWT output power performance analysis with incorporation of corner radius of 127 {mu}m, which is inevitably induced by nano-machining. Furthermore, the S{sub 21} value in both sections of the TWT structure was reduced to correspond to the measurements by using a degraded conductivity of 10% International Annealed Copper Standard. At 220 GHz, for an elliptic sheet electron beam of 20 kV and 0.25 A, the average output power of the tube was predicted

  1. Measurements of upper mantle shear wave anisotropy from a permanent network in southern Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, S.A.C.; Valenzuela, R.W.; Ponce, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Upper mantle shear wave anisotropy under stations in southern Mexico was measured using records of SKS phases. Fast polarization directions where the Cocos plate subducts subhorizontally are oriented in the direction of the relative motion between the Cocos and North American plates, and are trench-

  2. PIV measurements of the bottom boundary layer under nonlinear surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henriquez, M.; Reniers, A. J H M; Ruessink, B. G.; Stive, M. J F

    2014-01-01

    Sediment in the nearshore is largely mobilized in the wave bottom boundary layer (wbbl) hereby emphasizing the importance of this relatively thin layer to nearshore morphology. This paper presents a laboratory experiment where hydrodynamic properties of the wbbl were quantified by measuring flow vel

  3. On measuring surface wave phase velocity from station–station cross-correlation of ambient signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boschi, Lapo; Weemstra, Cornelis; Verbeke, Julie

    2012-01-01

    We apply two different algorithms to measure surface wave phase velocity, as a function of frequency, from seismic ambient noise recorded at pairs of stations from a large European network. The two methods are based on consistent theoretical formulations, but differ in the implementation: one met...

  4. Stiffness matrix determination of composite materials using lamb wave group velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putkis, O.; Croxford, A. J.

    2013-04-01

    The use of Lamb waves in Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is gaining popularity due to their ability to travel long distances without significant attenuation, therefore offering large area inspections with a small number of sensors. The design of a Lamb-wave-based NDE/SHM system for composite materials is more complicated than for metallic materials due to the directional dependence of Lamb wave propagation characteristics such as dispersion and group velocity. Propagation parameters can be theoretically predicted from known material properties, specifically the stiffness matrix and density. However, in practice it is difficult to obtain the stiffness matrix of a particular material or structure with high accuracy, hence introducing errors in theoretical predictions and inaccuracies in the resulting propagation parameters. Measured Lamb wave phase velocities can be used to infer the stiffness matrix, but the measurements are limited to the principal directions due to the steering effect (different propagation directions of phase and corresponding group velocities). This paper proposes determination of the stiffness matrix from the measured group velocities, which can be unambiguously measured in any direction. A highly anisotropic carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer plate is chosen for the study. The influence of different stiffness matrix elements on the directional group velocity profile is investigated. Thermodynamic Simulated Annealing (TSA) is used as a tool for inverse, multi variable inference of the stiffness matrix. A good estimation is achieved for particular matrix elements.

  5. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  6. Full-scale field measurements of wave kinematics and vortex shedding induced vibrations in slender structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, J.R.; Pedersen, B. [LIC Engineering (Denmark); Nielsen, K.G.; Bryndum, M.B. [Dansk Hydraulisk Inst., (Denmark)

    1999-07-01

    Vortex induced vibrations of pipes generated by high and steep waves in the crest zone have been investigated by full-scale field testing, An instrumented cylinder has been suspended from a platform bridge in the North Sea. Adjacent to it a newly developed acoustic system capable of measuring the three dimensional wave kinematics was placed. The kinematics were measured all the way up to the instantaneous water surface elevation, i.e. it included the wave crest. The paper presents time series of measured water surface elevations and orbital velocities at the instantaneous water surface together with the response of the instrumented pipe in a storm. The sea state was measured to H{sub s} {approx_equal} 6.4 m and T{sub z} = 8.4 sec. It was clearly seen that vortex shedding locking-on takes place in some of the rather high modes at the passage of large waves. Intermittent cross flow vortex induced vibrations of between 0.3 diameters up to 0.8 diameters were found in the 8th and the 4th mode respectively. The Reynolds numbers and KC numbers were up to 5 . 10{sup 5} and KC {approx} 250 respectively. (au)

  7. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  8. Spatial averaging-effects on turbulence measured by a continuous-wave coherent lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Mikkelsen, Torben; Mann, Jakob;

    2009-01-01

    The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused continuous-wave coherent Doppler lidar on observed wind turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer is described and analysed. For the first time, comparisons of lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra simultaneously obtained from a mast...

  9. Measurements of upper mantle shear wave anisotropy from a permanent network in southern Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, S.A.C.; Valenzuela, R.W.; Ponce, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Upper mantle shear wave anisotropy under stations in southern Mexico was measured using records of SKS phases. Fast polarization directions where the Cocos plate subducts subhorizontally are oriented in the direction of the relative motion between the Cocos and North American plates, and are

  10. Measurement of scaling laws for shock waves in thermal nonlocal media

    CERN Document Server

    Ghofraniha, N; Folli, V; Trillo, S; DelRe, E; Conti, C

    2012-01-01

    We are able to detect the details of spatial optical collisionless wave-breaking through the high aperture imaging of a beam suffering shock in a fluorescent nonlinear nonlocal thermal medium. This allows us to directly measure how nonlocality and nonlinearity affect the point of shock formation and compare results with numerical simulations.

  11. A Comparative Study on Three Different Transducers for the Measurement of Nonlinear Solitary Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piervincenzo Rizzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade there has been an increasing interest in the use of highly- and weakly- nonlinear solitary waves in engineering and physics. Nonlinear solitary waves can form and travel in nonlinear systems such as one-dimensional chains of particles, where they are conventionally generated by the mechanical impact of a striker and are measured either by using thin transducers embedded in between two half-particles or by a force sensor placed at the chain’s base. These waves have a constant spatial wavelength and their speed, amplitude, and duration can be tuned by modifying the particles’ material or size, or the velocity of the striker. In this paper we propose two alternative sensing configurations for the measurements of solitary waves propagating in a chain of spherical particles. One configuration uses piezo rods placed in the chain while the other exploits the magnetostrictive property of ferromagnetic materials. The accuracy of these two sensing systems on the measurement of the solitary wave’s characteristics is assessed by comparing experimental data to the numerical prediction of a discrete particle model and to the experimental measurements obtained by means of a conventional transducer. The results show very good agreement and the advantages and limitations of the new sensors are discussed.

  12. Comparative experimental study on several methods for measuring elastic wave velocities in rocks at high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Hongsen(谢鸿森); ZHOU; Wenge; 周文戈); LIU; Yonggang; (刘永刚); GUO; Jie; (郭捷); HOU; Wei; (侯渭); ZHAO; Zhidan(赵志丹)

    2002-01-01

    To measure elastic wave velocities in rocks at high temperature and high pressure is an important way to acquire the mechanics and thermodynamics data of rocks in the earth's interior and also a substantial approach to studying the structure and composition of materials there. In recent years, a rapid progress has been made in methodology pertaining to the measurements of elastic wave velocities in rocks at high temperature and high pressure with solids as the pressure-transfer media. However, no strict comparisons have been made of the elastic wave velocity data of rocks measured at high temperature and high pressure by various laboratories. In order to compare the experimental results from various laboratories, we have conducted a comparative experimental study on three measuring methods and made a strict comparison with the results obtained by using the transmission method with fluid as the pressure-transfer medium. Our experimental results have shown that the measurements obtained by the three methods are comparable in the pressure ranges of their application. The cubic sample pulse transmission method used by Kern is applicable to measuring elastic wave velocities in crustal rocks at lower temperature and lower pressure. The prism sample pulse reflection-transmission method has some advantages in pressure range, heating temperature and measuring precision. Although the measurements obtained under relatively low pressure conditions by the prism sample pulse transmission method are relatively low in precision, the samples are large in length and their assemblage is simple. So this method is suitable to the experiments that require large quantities of samples and higher pressures. Therefore, in practical application the latter two methods are usually recommended because their measurements can be mutually corrected and supplemented.

  13. Automation of measurement of heights waves around a model ship; Mokeisen mawari no hako keisoku no jidoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikehata, M.; Kato, M.; Yanagida, F. [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Trial fabrication and tests were performed on an instrument to automate measurement of heights of waves around a model ship. The currently used electric wave height measuring instrument takes long time for measurement, hence poor in efficiency. The method for processing optical images also has a problem in accuracy. Therefore, a computer controlled system was structured by using AC servo motors in driving the X and Y axes of a traverse equipment. Equipment was fabricated to automate the wave height measurement, in which four servo type wave height meters are installed on a moving rack in the lateral (Y-axial) direction so that wave heights to be measured by four meters can be measured automatically all at once. Wave heights can be measured continuously by moving the moving rack at a constant speed, verifying that wave shapes in longitudinal cross sections can be acquired by only one towing. Time required in the measurements using the instrument was 40 hours as a net time for fixed point measurement and 12 hours for continuous measurement, or 52 hours in total. On the other hand, the time may reach 240 hours for fixed point measurement when the conventional all-point manual traverse equipment is used. Enormous effects were obtained from automating the instrument. Collection of wave height data will continue also on tankers and other types of ships. 2 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Non-contact measurement of pulse wave velocity using RGB cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazuya; Aoki, Yuta; Satoh, Ryota; Hoshi, Akira; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-03-01

    Non-contact measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) using red, green, and blue (RGB) digital color images is proposed. Generally, PWV is used as the index of arteriosclerosis. In our method, changes in blood volume are calculated based on changes in the color information, and is estimated by combining multiple regression analysis (MRA) with a Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) model of the transit of light in human skin. After two pulse waves of human skins were measured using RGB cameras, and the PWV was calculated from the difference of the pulse transit time and the distance between two measurement points. The measured forehead-finger PWV (ffPWV) was on the order of m/s and became faster as the values of vital signs raised. These results demonstrated the feasibility of this method.

  15. Measurement and fitting techniques for the assessment of material nonlinearity using nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torello, David [GW Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech (United States); Kim, Jin-Yeon [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Tech (United States); Qu, Jianmin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University (United States); Jacobs, Laurence J. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Tech and GW Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This research considers the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and the nonlinearity of generating sources on measurements of nonlinear ultrasonic Rayleigh wave propagation. A new theoretical framework for correcting measurements made with air-coupled and contact piezoelectric receivers for the aforementioned effects is provided based on analytical models and experimental considerations. A method for extracting the nonlinearity parameter β{sub 11} is proposed based on a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm that is tailored for Rayleigh wave measurements. Quantitative experiments are conducted to confirm the predictions for the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric source and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the curve-fitting procedure. These experiments are conducted on aluminum 2024 and 7075 specimens and a β{sub 11}{sup 7075}/β{sub 11}{sup 2024} measure of 1.363 agrees well with previous literature and earlier work.

  16. Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-off of an HMX Based Explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2001-05-09

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  17. Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-Off of an HMX Based High Explosive PBX 9501

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, F; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2001-05-31

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  18. Pressure wave measurements from thermal cook-off of an HMX based high explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2000-10-10

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  19. Electronically swept millimeter-wave interferometer for spatially resolved measurement of plasma electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John; Oliver, David

    2006-12-01

    We report the development and initial implementation of what we believe to be a new rapid- spatial-scan millimeter-wave interferometer for plasma density measurements. The fast scan is effected by electronic frequency sweeping of a wideband (180-280 GHz) backward-wave oscillator whose output is focused onto a fixed blazed diffraction grating. The system, which augments the rotating-grating scanned multiview H-1 heliac interferometer, can sweep the plasma cross section in a period of less than 1 ms with a beam diameter in the plasma of 20 mm and phase noise of the order of 0.01 rad.

  20. On Mass Loading and Dissipation Measured with Acoustic Wave Sensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Voinova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize current trends in the analysis of physical properties (surface mass density, viscosity, elasticity, friction, and charge of various thin films measured with a solid-state sensor oscillating in a gaseous or liquid environment. We cover three different types of mechanically oscillating sensors: the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring, surface acoustic wave (SAW, resonators and magnetoelastic sensors (MESs. The fourth class of novel acoustic wave (AW mass sensors, namely thin-film bulk acoustic resonators (TFBARs on vibrating membranes is discussed in brief. The paper contains a survey of theoretical results and practical applications of the sensors and includes a comprehensive bibliography.

  1. Wave-current interactions in deep water conditions: field measurements and analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, Gilles; Rey, Vincent; Molcard, Anne

    2015-04-01

    The study of wave - current interaction has drawn interest in oceanography, ocean engineering, maritime navigation and for tides or waves power device design. In the context of the hydrodynamics study along the French Mediterranean coast, a current profiler was deployed near Toulon at the south of the "Port Cros" island. This coastal zone is characterized by a steep slope, the water depth varying from tens meters to several thousand meters over few kilometers from the coast. An ambient current, the "Northern Current", coming from the Ligurian sea (area of Genoa, Italy) and following the coast up to Toulon, is present all over the year. Its mean surface velocity is of about 0.30 m/s, its flow rate of about 1.5 Sv. The region is exposed to two dominating winds: the Mistral, coming from North-West, and Eastern winds. Both generate swell and/or wind waves in either following or opposing current conditions with respect to the Northern Current. A current profiler equipped with a wave tracking system (ACPD workhorse from RDI) was deployed from July to October 2014 in deep water conditions (depth of about 500m). The mooring system allowed the ADCP to measure the current profile from the sea surface down to 25m depth, which corresponds more or less to the depth of influence of waves of periods up to 10s. The collected data include energetic wave conditions in either following or opposing current conditions. The current intensity and its vertical profiles have shown a significant temporal variability according to the meteorological conditions. Effects of the wave conditions on the current properties are discussed. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was supported by the program BOMBYX and the ANR grant No ANR-13-ASTR-0007.

  2. Monitoring and analysis of thermal deformation waves with a high-speed phase measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lucas; Talghader, Joseph

    2015-10-20

    Thermal effects in optical substrates are vitally important in determining laser damage resistance in long-pulse and continuous-wave laser systems. Thermal deformation waves in a soda-lime-silica glass substrate have been measured using high-speed interferometry during a series of laser pulses incident on the surface. Two-dimensional images of the thermal waves were captured at a rate of up to six frames per thermal event using a quantitative phase measurement method. The system comprised a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, along with a high-speed camera capable of up to 20,000 frames-per-second. The sample was placed in the interferometer and irradiated with 100 ns, 2 kHz Q-switched pulses from a high-power Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. Phase measurements were converted to temperature using known values of thermal expansion and temperature-dependent refractive index for glass. The thermal decay at the center of the thermal wave was fit to a function derived from first principles with excellent agreement. Additionally, the spread of the thermal distribution over time was fit to the same function. Both the temporal decay fit and the spatial fit produced a thermal diffusivity of 5×10-7  m2/s.

  3. Sample Disturbance in Resonant Column Test Measurement of Small-Strain Shear-Wave Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Nicola; Stokoe, K. H.

    The accurate assessment of dynamic soil properties is a crucial step in the solution process of geotechnical earthquake engineering problems. The resonant column test is one of the ordinary procedures for dynamic characterization of soil. In this paper, the impact of sample disturbance on the resonant column test measurement of small-strain S-wave velocity is examined. Sample disturbance is shown to be a function of the ratio of the laboratory to field S-wave velocities: Vs, lab/Vs,field. The influence of four parameters - soil stiffness, soil plasticity index, in-situ sample depth and in-situ effective mean confining pressure - on sample disturbance is investigated both qualitatively and quantitatively. The relative importance of each parameter in predicting the small-strain field S-wave velocity from the resonant column test values is illustrated and predictive equations are presented.

  4. Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deike, Luc; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2014-02-01

    We study experimentally the influence of dissipation on stationary capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a liquid by changing its viscosity. We observe that the frequency power-law scaling of the capillary spectrum departs significantly from its theoretical value when the dissipation is increased. The energy dissipated by capillary waves is also measured and found to increase nonlinearly with the mean power injected within the liquid. Here we propose an experimental estimation of the energy flux at every scale of the capillary cascade. The latter is found to be nonconstant through the scales. For fluids of low enough viscosity, we found that both capillary spectrum scalings with the frequency and the newly defined mean energy flux are in good agreement with wave turbulence theory. The Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant is then experimentally estimated and compared to its theoretical value.

  5. Shock wave velocity measurement in the Al2O3 under ultrahigh pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feng; Peng Xiao-Shi; Liu Shen-Ye; Li Yong-Sheng; Jiang Xiao-Hua; Ding Yong-Kun

    2011-01-01

    In indirect-drive experiment, the blank effect caused by X-rays from Hohlraum will show the dark area in time scale of optical streak camera (OSC). This blank effect, which was a serious problem in indirect-drive shock wave experiments,has been explained by the semiconductor model. The X-rays cause the band to band transition and the probe laser is absorbed by the intraband transition, which leads to a dark region in time scale of the OSC image. In the experiment,the refiectivity of shock wave front was measured to be about 50% at shock wave velocity 32 km/s and was compared to the theoretical calculations with the Drude free electron model. From the experimental data, it is found that the blank effect can be avoided at radiation temperature of 170 eV if the Al layer is thicker than 60 μm.

  6. Measurements of Finite Dust Temperature Effects in the Dispersion Relation of the Dust Acoustic Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, Erica; Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-04-01

    A dusty plasma is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of these charged microparticles gives rise to new plasma wave modes, including the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements [1, 2] of the dispersion relationship for the dust acoustic wave in a glow discharge have shown that finite temperature effects are observed at higher values of neutral pressure. Other work [3] has shown that these effects are not observed at lower values of neutral pressure. We present the results of ongoing work examining finite temperature effects in the dispersion relation as a function of neutral pressure. [4pt] [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [0pt] [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [0pt] [3] T. Trottenberg, D. Block, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 13, 042105 (2006).

  7. Wave system fitting: A new method for force measurements in shock tunnels with long test duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Changtong; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Chun; Jiang, Zonglin

    2015-10-01

    Force measurements in shock tunnels are difficult due to the existence of vibrations excited by a sudden aerodynamic loading. Accelerometer inertia compensation could reduce its negative effect to some extent, but has inherent problems. A new signal decomposition method, wave system fitting (WSF), is proposed to remove vibration waves of low frequency. The WSF is accelerometer-free. It decomposes the balance signal and can separate vibration waves without the influence on the DC component, and it does work no matter the cycle of the sample signal is complete or not. As a standard signal post-processing tool in JF-12, the application results show that it works reliably with high accuracy, and it can also explain puzzling signals encountered in JF-12. WSF method is especially useful and irreplaceable whenever only a few cycles of a periodic signal could be obtained, as is usual for shock tunnels.

  8. Measurements in a container ship of wave-induced hull girder stresses in excess of design values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes full-scale measurements of the wave-induced vertical bending moment amidships a 9400 TEU container carrier and focuses on the effect of the hydro-elastic high-frequency vibration on the extreme hogging wave bending moment. One extreme event, where the vertical wave-induced ho......This paper describes full-scale measurements of the wave-induced vertical bending moment amidships a 9400 TEU container carrier and focuses on the effect of the hydro-elastic high-frequency vibration on the extreme hogging wave bending moment. One extreme event, where the vertical wave......-frequency vibrations caused by impulsive loads are observed to be of the same magnitude as the rigid-body wave-induced response and thus acts to double the total vertical bending moment amidships. It was also found that even though the ship is sailing in bow quartering seas, only the 2-node vertical vibration mode...

  9. Velocity Measurement of Induced Flow by a Laser Focusing Shock Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki HIRAHARA; Masaru FUJINAMI; Masaaki KAWAHASHI

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply the shock wave for control in a micro channel. The shock wave was generated by a laser focusing of pulsed laser beam in the channel. Using a pulse laser to generate a shock wave,a non-stationary flow was induced in the small space between the parallel plates. The spherical and cylindrical shock propagations were observed with schlieren method. The shock Mach number decreases with time and approaches to unity. As reported in the previous investigations, the shock speed was attenuated in a short distance and time. In the present experiment, It was not found a remarkable difference in the shock speed between the spherical and cylindrical shock experiments. Subsequently, the flow induced by the cylindrical shock wave was studied using PIV technique. A smoke tracer was used in the experiment and its velocity was measured within 100 μs. A numerical simulation was carried out to investigate the momentum relaxation between the gas and smoke particle. A suitable shock initiation model was introduced in the simulation. The experimental results show that a wide acceleration and deceleration zone exist behind the shock wave. Also,the relaxation distance in the experimental data is much longer than that in numerical simulation.

  10. Satellite-based RAR performance simulation for measuring directional ocean wave spectrum based on SAR inversion spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Lin; MAO Zhihua; HUANG Haiqing; GONG Fang

    2010-01-01

    Some missions have been carried out to measure wave directional spectrum by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and airborne real aperture radar (RAR) at a low incidence. Both them have their own advantages and limitations. Scientists hope that SAR and satellite-based RAR can complement each other for the research on wave properties in the future. For this study, the authors aim to simulate the satellite-based RAR system to validate performance for measuring the directional wave spectrum. The principal measurements are introduced and the simulation methods based on the one developed by Hauser are adopted and slightly modified. To enhance the authenticity of input spectrum and the wave spectrum measuring consistency for SAR and satellite-based RAR, the wave height spectrum inversed from Envisat ASAR data by cross spectrum technology is used as the input spectrum of the simulation system. In the process of simulation, the sea surface, backscattering signal, modulation spectrum and the estimated wave height spectrum are simulated in each look direction. Directional wave spectrum are measured based on the simulated observations from 0° to 360~. From the estimated wave spectrum, it has an 180° ambiguity like SAR, but it has no special high wave number cut off in all the direction. Finally, the estimated spectrum is compared with the input one in terms of the dominant wave wavelength, direction and SWH and the results are promising. The simulation shows that satellite-based RAR should be capable of measuring the directional wave properties. Moreover, it indicates satellite-based RAR basically can measure waves that SAR can measure.

  11. A two-dimensional Stockwell transform for gravity wave analysis of AIRS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindley, Neil P.; Smith, Nathan D.; Wright, Corwin J.; Rees, D. Andrew S.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.

    2016-06-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play a crucial role in the dynamics of the earth's atmosphere. These waves couple lower, middle and upper atmospheric layers by transporting and depositing energy and momentum from their sources to great heights. The accurate parameterisation of GW momentum flux is of key importance to general circulation models but requires accurate measurement of GW properties, which has proved challenging. For more than a decade, the nadir-viewing Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite has made global, two-dimensional (2-D) measurements of stratospheric radiances in which GWs can be detected. However, one problem with current one-dimensional methods for GW analysis of these data is that they can introduce significant unwanted biases. Here, we present a new analysis method that resolves this problem. Our method uses a 2-D Stockwell transform (2DST) to measure GW amplitudes, horizontal wavelengths and directions of propagation using both the along-track and cross-track dimensions simultaneously. We first test our new method and demonstrate that it can accurately measure GW properties in a specified wave field. We then show that by using a new elliptical spectral window in the 2DST, in place of the traditional Gaussian, we can dramatically improve the recovery of wave amplitude over the standard approach. We then use our improved method to measure GW properties and momentum fluxes in AIRS measurements over two regions known to be intense hotspots of GW activity: (i) the Drake Passage/Antarctic Peninsula and (ii) the isolated mountainous island of South Georgia. The significance of our new 2DST method is that it provides more accurate, unbiased and better localised measurements of key GW properties compared to most current methods. The added flexibility offered by the scaling parameter and our new spectral window presented here extend the usefulness of our 2DST method to other areas of geophysical data analysis and beyond.

  12. Modeling and measurement of angle-beam wave propagation in a scatterer-free plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    Wavefield imaging has been shown to be a powerful tool for improving the understanding and characterization of wave propagation and scattering in plates. The complete measurement of surface displacement over a 2-D grid provided by wavefield imaging has the potential to serve as a useful means of validating ultrasonic models. Here, a preliminary study of ultrasonic angle-beam wave propagation in a scatterer-free plate using a combination of wavefield measurements and 2-D finite element models is described. Both wavefield imaging and finite element analysis are used to study the propagation of waves at a refracted angle of 56.8° propagating in a 6.35 mm thick aluminum plate. Wavefield imaging is performed using a laser vibrometer mounted on an XYZ scanning stage, which is programmed to move point-to-point on a rectilinear grid to acquire waveform data. The commercial finite element software package, PZFlex, which is specifically designed to handle large, complex ultrasonic problems, is used to create a 2-D cross-sectional model of the transducer and plate. For model validation, vertical surface displacements from both the wavefield measurements and the PZFlex finite element model are compared and found to be in excellent agreement. The validated PZFlex model is then used to explain the mechanism of Rayleigh wave generation by the angle-beam wedge. Since the wavefield measurements are restricted to the specimen surface, the cross-sectional PZFlex model is able to provide insights the wavefield data cannot. This study illustrates how information obtained from ultrasonic experiments and modeling results can be combined to improve understanding of angle-beam wave generation and propagation.

  13. Glass-modified stress waves for adhesion measurement of ultra thin films for device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vijay; Kireev, Vassili; Tian, Jun; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Akahoshi, Haruo

    2003-08-01

    Laser-generated stress wave profiles with rarefaction shocks (almost zero post-peak decay times) have been uncovered in different types of glasses and presented in this communication. The rise time of the pulses was found to increase with their amplitude, with values reaching as high as 50 ns. This is in contrast to measurements in other brittle crystalline solids where pulses with rise times of 1 -2 ns and post-peak decay times of 16 -20 ns were recorded. The formation of rarefaction shock is attributed to the increased compressibility of glasses with increasing pressures. This was demonstrated using a one-dimensional nonlinear elastic wave propagation model in which the wave speed was taken as a function of particle velocity. The technological importance of these pulses in measuring the tensile strength of very thin film interfaces is demonstrated by using a previously developed laser spallation experiment in which a laser-generated compressive stress pulse in the substrate reflects into a tensile wave from the free surface of the film and pries off its interface at a threshold amplitude. Because of the rarefaction shock, glass-modified waves allow generation of substantially higher interfacial tensile stress amplitudes compared with those with finite post-peak decay profiles. Thus, for the first time, tensile strengths of very strong and ultra thin film interfaces can be measured. Results presented here indicate that interfaces of 185-nm-thick films, and with strengths as high as 2.7 GPa, can be measured. Thus, an important advance has been made that should allow material optimization of ultra thin layer systems that may form the basis of future MEMS-based microelectronic, mechanical and clinical devices.

  14. 2-D Physical Modeling to Measure the Effectiveness of Perforated Skirt Breakwater for Short-Period Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harman Ajiwibowo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a breakwater can be measured by quantifying the transmission coefficient (KT. The smaller the coefficient, the better the performance of the breakwater. A physical modeling on the proposed breakwater was conducted to identify the coefficient of Perforated Skirt Breakwater (PSB. The PSB model was tested in 2-D wave flume at Ocean Wave Research Laboratory FTSL ITB, to obtain the effectiveness of PSB for short-period waves (prototype periods, Tp= 4 second and smaller. The scaling of PSB models applies the principle of Froude Similarity, where the Froude number in model equals to the Froude number in prototype (Frm=Frp. The flume is equipped with 5 resistance-type wave probes and 8-channel DAS (Data Acquisition System. Wave heights (H and wave periods (T data were observed both manually by visual observation and wave probes readings (processed later with method of “zero mean up-crossing” technique. The incoming wave heights (Hi and transmitted wave heights (Ht were measured and processed to obtain the transmission coefficient (KT. The relationships between KT and non-dimensional variables (skirt draft / incident wave height, S/Hi are analyzed and the calculated effectiveness of the PSB for varied environmental condition is obtained to be up to 70%.Abstract. The effectiveness of a breakwater can be measured by quantifying the transmission coefficient (KT. The smaller the coefficient, the better the performance of the breakwater. A physical modeling on the proposed breakwater was conducted to identify the coefficient of Perforated Skirt Breakwater (PSB. The PSB model was tested in 2-D wave flume at Ocean Wave Research Laboratory FTSL ITB, to obtain the effectiveness of PSB for short-period waves (prototype periods, Tp= 4 second and smaller. The scaling of PSB models applies the principle of Froude Similarity, where the Froude number in model equals to the Froude number in prototype (Frm=Frp. The flume is equipped with 5

  15. Measurement of the environmental broadband electromagnetic waves in a mid-size European city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, R; Gil, I

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the level of exposure to broadband radiofrequency electromagnetic field in a mid-size European city was evaluated in accordance with the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines from 1998. With the aim to analyse all the potential electromagnetic waves present in the city up to 18GHz, a total of 271 locations distributed along Terrassa (Spain) have been measured. To show the results in an easy-to-interpret way by the citizen, the results have been represented in a set of raster maps. The measurement results obtained showed that the electromagnetic wave measured in all broadband frequency range along the city is much lower than the safety level according to the international regulations for both public and occupational sectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Optical measurements of the laser-inducedultrasonic waves on moving objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozar, Tomaz; Gregorcic, Peter; Mozina, Janez

    2009-12-07

    We performed a single-shot, contactless measurement of ultrasonic waves on a laser-propelled rod with a homodyne quadrature laser interferometer (HQLI) during the entire duration of its motion. This is the first such experimental demonstration of the laser-induced motion of an elastic body where the most important mechanisms that reveal the nature of its motion are presented and explained. Furthermore, these measurements quantitatively demonstrate that the HQLI is an appropriate tool for monitoring high-amplitude (1.3 microm) and high-frequency (200 MHz) ultrasonic waves on moving objects. The applicability of the HQLI can also be extended to measure other optodynamic and high-frequency transient phenomena with a constant sensitivity and a resolution below 1 nm.

  17. Measurement and modeling of wind waves at the northern coast of Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henrique G. M. Alves

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional measurements of wind-wave spectra made during the year of 1996 are used in a preliminary investigation of the wind-wave climate and its transformation at the São Francisco do Sul island, northern coast of the Santa Catarina state. Four major sea states and associated meteorological conditions are identified through analyses of joint distributions of observed wave parameters. Transformations of these main sea-state patterns due to refraction and shoaling are investigated through a numerical modeling approach that allows the reconstruction of the wave field within extensive coastal areas, using single point measurements of the wave spectrum in shallow waters. Cross-validation of measured and reconstructed spectra at the study site yield consistent results, suggesting that the proposed methodology works well for the São Francisco do Sul coast.Medições do espectro direcional de ondas geradas pelo vento realizadas em 1996 são utilizadas em uma investigação preliminar do clima de ondas no litoral norte de Santa Catarina, Brasil. Quatro estados de mar predominantes são identificados, em conjunto com os padrões meteorológicos associados a sua ocorrência, através de análises estatísticas. As transformações desses quatro estados de mar devido a refraçâo e empinamento são investigadas através de modelos numéricos, que permitem obter estimativas do campo de ondas em áreas extensas a partir de medições pontuais feitas em águas rasas. Comparações entre espectros medidos e modelados produzem resultados consistentes, sugerindo que a metodologia proposta é válida para a costa de São Francisco do Sul.

  18. Particle transport in 3He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hada

    Full Text Available Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths lW - P are calculated using the measured wave intensities, polarizations, and k directions. The values of lW - P are found to be ~ 5 times less than the value of lHe , the latter derived from He intensity and anisotropy time profiles. It is demonstrated by computer simulation that scattering rates through a 90° pitch angle are lower than that of other pitch angles, and that this is a possible explanation for the discrepancy between the lW - P and lHe values. At this time the scattering mechanism(s is unknown. We suggest a means where a direct comparison between the two l values could be made. Computer simulations indicate that although scattering through 90° is lower, it still occurs. Possibilities are either large pitch angle scattering through resonant interactions, or particle mirroring off of field compression regions. The largest solar proton events are analyzed to investigate the possibilities of local wave generation at 1 AU. In accordance with the results of a previous calculation (Gary et al., 1985 of beam stability, proton beams at 1 AU are found to be marginally stable. No evidence for substantial wave amplitude was found. Locally generated waves, if present, were less than 10-3 nT 2 Hz-1 at the leading

  19. Plasma scattering measurement using a submillimeter wave gyrotron as a radiation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, I.; Idehara, T.; Itakura, Y.; Myodo, M. [Fukui Univ., Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region (Japan); Hori, T. [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Basic and Advanced Research Division, Nukui-Kita, Koganei (Japan); Hatae, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Mukoyama, Naka (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Plasma scattering measurement is an effective technique to observe low frequency density fluctuations excited in plasma. The spatial and wave number resolutions and the S/N ratio of measurement depend on the wavelength range, the size and the intensity of a probe beam. A well-collimated, submillimeter wave beam is suitable for improving the spatial and wave number resolutions. Application of high frequency gyrotron is effective in improving the S/N ratio of the measurement because of its capacity to deliver high power. Unlike the molecular vapor lasers, the gyrotrons generate diverging beam of radiation with TE{sub mn} mode structure. It is therefore necessary to convert the output radiation into a Gaussian beam. A quasi-optical antenna is a suitable element for the conversion system under consideration since it is applicable to several TE{sub 0n} and TE{sub 1n} modes. In order to apply the gyrotron to plasma scattering measurement, we have stabilized the output (P = 110 W, f = 354 GHz) of gyrotron up to the level ({delta}P/P < 1 %, {delta}f< 10 kHz). The gyrotron output can be stabilized by decreasing the fluctuation of the cathode potential. (authors)

  20. Non-invasive temperature measurement by using phase changes in electromagnetic waves in a cavity resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Yasutoshi; Ohwada, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of hyperthermia treatment, a novel method of non-invasive measurement of changes in body temperature is proposed. The proposed method is based on phase changes with temperature in electromagnetic waves in a heating applicator and the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. An image of the temperature change inside a body is reconstructed by applying a computed tomography algorithm. This method can be combined easily with a heating applicator based on a cavity resonator and can be used to treat cancer effectively while non-invasively monitoring the heating effect. In this paper the phase change distributions of electromagnetic waves with temperature changes are measured experimentally, and the accuracy of reconstruction is discussed. The phase change distribution is reconstructed by using a prototype system with a rectangular aluminum cavity resonator that can be rotated 360° around an axis of rotation. To make measurements without disturbing the electromagnetic field distribution, an optical electric field sensor is used. The phase change distribution is reconstructed from 4-projection data by using a simple back-projection algorithm. The paper demonstrates that the phase change distribution can be reconstructed. The difference between phase changes obtained experimentally and by numerical analysis is about 20% and is related mainly to the limited signal detection sensitivity of electromagnetic waves. A temperature change inside an object can be reconstructed from the measured phase changes in a cavity resonator.

  1. Characterization of Ring Wave Spectra for Natural Rain: Measurements and Model for Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliven, L.; Sobieski, P.; Craeye, C.

    1998-01-01

    Ring waves generated by natural rains from 1 to 100 mm/hr were measured in a small tank located in a field. Time series were obtained: (a) from a wire capacitance probe that measured surface elevation, (b) from an optical gauge that measured rain rates R, (c) from an anemometer that measured wind speeds and (d) from a 13.5 GHz scatterometer (w polarization, and 30 degree incidence angle). Ring wave frequency spectra are computed from the surface elevation data for each minute of rain. All the spectra have a similar shape, with a maximum near 5 Hz, and with a more rapid decay towards higher frequencies than towards lower frequencies. A log-Gaussian spectral model provides a useful representation of these data and analysis of the model coefficients shows that the peak frequency and bandwidth are approximately constant, but the magnitude increases as R increases, Additionally, the normalized radar cross section from the scatterometer varies approximately linearly with the spectral line corresponding to the Bragg-wavelength, so together the log-Gaussian ring wave model and the Bragg scattering theory should be useful for a broad range of applications. These findings can be used to help interpret remote sensing data during rain events and to guide model development for radar scattering from rain roughened seas.

  2. Waves study in the Gulf of Naples by HF radar and buoy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviano, Simona; Kalampokis, Alkiviadis; Uttieri, Marco; Zambianchi, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    An HF radar (25 MHz SeaSonde manufactured by CODAR Ocean Sensors Ltd.) has been operating in the Gulf of Naples (GoN) (Southeastern Tyrrhenian Sea) since 2004. HF radars use first-order echoes to determine surface currents, while second-order ones can be exploited to estimate the main parameters characterizing the wave field: wave direction, significant height (hs) and period (ps). Waves were studied in the GoN at three radar sites over a range cell located between 5 and 6 km from the coast. This choice, based upon preliminary sensitivity studies, allowed us to analyze the surface gravity wave field over an area of the basin where the depth is deep enough to avoid breaking, but at the same time close to the coast where the sea echo intensity is sufficiently high to ensure good data quality. The data acquired in the reference year 2012 are compared with the measurements collected over the same period by a directional waverider buoy installed offshore Capri island and managed by the Civil Protection Department of the Campania Region. The analysis aims at investigating the accuracy and the seasonal patterns of the wave parameters, showing the different responses of the wave field in different sectors of the GoN, and at verifying the agreement between the recordings of the two platforms. In addition, a coastal storm is studied to test the responsiveness of HF radars in critical environmental conditions. This work is a contribution to the Flagship Project RITMARE - The Italian Research for the Sea.

  3. Unravelling the noise: the discrimination of wave function collapse models under time-continuous measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Duarte, O. S.; Serafini, Alessio

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by the notion that environmental noise is in principle observable, while fundamental noise due to spontaneous localization would not be, we study the estimation of the diffusion parameter induced by wave function collapse models under continuous monitoring of the environment. We take into account finite measurement efficiencies and, in order to quantify the advantage granted by monitoring, we analyse the quantum Fisher information associated with such a diffusion parameter, identify optimal measurements in limiting cases, and assess the performance of such measurements in more realistic conditions.

  4. Measurement of Lamb wave polarization using a one-dimensional scanning laser vibrometer (L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, James; Apetre, Nicole; Ruzzene, Massimo; Sabra, Karim

    2011-02-01

    A single head scanning laser Doppler vibrometer is used for the estimation of the polarization of the first symmetric (S(0)) and antisymmetric (A(0)) Lamb wave modes. The measurements at two known incidence angles are performed in order to resolve the two components of motion. Filtering in the frequency/wavenumber domain of the response recorded along a scan line separates the contributions from each mode and allows the evaluation of the corresponding elliptical trajectories of particle motion. Comparison between measured and analytically estimated trajectories validates the measurement technique and suggests its application for the development of material characterization and diagnostics tools.

  5. Multipoint Vernier VISAR Interferometer System for Measuring Mass Velocity in Shock Wave Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubskii, K. L.; Koshkin, D. S.; Mikhaylyuk, A. V.; Korolev, A. M.; Pirog, V. A.; Kuznetsov, A. P.

    The results of development of a laser interferometer designed to measure the mass velocity of condensed substances in shock wave experiments in the field of high energy density physics are presented. The developed laser system allows measurements of the velocity of free surfaces of samples in shockwave experiments with accuracy no worse than 10 m/s for the entire range of velocities attained experimentally. The time resolution of measurements is limited by the response speed of the used PMTs and amounts to 2.5 ns.

  6. On the nature of the change in the wave function in a measurement in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, D M

    1996-01-01

    Generally a central role has been assigned to an unavoidable physical interaction between the measuring instrument and the physical entity measured in the change in the wave function that often occurs in measurement in quantum mechanics. A survey of textbooks on quantum mechanics by authors such as Dicke and Witke (1960), Eisberg and Resnick (1985), Gasiorowicz (1974), Goswami (1992), ift fur Physik, vol. 158, p. 417), supports these points. Work on electron shelving is reported by Dehmelt and his colleagues (Physical Review Letters, vol. 56, p. 2797), Wineland and his colleagues (Physical Review Letters, vol. 57, p. 1699), and Sauter, Neuhauser, Blatt, and Toschek (Physical Review Letters, vol. 57, p. 1696).

  7. In Vivo Measures of Shear Wave Speed as a Predictor of Tendon Elasticity and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jack A; Biedrzycki, Adam H; Lee, Kenneth S; DeWall, Ryan J; Brounts, Sabrina H; Murphy, William L; Markel, Mark D; Thelen, Darryl G

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential for ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) to measure tissue elasticity and ultimate stress in both intact and healing tendons. The lateral gastrocnemius (Achilles) tendons of 41 New Zealand white rabbits were surgically severed and repaired with growth factor coated sutures. SWE imaging was used to measure shear wave speed (SWS) in both the medial and lateral tendons pre-surgery, and at 2 and 4 wk post-surgery. Rabbits were euthanized at 4 wk, and both medial and lateral tendons underwent mechanical testing to failure. SWS significantly (p tendons. SWS was significantly (p tendon elastic modulus (r = 0.52) and ultimate stress (r = 0.58). Thus, ultrasound SWE is a potentially promising non-invasive technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical integrity of pre-operative and post-operative tendons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. MEASUREMENTS OF SHOCK WAVE FORCE IN SHOCK TUBE WITH INDIRECT METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Dobrilović

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Tests have been conducted at the “Laboratory for testing of civil explosives, detonators, electrical detonators and pyrotechnical materials”, Department for mining and geotechnics of the Faculty of mining, geology and petroleum engineering, University of Zagreb with the purpose of designing a detonator that would unite advantages of a non-electric system and the precision in regulation of time delay in electronic initiation system. Sum of energy released by the wave force in shock tube is a pre-condition for operation of the new detonator, and measurement of wave force is the first step in determining the sum of energy. The sum of energy is measured indirectly, based on two principles: movement sensors and strain.

  9. Measuring test mass acceleration noise in space-based gravitational wave astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The basic constituent of interferometric gravitational wave detectors -- the test mass to test mass interferometric link -- behaves as a differential dynamometer measuring effective differential forces, comprising an integrated measure of gravity curvature, inertial effects, as well as non-gravitational spurious forces. This last contribution is going to be characterised by the LISA Pathfinder mission, a technology precursor of future space-borne detectors like eLISA. Changing the perspective from displacement to acceleration can benefit the data analysis of LISA Pathfinder and future detectors. The response in differential acceleration to gravitational waves is derived for a space-based detector's interferometric link. The acceleration formalism can also be integrated into time delay interferometry by building up the unequal-arm Michelson differential acceleration combination. The differential acceleration is nominally insensitive to the system free evolution dominating the slow displacement dynamics of low-...

  10. Pulse wave transit time measured by imaging photoplethysmography in upper extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volynsky, M. A.; Mamontov, O. V.; Sidorov, I. S.; Kamshilin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    We describe highly reliable measurement method of the pulse wave transit time (PWTT) to human limbs by using simultaneous recordings of imaging photoplethysmography and electrocardiography. High accuracy of measurements was achieved by access to a larger number of statistically independent data obtained simultaneously in different points. The method is characterized by higher diagnostic reliability because of automatic selection of the regions less affected by environmental noise. The technique was tested in the group of 12 young healthy subjects aged from 21 to 33 years. Even though PWTT in right and left hands was comparable after averaging over the whole group of subjects, significant difference in the time delay of pulse wave between the hands was found in several individuals. The technique can be used for early-stage diagnostics of various vascular diseases.

  11. Determination of elastic anisotropy of rocks from P- and S-wave velocities: numerical modelling and lab measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitek, Tomáš; Vavryčuk, Václav; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Petružálek, Matěj

    2014-12-01

    The most common type of waves used for probing anisotropy of rocks in laboratory is the direct P wave. Information potential of the measured P-wave velocity, however, is limited. In rocks displaying weak triclinic anisotropy, the P-wave velocity depends just on 15 linear combinations of 21 elastic parameters, called the weak-anisotropy parameters. In strong triclinic anisotropy, the P-wave velocity depends on the whole set of 21 elastic parameters, but inversion for six of them is ill-conditioned and these parameters are retrieved with a low accuracy. Therefore, in order to retrieve the complete elastic tensor accurately, velocities of S waves must also be measured and inverted. For this purpose, we developed a lab facility which allows the P- and S-wave ultrasonic sounding of spherical rock samples in 132 directions distributed regularly over the sphere. The velocities are measured using a pair of P-wave sensors with the transmitter and receiver polarized along the radial direction and using two pairs of S-wave sensors with the transmitter and receiver polarized tangentially to the spherical sample in mutually perpendicular directions. We present inversion methods of phase and ray velocities for elastic parameters describing general triclinic anisotropy. We demonstrate on synthetic tests that the inversion becomes more robust and stable if the S-wave velocities are included. This applies even to the case when the velocity of the S waves is measured in a limited number of directions and with a significantly lower accuracy than that of the P wave. Finally, we analyse velocities measured on a rock sample from the Outokumpu deep drill hole, Finland. We present complete sets of elastic parameters of the sample including the error analysis for several levels of confining pressure ranging from 0.1 to 70 MPa.

  12. Laboratory measurement of longitudinal wave velocity of artificial gas hydrate under different temperatures and pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The longitudinal wave velocity and attenuation measurements of artificial gas hy- drate samples at a low temperature are reported. And the temperature and pressure dependence of longitudinal wave velocity is also investigated. In order to under- stand the acoustic properties of gas hydrate, the pure ice, the pure tetrahydrofuran (THF), the pure gas hydrate samples and sand sediment containing gas hydrate are measured at a low temperature between 0℃ and –15℃. For the pure ice, the pure THF and the pure gas hydrate samples, whose density is 898 kg/m3, 895 kg/m3 and 475 kg/m3, the velocity of longitudinal wave is respectively 3574 m/s, 3428 m/s and 2439 m/s. For synthesized and compacted samples, the velocity of synthesized samples is lower than that of compacted samples. The velocities increase when the densities of the samples increase, while the attenuation decreases. Under the con- dition of low temperature, the results show that the velocity is slightly affected by the temperature. The results also show that wave velocities increase with the in- crease of piston pressures. For example, the velocity of one sample increases from 3049 up to 3337 m/s and the other increases from 2315 up to 2995 m/s. But wave velocity decreases from 3800 to 3546 m/s when the temperature increases from –15℃ to 5℃ and changes significantly close to the melting point. Formation con- ditions of the two samples are the same but with different conversion ratios of wa- ter. The results of the experiment are important for exploration of the gas hydrate resources and development of acoustic techniques.

  13. Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Sara V; Blicher, Marie K; Kruger, Ruan;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood pres...

  14. Water Temperature and Concentration Measurements Within the Expanding Blast Wave of a High Explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    housing was made of 1018 steel , and the gauge roof was extended to shield the opto- mechanical components from the primary blast wave. The input fiber...regions of each image indicate the steel frame and support crossbars of the gauge. This set of images provides a sense of the speed with which the shock was...University Press) [3] Peuker J M, Lynch P, Krier H and Glumac N 2009 Optical depth measurements of fireballs from aluminized high explosives Opt

  15. Deep S-wave velocity structure at Hawaii Islands obtained by microtremor array measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Microtremor array measurements and three-component microtremor measurements have been performed at the west coast of Hawaii Island (Figure.1). Two seismographs with three-component accelerometers were used for data acquisition. At each site, one seismograph was fixed in one place and data was acquired at that location for the entire survey. Data was acquired by a second seismograph at larger separations ranging from 5 to 3403m from the fixed seismograph. Data acquisition was repeated at each new separation. In each measurement, 10 to 60 minutes of ambient noise was recorded. As the separations of seismographs increased, the record length of ambient noise was increased. The sampling interval used was 10msec. An entire measurement took several hours. Data acquisition was performed in the day-time and the seismographs were placed in relatively quiet places such as in parks or residential areas. A spatial autocorrelation was used for calculating phase velocity and a clear dispersion curve (Figure 2a) was obtained in frequency range from 0.2 to 30 Hz. A joint inversion was applied to the observed dispersion curve, and H/V spectrum, and S-wave velocity model was analyzed for the site. In the inversion, phase velocities of the dispersion curve and the absolute value and peak frequencies of the H/V spectra were used as observation data. The unknown parameters were layer thickness and S-wave velocity. A Genetic Algorithm was used for optimization. Theoretical H/V spectra and phase velocities are generated by calculating the weighted average of the fundamental mode and higher modes (up to the 5th mode) based on medium response. Figure 2b shows an S-wave velocity model obtained by the inversion. We can see that a low velocity layer with S-wave velocity from 250 to 700 m/s exists to a depth of 90 m. A velocity layer with S-wave velocity from 900 to 1500 m/s exists at a depth range of 90 to 1300 m. Bedrock with S-wave velocity about 3000 m/s exists at a depth of 2200 m.

  16. Traveling wave tube measurements for low-frequency properties of underwater acoustic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A traveling wave tube measurement technique for measuring acoustic properties of underwater acoustic materials was developed. Water temperature and pressure environments of the ocean can be simulated in a water-filled tube, and the acoustic parameters of samples of underwater acoustic materials are measured in the range of low-frequency. A tested sample is located at central position of the tube. A pair of projectors is separately located at both ends of the tube. Using an active anechoic technique, the sound wave transmitting the tested sample is hardly reflected by the surface of secondary transducer. So the traveling sound field is built up in the tube. By separately calculating the transfer functions of every pair of double hydrophones in the sound fields from the both sides of the sample, its reflection coefficients and transmission coefficients are obtained. In the measurement system, the inside diameter of the tube is Φ208 mm, the working frequency range is from 100 to 4000 Hz, the maximum pressure is 5 MPa. The reflection coefficients and transmission coefficients of a water layer and a stainless steel layer samples are measured actually and calculated theoretically. The results show that the measured values are in good agreement with the values calculated, and the measurement uncertainty is not greater than 1.5 dB.

  17. High-frequency Surface Wave Measurements of Micro-tunamis generated by Glacier Calving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minowa, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Shin; Sakakibara, Daiki; Podolskiy, Evgeny; Ohashi, Yoshihiko; Skvarca, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Calving plays a key role in recent rapid retreat of glaciers in Greenland, Alaska and Patagonia. However, processes related to calving are poorly understood since direct observations are difficult. When calving occurred at the glacier front, ice hits water surface and generates surface wave or micro-tsunami. Because characteristics of the micro-tsunami are dependent on the impact on water, it is expected that analysis of the wave provides useful information on the size and type of calving. To study the calving processes from surface wave, we performed field observations at Glaciar Perito Moreno, a freshwater calving glacier in the Southern Patagonia Icefield. We measured the surface level by recording water pressure every 2 s (0.5 Hz), using a sensor installed in a lake 300 m from the calving front. Spectral and statistical analyses were performed on the wave data. We also carried out time-lapse photography, ice speed and water temperature measurements. The time-lapse photographs were used to identify the types of observed calving events (1. Subaqueous, 2. Topple, 3. Drop, 4. Small serac failure). During summer (15 December 2013-4 January 2014) and spring (6-20 October 2014) field campaigns, 640 (30 events d-1) and 195 (12 events d-1) calving events were recorded by the pressure sensor, respectively. The number of calving events varied in time (from 0 to 6 events h-1) and this variation correlates well with lakewater temperature. Subaqueous calving account for only 2.4 % of calving events recorded during the field campaigns (7 out of 364 events). These results imply importance of melting at/under water surface as a triggering mechanism of calving. Waves generated by subaerial calving events (type 2, 3 and 4) showed similar frequency spectrums, whereas those by subaqueous calving had smaller power in frequency range between 0.12-0.25 Hz. The amplitude of the surface waves increased with size of calving, which was quantified by the time-lapse photographs. Our results

  18. Remote vibration measurement: a wireless passive surface acoustic wave resonator fast probing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedt, J-M; Droit, C; Ballandras, S; Alzuaga, S; Martin, G; Sandoz, P

    2012-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators can advantageously operate as passive sensors which can be interrogated through a wireless link. Amongst the practical applications of such devices, structural health monitoring through stress measurement and more generally vibration characteristics of mechanical structures benefit from the ability to bury such sensors within the considered structure (wireless and battery-less). However, measurement bandwidth becomes a significant challenge when measuring wideband vibration characteristics of mechanical structures. A fast SAW resonator measurement scheme is demonstrated here. The measurement bandwidth is limited by the physical settling time of the resonator (Q/π periods), requiring only two probe pulses through a monostatic RADAR-like electronic setup to identify the sensor resonance frequency and hence stress on a resonator acting as a strain gauge. A measurement update rate of 4800 Hz using a high quality factor SAW resonator operating in the 434 MHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band is experimentally demonstrated.

  19. Preliminary results from the MEMO multicomponent measurements of waves on-board INTERBALL 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lefeuvre

    Full Text Available The MEMO (MEsure Multicomposante des Ondes experiment is a part of the INTERBALL 2 wave consortium. It is connected to a total of six electric and nine magnetic independent sensors. It provides waveforms associated with the measurement of two to five components in three frequency bands: ELF (5–1000 Hz, VLF (1–20 kHz, LF (20–250 kHz. Preliminary analyses of low and high resolution data are presented. The emphasis is put on the estimation of the propagation characteristics of the observed waves.VLF hiss emissions are shown to be mainly whistler mode emissions, but other modes are present. An accurate estimation of the local plasma frequency is proposed when the low L = 0 cutoff frequency is identified. AKR emissions observed just above source regions are studied. R-X and L-O modes are found: the first at the lowest frequencies and the second at the highest. Both propagate with wave normal directions weakly oblique or quasi-parallel to the Earth's magnetic field direction. Propagation characteristics are also determined for a (non-drifting fine structure of AKR. There is no fundamental difference with structurless events. Nightside and dayside bursts of ELF electromagnetic emissions are presented. It is not clear whether the two emissions belong to the "lion roar" emissions or not.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; plasma waves and instabilities; instruments and techniques

  20. Measurement and analysis of three 1.5-GPa shock-wave profiles in copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnes, R.H.; Tonks, D.L.

    1993-07-01

    Three wave-profile experiments were performed on OFE fully annealed (600{degree}C for one hour) copper using a 101.6-mm-diam gas gun at impact velocities of 86 m/s. A symmetric impact produced a 1.5-GPa shock wave in the target. A sapphire window was bonded to the front (non-impact) face of the target, and a four-detector push-pull velocity interferometer (VISAR) measured the velocity of the copper/sapphire interface. The impactor thickness (4 mm) was the same in all experiments, the target thicknesses were 10, 20, and 30 mm. The stresses and strains, including the deviatoric stresses and strains, have been extracted from these data using a quasi-Lagrangian analysis. (The waves are not steady.) The use of three separate shots in Lagrangian analysis yields only approximate results for the deviatoric stresses; but the results for the normal stresses, and for the strains, are fairly accurate. Even though the strain rates fall in the Hopkinson bar regime, the mechanism of dislocation motion appears to be dislocation drag, as is the case for stronger shock waves in Cu.

  1. Comparison of ultrasonic wave speed measurements on wax at elevated temperatures to numerical method predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David G.; Stair, Sarah L.; Jack, David A.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic stress wave amplitude and time-of-flight values may change as a media is heated. The measurement of relatively small variations in velocity and material attenuation can detect and quantify significant variations within a material's microstructure, such as a change in phase from solid to liquid. This paper discusses the experimental setup, ultrasonic wave speed tracking methods and signal analysis algorithms that are used in this study to document the changes within highly attenuative wax material as it is either being heated or cooled from 25°C to 90°C. The experimental set-up utilizes ultrasonic probes in a through-transmission configuration. The ultrasonic waveforms are recorded and analyzed during long duration thermal experiments. To complement the ultrasonic data, a Discontinuous-Galerkin Model (DGM) was also created, which uses unstructured meshes to determine how waves travel in this media and how the sound interacts with the prescribed boundary conditions. This numerical method solves particle motion travel using partial differential equations and outputs a wave trace per unit time. Both experimental and analytical data are presented and compared. The experimental and analytical data share some similarities; however, the differences between the two, including a high frequency component present in the analytical data that is not observed in the experimental data, are continuing to be studied and addressed in the model.

  2. Tsunami Lead Wave Reconstruction Based on Noisy Sea Surface Height Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kegen

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a Tsunami lead wave reconstruction method using noisy sea surface height (SSH) measurements such as observed by a satellite-carried GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) sensor. It is proposed to utilize wavelet theory to mitigate the strong noise in the GNSS-R based SSH measurements. Through extracting the noise components by high-pass filters at decomposition stage and shrinking the noise by thresholding prior to reconstruction, the noise is greatly reduced. Real Tsunami data based simulation results demonstrate that in presence of SSH measurement error of standard deviation 50 cm the accuracy in terms of root mean square error (RMSE) of the lead wave height (true value 145.5 cm) and wavelength (true value 592.0 km) estimation is 21.5 cm and 56.2 km, respectively. The results also show that the proposed wavelet based method considerably outperforms the Kalman filter based method on average. The results demonstrate that the proposed wave reconstruction approach has the potential for Tsunami detection and parameter estimation to assist in achieving reliable Tsunami warning.

  3. TSUNAMI LEAD WAVE RECONSTRUCTION BASED ON NOISY SEA SURFACE HEIGHT MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Tsunami lead wave reconstruction method using noisy sea surface height (SSH measurements such as observed by a satellite-carried GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R sensor. It is proposed to utilize wavelet theory to mitigate the strong noise in the GNSS-R based SSH measurements. Through extracting the noise components by high-pass filters at decomposition stage and shrinking the noise by thresholding prior to reconstruction, the noise is greatly reduced. Real Tsunami data based simulation results demonstrate that in presence of SSH measurement error of standard deviation 50 cm the accuracy in terms of root mean square error (RMSE of the lead wave height (true value 145.5 cm and wavelength (true value 592.0 km estimation is 21.5 cm and 56.2 km, respectively. The results also show that the proposed wavelet based method considerably outperforms the Kalman filter based method on average. The results demonstrate that the proposed wave reconstruction approach has the potential for Tsunami detection and parameter estimation to assist in achieving reliable Tsunami warning.

  4. Developing the new method measuring thickness and quality of bottom sediments in using ultrasonic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tomonari; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Hozumi, Naohiro

    2017-07-01

    Measuring the quality and thickness of bottom sediment that it causes some environmental problem, the shortage of water storage volume and anaerobic zone in the bottom of reservoirs, takes huge costs and long time. The purpose of our research is to develop a new method to measure the thickness and size characteristics of bottom sediment using ultrasonic waves that allow obtaining the quality of it indirectly. This new method applies the echo characteristic of bottom sediment in each particle size using the higher frequency than another method, which uses for measuring geological layer at seabed survey. In this research, we attempted to estimate the particle size of bottom sediment by ultrasonic waves irradiating from two different directions such as horizontal and vertical direction, and compare these experiments. We use sediment that we sampled from the lake bottom classified by particle size. At first, we acquired the results that show a relation between particle size and intensity; the obtained echo intensities, which were observed with oscilloscope, were changed depending on the particle sizes. In addition, peaks, which were obtained by power spectrum analysis, appeared on the same frequency band even though the different particle size. However the relation between the experiments of horizontal and vertical direction is not clear. This research indicated the possibility of estimating the characteristics of each particle size in bottom sediment by ultrasonic waves.

  5. The southern stratospheric gravity-wave hot spot: individual waves and their momentum fluxes measured by COSMIC GPS-RO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Hindley

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available During austral winter the mountains of the southern Andes and Antarctic Peninsula are a known hot spot of intense gravity wave momentum flux. There also exists a long leeward region of increased gravity wave energy that sweeps eastwards from the mountains out over the Southern Ocean, the source of which has historically proved difficult to determine. In this study we use Global Positioning System (GPS Radio Occultation (RO data from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC satellite constellation to investigate the distribution, variability and sources of waves in the hot spot region and over the Southern Ocean. We present evidence that suggests a southward focusing of waves into the stratospheric jet from sources to the north. We also describe a wavelet analysis technique for the quantitative identification of individual waves from COSMIC temperature profiles. This analysis reveals different geographical regimes of wave amplitude and short-timescale variability in the wave field over the Southern Ocean. Finally, we take advantage of the large numbers of closely spaced pairs of profiles from the deployment phase of the COSMIC constellation in 2006 to make estimates of gravity wave horizontal wavelengths. We show that, given sufficient numbers of these pairs, GPS-RO can then produce physically reasonable estimates of stratospheric gravity wave momentum flux in the hot spot region that are consistent with other studies. The results are discussed in the context of previous satellite and modelling studies to build up a better picture of the nature and origins of waves in the southern winter stratosphere.

  6. A novel protocol to measure the attenuation of electromagnetic waves through smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan-wu, Li; Hong-yong, Yuan; Yang, Lu; Xiaoxiang, Zhang; Ru-feng, Xu; Ming, Fu

    2016-06-01

    The electromagnetic properties of smoke from a structure fire are important in terms of their relation to the stability of wireless communication systems used in fire rescue. As it is hard to make a measurable electromagnetic environment for particles in the air, compressed and bulk samples are used instead to measure sand storms and smoke plumes. In this paper, an experiment system was designed to measure smoke particles in the air, in consideration of both smoke control and electromagnetic measurement. Several measures had been taken to create a fulfilled smoke environment. The simulated and measured transmission parameters of the electromagnetic testing area were approximate and the electromagnetic wave frequencies were set from 350 to 400 MHz. Repeated experiments have been conducted to test the stability of the results and they showed that there was no obvious attenuation until the smoke concentration was more than 10 dB m-1. It was found that the frequency around 355 and 360 MHz had a larger attenuation coefficient. The relationship between the attenuation coefficient and the smoke concentration was concluded to be linear. The results may help us understand the attenuation of electromagnetic waves within a smoke column.

  7. Mountain wave PSC dynamics and microphysics from ground-based lidar measurements and meteorological modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reichardt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The day-long observation of a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC by two co-located ground-based lidars at the Swedish research facility Esrange (67.9° N, 21.1° E on 16 January 1997 is analyzed in terms of PSC dynamics and microphysics. Mesoscale modeling is utilized to simulate the meteorological setting of the lidar measurements. Microphysical properties of the PSC particles are retrieved by comparing the measured particle depolarization ratio and the PSC-averaged lidar ratio with theoretical optical data derived for different particle shapes. In the morning, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT particles and then increasingly coexisting liquid ternary aerosol (LTA were detected as outflow from a mountain wave-induced ice PSC upwind Esrange. The NAT PSC is in good agreement with simulations for irregular-shaped particles with length-to-diameter ratios between 0.75 and 1.25, maximum dimensions from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, and a number density from 8 to 12 cm-3 and the coexisting LTA droplets had diameters from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, a refractive index of 1.39 and a number density from 7 to 11 cm-3. The total amount of condensed HNO3 was in the range of 8–12 ppbv. The data provide further observational evidence that NAT forms via deposition nucleation on ice particles as a number of recently published papers suggest. By early afternoon the mountain-wave ice PSC expanded above the lidar site. Its optical data indicate a decrease in minimum particle size from 3 to 1.9 µm with time. Later on, following the weakening of the mountain wave, wave-induced LTA was observed only. Our study demonstrates that ground-based lidar measurements of PSCs can be comprehensively interpreted if combined with mesoscale meteorological data.

  8. Measurement of the lowest millimetre-wave transition frequency of the CH radical

    CERN Document Server

    Truppe, S; Hinds, E A; Tarbutt, M R

    2013-01-01

    The CH radical offers a sensitive way to test the hypothesis that fundamental constants measured on earth may differ from those observed in other parts of the universe. The starting point for such a comparison is to have accurate laboratory frequencies. Here we measure the frequency of the lowest millimetre-wave transition of CH, near 535 GHz, with an accuracy of 0.6 kHz. This improves the uncertainty by roughly two orders of magnitude over previous determinations and opens the way for sensitive new tests of varying constants.

  9. Precise Measurement of Subsurface Seismic Velocity Variation by Coda Wave Interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Yu; Wang Baoshan; Ge Hongkui; Chen Yong

    2008-01-01

    A filed experiment was conducted continuously for three days,and the velocity variation was measured using coda wave interferometry.The measurement error is estimated to be around 10-4,which coincides well with the theoretical error.The velocity variation during this period is up to 10-3.The relationship between velocity variation and changes in air temperature,barometric pressure and solid earth tide was analyzed with linear least square fitting.The velocity has no dependence on air temperature,but displayed change of the order of 10-6~10-7 when the barometer or earth tide changed one Pa.

  10. Characteristics measurement of gain and refractive index of traveling-wave semiconductor optical amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Qing-yuan; Huang De-xiu; WANG Tao; KONG Xiao-jian; KE Chang-jian

    2005-01-01

    A novel method to measure the gain and refractive index characteristics of traveling-wave semiconductor optical amplifier(TMA) is presented.In-out fiber ends of TWA are used to construct an external cavity resonator to produce big ripple on amplified spontaneous emission(ASE) spectrum.By this means,Hakki-Paoli method is adopted to obtain the gain spectra of TWA over a wide spectral range.From measured longitudinal mode spacing and peak wavelength shift due to increased bias current,we further calculate the effective refractive index and the refractive index change.Special feature of refractive index change above lasing threshold is revealed and explained.

  11. Measurement of the Optical Rotation Angle Using a Rotating-Wave-Plate Stokes Polarimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang C.C.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A polarimeter based on Stokes-Mueller formalism and rotating-wave-plate Stokes polarimeter is successfully developed to measure the optical rotation angle in a chiral medium. The average relative error in the measured rotation angles of glucose solutions with concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.2g/dl is determined to be 3.78%. The correlation coefficient between the measured rotation angle and the glucose concentration is found to be 0.9995, while the standard deviation is just 0.00376 degrees. From the sol-gel materials containing C17H17ClO6 with concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.0665g/ml, the average relative error in the measured rotation angles is determined to be 3.63%. Consequently, the developed system is evaluated with a precision of 5.4% approximately in rotation angle measurement.

  12. In situ measurements of impact-induced pressure waves in sandstone targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerth, Tobias; Schäfer, Frank; Nau, Siegfried; Kuder, Jürgen; Poelchau, Michael H.; Thoma, Klaus; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    In the present study we introduce an innovative method for the measurement of impact-induced pressure waves within geological materials. Impact experiments on dry and water-saturated sandstone targets were conducted at a velocity of 4600 m/s using 12 mm steel projectiles to investigate amplitudes, decay behavior, and speed of the waves propagating through the target material. For this purpose a special kind of piezoresistive sensor capable of recording transient stress pulses within solid brittle materials was developed and calibrated using a Split-Hopkinson pressure bar. Experimental impact parameters (projectile size and speed) were kept constant and yielded reproducible signal curves in terms of rise time and peak amplitudes. Pressure amplitudes decreased by 3 orders of magnitude within the first 250 mm (i.e., 42 projectile radii). The attenuation for water-saturated sandstone is higher compared to dry sandstone which is attributed to dissipation effects caused by relative motion between bulk material and interstitial water. The proportion of the impact energy radiated as seismic energy (seismic efficiency) is in the order of 10-3. The present study shows the feasibility of real-time measurements of waves caused by hypervelocity impacts on geological materials. Experiments of this kind lead to a better understanding of the processes in the crater subsurface during a hypervelocity impact.

  13. Measurements of Sub and Super Harmonic Waves at the Interfaces of Fatigue-Cracked CT Specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong Hyun Jo [Wonkwnag University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Barnard, Dan [Iowa State University, Ames (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Nonlinear harmonic waves generated at cracked interfaces are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A compact tension specimen is fabricated and the amplitude of transmitted wave is analyzed as a function of position along the fatigued crack surface. In order to measure as many nonlinear harmonic components as possible a broadband Lithium Niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) transducers are employed together with a calibration technique for making absolute amplitude measurements with fluid-coupled receiving transducers. Cracked interfaces are shown to generate high acoustic nonlinearities which are manifested as harmonics in the power spectrum of the received signal. The first subharmonic (f/2) and the second harmonic (2f) waves are found to be dominant nonlinear components for an incident toneburst signal of frequency f. To explain the observed nonlinear behavior a partially closed crack is modeled by planar half interfaces that can account for crack parameters such as crack opening displacement and crack surface conditions. The simulation results show reasonable agreements with the experimental results

  14. Measurement of the viscosity-density product using multiple reflections of ultrasonic shear horizontal waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Margaret S; Adamson, Justus D; Bond, Leonard J

    2006-12-22

    We have developed an on-line computer-controlled sensor, based on ultrasound reflection measurements, to determine the product of the viscosity and density of a liquid or slurry for Newtonian fluids and the shear impedance of the liquid for non-Newtonian fluids. A 14 MHz shear wave transducer is bonded to one side of a 45-90 degrees fused silica wedge and the base is in contract with the liquid. Twenty-eight echoes were observed due to the multiple reflections of an ultrasonic shear horizontal (SH) wave within the wedge. The fast Fourier transform of each echo was obtained for a liquid and for water, which serves as the calibration fluid, and the reflection coefficient at the solid-liquid interface was obtained. Data were obtained for 11 sugar water solutions ranging in concentration from 10% to 66% by weight. The viscosity values are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained independently using a laboratory viscometer. The data acquisition time is 14s and this can be reduced by judicious selection of the echoes for determining the reflection coefficient. The measurement of the density results in a determination of the viscosity for Newtonian fluids or the shear wave velocity for non-Newtonian fluids. The sensor can be deployed for process control in a pipeline, with the base of the wedge as part of the pipeline wall, or immersed in a tank.

  15. Imaging shear wave propagation for elastic measurement using OCT Doppler variance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Miao, Yusi; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have developed an acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) method for the visualization of the shear wave and the calculation of the shear modulus based on the OCT Doppler variance method. The vibration perpendicular to the OCT detection direction is induced by the remote acoustic radiation force (ARF) and the shear wave propagating along the OCT beam is visualized by the OCT M-scan. The homogeneous agar phantom and two-layer agar phantom are measured using the ARFOE-OCE system. The results show that the ARFOE-OCE system has the ability to measure the shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth. The OCT Doppler variance method, instead of the OCT Doppler phase method, is used for vibration detection without the need of high phase stability and phase wrapping correction. An M-scan instead of the B-scan for the visualization of the shear wave also simplifies the data processing.

  16. Measurement of corneal topography through Hartmann-Shack wave-front sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinsheng; Rao, Xuejun; Rao, Changhui

    2008-12-01

    A corneal topography based on Hartmann-Shack Sensor is presented in this paper. In the system, the focus of an objective lens is precisely positioned on cornea's curve center. Wave-front of the reflecting beam can be measured by the Hartmann-Shack sensor which is conjugate to the cornea plane. If the corneal surface is a perfect sphere, wave-front detected by the Hartmann-Shack sensor is a plane. As a result, data measured by Hartmann-Shacks sensor is the deviation between the sphere and the real cornea surface. This paper describes a methodology for designing instrument based on Hartmann-Shack sensor. Then, applying this method, an instrument is developed for accurate measurement of corneal topography. In addition, measuring principle of Hartmann-Shack sensor which determined system parameters is also introduced. Repeatability is demonstrated by a series of data. The instrument was able to accurately measure simulative cornea's reflective aberrations, from which corneal topography and corneal refractive aberrations were derived.

  17. Measurements of the force fields within an acoustic standing wave using holographic optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassindale, P. G.; Drinkwater, B. W. [Faculty of Engineering, Queens building, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Phillips, D. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Barnes, A. C. [Department of Physics, H.H.Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-21

    Direct measurement of the forces experienced by micro-spheres in an acoustic standing wave device have been obtained using calibrated optical traps generated with holographic optical tweezers. A micro-sphere, which is optically trapped in three dimensions, can be moved through the acoustic device to measure forces acting upon it. When the micro-sphere is subjected to acoustic forces, it's equilibrium position is displaced to a position where the acoustic forces and optical forces are balanced. Once the optical trapping stiffness has been calibrated, observation of this displacement enables a direct measurement of the forces acting upon the micro-sphere. The measured forces are separated into a spatially oscillating component, attributed to the acoustic radiation force, and a constant force, attributed to fluid streaming. As the drive conditions of the acoustic device were varied, oscillating forces (>2.5 pN{sub pp}) and streaming forces (<0.2 pN) were measured. A 5 μm silica micro-sphere was used to characterise a 6.8 MHz standing wave, λ = 220 μm, to a spatial resolution limited by the uncertainty in the positioning of the micro-sphere (here to within 2 nm) and with a force resolution on the order of 10 fN. The results have application in the design and testing of acoustic manipulation devices.

  18. The Measurement of Sucrose Content of Sugar Cane Using Ultrasonic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoranto Trisnobudi, Tjia Liong Hoei, Enung Rosihan Nugraha

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of sucrose content of sugar cane is usually carried out by using polarimeter and Brix Wager scale. These two apparatus are operated manually so that the accuracy of the measurement results is depended on the operator skill. To overcome this problem we have developed an alternative method that can measure the sucrose content more quickly and accurately than the conventional methods. This new method was carried out by using ultrasonic waves whose velocity depends on the sucrose content. Firstly, the electronic apparatus used was calibrated with 37 samples of sugar cane with various sucrose content from 4.46 % to 7.29 %. The result of this calibration was an empirical equation between the ultrasonic wave velocity V and the sucrose content R, i.e. R = 2.65 V2 - 11,95 V + 17,65 where R in % and V in km/s. Then this equation was stored as database in a computer program that will be used to calculate the sucrose content. Finally, this sucrose content measurement system was tested by using 30 samples of sugar cane. The maximum error of the measurement result was 6.4 %.

  19. Measurements of electrical impedance and elastic wave velocity of reservoir rock under fluid-flow test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawayama, Kazuki; Kitamura, Keigo; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    The estimation of water saturation under the ground is essential in geothermal fields, particularly for EGS (enhanced geothermal system). To estimate water saturation, recently, electromagnetic exploration using Magnetotelluric (MT) method has been applied in the geothermal fields. However, the relationship between electrical impedance obtained from this method and water saturation in the reservoir rock has not been well known. Our goal is to elucidate this basic relationship by fluid-flow experiments. As our first step to this goal, we developed the technique to measure and analyze the electrical impedance of the cracked rock in the geothermal reservoir. The fluid-flow test has been conducted as following procedures. At first, reservoir rock sample (pyroxene andesite, Makizono lava formation, Japan) was filled with nitrogen gas (Pp = 10 MPa) under 20 MPa of confining pressure. This nitrogen gas imitates the overheated steam in the geothermal fields. Then, brine (1wt.%-KCl, 1.75 S/m) which imitates the artificial recharge to the reservoir was injected to the samples. After flow rate of drainage fluid becomes stable, injection pressure was increased (11, 12, 14, 16, 18 MPa) and decreased (18, 16, 14, 12, 11 MPa) to vary the water saturation in the samples. During the test, water saturation, permeability, electrical impedance (10-2-105 Hz of frequency) and elastic wave velocity were measured. As a result of andesite, electrical impedance dramatically decreased from 105 to 103 Ω and P-wave velocity increased by 2% due to the brine injection. This remarkable change of the electrical impedance could be due to the replacement of pre-filled nitrogen gas to the brine. After the brine injection, electrical impedance decreased with injection pressure (small change of water saturation) by up to 40% while P-wave velocity was almost constant (less than 1%). This decrease of electrical impedance with injection pressure could be related to the flow to the narrow path (microcrack

  20. Effect of Shear on Ultrasonic Flow Measurement Using Nonaxisymmetric Wave Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonaxisymmetric wave propagation in an inviscid fluid with a pipeline shear flow is investigated. Mathematical equation is deduced from the conservations of mass and momentum, leading to a second-order differential equation in terms of the acoustic pressure. Meanwhile a general boundary condition is formulated to cover different types of wall configurations. A semianalytical method based on the Fourier-Bessel theory is provided to transform the differential equation to algebraic equations. Numerical analysis of phase velocity and wave attenuation in water is addressed in the laminar and turbulent flow. Meanwhile comparison among different kinds of boundary condition is given. In the end, the measurement performance of an ultrasonic flow meter is demonstrated.

  1. Particle transport in 3 He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Zhang, L. D.; Mason, G. L.; Lakhina, G. S.; Hada, T.; Arballo, J. K.; Zwickl, R. D.

    2002-04-01

    Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths l

  2. Integrated Love Wave Device Dedicated to Biomolecular Interactions Measurements in Aqueous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Ballandras

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass-sensitive electro-acoustic devices such as surface acoustic wave (SAWmicro-balances, capable to operate with aqueous media are particularly favorable for thedevelopment of biosensors. Their dimensions and physical properties offer a large potentialin biological fluid investigations, especially for measuring physical phenomenon (massdeposition, adsorption, pressure.... In this work, we propose a specific gratingconfiguration to lower the influence of viscosity of fluids which reduces the signal dynamicsof the surface wave transducers. A dedicated liquid cell also has been developed to isolatethe electro-active part of the device. The fabrication of the cell is achieved using theSU-8TMphoto-resist, allowing for manufacturing thick structures preventing any contact between thetested liquids and the transducers. Furthermore, the sensing area has been optimized tooptimize the sensor gravimetric sensitivity. The operation of the sensor is illustrated bydetecting bovine serum albumin (BSA adsorption in the sensing area.

  3. Measurements of wave-particle interaction in a single-ended Q machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Christoffersen, G.B.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1971-01-01

    A Green-function technique is used to solve the linearized Vlasov equation for the perturbed ion velocity distribution function, f( x,v,t), in a case where a short density pulse is released into a plasma. Some characteristic features in the calculated curves are caused by wave-particle interaction....... Experimentally, short density pulses are generated in the plasma in a single-ended Q machine by application of electrical square pulses to a grid immersed in the plasma column. The perturbed ion velocity distribution function in the density pulse is measured by means of an electrostatic energy analyzer....... The features showing the wave-particle interaction appear in the experimental results...

  4. Real-time measurements of spontaneous breathers and rogue wave events in optical fibre modulation instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närhi, Mikko; Wetzel, Benjamin; Billet, Cyril; Toenger, Shanti; Sylvestre, Thibaut; Merolla, Jean-Marc; Morandotti, Roberto; Dias, Frederic; Genty, Goëry; Dudley, John M.

    2016-12-01

    Modulation instability is a fundamental process of nonlinear science, leading to the unstable breakup of a constant amplitude solution of a physical system. There has been particular interest in studying modulation instability in the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, a generic model for a host of nonlinear systems including superfluids, fibre optics, plasmas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Modulation instability is also a significant area of study in the context of understanding the emergence of high amplitude events that satisfy rogue wave statistical criteria. Here, exploiting advances in ultrafast optical metrology, we perform real-time measurements in an optical fibre system of the unstable breakup of a continuous wave field, simultaneously characterizing emergent modulation instability breather pulses and their associated statistics. Our results allow quantitative comparison between experiment, modelling and theory, and are expected to open new perspectives on studies of instability dynamics in physics.

  5. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  6. Individual wave height distributions in the coastal zone: Measurements and simulations and the effect of directional spreading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vledder, G.P.; Ruessink, G.; Rijnsdorp, D.P.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of the individual wave height distribution in shallow water have been investigated using measured wave data and results of numerical simulations using the non-hydrostatic SWASH model. It is shown that the SWASH model is capable of reproducing the temporal and spatial variation of sur

  7. Comparison of simulations and offshore measurement data of a prototype of a floating combined wind and wave energy conversion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Anders; Larsen, Torben J.; Hansen, Anders Melchior

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, results from comparisons of simulations and measured offshore data from a floating combined wind and wave energy conversion system are presented. The device is a downscaled prototype that consists of a floating platform equipped with ten wave energy absorbers and three wind turbines...

  8. Measurement of viscosity and shear wave velocity of a liquid or slurry for on-line process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Margaret Stautberg; Bamberger, Judith Ann

    2002-08-01

    An on-line sensor to measure the density of a liquid or slurry, based on longitudinal wave reflection at the solid-fluid interface, has been developed by the staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of this research is to employ shear wave reflection at the solid-fluid interface to provide an on-line measurement of viscosity as well. Both measurements are of great interest for process control in many industries. Shear wave reflection measurements were conducted for a variety of liquids. By analyzing multiple reflections within the solid (only 0.63 cm thick-similar to pipe wall thickness) we increased the sensitivity of the measurement. At the sixth echo, sensitivity was increased sufficiently and this echo was used for fluid interrogation. Shear wave propagation of ultrasound in liquids is dependent upon the viscosity and the shear modulus. The data are analyzed using the theory for light liquids (such as water and sugar water solutions) and also using the theory for highly viscous liquids (such as silicone oils). The results show that, for light liquids, the shear wave reflection measurements interrogate the viscosity. However, for highly viscous liquids, it is the shear wave modulus that dominates the shear wave reflection. Since the density is known, the shear wave velocity in the liquid can be determined from the shear wave modulus. The results show that shear wave velocities in silicone oils are very small and range from 315 to 2389 cm/s. Shear wave reflection measurements are perhaps the only way that shear wave velocity in liquids can be determined, because the shear waves in liquids are highly attenuated. These results show that, depending on the fluid characteristics, either the viscosity or the shear wave velocity can be used for process control. There are several novel features of this sensor: (1) The sensor can be mounted as part of the wall of a pipeline or tank or submerged in a tank. (2) The sensor is very compact and can be

  9. Theoretical research and experimental study for a new measurement method of standing wave levitation force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinbo; Jiang, Hai; Jiao, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Guojun; Liu, Jianfang [Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2015-05-15

    Based on the lever principle, a novel measurement method for the standing wave levitation force is investigated and the measurement device is developed. The relative levitation force was simulated by MATLAB software, from which the relative levitation force distribution and the curves of relative levitation force in vertical and horizontal directions were obtained. To verify the rationale of the measurement method, a series of experiments were carried out with the designed measurement device system. The levitation force distribution and the curves of levitation force in vertical and horizontal directions were also obtained from the experiment. Comparing the experimental results with the simulation, the levitation force distribution situation from the experimental results and the simulation is identical.

  10. The Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) onboard the BepiColombo/MMO: First measurement of electric fields, electromagnetic waves, and radio waves around Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaba, Y.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Blomberg, L. G.; Kojima, H.; Yagitani, S.; Moncuquet, M.; Trotignon, J.-G.; Chanteur, G.; Kumamoto, A.; Kasahara, Y.; Lichtenberger, J.; Omura, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    The BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) spacecraft includes the plasma and radio wave observation system called Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI). Since the receivers for electric field, plasma waves, and radio waves are not installed in any of the preceding spacecraft to Mercury, the PWI will provide the first opportunity for conducting in-situ and remote-sensing observations of electric fields, plasma waves, and radio waves in the Hermean magnetosphere and exosphere. These observations are valuable in studying structure, dynamics, and energy exchange processes in the unique magnetosphere of Mercury. They are characterized by the key words of the non-MHD environment and the peculiar interaction between the relatively large planet without ionosphere and the solar wind with high dynamic pressure. The PWI consists of three sets of receivers (EWO, SORBET, and AM 2P), connected to two sets of electric field sensors (MEFISTO and WPT) and two kinds of magnetic field sensors (LF-SC and DB-SC). The PWI will observe both waveforms and frequency spectra in the frequency range from DC to 10 MHz for the electric field and from 0.3 Hz to 640 kHz for the magnetic field. From 2008, we will start the development of the engineering model, which is conceptually consistent with the flight model design. The present paper discusses the significance and objectives of plasma/radio wave observations in the Hermean magnetosphere, and describes the PWI sensors, receivers and their performance as well as the onboard data processing.

  11. Study of atmospheric parameters measurements using MM-wave radar in synergy with LITE-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrawis, Madeleine Y.

    1994-12-01

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment, (LITE), has been developed, designed, and built by NASA Langley Research Center, to be flown on the space shuttle 'Discovery' on September 9, 1994. Lidar, which stands for light detecting and ranging, is a radar system that uses short pulses of laser light instead of radio waves in the case of the common radar. This space-based lidar offers atmospheric measurements of stratospheric and tropospheric aerosols, the planetary boundary layer, cloud top heights, and atmospheric temperature and density in the 10-40 km altitude range. A study is being done on the use, advantages, and limitations of a millimeterwave radar to be utilized in synergy with the Lidar system, for the LITE-2 experiment to be flown on a future space shuttle mission. The lower atmospheric attenuation, compared to infrared and optical frequencies, permits the millimeter-wave signals to penetrate through the clouds and measure multi-layered clouds, cloud thickness, and cloud-base height. These measurements would provide a useful input to radiation computations used in the operational numerical weather prediction models, and for forecasting. High power levels, optimum modulation, data processing, and high antenna gain are used to increase the operating range, while space environment, radar tradeoffs, and power availability are considered. Preliminary, numerical calculations are made, using the specifications of an experimental system constructed at Georgia Tech. The noncoherent 94 GHz millimeter-wave radar system has a pulsed output with peak value of 1 kW. The backscatter cross section of the particles to be measured, that are present in the volume covered by the beam footprint, is also studied.

  12. Detonation wave profiles measured in plastic bonded explosives using 1550 nm photon doppler velocimetry (PDV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Nathaniel (nate) J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present detonation wave profiles measured in two TATB based explosives and two HMX based explosives. Profiles were measured at the interface of the explosive and a Lithium-Fluoride (LiF) window using 1550 nm Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with a projectile launched in a gas-gun. The impact state was varied to produce varied distance to detonation, and therefore varied support of the Taylor wave following the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) or sonic state. Profiles from experiments with different support should be the same between the Von-Neumann (VN) spike and CJ state and different thereafter. Comparison of profiles with differing support, therefore, allows us to estimate reaction zone lengths. For the TATB based explosive, a reaction zone length of {approx} 3.9 mm, 500 ns was measured in EDC-35, and a reaction zone length of {approx} 6.3 mm, 800 ns was measured in PBX 9502 pre-cooled to -55 C. The respective VN spike state was 2.25 {+-} 0.05 km/s in EDC-35 and 2.4 {+-} 0.1 km/s in the cooled PBX 9502. We do not believe we have resolved either the VN spike state (> 2.6 km/s) nor the reaction zone length (<< 50 ns) in the HMX based explosives.

  13. Sensor Measurement Strategies for Monitoring Offshore Wind and Wave Energy Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Deirdre; Srbinovsky, Bruno; Murphy, Jimmy; Popovici, Emanuel; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2015-07-01

    While the potential of offshore wind and wave energy devices is well established and accepted, operations and maintenance issues are still not very well researched or understood. In this regard, scaled model testing has gained popularity over time for such devices at various technological readiness levels. The dynamic response of these devices are typically measured by different instruments during such scaled tests but agreed sensor choice, measurement and placement guidelines are still not in place. This paper compared the dynamic responses of some of these sensors from a scaled ocean wave testing to highlight the importance of sensor measurement strategies. The possibility of using multiple, cheaper sensors of seemingly inferior performance as opposed to the deployment of a small number of expensive and accurate sensors are also explored. An energy aware adaptive sampling theory is applied to highlight the possibility of more efficient computing when large volumes of data are available from the tested structures. Efficient sensor measurement strategies are expected to have a positive impact on the development of an device at different technological readiness levels while it is expected to be helpful in reducing operation and maintenance costs if such an approach is considered for the devices when they are in operation.

  14. Detonation Wave Profiles Measured in Plastic Bonded Explosives Using 1550 nm Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsen, R. L.; Bartram, B. D.; Sanchez, N. J.

    2009-12-01

    We present detonation wave profiles measured in two TATB based explosives and two HMX based explosives. Profiles were measured at the interface of the explosive and a Lithium-Fluoride (LiF) window using 1550 nm Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with a projectile launched in a gas-gun. The impact state was changed from shot to shot in order to produce varied distances to detonation. In this way, we tuned the support of the Taylor wave following the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) or sonic state. Profiles from experiments with different support should be the same between the Von-Neumann (VN) spike and CJ state and different thereafter. Comparison of profiles with differing support, therefore, allows us to estimate reaction zone lengths. For the TATB based explosive, a reaction zone length of ≈3.9 mm, 500 ns was measured in EDC-35, and a reaction zone length of ≈6.3 mm, 800 ns was measured in PBX 9502 pre-cooled to -55° C. The respective VN spike state was 2.25±0.05 km/s in EDC-35 and 2.4±0.1 km/s in the cooled PBX 9502. We do not believe we have resolved either the VN spike state (>2.6 km/s) nor the reaction zone length (≪50 ns) in the HMX based explosives.

  15. Can we measure individual black-hole spins from gravitational-wave observations?

    CERN Document Server

    Pürrer, Michael; Ohme, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of black-hole spins from gravitational-wave observations of black-hole binaries with ground-based detectors are expected to be hampered by partial degeneracies in the gravitational-wave phasing: between the two component spins, and between the spins and the binary's mass ratio, at least for signals that are dominated by the binary's inspiral. Through the merger and ringdown, however, a different set of degeneracies apply. This suggests the possibility that, if the inspiral, merger and ringdown are all within the sensitive frequency band of a detector, we may be able to break these degeneracies and more accurately measure both spins. In this work we investigate our ability to measure individual spins for non-precessing binaries, for a range of configurations and signal strengths, and conclude that in general the spin of the larger black hole will be measurable (at best) with observations from Advanced LIGO and Virgo. This implies that in many applications waveform models parameterized by only one ...

  16. Can we measure individual black-hole spins from gravitational-wave observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pürrer, Michael; Hannam, Mark; Ohme, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of black-hole spins from gravitational-wave observations of black-hole binaries with ground-based detectors are known to be hampered by partial degeneracies in the gravitational-wave phasing: between the two component spins, and between the spins and the binary's mass ratio, at least for signals that are dominated by the binary's inspiral. Through the merger and ringdown, however, a different set of degeneracies apply. This suggests the possibility that, if the inspiral, merger and ringdown are all within the sensitive frequency band of a detector, we may be able to break these degeneracies and more accurately measure both spins. In this work we investigate our ability to measure individual spins for nonprecessing binaries, for a range of configurations and signal strengths, and conclude that in general the spin of the larger black hole will be measurable (at best) with observations from Advanced LIGO and Virgo. This implies that in many applications waveform models parameterized by only one effective spin will be sufficient. Our work does not consider precessing binaries or subdominant harmonics, although we provide some arguments why we expect that these will not qualitatively change our conclusions.

  17. In Situ Measurements of an Energetic Wave Event in the Arctic Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson ...three phases of interaction: (1) wave blocking by ice, (2) strong attenuation of wave energy and fracturing of ice by wave forcing and (3) uninhibited...propagation of the peak waves and an extension of allowed waves to higher frequencies (above the peak). Wave properties during fracturing of ice cover

  18. Measurement of coherence decay in GaMnAs using femtosecond four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Daniel; de Boer, Tristan; Yildirim, Murat; March, Sam; Mathew, Reuble; Gamouras, Angela; Liu, Xinyu; Dobrowolska, Margaret; Furdyna, Jacek; Hall, Kimberley

    2013-12-03

    The application of femtosecond four-wave mixing to the study of fundamental properties of diluted magnetic semiconductors ((s,p)-d hybridization, spin-flip scattering) is described, using experiments on GaMnAs as a prototype III-Mn-V system.  Spectrally-resolved and time-resolved experimental configurations are described, including the use of zero-background autocorrelation techniques for pulse optimization.  The etching process used to prepare GaMnAs samples for four-wave mixing experiments is also highlighted.  The high temporal resolution of this technique, afforded by the use of short (20 fsec) optical pulses, permits the rapid spin-flip scattering process in this system to be studied directly in the time domain, providing new insight into the strong exchange coupling responsible for carrier-mediated ferromagnetism.  We also show that spectral resolution of the four-wave mixing signal allows one to extract clear signatures of (s,p)-d hybridization in this system, unlike linear spectroscopy techniques.   This increased sensitivity is due to the nonlinearity of the technique, which suppresses defect-related contributions to the optical response. This method may be used to measure the time scale for coherence decay (tied to the fastest scattering processes) in a wide variety of semiconductor systems of interest for next generation electronics and optoelectronics.

  19. The electrocardiogram in hypertensive patients. P wave dispersion: a new measure to be considered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elibet Chávez González

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiogram is a complementary test with high specificity but low sensitivity. In the case of patients with arterial hypertension it is of great importance in the diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring during treatment. The prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy observed through electrocardiogram in hypertensive patients has been reported in up to 9% of them. Different indexes have been described to approach the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy, including the Sokolow and Cornell indexes. Atrial and ventricular arrhythmias are both considered as comorbidity in arterial hypertension. The mechanisms involved are varied and include left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. In patients suffering from hypertension, premature atrial complexes are frequently found and there is an increasing risk of atrial fibrillation, mainly in patients over 65 years old. The predisposition of patients with hypertension to episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation can be determined through manual measurement of P wave’s maximum, minimum and dispersion. The highest values of P wave dispersion in the reading of a 12-lead surface electrocardiogram are more related to events of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Irrigation increases in patients with P wave maximum values up to 134 ms and P wave dispersion values up to 46 ms.

  20. Certification of contact probe measurement of surface wave of Li jet for IFMIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, Takafumi, E-mail: okita@stu.nucl.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Hoashi, Eiji; Yoshihashi, Sachiko [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kondo, Hiroo; Kanemura, Takuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamaoka, Nobuo; Horiike, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We have conducted experiments of liquid lithium free-surface flow for IFMIF. • In the experiment using electro-contact probe apparatus, a droplet of liquid Li on the middle of measurement probe was observed. • Behavior of a droplet and false detections were observed by using HSV camera. • The error of the statistical result was roughly evaluated about 1%. • From results of numerical simulations, we obtained the detailed information about the behavior of a Li droplet. - Abstract: The international fusion material irradiation facility (IFMIF) is a neutron source for developing fusion reactor materials. A liquid lithium (Li) jet with free surface is planned as a target to generate intense neutron field. It is important to obtain information on the surface wave characteristic for safety of the facility and efficient neutron generation. Surface wave characteristics experiment using the liquid Li circulation facility is carried out at Osaka University. In our studies, measurement using an electro-contact probe apparatus is conducted and many data about surface wave height were taken. In this experiment, a liquid Li droplet was observed on the probe. To see effect due to droplets on the probe needle, images near the surface of the Li jet including the Li droplet were taken by HSV camera synchronized with probe contact signals, and correlation between the behavior of the Li droplet and signals was evaluated. From the results, when the droplet on the probe contacts of the droplet with the surface, signals obviously different from the regular signal were observed. The influence on the result of frequency was estimated and is approximately <1%. Accuracy of measurement using probe could be increased by carefully deleting false signals.

  1. Measuring neutron-star properties via gravitational waves from neutron-star mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauswein, A; Janka, H-T

    2012-01-06

    We demonstrate by a large set of merger simulations for symmetric binary neutron stars (NSs) that there is a tight correlation between the frequency peak of the postmerger gravitational-wave (GW) emission and the physical properties of the nuclear equation of state (EoS), e.g., expressed by the radius of the maximum-mass Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkhoff configuration. Therefore, a single measurement of the peak frequency of the postmerger GW signal will constrain the NS EoS significantly. For optimistic merger-rate estimates a corresponding detection with Advanced LIGO is expected to happen within an operation time of roughly a year.

  2. Force measurements of a superconducting-film actuator for a cryogenic interferometric gravitational-wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, N; Kanda, N; Kuroda, K; Miyoki, S; Ohashi, M; Saitô, Y; Shintomi, T; Suzuki, T; Tatsumi, D; Taylor, C; Tomaru, T; Uchiyama, T; Yamamoto, A

    2002-01-01

    We measured forces applied by an actuator with a YBCO film at near 77 K for the Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational-wave Telescope (LCGT) project. An actuator consisting of both a YBCO film of 1.6 micrometers thickness and 0.81 square centimeters area and a solenoid coil exerted a force of up to 0.2 mN on a test mass. The presented actuator system can be used to displace the mirror of LCGT for fringe lock of the interferometer.

  3. The doping concentration and physical properties measurement of silicon water using tera hertz wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Hyeon; Oh, Gyung Hwan; Kim, Hak Sung [Dept. of Mechanical Convergence Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, a tera hertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) imaging technique was used to measure doping concentration and physical properties (such as refractive index and permittivity) of the doped silicon (Si) wafers. The transmission and reflection modes with an incidence angle of 30° were employed to determine the physical properties of the doped Si wafers. The doping concentrations of the prepared Si wafers were varied from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 18} in both N-type and P-type cases. Finally, the correlation between the doping concentration and the power of the THz wave was determined by measuring the powers of the transmitted and reflected THz waves of the doped Si wafers. Additionally, the doped thickness, the refractive index, and permittivity of each doped Si wafer were calculated using the THz time domain waveform. The results indicate that the THz-TDS imaging technique is potentially a promising technique to measure the doping concentration as well as other optical properties (such as the refractive index and permittivity) of the doped Si wafer.

  4. Experimental measurements of the detonation wave profile in a TATB based explosive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decaris L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report results of the experimental measurements of the detonation wave profile of the TATB based plastic bonded explosive T2 (97 w. % of TATB using VISAR and Heterodyne Velocimetry (HV – same as Photon Doppler Velocimetry. The experiment consists in initiating a detonation wave in a 15 mm diameter cylinder of explosive using an explosive wire detonator and an explosive booster. In order to obtain the particle velocity history in the reaction zone, we measure particle velocity at the interaction of the detonation front with an aluminized window or the free surface velocity of a metallic foil. Lithium Fluoride (LIF, PMMA and steel have been tested. Several shots have been performed for different lengths of explosive. We compare the VISAR and HV measurements. With LIF and steel, VISAR and HV diagnostics give very similar profiles. The ZND profile obtained on LIF is resolved with both techniques. With PMMA, HV gives a more accurate profile than VISAR in the reaction zone. There is no evidence of the influence of the explosive cylinder length.

  5. Accuracy in measuring the neutron star mass in gravitational wave parameter estimates for nonspinning compact binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hee-Suk

    2015-09-01

    In gravitational wave (GW) data analysis, the parameter estimate is performed to find the physical parameters of GW sources. The result of the parameter estimate is given by a posterior probability density function, and the measurement errors can be computed by using the Fisher matrix method. Using this method, we investigate the accuracy in estimates of neutron star (NS) masses ( M NS) for GWs emitted from merging compact binaries. As GW sources, we consider nonspinning binaries in which the primary component is assumed to be a NS and the companion is assumed to be a NS or a stellar-mass black hole (BH). Adopting GW signals with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10 for Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) sensitivity, we calculate measurement errors (σ) of M NS. We find that the errors strongly depend on the mass ratio of the companion mass ( M com) to the NS mass ( M NS). For NS-NS binaries, the fractional errors (σ/ M NS) are larger than 10% only in the symmetric mass region. For BH-NS binaries, the fractional errors tend to decrease with increasing mass ratio ( M com/ M NS), and the measurement accuracies are better than those for NS-NS binaries. In this case, the errors are always smaller than ~ 3%.

  6. Laser-induced pressure-wave and barocaloric effect during flash diffusivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Porter, W. D.; Dinwiddie, R. B.

    2017-07-01

    We report the laser-induced pressure-wave and the barocaloric effect captured by an infrared detector during thermal diffusivity measurements. Very fast (laser flash measurements were captured using the infrared detector on thin, high thermal conductivity samples. The standard thermal diffusivity analysis only focuses on the longer time scale thermal transient measured from the back-surface due to heat conduction. Previously, these negative transients or spikes were filtered out and ignored as noise or anomaly from the instrument. This study confirmed that the initial negative signal was indeed a temperature drop induced by the laser pulse. The laser pulse induced instantaneous volume expansion and the associated cooling in the specimen can be explained by the barocaloric effect. The initial cooling (<100 μs) is also known as the thermoelastic effect in which a negative temperature change is generated when the material is elastically deformed by volume expansion. A subsequent temperature oscillation in the sample was observed and only lasted about 1 ms. The pressure-wave induced thermal signal was systematically studied and analyzed. The underlying physics of photon-mechanical-thermal energy conversions and the potential of using this signal to study barocaloric effects in solids are discussed.

  7. Optomechanical dual-beam backaction-evading measurement beyond the rotating-wave approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malz, Daniel; Nunnenkamp, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    We present the exact analytical solution of the explicitly time-periodic quantum Langevin equation describing the dual-beam backaction-evading measurement of a single mechanical oscillator quadrature due to V. B. Braginsky, Y. I. Vorontsov, and K. S. Thorne [Science 209, 547 (1980), 10.1126/science.209.4456.547] beyond the commonly used rotating-wave approximation. We show that counterrotating terms lead to extra sidebands in the optical and mechanical spectra and to a modification of the main peak. Physically, the backaction of the measurement is due to periodic coupling of the mechanical resonator to a light-field quadrature that only contains cavity-filtered shot noise. Since this fact is independent of other degrees of freedom the resonator might be coupled to, our solution can be generalized, including to dissipatively or parametrically squeezed oscillators, as well as recent two-mode backaction-evading measurements.

  8. Measurements of plasma density fluctuations and electric wave fields using spherical electrostatic probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, A.I.; Bostroem, R.

    1995-04-01

    Spherical electrostatic probes are in wide use for the measurements of electric fields and plasma density. This report concentrates on the measurements of fluctuations of these quantities rather than background values. Potential problems with the technique include the influence of density fluctuations on electric field measurements and vice versa, effects of varying satellite potential, and non-linear rectification in the probe and satellite sheaths. To study the actual importance of these and other possible effects, we simulate the response of the probe-satellite system to various wave phenomena in the plasma by applying approximate analytical as well as numerical methods. We use a set of non-linear probe equations, based on probe characteristics experimentally obtained in space, and therefore essentially independent of any specific probe theory. This approach is very useful since the probe theory for magnetized plasmas is incomplete. 47 refs.

  9. Unseeded Large Scale PIV measurements accounting for capillary-gravity waves phase speed

    CERN Document Server

    Benetazzo,; Gamba,; M.,; Barbariol,; F,

    2016-01-01

    Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) is widely recognized as a reliable method to measure water surface velocity field in open channels and rivers. LSPIV technique is based on a camera view that frames the water surface in a sequence, and image-processing methods to compute water surface displacements between consecutive frames. Using LSPIV, high flow velocities, as for example flood conditions, were accurately measured, whereas determinations of low flow velocities is more challenging, especially in absence of floating seeding transported by the flow velocity. In fact, in unseeded conditions, typical surface features dynamics must be taken into account: besides surface structures convected by the current, capillary-gravity waves travel in all directions, with their own dynamics. Discrimination between all these phenomena is here discussed, providing a new method to distinguish and to correct unseeded LSPIV measurements associated with wavy structures, accounting for their phase speed magnitude and ...

  10. Measurements of the negative refractive index of sub-diffraction waves propagating in an indefinite permittivity medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobkin, Dmitriy; Neuner, Burton; Fietz, Chris; Jegenyes, Nikoletta; Ferro, Gabriel; Shvets, Gennady

    2010-10-25

    An indefinite permittivity medium (IPM) has been fabricated and optically characterized in mid-infrared spectral range (10.7 µm-11.3 µm). Phase and amplitude transmission measurements reveal two remarkable properties of IPMs: (i) transmission of sub-diffraction waves (as short as λ/4) can exceed those of diffraction-limited ones, and (ii) sub-diffraction waves can propagate with negative refractive index. We describe a novel double-detector optical technique relying on the interference between sub-diffraction and diffraction-limited waves for accurate measurement of the transmission amplitude and phase of the former.

  11. Liquefaction assessment based on combined use of CPT and shear wave velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bán, Zoltán; Mahler, András; Győri, Erzsébet

    2017-04-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the most devastating secondary effects of earthquakes and can cause significant damage in built infrastructure. For this reason liquefaction hazard shall be considered in all regions where moderate-to-high seismic activity encounters with saturated, loose, granular soil deposits. Several approaches exist to take into account this hazard, from which the in-situ test based empirical methods are the most commonly used in practice. These methods are generally based on the results of CPT, SPT or shear wave velocity measurements. In more complex or high risk projects CPT and VS measurement are often performed at the same location commonly in the form of seismic CPT. Furthermore, VS profile determined by surface wave methods can also supplement the standard CPT measurement. However, combined use of both in-situ indices in one single empirical method is limited. For this reason, the goal of this research was to develop such an empirical method within the framework of simplified empirical procedures where the results of CPT and VS measurements are used in parallel and can supplement each other. The combination of two in-situ indices, a small strain property measurement with a large strain measurement, can reduce uncertainty of empirical methods. In the first step by careful reviewing of the already existing liquefaction case history databases, sites were selected where the records of both CPT and VS measurement are available. After implementing the necessary corrections on the gathered 98 case histories with respect to fines content, overburden pressure and magnitude, a logistic regression was performed to obtain the probability contours of liquefaction occurrence. Logistic regression is often used to explore the relationship between a binary response and a set of explanatory variables. The occurrence or absence of liquefaction can be considered as binary outcome and the equivalent clean sand value of normalized overburden corrected cone tip

  12. Estimation of femoral bone density from trabecular direct wave and cortical guided wave ultrasound velocities measured at the proximal femur in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkmann, Reinhard; Dencks, Stefanie; Bremer, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal femur is a predictor of hip fracture risk. We developed a Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) scanner for measurements at this site with similar performance (FemUS). In this study we tested if ultrasound velocities of direct waves through trabecular bone...... echoes reflected from the skin of the leg to yield speed-of-sound (SOS) of different wave components. Data were cross-calibrated and pooled (62 women). Bivariate correlations and a multivariate model were calculated for the estimation of femur BMD. BMD correlated both with trabecular and cortical SOS...

  13. New GOES High-Res Magnetic Measurements: Characterization of ULF Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmon, Robert; Loto'aniu, Paul; Chi, Peter; Abdelqader, Ahmed; Singer, Howard; Boudouridis, Athanasios; Tilton, Margaret

    2017-04-01

    This presentation describes the development of a new 20+ year archive of science-quality, high-cadence geostationary measurements of the magnetic field from eight NOAA spacecraft (GOES-8 through GOES-15) and preliminary scientific results using these data. The era of NOAA operational observations of the geomagnetic field started with SMS-1 in May 1974 and continues to this day with GOES-13-16 (on-orbit). GOES magnetic observations provide an early warning of impending space weather, are the core geostationary data set used for the construction of magnetospheric magnetic models, and can be used to estimate electromagnetic wave power in frequency bands important for plasma processes. Many science grade improvements are being made across the GOES archive to unify the format and content from GOES-8 through the new GOES-R series (launched November 19, 2016). A majority of the 2 Hz magnetic observations from GOES-8-12 have never before been publicly accessible due to processing constraints. Now, a NOAA Big Earth Data Initiative project is underway to process these measurements starting from original telemetry records. Overall the new archive will include vector measurements in geophysically relevant coordinates (EPN, GSM, VDH), comprehensive documentation, highest temporal cadence, best calibration parameters, recomputed means, updated quality flagging, full spacecraft ephemeris information, a unified standard format and public access. We are also developing spectral characterization tools for estimating power in standard frequency bands (up to 1 Hz), and detecting ULF waves related to field-line resonances. We present the project status and initial findings, including in-situ statistical and extreme ULF event properties, and case studies where the ULF oscillations along the same field line were observed simultaneously by GOES near the equator in the magnetosphere, the ST-5 satellites at low altitudes, and ground magnetometer stations. For event studies, we find that the

  14. Measuring the linear and nonlinear elastic properties of brain tissue with shear waves and inverse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Li, Guoyang; Qian, Lin-Xue; Liang, Si; Destrade, Michel; Cao, Yanping

    2015-10-01

    We use supersonic shear wave imaging (SSI) technique to measure not only the linear but also the nonlinear elastic properties of brain matter. Here, we tested six porcine brains ex vivo and measured the velocities of the plane shear waves induced by acoustic radiation force at different states of pre-deformation when the ultrasonic probe is pushed into the soft tissue. We relied on an inverse method based on the theory governing the propagation of small-amplitude acoustic waves in deformed solids to interpret the experimental data. We found that, depending on the subjects, the resulting initial shear modulus [Formula: see text] varies from 1.8 to 3.2 kPa, the stiffening parameter [Formula: see text] of the hyperelastic Demiray-Fung model from 0.13 to 0.73, and the third- [Formula: see text] and fourth-order [Formula: see text] constants of weakly nonlinear elasticity from [Formula: see text]1.3 to [Formula: see text]20.6 kPa and from 3.1 to 8.7 kPa, respectively. Paired [Formula: see text] test performed on the experimental results of the left and right lobes of the brain shows no significant difference. These values are in line with those reported in the literature on brain tissue, indicating that the SSI method, combined to the inverse analysis, is an efficient and powerful tool for the mechanical characterization of brain tissue, which is of great importance for computer simulation of traumatic brain injury and virtual neurosurgery.

  15. Investigation of turbulence measurements with a continuous wave, conically scanning LiDAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.; Mikkelsen, T.; Courtney, M.

    2009-03-15

    LIDAR systems are getting more and more accurate and reliable. It has been shown many times that the mean horizontal wind speed measured by a lidar over flat terrain compares very well with that measured by a cup anemometer. But can a lidar measure turbulence? Here we investigate the case of a continuous wave, conically scanning Zephir lidar. First, the wind speed standard deviation measured by such a lidar gives on average 80% of the standard deviation measured by a cup anemometer. This difference is due to the spatial averaging inherently made by a cw conically scanning lidar. The spatial averaging is done in two steps: 1) the weighted averaging of the wind speed in the probe volume of the laser beam; 2) the averaging of the wind speeds occurring on the circular path described by the conically scanning lidar. Therefore the standard deviation measured by a lidar resolves only the turbulence structures larger than a length scale depending on the circle diameter and the mean wind speed (range of magnitude: 100m). However, the Zephir lidar gives another turbulence quantity, the so-called turbulence parameter, which can resolve turbulence structures with a smaller length scale. In this paper, we suggest a volumetric filtering of the turbulence to represent the effect of the spatial averaging operated by a lidar when measuring the wind speed. We then evaluate this model by comparing the theoretical results to experimental data obtained with several Zephir systems, for both turbulence quantities. (au)

  16. Errors and uncertainties in the measurement of ultrasonic wave attenuation and phase velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikov, Alexander N; Challis, Richard E

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the error generation mechanisms that affect the accuracy of measurements of ultrasonic wave attenuation coefficient and phase velocity as functions of frequency. In the first stage of the analysis we show that electronic system noise, expressed in the frequency domain, maps into errors in the attenuation and the phase velocity spectra in a highly nonlinear way; the condition for minimum error is when the total measured attenuation is around 1 Neper. The maximum measurable total attenuation has a practical limit of around 6 Nepers and the minimum measurable value is around 0.1 Neper. In the second part of the paper we consider electronic noise as the primary source of measurement error; errors in attenuation result from additive noise whereas errors in phase velocity result from both additive noise and system timing jitter. Quantization noise can be neglected if the amplitude of the additive noise is comparable with the quantization step, and coherent averaging is employed. Experimental results are presented which confirm the relationship between electronic noise and measurement errors. The analytical technique is applicable to the design of ultrasonic spectrometers, formal assessment of the accuracy of ultrasonic measurements, and the optimization of signal processing procedures to achieve a specified accuracy.

  17. Pulse wave attenuation measurement by linear and nonlinear methods in nonlinearly elastic tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, C D; Pythoud, F; Stergiopulos, N; Meister, J J

    1999-04-01

    Reasons for the continuing difficulty in making definitive measurements of pulse wave attenuation in elastic tubes and arteries in the presence of reflections are sought. The measurement techniques available were re-examined in elastic tubes mimicking the arterial compliance nonlinearity, under conditions of strong reflection. The pulse was of physiological shape, and two different pulse amplitudes in the physiological range were used. Measurements of pressure, flow-rate and diameter pulsation allowed the deployment of four of the classical linear methods of analysis. In addition, a method of separating the forward- and backward-travelling waves that does not require linearising assumptions was used, and the attenuation in the forward and reverse directions was calculated from the resulting waveforms. Overall, the results obtained here suggest that a fully satisfactory way of measuring arterial attenuation has yet to be devised. The classical linear methods all provided comparable attenuation estimates in terms of average value and degree of scatter across frequency. Increased scatter was generally found at the higher pulse amplitude. When the forward waveforms from the separation were similarly compared in terms of frequency components, the average value at energetic harmonics was similar to both the value indicated by the linear methods and the values predicted from linear theory on the basis of estimated viscous and viscoelastic parameter data. The backward waveforms indicated a physically unreasonable result, attributed as the expression for this technique of the same difficulties that normally manifest in scatter. Data in the literature suggesting that one of the classical methods, the three-point, systematically over-estimates attenuation were not supported, but it was confirmed that this method becomes prone to negative attenuation estimates at low harmonics as pulse amplitude increases. Although the goal of definitive attenuation measurement remains elusive

  18. Measurement of Rayleigh wave Z/H ratio and joint inversion for a high-resolution S wave velocity model beneath the Gulf of Mexico passive margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, W.; Li, G.; Niu, F.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge on the 3D sediment structure beneath the Gulf of Mexico passive margin is not only important to explore the oil and gas resources in the area, but also essential to decipher the deep crust and mantle structure beneath the margin with teleseismic data. In this study, we conduct a joint inversion of Rayleigh wave ellipticity and phase velocity at 6-40 s to construct a 3-D S wave velocity model in a rectangular area of 100°-87° west and 28°-37° north. We use ambient noise data from a total of 215 stations of the Transportable Array deployed under the Earthscope project. Rayleigh wave ellipticity, or Rayleigh wave Z/H (vertical to horizontal) amplitude ratio is mostly sensitive to shallow sediment structure, while the dispersion data are expected to have reasonably good resolution to uppermost mantle depths. The Z/H ratios measured from stations inside the Gulf Coastal Plain are distinctly lower in comparison with those measured from the inland stations. We also measured the phase velocity dispersion from the same ambient noise dataset. Our preliminary 3-D model is featured by strong low-velocity anomalies at shallow depth, which are spatially well correlated with Gulf Cost, East Texas, and the Lower Mississippi basins. We will discuss other features of the 3-D models once the model is finalized.

  19. Wall thickness measurement using resonant phenomena of circumferential Lamb waves generated by plural transducer elements located evenly on girth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Hideo; Iwata, Kodai; Ishikawa, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel method of measuring the pipe wall thickness using the resonance of the circumferential (C-) Lamb wave generated by a piezoelectric ring-shaped sensor (PS). The PS is a special device for an axially propagating torsional wave; however, the C-Lamb waves are generated simultaneously as spurious signals owing to the structure of the PS. Particularly under resonant conditions, the C-Lamb waves are dominantly generated, distorting the axially propagating wave. In this method, these troublesome spurious signals are used effectively for the measurement of the wall thickness under the PS location that is a dead zone of the PS itself. The method can compensate for its drawback, namely, the dead zone problem, without using additional instruments. In this study, the mechanisms of the generation and resonance of the C-Lamb waves were first explained. Secondly, the principle of the wall thickness estimation utilizing the resonance of the C-Lamb waves was proposed. Finally, experimental verifications were carried out. The estimated wall thicknesses agreed very well (maximum 1.5% error) with those measured by a micrometer caliper under suitable resonant conditions.

  20. Kinetic Temperature and Electron Density Measurement in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Julia; Lyons, Wendy; Tong, WIlliam G.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser wave mixing is presented as an effective technique for spatially resolved kinetic temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma. Measurements are performed in a 1 kW, 27 MHz RF plasma using a continuous-wave, tunable 811.5-nm diode laser to excite the 4s(sup 3)P2 approaches 4p(sup 3)D3 argon transition. Kinetic temperature measurements are made at five radial steps from the center of the torch and at four different torch heights. The kinetic temperature is determined by measuring simultaneously the line shape of the sub-Doppler backward phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing and the Doppler-broadened forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing. The temperature measurements result in a range of 3,500 to 14,000 K+/-150 K. Electron densities measured range from 6.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm to 10.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm. The experimental spectra are analyzed using a perturbative treatment of the backward phase-conjugate and forward-geometry wave-mixing theory. Stark width is determined from the collisional broadening measured in the phase-conjugate geometry. Electron density measurements are made based on the Stark width. The kinetic temperature of the plasma was found to be more than halved by adding deionized water through the nebulizer.

  1. Millimeter-Wave Phaseless Antenna Measurement Based on a Modified Off-Axis Holography Setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleya, Ana; Ala-Laurinaho, Juha; Laviada, Jaime; Álvarez, Yuri; Las-Heras, Fernando; Räisänen, Antti V.

    2016-02-01

    A novel scheme for planar near-field phaseless antenna measurement based on off-axis holography is presented. Separation of the image terms of the hologram is artificially increased by multiplexing the measurements of two sub-sampled holograms generated with two 180° phase-shifted reference waves. Combination of both sub-sampled holograms produces replicas of the image terms at half a period distance of the originals in the spectral domain, while the amplitude of the original image terms is highly reduced, easing the filtering process of the desired replica. The higher separation of the image terms reduces overlapping making the method suitable also for the characterization of medium and low gain antennas in the near-field. As the separation is artificially increased, the reference antenna can be placed close to the antenna under test allowing to reduce the scan distance and the sensitivity to scan axis errors. Nevertheless, spatial multiplexing requires the retrieved data to be spatially low-pass filtered to remove the effect of the aliasing. Mirror reflection is used for illuminating the acquisition plane with the reference wave, being the phase shift achieved by means of a mechanical displacement of the mirror. The effect of the location of the reference antenna on the position and shape of the image terms and their replicas has been studied through numerical simulations for a setup in the W-band. Experimental validation of the method is presented for the characterization of three different antennas at 94 GHz.

  2. Identification of thin elastic isotropic plate parameters applying Guided Wave Measurement and Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabisek, Ewa; Waszczyszyn, Zenon

    2015-12-01

    A new hybrid computational system for material identification (HCSMI) is presented, developed for the identification of homogeneous, elastic, isotropic plate parameters. Attention is focused on the construction of dispersion curves, related to Lamb waves. The main idea of the system HCSMI lies in separation of two essential basic computational stages, corresponding to direct or inverse analyses. In the frame of the first stage an experimental dispersion curve DCexp is constructed, applying Guided Wave Measurement (GWM) technique. Then, in the other stage, corresponding to the inverse analysis, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is trained 'off line'. The substitution of results of the first stage, treated as inputs of the ANN, gives the values of identified plate parameters. In such a way no iteration is needed, unlike to the classical approach. In such an approach, the "distance" between the approximate experimental curves DCexp and dispersion curves DCnum obtained in the direct analysis, is iteratively minimized. Two case studies are presented, corresponding either to measurements in laboratory tests or those related to pseudo-experimental noisy data of computer simulations. The obtained results prove high numerical efficiency of HCSMI, applied to the identification of aluminum plate parameters.

  3. A multiplexed two-wave mixing interferometer for laser ultrasonic measurements of material anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Murray, Todd W.; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2002-05-01

    A method to optically measure ultrasonic displacements simultaneously over an array of detection points has been developed. Optical phase gratings are used to create a detection-array of laser beams that are directed to the specimen. The detection array can be arranged in several ways on the test object. The scattered beams from the detection-array are collected and combined with a single reference beam in a photorefractive crystal to from a multiplexed two-wave mixing (MTWM) configuration. Each of the output beams from the photorefractive crystal is imaged on to a separate element of a photodetector array. The resulting MTWM system is capable of providing simultaneous optical detection (with high spatial resolution and sub-nanometer displacement sensitivities) at several points on a test object. The MTWM system can be used in several modes for laser ultrasonic NDE of flaws and materials characterization. In this paper, the MTWM is used to characterize material anisotropy. Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are generated using a pulsed laser focused to a point on a test object. The resulting SAW propagation is monitored optically simultaneously at 8 points arranged circularly around the generating spot. The scattered beams from the eight detection points are processed simultaneously in the MTWM setup. The group velocity slowness curve is obtained directly from the measured signals from the MTWM array. Results are shown for silicon and quartz. It is shown that the MTWM enables rapid experimental determination of material anisotropy.

  4. Charge transfer to a dielectric target by guided ionization waves using electric field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slikboer, Elmar; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Guaitella, Olivier; Sobota, Ana

    2017-03-01

    A kHz-operated atmospheric pressure plasma jet is investigated by measuring charge transferred to a dielectric electro-optic surface (BSO crystal) allowing for the measurement of electric field by exploiting the Pockels effect. The electric field values, distribution of the surface discharge and amount of deposited charge are obtained for various parameters, including gas flow, applied voltage, target distance and the length of the capillary from ground to the end. A newly formed surface discharge emerges at the target when enough charge is deposited at the impact point and electric fields are high enough, i.e. 200 pC and 9 ± 2 kV cm‑1. The maximum amount of charge transferred by a single ionization wave (‘plasma bullet’) is 350 ± 40 pC. Due to the emerging new surface discharge behind the impact point, the total charge deposited on the surface of the dielectric target can increase up to 950 pC. The shape of the secondary discharge on the target is found to be mainly driven by gas flow, while the applied voltage allows us to utilize longer distances within the boundaries set by this gas mixing. Finally the ionization wave is found to lose charge along its propagation on the inner walls of the capillary. The loss is estimated to be approximately 7.5 pC mm‑1 of travel distance inside the capillary.

  5. Measurability of the tidal polarizability of neutron stars in late-inspiral gravitational-wave signals

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault; Villain, Loic

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational wave signal from a binary neutron star inspiral contains information on the nuclear equation of state. This information is contained in a combination of the tidal polarizability parameters of the two neutron stars and is clearest in the late inspiral, just before merger. We use the recently defined tidal extension of the effective one-body formalism to construct a controlled analytical description of the frequency-domain phasing of neutron star inspirals up to merger. Exploiting this analytical description we find that the tidal polarizability parameters of neutron stars can be measured by the advanced LIGO-Virgo detector network from gravitational wave signals having a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio of $\\rho=16$. This measurability result seems to hold for all the nuclear equations of state leading to a maximum mass larger than $1.97M_\\odot$. We also propose a promising new way of extracting information on the nuclear equation of state from a coherent analysis of an ensemble of gravitatio...

  6. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layer physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Friedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance and acoustic (Love mode surface acoustic wave device real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition and surfactant adsorption, the bound mass and its physical properties – density and optical index – are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70±20% water and are 16±3 to 19±3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 μg/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50±10% water for layer thicknesses in the 6±1.5 to 13±2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 μg/ml range.

  7. Precision Measurement of the Position-space Wave Functions of Gravitationally Bound Ultracold Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kamiya, Y; Komamiya, S

    2015-01-01

    Gravity is the most familiar force at our natural length scale. However, it is still exotic from the view point of particle physics. The first experimental study of quantum effects under gravity was performed using a cold neutron beam in 1975. Following this, an investigation of gravitationally bound quantum states using ultracold neutrons was started in 2002. This quantum bound system is now well understood, and one can use it as a tunable tool to probe gravity. In this paper, we review a recent measurement of position-space wave functions of such gravitationally bound states, and discuss issues related to this analysis, such as neutron loss models in a thin neutron guide, the formulation of phase space quantum mechanics, and UCN position sensitive detectors. The quantum modulation of neutron bound states measured in this experiment shows good agreement with the prediction from quantum mechanics.

  8. Simultaneous surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurements: Electrodeposition and biological interactions monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedt, J.-M.; Francis, L.; Reekmans, G.; De Palma, R.; Campitelli, A.; Sleytr, U. B.

    2004-02-01

    We present results from an instrument combining surface acoustic wave propagation and surface plasmon resonance measurements. The objective is to use two independent methods, the former based on adsorbed mass change measurements and the latter on surface dielectric properties variations, to identify physical properties of protein layers, and more specifically their water content. We display mass sensitivity calibration curves using electrodeposition of copper leading to a sensitivity in liquid of 150±15 cm2/g for the Love mode device used here, and the application to monitoring biological processes. The extraction of protein layer thickness and protein to water content ratio is also presented for S-layer proteins under investigation. We obtain, respectively, 4.7±0.7 nm and 75±15%.

  9. Cryogenic Q-factor measurement of optical substrates for optimization of gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietzsche, S [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Nawrodt, R [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Zimmer, A [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Schnabel, R [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Universitaet Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Vodel, W [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Future generations of gravitational wave interferometers are likely to be operated at cryogenic temperatures because one of the sensitivity limiting factors of the present generation is the thermal noise of end mirrors and beam splitters that occurs in the optical substrates as well as in the dielectric coatings. A possible method for minimizing thermal noise is cooling to cryogenic temperatures, maximizing the mechanical quality factor Q, and maximizing the eigenfrequencies of the substrate. We present experimental details of a new cryogenic apparatus that is suitable for the measurement of the temperature-dependent Q-factor of reflective, transmissive as well as nano-structured grating optics down to 5 K. In particular, the SQUID-based and the optical interferometric approaches to the measurement of the amplitude of vibrating test bodies are compared and the method of ring-down recording is described.

  10. Measurement of Plasma Clotting Using Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Tatsuya; Kondoh, Jun; Oonishi, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Kazuya

    2013-07-01

    The monitoring of blood coagulation is important during operation. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied to monitor plasma clotting. An SH-SAW sensor with a metallized surface for mechanical perturbation detection can detect plasma clotting. As plasma clotting is a gel formation reaction, the SH-SAW sensor detects viscoelastic property changes. On the other hand, an SH-SAW sensor with a free surface for electrical perturbation detection detects only the liquid mixing effect. No electrical property changes due to plasma clotting are obtained using this sensor. A planar electrochemical sensor is also used to monitor plasma clotting. In impedance spectral analysis, plasma clotting is measured. However, in the measurement of time responses, no differences between clotting and nonclotting are obtained. Therefore, the SH-SAW sensor is useful for monitoring plasma clotting.

  11. Measured and calculated transmission losses of sound waves through a helium layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was performed to measure the transmission losses of sound waves traversing an impedance layer. The sound emanated from a point source and the impedance layer was created by a low-speed helium jet. The transmission losses measured were of the order of 12 db for frequencies of the source between 4 and 12 kHz. These losses are greater than those predicted from analysis when the observer angle is less than about 35 deg, but less than those predicted for larger observer angles. The experimental results indicate that appreciable noise reductions can be realized for an observer shielded by an impedance layer, irrespective of his position relative to the source of sound.

  12. Precision Measurement of the Position-Space Wave Functions of Gravitationally Bound Ultracold Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kamiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity is the most familiar force at our natural length scale. However, it is still exotic from the view point of particle physics. The first experimental study of quantum effects under gravity was performed using a cold neutron beam in 1975. Following this, an investigation of gravitationally bound quantum states using ultracold neutrons was started in 2002. This quantum bound system is now well understood, and one can use it as a tunable tool to probe gravity. In this paper, we review a recent measurement of position-space wave functions of such gravitationally bound states and discuss issues related to this analysis, such as neutron loss models in a thin neutron guide, the formulation of phase space quantum mechanics, and UCN position sensitive detectors. The quantum modulation of neutron bound states measured in this experiment shows good agreement with the prediction from quantum mechanics.

  13. Sparse aperture differential piston measurements using the pyramid wave-front sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Yan, Zhaojun; Zheng, Lixin; Agapito, Guido; Wang, Chaoyan; Zhu, Nenghong; Zhu, Liyun; Cai, Jianqing; Tang, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the laboratory experiment we settled in the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) to investigate the pyramid wavefront sensor (WFS) ability to measure the differential piston on a sparse aperture. The ultimate goal is to verify the ability of the pyramid WFS work in closed loop to perform the phasing of the primary mirrors of a sparse Fizeau imaging telescope. In the experiment we installed on the optical bench we performed various test checking the ability to flat the wave-front using a deformable mirror and to measure the signal of the differential piston on a two pupils setup. These steps represent the background from which we start to perform full closed loop operation on multiple apertures. These steps were also useful to characterize the achromatic double pyramids (double prisms) manufactured in the SHAO optical workshop.

  14. Pseudo-random noise-continuous-wave laser radar for surface and cloud measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthey, Renaud; Mitev, Valentin

    2005-03-01

    Laser radar (lidar) application may require an instrument with compact size, long life of the components, low consumption and eye-safety. One possibility to achieve these features is to use a continuous-wave (cw) diode laser as lidar transmitter. A practical way to perform range-resolved measurements with a cw laser diode is the pseudo-random noise (PRN) modulation. This paper presents a compact PRN-cw lidar, using a 370-mW cw diode laser and an APD as detector. Daytime measurements of cloud base and topographic surface are demonstrated with the PRN-cw lidar technique, where the range detection exceeds 2 km. The detection of the topographic surface is performed with integration time of some tens of milliseconds during daytime and some tens of microseconds during night-time.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of gas concentration and temperature by the ball surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Kazushi; Akao, Shingo; Takeda, Nobuo; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Oizumi, Toru; Tsukahara, Yusuke

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) trace moisture sensor with an amorphous silica sensitive film and realized wide-range measurement from 0.017 ppmv [a frost point (FP) of -99 °C] to 6.0 × 103 ppmv (0 °C FP). However, since the sensitivity of the sensor depends on the temperature, measurement results are disturbed when the temperature largely changes. To overcome this problem, we developed a method to simultaneously measure temperature and gas concentration using a ball SAW sensor. Temperature and concentration is derived by solving equations for the delay time change at two frequencies. When the temperature had a large jump, the delay time change was significantly disturbed, but the water concentration was almost correctly measured, by compensating the sensitivity change using measured temperature. The temperature measured by a ball SAW sensor will also be used to control the ball temperature. This method will make a ball SAW sensor reliable in environments of varying temperatures.

  16. A Model for Measured Traveling Waves at End-Diastole in Human Heart Wall by Ultrasonic Imaging Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, Naoaki; Shintani, Seine A.; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    We observe traveling waves, measured by the ultrasonic noninvasive imaging method, in a longitudinal beam direction from the apex to the base side on the interventricular septum (IVS) during the period from the end-diastole to the beginning of systole for a healthy human heart wall. We present a possible phenomenological model to explain part of one-dimensional cardiac behaviors for the observed traveling waves around the time of R-wave of echocardiography (ECG) in the human heart. Although the observed two-dimensional patterns of traveling waves are extremely complex and no one knows yet the exact solutions for the traveling homoclinic plane wave in the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE), we numerically find that part of the one-dimensional homoclinic dynamics of the phase and amplitude patterns in the observed traveling waves is similar to that of the numerical homoclinic plane-wave solutions in the CGLE with periodic boundary condition in a certain parameter space. It is suggested that part of the cardiac dynamics of the traveling waves on the IVS can be qualitatively described by the CGLE model as a paradigm for understanding biophysical nonlinear phenomena.

  17. Repeatability, variability and reference values of pulsed wave Doppler echocardiographic measurements in healthy Saanen goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leroux Aurélia A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulsed wave (PW Doppler echocardiography has become a routine non invasive cardiac diagnostic tool in most species. However, evaluation of intracardiac blood flow requires reference values, which are poorly documented in goats. The aim of this study was to test the repeatability, the variability, and to establish the reference values of PW measurements in healthy adult Saanen goats. Using a standardised PW Doppler echocardiographic protocol, 10 healthy adult unsedated female Saanen goats were investigated three times at one day intervals by the same observer. Mitral, tricuspid, aortic and pulmonary flows were measured from a right parasternal view, and mitral and aortic flows were also measured from a left parasternal view. The difference between left and right side measurements and the intra-observer inter-day repeatability were tested and then the reference values of PW Doppler echocardiographic parameters in healthy adult female Saanen goats were established. Results As documented in other species, all caprine PW Doppler parameters demonstrated a poor inter-day repeatability and a moderate variability. Tricuspid and pulmonary flows were best evaluated on the right side whereas mitral and aortic flows were best obtained on the left side, and reference values are reported for healthy adult Saanen goats. Conclusions PW Doppler echocardiography allows the measurement of intracardiac blood flow indices in goats. The reference values establishment will help interpreting these indices of cardiac function in clinical cardiac cases and developing animal models for human cardiology research.

  18. Measurement of porcine haptoglobin in meat juice using surface acoustic wave biosensor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Thorsten N; Gronewold, Thomas M A; Perpeet, Markus; Plattes, Susanne; Petersen, Brigitte

    2013-11-01

    Aim of the study was the application of biosensor technique to measure the concentration of an acute phase protein (APP) within complex matrices from animal origin. For the first time, acute phase protein haptoglobin (Hp) was detected from unpurified meat juice of slaughter pigs by a label-free biosensor-system, the SAW-based sam®5 system. The system uses a sensor chip with specific antibodies to catch Hp while the mass-related phase shift is measured. The concentration is calculated as a function of these measured phase shifts. The results correlate very well with reference measurement results obtained by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), R=0.98. The robust setup of the surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based system and its ability to measure within very short time periods qualifies it for large-scale analyses and is apt to identify rapidly pigs in the meat production process whose consumption would have an increased risk for consumers.

  19. Measuring the carrier lifetime by using a quasi-optical millimeter- and THz-wave system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Mun Seok; Sawant, Ashwini; Lee, Kyu-Sup; Yu, Nan Ei; Choi, EunMi

    2017-02-01

    The existing method for contactless measurement of the photoconductivity decay time is limited in terms of sample selection according to the injection level or doping density. To solve this problem and improve the measurement sensitivity, we developed a quasi-optical photoconductivity decay (QO-PCD) technique based on millimeter- and terahertz-wave technology. A semi-insulating silicon (Si) wafer was used in a proof-of-concept experiment with the proposed QO-PCD system to find the initial excess carrier density and carrier lifetime based on the Drude-Zener model with a single decay function. The initial excess carrier density and carrier lifetime were measured to be 1.5 × 1015 cm-3 and 30.6 μs, respectively, in semi-insulating Si wafer (460 μm thickness). A 2D areal measurement of the decay time of the Si wafer was experimentally obtained. The proposed QO-PCD technique can provide more reliable and sensitive carrier lifetime measurement data for semiconductor wafers, which may impact the fields of photovoltaic solar cells and power electronics.

  20. 3D attitude measurement by means of spread spectrum modulated ultrasonic wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shinji Ohyama; Hiroshi Iwasawa; Sang Il Ko; Junya Takayama

    2007-01-01

    Local position and attitude measurement methods are necessary for the navigation of autonomous robots and the other applications. In this paper, a 3D attitude measurement method is proposed. This method uses the spread spectrum modulated ultrasonic wave for the measurement of the pseudo-distance of each pathway between transmitter and receiver elements that are arranged in an array. The relative attitude between transmitter and receiver unit could be calculated from the relationship between these pseudo-distances. The use of spread spectrum modulation enables the high accuracy, noise tolerance, and coexistence of multiple transmitter devices by code division multiple access (CDMA) between transmitter and receiver elements. A pair of transmitter and receiver prototype for proposed method was manufactured, and the fundamental performance was examined in experiments. As a result, accuracy of σ = 0.78 mm in the pseudo-distance measurement of each pathway between transmitter and receiver elements was confirmed, and about 0.01 rad resolution in the attitude measurement was also confirmed.

  1. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave speeds in compacted, polycrystalline ice lh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on laboratory measurements of compressional- and shear-wave speeds in a compacted, polycrystalline ice-Ih sample. The sample was made from triply distilled water that had been frozen into single crystal ice, ground into small grains, and sieved to extract the 180–250 µm diameter fraction. Porosity was eliminated from the sample by compacting the granular ice between a hydraulically driven piston and a fixed end plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Based on simultaneous compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements, we calculated Poisson's ratio and compressional-wave, bulk, and shear moduli from –20 to –5°C and 22 to 33 MPa.

  2. Apparatus for measurement of acoustic wave propagation under uniaxial loading with application to measurement of third-order elastic constants of piezoelectric single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, J A; Karim, Md Afzalul

    2013-05-01

    We describe an apparatus for the measurement of acoustic wave propagation under uniaxial loading featuring a special mechanism designed to assure a uniform mechanical load on a cube-shaped sample of piezoelectric material. We demonstrate the utility of the apparatus by determining the effects of stresses on acoustic wave speed, which forms a foundation for the final determination of the third-order elastic constants of langasite and langatate single crystals. The transit time method is used to determine changes in acoustic wave velocity as the loading is varied. In order to minimize error and improve the accuracy of the wave speed measurements, the cross correlation method is used to determine the small changes in the time of flight. Typical experimental results are presented and discussed.

  3. Interhemispheric structure and variability of the 5-day planetary wave from meteor radar wind measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimura, H.; Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Singer, W.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    A study of the quasi-5-day wave (5DW) was performed using meteor radars at conjugate latitudes in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. These radars are located at Esrange, Sweden (68° N) and Juliusruh, Germany (55° N) in the Northern Hemisphere, and at Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (54° S) and Rothera Station, Antarctica (68° S) in the Southern Hemisphere. The analysis was performed using data collected during simultaneous measurements by the four radars from June 2010 to December 2012 at altitudes from 84 to 96 km. The 5DW was found to exhibit significant short-term, seasonal, and interannual variability at all sites. Typical events had planetary wave periods that ranged between 4 and 7 days, durations of only a few cycles, and infrequent strongly peaked variances and covariances. Winds exhibited rotary structures that varied strongly among sites and between events, and maximum amplitudes up to ~ 20 m s-1. Mean horizontal velocity covariances tended to be largely negative at all sites throughout the interval studied.

  4. A possible scheme for measuring gravitational waves by using a spinful quantum fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed for measuring gravitational waves (GWs from the collective electromagnetic (EM response of a spinful quantum fluid, based on recent studies of the long-lived Mössbauer state 93mNb in a pure Nb crystal. A pronounced EM response was found for the geometric phase by rotating the sample in a magnetic field, suggesting that GWs could also be detected. It was recently suggested that the macroscopic wave functions confined in two twisted nonspherical superconductors would give a geometrical phase oscillation induced by GWs. The sensitivity to GWs would be inversely proportional to the square of the bound length, which is the detector size. The proposed sensitivity to GWs would be dramatically enhanced by changing the characteristic size, i.e., using the microscopic size of a non-spherical particle instead of the macroscopic detector size of a scalar quantum fluid. The collective EM response from the quantum fluid would allow the macroscopic geometrical phase to be read from microscopic particles. GWs in the millihertz range, with amplitude of 10−22, would be detectable.

  5. Does consciousness really collapse the wave function? A possible objective biophysical resolution of the measurement problem

    CERN Document Server

    Thaheld, F H

    2005-01-01

    An analysis has been performed of the theories and postulates advanced by von Neumann, London and Bauer, and Wigner, concerning the role that consciousness might play in the collapse of the wave function, which has become known as the measurement problem. This reveals that an error may have been made by them in the area of biology and its interface with quantum mechanics, when they called for the reduction of any superposition states in the brain through the mind or consciousness. Many years later Wigner changed his mind to reflect a simpler and more realistic objective position, expanded upon by Shimony, which appears to offer a way to resolve this issue. The argument is therefore made that the wave function of any superposed photon state or states is always objectively changed within the complex architecture of the eye in a continuous linear process initially for most of the superposed photons, followed by a discontinuous nonlinear collapse process later for any remaining superposed photons, thereby guarant...

  6. Standard practice for measuring the ultrasonic velocity in polyethylene tank walls using lateral longitudinal (LCR) waves

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for measuring the ultrasonic velocities in the outer wall of polyethylene storage tanks. An angle beam lateral longitudinal (LCR) wave is excited with wedges along a circumferential chord of the tank wall. A digital ultrasonic flaw detector is used with sending-receiving search units in through transmission mode. The observed velocity is temperature corrected and compared to the expected velocity for a new, unexposed sample of material which is the same as the material being evaluated. The difference between the observed and temperature corrected velocities determines the degree of UV exposure of the tank. 1.2 The practice is intended for application to the outer surfaces of the wall of polyethylene tanks. Degradation typically occurs in an outer layer approximately 3.2-mm (0.125-in.) thick. Since the technique does not interrogate the inside wall of the tank, wall thickness is not a consideration other than to be aware of possible guided (Lamb) wave effects or reflection...

  7. Case study of wave breaking with high-resolution turbulence measurements with LITOS and WRF simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Andreas; Söder, Jens; Gerding, Michael; Wagner, Johannes; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    Gravity waves in their final stage produce turbulence and dissipation. In the stratosphere only few studies of this phenomenon exist because the observation is technically challenging. In order to precisely infer energy dissipation rates, the viscous subrange has to be covered, which in the stratosphere lies at scales of centimetres and below. With our balloon-borne instrument LITOS (Leibniz-Institute Turbulence Observations in the Stratosphere), which has a vertical resolution below 1 mm, measurements were performed from Kiruna (68°N, 21°E) as well as from Kühlungsborn (54°N, 12°E). To characterise the atmospheric background conditions, WRF simulations driven by ECMWF reanalysis data were performed for the times of the flights. Averaged dissipation rates observed by LITOS are connected to wave signatures seen in the model. Particularly, larger dissipation rates correlate to larger amplitudes seen in the horizontal divergence or vertical winds in the model and vice versa. For one flight, a very pronounced maximum in dissipation is observed below the tropopause. It is connected to a wind reversal and dynamic instability. In the corresponding WRF simulation, turbulent kinetic energies (TKE) and amplitudes in horizontal divergence are enhanced in this region. For the other flights, no such pronounced maximum in dissipation but also no enhanced values of TKE outside of the boundary layer are observed. That means that low and moderate turbulence is not resolved in WRF, but is observed by LITOS throughout all altitudes.

  8. Measuring the dimensionality of compact extra dimensions with inspiral gravitational waves from black-hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Li-E.; Zhao, Shu Hong; Xu, Peng

    2016-12-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescing black-hole binaries (BHBs) were recently observed by the advanced LIGO detectors. Based on the perturbation analysis, for general Kaluza-Klein theories with compact extra dimensions, we find a 1st-order post-Newtonian correction to the inspiral gravitational waveforms of black-hole binaries, that comes from the variations of the volume of the extra dimensions in near source zones. Such correction depends on a new parameter χ=\\frac{n}{2+n} with n the dimensionality of the extra space and it is irrelevant to the particular choice of the topology of the extra space. For the ideal case of a black-hole binary system following nearly circular orbital motion with almost equal or intermediate mass ratio, such higher-dimensional corrections to the chirping amplitude are worked out. Giving the power of tracing inspiral waves from coalescing massive BHBs with high signal-to-noise ratios, the planned space-borne antennas such as the eLISA and DECIGO may give us a measurement of the parameter χ in the near future and may serve us as new probes in the searching for the evidence of the hidden compact dimensions.

  9. Measurement of transmission and reflection from a thick anisotropic crystal modeled by a sum of incoherent partial waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Shane; Arteaga, Oriol; Martin, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2015-11-01

    Formulas for modeling ellipsometric measurements of bianisotropic crystals assume perfectly coherent plane wave illumination. As such, the finite coherence of typical spectroscopic ellipsometers renders such formulas invalid for crystals thicker than a few micrometers. Reflection measurements of thick crystalline slabs show depolarization. Researchers have proposed strategies for the full accounting for multiply reflected incoherent waves in anisotropic, arbitrarily oriented crystals [Appl. Opt.41, 2521 (2002).APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.41.002521], but to the best of our knowledge these methods have not been tested by explicit measurements. It is shown that by a summation of multiply reflected incoherent waves, transmission and reflection measurements of thick quartz slabs can be interpreted in terms of the constitutive material parameters.

  10. Direct voltage measurements using bulk acoustic wave sensing in LiNbO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nishant Bhupendra

    Accurate (impedance effects that can distort the pulse shape, and pickup of extraneous signals resulting from electromagnetic interference effects. A piezoelectric crystal-based bulk acoustic wave sensor using lithium niobate (LiNbO3) that has applications to metrology, research, and power metering was developed to overcome these measurement issues with the factors of scalability, ease of use, and compactness in mind. A Y+36° cut LiNbO3crystal was coupled to two acoustic transducers, where direct current (DC) voltages ranging from 128--1100 V were applied transversely to the crystal. An acoustic wave was used to interrogate the crystal before, during, and after voltage application. Both single and multiple pass measurements were performed and compared to linear piezoelectric theory. A comparison study between Y+36° and 0° X-cut LiNbO3 was performed to evaluate the influence of crystal cut on acoustic propagation. The study was extended to applying alternating current (AC), and pulsed voltages. The measured DC data was compared to a 1-D impedance matrix model that was based on a three port circuit with voltage-induced strain effects inputted as a model parameter. An uncertainty budget was carried out for both crystal cuts and compared. Environmental effects such as pressure and temperature were also measured to determine their influence on the sensor under ambient conditions. Published literature regarding material constants, such as elastic constants and piezoelectric constants, for LiNbO3 do not account for the influence of an electric field. In light of this, measurements of the acoustic velocities and material constants under the presence of a DC electric field were performed up to 896 V. This information was used to develop an uncertainty analysis for the determination of stress-charge form piezoelectric constants e15 and e22. All measured and calculated values were input into a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the error of the strain-charge form

  11. Wave transformation and attenuation along the west coast of India: Measurements and numerical simulations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aboobacker, V.M.; Vethamony, P.; Samiksha, S.V.; Rashmi, R.; Jyoti, K.

    and Sorensen, 1993]. Interaction of waves with bottom produces a boundary layer, which results in the loss of wave energy to the bed due to bottom friction [Bagnold, 1946]. Vortex ripples and their feedback on the waves through enhanced bottom roughness...

  12. Qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastography for breast masses: How it correlates to quantitative measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jung Hyun, E-mail: lvjenny0417@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Kyung Hee, E-mail: yourheeya@cha.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hae Kyoung, E-mail: AA40501@cha.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Tae, E-mail: jtlee@cha.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To determine the correlation of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) pattern classification to quantitative SWE measurements and whether it is representative of quantitative SWE values with similar performances. Methods: From October 2012 to January 2013, 267 breast masses of 236 women (mean age: 45.12 ± 10.54 years, range: 21–88 years) who had undergone ultrasonography (US), SWE, and subsequent biopsy were included. US BI-RADS final assessment and qualitative and quantitative SWE measurements were recorded. Correlation between pattern classification and mean elasticity, maximum elasticity, elasticity ratio and standard deviation were evaluated. Diagnostic performances of grayscale US, SWE parameters, and US combined to SWE values were calculated and compared. Results: Of the 267 breast masses, 208 (77.9%) were benign and 59 (22.1%) were malignant. Pattern classifications significantly correlated with all quantitative SWE measurements, showing highest correlation with maximum elasticity, r = 0.721 (P < 0.001). Sensitivity was significantly decreased in US combined to SWE measurements to grayscale US: 69.5–89.8% to 100.0%, while specificity was significantly improved: 62.5–81.7% to 13.9% (P < 0.001). Area under the ROC curve (A{sub z}) did not show significant differences between grayscale US to US combined to SWE (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Pattern classification shows high correlation to maximum stiffness and may be representative of quantitative SWE values. When combined to grayscale US, SWE improves specificity of US.

  13. Measuring intermediate mass black hole binaries with advanced gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Veitch, John; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    We perform a systematic study to explore the accuracy with which the parameters of intermediate-mass black-hole binary systems can be measured from their gravitational wave (GW) signatures using second-generation GW detectors. We make use of the most recent reduced-order models containing inspiral, merger and ringdown signals of aligned-spin effective-one-body waveforms (SEOBNR) to significantly speed up the calculations. We explore the phenomenology of the measurement accuracies for binaries with total masses between 50 and 500 $M_\\odot$ and mass ratios between 0.1 and 1. We find that (i) at total masses below ~200 $M_\\odot$, where the signal-to-noise-ratio is dominated by the inspiral portion of the signal, the chirp mass parameter can be accurately measured; (ii) at higher masses, the information content is dominated by the ringdown, and total mass is measured more accurately; (iii) the mass of the lower-mass companion is poorly estimated, especially at high total mass and more extreme mass ratios; (iv) sp...

  14. Measurement of the Electron Bernstein Wave Emission with One of the Power Transmission Lines for ECH in LHD%Measurement of the Electron Bernstein Wave Emission with One of the Power Transmission Lines for ECH in LHD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroe IGAMI; Hiroshi IDEI; Shin KUBO; Yasuo YOSHIMURA; Takashi SHIMOZUMA; Hiromi TAKAHASHI

    2011-01-01

    Possibility of the measurement of radiated waves derived from the thermally emitted electron Bernstein wave (EBW) is numerically investigated based on the assumption of the super dense core (SDC) plasma generated in LHD. EBW that is thermally emitted in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) layer may couple with the electromagnetic wave and be emitted to the vacuum via the EBW-extraordinary-ordinary (B-X-O) mode conversion process. We consider the use of one of the transmission lines for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in LHD as a receiving system of the emission. It is derived that the waves in the fundamental cyclotron frequency range are emitted as the EBW near their upper hybrid resonance (UHR) layer outside the last close flux surface (LCFS). On the other hand, waves in the second harmonics cyclotron frequency range are emitted in the core region. It means that successful measurement of waves of the second harmonic frequency range emitted from extremely high dense core plasma with setting an aim angle for receiving indicates a possibility of the second harmonic ECH by EBW in the core region with setting the same aim angle and the same polarization for launching.

  15. Surface wave tomography of central and northern Europe from automated inter-station dispersion measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, R. A.; Weidle, C.; Lebedev, S.; Cristiano, L.; Meier, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    With the rapid growth in the no. of seismic stations globally, manual data processing for routine analysis as well as determination of seismic observables becomes more and more impractical. Therefore, automated schemes are inevitable to handle these large data volumes. For surface wave tomography, phase velocity dispersion curves of fundamental mode surface waves yield information on the isotropic as well as anisotropic structure of the crust and upper mantle. We measure inter-station phase velocity dispersion curves through cross correlation of vertical component (Rayleigh wave) and transverse component (Love wave) seismograms. We have developed a scheme to automate this well established inter-station method, which automatically selects the smooth parts of observed phase velocity dispersion curves, and thus obtain path average phase velocity dispersion curve of each inter-station path. After testing various parameters for automation of the procedure we finally confined the method to three parameters only, namely (1) difference of the measured phase velocity curve from a background model, (2) a smoothness constraint and (3) a length criterion. We performed rigorous tests to optimize the parameters and obtained optimal values of these three parameters. We successfully applied the method to more than one hundred thousand inter station paths in central and northern Europe which involved more than one million cross correlations on 20 years of the data of the permanent networks. The method was also tested on temporary deployments e.g. TOR, PASSEQ, SVEKALPKO etc, across Europe. After inversion of the fundamental mode phase velocity dispersion curves for both Rayleigh and Love waves, we obtain high resolution anisotropic phase velocity maps for periods between 10 and 250 seconds with a lateral resolution between about 50 to 100 kilometers. Well known features of upper mantle structure in central Europe are well resolved in our phase velocity maps. Distinct differences

  16. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Feng [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei, E-mail: weicai@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Duan, Qianqian [College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Zhiguo, E-mail: zhangzhiguo@hit.edu.cn [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Laboratory of Sono- and Photo-Theranostic Technologies, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Cao, Wenwu, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Laboratory of Sono- and Photo-Theranostic Technologies, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd{sup 3+} lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho{sup 3+} was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+} was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar{sup +} laser, Kr{sup +} laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc.

  17. Measurement of optical properties of nano-cement using THz electromagnetic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heon Young; Kang, Dong Hoon [Advanced Materials Research Team, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Chulmin [Dept. of Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Jae [Institute for Medical Convergence, Yonsei University Medical Liberay, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Enhancing mechanical strength of concrete has been fascinated using carbon-based nanomaterials such as CNT and graphene. The key to improving strength is a dispersion of nanomaterials. A novel method is required to investigate the dispersion inner concrete nondestructively. In this study, the optical optical properties such as refractive index and absorption coefficient are measured in nano-cement mortar specimens containing MWCNT and GO using THz electro-magnetic waves. From the results, the properties of nano-cement mortar are confirmed to be 1.0% to 2.5% higher in refractive index, and -14% to 28% higher in absorption coefficient than those of cement mortar at the average values. Using these characteristics, visualizing the dispersion of nano-concrete structures seems possible in future.

  18. A balloon-borne millimeter-wave telescope for cosmic microwave background anisotropy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Fixsen, D J; Cottingham, D A; Folz, W C; Inman, C A; Kowitt, M S; Meyer, S; Page, L A; Puchalla, J L; Ruhl, J E; Silverberg, R F

    1995-01-01

    We report on the characteristics and design details of the Medium Scale Anisotropy Measurement (MSAM), a millimeter-wave, balloon-borne telescope that has been used to observe anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) on 0\\fdg5 angular scales. The gondola is capable of determining and maintaining absolute orientation to a few arcminutes during a one-night flight. Emphasis is placed on the optical and pointing performance as well as the weight and power budgets. We also discuss the total balloon/gondola mechanical system. The pendulation from this system is a ubiquitous perturbation on the pointing system. A detailed understanding in these areas is needed for developing the next generation of balloon-borne instruments.

  19. Mantle Flow Implications across Easter and Southern Africa from Shear Wave Splitting Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, C.; Nyblade, A.; Bagley, B. C.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F.; Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D.; van der Meijde, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present new shear wave splitting results from broadband seismic stations in Botswana and Namibia, and combine them with previous results from stations in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, South Africa, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Angola to further examine the pattern of seismic anisotropy across southern Africa. The new results come from stations in northern Namibia and Botswana, which help to fill in large gaps in data coverage. Our preliminary results show that fast polarization directions overall trend in a NE orientation. The most noticeable measurements that deviate from this pattern are located around the Archean Tanzania Craton in eastern Africa. The general NE pattern of fast polarization directions is attributed to mantle flow linked to the African superplume. Smaller scale variations from this general direction can be explained by shape anisotropy in the lithosphere in magmatic regions in the East African rift system and to fossil anisotropy in the Precambrian lithosphere.

  20. Developing absolute shock wave equation of state measurements on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, Peter; Fratanduono, D. E.; Lazicki, A.; London, R. A.; Brygoo, S.; Swift, D. C.; Coppari, F.; Millot, M.; Peterson, J. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Erskine, D. J.; Ali, S.; Collins, G. W.

    2016-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility provides an unprecedented capability to generate ultra-high pressure planar shock waves (around 10 TPa) in solid samples. We are currently fielding impedance match equation of state (EOS) experiments to determine the shock Hugoniot of various samples relative to EOS standards, such as aluminum and quartz. However, the equations of state of the standards at multi-TPa shock pressures are not yet well-established. Absolute techniques are needed to provide the data needed to establish the Hugoniots of the standards, and also to measure the state of a sample directly. We are pursuing several approaches using absolute techniques. These approaches will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Wave hindcast studies using SWAN nested in WAVEWATCH III - comparison with measured nearshore buoy data off Karwar, eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amrutha, M.M.; SanilKumar, V.; Sandhya, K.G.; Nair, T.M.B.; Rathod, J.L.

    was tested. The performance of WW3 was evaluated with the measured deep water buoy data at 15.0000° N, 69.0000° E. Overall, the WW3 wave hindcast results using ST4 physics in deep water show a reasonable match (r=0.97 and SI=0.16) with the measured...

  2. An assessment of the potential of continuous-wave ranging for measuring the distance to a highly reflective, infinite sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, C. P.; Bailey, M. C.; Czerner, M. J.; Dudley, K. L.; Vedeler, E.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a continuous-wave, distance-measuring technique for measuring the distance from a spacecraft antenna to a highly ionized plasma surface is examined. The reflection coefficient angle is computed for several aperture models. It is concluded that aperture size and the presence of a nonablating dielectric cover over the antenna are critical factors.

  3. Validity and reproducibility of arterial pulse wave velocity measurement using new device with oscillometric technique: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patnaik Amar

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Availability of a range of techniques and devices allow measurement of many variables related to the stiffness of large or medium sized arteries. There is good evidence that, pulse wave velocity is a relatively simple measurement and is a good indicator of changes in arterial properties. The pulse wave velocity calculated from pulse wave recording by other methods like doppler or tonometry is tedious, time-consuming and above all their reproducibility depends on the operator skills. It requires intensive resource involvement. For epidemiological studies these methods are not suitable. The aim of our study was to clinically evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a new automatic device for measurement of pulse wave velocity that can be used in such studies. Methods In 44 subjects including normal healthy control and patients with coronary artery disease, heart brachial, heart ankle, brachial ankle and carotid femoral pulse wave velocities were recorded by using a new oscillometric device. Lead I and II electrocardiogram and pressure curves were simultaneously recorded. Two observers recorded the pulse wave velocity for validation and one observer recorded the velocity on two occasions for reproducibility. Results and Discussion Pulse wave velocity and arterial stiffness index were recorded in 24 control and 20 coronary artery disease patients. All the velocities were significantly high in coronary artery disease patients. There was highly significant correlation between the values noted by the two observers with low standard deviation. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for various velocities ranged from (r = 0.88–0.90 with (p Conclusion The new device "PeriScope" based on oscillometric technique has been found to be a simple, non-invasive and reproducible device for the assessment of pulse wave velocity and can be used to determine arterial stiffness in large population based studies.

  4. Variability and origin of seismic anisotropy across eastern Canada: Evidence from shear wave splitting measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Bastow, I. D.; Forte, A. M.; Hobbs, T. E.; Calvel, A.; Gonzalez-Monteza, A.; Schow, B.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of seismic anisotropy in continental regions are frequently interpreted with respect to past tectonic processes, preserved in the lithosphere as "fossil" fabrics. Models of the present-day sublithospheric flow (often using absolute plate motion as a proxy) are also used to explain the observations. Discriminating between these different sources of seismic anisotropy is particularly challenging beneath shields, whose thick (≥200 km) lithospheric roots may record a protracted history of deformation and strongly influence underlying mantle flow. Eastern Canada, where the geological record spans ˜3 Ga of Earth history, is an ideal region to address this issue. We use shear wave splitting measurements of core phases such as SKS to define upper mantle anisotropy using the orientation of the fast-polarization direction ϕ and delay time δt between fast and slow shear wave arrivals. Comparison with structural trends in surface geology and aeromagnetic data helps to determine the contribution of fossil lithospheric fabrics to the anisotropy. We also assess the influence of sublithospheric mantle flow via flow directions derived from global geodynamic models. Fast-polarization orientations are generally ENE-WSW to ESE-WNW across the region, but significant lateral variability in splitting parameters on a ≤100 km scale implies a lithospheric contribution to the results. Correlations with structural geologic and magnetic trends are not ubiquitous, however, nor are correlations with geodynamically predicted mantle flow directions. We therefore consider that the splitting parameters likely record a combination of the present-day mantle flow and older lithospheric fabrics. Consideration of both sources of anisotropy is critical in shield regions when interpreting splitting observations.

  5. Quality assurance and control issues for HF radar wave and current measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Lucy

    2015-04-01

    HF radars are now widely used to provide surface current measurements over wide areas of the coastal ocean for scientific and operational applications. In general data quality is acceptable for these applications but there remain issues that impact on the quantity and quality of the data. These include problems with calibration and interference which impact on both phased array (e.g. WERA, Pisces) and direction-finding (e.g. SeaSonde) radars. These same issues and others (e.g. signal-to-noise, in-cell current variability, antenna sidelobes) also impact on the quality and quantity of wave data that can be obtained. These issues will be discussed in this paper, illustrated with examples from deployments of WERA, Pisces and SeaSonde radars in the UK, Europe, USA and Australia. These issues involve both quality assurance (making sure the radars perform to spec and the software is fully operational) and in quality control (identifying problems with the data due to radar hardware or software performance issues and flagging these in the provided data streams). Recommendations for the former, and current practice (of the author and within the Australian Coastal Ocean Radar Network, ACORN*) for the latter, will be discussed. The quality control processes for wave measurement are not yet as well developed as those for currents and data from some deployments can be rather noisy. Some new methods, currently under development by SeaView Sensing Ltd and being tested with ACORN data, will be described and results presented. *ACORN is a facility of the Australian Integrated Marine Observing System, IMOS. IMOS is a national collaborative research infrastructure, supported by Australian Government. It is led by University of Tasmania in partnership with the Australian marine and climate science community.

  6. Nondiseased liver stiffness measured by shear wave elastography: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Yongsoo; Kim, Min Yeong; Kim, Jinoo; Kim, Soo Yeon; Ryu, Jeong Ah; Kim, Tae Yeob; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Kim, Young Hwan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of liver stiffness in patients without liver disease using shear wave elastography and to determine the liver stiffness threshold value for identifying patients with chronic liver diseases. A total of 150 patients who underwent liver sonography coupled with shear wave elastography were enrolled. On the basis of clinical and pathologic criteria, they were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: nondiseased liver (n = 97) and noncirrhotic chronic liver disease (n = 53). Liver stiffness was measured in the right liver, and the median value of 10 measurements was calculated. Both mean and median values in the nondiseased liver group were compared with those in the noncirrhotic chronic liver disease group. To validate this comparison, liver stiffness of the patients who underwent liver biopsy revealing either no fibrosis (fibrosis score F0; n = 5) or substantial fibrosis (F2; n = 14) was also investigated and compared. To determine the optimal threshold value for determining chronic liver disease, a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed. The mean liver stiffness value in the nondiseased liver group was 5.4 kPa. In the noncirrhotic chronic liver disease group, the mean value was 8.1 kPa. Differences between the nondiseased liver and both noncirrhotic chronic liver disease groups were statistically significant (P < .001). The optimal liver stiffness threshold value for discriminating nondiseased liver from noncirrhotic chronic liver disease was 6.9 kPa. The sensitivity using this threshold was 94%. In the biopsy-proven patients, the mean liver stiffness values were 6.0 kPa in the F0 group and 9.9 kPa in the F2 group. The range of liver stiffness in patients with nondiseased liver and the optimal threshold value for discriminating these patients from those with chronic liver disease were identified.

  7. Wave transformation at select locations along the Indian coast through measurements, modelling and remote sensing

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aboobacker, V.M.

    global spectral wave model, IEEE Trans Geosci. Rem. Sens., 43, 110-117. Bhowmick, S.A., R. Kumar, S. Basu, A. Sarkar and V.K. Agarwal, 2009: Improvement in wave forecast using data assimilative coastal wave model, Indian J. Mar. Sci., 38(2), 142..., 1993: The impact of the ERS-1 altimeter on the wave analysis and forecast, Report No. GKSS 93/E/44, GKSS, Germany, 56p. Hanson, J. L., and O. M. Phillips, 2001: Automated analysis of ocean surface directional wave spectra, J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol...

  8. Particle image velocimetry measurement of an instability wave over a porous wall in a duct with flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomar, Antoni; Aurégan, Yves

    2017-01-01

    The flow in a rectangular channel lined with a porous material and acoustically excited with an upstream loudspeaker has been investigated using particle image velocimetry. The measurements are phase-locked to the loudspeaker signal so that the phase-averaged velocity in the lined section is obtained during an excitation period. Most features of the phase-averaged velocity field in the lined section are found to be well described from the sum of three single duct modes: the hydrodynamic instability wave, a standing wave and an acoustic wave. The hydrodynamic instability wave travels at half the mean flow velocity, and its structure shows differences to the case of a locally reacting liner. The relative phase lag between the hydrodynamic and acoustic waves at the liner end dictates the interference between both waves, giving rise to the oscillations of the acoustical transmission coefficient as a function of the frequency. A detachment of the instability wave from the porous wall is observed in the vicinity of the liner downstream edge, together with the separation of the mean vorticity core.

  9. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  10. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  11. Measurement of the open porosity of agricultural soils with acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Jeanne; Mercatoris, Benoit; Destain, Marie-France

    2015-04-01

    soil, since there are more voids filled with air and water, increasing the viscous losses. Fellah et al. (2003) showed that porosity can be determined from phase speed and reflection coefficient. The propagation of acoustic waves in soil is investigated to develop a rapid method for the quantification of the porosity level of agricultural soils. In the present contribution, correlations are determined between the acoustic signatures of agricultural soil in function of its structural properties. In laboratory, compression tests are performed on unsaturated soil samples to reproduce different porosity levels. Ultrasonic pulses are sent through the considered samples. The propagated signals are treated in both time and frequency domains in order to determine the speed of the phase velocity and the reflection. Porosity is then determined and compared with water content measured by gravimetric method. Alaoui, A., Lipiec, J. & Gerke, H.H., 2011. A review of the changes in the soil pore system due to soil deformation: A hydrodynamic perspective. Soil and Tillage Research, 115-116, pp.1-15. Fellah Z.E.A., Berger S., Lauriks W., Depollier C., Aristegui C., Chapelon J.Y., 2003. Measuring the porosity and the tortuosity of porous materials via reflected waves at oblique incidence. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 113 (5), pp 2424-2433 Hamza, M.A. & Anderson, W.K., 2005. Soil compaction in cropping systems. Soil and Tillage Research, 82(2), pp.121-145. Lu, Z., 2005. Role of hysteresis in propagating acousitcs waves in soils. Geophysical Research Letter, pp.32:1-4. Lu, Z., Hickey, C.J. & Sabatier, J.M., 2004. Effects of compaction on the acoustic velocity in soils. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 68(1), pp.7-16. Lu, Z. & Sabatier, J.M., 2009. Effects of soil water potential and moisture content on sound speed. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 73(5), pp.1614-1625. Le Maitre, D.C., Kotzee, I.M. & O'Farrell, P.J., 2014. Impacts of land-cover change on

  12. Detection of cerebral ischemia using the power spectrum of the pulse wave measured by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Akira; Tanaka, Yuichi; Konno, Takehiko; Kawasaki, Shingo; Fujiwara, Michiyuki; Watanabe, Eiju

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and medical treatment of cerebral ischemia are becoming more important due to the increase in the prevalence of cerebrovascular disease. However, conventional methods of evaluating cerebral perfusion have several drawbacks: they are invasive, require physical restraint, and the equipment is not portable, which makes repeated measurements at the bedside difficult. An alternative method is developed using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). NIRS signals are measured at 44 positions (22 on each side) on the fronto-temporal areas in 20 patients with cerebral ischemia. In order to extract the pulse-wave component, the raw total hemoglobin data recorded from each position are band-pass filtered (0.8 to 2.0 Hz) and subjected to a fast Fourier transform to obtain the power spectrum of the pulse wave. The ischemic region is determined by single-photon emission computed tomography. The pulse-wave power in the ischemic region is compared with that in the symmetrical region on the contralateral side. In 17 cases (85%), the pulse-wave power on the ischemic side is significantly lower than that on the contralateral side, which indicates that the transmission of the pulse wave is attenuated in the region with reduced blood flow. Pulse-wave power might be useful as a noninvasive marker of cerebral ischemia.

  13. Validity and reproducibility of arterial pulse wave velocity measurement using new device with oscillometric technique: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Madireddy Umamaheshwar Rao; Reddy, Budda Muralidhar; Yashmaina, Sridhar; Patnaik, Amar Narayana; Rani, Pingali Usha

    2005-08-23

    Availability of a range of techniques and devices allow measurement of many variables related to the stiffness of large or medium sized arteries. There is good evidence that, pulse wave velocity is a relatively simple measurement and is a good indicator of changes in arterial properties. The pulse wave velocity calculated from pulse wave recording by other methods like doppler or tonometry is tedious, time-consuming and above all their reproducibility depends on the operator skills. It requires intensive resource involvement. For epidemiological studies these methods are not suitable. The aim of our study was to clinically evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a new automatic device for measurement of pulse wave velocity that can be used in such studies. In 44 subjects including normal healthy control and patients with coronary artery disease, heart brachial, heart ankle, brachial ankle and carotid femoral pulse wave velocities were recorded by using a new oscillometric device. Lead I and II electrocardiogram and pressure curves were simultaneously recorded. Two observers recorded the pulse wave velocity for validation and one observer recorded the velocity on two occasions for reproducibility. Pulse wave velocity and arterial stiffness index were recorded in 24 control and 20 coronary artery disease patients. All the velocities were significantly high in coronary artery disease patients. There was highly significant correlation between the values noted by the two observers with low standard deviation. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for various velocities ranged from (r = 0.88-0.90) with (p wave velocity were also significantly correlated (r = 0.71-0.98) (P wave velocity was found to correlate significantly with heart brachial, heart ankle, brachial ankle pulse wave velocity and arterial stiffness index values. Reproducibility of our method was good with very low variability in both interobserver and interperiod analysis. The new device "Peri

  14. Transient elastography in anisotropic medium: application to the measurement of slow and fast shear wave speeds in muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Catheline, Stefan; Chaffaï, Sana; Fink, Mathias

    2003-07-01

    From the measurement of a low frequency (50-150 Hz) shear wave speed, transient elastography evaluates the Young's modulus in isotropic soft tissues. In this paper, it is shown that a rod source can generate a low frequency polarized shear strain waves. Consequently this technique allows to study anisotropic medium such as muscle. The evidence of the polarization of low frequency shear strain waves is supported by both numeric simulations and experiments. The numeric simulations are based on theoretical Green's functions in isotropic and anisotropic media (hexagonal system). The experiments in vitro led on beef muscle proves the pertinent of this simple anisotropic pattern. Results in vivo on man biceps shows the existence of slow and fast shear waves as predicted by theory.

  15. Measuring the distance-redshift relation with the cross-correlation of gravitational wave standard sirens and galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Oguri, Masamune

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries are known to be an excellent absolute distance indicator, yet it is unclear whether electromagnetic counterparts of these events are securely identified for measuring their redshifts, especially in the case of black hole-black hole mergers such as the one recently observed with the Advanced LIGO. We propose to use the cross-correlation between spatial distributions of gravitational wave sources and galaxies with known redshifts as an alternative means of constraining the distance-redshift relation from gravitational waves. In our analysis, we explicitly include the modulation of the distribution of gravitational wave sources due to weak gravitational lensing. We show that the cross-correlation analysis in next-generation observations will be able to tightly constrain the relation between the absolute distance and the redshift, and therefore constrain the Hubble constant as well as dark energy parameters.

  16. Millimeter wave spectroscopic measurements of stratospheric and mesospheric constituents over the Italian Alps: stratospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Romaniello

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of rotational lines emitted by middle atmospheric trace gases have been carried out from the Alpine station of Testa Grigia (45.9°N, 7.7°E, elev. 3500 m by means of a Ground-Based Millimeter-wave Spectrometer (GBMS. Observations of species such as O3, HNO3, CO, N2O, HCN, and HDO took place during 4 winter periods, from February 2004 to March 2007, for a total of 116 days of measurements grouped in about 18 field campaigns. By studying the pressure-broadened shape of emission lines the vertical distribution of the observed constituents is retrieved within an altitude range of ?17-75 km, constrained by the 600 MHz pass band and the 65 kHz spectral resolution of the back-end spectrometer. This work discusses the behavior of stratospheric O3 during the entire period of operation at Testa Grigia. Mid-latitude O3 columnar content as estimated using GBMS measurements can vary by large amounts over a period of very few days, with the largest variations observed in December 2005, February 2006, and March 2006, confirming that the northern winter of 2005-2006 was characterized by a particularly intense planetary wave activity. The largest rapid variation from maximum to minimum O3 column values over Testa Grigia took place in December 2006 and reached a relative value of 72% with respect to the average column content for that period. During most GBMS observation times much of the variability is concentrated in the column below 20 km, with tropospheric weather systems and advection of tropical tropospheric air into the lower stratosphere over Testa Grigia having a large impact on the observed variations in column contents. Nonetheless, a wide variability is also found in middle stratospheric GBMS O3 measurements, as expected for mid-latitude ozone. We find that O3 mixing ratios at ?32 km are very well correlated with the solar illumination experienced by air masses over the previous ?15 days, showing that already at 32 km

  17. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America airborne investigation are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are being investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the mission science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of intervening optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the Earth's surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture to support the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) and ACT-America programs.

  18. Measuring Intermediate-Mass Black-Hole Binaries with Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, John; Pürrer, Michael; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-10-02

    We perform a systematic study to explore the accuracy with which the parameters of intermediate-mass black-hole binary systems can be measured from their gravitational wave (GW) signatures using second-generation GW detectors. We make use of the most recent reduced-order models containing inspiral, merger, and ringdown signals of aligned-spin effective-one-body waveforms to significantly speed up the calculations. We explore the phenomenology of the measurement accuracies for binaries with total masses between 50M(⊙) and 500M(⊙) and mass ratios between 0.1 and 1. We find that (i) at total masses below ∼200M(⊙), where the signal-to-noise ratio is dominated by the inspiral portion of the signal, the chirp mass parameter can be accurately measured; (ii) at higher masses, the information content is dominated by the ringdown, and total mass is measured more accurately; (iii) the mass of the lower-mass companion is poorly estimated, especially at high total mass and more extreme mass ratios; and (iv) spin cannot be accurately measured for our injection set with nonspinning components. Most importantly, we find that for binaries with nonspinning components at all values of the mass ratio in the considered range and at a network signal-to-noise ratio of 15, analyzed with spin-aligned templates, the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole with mass >100M(⊙) can be confirmed with 95% confidence in any binary that includes a component with a mass of 130M(⊙) or greater.

  19. Fault zone exploration in a geothermal context using P- and S-wave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawerzinek, Britta; Buness, Hermann; Musmann, Patrick; Tanner, David C.; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Thomas, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the collaborative research programme gebo ('Geothermal Energy and High Performance Drilling') we applied seismic P- and S-wave measurements to analyse and characterise fault zones. Fault zones have a high potential for geothermal energy extraction, but their usability depends on complex factors (structure, lithology, tectonics), underlining the need for detailed fault zone exploration and the deeper understanding of the factors' interplay. In this study, we carried out both P- and S-wave reflection seismic surveys parallel and perpendicular to the eastern border of the Leinetal Graben, Lower Saxony, to explore the fault system. The seismic data reveal a high-resolution image of the complex graben structure which comprises both steeply-dipping normal faults and shallowly west-dipping normal faults, which cause a roll-over structure. In addition halokinesis is observed. The structural image of the graben structure indicates independent tectonic development of the uppermost (500 m) depth levels. One of the shallowly west-dipping normal faults is traceable from the surface down to 500 m depth. To further investigate this fault zone which shows different reflection characteristics of P- and S-waves, a petrophysical analysis was conducted, including elastic parameter derivation and seismic modelling. Elastic parameters change strongly in the near-surface area, e.g., vs increases from 300 m/s at the surface to 900 m/s at 100 m depth, leading to a decrease in vp/vs from 6 to approx. 2.5. Changes in elastic parameters correlate with the geological interpretation and are in correspondence to literature values for the given lithologies. However, the fault zone itself shows no significant changes in elastic parameters due to the low resolution of the derived seismic velocities. Seismic modelling is a helpful tool to check elastic parameters which are assigned to the fault zone in the model. A comparison between synthetic and field data shows that the field

  20. Measurement of quantitative viscoelasticity of bovine corneas based on lamb wave dispersion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Yin, Yin; Guo, Yanrong; Fan, Ning; Lin, Haoming; Liu, Fulong; Diao, Xianfen; Dong, Changfeng; Chen, Xin; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping

    2015-05-01

    The viscoelastic properties of the human cornea can provide valuable information for clinical applications such as the early detection of corneal diseases, better management of corneal surgery and treatment and more accurate measurement of intra-ocular pressure. However, few techniques are capable of quantitatively and non-destructively assessing corneal biomechanics in vivo. The cornea can be regarded as a thin plate in which the vibration induced by an external vibrator propagates as a Lamb wave, the properties of which depend on the thickness and biomechanics of the tissue. In this study, pulses of ultrasound radiation force with a repetition frequency of 100 or 200 Hz were applied to the apex of corneas, and the linear-array transducer of a SonixRP system was used to track the tissue motion in the radial direction. Shear elasticity and viscosity were estimated from the phase velocities of the A0 Lamb waves. To assess the effectiveness of the method, some of the corneas were subjected to collagen cross-linking treatment, and the changes in mechanical properties were validated with a tensile test. The results indicated that the shear modulus was 137 ± 37 kPa and the shear viscosity was 3.01 ± 2.45 mPa · s for the group of untreated corneas and 1145 ± 267 kPa and was 0.16 ± 0.11 mPa · s for the treated group, respectively, implying a significant increase in elasticity and a significant decrease in viscosity after collagen cross-linking treatment. This result is in agreement with the results of the mechanical tensile test and with reports in the literature. This initial investigation illustrated the ability of this ultrasound-based method, which uses the velocity dispersion of low-frequency A0 Lamb waves, to quantitatively assess both the elasticity and viscosity of corneas. Future studies could discover ways to optimize this system and to determine the feasibility of using this method in clinical situations.

  1. Thermoelastic dissipation in inhomogeneous media: loss measurements and displacement noise in coated test masses for interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fejer, M M; Cagnoli, G; Crooks, D R M; Gretarsson, A M; Harry, G M; Hough, J; Penn, S D; Sneddon, P H; Vyatchanin, S P

    2004-01-01

    The displacement noise in the test mass mirrors of interferometric gravitational wave detectors is proportional to their elastic dissipation at the observation frequencies. In this paper, we analyze one fundamental source of dissipation in thin coatings, thermoelastic damping associated with the dissimilar thermal and elastic properties of the film and the substrate. We obtain expressions for the thermoelastic dissipation factor necessary to interpret resonant loss measurements, and for the spectral density of displacement noise imposed on a Gaussian beam reflected from the face of a coated mass. The predicted size of these effects is large enough to affect the interpretation of loss measurements, and to influence design choices in advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  2. Human Heart Pulse Wave Responses Measured Simultaneously at Several Sensor Placements by Two MR-Compatible Fibre Optic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Myllylä

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental measurements conducted using two noninvasive fibre optic methods for detecting heart pulse waves in the human body. Both methods can be used in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. For comparison, the paper also performs an MRI-compatible electrocardiogram (ECG measurement. By the simultaneous use of different measurement methods, the propagation of pressure waves generated by each heart pulse can be sensed extensively in different areas of the human body and at different depths, for example, on the chest and forehead and at the fingertip. An accurate determination of a pulse wave allows calculating the pulse transit time (PTT of a particular heart pulse in different parts of the human body. This result can then be used to estimate the pulse wave velocity of blood flow in different places. Both measurement methods are realized using magnetic resonance-compatible fibres, which makes the methods applicable to the MRI environment. One of the developed sensors is an extraordinary accelerometer sensor, while the other one is a more common sensor based on photoplethysmography. All measurements, involving several test patients, were performed both inside and outside an MRI room. Measurements inside the MRI room were conducted using a 3-Tesla strength closed MRI scanner in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology at the Oulu University Hospital.

  3. A modified beam-to-earth transformation to measure short-wavelength internal waves with an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, A.; Butman, B.; Beardsley, R.C.; Alexander, P.S.; Anderson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The algorithm used to transform velocity signals from beam coordinates to earth coordinates in an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) relies on the assumption that the currents are uniform over the horizontal distance separating the beams. This condition may be violated by (nonlinear) internal waves, which can have wavelengths as small as 100-200 m. In this case, the standard algorithm combines velocities measured at different phases of a wave and produces horizontal velocities that increasingly differ from true velocities with distance from the ADCP. Observations made in Massachusetts Bay show that currents measured with a bottom-mounted upward-looking ADCP during periods when short-wavelength internal waves are present differ significantly from currents measured by point current meters, except very close to the instrument. These periods are flagged with high error velocities by the standard ADCP algorithm. In this paper measurements from the four spatially diverging beams and the backscatter intensity signal are used to calculate the propagation direction and celerity of the internal waves. Once this information is known, a modified beam-to-earth transformation that combines appropriately lagged beam measurements can be used to obtain current estimates in earth coordinates that compare well with pointwise measurements. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  4. Measurability of the tidal deformability by gravitational waves from coalescing binary neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Sekiguchi, Yu-ichiro; Shibata, Masaru

    2016-03-01

    Combining new gravitational waveforms derived by long-term (14 to 16 orbit) numerical-relativity simulations with waveforms by an effective-one-body (EOB) formalism for coalescing binary neutron stars, we construct hybrid waveforms and estimate the measurability for the dimensionless tidal deformability of the neutron stars, Λ , by advanced gravitational-wave detectors. We focus on the equal-mass case with the total mass 2.7 M⊙. We find that for an event at a hypothetical effective distance of Deff=200 Mpc , the distinguishable difference in the dimensionless tidal deformability will be ≈100 , 400, and 800 at 1 σ , 2 σ , and 3 σ levels, respectively, for Advanced LIGO. If the true equation of state is stiff and the typical neutron-star radius is R ≳13 km , our analysis suggests that the radius will be constrained within ≈1 km at 2 σ level for an event at Deff=200 Mpc . On the other hand, if the true equation of state is soft and the typical neutron-star radius is R ≲12 km , it will be difficult to narrow down the equation of state among many soft ones, although it is still possible to discriminate the true one from stiff equations of state with R ≳13 km . We also find that gravitational waves from binary neutron stars will be distinguished from those from spinless binary black holes at more than 2 σ level for an event at Deff=200 Mpc . The validity of the EOB formalism, Taylor-T4, and Taylor-F2 approximants as the inspiral waveform model is also examined.

  5. Geothermal exploration in the German Molasse Basin - Supplementary exploration using integrated 3-component data and shear wave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawerzinek, Britta; Buness, Hermann; Lüschen, Ewald; Thomas, Rüdiger

    2017-04-01

    To establish a dense area-wide network of geothermal facilities, the Stadtwerke München initiated the joint research project GRAME together with the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (GeoParaMoL*). As a database for the project, a 3D seismic survey was acquired from November 1015 to March 2016 and covers 170 km2 of the southern part of Munich. 3D seismic exploration is a well-established method to explore geothermal reservoirs, and its value for reservoir characterization of the Malm has been proven by several projects. A particular challenge often is the determination of geophysical parameters for facies interpretation without any borehole information, which is needed for calibration. A new approach to facilitate a reliable interpretation is to include shear waves in the interpretation workflow, which helps to tie down the range of lithological and petrophysical parameters. Shear wave measurements were conducted during the regular 3D seismic survey in Munich. In a passive experiment, the survey was additionally recorded on 467 single, 3-component (3C), digital receivers that were deployed along one main line (15 km length) and two crosslines (4 km length). In this way another 3D P-wave as well as a 3D shear wave dataset were acquired. In the active shear wave experiment the SHOVER technique (Edelmann, 1981) was applied to directly excite shear waves using standard vertical vibrators. The 3C recordings of both datasets show, in addition to the P-wave reflections on the vertical component, clear shear-wave signals on the horizontal components. The structural image of the P-waves recorded on the vertical component of the 3C receivers displays clear reflectors within the Molasse Basin down to the Malm and correlates well with the structural image of the regular survey. Taking into account a travel time ratio of 1.6 the reflection patterns of horizontal and vertical components approximately coincide. This indicates that Molasse sediments and the Malm can also

  6. Impact of the interfaces for wind and wave modeling - interpretation using COAWST, SAR and point measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment-transport (COAWST) modeling system. The roughness length has been calculated using seven schemes (Charnock, Fan, Oost, Drennen, Liu, Andreas, Taylor-Yelland). The stress approach is applied through a wave boundary layer model in SWAN. The experiments are done to a case where the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image......Air and sea interacts, where winds generate waves and waves affect the winds. This topic is ever relevant for offshore functions such as shipping, portal routines, wind farm operation and maintenance. In a coupled modeling system, the atmospheric modeling and the wave modeling interfere with each...... other through an interface. In most modeling system the interface is described through the roughness length. The roughness length is parameterized with the basic idea of the Charnock formulation while the coefficients could be functions of simply wind speed, or wave parameters. More advanced interfaces...

  7. Basic antenna transmitting characteristics using an extrapolation range measurement technique at a millimeter-wave band at NMIJ/AIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2007-06-01

    A novel test fixture operating at a millimeter-wave band using an extrapolation range measurement technique was developed at the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ). Here I describe the measurement system using a Q-band test fixture. I measured the relative insertion loss as a function of antenna separation distance and observed the effects of multiple reflections between the antennas. I also evaluated the antenna gain at 33 GHz using the extrapolation technique.

  8. Measurements of Antenna Surface for Millimeter-Wave Space Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Doi, Akihiro; Sato, Eiichi

    2011-01-01

    In the construction of a space radio telescope, it is essential to use materials with a low noise factor and high mechanical robustness for the antenna surface. We present the results of measurements of the reflection performance of two candidates for antenna surface materials for use in a radio telescope installed in a new millimeter-wave astronomical satellite, ASTRO-G. To estimate the amount of degradation caused by fluctuations in the thermal environment in the projected orbit of the satellite, a thermal cycle test was carried out for two candidates, namely, copper foil carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and aluminum-coated CFRP. At certain points during the thermal cycle test, the reflection loss of the surfaces was measured precisely by using a radiometer in the 41-45 GHz band. In both candidates, cracks appeared on the surface after the thermal cycle test, where the number density of the cracks increased as the thermal cycle progressed. The reflection loss also increased in proportion to the number...

  9. Measuring the Absolute Height and Profile of the Mesospheric Sodium Layer using a Continuous Wave Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, D J; Redfern, R M; Ageorges, N; Fews, H

    2003-01-01

    We have developed and tested a novel method, based on LIDAR, of measuring the height and profile of the mesospheric sodium layer using a continuous wave laser. It is more efficient than classical LIDAR as the laser is on for 50% of the time, and so can in principle be used during laser guide star adaptive optics observations. It also has significant advantages over direct imaging techniques because it does not require a second telescope, is almost independent of the atmospheric conditions, and avoids triangulation problems in determining the height. In the long term, regular monitoring using this method would allow a valuable database of sodium layer profiles, heights, and return flux measurements to be built up which would enable observatory staff astronomers to schedule observations optimally. In this paper we describe the original experiment carried out using the ALFA laser guide star system at Calar Alto Observatory in Spain. We validate the method by comparing the LIDAR results with those obtained from s...

  10. Stiffness of benign and malignant prostate tissue measured by shear-wave elastography: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvière, Olivier; Melodelima, Christelle; Hoang Dinh, Au; Bratan, Flavie; Pagnoux, Gaele; Sanzalone, Thomas; Crouzet, Sébastien; Colombel, Marc; Mège-Lechevallier, Florence; Souchon, Rémi

    2017-05-01

    To measure benign and malignant prostate tissue stiffness using shear-wave elastography (SWE). Thirty consecutive patients underwent transrectal SWE in the axial and sagittal planes before prostatectomy. After reviewing prostatectomy specimens, two radiologists measured stiffness in regions corresponding to cancers, lateral and median benign peripheral zone (PZ) and benign transition zone (TZ). Cancers were stiffer than benign PZ and TZ. All tissue classes were stiffer on sagittal than on axial imaging, in TZ than in PZ, and in median PZ than in lateral PZ. At multivariate analysis, the nature of tissue (benign or malignant; P prostate (TZ, median PZ or lateral PZ; P = 0.0065) significantly and independently influenced tissue stiffness. On axial images, the thresholds maximising the Youden index in TZ, lateral PZ and median PZ were respectively 62 kPa, 33 kPa and 49 kPa. On sagittal images, the thresholds were 76 kPa, 50 kPa and 72 kPa, respectively. SWE can distinguish prostate malignant and benign tissues. Tissue stiffness is influenced by the imaging plane and the location within the gland. • Prostate cancers were stiffer than the benign peripheral zone • All tissue classes were stiffer on sagittal than on axial imaging • All tissue classes were stiffer in the transition zone than in the peripheral zone • All tissue classes were stiffer in the median than in the lateral peripheral zone • Taking into account imaging plane and zonal anatomy can improve cancer detection.

  11. Automatic and accurate measurements of P-wave and S-wave polarisation properties with a weighted multi-station complex polarisation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Meersman, K.; van der Baan, M.; Kendall, J.-M.; Jones, R. H.

    2003-04-01

    We present a weighted multi-station complex polarisation analysis to determine P-wave and S-wave polarisation properties of three-component seismic array data. Complex polarisation analysis of particle motion on seismic data was first introduced by Vidale (1986). In its original form, the method is an interpretation of the eigenvalue decomposition of a 3 by 3, complex data-covariance matrix. We have extended the definition of the data-covariance matrix (C) to C=X^HW-1 X, where C now is a 3n by 3n symmetric complex covariance matrix, with n the number of included three-component (3C) stations. X is the data matrix, the columns of which are the analytic signals of the Northern, Eastern and vertical components of the subsequent 3C stations. X^H is the transpose of the complex conjugate of X and W is a diagonal weighting matrix containing the pre-arrival noise levels of all components and all stations. The signals used in the data-matrix are corrected for arrival time differences. The eigenvectors and eigenvalues of C now describe the polarisation properties within the selected analysis window for all included stations. The main advantages of this approach are a better separation of signal and noise in the covariance matrix and the measurement of signal polarisation properties that are not influenced by the presence of polarised white noise. The technique was incorporated in an automated routine to measure the P-wave and S-wave polarisation properties of a microseismic data-set. The data were recorded in the Valhall oilfield in 1998 with a six level 3C vertical linear array with geophones at 20 m intervals between depths of 2100 m and 2200 m. In total 303 microseismic events were analysed and the results compared with manual interpretations. This comparison showed the advantage and high accuracy of the method.

  12. Rogue waves: Classification, measurement and data analysis, and hyperfast numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, A. R.

    2010-07-01

    The last twenty years has seen the birth and subsequent evolution of a fundamental new idea in nonlinear wave research: Rogue waves, freak waves or extreme events in the wave field dynamics can often be classified as coherent structure solutions of the requisite nonlinear partial differential wave equations (PDEs). Since a large number of generic nonlinear PDEs occur across many branches of physics, the approach is widely applicable to many fields including the dynamics of ocean surface waves, internal waves, plasma waves, acoustic waves, nonlinear optics, solid state physics, geophysical fluid dynamics and turbulence (vortex dynamics and nonlinear waves), just to name a few. The first goal of this paper is to give a classification scheme for solutions of this type using the inverse scattering transform (IST) with periodic boundary conditions. In this context the methods of algebraic geometry give the solutions of particular PDEs in terms of Riemann theta functions. In the classification scheme the Riemann spectrum fully defines the coherent structure solutions and their mutual nonlinear interactions. I discuss three methods for determining the Riemann spectrum: (1) algebraic-geometric loop integrals, (2) Schottky uniformization and (3) the Nakamura-Boyd approach. I give an overview of several nonlinear wave equations and graph some of their coherent structure solutions using theta functions. The second goal is to discuss how theta functions can be used for developing data analysis (nonlinear Fourier) algorithms; nonlinear filtering techniques allow for the extraction of coherent structures from time series. The third goal is to address hyperfast numerical models of nonlinear wave equations (which are thousands of times faster than traditional spectral methods).

  13. Measurement of the decay rate of single-frequency perturbations on blast waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, A D; Ditmire, T; Hansen, J F; Edwards, M J; Adams, R G; Rambo, P K; Ruggles, L; Smith, I C; Porter, J L

    2005-12-09

    To explore the validity of theories forwarded to explain the dynamics of hydrodynamic perturbations on high Mach number blast waves, we have studied the decay rate of perturbations on blast waves traveling through nitrogen gas. In our experiments, 1 kJ pulses from the Z-Beamlet laser at Sandia National Laboratories illuminated solid targets immersed in gas and created blast waves. The polytropic index implied by comparing experiment to theoretical predictions is compared to simulation results.

  14. Tropical temperature variability and Kelvin-wave activity in the UTLS from GPS RO measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Randel, William J.; Kim, Joowan

    2017-01-01

    Tropical temperature variability over 10-30 km and associated Kelvin-wave activity are investigated using GPS radio occultation (RO) data from January 2002 to December 2014. RO data are a powerful tool for quantifying tropical temperature oscillations with short vertical wavelengths due to their high vertical resolution and high accuracy and precision. Gridded temperatures from GPS RO show the strongest variability in the tropical tropopause region (on average 3 K2). Large-scale zonal variability is dominated by transient sub-seasonal waves (2 K2), and about half of sub-seasonal variance is explained by eastward-traveling Kelvin waves with periods of 4 to 30 days (1 K2). Quasi-stationary waves associated with the annual cycle and interannual variability contribute about a third (1 K2) to total resolved zonal variance. Sub-seasonal waves, including Kelvin waves, are highly transient in time. Above 20 km, Kelvin waves are strongly modulated by the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in stratospheric zonal winds, with enhanced wave activity during the westerly shear phase of the QBO. In the tropical tropopause region, however, peaks of Kelvin-wave activity are irregularly distributed in time. Several peaks coincide with maxima of zonal variance in tropospheric deep convection, but other episodes are not evidently related. Further investigations of convective forcing and atmospheric background conditions are needed to better understand variability near the tropopause.

  15. Wind-wave coupling in the atmospheric boundary layer over a reservoir: field measurements and verification of the model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Papko, Vladislav; Baidakov, Georgy; Vdovin, Maxim; Kandaurov, Alexander; Sergeev, Daniil

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the results of field experiments conducted at the Gorky Reservoir to test a quasi-linear model of the atmospheric boundary layer [1]. In the course of the experiment we simultaneously measured profiles of wind speed and surface wave spectra using instruments placed on the Froude buoy, which measures the following parameters: i) the module and the direction of the wind speed using ultrasonic wind sensor WindSonic Gill instruments, located on the 4 - levels from 0.1 x 5 m long; ii) profile of the surface waves with 3-channel string wave-gauge with a base of 5 cm, iii) the temperature of the water and air with a resistive sensor. From the measured profiles of wind speed, we calculated basic parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer: the friction velocity u*, the wind speed at the standard height of 10 m U10 and the drag coefficient CD. Data on CD(U10), obtained at the Gorky Reservoir, were compared with similar data obtained on Lake George in Australia during the Australian Shallow Water Experiment (AUSWEX) conducted in 1997 - 1999 [2,3]. A good agreement was obtained between measured data at two different on the parameters of inland waters: deep Gorky reservoir and shallow Lake George.To elucidate the reasons for this coincidence of the drag coefficients under strongly different conditions an analysis of surface waves was conducted.Measurements have shown that in both water bodies the surface wave spectra have almost the same asymptotics (spatial spectrum - k-3, the frequency spectrum -5), corresponding to the Phillips saturation spectrum.These spectra are typically observed for the steep surface waves, for which the basic dissipation mechanism is wave breaking. The similarity of the short-wave parts of the spectra can be regarded as a probable cause of coincidence of dependency of drag coefficient of the water surface on wind speed. Quantitative verification of this hypothesis was carried out in the framework of quasi-linear model of the wind

  16. Hydro-acoustic and tsunami waves generated by the 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake: Modeling and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolali, Ali; Cecioni, Claudia; Bellotti, Giorgio; Kirby, James T.

    2015-02-01

    Detection of low-frequency hydro-acoustic waves as precursor components of destructive tsunamis can enhance the promptness and the accuracy of Tsunami Early Warning Systems (TEWS). We reconstruct the hydro-acoustic wave field generated by the 2012 Haida Gwaii tsunamigenic earthquake using a 2-D horizontal numerical model based on the integration over the depth of the compressible fluid wave equation and considering a mild sloped rigid seabed. Spectral analysis of the wave field obtained at different water depths and distances from the source revealed the frequency range of low-frequency elastic oscillations of sea water. The resulting 2-D numerical model gave us the opportunity to study the hydro-acoustic wave propagation in a large-scale domain with available computers and to support the idea of deep-sea observatory and data interpretation. The model provides satisfactory results, compared with in situ measurements, in the reproduction of the long-gravitational waves. Differences between numerical results and field data are probably due to the lack of exact knowledge of sea bottom motion and to the rigid seabed approximation, indicating the need for further study of poro-elastic bottom effects.

  17. Rotational spectroscopy and three-wave mixing of 4-carvomenthenol: A technical guide to measuring chirality in the microwave regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shubert, V. Alvin; Schmitz, David; Medcraft, Chris; Krin, Anna [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); The Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Patterson, David; Doyle, John M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Schnell, Melanie, E-mail: melanie.schnell@mpsd.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); The Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Universität Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    We apply chirality sensitive microwave three-wave mixing to 4-carvomenthenol, a molecule previously uncharacterized with rotational spectroscopy. We measure its rotational spectrum in the 2-8.5 GHz range and observe three molecular conformers. We describe our method in detail, from the initial step of spectral acquisition and assignment to the final step of determining absolute configuration and enantiomeric excess. Combining fitted rotational constants with dipole moment components derived from quantum chemical calculations, we identify candidate three-wave mixing cycles which were further tested using a double resonance method. Initial optimization of the three-wave mixing signal is done by varying the duration of the second excitation pulse. With known transition dipole matrix elements, absolute configuration can be directly determined from a single measurement.

  18. Measuring a cosmological distance-redshift relationship using only gravitational wave observations of binary neutron star coalescences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, C; Read, J

    2012-03-02

    Detection of gravitational waves from the inspiral phase of binary neutron star coalescence will allow us to measure the effects of the tidal coupling in such systems. Tidal effects provide additional contributions to the phase evolution of the gravitational wave signal that break a degeneracy between the system's mass parameters and redshift and thereby allow the simultaneous measurement of both the effective distance and the redshift for individual sources. Using the population of O(10(3)-10(7)) detectable binary neutron star systems predicted for 3rd generation gravitational wave detectors, the luminosity distance-redshift relation can be probed independently of the cosmological distance ladder and independently of electromagnetic observations. We conclude that for a range of representative neutron star equations of state the redshift of such systems can be determined to an accuracy of 8%-40% for z<1 and 9%-65% for 1

  19. Noninvasive measurement of wave speed of porcine cornea in ex vivo porcine eyes for various intraocular pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Boran; Sit, Arthur J; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to extend an ultrasound surface wave elastography (USWE) technique for noninvasive measurement of ocular tissue elastic properties. In particular, we aim to establish the relationship between the wave speed of cornea and the intraocular pressure (IOP). Normal ranges of IOP are between 12 and 22mmHg. Ex vivo porcine eye balls were used in this research. The porcine eye ball was supported by the gelatin phantom in a testing container. Some water was pour into the container for the ultrasound measurement. A local harmonic vibration was generated on the side of the eye ball. An ultrasound probe was used to measure the wave propagation in the cornea noninvasively. A 25 gauge butterfly needle was inserted into the vitreous humor of the eye ball under the ultrasound imaging guidance. The needle was connected to a syringe. The IOP was obtained by the water height difference between the water level in the syringe and the water level in the testing container. The IOP was adjusted between 5mmHg and 30mmHg with a 5mmHg interval. The wave speed was measured at each IOP for three frequencies of 100, 150 and 200Hz. Finite element method (FEM) was used to simulate the wave propagation in the corneal according to our experimental setup. A linear viscoelastic FEM model was used to compare the experimental data. Both the experiments and the FEM analyses showed that the wave speed of cornea increased with IOP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation on pre-seismic equatorial ionospheric anomaly and its possible association with the gravity wave using satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, K.; Oyama, K. I.; Sun, Y. Y.; Liu, T. J. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Some examples of the equatorial plasma density measured by DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) increased before some large earthquakes are introduced. Previous examples of the pre-seismic equatorial ionization anomalies (EIA) associated with the northern Sumatra earthquake of 2005, Wenchuan earthquake of 2008, Pisco earthquake of 2007, and Kuril Island earthquake of 2007, commonly accompanied conspicuous precursory EIA enhancements distinct from the longitudinal asymmetric variation which is known as a result of ionospheric interaction with the thermospheric tidal modulation generating wave structure in the global ionospheric density profile in the dayside local time. The physical mechanisms of the seismo-ionospheric coupling manifested as the enhanced EIA intensity can be ascribed either to the gravity wave or static electric field generated by the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling, which is still in debate because of lack in confident observational evidences. Molucca sea earthquake of 2007 which accompanied dominant-ever precursory EIA enhancement was selected as a case study to investigate whether the seismo-ionospheric coupling was originated from the gravity wave propagating from the mesosphere to the thermosphere using the SABER satellite data. The gravity wave intensity according to the frequency was derived by applying the s-transform to the atmospheric neutral temperature profile measured by SABER limb-scanning method. The initial analysis results of the ionospheric plasma condition and thermospheric gravity wave derived from DEMETER, CHAMP, and SABER are introduced and the possible association between the physical conditions are discussed.

  1. Noncollinear wave mixing for measurement of dynamic processes in polymers: physical ageing in thermoplastics and epoxy cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demčenko, A; Koissin, V; Korneev, V A

    2014-02-01

    Elastic wave mixing using an immersion method has shown effective monitoring and scanning capabilities when applied to thermoplastic ageing, epoxy curing, and non-destructive testing. In water, excitation and reception of waves do not require physical contact between the tools and the specimen, making the acquisition of high-resolution C-scans possible. The nonlinear material parameters exhibit a much higher sensitivity to the specimen state compared to linear ones. Thus, the nonlinear data for polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) have a 40% difference between zones of "young" and "aged" material, while the linear data show no difference at all. Methodology and logistics of the immersion wave-mixing method are discussed in detail. Monitoring of epoxy curing has also revealed a good sensitivity of the method to this complex process including several characteristic stages, such as the time of maximal viscosity, the gel time, and the vitrification time. These stages are independently verified in separate rheometry measurements. The presented method allows for a number of possibilities: wave-mode and frequency separations, elimination of surrounding medium influence, "steering" (scanning) a scattered wave, controlling the location of the intersection volume, single-sided or double-sided measurements, and operation in detector mode.

  2. Optimally accurate thermal-wave cavity photopyroelectric measurements of pressure-dependent thermophysical properties of air: theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Chi-Hang; Matvienko, Anna; Mandelis, Andreas

    2007-10-01

    An experimental technique for the measurement of thermal properties of air at low pressures using a photopyroelectric (PPE) thermal-wave cavity (TWC) was developed. In addition, two theoretical approaches, a conventional one-dimensional thermal-wave model and a three-dimensional theory based on the Hankel integral, were applied to interpret the thermal-wave field in the thermal-wave cavity. The importance of radiation heat transfer mechanisms in a TWC was also investigated. Radiation components were added to the purely conductive model by linearizing the radiation heat transfer component at the cavity boundary. The experimental results indicate that the three-dimensional model is necessary to describe the PPE signal, especially at low frequencies where thermal diffusion length is large and sideways propagation of the thermal-wave field becomes significant. Radiation is found to be the dominant contributor of the PPE signal at high frequencies and large cavity lengths, where heat conduction across the TWC length is relatively weak. The three-dimensional theory and the Downhill Simplex algorithm were used to fit the experimental data and extract the thermal diffusivity of air and the heat transfer coefficient in a wide range of pressures from 760 to 2.6 Torr. It was shown that judicious adjustments of cavity length and computational best fits to frequency-scanned data using three-dimensional photopyroelectric theory lead to optimally accurate value measurements of thermal diffusivity and heat transfer coefficient at various pressures.

  3. Short-term statistics of waves measured off Ratnagiri, eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amrutha, M.M.; SanilKumar, V.

    coast of India have been analyzed to study the short-term statistics of waves covering full one year period. The study indicates that the values of the observed maximum wave height as a function of duration are not consistent with the theoretical...

  4. Study of the directional spectrum of ocean waves using array, buoy and radar measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.

    to install capacitance gauges unless they are pile driven or mounted on spar buoys. Also at larger depths, the wave signal at the bottom mounted pressure gauges is attenuated as a function of wave period (frequency), the attenuation being greater for smaller...

  5. Heat waves measured with MODIS land surface temperature data predict changes in avian community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff

    2011-01-01

    Heat waves are expected to become more frequent and severe as climate changes, with unknown consequences for biodiversity. We sought to identify ecologically-relevant broad-scale indicators of heat waves based on MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and interpolated air temperature data and assess their associations with avian community structure. Specifically, we...

  6. Investigation on Radio Wave Propagation in Shallow Seawater: Simulations and Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Eugenio; Mena, Pablo; Dorta, Pablo; Perez-Alvarez, Ivan; Zazo, Santiago; Perez, Marina; Quevedo, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The authors present full wave simulations and experimental results of propagation of electromagnetic waves in shallow seawaters. Transmitter and receiver antennas are ten-turns loops placed on the seabed. Some propagation frameworks are presented and simulated. Finally, simulation results are compared with experimental ones.

  7. Is a Simple Measurement Task a Roadblock to Student Understanding of Wave Phenomena?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryjevskaia, Mila; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.; Heron, Paula R. L

    2012-01-01

    We present results from our ongoing investigation of student understanding of periodic waves and interference phenomena at the introductory physics level. We have found that many students experience significant difficulties when they attempt to express a distance of interest in terms of the wavelength of a periodic wave. We argue that for these…

  8. Prediction and measurement of the electromagnetic environment of high-power medium-wave and short-wave broadcast antennas in far field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhanghong; Wang, Qun; Ji, Zhijiang; Shi, Meiwu; Hou, Guoyan; Tan, Danjun; Wang, Pengqi; Qiu, Xianbo

    2014-12-01

    With the increasing city size, high-power electromagnetic radiation devices such as high-power medium-wave (MW) and short-wave (SW) antennas have been inevitably getting closer and closer to buildings, which resulted in the pollution of indoor electromagnetic radiation becoming worsened. To avoid such radiation exceeding the exposure limits by national standards, it is necessary to predict and survey the electromagnetic radiation by MW and SW antennas before constructing the buildings. In this paper, a modified prediction method for the far-field electromagnetic radiation is proposed and successfully applied to predict the electromagnetic environment of an area close to a group of typical high-power MW and SW wave antennas. Different from currently used simplified prediction method defined in the Radiation Protection Management Guidelines (H J/T 10. 3-1996), the new method in this article makes use of more information such as antennas' patterns to predict the electromagnetic environment. Therefore, it improves the prediction accuracy significantly by the new feature of resolution at different directions. At the end of this article, a comparison between the prediction data and the measured results is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed new method. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Statistical analysis of thermospheric gravity waves from Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of atomic oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. K. Ford

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Data from the Fabry-Perot Interferometers at KEOPS (Sweden, Sodankylä (Finland, and Svalbard (Norway, have been analysed for gravity wave activity on all the clear nights from 2000 to 2006. A total of 249 nights were available from KEOPS, 133 from Sodankylä and 185 from the Svalbard FPI. A Lomb-Scargle analysis was performed on each of these nights to identify the periods of any wave activity during the night. Comparisons between many nights of data allow the general characteristics of the waves that are present in the high latitude upper thermosphere to be determined. Comparisons were made between the different parameters: the atomic oxygen intensities, the thermospheric winds and temperatures, and for each parameter the distribution of frequencies of the waves was determined. No dependence on the number of waves on geomagnetic activity levels, or position in the solar cycle, was found. All the FPIs have had different detectors at various times, producing different time resolutions of the data, so comparisons between the different years, and between data from different sites, showed how the time resolution determines which waves are observed. In addition to the cutoff due to the Nyquist frequency, poor resolution observations significantly reduce the number of short-period waves (<1 h period that may be detected with confidence. The length of the dataset, which is usually determined by the length of the night, was the main factor influencing the number of long period waves (>5 h detected. Comparisons between the number of gravity waves detected at KEOPS and Sodankylä over all the seasons showed a similar proportion of waves to the number of nights used for both sites, as expected since the two sites are at similar latitudes and therefore locations with respect to the auroral oval, confirming this as a likely source region. Svalbard showed fewer waves with short periods than KEOPS data for a season when both had the same time resolution data

  10. Fractal dimensions of wave functions and local spectral measures on the Fibonacci chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macé, Nicolas; Jagannathan, Anuradha; Piéchon, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical framework for understanding the wave functions and spectrum of an extensively studied paradigm for quasiperiodic systems, namely the Fibonacci chain. Our analytical results, which are obtained in the limit of strong modulation of the hopping amplitudes, are in good agreement with published numerical data. In the perturbative limit, we show a symmetry of wave functions under permutation of site and energy indices. We compute the wave-function renormalization factors and from them deduce analytical expressions for the fractal exponents corresponding to individual wave functions, as well as their global averages. The multifractality of wave functions is seen to appear at next-to-leading order in ρ . Exponents for the local spectral density are given, in extremely good accord with numerical calculations. Interestingly, our analytical results for exponents are observed to describe the system rather well even for values of ρ well outside the domain of applicability of perturbation theory.

  11. Unsteady heat-flux measurements of second-mode instability waves in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat-flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors, and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are consistent with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was used to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  12. Comparison of Simulations and Offshore Measurement Data of a Combined Floating Wind and Wave Energy Demonstration Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Anders; Larsen, Torben J.; Hansen, Anders Melchior

    2015-01-01

    external system that reads the output generated directly by the wave analysis software WAMIT. The main focus of the comparison is on the statistical trends of the platform motion, mooring loads, and turbine loads in measurements and simulations during different operational conditions. Finally, challenges...

  13. Quantitative Measurement of the Exponential Growth of Spreading Width of a Quantum Wave Packet in Chaotic Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JunQing; LIU Fang; XING YongZhong; ZUO Wei

    2002-01-01

    The quantum correspondence of the very peculiar phenomenon of classical chaos-the exponential instability of motion can be characterized by the initially exponential growth rate of the total uncertainty measurement of the propagating quantum wave packet. Our calculation indicates that quantitatively the growth rate is approximately twice the classical maximum Lyapunov exponent of the system.

  14. First 3D measurements of temperature fluctuations induced by gravity wave with the infrared limb imager GLORIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisch, Isabell; Preusse, Peter; Ungermann, Jörn; Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Riese, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) are one of the most important coupling mechanisms in the atmosphere. They couple different compartments of the atmosphere. The GW-LCYCLE (Gravity Wave Life Cycle) project aims on studying the excitation, propagation, and dissipation of gravity waves. An aircraft campaign has been performed in winter 2015/2016, during which the first 3D tomographic measurements of GWs were performed with the infrared limb imager GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere). GLORIA combines a classical Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a 2D detector array. The capability to image the atmosphere and thereby take several thousand spectra simultaneously improves the spatial sampling compared to conventional limb sounders by an order of magnitude. Furthermore GLORIA is able to pan the horizontal viewing direction and therefore measure the same volume of air under different angles. Due to these properties tomographic methods can be used to derive 3D temperature and tracer fields with spatial resolutions of better than 30km x 30km x 250m from measurements taken during circular flight patterns. Temperature distributions measured during a strong GW event on the 25.01.2016 during the GW-LCycle campaign over Iceland will be presented and analyzed for gravity waves. The three dimensional nature of the GLORIA measurements allows for the determination of the gravity wave momentum flux, including its horizontal direction. The calculated momentum fluxes rank this event under one of the strongest 1% observed in that latitude range in January 2016. The three dimensional wave vectors determined from the GLORIA measurements can be used for a ray tracing study with the Gravity wave Regional Or Global RAy Tracer (GROGRAT). Here 1D ray tracing, meaning solely vertical column propagation, as used by standard parameterizations in numerical weather prediction and climate models is compared to 4D ray tracing (spatially three dimensional with time varying

  15. Crustal anisotropy along the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone from shear wave splitting measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syuhada, Syuhada; Hananto, Nugroho D.; Abdullah, Chalid I.; Puspito, Nanang T.; Anggono, Titi; Yudistira, Tedi; Ramdhan, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    We analyse shear wave splitting derived from the local earthquakes recorded at 13 seismic stations to investigate crustal anisotropy over varied geological regimes of the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone. We determine high-quality splitting measurements for 262 event-station pairs. The orientations of fast polarisation for the stations located in the oceanic regime are generally parallel or sub-parallel to the directions of the principal compressional strain-rate axes with a lack of dependency of delay time δt on increasing depth. The results suggest that anisotropy in this domain is primarily due to the influence of stress induced anisotropy on the upper crust. On the other hand, the average fast polarisations show more scattered for the stations located around Sumba Island and in the collision regime, implying a mix of anisotropy causes. Thus, anisotropy in this region is not only controlled by preferentially aligned cracks due to tectonic stress, but also by preferential mineral alignment and macro-scale faults associated with the regional tectonic deformation. We also perform further analysis to search possible temporal variations of splitting parameters associated with the stress changes excited by large earthquakes. The association between variation in splitting parameters and earthquake activity observed in this study might provide useful information about accumulation of stress before large events, and thus might be considered as an earthquake-forecasting tool in the future.

  16. Measurement of torsional vibration to detect angular misalignment through the modulated square wave of an encoder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meroño, P. A.; Gómez, F. C.; Marín, F.; Zaghar, L.

    2017-02-01

    One of the widely used processes to measure torsional vibration focuses on the analysis of a square signal from a device set in the machine shaft. The tools used for this purpose usually consist of a toothed wheel connected to an appropriate transducer, of an electromagnetic or optic type, which provides a square wave signal. If the rotation velocity is constant, the signal pulses are the same width, but when the velocity changes, the width of the pulses changes too, lengthening or shortening its width, resulting in a frequency modulated signal. When the shafts of the machines are misaligned angularly, the average speed changes due to variable torque action, so that spectral features of modulated signal show frequency components that are explained by the Bessel Functions. This work shows that these components are caused by a carrying (constant average speed) and a modulator signal (variable turning speed) between the harmonics surrounding the central frequency. Besides, it may also test their relationship with the presence of angular misalignment in the coupled-machine shafts. In addition, an iterative method is applied to construct the frequency spectral diagram of the induced square signal, once the appropriate modulation indices of the Bessel functions have been calculated. To compare and validate the method, different bench tests have been performed using pulse signal and laser interferometry.

  17. The high resolution spectrum of methyltrioxorhenium reinvestigated with new infrared and millimeter-wave measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Asselin, Pierre; Huet, Thérèse; Margulès, Laurent; Motiyenko, Roman; Hendricks, Richard; Tarbutt, Michael; Tokunaga, Sean; Darquié, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Following our first paper about high resolution spectroscopy of methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) [Stoeffler et al. PCCP, 13, 854, (2011)], the present study reports a deeper investigation of the ground state, and Re=O antisymmetric (nu\\_as) and symmetric (nu\\_s) stretching excited states of both CH3(187Re)O3 and CH3(185Re)O3 isotopologues, thanks to new devices implemented within our consortium. We carry out high resolution millimeter-wave (MMW) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy in room temperature absorption cells, in a pulsed supersonic jet and in a cryogenic buffer gas cell. This collection of sensitive spectrometers enables us to probe both levels of a vibrational transition in low and room temperature gaseous environments. We thus report a new series of measurements providing particularly accurate rotational and rovibrational data for such a large and heavy organometallic molecule that is solid at room temperature.The combination of the new MMW and IR data leads to an improvement of the rovibrational model of MTO:...

  18. Measurability of the tidal deformability by gravitational waves from coalescing binary neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yu-ichiro; Shibata, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Combining new gravitational waveforms derived by long-term (14--16 orbits) numerical-relativity simulations with waveforms by an effective-one-body (EOB) formalism for coalescing binary neutron stars, we construct hybrid waveforms and estimate the measurability for the dimensionless tidal deformability of the neutron stars, $\\Lambda$, by advanced gravitational-wave detectors. We focus on the equal-mass case with the total mass $2.7M_\\odot$. We find that for an event at a hypothetical effective distance of $D_{\\rm eff}=200$ Mpc, the distinguishable difference in the dimensionless tidal deformability will be $\\approx 100$, 400, and 800 at 1-$\\sigma$, 2-$\\sigma$, and 3-$\\sigma$ levels, respectively, for advanced LIGO. If the true equation of state is stiff and the typical neutron-star radius is $R \\gtrsim 13 $ km, our analysis suggests that the radius will be constrained within $\\approx 1$ km at 2-$\\sigma$ level for an event at $D_{\\rm eff}=200$ Mpc. On the other hand, if the true equation of state is soft and t...

  19. Measuring the spin of black holes in binary systems using gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Vitale, Salvatore; Veitch, John; Raymond, Vivien; Sturani, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Compact binary coalescences are the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs) for ground based detectors. Binary systems containing one or two spinning black holes are particularly interesting due to spin-orbit (and eventual spin-spin) interactions, and the opportunity of measuring spins directly through GW observations. In this letter we analyze simulated signals emitted by spinning binaries with several values of masses, spins, orientation, and signal-to-noise ratio. We find that spin magnitudes and tilt angles can be estimated to accuracy of a few percent for neutron star--black hole systems and $\\sim$ 5-30% for black hole binaries. In contrast, the difference in the azimuth angles of the spins, which may be used to check if spins are locked into resonant configurations, cannot be constrained. We observe that the best performances are obtained when the line of sight is perpendicular to the system's total angular momentum, and that a sudden change of behavior occurs when a system is observed from ...

  20. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  1. Measurement of wave-front aberration in a small telescope remote imaging system using scene-based wave-front sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyneer, Lisa A; Bauman, Brian J

    2015-03-31

    Reference-free compensated imaging makes an estimation of the Fourier phase of a series of images of a target. The Fourier magnitude of the series of images is obtained by dividing the power spectral density of the series of images by an estimate of the power spectral density of atmospheric turbulence from a series of scene based wave front sensor (SBWFS) measurements of the target. A high-resolution image of the target is recovered from the Fourier phase and the Fourier magnitude.

  2. A global horizontal shear velocity model of the upper mantle from multimode Love wave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tak; Priestley, Keith; Debayle, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Surface wave studies in the 1960s provided the first indication that the upper mantle was radially anisotropic. Resolving the anisotropic structure is important because it may yield information on deformation and flow patterns in the upper mantle. The existing radially anisotropic models are in poor agreement. Rayleigh waves have been studied extensively and recent models show general agreement. Less work has focused on Love waves and the models that do exist are less well-constrained than are Rayleigh wave models, suggesting it is the Love wave models that are responsible for the poor agreement in the radially anisotropic structure of the upper mantle. We have adapted the waveform inversion procedure of Debayle & Ricard to extract propagation information for the fundamental mode and up to the fifth overtone from Love waveforms in the 50-250 s period range. We have tomographically inverted these results for a mantle horizontal shear wave-speed model (βh(z)) to transition zone depths. We include azimuthal anisotropy (2θ and 4θ terms) in the tomography, but in this paper we discuss only the isotropic βh(z) structure. The data set is significantly larger, almost 500 000 Love waveforms, than previously published Love wave data sets and provides ˜17 000 000 constraints on the upper-mantle βh(z) structure. Sensitivity and resolution tests show that the horizontal resolution of the model is on the order of 800-1000 km to transition zone depths. The high wave-speed roots beneath the oldest parts of the continents appear to extend deeper for βh(z) than for βv(z) as in previous βh(z) models, but the resolution tests indicate that at least parts of these features could be artefacts. The low wave speeds beneath the mid-ocean ridges fade by ˜150 km depth except for the upper mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise which remains slow to ˜250 km depth. The resolution tests suggest that the low wave speeds at deeper depths beneath the East Pacific Rise are not solely due

  3. Shear Wave Velocity Profiles Determined from Surface Wave Measurements at Sites Affected by the August 15th, 2007 Earthquake in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblad, B. L.; Bay, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    The shear wave velocity (Vs) profile of near-surface soils is a critical parameter for understanding recorded ground motions and predicting local site effects in an earthquake. In structural design, the Vs profile in the top 30 m is used to modify design response spectra to account for local soil effects. In addition, knowledge of the near- surface Vs profile at strong motion stations can be used to account for changes in frequency content and amplification caused by the local site conditions. Following the August 15th, 2007 earthquake in Peru, a field testing program was performed to measure Vs profiles in the top 20 to 30 m at twenty-two locations in the affected region. The measurements were performed primarily at the sites of damaged school buildings but were also performed at several strong motion station sites as well as a few locations where evidence of soil liquefaction was observed. Nineteen of the sites were located in the severely affected cities of Chincha, Ica, Pisco and Tambo de Mora, with the remaining three sites located in, Lima, Palpa and Paracus. The Vs profiles were determined from surface wave velocity measurements performed with an impact source. The objective of this paper is to present and discuss the range of Vs profile conditions encountered in the regions affected by the Pisco-Peru earthquake. In the city of Ica, the profiles generally exhibited gradually increasing velocities with depth, with velocities which rarely exceeded 400 m/s in the top 30 m. In contrast, the profiles measured in Pisco, often exhibited strong, shallow velocity contrasts with Vs increasing from less than 200 m/s at the surface to over 600 m/s at some sites. The profiles measured in Chincha generally fell in between the ranges measured in Ica and Pisco. Lastly, soil liquefaction was evident throughout Tambo de Mora on the coast of Peru. Measurements indicated very low shear wave velocities of 75 to 125 m/s in the top 4 m, which is consistent with the observed

  4. A comparison measurement of nonlinear ultrasonic waves in tubes by a microphone and by an optical interferometric probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slegrová, Zuzana; Bálek, Rudolf

    2005-03-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of ultrasonic fields inside waveguides generated by ultrasonic waves of high amplitude. These waves behave nonlinearly, so it is not possible to use standard linear equations to describe their behaviour. Therefore, we started with an experimental determination of the acoustic pressure of air in glass tubes. We chose two methods of measurement--by a microphone and by an optical interferometric probe. The conventional method by a microphone creates numerous problems, which can be avoided by using an optical method, a heterodyne laser interferometer.

  5. Comparison of simulations and offshore measurement data of a prototype of a floating combined wind and wave energy conversion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Anders; Larsen, Torben J.; Hansen, Anders Melchior

    2015-01-01

    . The numerical model of the platform is based on the aeroelastic code, HAWC2, developed by DTU Wind Energy, which is coupled with a special external system that reads the output generated directly by the wave analysis software, WAMIT. The model also includes models for the dynamic mooring lines as well...... as the turbines non-linear yaw and teeter motion behavior. The main focus on the comparison will be on the statistical trends of the platform motion, mooring loads and turbine loads in measurements and simulations during different operational conditions such as increasing wind speed, wave height and wind...

  6. Measuring the spin of black holes in binary systems using gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore; Lynch, Ryan; Veitch, John; Raymond, Vivien; Sturani, Riccardo

    2014-06-27

    Compact binary coalescences are the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs) for ground-based detectors. Binary systems containing one or two spinning black holes are particularly interesting due to spin-orbit (and eventual spin-spin) interactions and the opportunity of measuring spins directly through GW observations. In this Letter, we analyze simulated signals emitted by spinning binaries with several values of masses, spins, orientations, and signal-to-noise ratios, as detected by an advanced LIGO-Virgo network. We find that for moderate or high signal-to-noise ratio the spin magnitudes can be estimated with errors of a few percent (5%-30%) for neutron star-black hole (black hole-black hole) systems. Spins' tilt angle can be estimated with errors of 0.04 rad in the best cases, but typical values will be above 0.1 rad. Errors will be larger for signals barely above the threshold for detection. The difference in the azimuth angles of the spins, which may be used to check if spins are locked into resonant configurations, cannot be constrained. We observe that the best performances are obtained when the line of sight is perpendicular to the system's total angular momentum and that a sudden change of behavior occurs when a system is observed from angles such that the plane of the orbit can be seen both from above and below during the time the signal is in band. This study suggests that direct measurement of black hole spin by means of GWs can be as precise as what can be obtained from x-ray binaries.

  7. Main-ion temperature and plasma rotation measurements based on scattering of electron cyclotron heating waves in ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Stejner; Rasmussen, Jesper; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate measurements of spectra of O-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) waves scattered collectively from microscopic plasma fluctuations in ASDEX Upgrade discharges with an ITER-like ECRH scenario. The measured spectra are shown to allow determination of the main ion...... temperature and plasma rotation velocity. This demonstrates that ECRH systems can be exploited for diagnostic purposes alongside their primary heating purpose in a reactor relevant scenario....

  8. Main-ion temperature and plasma rotation measurements based on scattering of electron cyclotron heating waves in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stejner, M.; Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, S. K.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; McDermott, R. M.; Salewski, M.; Schubert, M.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D. H.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate measurements of spectra of O-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) waves scattered collectively from microscopic plasma fluctuations in ASDEX Upgrade discharges with an ITER-like ECRH scenario. The measured spectra are shown to allow determination of the main ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity. This demonstrates that ECRH systems can be exploited for diagnostic purposes alongside their primary heating purpose in a reactor relevant scenario.

  9. PREDICTIONS OF WAVE INDUCED SHIP MOTIONS AND LOADS BY LARGE-SCALE MODEL MEASUREMENT AT SEA AND NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialong Jiao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to accurately predict wave induced motion and load responses of ships, a new experimental methodology is proposed. The new method includes conducting tests with large-scale models under natural environment conditions. The testing technique for large-scale model measurement proposed is quite applicable and general to a wide range of standard hydrodynamics experiments in naval architecture. In this study, a large-scale segmented self-propelling model allowed for investigating seakeeping performance and wave load behaviour as well as the testing systems were designed and experiments performed. A 2-hour voyage trial of the large-scale model aimed to perform a series of simulation exercises was carried out at Huludao harbour in October 2014. During the voyage, onboard systems, operated by crew, were used to measure and record the sea waves and the model responses. The post-voyage analysis of the measurements, both of the sea waves and the model’s responses, were made to predict the ship’s motion and load responses of short-term under the corresponding sea state. Furthermore, numerical analysis of short-term prediction was made by an in-house code and the result was compared with the experiment data. The long-term extreme prediction of motions and loads was also carried out based on the numerical results of short-term prediction.

  10. FTS Measurements of Submillimeter-Wave Atmospheric Opacity at Pampa la Bola II : Supra-Terahertz Windows and Model Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Satoki; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Pardo, Juan R.; Radford, Simon J. E.

    1999-10-01

    A second observing run aimed to measure the millimeter and submillimeter-wave (150-1500 GHz or 2 mm-200 mu m) atmospheric opacity was carried out with a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) at Pampa la Bola, 4800 m above sea level in northern Chile. We obtained high transmission spectra, showing up to ~ 67% transmission at submillimeter-wave windows. The observed spectra can be well modeled by newly developed radiative-transfer calculations. Correlations between 220 GHz and submillimeter-wave opacities were reanalized, including the new data set. The results show almost identical trends as the ones resulting from the first measurements. We also identified supra-terahertz windows (located around 1035 GHz, 1350 GHz, and 1500 GHz), which could not be seen in our first measurements. Opacity correlations between the 220 GHz and these new windows are derived for the first time. Combined with a statistical study of the 225 GHz opacity data of the Chajnantor site (7 km apart from Pampa la Bola), it is estimated that submillimeter-wave observations can be done with zenith opacity less than 1.0 (at the most transparent frequency in those windows) for about 50% of the winter season.

  11. Evaluation of Different CH4-CO2 Replacement Processes in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments by Measuring P-Wave Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of methane with carbon dioxide in natural gas hydrate-bearing sediments is considered a promising technology for simultaneously recovering natural gas and entrapping CO2. During the CH4-CO2 replacement process, the variations of geophysical property of the hydrate reservoir need to be adequately known. Since the acoustic wave velocity is an important geophysical property, in this work, the variations of P-wave velocity of hydrate-bearing sediments were measured during different CH4-CO2 replacement processes using pure gaseous CO2 and CO2/N2 gas mixtures. Our experimental results show that P-wave velocity continually decreased during all replacement processes. Compared with injecting pure gaseous CO2, injection of CO2/N2 mixture can promote the replacement process, however, it is found that the sediment experiences a loss of stiffness during the replacement process, especially when using CO2/N2 gas mixtures.

  12. Measurement of Large Spiral and Target Waves in Chemical Reaction-Diffusion-Advection Systems: Turbulent Diffusion Enhances Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kameke, A.; Huhn, F.; Muñuzuri, A. P.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.

    2013-02-01

    In the absence of advection, reaction-diffusion systems are able to organize into spatiotemporal patterns, in particular spiral and target waves. Whenever advection is present that can be parametrized in terms of effective or turbulent diffusion D*, these patterns should be attainable on a much greater, boosted length scale. However, so far, experimental evidence of these boosted patterns in a turbulent flow was lacking. Here, we report the first experimental observation of boosted target and spiral patterns in an excitable chemical reaction in a quasi-two-dimensional turbulent flow. The wave patterns observed are ˜50 times larger than in the case of molecular diffusion only. We vary the turbulent diffusion coefficient D* of the flow and find that the fundamental Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piskunov equation, vf∝D*, for the asymptotic speed of a reactive wave remains valid. However, not all measures of the boosted wave scale with D* as expected from molecular diffusion, since the wave fronts turn out to be highly filamentous.

  13. Wave Structures in Thermospheric Density from Satellite Electrostatic Triaxial Accelerometer Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-04

    Testud , J. (1970) Gravity waves generated diring magnetic substorms, .1. Atmos. Terr. Phys., 32:1793. .6 t9, "-€ according to their horizontal...auroral oval during polar substorms, J. Geophys. Res., 74:5721. 7. Testud , J. P., Amayenc, P., and Blanc, M. (1975) Middle and low latitude effects of...1730. 13. Bertin, F.J., Testud , J., Kersley, L., and Rees, P. R. (1978) The meteorological jet stream as a source of medium scale gravity waves in

  14. The roads not taken: empty waves, wavefunction collapse and protective measurement in quantum theory

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Within the class of ontological interpretations of quantum theory where a physical system comprises a particle and a field (wavefunction) guiding it, an empty wave is a segment of the wavefunction not containing the particle. We examine the impact of this concept on the debate between the epistemological and ontological viewpoints. The theoretical merits of the empty wave in avoiding the wavefunction collapse hypothesis, and in supplying conceptual precision in the application of quantum mech...

  15. A non-invasive technique for estimating carpal tunnel pressure by measuring shear wave speed in tendon: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuexiang; Qiang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaoming; Greenleaf, James F; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2012-11-15

    Although a close relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and median nerve dysfunction has been found, the current methods for pressure measurements are invasive, using a catheter in the carpal canal to monitor the pressure. A noninvasive method for quantifying carpal tunnel pressure would be useful as an alternative to the catheter method. In this study, a simplified experimental model was developed to measure the shear wave speed in a canine Achilles tendon under different tunnel pressures. The results showed that the speed of waves through the inside-tunnel tendon had a linear relationship with the pressure in the tunnel (first measurement: r=0.966, Ppropagation speed. However, further validations in human cadavers and clinical subjects are necessary. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Precise real-time polarization measurement of terahertz electromagnetic waves by a spinning electro-optic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumatsu, Naoya; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2012-02-01

    We propose and develop a method to quickly and precisely determine the polarization direction of coherent terahertz electromagnetic waves generated by femtosecond laser pulses. The measurement system consists of a conventional terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system with the electro-optic (EO) sampling method, but we add a new functionality in the EO crystal which is continuously rotating with the angular frequency ω. We find a simple yet useful formulation of the EO signal as a function of the crystal orientation, which enables a lock-in-like detection of both the electric-field amplitude and the absolute polarization direction of the terahertz waves with respect to the probe laser pulse polarization direction at the same time. The single measurement finishes around two periods of the crystal rotations (∼21 ms), and we experimentally prove that the accuracy of the polarization measurement does not suffer from the long-term amplitude fluctuation of the terahertz pulses. Distribution of the measured polarization directions by repeating the measurements is excellently fitted by a gaussian distribution function with a standard deviation of σ = 0.56°. The developed technique is useful for the fast direct determination of the polarization state of the terahertz electromagnetic waves for polarization imaging applications as well as the precise terahertz Faraday or Kerr rotation spectroscopy.

  17. Measurement and simulation of ground-coupled air waves and diffracted infrasound from the Kokoxili Earthquake, 14th Nov. 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, J.; Le Pichon, A.; Vallee, M.; Alcoverro, B.; Ulziibat, M.

    2002-12-01

    On November 14, 2001, a strong earthquake measuring Mm 7.8 occurred in the Qinghai Province (China). Coherent infrasonic waves were detected during more than one hour by the IS34 infrasound station in Mongolia (~1500 km from the epicenter). Using an appropriate acoustic propagation model, the inversion of the infrasonic measurements allows a precise localization of the secondary sources distribution along the Qinghai mountains. The predominant source of infrasound is likely ground-coupled air waves generated by the strong variations of topography due to energy carried out by surface seismic waves that travel from the epicenter region through the Qinghai mountains. To confirm the locations of these distant source regions, the pressure field has been reconstructed at IS34. For each element of the topography, a synthetic seismogram used as an input of the integral relation of Huygens-Rayleigh permits to estimate the pressure variation. The synthetic pressure field fit the recorded data in azimuth and in relative amplitude. These results confirm the hypothesis of a strong coupling between the Rayleigh waves and the atmosphere, as it has already been observed during the Arequipa earthquake of June 23rd 2001. The simulations also permit to validate the infrasonic propagation model. This favorable setting within a region of high mountains makes easier the evaluation of the relative contribution of the different source mechanisms involved in large earthquake.

  18. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic

  19. ICRF wave field measurements in the presence of scrape off layer turbulence on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Suárez López, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new array of B-dot probes was installed on ASDEX Upgrade. The purpose of the new diagnostic is to study Ion Cyclotron Range-off Frequencies (ICRF) wave field distributions in the evanescent scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma region on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. The vacuum measurements (no gas, BT = 0 T) reveal ICRF wave field measurements consistent with the profiles expected from the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antennas outside the antenna box: the shape of the toroidal distribution of both the amplitude and the phase is the same for the case of only the central straps being active, as for the case of only the side straps being active. These profiles become strongly modified during plasma operations. The modifications can be separated into two types: "Inter-edge localized mode (ELM)" and "During-ELM" periods. The phase distribution of the ICRF wave fields remains well-defined during the Inter-ELM period; however, it becomes more spread out over the entire 360° range during ELMs. The observed modulations cannot be explained by the observed changes in the ICRF power, as monitored in the transmission line. However, they are consistent with ICRF coupling changes introduced by plasma filaments: the plasma density perturbations due to the filaments are high enough to change the nature of the fast ICRF wave field from evanescent to propagating. The coverage of the present diagnostic is being expanded to include both the low field side and the high field side probes. Additionally, a manipulator probe head is being developed to measure ICRF wave field radial profiles across the SOL region.

  20. Measuring aortic pulse wave velocity using high-field cardiovascular magnetic resonance: comparison of techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer Jean M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assessment of arterial stiffness is increasingly used for evaluating patients with different cardiovascular diseases as the mechanical properties of major arteries are often altered. Aortic stiffness can be noninvasively estimated by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV. Several methods have been proposed for measuring PWV using velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, including transit-time (TT, flow-area (QA, and cross-correlation (XC methods. However, assessment and comparison of these techniques at high field strength has not yet been performed. In this work, the TT, QA, and XC techniques were clinically tested at 3 Tesla and compared to each other. Methods Fifty cardiovascular patients and six volunteers were scanned to acquire the necessary images. The six volunteer scans were performed twice to test inter-scan reproducibility. Patient images were analyzed using the TT, XC, and QA methods to determine PWV. Two observers analyzed the images to determine inter-observer and intra-observer variabilities. The PWV measurements by the three methods were compared to each other to test inter-method variability. To illustrate the importance of PWV using CMR, the degree of aortic stiffness was assessed using PWV and related to LV dysfunction in five patients with diastolic heart failure patients and five matched volunteers. Results The inter-observer and intra-observer variability results showed no bias between the different techniques. The TT and XC results were more reproducible than the QA; the mean (SD inter-observer/intra-observer PWV differences were -0.12(1.3/-0.04(0.4 for TT, 0.2(1.3/0.09(0.9 for XC, and 0.6(1.6/0.2(1.4 m/s for QA methods, respectively. The correlation coefficients (r for the inter-observer/intra-observer comparisons were 0.94/0.99, 0.88/0.94, and 0.83/0.92 for the TT, XC, and QA methods, respectively. The inter-scan reproducibility results showed low variability between the repeated

  1. Spatial aliasing and distortion of energy distribution in the wave vector domain under multi-spacecraft measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aliasing is a general problem in the analysis of any measurements that make sampling at discrete points. Sampling in the spatial domain results in a periodic pattern of spectra in the wave vector domain. This effect is called spatial aliasing, and it is of particular importance for multi-spacecraft measurements in space. We first present the theoretical background of aliasing problems in the frequency domain and generalize it to the wave vector domain, and then present model calculations of spatial aliasing. The model calculations are performed for various configurations of the reciprocal vectors and energy spectra or distribution that are placed at different positions in the wave vector domain, and exhibit two effects on aliasing. One is weak aliasing, in which the true spectrum is distorted because of non-uniform aliasing contributions in the Brillouin zone. It is demonstrated that the energy distribution becomes elongated in the shortest reciprocal lattice vector direction in the wave vector domain. The other effect is strong aliasing, in which aliases have a significant contribution in the Brillouin zone and the energy distribution shows a false peak. These results give a caveat in multi-spacecraft data analysis in that spectral anisotropy obtained by a measurement has in general two origins: (1 natural and physical origins like anisotropy imposed by a mean magnetic field or a flow direction; and (2 aliasing effects that are imposed by the configuration of the measurement array (or the set of reciprocal vectors. This manuscript also discusses a possible method to estimate aliasing contributions in the Brillouin zone based on the measured spectrum and to correct the spectra for aliasing.

  2. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, T.

    1973-01-01

    Time-resolved spectra have been obtained behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon at initial pressures of 0.1 and 1.0 torr using a rotating drum spectrograph and the OSU (The Ohio State University) arc-driven shock tube. These spectra were used to determine the qualitative nature of the flow as well as for making estimates of the available test time. The (n+1,n) and (n,n) band spectra of N2(+) (1st negative) were observed in the test gas behind incident shock waves in air at p1=1.0 torr and Us=9-10 km/sec. Behind reflected shock waves in air, the continuum of spectra appeared to cover almost the entire wavelength of 2,500-7,000 A for the shock-heated test gas. For xenon, the spectra for the incident shock wave cases for p1=0.1 torr show an interesting structure in which two intensely bright regions are witnessed in the time direction. The spectra obtained behind reflected shock waves in xenon were also dominated by continuum radiation but included strong absorption spectra due to FeI and FeII from the moment the reflected shock passed and on.

  3. Separation of Lamb waves modes using polarization filter of 3D laser measured signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-04-01

    Interpretation of Lamb waves signals can rise serious difficulties due to their multi-modal nature. Different modes propagating with different velocities can be misleading with damage reflected components. As a solution to this problem we propose a technique capable of modes separation based on a polarization filter. Both S0 and A0 Lamb modes exhibit elliptical polarization, however, their polarization parameters, i.e. the ratios of in-plane and out-of-plane displacements and phase-shifts between these components are different. Furthermore, these parameters can be considered constant in a narrow frequency band. Therefore, if the vertical and horizontal components of the wave motion are available, it is possible to apply signal processing technique referred to as oblique polarization filter. This operation is based on phase-shifts and amplifications of the in- and out-of-plane components, which results in orthogonal, linearly polarized A0 and S0 waves signals. In this paper the proposed technique will be illustrated using both numerical simulations and experimental data. The simulations of wave propagation were performed using local interaction simulation approach (LISA) assuming isotropic material. The experiments were performed using 3D laser scanning Doppler vibrometer that allowed to capture the in-plane and out-of-plane wave components.

  4. Optical Measurement of In-plane Elastic Waves in Mechanical Metamaterials Through Digital Image Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Schaeffer, Marshall; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a Digital Image Correlation-based technique for the detection of in-plane elastic waves propagating in structural lattices. The experimental characterization of wave motion in lattice structures is currently of great interest due its relevance to the design of novel mechanical metamaterials with unique/unusual properties such as strongly directional behavior, negative refractive indexes and topologically protected wave motion. Assessment of these functionalities often requires the detection of highly spatially resolved in-plane wavefields, which for reticulated or porous structural assemblies is an open challenge. A Digital Image Correlation approach is implemented that tracks small displacements of the lattice nodes by centering image subsets about the lattice intersections. A high speed camera records the motion of the points by properly interleaving subsequent frames thus artificially enhancing the available sampling rate. This, along with an imaging stitching procedure, enables the capturing ...

  5. Optical-flow-based background-oriented schlieren technique for measuring a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    CERN Document Server

    Hayasaka, Keisuke; Liu, Tianshu; Kameda, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    The background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique with the physics-based optical flow method (OF-BOS) is developed for measuring the pressure field of a laser-induced underwater shock wave. Compared to BOS with the conventional cross-correlation method in PIV (called PIV-BOS), by using the OF-BOS, the displacement field generated by the small density gradient in water can be obtained at the spatial resolution of one vector per pixel. The corresponding density and pressure fields can be further extracted. It is particularly demonstrated that the sufficiently high spatial resolution of the extracted displacement vector field is required in the tomographic reconstruction to correctly infer the pressure field of the spherical underwater shock wave. The capability of the OF-BOS is critically evaluated based on synchronized hydrophone measurements. Special emphasis is placed on direct comparison between the OF-BOS with the PIV-BOS.

  6. Optical-flow-based background-oriented schlieren technique for measuring a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaka, Keisuke; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Liu, Tianshu; Kameda, Masaharu

    2016-12-01

    The background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique with the physics-based optical flow method (OF-BOS) is developed for measuring the pressure field of a laser-induced underwater shock wave. Compared to BOS with the conventional cross-correlation method that is also applied for particle image velocimetry (here called PIV-BOS), by using the OF-BOS, the displacement field generated by a small density gradient in water can be obtained at the spatial resolution of one vector per pixel. The corresponding density and pressure fields can be further extracted. It is demonstrated in particular that the sufficiently high spatial resolution of the extracted displacement vector field is required in the tomographic reconstruction to correctly infer the pressure field of the spherical underwater shock wave. The capability of the OF-BOS method is critically evaluated based on synchronized hydrophone measurements. Special emphasis is placed on direct comparison between the OF-BOS and PIV-BOS methods.

  7. Influence of acoustoelastic coefficient on wave time of flight in stress measurement in piezoelectric self-excited system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaśniewki, Janusz; Dominik, Ireneusz; Lalik, Krzysztof; Holewa, Karolina

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the Self-excited Acoustical System (SAS) in elastic construction stress change measurement. The system is based on the acoustical autoresonance phenomena and enables an indirect measurement of the construction effort level. The essence of the SAS system is to use a piezoelectric vibration emitter and a piezoelectric vibration receiver placed at a distance, which are coupled with a proper power amplifier, and which are operating in a closed loop with a positive feedback. This causes the excitation of the system. The change of the velocity of wave propagation, which is associated with the change of the resonance frequency in the system is caused by the stress change in the examined material. A variable, which determines the change of the acoustic wave velocity, is called an acoustoelastic coefficient β. Such a coefficient allows to determine the absolute stress value in the tested material.

  8. Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by man-made waves A comparison between theory and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, U. S.; Chang, H. C.; Helliwell, R. A.; Imhof, W. L.; Reagan, J. B.; Walt, M.

    1985-01-01

    The temporal and spectral shape and the absolute flux level of particle pulses precipitated by a VLF transmitter are examined from a theoretical point of view. A test-particle model of the gyroresonant wave-particle interaction is applied to the parameters of the observed cases for calculating the precipitation characteristics. The temporal shapes of the precipitation pulses are found to be controlled (1) by the pitch angle dependence of the particle distribution near the edge of the loss cone and (2) by the multiple interaction of the particles with the waves due to significant atmospheric backscatter.

  9. Analysis of Upper Hybrid Wave Growth Rates From Measured Electron Distributions; An Encounter With the Source of Auroral Roar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounds, S. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Labelle, J. W.; Samara, M.; Yoon, P. H.

    2005-12-01

    In January of 2003, the High Bandwidth Auroral Rocket (HIBAR) passed through two regions of strong upper hybrid wave emission associated with the approximate matching of the upper hybrid frequency to twice the electron cyclotron frequency (fuh = 2 fce) (Samara 2004) These types of emission are believed to be the source of the HF auroral roar often observed by ground based receivers. The current model theorizes that the free space 0-mode waves observed on the ground are produced through mode conversion of strong emission of Z-mode, or upper hybrid waves. The relativistic electron cyclotron maser exhibits significant growth rates for the Z-mode when the local upper hybrid frequency is just below (~1%) twice the electron cyclotron frequency and with the appropriately unstable electron distribution (Yoon 1996, Yoon 1998, Yoon 2000). Though auroral roar is frequently observed from the ground, the source region has rarely been identified in-situ and even more rarely with sufficient bandwidth to analyze the underlying physical processes. Analysis of the electron distributions from HIBAR show good agreement with the theoretical distributions used by Yoon:98. HIBAR encountered three separate regions where fuh ≍ 2 fce, two of these regions include strong upper hybrid emission, while the third is void of upper hybrid wave activity. The measured particle distributions demonstrate that, in the two regions with wave emission, the relativistic electron cyclotron maser instability produces Z mode wave growth rates at least an order of magnitude greater than the electron collision frequency. In the third region without wave emission, the growth rates are much smaller in both amplitude and the extent of occurance. Samara, M., J. LaBelle, C. A. Kletzing, and S. R. Bounds, Rocket observations of structured upper hybrid wave at fuh=2fce, Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L22804, doi:10.1029/2004GL021043. Yoon, P. H., A. T. Weatherwax, and T. J. Rosenberg, Lower ionospheric cyclotron maser

  10. Inferring electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave intensity from low altitude POES proton flux measurements: A detailed case study with conjugate Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Shi, Run; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Zhang, Xianguo; Zuo, Pingbing; Fu, Song; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Cao, Xing; Zou, Zhengyang

    2017-03-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play an important role in the magnetospheric particle dynamics and can lead to resonant pitch-angle scattering and ultimate precipitation of ring current protons. Commonly, the statistics of in situ EMIC wave measurements is adopted for quantitative investigation of wave-particle interaction processes, which however becomes questionable for detailed case studies especially during geomagnetic storms and substorms. Here we establish a novel technique to infer EMIC wave amplitudes from low-altitude proton measurements onboard the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). The detailed procedure is elaborated regarding how to infer the EMIC wave intensity for one specific time point. We then test the technique with a case study comparing the inferred root-mean-square (RMS) EMIC wave amplitude with the conjugate Van Allen Probes EMFISIS wave measurements. Our results suggest that the developed technique can reasonably estimate EMIC wave intensities from low-altitude POES proton flux data, thereby providing a useful tool to construct a data-based, near-real-time, dynamic model of the global distribution of EMIC waves once the proton flux measurements from multiple POES satellites are available for any specific time period.

  11. Measuring air–sea gas-exchange velocities in a large-scale annular wind–wave tank

    OpenAIRE

    E. Mesarchaki; C. Kräuter; K. E. Krall; Bopp, M; Helleis, F.; Williams, J.; Jähne, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we present gas-exchange measurements conducted in a large-scale wind–wave tank. Fourteen chemical species spanning a wide range of solubility (dimensionless solubility, α = 0.4 to 5470) and diffusivity (Schmidt number in water, Scw = 594 to 1194) were examined under various turbulent (u10 = 0.73 to 13.2 m s−1) conditions. Additional experiments were performed under different surfactant modulated (two different concentration levels of Triton X-100) surface...

  12. A Case Study of Hemochromatosis and Conflicting Point Shear Wave Measurements in the Assessment of Liver Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Tal; Barr, Richard G

    2017-01-09

    There are multiple factors that affect the shear wave speed in the assessment of liver stiffness. In this case report, we present a case of hemochromatosis that has elevated liver stiffness suggestive of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis; however on liver biopsy, no fibrosis was identified. This article will discuss the possibility that liver iron deposition may affect SWE measurements of the liver, leading to inaccurate assessment of liver fibrosis. In these cases, a liver biopsy may be required for accurate liver assessment.

  13. Determining the values of second-order surface nonlinearities by measurements with wave plates of different retardations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valev, Ventsislav K; Foerier, Stijn; Verbiest, Thierry

    2009-06-01

    We measured the second harmonic generation response of a thin film consisting of chiral molecules with four wave plates having different retardation coefficients. By means of the fitting procedure described in a previously reported formalism, we demonstrated that a single set of tensor components of second order surface nonlinearities fits all the data. Our results provide clear experimental evidence for the validity of this method, which can find applications in the studies of chiral structures and achiral anisotropic materials.

  14. A novel forward and backward scattering wave measurement system for optimizing GPR standoff mine/IED detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Yukinori

    2012-06-01

    Standoff detection of mines and improvised explosive devices by ground penetrating radar has advantages in terms of safety and efficiency. However, the reflected signals from buried targets are often disturbed by those from the ground surface, which vary with the antennas angle, making it more difficult to detect at a safe distance. An understanding of the forward and backward scattering wave is thus essential for improving standoff detection capability. We present some experimental results from using our measurement system for such an analysis.

  15. Application of microtremor array measurements to delineate S-wave velocity structures in San Francisco Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K.; Underwood, D.

    2012-12-01

    Microtremor array measurements and three-component microtremor measurements have been performed at four sites in the South Bay of the San Francisco Bay Area (Figure 1). Two seismographs with three-component accelerometers were used for data acquisition. At each site, one seismograph was fixed in one place and data was acquired at that location for the entire survey. Data was acquired by a second seismograph at larger separations ranging from 5 to 4125m from the fixed seismograph. Data acquisition was repeated at each new separation. In each measurement, 10 to 60 minutes of ambient noise was recorded. As the separations of seismographs increased, the record length of ambient noise was increased. The sampling interval used was 10msec. Entire measurements at one site took several hours. Data acquisition was performed in the day-time and the seismographs were placed in relatively quiet places such as in parks or residential areas. A spatial autocorrelation was used for calculating phase velocity and clear dispersion curves were obtained in frequency range from 0.2 to 10 Hz. A joint inversion was applied to the observed dispersion curves, and H/V spectra, and S-wave velocity models were analyzed for four sites. In the inversion, phase velocities of the dispersion curves and the absolute value and peak frequencies of the H/V spectra were used as observation data. The unknown parameters were layer thickness and S-wave velocity. A Genetic Algorithm was used for optimization. Theoretical H/V spectra and phase velocities are generated by calculating the weighted average of the fundamental mode and higher modes (up to the 5th mode) based on medium response. Figure 2 shows comparison of S-wave velocity models obtained by the inversion. We can see that a low velocity layer with S-wave velocity lower than 400m/s exists between depths of 50 to 100m at all sites. Intermediate bedrock with S-wave velocity higher than 1000m/s exists between depths of 500 to 1000m. Deepest bedrock

  16. Methods Of Measurement The Three-Dimensional Wind Waves Spectra, Based On The Processing Of Video Images Of The Sea Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Salin, Boris M

    2013-01-01

    Optical means of measurement of surface waves characteristics provide better spatial and temporal resolution than other methods, but they face definite difficulties, while converting results of the indirect measurements to absolute levels of the waves. This publication solves this problem, to some extent. In this paper we propose an optical method for measuring the 3D power spectral density of the surface waves and the space-time samples of profiles of the waves. The method involves, firstly, synchronous recording of brightness field over a patch of the rough surface and measurement of surface oscillations in one or more points, and secondly, filtering of the image spatial spectrum and the filter parameters are selected to maximize correlation of surface oscillations that are reconstructed and measured in one or two points. In addition to the measurement procedure, the paper provides experimental results on the measurement of multidimensional spectra of roughness, which are, in common, in agreement with theor...

  17. Measurement of the dissociation constant of Fluo-3 for Ca2+ in isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes using Ca2+ wave characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughrey, C M; MacEachern, K E; Cooper, J; Smith, G L

    2003-07-01

    The Ca(2+) dissociation constant (K(d)) of Fluo-3 was determined using confocal fluorescence microscopy in two different situations: (i) within the cytosol of a permeabilised cardiomyocyte; and (ii) in an intact cardiomyocyte after incubation with the acetoxymethyl ester form of Fluo-3 (AM). Measurements were made on isolated rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes after permeabilisation by a brief treatment with beta-escin (0.1mg/ml) and equilibration with 10 microM Fluo-3. The K(d) of Fluo-3 within the cytosol was not significantly different from that in free solution (558 +/- 15 nM, n=6). Over a range of cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)], the minimum [Ca(2+)] values between Ca(2+) waves was relatively constant despite changes in wave frequency. After loading intact cardiomyocytes with Fluo-3 by incubation with the -AM, spontaneous Ca(2+) waves were produced by incubation with strophanthidin (10 microM). By assuming a common minimum [Ca(2+)] in permeabilised and intact cells, the intracellular K(d) of Fluo-3 in intact myocytes was estimated to be 898 +/-64 nM (n=6). Application of this K(d) to fluorescence records shows that Ca(2+) waves in intact cells have similar amplitudes to those in permeabilised cells. Stimulation of cardiac myocytes at 0.5 Hz in the absence of strophanthidin (room temperature) resulted in a Ca(2+) transient with a maximum and minimum [Ca(2+)] of 1190 +/- 200 and 158 +/- 30 nM (n=11), respectively.

  18. Measurements of non-equilibrium and equilibrium temperature behind a strong shock wave in simulated martian atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Lin; Xi-Long Yu; Fei Li; Shao-Hua Zhang; Jian-Guo Xin; Xin-Yu Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Non-equilibrium radiation measurements behind strong shock wave for simulated Martian atmosphere are presented in this paper.The shock wave is established in a hydrogen oxygen combustion driven shock tube.Time-resolved spectra of the △v =0 sequence of the B2Σ+ → X2Σ+ electronic transition of CN have been observed through optical emission spectroscopy (OES).A new method,which is based on fitting high resolution spectrum for rotational and vibrational temperatures measurement,is proposed to diagnose temperature distribution behind the shock wave.It is estimated that the current scheme has the maximum deviation less than 8% (1σ) for vibrational temperature measurement through detailed analysis of the influence of the uncertainties of spectroscopic constants and spectral resolution.Radiation structure of the shock layer,including induction,relaxation and equilibrium process,and corresponding rotational and vibrational temperatures are obtained through time gating OES diagnostics with sub-microsecond temporal resolution.The present extensive results will strongly benefit the reaction rate estimation and computational fluid dynamics (CFD)code validation in high enthalpy Mars reentry chemistry.

  19. A Comparison of Model-Scale Experimental Measurements and Computational Predictions for a Large Transom-Stern Wave

    CERN Document Server

    Drazen, David A; Fu, Thomas C; Beale, Kristine L C; O'Shea, Thomas T; Brucker, Kyle A; Dommermuth, Douglas G; Wyatt, Donald C; Bhushan, Shanti; Carrica, Pablo M; Stern, Fred

    2014-01-01

    The flow field generated by a transom stern hull form is a complex, broad-banded, three-dimensional system marked by a large breaking wave. This unsteady multiphase turbulent flow feature is difficult to study experimentally and simulate numerically. Recent model-scale experimental measurements and numerical predictions of the wave-elevation topology behind a transom-sterned hull form, Model 5673, are compared and assessed in this paper. The mean height, surface roughness (RMS), and spectra of the breaking stern-waves were measured by Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and Quantitative Visualization (QViz) sensors over a range of model speeds covering both wet- and dry-transom operating conditions. Numerical predictions for this data set from two Office of Naval Research (ONR) supported naval-design codes, Numerical Flow Analysis (NFA) and CFDship-Iowa-V.4, have been performed. Comparisons of experimental data, including LiDAR and QViz measurements, to the numerical predictions for wet-transom and dry transo...

  20. Frequency measurement of THz waves by electro-optic sampling using Mach-Zehnder-modulator-based flat comb generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohashi, Isao; Kirigaya, Mayu; Kaneko, Yuta; Katayama, Ikufumi; Sakamoto, Takahide; Sekine, Norihiko; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Hosako, Iwao

    2016-02-01

    In the recent progress in terahertz (THz) devices, various kinds of source devices, such as resonant tunneling diodes, quantum cascade lasers and so forth, have been developed. Frequency measurement of THz radiations, which can operate in high speed and at room-temperature, is important for development of high-performance THz source devices. Recently, frequency measurement using optical combs are demonstrated by several groups. In these techniques, modelocked lasers (MLLs) are used for optical comb source, so that phase-locking techniques are required in order to stabilize the repetition frequency of the MLLs. On the other hand, a modulator-based optical comb generator has high accuracy and stability in the comb spacing, which is comparable to that of microwave signal driving the modulator. Thus it is suitable for frequency measurement of THz waves. In this paper, we demonstrated frequency measurement of THz waves using a Mach-Zehnder-modulator-based flat comb generator (MZ-FCG). The frequency measurement was carried out by an electro-optic (EO) sampling method, where an optical two-tone signal extracted from the optical comb generated by the MZ-FCG was used for the probe light. A 100 GHz signal generated by a W-band frequency multiplier and the probe beam collinearly traveled through an EO crystal, and beat signals between them were measured by a combination of a balanced photodetector and a spectrum analyzer. As a result, frequency measurement of the 100 GHz wave was successfully demonstrated, in which the linewidth of the beat signal was less than 1 Hz.

  1. Laboratory measurements and theoretical modeling of seismoelectric interface response and coseismic wave fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, M.D.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Slob, E.C.; Heller, H.K.J.

    2011-01-01

    A full-waveform seismoelectric numerical model incorporating the directivity pattern of a pressure source is developed. This model provides predictions of coseismic electric fields and the electromagnetic waves that originate from a fluid/porous-medium interface. An experimental setup in which cosei

  2. Optical Measurement of In-plane Waves in Mechanical Metamaterials Through Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Marshall; Trainiti, Giuseppe; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2017-02-01

    We report on a Digital Image Correlation-based technique for the detection of in-plane elastic waves propagating in structural lattices. The experimental characterization of wave motion in lattice structures is currently of great interest due its relevance to the design of novel mechanical metamaterials with unique/unusual properties such as strongly directional behaviour, negative refractive indexes and topologically protected wave motion. Assessment of these functionalities often requires the detection of highly spatially resolved in-plane wavefields, which for reticulated or porous structural assemblies is an open challenge. A Digital Image Correlation approach is implemented that tracks small displacements of the lattice nodes by centring image subsets about the lattice intersections. A high speed camera records the motion of the points by properly interleaving subse- quent frames thus artificially enhancing the available sampling rate. This, along with an imaging stitching procedure, enables the capturing of a field of view that is sufficiently large for subsequent processing. The transient response is recorded in the form of the full wavefields, which are processed to unveil features of wave motion in a hexagonal lattice. Time snapshots and frequency contours in the spatial Fourier domain are compared with numerical predictions to illustrate the accuracy of the recorded wavefields.

  3. Measurements of shock-induced guided and surface acoustic waves along boreholes in poroelastic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chao, G.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Van Dongen, M.E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic experiments on the propagation of guided waves along water-filled boreholes in water-saturated porous materials are reported. The experiments were conducted using a shock tube technique. An acoustic funnel structure was placed inside the tube just above the sample in order to enhance the ex

  4. Separating Internal Waves and Vortical Motions: Analysis of LatMix -EM-APEX Float Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Washington 98105 Phone: (206) 685-1079 fax: (206) 543-6785 email: lien@apl.washington.edu Thomas B. Sanford Applied Physics Laboratory and School ...project is to separate internal waves and vortical motions. These two processes coexist at small spatial scales (Müller 1984). However, they have distinct

  5. System Identification of Mistuned Bladed Disks from Traveling Wave Response Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiner, D. M.; Griffin, J. H.; Jones, K. W.; Kenyon, J. A.; Mehmed, O.; Kurkov, A. P.

    2003-01-01

    A new approach to modal analysis is presented. By applying this technique to bladed disk system identification methods, one can determine the mistuning in a rotor based on its response to a traveling wave excitation. This allows system identification to be performed under rotating conditions, and thus expands the applicability of existing mistuning identification techniques from integrally bladed rotors to conventional bladed disks.

  6. Measurements of boat motion in waves at Durban harbour for qualitative validation of motion model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mosikare, OR

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available in Waves at Durban Harbour for Qualitative Validation of Motion Model O.R. Mosikare1,2, N.J. Theron1, W. Van der Molen 1 University of Pretoria, South Africa, 0001 2Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Meiring Naude Rd, Brummeria, 0001...

  7. Comparison of Polarimetric SAR Techniques for the Measurement of Directional Ocean Wave Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-25

    II . ORIENTATION ANGLE INTENSITY MODULATION The first polarimetric SAR technique has been investigated for improving the visibility of...Buoy, Bodega Bay). Modulations in the polarization orientation angle induced by azimuth traveling ocean waves in the study area were visible in the

  8. Surface Roughness Measurements Utilizing Long-Range Surface-Plasma Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    constants in media 2. 1. and 0 and represents termined for given dielectric parameters by the propa- a generalization of the formula given by Marcuse in...Brekhovshikh, Waues in Layered Media (Academic, New in either of the forms York, 1960): D. Marcuse , Theory of Dielectric ’ptical Wave- guides (Academic

  9. Measurement of Flow Resistance Coefficient of Sodium Valve in Traveling Wave Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV; Ming-yu; WANG; Chong; YU; Hua-jin

    2015-01-01

    Traveling wave reactor(TWR)whose fundamental philosophy is achieving breeding and incineration of 238 U which is in the majority in natural uranium at original location through deepened burnup is a new concept fast reactor.It can effectively enhance utilization rate of uranium resources.TWR has much characteristics,such as

  10. Apertureless SNOM imaging of the surface phonon polariton waves: what do we measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, D. V.; Ryssel, H.

    2013-10-01

    The apertureless scanning near-field microscope (ASNOM) mapping of surface phonon polariton (SPP) waves being excited at the surface of the SiC polar crystal at a frequency corresponding to the lattice resonance was investigated. The wave with well-defined direction and source position, as well as a well-known propagation law, was used to calibrate the signal of an ASNOM. An experimental proof is presented showing that the signal collected by the ASNOM in such a case is proportional (as a complex number) to the local field amplitude above the surface, regardless of the tip response model. It is shown that the expression describing an ASNOM response, which is, in general case, rather complicated nonlinear function of a surface/tip dielectric constants, wavelength, tip vibration amplitude, tip shape etc., can be dramatically simplified in the case of the SPP waves mapping in a mid-IR range, due to a lucky combination of the tip and surface parameters for the case being considered. A tip vibration amplitude is much less than a running SPP wave field decay height in a normal direction. At the same time, the tip amplitude is larger than a characteristic distance at which a tip-surface electromagnetic near-field interaction plays a significant role.

  11. Optical Measurement of In-plane Waves in Mechanical Metamaterials Through Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Marshall; Trainiti, Giuseppe; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    We report on a Digital Image Correlation-based technique for the detection of in-plane elastic waves propagating in structural lattices. The experimental characterization of wave motion in lattice structures is currently of great interest due its relevance to the design of novel mechanical metamaterials with unique/unusual properties such as strongly directional behaviour, negative refractive indexes and topologically protected wave motion. Assessment of these functionalities often requires the detection of highly spatially resolved in-plane wavefields, which for reticulated or porous structural assemblies is an open challenge. A Digital Image Correlation approach is implemented that tracks small displacements of the lattice nodes by centring image subsets about the lattice intersections. A high speed camera records the motion of the points by properly interleaving subse- quent frames thus artificially enhancing the available sampling rate. This, along with an imaging stitching procedure, enables the capturing of a field of view that is sufficiently large for subsequent processing. The transient response is recorded in the form of the full wavefields, which are processed to unveil features of wave motion in a hexagonal lattice. Time snapshots and frequency contours in the spatial Fourier domain are compared with numerical predictions to illustrate the accuracy of the recorded wavefields. PMID:28205589

  12. 3mm波电磁特性测量雷达%3mm wave electromagnetic characteristic measurement radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永鸿; 林权; 樊勇; 邹林; 李良超; 杨建宇

    2011-01-01

    为了对非静止的烟幕进行插损、反射、辐射等电磁特性的测量,采用锁相技术研制了3mm波雷达反射截面积(RCS)测量雷达和3mm波辐射特性测量雷达(辐射计).前者采用收发分置的连续波双天线体制,可根据目标尺寸和反射的大小更换天线;采用毫米波固定衰减器和远近程切换,以及FFT积累的数字接收,提高灵敏度和动态范围.后者是超外差中频迪克式体制,用硬件和软件积分相结合的方式保证灵敏度.系统每2ms可给出一个测试结果,实现了动态测量.%For measuring insertion loss, reflection and radiation of smoke screen, a 3mm wave electromagnetic characteristic measurement radar has been fabricated, which comprises a 3mm wave radar cross section ( RCS ) measurement radar and a 3mm wave radiometer. The transmitter and receiver of the former are separated, and each antenna of them can be chosen among three kinds of antennas with different beam width or gain, according to the sizes of object and the power of reflection signal. In order to fit the tremendous changes of power between transmission and reflection, the sensitivity and the dynamic range of the system is improved by millimeter wave fixed attenuator, switching between long range and short range,and digital intermediate frequency (IF) receiver with signal accumulating by Fast Fourier Transform Algorithm (FFT). In the 3mm wave super-heterodyne IF Dicke-radiometer, hardware integral and soft integral are both used to achieve high sensitivity. All the millimeter wave oscillators in the system are phase-locked. The interval between two adjacent data is 2ms,which is suitable for suspending and movable smoke screen.

  13. S-Wave Velocity Structure of the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP) Site Using Microtremor Array Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Feng; Huang, Huey-Chu

    2015-10-01

    The Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP) drilled a 2-km-deep hole 2.4 km east of the surface rupture of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake ( M w 7.6), near the town of Dakeng. Geophysical well logs at the TCDP site were run over depths ranging from 500 to 1,900 m to obtain the physical properties of the fault zones and adjacent damage zones. These data provide good reference material for examining the validity of velocity structures using microtremor array measurement; therefore, we conduct array measurements for a total of four arrays at two sites near the TCDP drilling sites. The phase velocities at frequencies of 0.2-5 Hz are calculated using the frequency-wavenumber ( f- k) spectrum method. Then the S-wave velocity structures are estimated by employing surface wave inversion techniques. The S-wave velocity from the differential inversion technique gradually increases from 1.52 to 2.22 km/s at depths between 585 and 1,710 m. This result is similar to those from the velocity logs, which range from 1.4 km/s at a depth of 597 m to 2.98 km/s at a depth of 1,705 m. The stochastic inversion results are similar to those from the seismic reflection methods and the lithostratigraphy of TCDP-A borehole, comparatively. These results show that microtremor array measurement provides a good tool for estimating deep S-wave velocity structure.

  14. Measurement of Dielectric Properties at 75 - 325 GHz using a Vector Network Analyzer and Full Wave Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Khanal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fast and easy to use method to determine permittivity and loss tangent in the frequency range of 75 to 325 GHz. To obtain the permittivity and the loss tangent of the test material, the reflection and transmission S-parameters of a waveguide section filled with the test material are measured using a vector network analyzer and then compared with the simulated plots from a full wave simulator (HFSS, or alternatively the measurement results are used in mathematical formulas. The results are coherent over multiple waveguide bands.

  15. Calculation of aerosol backscatter from airborne continuous wave focused CO sub 2 Doppler lidar measurements. 1. Algorithm description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothermel, J. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (USA)); Bowdle, D.A. (Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville (USA)); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Worcestershire (England)); Woodfield, A.A. (Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedfordshire (England))

    1991-03-20

    Since 1981 the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment and the Royal Aircraft Establishment, United Kingdom, have made vertical and horizontal sounding measurements of aerosol backscatter coefficients at 10.6 {mu}m using an airborne continuous wave focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar, the Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS). The heterodyne signal from the LATAS detector is spectrally analyzed. Then, in conjunction with aircraft flight parameters, the data are processed in a six-stage computer algorithm: Set search window, search for peak signal, test peak signal, measure total signal, calculate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and calculate backscatter coefficient.

  16. Optic-electronic systems for measurement the three-dimension angular deformation of axles at the millimeter wave range radiotelescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyakhin, Igor A.; Kopylova, Tatyana V.; Konyakhin, Alexsey I.; Smekhov, Andrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Researches in the millimetre wave range require the high accuracy for position of the mirror components of the radiotelescope. A mirror weight is the cause of the three-dimension angular deformation of the elevation axle and azimuth axle relatively bearings. At result the elevation angle and azimuth angle of a parabolic mirror axis orientation is not equal to the set values. For the measuring roll, pitch and yaw angular deformations the autocollimation system with new type of the reflector are used. Reflector for autocollimation measurements as compositions of the anamorphic prism and special tetrahedral reflector is described. New methods for roll, pitch, yaw angles measuring are discussed. Optical scheme for the measurement system, structure the anamorphic prism and tetrahedral reflector are proposed. Equations for the static characteristic of the measuring system are shown.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and emissivity of lunar regolith simulant using dual-channel millimeter-wave radiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloy, J S; Sundaram, S K; Matyas, J; Woskov, P P

    2011-05-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometry can be used for simultaneous measurement of emissivity and temperature of materials under extreme environments (high temperature, pressure, and corrosive environments). The state-of-the-art dual channel MMW passive radiometer with active interferometric capabilities at 137 GHz described here allows for radiometric measurements of sample temperature and emissivity up to at least 1600 °C with simultaneous measurement of sample surface dynamics. These capabilities have been used to demonstrate dynamic measurement of melting of powders of simulated lunar regolith and static measurement of emissivity of solid samples. The paper presents the theoretical background and basis for the dual-receiver system, describes the hardware in detail, and demonstrates the data analysis. Post-experiment analysis of emissivity versus temperature allows further extraction from the radiometric data of millimeter wave viewing beam coupling factors, which provide corroboratory evidence to the interferometric data of the process dynamics observed. These results show the promise of the MMW system for extracting quantitative and qualitative process parameters for industrial processes and access to real-time dynamics of materials behavior in extreme environments.

  18. Field measurements and modeling of wave propagation and subsequent weak layer failure in snow due to explosive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, Stephan; Sidler, Rolf; Dual, Jürg; Schweizer, Jürg

    2015-04-01

    Avalanche control by explosives is among the key temporary preventive measures. Yet, little is known about the mechanism involved in releasing avalanches by the effect of an explosion. Here, we test the hypothesis that the stress induced by acoustic waves exceeds the strength of weak snow layers. Consequently the snow fails and the onset of rapid crack propagation might finally lead to the release of a snow slab avalanche. We performed experiments with explosive charges over a snowpack. We installed microphones above the snowpack to measure near-surface air pressure and accelerometers within three snow pits. We also recorded pit walls of each pit with high speed cameras to detect weak layer failure. Empirical relationships and a priori information from ice and air were used to characterize a porous layered model from density measurements of snow profiles in the snow pits. This model was used to perform two-dimensional numerical simulations of wave propagation in Biot-type porous material. Locations of snow failure were identified in the simulation by comparing the axial and deviatoric stress field of the simulation to the corresponding snow strength. The identified snow failure locations corresponded well with the observed failure locations in the experiment. The acceleration measured in the snowpack best correlated with the modeled acceleration of the fluid relative to the ice frame. Even though the near field of the explosion is expected to be governed by non-linear effects as for example the observed supersonic wave propagation in the air above the snow surface, the results of the linear poroelastic simulation fit well with the measured air pressure and snowpack accelerations. The results of this comparison are an important step towards quantifying the effectiveness of avalanche control by explosives.

  19. Helicopter downwash measured by continuous-wave Doppler lidars with agile beam steering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Angelou, Nikolas; Hansen, Per

    2012-01-01

    A ground-based remote sensing short-range WindScanner with agile beam steering based on a modified ZephIR continuous-wave wind lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging) and a double prism arrangement has recently been developed at the Department of Wind Energy at the DTU Risø campus. The WindScanner me......A ground-based remote sensing short-range WindScanner with agile beam steering based on a modified ZephIR continuous-wave wind lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging) and a double prism arrangement has recently been developed at the Department of Wind Energy at the DTU Risø campus. The Wind...

  20. Real-Time Leaky Lamb Wave Spectrum Measurement and Its Application to NDE of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1999-01-01

    Numerous analytical and theoretical studies of the behavior of leaky Lamb waves (LLW) in composite materials were documented in the literature. One of the key issues that are constraining the application of this method as a practical tool is the amount of data that needs to be acquired and the slow process that is involved with such experiments. Recently, a methodology that allows quasi real-time acquisition of LLW dispersion data was developed. At each angle of incidence the reflection spectrum is available in real time from the experimental setup and it can be used for rapid detection of the defects. This technique can be used to rapidly acquire the various plate wave modes along various angles of incidence for the characterization of the material elastic properties. The experimental method and data acquisition technique will be described in this paper. Experimental data was used to examine a series of flaws including porosity and delaminations and demonstrated the efficiency of the developed technique.