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Sample records for wave interferometric sensor

  1. An Atomic Gravitational Wave Interferometric Sensor (AGIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Savas; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Graham, Peter W.; /SLAC; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rajendran, Surjeet; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-08-01

    We propose two distinct atom interferometer gravitational wave detectors, one terrestrial and another satellite-based, utilizing the core technology of the Stanford 10m atom interferometer presently under construction. Each configuration compares two widely separated atom interferometers run using common lasers. The signal scales with the distance between the interferometers, which can be large since only the light travels over this distance, not the atoms. The terrestrial experiment with baseline {approx} 1 km can operate with strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -19}/{radical}Hz in the 1 Hz-10 Hz band, inaccessible to LIGO, and can detect gravitational waves from solar mass binaries out to megaparsec distances. The satellite experiment with baseline {approx} 1000 km can probe the same frequency spectrum as LISA with comparable strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -20}/{radical}Hz. The use of ballistic atoms (instead of mirrors) as inertial test masses improves systematics coming from vibrations, acceleration noise, and significantly reduces spacecraft control requirements. We analyze the backgrounds in this configuration and discuss methods for controlling them to the required levels.

  2. Self Calibrating Interferometric Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Schiøtt

    This thesis deals with the development of an optical sensor based on micro interferometric backscatter detection (MIBD). A price effective, highly sensitive and ready for mass production platform is the goal of this project. The thesis covers three areas. The first part of the thesis deals...... mask. The fabricated micro structures have been electroplated for later injection molding, showing the potential of the MIBD sensor to be mass produced with high reproducibility and sensitivity. In part three MIBD experiments on vital biological systems are described. Label–free binding studies of bio...

  3. Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Young Choi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  4. Interferometric fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong Ha; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwan Seob; Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Myoung Jin; Rho, Byung Sup; Choi, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG) is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  5. Quantum Interferometric Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Kapale, K T; Lee, H; Kok, P; Dowling, J P; Kapale, Kishore T.; Didomenico, Leo D.; Lee, Hwang; Kok, Pieter; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2005-01-01

    Quantum entanglement has the potential to revolutionize the entire field of interferometric sensing by providing many orders of magnitude improvement in interferometer sensitivity. The quantum-entangled particle interferometer approach is very general and applies to many types of interferometers. In particular, without nonlocal entanglement, a generic classical interferometer has a statistical-sampling shot-noise limited sensitivity that scales like $1/\\sqrt{N}$, where $N$ is the number of particles passing through the interferometer per unit time. However, if carefully prepared quantum correlations are engineered between the particles, then the interferometer sensitivity improves by a factor of $\\sqrt{N}$ to scale like 1/N, which is the limit imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. For optical interferometers operating at milliwatts of optical power, this quantum sensitivity boost corresponds to an eight-order-of-magnitude improvement of signal to noise. This effect can translate into a tremendous s...

  6. Theory, analysis and design of RF interferometric sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Cam

    2012-01-01

    Theory, Analysis and Design of RF Interferometric Sensors presents the theory, analysis and design of RF interferometric sensors. RF interferometric sensors are attractive for various sensing applications that require every fine resolution and accuracy as well as fast speed. The book also presents two millimeter-wave interferometric sensors realized using RF integrated circuits. The developed millimeter-wave homodyne sensor shows sub-millimeter resolution in the order of 0.05 mm without correction for the non-linear phase response of the sensor's quadrature mixer. The designed millimeter-wave double-channel homodyne sensor provides a resolution of only 0.01 mm, or 1/840th of the operating wavelength, and can inherently suppress the non-linearity of the sensor's quadrature mixer. The experimental results of displacement and velocity measurement are presented as a way to demonstrate the sensing ability of the RF interferometry and to illustrate its many possible applications in sensing. The book is succinct, ye...

  7. Ultra-Low Noise Quad Photoreceiver for Space Based Laser Interferometric Gravity Wave Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravity wave detection using space-based long-baseline laser interferometric sensors imposes stringent noise requirements on the system components, including the...

  8. Fundamentals of interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Saulson, Peter R

    2017-01-01

    LIGO's recent discovery of gravitational waves was headline news around the world. Many people will want to understand more about what a gravitational wave is, how LIGO works, and how LIGO functions as a detector of gravitational waves.This book aims to communicate the basic logic of interferometric gravitational wave detectors to students who are new to the field. It assumes that the reader has a basic knowledge of physics, but no special familiarity with gravitational waves, with general relativity, or with the special techniques of experimental physics. All of the necessary ideas are developed in the book.The first edition was published in 1994. Since the book is aimed at explaining the physical ideas behind the design of LIGO, it stands the test of time. For the second edition, an Epilogue has been added; it brings the treatment of technical details up to date, and provides references that would allow a student to become proficient with today's designs.

  9. The response of interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Lee Samuel

    2008-01-01

    The standard derivation of the response of interferometric gravitational wave detectors makes a series of erroneous approximations regarding the coordinate trajectory of the light and the parameterization of the null geodesic it travels along. These errors appear to have remained unrecognized for at least thirty five years. We provide, in full detail, a correct derivation of the response of a single-bounce Michelson interferometer to gravitational waves, compare it to the "standard", but incorrect, derivation, and show where the earlier mistakes were made. By a fortuitous set of circumstances, not generally so, the final result is the same.

  10. Miniaturized fiber-optic Michelson-type interferometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kent A.; Miller, William V., III; Tran, Tuan A.; Vengsarkar, Ashish M.; Claus, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    A novel, miniaturized Michelson-type fiber-optic interferometric sensor that is relatively insensitive to temperature drifts is presented. A fused-biconical tapered coupler is cleaved immediately after the coupled length and polished down to the region of the fused cladding, but short of the interaction region. The end of one core is selectively coated with a reflective surface and is used as the reference arm; the other core serves as the sensing arm. The detection of surface acoustic waves, microdisplacements, and magnetic fields is reported. The sensor is shown to be highly stable in comparison to a classic homodyne, uncompensated Michelson interferometer, and signal-to-noise ratios of 65 dB have been obtained.

  11. Dynamics of laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmanov, Malik

    2000-11-01

    Dynamics of fields and mirrors in the new laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors is described. The dynamics of fields is formulated in terms of difference equations, which take into account the large delay due to the light transit time in the interferometer arm cavities. Solutions of these field equations are found in both transient and steady-state regimes. The solutions for fields in the transient regime can be used for the measurement of the parameters of Fabry-Perot cavities. The solutions for fields in the steady-state regime can be used for the analysis of noise performance of Fabry-Perot cavities. The dynamics of the mirrors is described in terms of two normal coordinates: the cavity length and its center of mass. Such dynamics is strongly affected by the radiation pressure of light circulating in the cavity. The forces of radiation pressure are nonlinear and nonconservative. These two effects introduce instabilities and give rise to a violation of conservation of energy for the motion of the suspended mirrors. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations of the dynamics are done with applications to the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). The dynamics of signal recycling and power recycling interferometers is analyzed using the field equations. The response of the interferometers to the input laser field and motion of its mirrors is calculated. Several basic transfer functions are found. These correspond to either a single or a nested cavity. A nested cavity appears either in the dynamics of the differential mode in signal recycling interferometers or in the dynamics of the common mode of power recycling interferometers. The poles of transfer functions of these nested cavities are found. The response of the interferometers to gravitational waves is described: the analysis is done in the rest frame of a local observer which is a natural coordinate system of the detector. This response is given by the interferometer

  12. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  13. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  14. Weighted-elastic-wave interferometric imaging of microseismic source location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Chen, Hao; Wang, Xiu-Ming

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge of the locations of seismic sources is critical for microseismic monitoring. Time-window-based elastic wave interferometric imaging and weighted-elastic-wave (WEW) interferometric imaging are proposed and used to locate modeled microseismic sources. The proposed method improves the precision and eliminates artifacts in location profiles. Numerical experiments based on a horizontally layered isotropic medium have shown that the method offers the following advantages: It can deal with low-SNR microseismic data with velocity perturbations as well as relatively sparse receivers and still maintain relatively high precision despite the errors in the velocity model. Furthermore, it is more efficient than conventional traveltime inversion methods because interferometric imaging does not require traveltime picking. Numerical results using a 2D fault model have also suggested that the weighted-elastic-wave interferometric imaging can locate multiple sources with higher location precision than the time-reverse imaging method.

  15. Interferometric millimeter wave and THz wave doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shaolin; Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Elmer, Thomas

    2015-08-11

    A mixerless high frequency interferometric Doppler radar system and methods has been invented, numerically validated and experimentally tested. A continuous wave source, phase modulator (e.g., a continuously oscillating reference mirror) and intensity detector are utilized. The intensity detector measures the intensity of the combined reflected Doppler signal and the modulated reference beam. Rigorous mathematics formulas have been developed to extract bot amplitude and phase from the measured intensity signal. Software in Matlab has been developed and used to extract such amplitude and phase information from the experimental data. Both amplitude and phase are calculated and the Doppler frequency signature of the object is determined.

  16. An analog modulation and demodulation method employing LVDT signal conditioner for fiber-optic interferometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kejiang; Rao, Qi; Zhang, Minjie; Hu, Keke; Ruan, Yefeng

    2017-09-01

    An analog method to modulate and demodulate fiber-optic interferometric sensors employing a linear variable differential transformer signal conditioner to generate sine modulation wave and demodulate phase-modulated signal from the photodetector’s output is presented in this letter. No external lock-in amplifiers or digital components are used in this design. All the necessary components for signal processing are integrated in a single analog electronic microchip AD698, which reduces the system’s complexity significantly. After implementation on an interferometric fiber-optic gyroscope as an example, this method demonstrates a bias stability of 0.063 deg h-1 (i.e. 0.220 µrad).

  17. Broadband, Common-path, Interferometric Wavefront Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, James Kent (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid sensors comprising Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (S-HWFS) and Zernike Wavefront Sensor (Z-WFS) capabilities are presented. The hybrid sensor includes a Z-WFS optically arranged in-line with a S-HWFS such that the combined wavefront sensor operates across a wide dynamic range and noise conditions. The Z-WFS may include the ability to introduce a dynamic phase shift in both transmissive and reflective modes.

  18. Broadband circular interferometric millimetre-wave ISAR for threat detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bertl

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available To detect threats on a person's body surface the application of millimetre-waves is possible. In order to get a view of the person from all sides either the person has to be rotated standing on a turntable (Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar, ISAR or a sensor is moved on a circular path around the person (Synthetic Aperture Radar, SAR. The goal of the reconstruction is to obtain information about the shape of the threats and their positions in all three dimensions. At first the reconstruction is done along range and azimuth, which span the principal surface given by the sensor configuration. This paper reports on two methods to obtain the third spatial dimension. Due to the circular shape and its 3D focussing ability of the aperture this information can be obtained by the evaluation of the image focus. Secondly, if two coherent receiving channels are used, a possibility to achieve 3D spatial resolution is the processing of the interferometric phase. A comparison between these two will be presented.

  19. A step-wise steerable source of illumination for low-noise "Violin-Mode" shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2016-01-01

    A steerable low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow-sensors having a displacement sensitivity of ∼100 pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of at least ±0.5 mm. These sensors were designed to detect lateral "Violin-Mode" resonances in the highly tensioned fused-silica suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave detectors. The shadow sensors-one intended for each of the four fibres in a suspension-comprised a source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation (emitter) and a differential shadow-displacement sensor (detector), these bracketing the fibre under test. The suspension fibres themselves were approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm in diameter, and when illuminated from the side, they cast narrow, vertical, shadows onto their respective detectors-these being located at an effective distance of 50 fibre diameters behind the axes of the fibres themselves. The emitter described here was designed to compensate for a significant degree of mechanical drift or creep over time in the mean position of its suspension fibre. This was achieved by employing five adjacent columns of 8  × miniature NIR LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes, λ = 890 nm), with one column being activated at a time. When used in conjunction with a "reverse Galilean" telescope, the LED sources allowed the collimated beam from the emitter to be steered azimuthally in fine angular increments (0.65°), causing the fibre's shadow to move laterally, in a step-wise manner, across the plane of its facing detector. Each step in shadow position was approximately 0.23 mm in size, and this allowed the fibre's shadow to be re-centred, so as to bridge once again both elements of its photodiode detector-even if the fibre was off-centred by as much as ±0.5 mm. Re-centring allowed Violin-Mode vibrations of the fibre to be sensed once again as differential AC photocurrents, these flowing in anti-phase in the two

  20. A step-wise steerable source of illumination for low-noise “Violin-Mode” shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V. [SUPA (Scottish Universities Physics Alliance), Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    A steerable low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow-sensors having a displacement sensitivity of ∼100 pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of at least ±0.5 mm. These sensors were designed to detect lateral “Violin-Mode” resonances in the highly tensioned fused-silica suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave detectors. The shadow sensors—one intended for each of the four fibres in a suspension—comprised a source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation (emitter) and a differential shadow-displacement sensor (detector), these bracketing the fibre under test. The suspension fibres themselves were approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm in diameter, and when illuminated from the side, they cast narrow, vertical, shadows onto their respective detectors—these being located at an effective distance of 50 fibre diameters behind the axes of the fibres themselves. The emitter described here was designed to compensate for a significant degree of mechanical drift or creep over time in the mean position of its suspension fibre. This was achieved by employing five adjacent columns of 8  × miniature NIR LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes, λ = 890 nm), with one column being activated at a time. When used in conjunction with a “reverse Galilean” telescope, the LED sources allowed the collimated beam from the emitter to be steered azimuthally in fine angular increments (0.65°), causing the fibre’s shadow to move laterally, in a step-wise manner, across the plane of its facing detector. Each step in shadow position was approximately 0.23 mm in size, and this allowed the fibre’s shadow to be re-centred, so as to bridge once again both elements of its photodiode detector—even if the fibre was off-centred by as much as ±0.5 mm. Re-centring allowed Violin-Mode vibrations of the fibre to be sensed once again as differential AC photocurrents, these flowing in

  1. A step-wise steerable source of illumination for low-noise "Violin-Mode" shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    A steerable low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow-sensors having a displacement sensitivity of ˜100 pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of at least ±0.5 mm. These sensors were designed to detect lateral "Violin-Mode" resonances in the highly tensioned fused-silica suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave detectors. The shadow sensors—one intended for each of the four fibres in a suspension—comprised a source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation (emitter) and a differential shadow-displacement sensor (detector), these bracketing the fibre under test. The suspension fibres themselves were approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm in diameter, and when illuminated from the side, they cast narrow, vertical, shadows onto their respective detectors—these being located at an effective distance of 50 fibre diameters behind the axes of the fibres themselves. The emitter described here was designed to compensate for a significant degree of mechanical drift or creep over time in the mean position of its suspension fibre. This was achieved by employing five adjacent columns of 8 × miniature NIR LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes, λ = 890 nm), with one column being activated at a time. When used in conjunction with a "reverse Galilean" telescope, the LED sources allowed the collimated beam from the emitter to be steered azimuthally in fine angular increments (0.65°), causing the fibre's shadow to move laterally, in a step-wise manner, across the plane of its facing detector. Each step in shadow position was approximately 0.23 mm in size, and this allowed the fibre's shadow to be re-centred, so as to bridge once again both elements of its photodiode detector—even if the fibre was off-centred by as much as ±0.5 mm. Re-centring allowed Violin-Mode vibrations of the fibre to be sensed once again as differential AC photocurrents, these flowing in anti-phase in the

  2. Synchronous phase detection for optical fiber interferometric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, I J; Phillips, R L

    1983-08-01

    A system has been developed to accurately detect phase signals produced in optical interferometric sensors. The system employs optical heterodyning and synchronously detects optical phase by feeding back an error signal to a phase modulator in the reference leg of the interferometer. This system is seen to have properties similar to a phase-locked loop. The system is mathematically analyzed and a simple second-order model developed which accurately predicts the system response.

  3. Data Quality Studies of Enhanced Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    McIver, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Data quality assessment plays an essential role in the quest to detect gravitational wave signals in data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Interferometer data contains a high rate of noise transients from the environment, the detector hardware, and the detector control systems. These transients severely limit the statistical significance of gravitational wave candidates of short duration and/or poorly modeled waveforms. This paper describes the data quality studies that have been performed in recent LIGO and Virgo observing runs to mitigate the impact of transient detector artifacts on the gravitational wave searches.

  4. Differentiating surface and bulk interactions in nanoplasmonic interferometric sensor arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Beibei; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2014-01-01

    Detecting specific target analytes and differentiating them from interfering background effects is a crucial but challenging task in complex multi-component solutions commonly encountered in environmental, chemical, biological, and medical sensing applications. Here we present a simple nanoplasmonic interferometric sensor platform that can differentiate the adsorption of a thin protein layer on the sensor surface (surface effects) from bulk refractive index changes (interfering background effects) at a single sensing spot, exploiting the different penetration depths of multiple propagating surface plasmon polaritons excited in the ring-hole nanostructures. A monolayer of bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules with an effective thickness of 1.91nm is detected and differentiated from a 10-3 change in the bulk refractive index unit of the solution. The noise level of the retrieved real-time sensor output compares favorably with traditional prism-based surface plasmon resonance sensors, but is achieved using a sign...

  5. Twin mirrors for laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassolas, Benoît; Benoît, Quentin; Flaminio, Raffaele; Forest, Danièle; Franc, Janyce; Galimberti, Massimo; Lacoudre, Aline; Michel, Christophe; Montorio, Jean-Luc; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Gravitational-wave detectors such as Virgo and the laser interferometric gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) use a long-baseline Michelson interferometer with Fabry-Perot cavities in the arms to search for gravitational waves. The symmetry between the two Fabry-Perot cavities is crucial to reduce the interferometer's sensitivity to the laser amplitude and frequency noise. To this purpose, the transmittance of the mirrors in both cavities should be as close as possible. This paper describes the realization and the characterization of the first twin large low-loss mirrors with transmissions differing by less than 0.01%.

  6. Interferometric and localized surface plasmon based fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muri, Harald Ian D. I.; Bano, Andon; Hjelme, Dag Roar

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a novel single point, multi-parameter, fiber optic sensor concept based on a combination of interferometric and plasmonic sensor modalities on an optical fiber end face. The sensor consists of a micro-Fabry-Perot interferometer in the form of a hemispherical stimuli-responsive hydrogel with immobilized gold nanoparticles. We present results of proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing of refractive index (RI) in the visible range and interferometric measurements of volumetric changes of the pH stimuli-responsive hydrogel in near infrared range. The response of LSPR to RI (Δλr/ΔRI 877nm/RI) and the free spectral range (FSR) to pH (ΔpH/ΔFSR = 0.09624/nm) were measured with LSPR relatively constant for hydrogel swelling degree and FSR relatively constant for RI. We expect this novel sensor concept to be of great value for biosensors for medical applications.

  7. Nanohertz gravitational wave searches with interferometric pulsar timing experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Massimo

    2011-05-13

    We estimate the sensitivity to nano-Hertz gravitational waves of pulsar timing experiments in which two highly stable millisecond pulsars are tracked simultaneously with two neighboring radio telescopes that are referenced to the same timekeeping subsystem (i.e., "the clock"). By taking the difference of the two time-of-arrival residual data streams we can exactly cancel the clock noise in the combined data set, thereby enhancing the sensitivity to gravitational waves. We estimate that, in the band (10(-9)-10(-8))  Hz, this "interferometric" pulsar timing technique can potentially improve the sensitivity to gravitational radiation by almost 2 orders of magnitude over that of single-telescopes. Interferometric pulsar timing experiments could be performed with neighboring pairs of antennas of the NASA's Deep Space Network and the forthcoming large arraying projects.

  8. Asymmetric Fabry-Pérot interferometric cavity for fiber optical sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaoji Jiang; Youcheng Liang; Xi Zhu; Hezhou Wang

    2006-01-01

    Good linearity and wide dynamic range are the advantages of asymmetric Fabry-Pérot (F-P) interferometric cavity, whose realization has been long for. Based on optical thin film characteristic matrix theory, an asymmetric F-P interferometric cavity with good linearity and wide dynamic range is designed. And by choosing the material of two different thin metallic layers, the asymmetric F-P interferometric cavity is successfully fabricated. The design theory and method of this asymmetric F-P interferometric cavity have been described in detailed. In this paper an asymmetric F-P interferometric cavity used in fiber optical sensor is reported.

  9. Passive millimeter-wave camera with interferometric processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohmi, Hitoshi; Ohnishi, Seiki; Kujubu, Osamu

    2006-05-01

    A proto-type passive millimeter-wave (MMW) camera with interferometric processing has been developed. The purpose is to confirm the feasibility of the interferometric MMW camera and to study the characteristics of MMW images. In this paper, the principle and the feature of the interferometric MMW camera is described. Also, the hardware configuration and the image processing algorithm are presented. This proto-type camera is comprised of the minimum configuration as an interferometric imager which consists of two sets of a W-band front end with a horn antenna, a receiver, and an A/D converter, a high-speed processing hardware, and a computer. The position of these two antennas with W-band front-end moves on the precision linear slider in horizontal and vertical axis. The coherently amplified two channel signals are digitized and processed in the hardware processor. The process is comprised of phase error compensation, correlation of all combination of each axis data, and integration to improve the signal to noise ratio. The computer input the integrated data to make an image by matched filter processing. The integration time is from 1mS to 10S depending on required integration gain. The maximum synthesized antenna aperture size is 1m for horizontal axis and 50cm for vertical axis. Because it takes certain time to receive by the moving antennas, only the targets without motion are imaged by this proto-type camera. The processed images will be shown. Also, future plan for a real-time camera using this technique is presented.

  10. Advanced Virgo: a 2nd generation interferometric gravitational wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Virgo is the project to upgrade the Virgo interferometric detector of gravitational waves, with the aim of increasing the number of observable galaxies (and thus the detection rate) by three orders of magnitude. The project is now in an advanced construction phase and the assembly and integration will be completed by the end of 2015. Advanced Virgo will be part of a network with the two Advanced LIGO detectors in the US and GEO HF in Germany, with the goal of contributing to the early detections of gravitational waves and to opening a new observation window on the universe. In this paper we describe the main features of the Advanced Virgo detector and outline the status of the construction.

  11. Interferometric adaptive optics for high power laser pointing, wave-front control and phasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Homoelle, D C; Henesian, M A; Bliss, E S; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-01-21

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing and overall wavefront quality. One quad of the NIF beams, 4 beam pairs, will be utilized for these experiments and hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that for the fast ignition experiments, these beams will be required to deliver 50% (4.0 kJ) of their total energy (7.96 kJ) within a 40 {micro}m diameter spot at the end of a fast ignition cone target. This requirement implies a stringent pointing and overall phase conjugation error budget on the adaptive optics system used to correct these beam lines. The overall encircled energy requirement is more readily met by phasing of the beams in pairs but still requires high Strehl ratios, Sr, and rms tip/tilt errors of approximately one {micro}rad. To accomplish this task we have designed an interferometric adaptive optics system capable of beam pointing, high Strehl ratio and beam phasing with a single pixilated MEMS deformable mirror and interferometric wave-front sensor. We present the design of a testbed used to evaluate the performance of this wave-front sensor below along with simulations of its expected performance level.

  12. Interferometric microstructured polymer optical fiber ultrasound sensor for optoacoustic endoscopic imaging in biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego, Daniel; Sáez-Rodríguez, David; Webb, David

    2014-01-01

    We report a characterization of the acoustic sensitivity of microstructured polymer optical fiber interferometric sensors at ultrasonic frequencies from 100kHz to 10MHz. The use of wide-band ultrasonic fiber optic sensors in biomedical ultrasonic and optoacoustic applications is an open alternative...... interferometric sensors depends strongly of the material which is composed of. In this work we compare experimentally the intrinsic ultrasonic sensitivities of a PMMA mPOF with other three optical fibers: a singlemode silica optical fiber, a single-mode polymer optical fiber and a multimode graded...

  13. Noise in adaptive interferometric fiber sensor based on population dynamic grating in erbium-doped fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Serguei; Sánchez, Marcos Plata; Hernández, Eliseo Hernández

    2016-09-10

    Experimental investigations of the main noise sources that limit the sensitivity of the adaptive interferometric all-fiber sensors operating in the communication wavelength region are reported. Adaptive properties (i.e., the autostabilization of an optimal operation point of the interferometer) are enabled by the dynamic population grating recorded in a segment of the erbium-doped fiber (EDF) at milliwatt-scale cw power in the 1480-1560 nm spectral range. The utilized symmetric Sagnac configuration with low light internal reflections ensures reduced sensitivity of the sensor to phase noise of the laser, while intensity noise is reduced to an insignificant level by the balanced detection scheme. It is shown that the fluorescence from the erbium ions, excited by the counterpropagating waves recording the grating, increases the noise level from the fundamental shot noise approximately by a factor of 2-3 only. It is also shown that conventional communication distributed feedback (DFB) semiconductor lasers with megahertz linewidth are not suitable for high-sensitivity applications of such sensors. Because of inevitable backreflections from the output terminal devices (photodiodes, insulators, circulator), the above-mentioned fundamental noise level is increased by 2 orders of magnitude due to high phase noise of the DFB laser.

  14. Combined optical fiber interferometric sensors for the detection of acoustic emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yi-jun; MU Lin-lin; LIU Jun-feng; YU Xiao-tao

    2008-01-01

    A type of combined optical fiber interferometric acoustic emission sensor is proposed.The sensor can be independent on the laser source and make light interference by matching the lengths of two arms,so it can be used to monitor the health of large structure.Theoretical analyses indicate that the system can be equivalent to the Michelson interferometer with two optical fiber loop reflectors,and its sensitivity has been remarkably increased because of the decrease of the losses of light energy.PZT is powered by DC regulator to control the operating point of the system,so the system can accurately detect feeble vibration which is generated by ultrasonic waves propagating on the surface of solid.The amplitude and the frequency of feeble vibration signal are obtained by detecting the output light intensity of intefferometer and using Fourier transform technique.The results indicate that the system can be used to detect the acoustic emission signals by the frequency characteristics.

  15. Interferometric Techniques for Gravitational Wave Detection in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robin T; Bender, Peter L.

    2000-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission will detect gravitational waves from galactic and extragalactic sources, most importantly those involving supermassive black holes. The primary goal of this project is to investigate stability and robustness issues associated with LISA interferometry. We specifically propose to study systematic errors arising from: optical misalignments, optical surface errors, thermal effects and pointing tolerances. This report covers the first fiscal year of the grant, from January 1st to December 31st 1999. We have employed an optical modeling tool to evaluate the effect of misplaced and misaligned optical components. Preliminary results seem to indicate that positional tolerances of one micron and angular tolerances of 0.6 millirad produce no significant effect on the achievable contrast of the interference pattern. This report also outlines research plans for the second fiscal year of the grant, from January 1st to December 31st 2000. Since the work under NAG5-6880 has gone more rapidly than projected, our test bed interferometer is operational, and can be used for measurements of effects that cause beam motion. Hence, we will design, build and characterize a sensor for measuring beam motion, and then install it. We are also planning a differential wavefront sensor based on a quadrant photodiode as a first generation sensor.

  16. Extracting Information from the Atom-Laser Wave Function UsingInterferometric Measurement with a Laser Standing-Wave Grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正东; 武强; 曾亮; 林宇; 朱诗尧

    2001-01-01

    The reconstruction of the atom-laser wave function is performed using an interferometric measurement with a standing-wave grating, and the results of this scheme are studied. The relations between the measurement data and the atomic wave function are also presented. This scheme is quite applicable and effectively avoids the initial random phase problem of the method that employs the laser running wave. The information which is encoded in the atom-laser wave is extracted.

  17. Interferometric vibration sensor using phase-generated carrier method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Liu, Zhibo; Liu, Yan; Ma, Lin; Tan, Zhongwei; Jian, Shuisheng

    2013-09-01

    An interferometric fiber-optic vibration sensing system using the phase-generated carrier (PGC) method is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensing section consists of a Sagnac interferometer combined with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a length of sensing fiber is shared between the two interferometers. The PGC demodulation scheme is used to demodulate the time-varying phase shifts induced by vibrations. Spatial information can be extracted from the demodulated results. A prototype sensing system with a 628 m long sensing fiber has been tested and a spatial resolution better than 12 m is successfully achieved.

  18. A Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for extracting periodic gravitational wave signals from laser interferometric detector data

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, N; Woan, G; Meyer, R; Christensen, Nelson; Woan, Graham; Meyer, Renate

    2004-01-01

    The Markov chain Monte Carlo methods offer practical procedures for detecting signals characterized by a large number of parameters and under conditions of low signal-to-noise ratio. We present a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm capable of inferring the spin and orientation parameters of a neutron star from its periodic gravitational wave signature seen by laser interferometric detectors

  19. Super-virtual Interferometric Separation and Enhancement of Back-scattered Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2015-08-19

    Back-scattered surface waves can be migrated to detect near-surface reflectors with steep dips. A robust surface-wave migration requires the prior separation of the back-scattered surface-wave events from the data. This separation is often difficult to implement because the back-scattered surface waves are masked by the incident surface waves. We mitigate this problem by using a super-virtual interferometric method to enhance and separate the back-scattered surface waves. The key idea is to calculate the virtual back-scattered surface waves by stacking the resulting virtual correlated and convolved traces associated with the incident and back-scattered waves. Stacking the virtual back-scattered surface waves improves their signal-to-noise ratio and separates the back-scattered surface-waves from the incident field. Both synthetic and field data results validate the robustness of this method.

  20. Robust real-time self-mixing interferometric laser vibration sensor with embedded MEMS accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabit, Usman; Bernal, Olivier D.; Bosch, Thierry

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a real-time implementation of a Self-Mixing (SM) interferometric laser diode (LD) based vibration sensor coupled with an embedded MEMS (microelectromechanical system) accelerometer. Such a sensor allows measuring correct target movements even when the LD based SM sensor is subject to extraneous movements. This results in a vibration sensing system that can be used for embedded applications as there is no more need of keeping the sensor stationary. Such an approach opens the way for the use of such laser sensors in conditions where the use of anti-vibration support is not available or possible. The proposed data fusion between a MEMS accelerometer and a LD based SM sensor results in a robust, compact and low-cost sensing system.

  1. Hidden photon measurements using the long-baseline cavity of laser interferometric gravitational-wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a new application for the long-baseline and high powered cavities in a laser-interferometric gravitational-wave~(GW) detector to search for WISPs (weakly interacting sub-eV particles), such as a hidden U(1) gauge boson, called the hidden-sector photon. It is based on the principle of a light shining through the wall experiment, adapted to the laser with a wavelength of 1064 or 532 nm. The transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer is assumed as a detector, which the dark rate and efficiency are assumed as $0.000001~\\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ and 0.75, respectively. The TES bolometer is sufficiently sensitive to search for the low-mass hidden-sector photons. We assume that the reconversion cavity is mounted on the reconversion region of hidden-sector photons, which number of reflection and length are assumed as 1000 and 10, 100, and 1000m. We found that the second-point-five and the second generation GW experiments, such as KAGRA and Advanced LIGO with a regeneration cavity and TES bolometers. The expected lower ...

  2. Visibility in magnetostrictive fiber-optic interferometric sensors and its dependence on the input SOP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changhai Shi; Jianping Chen; Xinwan Li; Ailun Ye; Junhe Zhou; Yi Zhang; Qing Xue; Lin Hong

    2006-01-01

    The visibility in magnetostrictive fiber-optic interferometric sensors using a Gaussian laser beam is analyzed. It is shown that the conventional Gaussian laser beam has little influence on the visibility. The visibility depends strongly on the input state of polarization (SOP). We implement a cylindrical transducer and build a measurement setup with a polarization controller. The visibility dependent on the SOP of input light is measured. The estimated values are similar to the experiment results, which verifies the analysis.

  3. A Scheme of Interferometric Measurement of an Atomic Wave Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zheng-Dong; LIN Yu; ZENG Liang; PAN Qin-Min

    2000-01-01

    A new method to measure an atomic wave function is discussed. It effectively solves the problem of an initially random phase of a travelling-wave laser beam. The relationship between the measured data and the atomic wavefunction is presented, and the wave function's reconstruction procedure is also analyzed.PACS: 03.65. Bz, 03. 75. Dg

  4. Shack-Hartmann and Interferometric Hybrid Wavefront Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    abstract.cfm?URI=josaa-11-7-2080. 171 24. Flatté, Stanley M. and James S. Gerber . “Irradiance-variance behavior by numerical simulation for plane-wave...www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=URI=FiO-2008-FMF2. 23. Flatté, Stanley M., Charles Bracher, and Guang-Yu Wang. “Probability- density functions of...josaa-17-6-1092. 25. Flatté, Stanley M., Guang-Yu Wang, and Jan Martin. “Irradiance variance of optical waves through atmospheric turbulence by

  5. High-temperature fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Wenhui; Jiang, Yi; Gao, Ran, E-mail: bitjy@bit.edu.cn [School of Optoelectronics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Liu, Yuewu [Key Laboratory for Mechanics in Fluid Solid Coupling Systems, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-05-15

    A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based high-temperature fiber-optic sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensor head is a Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured with a short section of endless single-mode photonic crystal fiber (ESM PCF). The interferometric spectrum of the Fabry-Perot interferometer is collected by a charge coupled device linear array based micro spectrometer. A high-resolution demodulation algorithm is used to interrogate the peak wavelengths. Experimental results show that the temperature range of 1200 °C and the temperature resolution of 1 °C are achieved.

  6. High-temperature fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenhui; Jiang, Yi; Gao, Ran; Liu, Yuewu

    2015-05-01

    A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based high-temperature fiber-optic sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensor head is a Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured with a short section of endless single-mode photonic crystal fiber (ESM PCF). The interferometric spectrum of the Fabry-Perot interferometer is collected by a charge coupled device linear array based micro spectrometer. A high-resolution demodulation algorithm is used to interrogate the peak wavelengths. Experimental results show that the temperature range of 1200 °C and the temperature resolution of 1 °C are achieved.

  7. A new demodulation technique for optical fiber interferometric sensors with [3×3] directional couplers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingting Liu; Jie Cui; Desheng Chen; Ling Xiao; Dexing Sun

    2008-01-01

    2Optical fiber interferometric sensors based on [3 × 3] couplers have been used in many fields. A new technique is proposed to demodulate output signals of this kind of sensors. The technique recovers the signal of interest by fitting coefficients of elliptic (Lissajous) curves between each fiber pair. Different from other approaches, this technique eliminates the dependence on the idealization of [3 × 3] coupler, provides enhanced tolerance to the variance of photoelectric converters, and is anti-polarization in a certain extent. The main algorithm has been successfully demonstrated both by numerical simulation and experimental result.

  8. A portable interferometric micro-array reader on image sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Villar Zafra, Aitor

    2014-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] Microarrays constitute a valuable analytical tool for multiplex and high-throughput analysis and are widely used in genomics and proteomics with many potential applications. During the last decades, protein chips have found increasing acceptance for diagnostic applications due to several advantages over conventional bioanalysis such as miniaturization, parallelization, real-time and sensitivity. Even though the majority of DNA-sensor systems relies on labeling of DNA, the recent prog...

  9. Measurement uncertainty budget of an interferometric flow velocity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermuske, Mike; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Flow rate measurements are a common topic for process monitoring in chemical engineering and food industry. To achieve the requested low uncertainties of 0:1% for flow rate measurements, a precise measurement of the shear layers of such flows is necessary. The Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) is an established method for measuring local flow velocities. For exact estimation of the flow rate, the flow profile in the shear layer is of importance. For standard LDV the axial resolution and therefore the number of measurement points in the shear layer is defined by the length of the measurement volume. A decrease of this length is accompanied by a larger fringe distance variation along the measurement axis which results in a rise of the measurement uncertainty for the flow velocity (uncertainty relation between spatial resolution and velocity uncertainty). As a unique advantage, the laser Doppler profile sensor (LDV-PS) overcomes this problem by using two fan-like fringe systems to obtain the position of the measured particles along the measurement axis and therefore achieve a high spatial resolution while it still offers a low velocity uncertainty. With this technique, the flow rate can be estimated with one order of magnitude lower uncertainty, down to 0:05% statistical uncertainty.1 And flow profiles especially in film flows can be measured more accurately. The problem for this technique is, in contrast to laboratory setups where the system is quite stable, that for industrial applications the sensor needs a reliable and robust traceability to the SI units, meter and second. Small deviations in the calibration can, because of the highly position depending calibration function, cause large systematic errors in the measurement result. Therefore, a simple, stable and accurate tool is needed, that can easily be used in industrial surroundings to check or recalibrate the sensor. In this work, different calibration methods are presented and their influences to the

  10. Optimal detection of burst events in gravitational wave interferometric observatories

    CERN Document Server

    Viceré, A

    2002-01-01

    We consider the problem of detecting a burst signal of unknown shape. We introduce a statistic which generalizes the excess power statistic proposed by Flanagan and Hughes and extended by Anderson et al. The statistic we propose is shown to be optimal for arbitrary noise spectral characteristic, under the two hypotheses that the noise is Gaussian, and that the prior for the signal is uniform. The statistic derivation is based on the assumption that a signal affects only affects N samples in the data stream, but that no other information is a priori available, and that the value of the signal at each sample can be arbitrary. We show that the proposed statistic can be implemented combining standard time-series analysis tools which can be efficiently implemented, and the resulting computational cost is still compatible with an on-line analysis of interferometric data. We generalize this version of an excess power statistic to the multiple detector case, also including the effect of correlated noise. We give full...

  11. Resolution limits of extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric displacement sensors utilizing wavelength scanning interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, Nikolai; Liokumovich, Leonid

    2014-08-10

    The factors limiting the resolution of displacement sensors based on the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer were studied. An analytical model giving the dependency of extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) resolution on the parameters of an optical setup and a sensor interrogator was developed. The proposed model enables one to either estimate the limit of possible resolution achievable with a given setup, or derive the requirements for optical elements and/or a sensor interrogator necessary for attaining the desired sensor resolution. An experiment supporting the analytical derivations was performed, demonstrating a large dynamic measurement range (with cavity length from tens of microns to 5 mm), a high baseline resolution (from 14 pm), and good agreement with the model.

  12. Impact of backscattered light in a squeezing-enhanced interferometric gravitational-wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    Chua, S S Y; Barsotti, L; Sigg, D; Schofield, R M S; Frolov, V V; Kawabe, K; Evans, M; Meadors, G D; Factourovich, M; Gustafson, R; Smith-Lefebvre, N; Vorvick, C; Landry, M; Khalaidovski, A; Stefszky, M S; Mow-Lowry, C M; Buchler, B C; Shaddock, D A; Lam, P K; Schnabel, R; Mavalvala, N; McClelland, D E

    2014-01-01

    Squeezed states of light have been recently used to improve the sensitivity of laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors beyond the quantum limit. To completely establish quantum engineering as a realistic option for the next generation of detectors, it is crucial to study and quantify the noise coupling mechanisms which injection of squeezed states could potentially introduce. We present a direct measurement of the impact of backscattered light from a squeezed-light source deployed on one of the 4 km long detectors of the Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). We also show how our measurements inform the design of squeezed light sources compatible with the even more sensitive advanced detectors currently under construction, such as Advanced LIGO.

  13. Advanced millimeter wave chemical sensor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsami, N.

    1999-03-24

    This paper discusses the development of an advanced millimeter-wave (mm-wave) chemical sensor and its applications for environmental monitoring and arms control treaty verification. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of fingerprint-type molecular rotational signatures in the mm-wave spectrum to sense airborne chemicals. The mm-wave spectrum to sense airborne chemicals. The mm-wave sensor, operating in the frequency range of 220-300 GHz, can work under all weather conditions and in smoky and dusty environments. The basic configuration of the mm-wave sensor is a monostatic swept-frequency radar consisting of a mm-wave sweeper, a hot-electron-bolometer or Schottky barrier detector, and a trihedral reflector. The chemical plume to be detected is situated between the transmitter/detector and the reflector. Millimeter-wave absorption spectra of chemicals in the plume are determined by measuring the swept-frequency radar return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. The problem of pressure broadening, which hampered open-path spectroscopy in the past, has been mitigated in this work by designing a fast sweeping source over a broad frequency range. The heart of the system is a Russian backward-wave oscillator (BWO) tube that can be tuned over 220-350 GHz. Using the Russian BWO tube, a mm-wave radar system was built and field-tested at the DOE Nevada Test Site at a standoff distance of 60 m. The mm-wave system detected chemical plumes very well; the detection sensitivity for polar molecules like methyl chloride was down to a concentration of 12 ppm.

  14. Millimeter-wave imaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W. J.; Howard, R. J.; Ibbott, A. C.; Parks, G. S.; Ricketts, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    A scanning 3-mm radiometer system has been built and used on a helicopter to produce moderate-resolution (0.5 deg) images of the ground. This millimeter-wave sensor can be used for a variety of remote-sensing applications and produces images through clouds, smoke, and dust when visual and IR sensors are not usable. The system is described and imaging results are presented.

  15. Interferometric fiber-optic bending / nano-displacement sensor using plastic dual-core fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, H; Skorobogatiy, M

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an interferometric fiber-optic bending/micro-displacement sensor based on a plastic dual-core fiber with one end coated with a silver mirror. The two fiber cores are first excited with the same laser beam, the light in each core is then back-reflected at the mirror-coated fiber-end, and, finally, the light from the two cores is made to interfere at the coupling end. Bending of the fiber leads to shifting interference fringes that can be interrogated with a slit and a single photodetector. We find experimentally that the resolution of our bending sensor is ~3x10-4 m-1 for sensing of bending curvature, as well as ~70 nm for sensing of displacement of the fiber tip. We demonstrate operation of our sensor using two examples. One is weighting of the individual micro-crystals of salt, while the other one is monitoring dynamics of isopropanol evaporation.

  16. Data Acquisition System of the Virgo Gravitational Waves Interferometric Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Acernese, F.; Amico, P.; Alshourbagy, M.; Antonucci, F. (Fausta); Aoudia, S.; Astone, P.; Avino, S; Babusci, D.; Ballardin, G; Barone, F.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bauer, Th.S.; Beauville, F.; Bigotta, S.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Virgo is an experiment aiming at the detection of gravitational waves emitted by astrophysical sources. Its detector, based on a 3km arms interferometer, is a complex setup which requires several digital control loops running up to 10kHz, an accurate and reliable central timing system and an efficient data acquisition, all of them being distributed over 3km. We overview here the main hardware and software components developed for the data acquisition system (DAQ) and i...

  17. Residual Amplitude Modulation in Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Arai, Koji; Adhikari, Rana X

    2013-01-01

    The effects of residual amplitude modulation (RAM) in laser interferometers using heterodyne sensing can be substantial and difficult to mitigate. In this work, we analyze the effects of RAM on a complex laser interferometer used for gravitational wave detection. The RAM introduces unwanted offsets in the cavity length signals and thereby shifts the operating point of the optical cavities from the nominal point via feedback control. This shift causes variations in the sensing matrix, and leads to degradation in the performance of the precision noise subtraction scheme of the multiple-degree-of-freedom control system. In addition, such detuned optical cavities produce an opto-mechanical spring, which also varies the sensing matrix. We use our simulations to derive requirements on RAM for the Advanced LIGO detectors, and show that the RAM expected in Advanced LIGO will not limit its sensitivity.

  18. Residual amplitude modulation in interferometric gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokeyama, Keiko; Izumi, Kiwamu; Korth, William Z; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Arai, Koji; Adhikari, Rana X

    2014-01-01

    The effects of residual amplitude modulation (RAM) in laser interferometers using heterodyne sensing can be substantial and difficult to mitigate. In this work, we analyze the effects of RAM on a complex laser interferometer used for gravitational wave detection. The RAM introduces unwanted offsets in the cavity length signals and thereby shifts the operating point of the optical cavities from the nominal point via feedback control. This shift causes variations in the sensing matrix, and leads to degradation in the performance of the precision noise subtraction scheme of the multiple-degree-of-freedom control system. In addition, such detuned optical cavities produce an optomechanical spring, which also perturbs the sensing matrix. We use our simulations to derive requirements on RAM for the Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) detectors, and show that the RAM expected in aLIGO will not limit its sensitivity.

  19. Modeling and Validation of Performance Limitations for the Optimal Design of Interferometric and Intensity-Modulated Fiber Optic Displacement Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, Erik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07

    Optical fiber sensors offer advantages over traditional electromechanical sensors, making them particularly well-suited for certain measurement applications. Generally speaking, optical fiber sensors respond to a desired measurand through modulation of an optical signal's intensity, phase, or wavelength. Practically, non-contacting fiber optic displacement sensors are limited to intensity-modulated and interferometric (or phase-modulated) methodologies. Intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensors relate target displacement to a power measurement. The simplest intensity-modulated sensor architectures are not robust to environmental and hardware fluctuations, since such variability may cause changes in the measured power level that falsely indicate target displacement. Differential intensity-modulated sensors have been implemented, offering robustness to such intensity fluctuations, and the speed of these sensors is limited only by the combined speed of the photodetection hardware and the data acquisition system (kHz-MHz). The primary disadvantages of intensity-modulated sensing are the relatively low accuracy (?m-mm for low-power sensors) and the lack of robustness, which consequently must be designed, often with great difficulty, into the sensor's architecture. White light interferometric displacement sensors, on the other hand, offer increased accuracy and robustness. Unlike their monochromatic-interferometer counterparts, white light interferometric sensors offer absolute, unambiguous displacement measurements over large displacement ranges (cm for low-power, 5 mW, sources), necessitating no initial calibration, and requiring no environmental or feedback control. The primary disadvantage of white light interferometric displacement sensors is that their utility in dynamic testing scenarios is limited, both by hardware bandwidth and by their inherent high-sensitivity to Doppler-effects. The decision of whether to use either an intensity

  20. Tunable mechanical monolithic sensor with interferometric readout for low frequency seismic noise measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acernese, F.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Barone, F.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric-discharge-machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation make it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low-frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2007), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a laser optical lever and a new laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve both for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, evaluated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result, for example, is that the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument is 70 mHz with a Q = 140 in air without thermal stabilization, demonstrating the feasibility of a monolithic FP sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of mHz with a more refined mechanical tuning. Results on the readout system based on polarimetric homodyne Michelson interferometer is discussed.

  1. Squeezed Light for the Interferometric Detection of High Frequency Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Schnabel, R; Strain, K A; Danzmann, K

    2004-01-01

    The quantum noise of the light field is a fundamental noise source in interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Injected squeezed light is capable of reducing the quantum noise contribution to the detector noise floor to values that surpass the so-called Standard-Quantum-Limit (SQL). In particular, squeezed light is useful for the detection of gravitational waves at high frequencies where interferometers are typically shot-noise limited, although the SQL might not be beaten in this case. We theoretically analyze the quantum noise of the signal-recycled laser interferometric gravitational-wave detector GEO600 with additional input and output optics, namely frequency-dependent squeezing of the vacuum state of light entering the dark port and frequency-dependent homodyne detection. We focus on the frequency range between 1 kHz and 10 kHz, where, although signal recycled, the detector is still shot-noise limited. It is found that the GEO600 detector with present design parameters will benefit from frequency d...

  2. Reduction of thermal fluctuations in a cryogenic laser interferometric gravitational wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    Uchiyama, Takashi; Telada, Souichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Masatake; Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Arai, Koji; Fujimoto, Masa-Katsu; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Kawamura, Seiji; Miyakawa, Osamu; Ohishi, Naoko; Saito, Takanori; Shintomi, Takakazu; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Tatsumi, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    The thermal fluctuation of mirror surfaces is the fundamental limitation for interferometric gravitational wave (GW) detectors. Here, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time a reduction in a mirror's thermal fluctuation in a GW detector with sapphire mirrors from the Cryogenic Laser Interferometer Observatory at 17\\,K and 18\\,K. The detector sensitivity, which was limited by the mirror's thermal fluctuation at room temperature, was improved in the frequency range of 90\\,Hz to 240\\,Hz by cooling the mirrors. The improved sensitivity reached a maximum of $2.2 \\times 10^{-19}\\,\\textrm{m}/\\sqrt{\\textrm{Hz}}$ at 165\\,Hz.

  3. Fermionic Lorentz violation and its implications for interferometric gravitational-wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, M.

    2017-07-01

    The recent direct detection of gravitational waves reported by Advanced LIGO has inspired the current article. In this context, a particular Lorentz-violating framework for classical, massive particles is the focus. The latter is characterized by a preferred direction in spacetime comprised of CPT-odd components with mass dimension 1. Curvature effects in spacetime, which are caused by a propagating gravitational wave, are assumed to deform the otherwise constant background field. In accordance with spontaneous Lorentz violation, a particular choice for the vector field is taken, which was proposed elsewhere. The geodesic equations for a particle that is subject to this type of Lorentz violation are obtained. Subsequently, their numerical solutions are computed and discussed. The particular model considered leads to changes in the particle trajectory whose impact on interferometric gravitational-wave experiments such as LIGO will be studied.

  4. Wavelength-switched phase interrogator for extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ji; Xiong, Shuidong; Wang, Fuyin; Luo, Hong

    2016-07-01

    We report on phase interrogation of extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) sensors through a wavelength-switched unit with a polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating (PMFBG). The measurements at two wavelengths are first achieved in one total-optical path. The reflected peaks of the PMFBG with two natural wavelengths are in mutually perpendicular polarization detection, and they are switched through an electro-optic modulator at a high switching speed of 10 kHz. An ellipse fitting differential cross multiplication (EF-DCM) algorithm is proposed for interrogating the variation of the gap length of the EFPI sensors. The phase demodulation system has been demonstrated to recover a minimum phase of 0.42  μrad/Hz at the test frequency of 100 Hz with a stable intensity fluctuation level of ±0.8  dB. Three EFPI sensors with different cavity lengths are tested at the test frequency of 200 Hz, and the results indicate that the system can achieve the demodulation of EFPI sensors with different cavity lengths stably.

  5. Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS—A Platform Technology for Multiplexed Diagnostics and Digital Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguzhan Avci

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, the growing need in disease diagnostics has stimulated rapid development of new technologies with unprecedented capabilities. Recent emerging infectious diseases and epidemics have revealed the shortcomings of existing diagnostics tools, and the necessity for further improvements. Optical biosensors can lay the foundations for future generation diagnostics by providing means to detect biomarkers in a highly sensitive, specific, quantitative and multiplexed fashion. Here, we review an optical sensing technology, Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS, and the relevant features of this multifunctional platform for quantitative, label-free and dynamic detection. We discuss two distinct modalities for IRIS: (i low-magnification (ensemble biomolecular mass measurements and (ii high-magnification (digital detection of individual nanoparticles along with their applications, including label-free detection of multiplexed protein chips, measurement of single nucleotide polymorphism, quantification of transcription factor DNA binding, and high sensitivity digital sensing and characterization of nanoparticles and viruses.

  6. Optical fiber waist-enlarged bitaper-based Michelson interferometric humidity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pengbing; Chen, Zhemin; Pan, Sunqiang; Li, Guoshui; Zhang, Jianfeng; Cheng, Jia

    2015-02-01

    An optical fiber waist-enlarged bitaper-based Michelson interferometric sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for humidity measurement. The waist enlarged bitaper is created for light coupling between core mode and cladding modes propagating in the fiber interferometer. A chitason layer is plated onto the surface of the interferometer to act as a humidity-to-refractive index (RI) transducer and thus humidity measurement can be realized by monitoring the wavelength shifts of its interferogram induced by RI variations. The influence of the coating thickness and concentration of chitason on relative humidity (RH) measurement is experimentally studied. The coating sensor demonstrates an optimal humidity-sensing ability, with a humidity sensitivity and fast time-response of ~26 pm/%RH and ~5 s respectively, when it is 3-dip coated in chitason solutions of the concentration of 1 wt.%. The proposed humidity sensor is compact, cost-effective and of easy-operation, therefore it has potentials in many practical applications.

  7. Seismic gravity-gradient noise in interferometric gravitational-wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, S A; Hughes, Scott A.; Thorne, Kip S.

    1998-01-01

    When ambient seismic waves pass near an interferometric gravitational-wave detector, they induce density perturbations in the earth which produce fluctuating gravitational forces on the interferometer's test masses. These forces mimic a stochastic background of gravitational waves and thus constitute noise. We compute this noise using the theory of multimode Rayleigh and Love waves propagating in a layered medium that approximates the geological strata at the LIGO sites. We characterize the noise by a transfer function $T(f) motion $\\tilde W(f)$ to the spectrum of test mass motion $\\tilde x(f) = L\\tilde h(f)$ (where $L$ is the length of the interferometer's arms, and $\\tilde h(f)$ is the spectrum of gravitational-wave noise). This paper's primary foci are (i) a study of how $T(f)$ depends on the various seismic modes; (ii) an attempt to estimate which modes are excited at the LIGO sites at quiet and noisy times; and (iii) a corresponding estimate of the seismic gravity-gradient noise level. At quiet times the...

  8. Wave effects on a pressure sensor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; DeSa, E.J.; Desa, E.; McKeown, J.; Peshwe, V.B.

    Wave flume experiments indicated that for waves propagating on quiescent waters the sensor's performance improved (i.e. the difference Delta P between the average hydrostatic and measured pressures was small and positive) when the inlet...

  9. Spectral interferometric sensors for gases and liquids using integrated optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenhoff, Jan; Gauglitz, Guenter; Fabricius, Norbert

    1993-04-01

    Investigations for a sensor application with an integrated optical (IO) interferometric arrangement are presented. One of the two waveguide arms of an IO-Mach-Zehnder- interferometer is covered with a thin layer of polysiloxane (superstrate), which is sensitive to hydrocarbons. The dielectric IO-devices are fabricated by IOT. Gases of organic compounds including halogenated and non-halogenated hydrocarbons cause a change of the polysiloxan's refractive index followed by an increase or decrease of the effective refractive index of the covered waveguide arm. The resulting phase shift between the guided light in the measuring and the reference arm depends on the detection wavelength and the concentration of gas. Using an LED as the light source the spectral interferogram becomes observable and so order and phase of the signal can be determined. The aim of this work is the development of a reversibly working, miniaturized sensor with a short response time. The advantages of spectral observation of the interference are discussed. A comparison between measured and calculated spectral interference signals is given.

  10. AIGO: a southern hemisphere detector for the worldwide array of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P; Blair, D G; Coward, D; Davidson, J; Dumas, J-C; Howell, E; Ju, L; Wen, L; Zhao, C [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McClelland, D E; Scott, S M; Slagmolen, B J J; Inta, R [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Munch, J; Ottaway, D J; Veitch, P; Hosken, D [Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Melatos, A; Chung, C; Sammut, L, E-mail: pbarriga@cyllene.uwa.edu.a [School of Physics University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia)

    2010-04-21

    This paper describes the proposed AIGO detector for the worldwide array of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. The first part of the paper summarizes the benefits that AIGO provides to the worldwide array of detectors. The second part gives a technical description of the detector, which will follow closely the Advanced LIGO design. Possible technical variations in the design are discussed.

  11. Detection strategies for a supernova gravitational wave burst in a network of interferometric detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, N; Bizouard, M A; Brisson, V; Cavalier, F; Davier, M; Hello, P; Kreckelberg, S; Porter, E K; Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelberg, Stephane; Porter, Edward K.

    2003-01-01

    Trying to detect the gravitational wave (GW) signal emitted by a type II supernova is a main challenge for the GW community. Indeed, the corresponding waveform is not accurately modeled as the supernova physics is very complex; in addition, all the existing numerical simulations agree on the weakness of the GW emission, thus restraining the number of sources potentially detectable. Consequently, triggering the GW signal with a confidence level high enough to conclude directly to a detection is very difficult, even with the use of a network of interferometric detectors. On the other hand, one can hope to take benefit from the neutrino and optical emissions associated to the supernova explosion, in order to discover and study GW radiation in an event already detected independently. This article aims at presenting some realistic scenarii for the search of the supernova GW bursts, based on the present knowledge of the emitted signals and on the results of network data analysis simulations. Both the direct search ...

  12. Characterization of the room temperature payload prototype for the cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector KAGRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Fujii, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Barton, Mark; Hirata, Naoatsu; Shoda, Ayaka; van Heijningen, Joris; Flaminio, Raffaele; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Okutumi, Koki; Akutsu, Tomotada; Aso, Yoichi; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Ohishi, Naoko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Takamori, Akiteru; Majorana, Ettore; Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Hennes, Eric; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    KAGRA is a cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector currently under construction in the Kamioka mine in Japan. Besides the cryogenic test masses, KAGRA will also rely on room temperature optics which will hang at the bottom of vibration isolation chains. The payload of each chain comprises an optic, a system to align it, and an active feedback system to damp the resonant motion of the suspension itself. This article describes the performance of a payload prototype that was assembled and tested in vacuum at the TAMA300 site at the NAOJ in Mitaka, Tokyo. We describe the mechanical components of the payload prototype and their functionality. A description of the active components of the feedback system and their capabilities is also given. The performance of the active system is illustrated by measuring the quality factors of some of the resonances of the suspension. Finally, the alignment capabilities offered by the payload are reported.

  13. Evaluation of an Interferometric Sensor for In-Space Detection of Gas Leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Korman, Valentin; Sinko, John; Hendrickson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Space mission planning often involves long-term storage of volatile liquids or high-pressure gases. These may include cryogenic fuels and oxidizers, high-pressure gases, and life-support-critical consumables. The risk associated with the storage of fluids and gases in space systems has long been an issue and the ability to retain these fluids is often tied to mission success. A leak in the storage or distribution system can cause many different problems, including a simple, but mission endangering, loss of inventory or, in severe cases, unbalanced thrust loads on a flight vehicle. Cryogenic propellants are especially difficult to store, especially over a long duration. The propellant can boil off and be lost through the insulating walls of the tank or simple thermal cycling of the fittings, valves, and propellant feed lines may unseat seals allowing the fluid to escape. Current NASA missions call for long-duration in-space storage of propellants, oxidizers, and life support supplies. Leaks of a scale detectable through a pressure drop in the storage tank are often catastrophic and have long been the focus of ground-based mitigation efforts where redundant systems are often employed. However, there is presently no technology available for detecting and monitoring low-level, but still mission-endangering, gas leaks in space. Standard in-space gas detection methods either have a very limited pressure range over which they operate effectively or are limited to certain gases. Mass spectrometer systems are able to perform the detection tasks, but their size, mass and use of high voltage, which could potentially lead to an arc that ignites a combustible propellent, severely limit their usefulness in a space system. In this paper, we present results from testing of the light-based interferometric gas monitoring and leak detection sensor shown in Fig. 1. The output of the sensor is an interference fringe pattern that is a function of the gas density, and commensurate index

  14. Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensor using a polarization-switched phase interrogator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ji; Wang, Fuyin; Yang, Yangyang; Xiong, Shuidong; Luo, Hong; Wei, Wenjian

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a phase variation tracking method for the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) voice sensing system is designed and experimentally demonstrated through a polarization-switched unit based on the combination of polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating (PMFBG). The measurements at two operation wavelengths are firstly achieved in one total-optical path, which eliminates the imbalance of optical power from the external disturbances, optical source fluctuation, different detecting response of photoelectric detector and different background noise. Two operation wavelengths reflected from a PMFBG for interference phase tracking are switched via an electro-optic modulator at a high switching speed of 10 kHz. Besides, an ellipse fitting-differential cross multiplication (EF-DCM) algorithm is proposed and illustrated for interrogating the variation of EFPI cavity gap length of the EFPI voice sensor effectively. Preliminary experimental results have proven that the polarization-switched system based on the EF-DCM algorithm could find potential applications in the fields of marine acoustic, medical science measurements, etc.

  15. Simultaneous refractive index and thickness measurement with the transmission interferometric adsorption sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Voeroes, Janos [Laboratory of Biosensors and Bioelectronics, Department of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, ETH Zurich, 8092, Zurich (Switzerland); Balmer, Tobias E [Materials Research Center, ETH Zurich, 8093, Zurich (Switzerland); Heuberger, Manfred, E-mail: sannomiya@biomed.ee.ethz.c, E-mail: tobias.balmer@mat.ethz.c, E-mail: manfred.heuberger@empa.c, E-mail: janos.voros@biomed.ee.ethz.c [Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, 8093, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-10-13

    Refractive index and thickness of the adlayer are determined simultaneously using the transmission interferometric adsorption sensor (TInAS). Optical biosensors, where both refractive index and thickness of a homogeneous adlayer (thus the adsorbed mass) are determined simultaneously, so-called model-free biosensors, are important tools to investigate the adsorbed mass of biomolecules with unknown conformation. Our proposed calculation method enables model-free biosensing from a single spectrum acquired by a simple TInAS setup, namely using information of peak/dip positions as well as peak/dip intensities. The feasibility of this method was experimentally tested by adsorbing polyelectrolyte multilayer as well as biomolecules. To validate the new method also for the more intricate heterogeneous adlayer, the apparent refractive index and thickness were assessed theoretically by simulating a selection of different adsorbate configurations with the multiple multipole program (MMP). We found that a lateral inhomogeneity of the adsorbate (e.g. islands or adsorbed colloids) results in correct thickness and in reduced refractive index averaged in proportion to their density while vertically inhomogeneous density caused more complex responses. However, the apparent mass was always correct. Measurement errors can lead to significant errors in the apparent refractive index, particularly when the adlayer is very thin (<5 nm). This model-free TInAS technique would be useful not only for the measurement of adsorbed mass but also for the conformational analysis of the adsorbed molecules.

  16. I.C.E.: An Ultra-Cold Atom Source for Long-Baseline Interferometric Inertial Sensors in Reduced Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Varoquaux, Gaël; Chaibi, Walid; Clément, Jean-François; Carraz, Olivier; Brantut, Jean Philippe; Nyman, Robert A; Santos, Franck Pereira Dos; Mondin, Linda; Rouzé, Michel; Bidel, Yannick; Bresson, Alexandre; Landragin, Arnaud; Bouyer, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of current atom-interferometric inertialsensors rival state-of-the-art conventional devices using artifact-based test masses . Atomic sensors are well suited for fundamental measurements of gravito-inertial fields. The sensitivity required to test gravitational theories can be achieved by extending the baseline of the interferometer. The I.C.E. (Interf\\'erom\\'etrie Coh\\'erente pour l'Espace) interferometer aims to achieve long interrogation times in compact apparatus via reduced gravity. We have tested a cold-atom source during airplane parabolic flights. We show that this environment is compatible with free-fall interferometric measurements using up to 4 second interrogation time. We present the next-generation apparatus using degenerate gases for low release-velocity atomic sources in space-borne experiments.

  17. Invited article: CO2 laser production of fused silica fibers for use in interferometric gravitational wave detector mirror suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heptonstall, A; Barton, M A; Bell, A; Cagnoli, G; Cantley, C A; Crooks, D R M; Cumming, A; Grant, A; Hammond, G D; Harry, G M; Hough, J; Jones, R; Kelley, D; Kumar, R; Martin, I W; Robertson, N A; Rowan, S; Strain, K A; Tokmakov, K; van Veggel, M

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 the first mirror suspensions to use a quasi-monolithic final stage were installed at the GEO600 detector site outside Hannover, pioneering the use of fused silica suspension fibers in long baseline interferometric detectors to reduce suspension thermal noise. Since that time, development of the production methods of fused silica fibers has continued. We present here a review of a novel CO(2) laser-based fiber pulling machine developed for the production of fused silica suspensions for the next generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors and for use in experiments requiring low thermal noise suspensions. We discuss tolerances, strengths, and thermal noise performance requirements for the next generation of gravitational wave detectors. Measurements made on fibers produced using this machine show a 0.8% variation in vertical stiffness and 0.05% tolerance on length, with average strengths exceeding 4 GPa, and mechanical dissipation which meets the requirements for Advanced LIGO thermal noise performance.

  18. Interferometric windows characterization up to 450 K for shock wave experiments: Hugoniot curves and refractive index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godefroit J.-L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Conventional shock wave experiments need interferometric windows in order to determine the equation of state of a large variety of metals. Lithium fluoride (LiF and sapphire are extensively used for that purpose because their optical transparencies enable the optical diagnostics at interfaces under a given range of shock pressure. In order to simulate and analyse the experiments it is necessary to gather a correct knowledge of the optical and mechanical properties of these windows. Therefore, our window supplies are systematically characterized and an experimental campaign under shock loading is conducted. Our preliminary work on LiF windows at 532 nm is in good agreement with literature data at room temperature and the new characterization at 450 K enables a better interpretation of our preheated target experiments. It confirms the predominant effect of density on optical properties under pressure and temperature. The present work demonstrates that the initial density determination is a key point and that the uncertainties need to be improved. For that purpose, complementary experiments are conducted on LiF windows with simplified target designs and enriched diagnostics, coupling VISAR (532 nm and PdV (1550 nm diagnostics. Furthermore, a similar campaign is conducted on sapphire windows with symmetric impact configuration.

  19. Human Gravity-Gradient Noise in Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thorne, K S; Thorne, Kip S.; Winstein, Carolee J.

    1999-01-01

    Among all forms of routine human activity, the one which produces the strongest gravity-gradient noise in interferometric gravitational-wave detectors (e.g. LIGO) is the beginning and end of weight transfer from one foot to the other during walking. The beginning and end of weight transfer entail sharp changes (timescale tau ~ 20msec) in the horizontal jerk (first time derivative of acceleration) of a person's center of mass. These jerk pairs, occuring about twice per second, will produce gravity-gradient noise in LIGO in the frequency band 2.5 Hz <~ f <~ 1/(2 tau) ~= 25 Hz with the form sqrt{S_h(f)} sum is over all the walking people, r_i is the distance of the i'th person from the nearest interferometer test mass, and we estimate this formula to be accurate to within a factor 3. To ensure that this noise is neglible in advanced LIGO interferometers, people should be prevented from coming nearer to the test masses than r ~= 10m. A r ~= 10m exclusion zone will also reduce to an acceptable level gravity ...

  20. Ground-based gravitational wave interferometric detectors of the first and second generation: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losurdo, Giovanni

    2012-06-01

    The era of first-generation gravitational wave interferometric detectors is ending. No signals have been detected so far. However, remarkable results have been achieved: the design sensitivity has been approached (and in some cases even exceeded) together with the achievement of robustness and reliability; a world-wide network of detectors has been established; the data collected so far has allowed upper limits to be put on several types of sources; some second-generation technologies have been tested on these detectors. The scenario for the next few years is very exciting. The projects to upgrade LIGO and Virgo to second-generation interferometers, capable of increasing the detection rate by a factor of ˜1000, have been funded. The construction of Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo has started. GEO600 has started the upgrade to GEO HF, introducing light squeezing for the first time on a large detector. LCGT has been partly funded and the construction of the vacuum system is underway. There is a possibility that the third Advanced LIGO interferometer will be constructed in India. So, a powerful worldwide network could be in operation by the end of the decade. In this paper, we review the results achieved so far and the perspectives for the advanced detectors.

  1. Wireless Multiplexed Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Sensor is a new technology for obtaining multiple, real-time measurements under extreme environmental conditions. This project plans to develop a wireless multiplexed sensor system that uses SAW sensors, with no batteries or semiconductors, that are passive and rugged, can operate down to cryogenic temperatures and up to hundreds of degrees C, and can be used to sense a wide variety of parameters over reasonable distances (meters).

  2. Thermoelastic dissipation in inhomogeneous media: loss measurements and displacement noise in coated test masses for interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fejer, M M; Cagnoli, G; Crooks, D R M; Gretarsson, A M; Harry, G M; Hough, J; Penn, S D; Sneddon, P H; Vyatchanin, S P

    2004-01-01

    The displacement noise in the test mass mirrors of interferometric gravitational wave detectors is proportional to their elastic dissipation at the observation frequencies. In this paper, we analyze one fundamental source of dissipation in thin coatings, thermoelastic damping associated with the dissimilar thermal and elastic properties of the film and the substrate. We obtain expressions for the thermoelastic dissipation factor necessary to interpret resonant loss measurements, and for the spectral density of displacement noise imposed on a Gaussian beam reflected from the face of a coated mass. The predicted size of these effects is large enough to affect the interpretation of loss measurements, and to influence design choices in advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  3. A comparison measurement of nonlinear ultrasonic waves in tubes by a microphone and by an optical interferometric probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slegrová, Zuzana; Bálek, Rudolf

    2005-03-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of ultrasonic fields inside waveguides generated by ultrasonic waves of high amplitude. These waves behave nonlinearly, so it is not possible to use standard linear equations to describe their behaviour. Therefore, we started with an experimental determination of the acoustic pressure of air in glass tubes. We chose two methods of measurement--by a microphone and by an optical interferometric probe. The conventional method by a microphone creates numerous problems, which can be avoided by using an optical method, a heterodyne laser interferometer.

  4. Speech Articulator and User Gesture Measurements Using Micropower, Interferometric EM-Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, J F; Ng, L C

    2001-02-06

    Very low power, GHz frequency, ''radar-like'' sensors can measure a variety of motions produced by a human user of machine interface devices. These data can be obtained ''at a distance'' and can measure ''hidden'' structures. Measurements range from acoustic induced, 10-micron amplitude vibrations of vocal tract tissues, to few centimeter human speech articulator motions, to meter-class motions of the head, hands, or entire body. These EM sensors measure ''fringe motions'' as reflected EM waves are mixed with a local (homodyne) reference wave. These data, when processed using models of the system being measured, provide real time states of interface positions or other targets vs. time. An example is speech articulator positions vs. time in the user's body. This information appears to be useful for a surprisingly wide range of applications ranging from speech coding synthesis and recognition, speaker or object identification, noise cancellation, hand or head motions for cursor direction, and other applications.

  5. Speech Articulator and User Gesture Measurements Using Micropower, Interferometric EM-Sensore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    2000-09-15

    Very low power, GHz frequency, ''radar-like'' sensors can measure a variety of motions produced by a human user of machine interface devices. These data can be obtained ''at a distance'' and can measure ''hidden'' structures. Measurements range from acoustic induced 10-micron amplitude vibrations of vocal tract tissues, to few centimeter human speech articulator motions, to meter-class motions of the head, hands, or entire body. These EM sensors measure ''fringe motions' as reflected EM waves are mixed with a local (homodyne) reference wave. These data, when processed using models of the system being measured, provide real time states of interface positions vs. time. An example is speech articulator positions vs. time in the user's body. This information appears to be useful for a surprisingly wide range of applications ranging from speech coding and recognition, speaker or object identification, noise cancellation, hand or head motions for cursor direction, and other applications.

  6. Interferometric Astrometry with Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor 3 The Parallax of the Cataclysmic Variable TV Columbae

    CERN Document Server

    McArthur, B E; Lee, J; Van Altena, W F; Slesnick, C L; Rhee, J T; Patterson, R J; Fredrick, L W; Spiesman, W J; Nelan, E; Duncombe, R L; Hemenway, P D; Jefferys, W H; Shelus, P J; Franz, O G; Wasserman, L H

    2001-01-01

    TV Columbae (TV Col) is a 13th magnitude Intermediate Polar (IP) Cataclysmic Variable (CV), with multiple periods found in the light curves. Past estimates predicted a distance of 400 parsec to greater than 500 parsec. Recently completed Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) interferometric observations allow us to determine the first trigonometric parallax to TV Col. This determination puts the distance of TV Col at 368 -15+17 parsecs. CD-32 2376, a 10th magnitude Tycho Catalog star, is a reference star in the TV Col frame. We find a distance of $127.7 -1+1 parsecs.

  7. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  8. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Vibration Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Filipiak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  9. A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating

    CERN Document Server

    Sakakibara, Y; Suzuki, T; Yamamoto, K; Chen, D; Koike, S; Tokoku, C; Uchiyama, T; Ohashi, M; Kuroda, K

    2013-01-01

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  10. Numerical simulation and validation of ocean waves measured by an Along-Track Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Biao; HE Yijun; Paris W.VACHON

    2008-01-01

    A new nonlinear integral transform of ocean wave spectra into Along-Track Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (ATI-SAR )image spectra is described.ATI-SAR phase image spectra are calculated for various sea states and radar configurations based on the nonlinear integral transform.The numerical simulations show that the slant range to velocity ratio(R/V),significant wave height to ocean wavelength ratio(Hs/λ),the baseline (2B) and incident angle(θ)affect ATI-SAR imaging.The ATI-SAR imaging theory is validated by means of Two X-band,HH-polarized ATI-SAR phase images of ocean waves and eight C-band,HH-polarized ATI-SAR phase image spectra of ocean waves.It is shown that ATI-SAR phase image spectra are in agreement with those calculated by forward mapping in situ directional wave soectra collected simultaneously with available ATI-SAR observations.ATI-SAR spectral correlation coefficients between observed and simulated are greater than 0.6 and ale not sensitive to the degree of nonlinearity.However,the ATI-SAR phase image spectral turns towards the range direction.even if the real ocean wave direction is 30°.It is also shown that the ATI-SAR imaging mechanism is significantly affected by the degree of velocity bunching nonlinearity,especially for high values of R/V and Hs/λ.

  11. Surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shrinivas G.

    1991-03-01

    The use of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device to measure the rate of gas flow is described. A SAW oscillator heated to a suitable temperature above ambient is placed in the path of a flowing gas. Convective cooling caused by the gas flow results in a change in the oscillator frequency. A 73-MHz oscillator fabricated on 128 deg rotated Y-cut lithium niobate substrate and heated to 55 C above ambient shows a frequency variation greater than 142 kHz for flow-rate variation from 0 to 1000 cu cm/min. The output of the sensor can be calibrated to provide a measurement of volume flow rate, pressure differential across channel ports, or mass flow rate. High sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and direct digital output are among the attractive features of this sensor. Theoretical expressions for the sensitivity and response time of the sensor are derived. It is shown that by using ultrasonic Lamb waves propagating in thin membranes, a flow sensor with faster response than a SAW sensor can be realized.

  12. On line power spectra identification and whitening for the noise in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cuoco, E; Fabbroni, L; Losurdo, G; Mazzoni, M; Stanga, R M; Vetrano, F

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we address both to the problem of identifying the noise Power Spectral Density of interferometric detectors by parametric techniques and to the problem of the whitening procedure of the sequence of data. We will concentrate the study on a Power Spectral Density like the one of the Italian-French detector VIRGO and we show that with a reasonable finite number of parameters we succeed in modeling a spectrum like the theoretical one of VIRGO, reproducing all its features. We propose also the use of adaptive techniques to identify and to whiten on line the data of interferometric detectors. We analyze the behavior of the adaptive techniques in the field of stochastic gradient and in the Least Squares ones.

  13. Real-time interferometric monitoring and measuring of photopolymerization based stereolithographic additive manufacturing process: sensor model and algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X.; Rosen, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    As additive manufacturing is poised for growth and innovations, it faces barriers of lack of in-process metrology and control to advance into wider industry applications. The exposure controlled projection lithography (ECPL) is a layerless mask-projection stereolithographic additive manufacturing process, in which parts are fabricated from photopolymers on a stationary transparent substrate. To improve the process accuracy with closed-loop control for ECPL, this paper develops an interferometric curing monitoring and measuring (ICM&M) method which addresses the sensor modeling and algorithms issues. A physical sensor model for ICM&M is derived based on interference optics utilizing the concept of instantaneous frequency. The associated calibration procedure is outlined for ICM&M measurement accuracy. To solve the sensor model, particularly in real time, an online evolutionary parameter estimation algorithm is developed adopting moving horizon exponentially weighted Fourier curve fitting and numerical integration. As a preliminary validation, simulated real-time measurement by offline analysis of a video of interferograms acquired in the ECPL process is presented. The agreement between the cured height estimated by ICM&M and that measured by microscope indicates that the measurement principle is promising as real-time metrology for global measurement and control of the ECPL process.

  14. Liquid level sensor using ultrasonic Lamb waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharov, V E; Kuznetsov, S A; Zaitsev, B D; Kuznetsova, I E; Joshi, S G

    2003-06-01

    This paper describes a novel, noninvasive method for measurement of liquid level in closed metal tanks that are under high pressure. It is based on the use of ultrasonic Lamb waves propagating along the tank wall. Contact with liquid substantially changes the characteristics of these waves and this can be used as an indicator of liquid presence. Theoretical analysis shows that the symmetric and antisymmetric Lamb wave modes, both fundamental and higher order, are sensitive to presence of the liquid. The optimal wave frequency depends on the thickness of the tank wall and wall material. A prototype level sensor based on this principle has been developed. It uses two pairs of wedge transducers to generate and detect Lamb waves propagating along the circumference of the gas tank. An operating frequency of 100 kHz is found to be optimal for use with tanks having a wall thickness of 30-50 mm. Prototype sensors developed under this program have been used successfully in oil fields in the far northern region of Russia.

  15. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) task is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic chemical sensing techniques and apply them to detecting proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Our primary application is detecting signatures of WMD production, but LWIR CES techniques are also capable of detecting chemical weapons. The LWIR CES task is concerned exclusively with developing novel point sensors; stand-off detection is addressed by other PNNL tasks and projects. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on LWIR CES sensor development.

  16. Matter-wave laser Interferometric Gravitation Antenna (MIGA): New perspectives for fundamental physics and geosciences

    CERN Document Server

    Geiger, R; Bertoldi, A; Canuel, B; Chaibi, W; Danquigny, C; Dutta, I; Fang, B; Gaffet, S; Gillot, J; Holleville, D; Landragin, A; Merzougui, M; Riou, I; Savoie, D; Bouyer, P

    2015-01-01

    The MIGA project aims at demonstrating precision measurements of gravity with cold atom sensors in a large scale instrument and at studying the associated powerful applications in geosciences and fundamental physics. The firt stage of the project (2013-2018) will consist in building a 300-meter long optical cavity to interrogate atom interferometers and will be based at the low noise underground laboratory LSBB based in Rustrel, France. The second stage of the project (2018-2023) will be dedicated to science runs and data analyses in order to probe the spatio-temporal structure of the local gravity field of the LSBB region, which represents a generic site of hydrological interest. MIGA will also assess future potential applications of atom interferometry to gravitational wave detection in the frequency band 0.1-10 Hz hardly covered by future long baseline optical interferometers. This paper presents the main objectives of the project, the status of the construction of the instrument and the motivation for the...

  17. Individually Identifiable Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors, Tags and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor); Solie, Leland P. (Inventor); Tucker, Dana Y. G. (Inventor); Hines, Andrew T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A surface-launched acoustic wave sensor tag system for remotely sensing and/or providing identification information using sets of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor tag devices is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include coding and other diversity techniques to produce groups of sensors that interact minimally, reducing or alleviating code collision problems typical of prior art coded SAW sensors and tags, and specific device embodiments of said coded SAW sensor tags and systems. These sensor/tag devices operate in a system which consists of one or more uniquely identifiable sensor/tag devices and a wireless interrogator. The sensor device incorporates an antenna for receiving incident RF energy and re-radiating the tag identification information and the sensor measured parameter(s). Since there is no power source in or connected to the sensor, it is a passive sensor. The device is wirelessly interrogated by the interrogator.

  18. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Aker, Pam M.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) project is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic techniques and apply them to the development of LWIR chemical sensors needed for detecting weapons proliferation. This includes detecting not only the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) themselves, but also signatures of their production and/or detonation. The LWIR CES project is concerned exclusively with developing point sensors; other portions of PNNL's IR Sensors program address stand off detection. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on our LWIR CES sensor development. During FY02, PNNL investigated three LWIR CES implementations beginning with the easiest to implement, direct cavity-enhanced detection (simple CES), including a technique of intermediate difficulty, cavity-dithered phase-sensitive detection (FM recovery CES) through to the most complex technique, that of resonant sideband cavity-enhanced detection also known as noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy, or NICE-OHMS.

  19. Surface acoustic wave devices for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Liu; Xiao, Chen; Hualin, Cai; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xiangguang, Tian; Luqi, Tao; Yi, Yang; Tianling, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been widely used in different fields and will continue to be of great importance in the foreseeable future. These devices are compact, cost efficient, easy to fabricate, and have a high performance, among other advantages. SAW devices can work as filters, signal processing units, sensors and actuators. They can even work without batteries and operate under harsh environments. In this review, the operating principles of SAW sensors, including temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors and biosensors, will be discussed. Several examples and related issues will be presented. Technological trends and future developments will also be discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60936002, 61025021, 61434001, 61574083), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002) and the Special Fund for Agroscientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201303107). M.A.M is additionally supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF).

  20. Long period fiber grating based refractive index sensor with enhanced sensitivity using Michelson interferometric arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit

    2015-06-01

    The long period fiber grating (LPFG) is widely used as a sensor due to its high sensitivity and resolution. However, the broad bandwidth of the attenuation bands formed by the mode coupling between the fundamental core mode and the cladding modes constitutes a difficulty when the device is used as a conventional sensor. To overcome this limitation, a Michelson interferometer-type sensor configuration has been developed, using an LPFG grating pair formed by coating a mirror at the distal end of the LPFG. This sensor configuration is more convenient to use and is able to overcome the limitations of the single LPFG based sensor as the shifts in the attenuation bands being more easily detectable due to the formation of the sharp spectral fringe pattern in the LPFG based Michelson interferometer. In this work, I studied the LPFG based Michelson interferometer as the refractive index sensor and discussed the sensitivity enhancement of the LPFG based Michelson interferometer as a refractive index sensor by employing higher order cladding modes and by reducing the cladding radius. The results demonstrated the HE17 mode with a cladding radius of 62.5 μm, in the range of surrounding refractive index (SRI) of 1-1.45, and its resonant peak showed a wavelength shift of 26.99 nm/RIU. When the cladding region was further reduced to 24 μm, the resonant peak showed a wavelength shift of 569.88 nm/RIU, resulting in a sensitivity enhancement of nearly 21 times. However, as the cladding region was etched further, then the HE17 order cladding mode and higher mode would be cut off. Therefore, the implementation of high sensitivity for SRI sensing with the reduced cladding in the LPFG based Michelson interferometer is dependent on the proper combination of the cladding radius and cladding mode order.

  1. Dynamics of a noncontacting, white light Fabry-Perot interferometric displacement sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Erik A; Todd, Michael D; Puckett, Anthony D

    2012-07-01

    A white light extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer is implemented as a noncontacting displacement sensor, providing robust, absolute displacement measurements with micrometer accuracy at a sampling rate of 10 Hz. This paper presents a dynamic model of the sensing cavity between the sensor probe and the nearby target surface using a Fabry-Perot etalon approach obtained from straightforward electromagnetic field formulations. Such a model is important for system characterization, as the dynamically changing cavity length imparts a Doppler shift on any signals circulating within the sensing cavity. Contrary to previously published results, Doppler-induced shifting within the low-finesse sensing cavity is shown to significantly distort the measurement signal as recorded by the sensor. Experimental and simulation results are compared, and the direct effects of cavity dynamics on the measurement signal are analyzed along with their indirect impact on sensor performance. This document has been approved by Los Alamos National Laboratory for unlimited public release (LA-UR 12-00301).

  2. Adaptive grating interferometric sensor for NDE metrology in high energy electromagnetic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovgalenko, George; Altintepe, Kadir; Bodnar, Michael; Prokop, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    CCD cameras and CMOS devices are the major electronic components of industrial metrology, which are vulnerable to high level electromagnetic exposure. Typical sources of exposure of electronics to ionizing radiation are the Van Allen radiation belts for satellites, nuclear reactors in power plants for sensors and control circuits, particle accelerators for control electronics particularly particle detector devices, residual radiation from isotopes in chip packaging materials, cosmic radiation for spacecraft and highaltitude aircraft, and nuclear explosions for potentially all military and civilian electronics. A total dose 5 ×103 rad was delivered to silicon-based devices in seconds to minutes caused long-term degradation. We demonstrated adaptive grating, 3D image sensor for NDE metrology which is non vulnerable for high level X-Ray1 and 3 × 106 rad gamma radiation exposure. Sensor is based on adaptive holographic grating generated by 632.8 nm He-Ne laser - in doped electro optic Bismuth Titanate (BTO) monocrystal. Mathematical algorithm of bipolar model conductivity in BTO crystal has been applied for experimental analyses. Applications of proposed sensor for airspace, military, nuclear and civil engineering industries have been discussed.

  3. Adaptive filtering techniques for gravitational wave interferometric data Removing long-term sinusoidal disturbances and oscillatory transients

    CERN Document Server

    Chassande-Mottin, E

    2001-01-01

    It is known by the experience gained from the gravitational wave detector proto-types that the interferometric output signal will be corrupted by a significant amount of non-Gaussian noise, large part of it being essentially composed of long-term sinusoids with slowly varying envelope (such as violin resonances in the suspensions, or main power harmonics) and short-term ringdown noise (which may emanate from servo control systems, electronics in a non-linear state, etc.). Since non-Gaussian noise components make the detection and estimation of the gravitational wave signature more difficult, a denoising algorithm based on adaptive filtering techniques (LMS methods) is proposed to separate and extract them from the stationary and Gaussian background noise. The strength of the method is that it does not require any precise model on the observed data: the signals are distinguished on the basis of their autocorrelation time. We believe that the robustness and simplicity of this method make it useful for data prep...

  4. Omnidirectional Gravitational Wave Detector with a Laser-Interferometric Gravitational Compass

    CERN Document Server

    Maia, M D; Sousa, Claudio M G; Magalhaes, Nadja S; Frajuca, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Based on the Szekeres-Pirani gravitational compass we suggest the addition of a fourth, non-coplanar mass/mirror to the presently existing laser based gravitational wave observatories, enabling them to operate omnidirectionally, to filter out ambiguous interpretations and to point out the direction of the gravitational wave source.

  5. Fiber-Tip Fabry-Perot Interferometric Sensor based on a Thin Silver Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    interferometer (FPI), named after French physicists Charles Fabry and Alfred Perot, is typically formed by two reflecting surfaces or mirrors. It has been...utilized for sensing applications for a long time 13,14 . The interference is caused by waves successively reflected between the two parallel...Film Assume the film act as a free vibrating circular plate clamped rigidly at the edge. Its lowest resonant frequency f0 is expressed as follows

  6. 3D beam shape estimation based on distributed coaxial cable interferometric sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Baokai; Zhu, Wenge; Liu, Jie; Yuan, Lei; Xiao, Hai

    2017-03-01

    We present a coaxial cable interferometer based distributed sensing system for 3D beam shape estimation. By making a series of reflectors on a coaxial cable, multiple Fabry–Perot cavities are created on it. Two cables are mounted on the beam at proper locations, and a vector network analyzer (VNA) is connected to them to obtain the complex reflection signal, which is used to calculate the strain distribution of the beam in horizontal and vertical planes. With 6 GHz swept bandwidth on the VNA, the spatial resolution for distributed strain measurement is 0.1 m, and the sensitivity is 3.768 MHz mε ‑1 at the interferogram dip near 3.3 GHz. Using displacement-strain transformation, the shape of the beam is reconstructed. With only two modified cables and a VNA, this system is easy to implement and manage. Comparing to optical fiber based sensor systems, the coaxial cable sensors have the advantage of large strain and robustness, making this system suitable for structure health monitoring applications.

  7. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  8. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  9. Advanced technologies for future ground-based, laser-interferometric gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Giles; Hild, Stefan; Pitkin, Matthew

    2014-12-12

    We present a review of modern optical techniques being used and developed for the field of gravitational wave detection. We describe the current state-of-the-art of gravitational waves detector technologies with regard to optical layouts, suspensions and test masses. We discuss the dominant sources and noise in each of these subsystems and the developments that will help mitigate them for future generations of detectors. We very briefly summarise some of the novel astrophysics that will be possible with these upgraded detectors.

  10. Sensitivity enhancement of an in-fiber Michelson interferometer evanescent wave sensor using a silver nanoparticle-polymer composite overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Sukhpawan S.; Yang, Jian; Xu, C. Q.

    2008-02-01

    Many configurations of fiber optic evanescent wave sensors have recently been explored, with various structural and material modifications applied in attempt to increase their resolution and/or sensitivity. With the aid of long period gratings inscribed within the core of standard single mode fibers, fiber optic evanescent wave sensors with in-fiber interferometric configurations have been realized and have been shown to have excellent resolution due to sharp spectral features. The Michelson interferometer configuration, whereby a single long period grating acts as a beam splitter for the core and cladding modes, is of interest because it operates in reflection mode, which allows for easy signal detection schemes. In this work, it is experimentally demonstrated for the first time that the deposition of a nanoparticle-polymer composite high refractive index overlay film onto the cladding arm surface of such an interferometric sensor greatly increases its sensitivity. Film refractive indices of > 1.7 are achieved and can be further increased to > 2 upon repetition of the nanoparticle synthesis cycle. Sensitivity enhancement factors as large as 16.7 occur in the film index range of 1.9 - 2.1. Experimental data are presented and compared to the theoretical simulation results.

  11. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Aspects of the Theory of Binary Sources and Interferometric Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Scott Alexander

    This thesis presents a study of several problems in gravitational-wave astronomy. It is motivated by observatories being built in the United States (the LIGO project), Europe, and Japan. In Chapters 2 and 3, I examine, with Eanna Flanagan, binary black hole (BBH) coalescences. If BBH systems exist (unknown, due to uncertainties in our understanding of binary evolution), we find BBHs will be visible to great distances, farther than many other sources. This heightened visibility may compensate for their possibly low birthrate, making them an important source. We suggest ways for theoretical modeling to aid data analysis, and techniques to be used for event searches and waveform analysis. Chapter 4 examines gravitational-wave measurement from the merger of binary neutron stars. Such waves depend upon details of neutron star composition (e.g., their equation of state) and are driven by complicated merger processes. Unfortunately, LIGO has poor sensitivity at frequencies where they are emitted. Measurement will require specialty 'narrow-band' detectors. I present an algorithm for configuring a network of LIGO-type and narrow-band detectors to measure these waves. Improved merger modeling will be necessary to design such networks and analyze their data. In Chapter 5, with Patrick Brady, I examine the stability of binary neutron stars. Some researchers have found a companion renders neutron stars unstable, so that they collapse into black holes long before merger. This claimed effect greatly impacts gravitational-wave emission. The effect is claimed to be first order in a particular expansion, so we examine the evolution of these systems using a perturbation analysis that is exact to first-order. We find no such effect exists in general relativity. In Chapter 6, I examine, with Kip Thorne, seismic gravity-gradient noise, an important noise source for future detectors. This noise arises from fluctuations in the earth's density near the detectors' test masses. By studying

  12. Atom-interferometric gravitational-wave detection using heterodyne laser links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a gravitational-wave detection method based on heterodyne laser links and light-pulse atom interferometry that enables high sensitivity gravitational-wave detection in the 0.1-mHz to 1-Hz frequency band using a single, long (>108 m), detector baseline. The detection baseline in previous atom-based proposals was constrained by the need for a reference laser to remain collimated over the optical propagation path between two satellites. Here we circumvent this requirement by employing a strong local oscillator laser near each atom ensemble that is phase referenced or phase locked to the reference laser beam. Longer baselines offer a number of potential advantages, including enhanced sensitivity, simplified atom optics, and reduced atomic source flux requirements.

  13. Investigation of the telescope back-reflection for space-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Aaron Dean

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) represents a class of space-based gravitational wave observatories that will attempt to measure gravitational waves in the frequency range from 0.01 mHz to 1 Hz. These missions are all characterized by a constellation of three spacecraft housing proof masses in heliocentric orbits. Using laser interferometry, changes in the distances between these proof masses that are induced by gravitational waves can be measured with pm precision. A reflecting telescope is used to transfer the lasers between adjacent spacecraft. Using an on-axis telescope design with the secondary and primary mirror axially aligned would be ideal to save volume and mass onboard the spacecraft, however there exists concerns about light reflected directly back from the secondary mirror to the optical bench. This light must be attenuated or it can corrupt the measurement signal. This thesis details a number of different attenuation schemes for the back-reflected light using anti-reflective regions at the center of the secondary mirror. Several secondary prototypes were manufactured and an experimental testbed was built to measure the back-re ected distributions from these prototypes.

  14. Optimization of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqian Xu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of an surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor incorporating metallic dot arrays was performed by using the approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media. The optimal sensor chip designs, including the material choice of piezoelectric crystals and metallic dots, dot thickness, and sensor operation frequency were determined theoretically. The theoretical predictions were confirmed experimentally by using the developed SAW sensor composed of differential delay line-oscillators and a metallic dot array deposited along the acoustic wave propagation path of the SAW delay lines. A significant improvement in sensor sensitivity was achieved in the case of 128° YX LiNbO3, and a thicker Au dot array, and low operation frequency were used to structure the sensor.

  15. Force measurements of a superconducting-film actuator for a cryogenic interferometric gravitational-wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, N; Kanda, N; Kuroda, K; Miyoki, S; Ohashi, M; Saitô, Y; Shintomi, T; Suzuki, T; Tatsumi, D; Taylor, C; Tomaru, T; Uchiyama, T; Yamamoto, A

    2002-01-01

    We measured forces applied by an actuator with a YBCO film at near 77 K for the Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational-wave Telescope (LCGT) project. An actuator consisting of both a YBCO film of 1.6 micrometers thickness and 0.81 square centimeters area and a solenoid coil exerted a force of up to 0.2 mN on a test mass. The presented actuator system can be used to displace the mirror of LCGT for fringe lock of the interferometer.

  16. Arm-length stabilisation for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors using frequency-doubled auxiliary lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullavey, Adam J; Slagmolen, Bram J J; Miller, John; Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Sigg, Daniel; Waldman, Sam J; Shaddock, Daniel A; McClelland, David E

    2012-01-02

    Residual motion of the arm cavity mirrors is expected to prove one of the principal impediments to systematic lock acquisition in advanced gravitational-wave interferometers. We present a technique which overcomes this problem by employing auxiliary lasers at twice the fundamental measurement frequency to pre-stabilise the arm cavities' lengths. Applying this approach, we reduce the apparent length noise of a 1.3 m long, independently suspended Fabry-Perot cavity to 30 pm rms and successfully transfer longitudinal control of the system from the auxiliary laser to the measurement laser.

  17. Arm-length stabilisation for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors using frequency-doubled auxiliary lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Mullavey, Adam J; Miller, John; Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Sigg, Daniel; Waldman, Sam J; Shaddock, Daniel A; McClelland, David E

    2011-01-01

    Residual motion of the arm cavity mirrors is expected to prove one of the principal impediments to systematic lock acquisition in advanced gravitational-wave interferometers. We present a technique which overcomes this problem by employing auxiliary lasers at twice the fundamental measurement frequency to pre-stabilise the arm cavities' lengths. Applying this approach, we reduce the apparent length noise of a 1.3 m long, independently suspended Fabry-Perot cavity to 30 pm rms and successfully transfer longitudinal control of the system from the auxiliary laser to the measurement laser.

  18. Interferometric detection of gravitational waves: the definitive test for General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Corda, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Even if Einstein's General Relativity achieved a great success and overcame lots of experimental tests, it also showed some shortcomings and flaws which today advise theorists to ask if it is the definitive theory of gravity. In this essay we show that, if advanced projects on the detection of Gravitational Waves (GWs) will improve their sensitivity, allowing to perform a GWs astronomy, accurate angular and frequency dependent response functions of interferometers for GWs arising from various Theories of Gravity, i.e. General Relativity and Extended Theories of Gravity, will be the definitive test for General Relativity. The papers which found this essay have been the world's most cited in the official Astroparticle Publication Review of ASPERA during the 2007 with 13 citations.

  19. Coincidence and coherent data analysis methods for gravitational wave bursts in a network of interferometric detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, N; Bizouard, M A; Brisson, V; Cavalier, F; Davier, M; Hello, P; Kreckelberg, S; Porter, E K; Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelberg, Stephane; Porter, Edward K.

    2003-01-01

    Network data analysis methods are the only way to properly separate real gravitational wave (GW) transient events from detector noise. They can be divided into two generic classes: the coincidence method and the coherent analysis. The former uses lists of selected events provided by each interferometer belonging to the network and tries to correlate them in time to identify a physical signal. Instead of this binary treatment of detector outputs (signal present or absent), the latter method involves first the merging of the interferometer data and looks for a common pattern, consistent with an assumed GW waveform and a given source location in the sky. The thresholds are only applied later, to validate or not the hypothesis made. As coherent algorithms use a more complete information than coincidence methods, they are expected to provide better detection performances, but at a higher computational cost. An efficient filter must yield a good compromise between a low false alarm rate (hence triggering on data at...

  20. Controlling kilometre-scale interferometric detectors for gravitational wave astronomy: Active phase noise cancellation using EOMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, N.; Balembois, L.; Bizouard, M. A.; Brisson, V.; Casanueva, J.; Cavalier, F.; Davier, M.; Frey, V.; Hello, P.; Huet, D.; Leroy, N.; Loriette, V.; Maksimovic, I.; Robinet, F.

    2017-02-01

    The second generation of Gravitational waves detectors are kilometric Michelson interferometers with additional recycling Fabry-Perot cavities on the arms and ​the addition of two more recycling cavities to enhance their sensitivity, with the particularity that all the mirrors are suspended. In order to control them a new technique, based on the use of auxiliary lasers, has been developed to bring the interferometer to its working point, with all the cavities on their resonance, in an adiabatic way. The implementation of this technique in Advanced Virgo is under preparation and the propagation of a stable laser through a 3-km optical fibre is one of the most problematic issues. A new technique of active phase noise cancellation based on the use of Electro Optical Modulators has been developed, and a first prototype has been successfully tested.

  1. Optimal Location of Two Laser-interferometric Detectors for Gravitational Wave Backgrounds at 100 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Akutsu, Tomotada; Arai, Koji; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Nishida, Erina; Sakagami, Masa-aki; Chiba, Takeshi; Takahashi, Ryuichi; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2008-01-01

    Recently, observational searches for gravitational wave background (GWB) have been developed and given constraints on the energy density of GWB in a broad range of frequencies. These constraints have already resulted in the rejection of some theoretical models of relatively large GWB spectra. However, at 100 MHz, there is no strict upper limit from direct observation, though an indirect limit exists due to He4 abundance due to big-bang nucleosynthesis. In our previous paper, we investigated the detector designs that can effectively respond to GW at high frequencies, where the wavelength of GW is comparable to the size of a detector, and found that the configuration, a so-called synchronous-recycling interferometer is best at these sensitivity. In this paper, we investigated the optimal location of two synchronous-recycling interferometers and derived their cross-correlation sensitivity to GWB. We found that the sensitivity is nearly optimized and hardly changed if two coaligned detectors are located within a ...

  2. Laser-interferometric Detectors for Gravitational Wave Background at 100 MHz : Detector Design and Sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Akutsu, Tomotada; Arai, Koji; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Nishida, Erina; Sakagami, Masa-aki; Chiba, Takeshi; Takahashi, Ryuichi; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2007-01-01

    Recently, observational searches for gravitational wave background (GWB) have developed and given direct and indirect constraints on the energy density of GWB in a broad range of frequencies. These constraints have already rejected some theoretical models of large GWB spectra. However, at 100 MHz, there is no strict upper limit from direct observation, though the indirect limit by He4 abundance due to big-bang nucleosynthesis exists. In this paper, we propose an experiment with laser interferometers searching GWB at 100 MHz. We considered three detector designs and evaluated the GW response functions of a single detector. As a result, we found that, at 100 MHz, the most sensitive detector is the design, a so-called synchronous recycling interferometer, which has better sensitivity than an ordinary Fabry-Perot Michelson interferometer by a factor of 3.3 at 100 MHz. We also give the best sensitivity achievable at 100 MHz with realistic experimental parameters.

  3. Model of Thermal Wavefront Distortion in Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Detectors I Thermal Focusing

    CERN Document Server

    Beausoleil, R G; Kells, W; Camp, J; Gustafson, E K; Fejer, M M

    2002-01-01

    We develop a steady-state analytical and numerical model of the optical response of power-recycled Fabry-Perot Michelson laser gravitational-wave detectors to thermal focusing in optical substrates. We assume that the thermal distortions are small enough that we can represent the unperturbed intracavity field anywhere in the detector as a linear combination of basis functions related to the eigenmodes of one of the Fabry-Perot arm cavities, and we take great care to preserve numerically the nearly ideal longitudinal phase resonance conditions that would otherwise be provided by an external servo-locking control system. We have included the effects of nonlinear thermal focusing due to power absorption in both the substrates and coatings of the mirrors and beamsplitter, the effects of a finite mismatch between the curvatures of the laser wavefront and the mirror surface, and the diffraction by the mirror aperture at each instance of reflection and transmission. We demonstrate a detailed numerical example of thi...

  4. On Special Optical Modes and Thermal Issues in Advanced Gravitational Wave Interferometric Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinet Jean-Yves

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of present ground-based gravitational wave antennas is too low to detect many events per year. It has, therefore, been planned for years to build advanced detectors allowing actual astrophysical observations and investigations. In such advanced detectors, one major issue is to increase the laser power in order to reduce shot noise. However, this is useless if the thermal noise remains at the current level in the 100 Hz spectral region, where mirrors are the main contributors. Moreover, increasing the laser power gives rise to various spurious thermal effects in the same mirrors. The main goal of the present study is to discuss these issues versus the transverse structure of the readout beam, in order to allow comparison. A number of theoretical studies and experiments have been carried out, regarding thermal noise and thermal effects. We do not discuss experimental problems, but rather focus on some theoretical results in this context about arbitrary order Laguerre–Gauss beams, and other “exotic” beams.

  5. Thermal noise in interferometric gravitational wave detectors due to dielectric optical coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Harry, G M; Saulson, P R; Penn, S D; Startin, W J; Kittelberger, S E; Crooks, D R M; Hough, J; Cagnoli, G; Nakagawa, N; Rowan, S; Fejer, M M; Harry, Gregory M.; Gretarsson, Andri M.; Saulson, Peter R.; Penn, Steven D.; Startin, William J.; Kittelberger, Scott; Hough, Jim; Cagnoli, Gianpietro; Nakagawa, Norio; Rowan, Sheila; Fejer, Martin M.

    2002-01-01

    We report on thermal noise from the internal friction of dielectric coatings made from alternating layers of Ta2O5 and SiO2 deposited on fused silica substrates. We present calculations of the thermal noise in gravitational wave interferometers due to optical coatings, when the material properties of the coating are different from those of the substrate and the mechanical loss angle in the coating is anisotropic. The loss angle in the coatings for strains parallel to the substrate surface was determined from ringdown experiments. We measured the mechanical quality factor of three fused silica samples with coatings deposited on them. The loss angle of the coating material for strains parallel to the coated surface was found to be (4.2 +- 0.3)*10^(-4) for coatings deposited on commercially polished slides and (1.0 +- 0.3)*10^{-4} for a coating deposited on a superpolished disk. Using these numbers, we estimate the effect of coatings on thermal noise in the initial LIGO and advanced LIGO interferometers. We also...

  6. Circuit Design of Surface Acoustic Wave Based Micro Force Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sensors are commonly used in industrial production and mechanical system. However, resistance strain, piezoresistive sensor, and ceramic capacitive pressure sensors possess limitations, especially in micro force measurement. A surface acoustic wave (SAW based micro force sensor is designed in this paper, which is based on the theories of wavelet transform, SAW detection, and pierce oscillator circuits. Using lithium niobate as the basal material, a mathematical model is established to analyze the frequency, and a peripheral circuit is designed to measure the micro force. The SAW based micro force sensor is tested to show the reasonable design of detection circuit and the stability of frequency and amplitude.

  7. Modeling of a Surface Acoustic Wave Strain Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor technology for harsh environments aimed at aerospace applications. To aid in development of sensors a model of a SAW strain sensor has been developed. The new model extends the modified matrix method to include the response of Orthogonal Frequency Coded (OFC) reflectors and the response of SAW devices to strain. These results show that the model accurately captures the strain response of a SAW sensor on a Langasite substrate. The results of the model of a SAW Strain Sensor on Langasite are presented

  8. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  9. Flexible pulse-wave sensors from oriented aluminum nitride nanocolumns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Morito; Ueno, Naohiro; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Tateyama, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    Flexible pulse-wave sensors were fabricated from density-packed oriented aluminum nitride nanocolumns prepared on aluminum foils. The nanocolumns were prepared by the rf magnetron sputtering method and were perpendicularly oriented to the aluminum foil surfaces. The sensor structure is laminated, and the structure contributes to avoiding unexpected leakage of an electric charge. The resulting sensor thickness is 50 μm. The sensor is flexible like aluminum foil and can respond to frequencies from 0.1 to over 100 Hz. The sensitivity of the sensor to pressure is proportional to the surface area. The sensor sensitively causes reversible charge signals that correlate with the pulse wave form, which contains significant information on arteriosclerosis and cardiopathy of a man sitting on it.

  10. Coincidence and coherent data analysis methods for gravitational wave bursts in a network of interferometric detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Porter, Edward K.

    2003-11-01

    Network data analysis methods are the only way to properly separate real gravitational wave (GW) transient events from detector noise. They can be divided into two generic classes: the coincidence method and the coherent analysis. The former uses lists of selected events provided by each interferometer belonging to the network and tries to correlate them in time to identify a physical signal. Instead of this binary treatment of detector outputs (signal present or absent), the latter method involves first the merging of the interferometer data and looks for a common pattern, consistent with an assumed GW waveform and a given source location in the sky. The thresholds are only applied later, to validate or not the hypothesis made. As coherent algorithms use more complete information than coincidence methods, they are expected to provide better detection performances, but at a higher computational cost. An efficient filter must yield a good compromise between a low false alarm rate (hence triggering on data at a manageable rate) and a high detection efficiency. Therefore, the comparison of the two approaches is achieved using so-called receiving operating characteristics (ROC), giving the relationship between the false alarm rate and the detection efficiency for a given method. This paper investigates this question via Monte Carlo simulations, using the network model developed in a previous article. Its main conclusions are the following. First, a three-interferometer network such as Virgo-LIGO is found to be too small to reach good detection efficiencies at low false alarm rates: larger configurations are suitable to reach a confidence level high enough to validate as true GW a detected event. In addition, an efficient network must contain interferometers with comparable sensitivities: studying the three-interferometer LIGO network shows that the 2-km interferometer with half sensitivity leads to a strong reduction of performances as compared to a network of three

  11. Palladium nanoparticle-based surface acoustic wave hydrogen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Devika; Hines, Jacqueline; Udeoyo, Uduak; Borguet, Eric

    2015-03-18

    Palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (5-20 nm) are used as the sensing layer on surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices for detecting H2. The interaction with hydrogen modifies the conductivity of the Pd nanoparticle film, producing measurable changes in acoustic wave propagation, which allows for the detection of this explosive gas. The nanoparticle-based SAW sensor responds rapidly and reversibly at room temperature.

  12. Terahertz interferometric imaging of RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Barat, Robert B.; Gary, Dale E.; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Zorych, Ivan; Zimdars, David; Federici, John F.

    2007-04-01

    Experimental results of homodyne terahertz interferometric 2-D imaging of RDX are presented. Continuous waves at 0.25-0.6 THz are used to obtain images of a C-4 sample at several THz frequencies. The performance of an N element detector array is imitated by only one detector placed at N positions. The distance between the C-4 sample and the detector array is ~30 cm. By taking interferometric images at several THz frequencies RDX can be recognized by the spectral peak at 0.82 THz. Simulations of interferometric images of two point sources of spherical waves are presented. The terahertz interferometric imaging method can be used in defense and security applications to detect concealed weapons, explosives as well as chemical and biological agents.

  13. Combination of a fast white-light interferometer with a phase shifting interferometric line sensor for form measurements of precision components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Sören; Ehret, Gerd; Riebling, Jörg; Lehmann, Peter

    2017-06-01

    By means of an interferometric line sensor system, the form of a specimen can be measured by stitching several overlapping circular subapertures to form one 3D topography. This concept is very flexible and can be adapted to many different specimen geometries. The sensor is based on a Michelson interferometer configuration that consists of a rapidly oscillating reference mirror in combination with a high-speed line-scan camera. Due to the overlapping areas, movement errors of the scan axes can be corrected. In order to automatically adjust the line sensor in such a way that it is perpendicular to the measurement surface at a fixed working distance, a white-light interferometer was included in the line-based form-measuring system. By means of a fast white-light scan, the optimum angle of the sensor (with respect to the surface of the specimen) is determined in advance, before scanning the specimen using the line-based sinusoidal phase shifting interferometer. This produces accurate measurement results and makes it possible to also measure non-rotational specimens. In this paper, the setup of the line-based form-measuring system is introduced and the measurement strategy of the sensor adjustment using an additional white-light interferometer is presented. Furthermore, the traceability chain of the system and the main error influences are discussed. Examples of form measurement results are shown.

  14. Radar and Laser Sensors for High Frequency Ocean Wave Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C. R.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental measurement of air-sea fluxes invariably take place using shipbourne instrumentation and simultaneous measurement of wave height and direction is desired. A number of researchers have shown that range measuring sensors combined with inertial motion compensation can be successful on board stationary or very slowly moving ships. In order to measure wave characteristics from ships moving at moderate to full speed the sensors are required to operate at higher frequency so as to overcome the Doppler shift caused by ship motion. This work presents results from some preliminary testing of laser, radar and ultrasonic range sensors in the laboratory and on board ship. The characteristics of the individual sensors are discussed and comparison of the wave spectra produced by each is presented.

  15. Love wave acoustic sensor for testing in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Haifeng; Zhu, Huizhong; Feng, Guanping

    2001-09-01

    Love wave is one type of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs). It is guided acoustic mode propagating in ta thin layer deposited on a substrate. Because of its advantages of high mass sensitivity, low noise level and being fit for operating in liquids, Love wave acoustic sensors have become one of the hot spots in the research of biosensor nowadays. In this paper the Love wave devices with the substrate of ST-cut quartz and the guiding layers of PMMA and fused quartz were fabricated successfully. By measuring the transfer function S21 and the insertion loss of the devices, the characteristics of the Rayleigh wave device and the Love wave devices with different guiding layers in gas phase and liquid phase were compared. It was validated that the Love wave sensor is suitable for testing in liquids but the Rayleigh wave sensor is not. What's more, SiO2 is the more proper material for the guiding layer of the Love wave device.

  16. Lamb wave sensors array for nonviscous liquid sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Zhijun; HAN; Tao; JI; Xiaojun; GUO; Huawei; SHI; Wenkang

    2006-01-01

    The interdigital transducer (IDT) can excite Lamb wave in a piezoelectric plate loading with a liquid layer, and the phase velocity of Lamb wave is associated with the properties of the liquid layer. In this paper, the concept of effective permittivity is introduced to study the Lamb wave's potential application in liquid sensing. Considering the measuring of ideal nonviscous liquid, the sensors array is designed to sense the density and the dielectric constant of the liquid layer simultaneously. Using LiNbO3 as piezoelectric material, in order to improve the sensors array sensitivity and the electro-mechanical coupling coefficient, the optimized results including plate thicknesses and cut orientations are presented by numerical simulation. These studies show that the Lamb wave sensors array can be potential in liquid sensing.

  17. Substrates for zero temperature coefficient Love wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakoby, B; Vellekoop, M J

    2000-01-01

    Microacoustic Love wave delay lines show high sensitivity to perturbations such as mass depositions on the wave-guide surface. Furthermore, because of their shear polarization, Love waves are ideally suited for liquid sensing applications. Using a Love wave delay line as feedback element in an oscillator allows the realization of viscosity sensors, and, using a chemical interface, chemical sensors, where the output signal is the oscillation frequency. To achieve a high effective sensitivity, the cross-sensitivity to temperature has to be kept low. We outline the proper choice of a material and especially focus on the influence of crystal cut and the major device design parameters (mass sensitivity and coupling coefficient) on the temperature coefficient of the sensor.

  18. FEM Simulations of Leaky Lamb Wave in Ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jin Ho; Joo, Young Sang; Kim, Jong Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    As the sodium coolant of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is opaque to light, a conventional visual inspection cannot be used for carrying out an in-service inspection of the internal structures under a sodium level. An ultrasonic wave should be applied for an under-sodium viewing of the internal structures in a reactor vessel. Recently, a noble plate-type ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been developed for versatile applications in an under-sodium viewing application. The beam profile of a A{sub 0}-mode leaky Lamb wave of the waveguide sensor affects the resolution of visualization image in under-sodium viewing. In the design and manufacture of the waveguide sensor, the finite element method (FEM) modeling and simulation of the propagation of a leaky Lamb wave is required for the estimation and optimization of the waveguide sensor design parameters. In the previous research, the simple 2D modeling and simulation of the waveguide sensor had been carried out. In this work, FEM simulation of the propagation and radiation of the leaky Lamb wave in the waveguide sensor is performed for the vertical and lateral beam profile analysis using the pseudo 3D modeling including the wedge

  19. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  20. Approaches from a single- to a multiparameter evanescent wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Daniel; Hartmann, Andreas; Kaul, Sepp; Martin, Michael; Schulz, V.; Wolfrum, Juergen M.; Seeger, Stefan

    1996-01-01

    Evanescent wave sensors are an interesting tool for the fast detection of reactions between biomolecules. By using small and inexpensive diode lasers together with fluorescent dyes in the red spectral region, it was possible to construct a highly specific sensor. This was due to the use of the immobilization of receptor molecules via the Langmuir-Blodgett technique which enhances the specificity drastically. As a clinically relevant system an immunoassay of the tumor marker mucine was investigated. Mucine could be detected with a sandwich test using the antibody system BM-2/BM-7. In order to detect several analytes at one time, there are two possible ways: time-resolved detection using multiplex-dyes and the parallelization of the sensor by using several fibers simultaneously. A position-resolved evanescent wave sensor using a CCD camera is described.

  1. Low-power hardware implementation of artificial neural network strain detection for extrinsic Fabry-Pérot interferometric sensors under sinusoidal excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kyle; Ebel, William J.; Watkins, Steve E.

    2009-11-01

    Artificial neural networks are studied for use in estimating strain in extrinsic Fabry-Pérot interferometric sensors. These networks can require large memory spaces and a large number of calculations for implementation. We describe a modified neural network solution that is suitable for implementation on relatively low cost, low-power hardware. Moreover, we give strain estimates resulting from an implementation of the artificial neural network algorithm on an 8-bit 8051 processor with 64 kbytes of memory. For example, one of our results shows that for 2048 samples of the transmittance signal, the presented neural network algorithm requires around 24,622 floating point multiplies and 35,835 adds, and where the data and algorithm fit within the 64-kbyte memory.

  2. Laser ablation method for production of surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, Dmitry; Shevchenko, Sergey; Kukaev, Alexander; Safronov, Daniil

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors are produced using a photolithography method. In case of inertial sensors it suffers several disadvantages, such as difficulty in matching topologies produced on opposite sides of the wafer, expensive in small series production, not allowing further topology correction. In this case a laser ablation method seems promising. Details of a proposed technique are described in the paper along with results of its experimental test and discussion.

  3. Some Applications of Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the evaluation of thin amorphous magnetic film by using of surface acoustic waves on piezo electric substrate. The obtained experimental data show strong dependence of material parameters on the annealing temperature. The mixed ferromagnetic/SAW devices for electronic applications will be also discussed.

  4. PVDF Multielement Lamb Wave Sensor for Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of Lamb waves, which are multimodal and dispersive, provide both challenges and opportunities for structural health monitoring (SHM). Methods for nondestructive testing with Lamb waves are well established. For example, mode content can be determined by moving a sensor to different positions and then transforming the spatial-temporal data into the wavenumber-frequency domain. This mode content information is very useful because at every frequency each mode has a unique wavestructure, which is largely responsible for its sensitivity to material damage. Furthermore, mode conversion occurs when the waves interact with damage, making mode content an excellent damage detection feature. However, in SHM, the transducers are typically at fixed locations and are immovable. Here, an affixed polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) multielement sensor is shown to provide these same capabilities. The PVDF sensor is bonded directly to the waveguide surface, conforms to curved surfaces, has low mass, low profile, low cost, and minimal influence on passing Lamb waves. While the mode receivability is dictated by the sensor being located on the surface of the waveguide, both symmetric and antisymmetric modes can be detected and group velocities measured.

  5. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  6. Speech articulator measurements using low power EM-wave sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Burnett, G.C.; Ng, L.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Lea, W.A. [Speech Science Institute, P.O. Box 240428, Apple Valley, Minnesota 55124 (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Very low power electromagnetic (EM) wave sensors are being used to measure speech articulator motions as speech is produced. Glottal tissue oscillations, jaw, tongue, soft palate, and other organs have been measured. Previously, microwave imaging (e.g., using radar sensors) appears not to have been considered for such monitoring. Glottal tissue movements detected by radar sensors correlate well with those obtained by established laboratory techniques, and have been used to estimate a voiced excitation function for speech processing applications. The noninvasive access, coupled with the small size, low power, and high resolution of these new sensors, permit promising research and development applications in speech production, communication disorders, speech recognition and related topics. {copyright} {ital 1998 Acoustical Society of America.}

  7. Passive Downhole Pressure Sensor Based on Surface Acoustic Wave Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Sully M M; Figueiredo, Sávio W O; Takahashi, Victor L; Llerena, Roberth A W; Braga, Arthur M B

    2017-07-15

    A passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) pressure sensor was developed for real-time pressure monitoring in downhole application. The passive pressure sensor consists of a SAW resonator, which is attached to a circular metal diaphragm used as a pressure transducer. While the membrane deflects as a function of pressure applied, the frequency response changes due to the variation of the SAW propagation parameters. The sensitivity and linearity of the SAW pressure sensor were measured to be 8.3 kHz/bar and 0.999, respectively. The experimental results were validated with a hybrid analytical-numerical analysis. The good results combined with the robust design and packaging for harsh environment demonstrated it to be a promising sensor for industrial applications.

  8. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    N. Ramakrishnan; Parthiban, R.; Sawal Hamid Md Ali; Md. Shabiul Islam; Ajay Achath Mohanan

    2013-01-01

    In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW) device is investigated through finite element method (FEM) simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film...

  9. Vibration analysis based on surface acoustic wave sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnadinger Alfred P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to know, whether a civil engineering structure is safe or unsafe. One way to determine this is to measure vibrations at critical locations and feeding this data into an appropriate algorithm. Albido Corporation has developed wireless strain sensors based on surface acoustic wave (SAW principles that are mainly employed on rotating structures and in harsh environments. Albido's sensors could also be used to measure vibrations in civil engineering structures. They are small (~1 × 3 mm, passive and inexpensive (< 1$ in volume. They are powered by the electromagnetic field emanating from the antenna of a Reader System, similar to an RFID. The Reader System is essentially a computer with special software and has signal processing capability. One Reader System can service a multitude of sensors. The Reader antenna has to be within the reading range of the sensor. If large distances are required, a small electronic component acting as a Reader System can be placed within the reading range of the sensor that receives the sensor signal, generates a radio signal and encodes the sensor information on the radio signal. Then, the final data processing center can be placed anywhere.

  10. Long-wave infrared profile feature extractor (PFx) sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartain, Ronald B.; Aliberti, Keith; Alexander, Troy; Chiu, David

    2009-05-01

    The Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) Profile Feature Extractor (PFx) sensor has evolved from the initial profiling sensor that was developed by the University of Memphis (Near IR) and the Army Research Laboratory (visible). This paper presents the initial signatures of the LWIR PFx for human with and without backpacks, human with animal (dog), and a number of other animals. The current version of the LWIR PFx sensor is a diverging optical tripwire sensor. The LWIR PFx signatures are compared to the signatures of the Profile Sensor in the visible and Near IR spectral regions. The LWIR PFx signatures were collected with two different un-cooled micro bolometer focal plane array cameras, where the individual pixels were used as stand alone detectors (a non imaging sensor). This approach results in a completely passive, much lower bandwidth, much longer battery life, low weight, small volume sensor that provides sufficient information to classify objects into human Vs non human categories with a 98.5% accuracy.

  11. Sensors Based on Spectroscopy of Guided Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, Jiří

    The last two decades have witnessed remarkable progress in the develpment of affinity biosensors and their applications in areas such as environmental protection, biotechnology, medical diagnostics, drug screening, food safety, and security. An affinity biosensor consists of a transducer and a biological recognition element which is able to interact with a selected analyte. Various optical methods have been exploited in biosensors including fluorescence spectroscopy, interferometry (reflectometric white light interferometry, modal interferometry in optical waveguide structures), and spectroscopy of guided modes of optical waveguides. Optical biosensors based on spectroscopy of guided modes of optical waveguides - grating coupler, resonant mirror, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) - rely on the measurement of binding-induced refractive index changes and thus are label-free technologies. This paper reviews fundamentals of optical sensors based on spectroscopy of guided modes of optical waveguides and their applications.

  12. Optimization of autonomous magnetic field sensor consisting of giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transducer

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a novel autonomous thin film magnetic field sensor consisting of a tri-layer giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave transponder. Double and single electrode interdigital transducer (IDT) designs are employed and compared. The integrated sensor is fabricated using standard microfabrication technology. The results show the double electrode IDT has an advantage in terms of the sensitivity. In order to optimize the matching component, a simulation based on P-matrix is carried out. A maximum change of 2.4 dB of the reflection amplitude and a sensitivity of 0.34 dB/Oe are obtained experimentally. © 2012 IEEE.

  13. A Surface Acoustic Wave Ethanol Sensor with Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Giffney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors are a class of piezoelectric MEMS sensors which can achieve high sensitivity and excellent robustness. A surface acoustic wave ethanol sensor using ZnO nanorods has been developed and tested. Vertically oriented ZnO nanorods were produced on a ZnO/128∘ rotated Y-cut LiNbO3 layered SAW device using a solution growth method with zinc nitrate, hexamethylenetriamine, and polyethyleneimine. The nanorods have average diameter of 45 nm and height of 1 μm. The SAW device has a wavelength of 60 um and a center frequency of 66 MHz at room temperature. In testing at an operating temperature of 270∘C with an ethanol concentration of 2300 ppm, the sensor exhibited a 24 KHz frequency shift. This represents a significant improvement in comparison to an otherwise identical sensor using a ZnO thin film without nanorods, which had a frequency shift of 9 KHz.

  14. Analysis and optimization of Love wave liquid sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakoby, B; Vellekoop, M J

    1998-01-01

    Love wave sensors are highly sensitive microacoustic devices, which are well suited for liquid sensing applications thanks to the shear polarization of the wave. The sensing mechanism thereby relies on the mechanical (or acoustic) interaction of the device with the liquid. The successful utilization of Love wave devices for this purpose requires proper shielding to avoid unwanted electric interaction of the liquid with the wave and the transducers. In this work we describe the effects of this electric interaction and the proper design of a shield to prevent it. We present analysis methods, which illustrate the impact of the interaction and which help to obtain an optimized design of the proposed shield. We also present experimental results for devices that have been fabricated according to these design rules.

  15. Surface acoustic wave vapor sensors based on resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W.; Klusty, Mark

    1991-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices fabricated in the resonator configuration have been used as organic vapor sensors and compared with delay line devices more commonly used. The experimentally determined mass sensitivities of 200, 300, and 400 MHz resonators and 158 MHz delay lines coated with Langmuir-Blodgett films of poly(vinyl tetradecanal) are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. The response of LB- and spray-coated sensors to various organic vapors were determined, and scaling laws for mass sensitivities, vapor sensitivities, and detection limits are discussed. The 200 MHz resonators provide the lowest noise levels and detection limits of all the devices examined.

  16. ST Quartz Acoustic Wave Sensors with Sectional Guiding Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen McHale

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of removing a section of guiding layer from the propagation paths of ST-quartz Love wave sensors; this offers the ease of fabrication of a polymer guiding layer whilst retaining the native surface of the quartz which may then be used for the attachment of a sensitizing layer. Data is presented for the rigid and viscous loading, which indicates a small reduction in mass sensitivity compared to a Love wave device. Biosensing capabilities of these discontinuous ‘sectional’ guiding layer devices are demonstrated using protein adsorption from solution.

  17. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Puiu; Ana-Maria Gurban; Lucian Rotariu; Simona Brajnicov; Cristian Viespe; Camelia Bala

    2015-01-01

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporat...

  18. Following butter flavour deterioration with an acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Cláudia R B S; Gomes, M Teresa S R

    2012-09-15

    Off-flavours develop naturally in butter and the process is accelerated by heat. An acoustic wave sensor was used to detect the aroma compounds evolved from heated butter and the results have shown that registered marked changes were coincident to odour changes detected by sensory analysis. The flavour compounds have also been analysed by GC/MS for identification. The response of the sensor was fully characterized in terms of the sensitivity to each of the identified compounds, and sensitivities of the system SPME/sensor were compared with the sensitivities of the system SPME/GC/MS. It was found that the sensor analytical system was more sensitive to methylketones than to fatty acids. The SPME/GC/MS system also showed the highest sensitivity to 2-heptanone, followed by 2-nonanone, but third place was occupied by undecanone and butanoic acid, to which the sensor showed moderate sensitivity. 2-heptanone was found to be an appropriate model compound to follow odour changes till the 500 h, and the lower sensitivity of the sensor to butanoic acid showed to be a positive characteristic, as saturation was prevented, and other more subtle changes in the flavour could be perceived.

  19. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Crystals for Acoustic Wave Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Hongfei; Wu, Huiyan; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2016-03-01

    In this review paper, nine different types of high-temperature piezoelectric crystals and their sensor applications are overviewed. The important materials' properties of these piezoelectric crystals including dielectric constant, elastic coefficients, piezoelectric coefficients, electromechanical coupling coefficients, and mechanical quality factor are discussed in detail. The determination methods of these physical properties are also presented. Moreover, the growth methods, structures, and properties of these piezoelectric crystals are summarized and compared. Of particular interest are langasite and oxyborate crystals, which exhibit no phase transitions prior to their melting points ∼ 1500 °C and possess high electrical resistivity, piezoelectric coefficients, and mechanical quality factor at ultrahigh temperature ( ∼ 1000 °C). Finally, some research results on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) sensors developed using this high-temperature piezoelectric crystals are discussed.

  20. A micromachined surface acoustic wave sensor for detecting inert gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, S.; Hersam, M.; Ross, C.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1996-12-31

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors must be specifically designed for each application because many variables directly affect the acoustic wave velocity. In the present work, the authors have designed, fabricated, and tested an SAW sensor for detection of metastable states of He. The sensor consists of two sets of micromachined interdigitated transducers (IDTs) and delay lines fabricated by photolithography on a single Y-cut LiNbO{sub 3} substrate oriented for Z-propagation of the SAWs. One set is used as a reference and the other set employs a delay line coated with a titanium-based thin film sensitive to electrical conductivity changes when exposed to metastable states of He. The reference sensor is used to obtain a true frequency translation in relation to a voltage controlled oscillator. An operating frequency of 109 MHz has been used, and the IDT finger width is 8 {micro}m. Variation in electrical conductivity of the thin film at the delay line due to exposure to He is detected as a frequency shift in the assembly, which is then used as a measure of the amount of metastable He exposed to the sensing film on the SAW delay line. A variation in the He pressure versus frequency shifts indicates the extent of the metastable He interaction.

  1. Study of quality factor and hysteresis associated with the state-of-the-art passive seismic isolation system for Gravitational Wave Interferometric Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalvo, R.; Márka, Sz.; Numata, K.; Sannibale, V.; Takamori, A.; Tariq, H.; Ugas, E. J.; Yoda, T.; Aso, Y.; Bertolini, A.

    2005-02-01

    Seismic isolation systems, consistent of passive attenuators, based on mechanical harmonic oscillators with resonant frequencies below the frequency region of interest, are being used by multiple Gravitational wave (GW) detectors. We conduct a study of the fundamental limitations present due to the properties of the material such as Maraging steel, used in some of the seismic attenuation systems for GW detectors. We tentatively interpret the main effects observed in our system, such as the anomalous damping and the hysteresis, in terms of movement of dislocations trapped between Maraging steel intermetallic precipitates. In light of our understanding, we further discuss and propose ideas to overcome these limitations and improve the performance of these systems, which may allow for passive attenuation at even lower-frequency regimes than achieved so far. These advanced performances would help further reduce the requirements on the mirror suspension control actuators and could reduce their associated noise in the present Gravitational Wave Interferometric Detectors (GWID). This advancement can lead to more suitable seismic attenuation systems for the future instruments with lower frequency sensitivity requirements.

  2. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than ±0.5°C was achieved between 200°C and 600°C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700°C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

  3. Langasite surface acoustic wave gas sensors: modeling and verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Zheng,; Greve, D. W.; Oppenheim, I. J.

    2013-03-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  4. Multiple-frequency surface acoustic wave devices as sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Martin, Stephen J.

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a multiple-frequency acoustic wave (MUFAW) device on ST-cut quartz with nominal surface acoustic wave (SAW) center frequencies of 16, 40, 100, and 250 MHz. The four frequencies are obtained by patterning four sets of input and output interdigital transducers of differing periodicities on a single substrate. Such a device allows the frequency dependence of AW sensor perturbations to be examined, aiding in the elucidation of the operative interaction mechanism(s). Initial measurements of the SAW response to the vacuum deposition of a thin nickel film show the expected frequency dependence of mass sensitivity in addition to the expected frequency independence of the magnitude of the acoustoelectric effect. By measuring changes in both wave velocity and attenuation at multiple frequencies, extrinsic perturbations such as temperature and pressure changes are readily differentiated from one another and from changes in surface mass.

  5. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors: Modeling and Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W; Oppenheim, Irving J

    2013-01-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  6. A surface acoustic wave ICP sensor with good temperature stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Hu, Hong; Ye, Aipeng; Zhang, Peng

    2017-07-20

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is very important for assessing and monitoring hydrocephalus, head trauma and hypertension patients, which could lead to elevated ICP or even devastating neurological damage. The mortality rate due to these diseases could be reduced through ICP monitoring, because precautions can be taken against the brain damage. This paper presents a surface acoustic wave (SAW) pressure sensor to realize ICP monitoring, which is capable of wireless and passive transmission with antenna attached. In order to improve the temperature stability of the sensor, two methods were adopted. First, the ST cut quartz was chosen as the sensor substrate due to its good temperature stability. Then, a differential temperature compensation method was proposed to reduce the effects of temperature. Two resonators were designed based on coupling of mode (COM) theory and the prototype was fabricated and verified using a system established for testing pressure and temperature. The experiment result shows that the sensor has a linearity of 2.63% and hysteresis of 1.77%. The temperature stability of the sensor has been greatly improved by using the differential compensation method, which validates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ramakrishnan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW device is investigated through finite element method (FEM simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film made of an arbitrary material is coated over the ZnO surface and the resonance frequency shift caused by mass loading of the film is estimated. It was observed that Sezawa wave mode shows significant sensitivity to change in mass loading and has higher sensitivity (eight times higher than Rayleigh wave mode for the same device configuration. Further, the mass loading sensitivity was observed to be greater for a low ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio. Accordingly, highly sensitive SAW sensors can be developed by coating a sensing medium over a layered SAW device and operating at Sezawa mode resonance frequency. The sensitivity can be increased by tuning the ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio.

  8. Investigation into mass loading sensitivity of sezawa wave mode-based surface acoustic wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan, Ajay Achath; Islam, Md Shabiul; Ali, Sawal Hamid; Parthiban, R; Ramakrishnan, N

    2013-02-06

    In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW) device is investigated through finite element method (FEM) simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film made of an arbitrary material is coated over the ZnO surface and the resonance frequency shift caused by mass loading of the film is estimated. It was observed that Sezawa wave mode shows significant sensitivity to change in mass loading and has higher sensitivity (eight times higher) than Rayleigh wave mode for the same device configuration. Further, the mass loading sensitivity was observed to be greater for a low ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio. Accordingly, highly sensitive SAW sensors can be developed by coating a sensing medium over a layered SAW device and operating at Sezawa mode resonance frequency. The sensitivity can be increased by tuning the ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio.

  9. Guided Wave Annular Array Sensor Design for Improved Tomographic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Jaya Prakash; Rose, Joseph L.

    2009-03-01

    Guided wave tomography for structural health monitoring is fast emerging as a reliable tool for the detection and monitoring of hotspots in a structure, for any defects arising from corrosion, crack growth etc. To date guided wave tomography has been successfully tested on aircraft wings, pipes, pipe elbows, and weld joints. Structures practically deployed are subjected to harsh environments like exposure to rain, changes in temperature and humidity. A reliable tomography system should take into account these environmental factors to avoid false alarms. The lack of mode control with piezoceramic disk sensors makes it very sensitive to traces of water leading to false alarms. In this study we explore the design of annular array sensors to provide mode control for improved structural tomography, in particular, addressing the false alarm potential of water loading. Clearly defined actuation lines in the phase velocity dispersion curve space are calculated. A dominant in-plane displacement point is found to provide a solution to the water loading problem. The improvement in the tomographic images with the annular array sensors in the presence of water traces is clearly illustrated with a series of experiments. An annular array design philosophy for other problems in NDE/SHM is also discussed.

  10. A Guided Wave Sensor Enabling Simultaneous Wavenumber-Frequency Analysis for Both Lamb and Shear-Horizontal Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Baiyang; Cho, Hwanjeong; Lissenden, Cliff J

    2017-03-01

    Guided waves in plate-like structures have been widely investigated for structural health monitoring. Lamb waves and shear horizontal (SH) waves, two commonly used types of waves in plates, provide different benefits for the detection of various types of defects and material degradation. However, there are few sensors that can detect both Lamb and SH waves and also resolve their modal content, namely the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. A sensor that can detect both waves is desirable to take full advantage of both types of waves in order to improve sensitivity to different discontinuity geometries. We demonstrate that polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) film provides the basis for a multi-element array sensor that detects both Lamb and SH waves and also measures their modal content, i.e., the wavenumber-frequency spectrum.

  11. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  12. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucai Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH0 guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  13. A Microring Temperature Sensor Based on the Surface Plasmon Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A structure of microring sensor suitable for temperature measurement based on the surface plasmon wave is put forward in this paper. The sensor uses surface plasmon multilayer waveguiding structure in the vertical direction and U-shaped microring structure in the horizontal direction and utilizes SOI as the thermal material. The transfer function derivation of the structure of surface plasmon microring sensor is according to the transfer matrix method. While the change of refractive index of Si is caused by the change of ambient temperature, the effective refractive index of the multilayer waveguiding structure is changed, resulting in the drifting of the sensor output spectrum. This paper focuses on the transmission characteristics of multilayer waveguide structure and the impact on the output spectrum caused by refractive index changes in temperature parts. According to the calculation and simulation, the transmission performance of the structure is stable and the sensitivity is good. The resonance wavelength shift can reach 0.007 μm when the temperature is increased by 100 k and FSR can reach about 60 nm. This structure achieves a high sensitivity in the temperature sense taking into account a wide range of filter frequency selections, providing a theoretical basis for the preparation of microoptics.

  14. PASSIVE WIRELESS MULTI-SENSOR TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE SENSING SYSTEM USING ACOUSTIC WAVE DEVICES Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of...

  15. Passive Wireless Multi-Sensor Temperature and Pressure Sensing System Using Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive, orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems, an...

  16. New method for gravitational wave detection with atomic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W; Hogan, Jason M; Kasevich, Mark A; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2013-04-26

    Laser frequency noise is a dominant noise background for the detection of gravitational waves using long-baseline optical interferometry. Amelioration of this noise requires near simultaneous strain measurements on more than one interferometer baseline, necessitating, for example, more than two satellites for a space-based detector or two interferometer arms for a ground-based detector. We describe a new detection strategy based on recent advances in optical atomic clocks and atom interferometry which can operate at long baselines and which is immune to laser frequency noise. Laser frequency noise is suppressed because the signal arises strictly from the light propagation time between two ensembles of atoms. This new class of sensor allows sensitive gravitational wave detection with only a single baseline. This approach also has practical applications in, for example, the development of ultrasensitive gravimeters and gravity gradiometers.

  17. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fucai Li; Hideaki Murayama; Kazuro Kageyama; Takehiro Shirai

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber r...

  18. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Puiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT applications.

  19. Enhanced sensitive love wave surface acoustic wave sensor designed for immunoassay formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiu, Mihaela; Gurban, Ana-Maria; Rotariu, Lucian; Brajnicov, Simona; Viespe, Cristian; Bala, Camelia

    2015-05-05

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT) applications.

  20. Interferometric and schlieren characterization of the plasmas and shock wave dynamics during laser-triggered discharge in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Wu, Jian; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes our efforts to reveal the underlying physics of laser-triggered discharges in atmospheric air using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and schlieren photography. Unlike the hemispherical shock waves that are produced by laser ablation, bell-like morphologies are observed during laser-triggered discharges. Phase shifts are recovered from the interferograms at a time of 1000 ns by the 2D fast Fourier transform method, and then the values of the refractive index are deduced using the Abel inversion. An abundance of free electrons is expected near the cathode surface. The schlieren photographs visualize the formation of stagnation layers at ˜600 ns in the interaction zones of the laser- and discharge-produced plasmas. Multiple reflected waves are observed at later times with the development of shock wave propagations. Estimations using the Taylor-Sedov self-similar solution indicated that approximately 45.8% and 51.9% of the laser and electrical energies are transferred into the gas flow motions, respectively. Finally, numerical simulations were performed, which successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental observations, and provided valuable insights into the plasma and shock wave dynamics during the laser-triggered discharge.

  1. Passive Wireless Hydrogen Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors for NASA application to distributed wireless hydrogen leak...

  2. Passive Wireless Hydrogen Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors for NASA application...

  3. First cross-correlation analysis of interferometric and resonant-bar gravitational-wave data for stochastic backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Belczynski, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burgamy, M.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Casey, M. M.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkey, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Chin, D.; Chin, E.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hamilton, W. O.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jackrel, D.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lee, B.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McCaulley, B. J.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McNabb, J. W. C.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Miller, P.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moody, V.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Nettles, D.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Paik, H.-J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramsunder, M.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Sidles, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarallo, M.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Weaver, J.; Webber, D.; Weber, A.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitbeck, D. M.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.

    2007-07-01

    Data from the LIGO Livingston interferometer and the ALLEGRO resonant-bar detector, taken during LIGO’s fourth science run, were examined for cross correlations indicative of a stochastic gravitational-wave background in the frequency range 850 950 Hz, with most of the sensitivity arising between 905 and 925 Hz. ALLEGRO was operated in three different orientations during the experiment to modulate the relative sign of gravitational-wave and environmental correlations. No statistically significant correlations were seen in any of the orientations, and the results were used to set a Bayesian 90% confidence level upper limit of Ωgw(f)≤1.02, which corresponds to a gravitational-wave strain at 915 Hz of 1.5×10-23Hz-1/2. In the traditional units of h1002Ωgw(f), this is a limit of 0.53, 2 orders of magnitude better than the previous direct limit at these frequencies. The method was also validated with successful extraction of simulated signals injected in hardware and software.

  4. First Cross-Correlation Analysis of Interferometric and Resonant-Bar Gravitational-Wave Data for Stochastic Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgamy, M; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hamilton, W O; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Miller, P; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moody, V; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nettles, D; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Paik, H J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P

    2007-01-01

    Data from the LIGO Livingston interferometer and the ALLEGRO resonant bar detector, taken during LIGO's fourth science run, were examined for cross-correlations indicative of a stochastic gravitational-wave background in the frequency range 850-950 Hz, with most of the sensitivity arising between 905 Hz and 925 Hz. ALLEGRO was operated in three different orientations during the experiment to modulate the relative sign of gravitational-wave and environmental correlations. No statistically significant correlations were seen in any of the orientations, and the results were used to set a Bayesian 90% confidence level upper limit of Omega_gw(f) <= 1.02, which corresponds to a gravitational wave strain at 915 Hz of 1.5e-23/rHz. In the traditional units of h_100^2 Omega_gw(f), this is a limit of 0.53, two orders of magnitude better than the previous direct limit at these frequencies. The method was also validated with successful extraction of simulated signals injected in hardware and software.

  5. Biochemical measurement of bilirubin with an evanescent wave optical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscio, Patrick; Depeursinge, Christian D.; Emery, Y.; Parriaux, Olivier M.; Voirin, Guy

    1991-09-01

    Optical sensing techniques can be considered as powerful information sources on the biochemistry of tissue, blood, and physiological fluids. Various sensing modalities can be considered: spectroscopic determination of the fluorescence or optical absorption of the biological medium itself, or more generally, of a reagent in contact with the biological medium. The principle and realization of the optical sensor developed are based on the use of polished fibers: the cladding of a monomode fiber is removed on a longitudinal section. The device can then be inserted into an hypodermic needle for in-vivo measurements. Using this minute probe, local measurements of the tissue biochemistry or metabolic processes can be obtained. The sensing mechanism is based on the propagation of the evanescent wave in the tissues or reagent: the proximity of the fiber core allows the penetration of the model field tail into the sensed medium, with a uniquely defined field distribution. Single or multi-wavelength analysis of the light collected into the fiber yields the biochemical information. Here an example of this sensing technology is discussed. In-vitro measurement of bilirubin in gastric juice demonstrates that the evanescent wave optical sensor provides a sensitivity which matches the physiological concentrations. A device is proposed for in-vivo monitoring of bilirubin concentration in the gastro-oesophageal tract.

  6. Millimeter wave sensor requirements for maritime small craft identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald G.; Garcia, Jose; Boettcher, Evelyn; Prather, Dennis; Schuetz, Chrisopher; Samluk, Jesse; Stein, Lee; Kiser, William; Visnansky, Andrew; Grata, Jeremy; Wikner, David; Harris, Russ

    2009-09-01

    Passive millimeter wave (mmW) imagers have improved in terms of resolution sensitivity and frame rate. Currently, the Office of Naval Research (ONR), along with the US Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, Communications Electronics Research Development and Engineering Center (RDECOM CERDEC) Night Vision and Electronic Sensor Directorate (NVESD), are investigating the current state-of-the-art of mmW imaging systems. The focus of this study was the performance of mmW imaging systems for the task of small watercraft / boat identification field performance. First mmW signatures were collected. This consisted of a set of eight small watercrafts; at 5 different aspects, during the daylight hours over a 48 hour period in the spring of 2008. Target characteristics were measured and characteristic dimension, signatures, and Root Sum Squared of Target's Temperature (RRSΔT) tabulated. Then an eight-alternative, forced choice (8AFC) human perception experiment was developed and conducted at NVESD. The ability of observers to discriminate between small watercraft was quantified. Next, the task difficulty criterion, V50, was quantified by applying this data to NVESD's target acquisition models using the Targeting Task Performance (TTP) metric. These parameters can be used to evaluate sensor field performance for Anti-Terrorism / Force Protection (AT/FP) and navigation tasks for the U.S. Navy, as well as for design and evaluation of imaging passive mmW sensors for both the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard.

  7. Design and development of a multifunction millimeter wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadimi, Sayyid Abdolmajid

    1998-11-01

    The millimeter-wave (MMW) spectrum (30-300 GHz) offers a unique combination of features that are advantageous when retrieving information about the environment. Due to small wavelengths involved, physically small antennas may be used to obtain very high gains (>50 dB) and resulting high spatial resolutions. Moreover, some features have scattering and emission behaviors that are more sensitive at MMW wavelengths than at microwave wavelengths. Examples include, water vapor (H2O). fog, haze, clouds, ozone (O 3) molecules, and chlorine monoxide (ClO) have rotational spectra in this region. The 75-110 GHz (W-band) atmospheric window is relatively quiet, and it can supply spectral information that can be useful in identifying and quantifying pollutants. Information such as the size and concentration of particulate pollutants can be obtained using radar techniques at W-band. Although there have been some activities at millimeter wave frequencies over very narrow bandwidths, there is a great need for wider bandwidth instruments for studying scattering and emission behaviors. To address this need and provide a versatile system for laboratory studies of electromagnetic phenomena at millimeter-wave frequencies, a multifunctionmillimeter- wave sensor has been designed and developed. This instrument is an active/passive wide band sensor operating in the 75-110 GHz region of the millimeter wave spectrum in four primary modes: (1)As a spectrometer measuring absorption over the entire 75-110 GHz region. (2)As a radiometer measuring blackbody emissions over the entire 75-110 GHz region. (3)As a pulse radar over a 500 MHz bandwidth centered around 93.1 GHz with a peak power of 200 mW. (4)As a step frequency radar when used in combination with a network analyzer over selected 9 GHz bandwidth segments (75-84, 84-93, 93-102, and 102-110) of the 75-110 GHz region. Measurements were performed on two volume fraction (15% and 20%) dense random media targets using this system. The results

  8. Development of fiber optic sensors at TNO for explosion and shock wave measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Bouma, R.H.B.; Meer, B.J. van der; Prinse, W.C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Fiber Optic sensors are found to be very suitable for explosion and shock wave measurements because they are immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). In the past few years, TNO has developed a number of sensor systems for explosion and shock wave measurements in which the optical fiber is a vit

  9. Development of fiber optic sensors at TNO for explosion and shock wave measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Bouma, R.H.B.; Meer, B.J. van der; Prinse, W.C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Fiber Optic sensors are found to be very suitable for explosion and shock wave measurements because they are immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). In the past few years, TNO has developed a number of sensor systems for explosion and shock wave measurements in which the optical fiber is a vit

  10. A general formalism for Fourier based Wave Front Sensing: application to the Pyramid wave front sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Fauvarque, Olivier; Fusco, Thierry; Sauvage, Jean-François; Giraut, Orion

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we compare a set of Wave Front Sensors (WFS) based on Fourier filtering technique. In particular, this study explores the "class of pyramidal WFS" defined as the 4 faces pyramid WFS, all its recent variations (6, 8 faces, the flattened PWFS, etc.) and also some new WFSs as the flattened cone WFS or the 3 faces pyramid WFS. In the first part, we describe such a sensors class thanks to the optical parameters of the Fourier filtering mask and the modulation parameters. In the second part, we use the unified formalism to create a set of performance criteria: size of the signal on the detector, efficiency of incoming flux, sensitivity, linear range and chromaticity. In the third part, we show the influence of the previous optical and modulation parameters on these performance criteria. This exhaustive study allows to know how to optimize the sensor regarding to performance specifications. We show in particular that the number of faces has influence on the number of pixels required to do the wave f...

  11. A blind hierarchical coherent search for gravitational-wave signals from coalescing compact binaries in a network of interferometric detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Sukanta; Dayanga, Thilina; Ghosh, Shaon; Talukder, Dipongkar, E-mail: sukanta@wsu.edu, E-mail: wdayanga@wsu.edu, E-mail: shaonghosh@mail.wsu.edu, E-mail: talukder_d@wsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, 1245 Webster, Pullman, WA 99164-2814 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    We describe a hierarchical data analysis pipeline for coherently searching for gravitational-wave signals from non-spinning compact binary coalescences (CBCs) in the data of multiple earth-based detectors. This search assumes no prior information on the sky position of the source or the time of occurrence of its transient signals and, hence, is termed 'blind'. The pipeline computes the coherent network search statistic that is optimal in stationary, Gaussian noise. More importantly, it allows for the computation of a suite of alternative multi-detector coherent search statistics and signal-based discriminators that can improve the performance of CBC searches in real data, which can be both non-stationary and non-Gaussian. Also, unlike the coincident multi-detector search statistics that have been employed so far, the coherent statistics are different in the sense that they check for the consistency of the signal amplitudes and phases in the different detectors with their different orientations and with the signal arrival times in them. Since the computation of coherent statistics entails searching in the sky, it is more expensive than that of the coincident statistics that do not require it. To reduce computational costs, the first stage of the hierarchical pipeline constructs coincidences of triggers from the multiple interferometers, by requiring their proximity in time and component masses. The second stage follows up on these coincident triggers by computing the coherent statistics. Here, we compare the performances of this hierarchical pipeline with and without the second (or coherent) stage in Gaussian noise. Although introducing hierarchy can be expected to cause some degradation in the detection efficiency compared to that of a single-stage coherent pipeline, nevertheless it improves the computational speed of the search considerably. The two main results of this work are as follows: (1) the performance of the hierarchical coherent pipeline on

  12. On Mass Loading and Dissipation Measured with Acoustic Wave Sensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Voinova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize current trends in the analysis of physical properties (surface mass density, viscosity, elasticity, friction, and charge of various thin films measured with a solid-state sensor oscillating in a gaseous or liquid environment. We cover three different types of mechanically oscillating sensors: the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring, surface acoustic wave (SAW, resonators and magnetoelastic sensors (MESs. The fourth class of novel acoustic wave (AW mass sensors, namely thin-film bulk acoustic resonators (TFBARs on vibrating membranes is discussed in brief. The paper contains a survey of theoretical results and practical applications of the sensors and includes a comprehensive bibliography.

  13. Dual Matter-Wave Inertial Sensors in Weightlessness

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Brynle; Chichet, Laure; Battelier, Baptiste; Lévèque, Thomas; Landragin, Arnaud; Bouyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Quantum technology based on cold-atom interferometers is showing great promise for fields such as inertial sensing and fundamental physics. However, the best precision achievable on Earth is limited by the free-fall time of the atoms, and their full potential can only be realized in Space where interrogation times of many seconds will lead to unprecedented sensitivity. Various mission scenarios are presently being pursued which plan to implement matter-wave inertial sensors. Toward this goal, we realize the first onboard operation of simultaneous $^{87}$Rb $-$ $^{39}$K interferometers in the weightless environment produced during parabolic flight. The large vibration levels ($10^{-2}~g/\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$), acceleration range ($0-1.8~g$) and rotation rates ($5$ deg/s) during flight present significant challenges. We demonstrate the capability of our dual-quantum sensor by measuring the E\\"{o}tv\\"{o}s parameter with systematic-limited uncertainties of $1.1 \\times 10^{-3}$ and $3.0 \\times 10^{-4}$ during standard- a...

  14. Starch viscoelastic properties studied with an acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M D; Gomes, M T S R

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinization and retrogradation of starch was followed in real time with an acoustic wave sensor. This study relies on the monitorization of the frequency of oscillation of a piezoelectric quartz crystal in contact with a 2.5% emulsion of a commercial maize starch, during heating and cooling. The technique showed to be very powerful and sensitive to most of the changes described in the literature, which have been elucidated by some other techniques. The value for the temperature of gelatinization found using the sensor was confirmed by the analysis of the same starch emulsion by polarized light microscopy. Temperatures of gelatinization were found to vary with the sample heating rate, as follows: 73.5 °C at 2.0 °C/min, 66.0 °C at 1.0 °C/min, and 65.0 °C at 0.5 °C/min. Hysteresis of the studied system was evidenced by the frequency shift before heating and after cooling till the initial temperature. Analysis performed on a 1.5% emulsion of a rice starch heated at 2.0 °C/min and cooled as before, evidenced no hysteresis and showed complete reversibility, in which concerns to the series frequency of the piezoelectric quartz crystal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mode Selective Actuator-Sensor System for Lamb Wave-Based Structural Health Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Daniel; Wierach, Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) based on Lamb waves, a type of ultrasonic guided waves, is a promising method for in-service inspection of composite structures. In this study mode selective actuators and sensors are investigated to excite a particular Lamb wave mode in composite plates. The actuator and sensor exhibit an interdigital transducer design. In order to describe the complex displacement fields of

  16. Measurement of low-frequency ultrasonic wave in water using an acoustic fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Yoshito

    2006-04-01

    An acoustic fiber sensor for measurement of ultrasonic waves, which used the approximate Raman-Nath diffraction effect where light diffraction waves were generated in an optical fiber by strain due to the ultrasonic waves, was proposed and examined. In order to characterize the acoustic fiber sensor as a basic study, measurements of low-frequency ultrasonic waves in water were examined using a step index fiber operating as a detection sensor. The results showed that characteristics of detected signals agreed with the theoretical prediction based on Fraunhofer diffraction. This indicates that our proposed fiber sensor can be used for the detection of low-frequency ultrasonic waves as well as the transmission of light diffraction signals.

  17. Theoretical Modeling and Implementation of Traveling Wave Sensor Based on PCB Coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewen Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on analyzing characteristics of Rogowski coil, a new type of PCB traveling wave sensor with simple structure, high linearity, and anti-interference ability is proposed. The sensor has fine physical structure, which can effectively resist external electromagnetic interference by anti-interference measurement. In addition, it can greatly improve mutual inductance based on simple combinations. Simulations show that the new PCB traveling wave sensor can validly extract and deliver traveling wave signal and therefore realize fault location and protection accurately.

  18. Analysis of Radiation Beam of a Leaky Lamb Wave in Ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Y. S.; Bae, J. H.; Park, C. G.; Lee, J. H.

    2010-02-15

    The theoretical and experimental study of the propagation and radiation of leaky Lamb wave in a plate waveguide sensor has been carried out. In the plate waveguide sensor, the A{sub 0} leaky Lamb wave is utilized for the single mode generation and the effective radiation capability in a fluid. The plate waveguide sensor which consists of a plate waveguide, a teflon wedge and an ultrasonic sensor has been designed and manufactured. The tone-burst excitation of high power long pulse should be applied to minimize the dispersion effect in 10 m long distance propagation of the A{sub 0} Lamb wave. A novel technique which is capable of steering a radiation beam of a waveguide sensor without a mechanical movement can be achieved by a frequency tuning method of the excitation pulse in the dispersive low frequency range of the A{sub 0} Lamb wave. The characteristics of radiation beam of ultrasonic waveguide sensors has been investigated by the beam profile measurements according to the plate thickness, the radiation aperture length, the pulse cycles and the excitation frequency. The design parameters of the plate waveguide sensor has been optimized. The C-scanning experiments in water have been carried out for the performance of the optimized ultrasonic waveguide sensor. The poulsbility of C-scan visualization using the plate waveguide sensor has been verified

  19. Theoretical Study of Monolayer and Double-Layer Waveguide Love Wave Sensors for Achieving High Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangming; Wan, Ying; Fan, Chunhai; Su, Yan

    2017-03-22

    Love wave sensors have been widely used for sensing applications. In this work, we introduce the theoretical analysis of the monolayer and double-layer waveguide Love wave sensors. The velocity, particle displacement and energy distribution of Love waves were analyzed. Using the variations of the energy repartition, the sensitivity coefficients of Love wave sensors were calculated. To achieve a higher sensitivity coefficient, a thin gold layer was added as the second waveguide on top of the silicon dioxide (SiO₂) waveguide-based, 36 degree-rotated, Y-cut, X-propagating lithium tantalate (36° YX LiTaO₃) Love wave sensor. The Love wave velocity was significantly reduced by the added gold layer, and the flow of wave energy into the waveguide layer from the substrate was enhanced. By using the double-layer structure, almost a 72-fold enhancement in the sensitivity coefficient was achieved compared to the monolayer structure. Additionally, the thickness of the SiO₂ layer was also reduced with the application of the gold layer, resulting in easier device fabrication. This study allows for the possibility of designing and realizing robust Love wave sensors with high sensitivity and a low limit of detection.

  20. Design of guided Bloch surface wave resonance bio-sensors with high sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiu-Bao; Wen, Li-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Guo

    2017-01-01

    The sensing performance of bio-sensors based on guided Bloch surface wave (BSW) resonance (GBR) is studied. GBR is realized by coupling the propagating electromagnetic wave with BSW on one side of a one-dimensional photonic crystal slab via the grating on the other side. The sensitivity of the designed bio-sensors is proportional to the grating constant when the wavelength spectrum is analyzed, and inversely proportional to the normal wave vector of the incident electromagnetic wave when the angular spectrum is resolved. For a GBR bio-sensor designed to operate near 70° angle of incidence from air, the angular sensitivity is very high, reaching 128 deg RIU-1. The sensitivity can be substantially increased by designing bio-sensors for operating at larger angles of incidence.

  1. Passive Wireless Cryogenic Liquid Level Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based liquid level sensors for NASA application to cryogenic liquid...

  2. Passive Wireless Cryogenic Liquid Level Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based liquid level sensors for NASA application to cryogenic liquid level...

  3. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhard Michael Reindl; Bernd Henning; Jens Rautenberg; Gerhard Lindner; Sergei Olfert; Martin Schmitt

    2013-01-01

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide ...

  4. Temperature Frequency Characteristics of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) Polymer Coated Rayleigh Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Gas-Phase Sensor Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ekaterina I. Radeva; Esmeryan, Karekin D.; Avramov, Ivan D.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature induced frequency shifts may compromise the sensor response of polymer coated acoustic wave gas-phase sensors operating in environments of variable temperature. To correct the sensor data with the temperature response of the sensor the latter must be known. This study presents and discusses temperature frequency characteristics (TFCs) of solid hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) polymer coated sensor resonators using the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (RSAW) mode on ST-cut quartz. Using ...

  5. Wave front sensor based on holographic optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, M. S.; Krasin, G. K.; Malinina, P. I.; Odinokov, S. B.; Sagatelyan, H. R.

    2016-08-01

    A wavefront sensor (WFS) based on holographic optical elements, namely computer generated Fourier holograms is proposed as a perspective alternative to the Shack-Hartmann sensor. A possibility of single and multimode sensor and the dependence of their characteristics were investigated.

  6. Nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor based on four-wave mixing in microstructured optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Scott Wu; Frosz, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor, which uses the shifts of four-wave mixing Stokes and anti-Stokes peaks caused by the strain-induced changes in the structure and refractive index of a microstructured optical fiber. The sensor thus uses the inherent nonlinearity of the fiber...

  7. Ultrasonic Beam Radiation of an A0 Leaky Lamb Wave in a Plate Waveguide Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jin Ho; Joo, Young Sang; Kim, Jong Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Hui Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    As the sodium coolant of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is opaque to light, a conventional visual inspection cannot be used for carrying out an in-service inspection of the internal structures under a sodium level. An ultrasonic wave should be applied for an under-sodium viewing of the internal structures in a reactor vessel. Immersion sensors and waveguide sensors have been applied to the under-sodium visualization. The immersion sensor has a precise imaging capability, but may have high temperature restrictions and an uncertain life. The waveguide sensor has the advantages of a long lifetime and stable application. Recently, a new plate waveguide sensor has been developed for the versatile applications in the under-sodium viewing application. In the plate waveguide sensor, the A0 leaky Lamb wave is utilized for the long distance propagation and the effective radiation capability in a fluid. And a new technique is presented which is capable of steering an ultrasonic beam of a waveguide sensor without a mechanical movement of the sensor assembly. In this paper, the experimental study of the radiation beam profile of the A0 leaky Lamb wave in a plate waveguide sensor is carried out

  8. Guided wave diagnosis in composite grid structure with embedded FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Masataro; Arai, Takeo; Takeda, Nobuo

    2007-04-01

    The authors tried to construct a structural health monitoring (SHM) system to identify damage in composite grid structure called Advanced Grid Structure (AGS) by using two types of guided waves, compressional and flexural waves, propagating along ribs of AGS. Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors network embedded in AGS is utilized as their receivers. AGS is defined as trussed structures whose ribs are made of Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). AGS has often been applied to aerospace structures because it is structurally effective and redundant. The authors had reported one possible method of SHM of AGS by monitoring of static strain distribution with embedded FBG sensors network in AGS. In this paper, we propose another possible method of SHM of AGS. We utilized two types of guided waves, compressional and flexural waves, for damage diagnosis. First, we verified our proposed system experimentally. The results confirmed that FBG sensors could measure both elastic waves and two types of guided waves were generated with the proposed system. Then, some basic characteristics of compressional and flexural wave propagations were clarified experimentally to find that compressional wave has directionality and flexural wave has isotropy. Based on the characteristics, the authors proposed two types of damage diagnosis methods with compressional and flexural waves, respectively. Moreover, those proposed methods were applied to two specific damage types, rib crack and debonding between ribs and skin. The specific damage diagnosis methods were verified experimentally to find that damages could be detected by those methods.

  9. Interferometric star tracker Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optical Physics Company (OPC) proposes to develop a high accuracy version of its interferometric star tracker capable of meeting the milli-arcsecond-level pointing...

  10. Unipolar and Bipolar High-Magnetic-Field Sensors Based on Surface Acoustic Wave Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polewczyk, V.; Dumesnil, K.; Lacour, D.; Moutaouekkil, M.; Mjahed, H.; Tiercelin, N.; Petit Watelot, S.; Mishra, H.; Dusch, Y.; Hage-Ali, S.; Elmazria, O.; Montaigne, F.; Talbi, A.; Bou Matar, O.; Hehn, M.

    2017-08-01

    While surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors have been used to measure temperature, pressure, strains, and low magnetic fields, the capability to measure bipolar fields and high fields is lacking. In this paper, we report magnetic surface acoustic wave sensors that consist of interdigital transducers made of a single magnetostrictive material, either Ni or TbFe2 , or based on exchange-biased (Co /IrMn ) multilayers. By controlling the ferromagnet magnetic properties, high-field sensors can be obtained with unipolar or bipolar responses. The issue of hysteretic response of the ferromagnetic material is especially addressed, and the control of the magnetic properties ensures the reversible behavior in the SAW response.

  11. Measurement of Plasma Clotting Using Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Tatsuya; Kondoh, Jun; Oonishi, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Kazuya

    2013-07-01

    The monitoring of blood coagulation is important during operation. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied to monitor plasma clotting. An SH-SAW sensor with a metallized surface for mechanical perturbation detection can detect plasma clotting. As plasma clotting is a gel formation reaction, the SH-SAW sensor detects viscoelastic property changes. On the other hand, an SH-SAW sensor with a free surface for electrical perturbation detection detects only the liquid mixing effect. No electrical property changes due to plasma clotting are obtained using this sensor. A planar electrochemical sensor is also used to monitor plasma clotting. In impedance spectral analysis, plasma clotting is measured. However, in the measurement of time responses, no differences between clotting and nonclotting are obtained. Therefore, the SH-SAW sensor is useful for monitoring plasma clotting.

  12. A sparse sensor network topologized for cylindrical wave-based identification of damage in pipeline structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing

    2016-07-01

    A sparse sensor network, based on the concept of semi-decentralized and standardized sensing, is developed, to actively excite and acquire cylindrical waves for damage identification and health monitoring of pipe structures. Differentiating itself from conventional ‘ring-style’ transducer arrays which attempt to steer longitudinal axisymmetric cylindrical waves via transducer synchronism, this sparse sensor network shows advantages in some aspects, including the use of fewer sensors, simpler manipulation, quicker configuration, less mutual dependence among sensors, and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. The sparse network is expanded topologically, aimed at eliminating the presence of ‘blind zones’ and the challenges associated with multi-path propagation of cylindrical waves. Theoretical analysis is implemented to comprehend propagation characteristics of waves guided by a cylindrical structure. A probability-based diagnostic imaging algorithm is introduced to visualize damage in pixelated images in an intuitive, prompt, and automatic manner. A self-contained health monitoring system is configured for experimental validation, via which quantitative identification of mono- and multi-damage in a steel cylinder is demonstrated. The results highlight an expanded sensing coverage of the sparse sensor network and its enhanced capacity of acquiring rich information, avoiding the cost of augmenting the number of sensors in a sensor network.

  13. Calibration of a shock wave position sensor using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the calibration of a shock wave position sensor. The position sensor works by using artificial neural networks to map cropped CCD frames of the shadows of the shock wave into the value of the shock wave position. This project was done as a tutorial demonstration of method and feasibility. It used a laboratory shadowgraph, nozzle, and commercial neural network package. The results were quite good, indicating that artificial neural networks can be used efficiently to automate the semi-quantitative applications of flow visualization.

  14. Effect of thickness disorder on the performance of photonic crystal surface wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anopchenko, Aleksei; Occhicone, Agostino; Rizzo, Riccardo; Sinibaldi, Alberto; Figliozzi, Giovanni; Danz, Norbert; Munzert, Peter; Michelotti, Francesco

    2016-04-04

    We investigated experimentally and numerically the robustness of optical sensors based on Bloch waves at the surface of periodic one-dimensional photonic crystals. The distributions of sensor characteristics caused by the fabrication uncertainties in dielectric layer thicknesses have been analyzed and robustness criteria have been set forth and discussed. We show that the performance of the surface wave sensors is sufficiently robust with respect to the changes of the photonic crystal layer thicknesses. Layer thickness optimization of the photonic crystal, carried out to achieve low limit of detection, leads to an improvement of the robustness of the surface wave sensors that is attributed to Bloch states lying deeper in the photonic band gap.

  15. Tilt sensor and servo control system for gravitational wave detection

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Y; Ju, L; Blair, D G

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a novel double-flexure two-axis tilt sensor with a tilt readout based on an optical walk-off sensor. The performance of the device has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The walk-off sensor has demonstrated a sensitivity of 10 sup - sup 1 sup 1 rad Hz sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 at 1 Hz. The tilt sensor has measured seismic noise approx 10 sup - sup 9 -10 sup - sup 1 sup 0 rad Hz sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 for frequency in the 2-10 Hz range.

  16. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonhard Michael Reindl

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  17. Multi reflection of Lamb wave emission in an acoustic waveguide sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Martin; Olfert, Sergei; Rautenberg, Jens; Lindner, Gerhard; Henning, Bernd; Reindl, Leonhard Michael

    2013-02-27

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid-liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  18. The Development of Love Wave-Based Humidity Sensors Incorporating Multiple Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A Love wave humidity sensor is developed by using a multilayer structure consisting of PVA/SiO2 layers on an ST-90°X quartz substrate. The theoretical result shows that the sensor with such a two-layer structure can achieve a higher sensitivity and a smaller loss than the structures with a single polymer layer. Comparative experiments are performed for the sensor incorporating PVA/SiO2 layers and the sensor incorporating a PVA layer. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predication.

  19. The development of love wave-based humidity sensors incorporating multiple layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Jiansheng; He, Shitang

    2015-04-14

    A Love wave humidity sensor is developed by using a multilayer structure consisting of PVA/SiO2 layers on an ST-90°X quartz substrate. The theoretical result shows that the sensor with such a two-layer structure can achieve a higher sensitivity and a smaller loss than the structures with a single polymer layer. Comparative experiments are performed for the sensor incorporating PVA/SiO2 layers and the sensor incorporating a PVA layer. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predication.

  20. Influence of viscoelasticity and interfacial slip on acoustic wave sensors

    OpenAIRE

    McHale, G; Lucklum, R.; Newton, MI; Cowen, JA

    2000-01-01

    Acoustic wave devices with shear horizontal displacements, such as quartz crystal microbalances (QCM) and shear horizontally polarised surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) devices provide sensitive probes of changes at solid-solid and solid- liquid interfaces. Increasingly the surfaces of acoustic wave devices are being chemically or physically modified to alter surface adhesion or coated with one or more layers to amplify their response to any change of mass or material properties. In this work, w...

  1. A Non-Intrusive Pressure Sensor by Detecting Multiple Longitudinal Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongliang; Lin, Weibin; Ge, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Jian

    2016-08-05

    Pressure vessels are widely used in industrial fields, and some of them are safety-critical components in the system-for example, those which contain flammable or explosive material. Therefore, the pressure of these vessels becomes one of the critical measurements for operational management. In the paper, we introduce a new approach to the design of non-intrusive pressure sensors, based on ultrasonic waves. The model of this sensor is built based upon the travel-time change of the critically refracted longitudinal wave (LCR wave) and the reflected longitudinal waves with the pressure. To evaluate the model, experiments are carried out to compare the proposed model with other existing models. The results show that the proposed model can improve the accuracy compared to models based on a single wave.

  2. An Inexpensive Arterial Pressure Wave Sensor and its application in different physiological condition

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Sur, Shantanu

    2005-01-01

    Arterial Blood Pressure wave monitoring is considered to be important in assessment of cardiovascular system. We developed a novel pulse wave detection system using low frequency specific piezoelectric material as pressure wave sensor. The transducer detects the periodic change in the arterial wall diameter produced by pressure wave and the amplified signal after integration represents the pressure wave. The signal before integration is proportional to the rate of change of pressure wave and it not only reproduces the pressure waveform faithfully, but also its sharper nature helps to reliably detect the heart period variability (HPV). We have studied the position-specific (e.g. over carotid or radial artery) nature of change of this pulse wave signal (shape and amplitude) and also the changes at different physiological states.

  3. Mm-Wave Spectroscopic Sensors, Catalogs, and Uncatalogued Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Ivan; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-06-01

    Analytical chemical sensing based on high resolution rotational molecular spectra has been recognized as a viable technique for decades. We recently demonstrated a compact implementation of such a sensor. Future generations of these sensors will rely on automated algorithms for quantification of chemical dilutions based on their spectral libraries, as well as identification of spectral features not present in spectral catalogs. Here we present an algorithm aimed at detection of unidentified lines in complex molecular species based on spectroscopic libraries developed in our previous projects. We will discuss the approaches suitable for data mining in feature-rich rotational molecular spectra. Neese, C.F., I.R. Medvedev, G.M. Plummer, A.J. Frank, C.D. Ball, and F.C. De Lucia, "A Compact Submillimeter/Terahertz Gas Sensor with Efficient Gas Collection, Preconcentration, and ppt Sensitivity." Sensors Journal, IEEE, 2012. 12(8): p. 2565-2574

  4. Digital Detection of Exosomes by Interferometric Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, which are membranous nanovesicles, are actively released by cells and have been attributed to roles in cell-cell communication, cancer metastasis, and early disease diagnostics. The small size (30–100 nm) along with low refractive index contrast of exosomes makes direct characterization and phenotypical classification very difficult. In this work we present a method based on Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS) that allows multiplexed phenotyping and ...

  5. Design and Implementation of an Electronic Front-End Based on Square Wave Excitation for Ultrasonic Torsional Guided Wave Viscosity Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabani, Amir

    2016-10-12

    The market for process instruments generally requires low cost devices that are robust, small in size, portable, and usable in-plant. Ultrasonic torsional guided wave sensors have received much attention by researchers for measurement of viscosity and/or density of fluids in recent years. The supporting electronic systems for these sensors providing many different settings of sine-wave signals are bulky and expensive. In contrast, a system based on bursts of square waves instead of sine waves would have a considerable advantage in that respect and could be built using simple integrated circuits at a cost that is orders of magnitude lower than for a windowed sine wave device. This paper explores the possibility of using square wave bursts as the driving signal source for the ultrasonic torsional guided wave viscosity sensor. A simple design of a compact and fully automatic analogue square wave front-end for the sensor is also proposed. The successful operation of the system is demonstrated by using the sensor for measuring the viscosity in a representative fluid. This work provides the basis for design and manufacture of low cost compact standalone ultrasonic guided wave sensors and enlightens the possibility of using coded excitation techniques utilising square wave sequences in such applications.

  6. Design and Implementation of an Electronic Front-End Based on Square Wave Excitation for Ultrasonic Torsional Guided Wave Viscosity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Rabani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The market for process instruments generally requires low cost devices that are robust, small in size, portable, and usable in-plant. Ultrasonic torsional guided wave sensors have received much attention by researchers for measurement of viscosity and/or density of fluids in recent years. The supporting electronic systems for these sensors providing many different settings of sine-wave signals are bulky and expensive. In contrast, a system based on bursts of square waves instead of sine waves would have a considerable advantage in that respect and could be built using simple integrated circuits at a cost that is orders of magnitude lower than for a windowed sine wave device. This paper explores the possibility of using square wave bursts as the driving signal source for the ultrasonic torsional guided wave viscosity sensor. A simple design of a compact and fully automatic analogue square wave front-end for the sensor is also proposed. The successful operation of the system is demonstrated by using the sensor for measuring the viscosity in a representative fluid. This work provides the basis for design and manufacture of low cost compact standalone ultrasonic guided wave sensors and enlightens the possibility of using coded excitation techniques utilising square wave sequences in such applications.

  7. Ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor Using a Leaky Lamb Wave for Under-Sodium Viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young-Sang; Lee, Jae-Han

    2010-02-01

    A plate-type ultrasonic waveguide sensor using a leaky Lamb wave has been developed for the under-sodium viewing of a reactor core and in-vessel structures of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). An A0 Lamb wave mode is utilized in the waveguide sensor for the single mode generation and the effective radiation capability in a fluid. A radiation beam steering technique is presented which is achieved by the frequency tuning of the excitation pulse in the frequency range of the A0 Lamb wave mode which the group velocity is not dispersive and the phase velocity is dispersive. The long distance propagation ability and C-scan imaging performance have been demonstrated successfully by experimental feasibility tests of the waveguide sensor.

  8. Effect of an imperfect interface on the SH wave propagating in a cylindrical piezoelectric sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Dong; Yong Lee, Kang

    2010-04-01

    Under harsh in situ conditions, the interface in piezoelectric sensors may be damaged mechanically and/or electrically. The damaged interface would in turn affect the electromechanical behaviors of the sensors. The purpose of the present work is to study the effect of the imperfect interface on SH wave propagating in a cylindrical piezoelectric sensor. The dispersion relations of SH wave are derived analytically and the phase velocity are obtained numerically. Parametric studies on the phase velocity indicate that the mechanical imperfection may reduce the phase velocity under certain circumstances; however, the electrical imperfection has no obvious effect on the phase velocity in any cases; with the thickness of the piezoelectric layer increasing, the phase velocity may increase, decrease or keep unchanged, depending on the combination of the values of the wave number and the mechanical imperfection parameter.

  9. Analysis of errors induced by λ/4 wave plate in fiber-optic current sensor system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨瑞峰

    2008-01-01

    1/4λ wave plate is a key element in the fiber-optic current sensor system. When a retardation error or an orientation error of birefringence axes of 1/4λ wave plate with respect to the hi-bi fiber axes occurs in the 1/4λ wave plate, the sensor system will output a wrong result of the measured current. The contributions of these two errors to the final result of the whole system were studied and the errors functions were deduced by establishing the measurement function of the current sensor system with Jones matrixes of the optical elements. The results show that that the greater the orientation error or the retardation error, the larger the final error, and that these two errors cannot be compensated each other.

  10. PVDF array sensor for Lamb wave reception: Aircraft structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2016-02-01

    Fracture critical structures need structural health monitoring (SHM) to improve safety and reliability as well as reduce downtime and maintenance costs. Lamb waves provide promising techniques for on-line SHM systems because of their large volumetric coverage and good sensitivity to defects. Extensive research has focused on using features derived from time signals obtained at sparse locations distributed across the structure. Commonly used features are wave amplitude, energy, and time of arrival. However, the modal content of received Lamb waves contains valuable information about the existence and characteristics of defects, but cannot be determined from these signal features. Wave scattering at a defect often results in mode conversions in both transmitted and reflected waves. Features like change in time of arrival or amplitude reduction can be interpreted as being a result of mode conversion. This work is focused on the design of a 1D array sensor such that received wave signals at equally spaced locations are available for modal analysis in the wavenumber-frequency domain. PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) is selected as the active material of the sensor because of its low interference with wave fields in structures. The PVDF array sensor is fabricated to have 16 independent channels and its capability to detect and characterize different types of defects is demonstrated experimentally.

  11. Sensitivity Distribution Properties of a Phase-Shifted Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor to Ultrasonic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the sensitivity distribution properties of a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG to ultrasonic waves were investigated employing the surface attachment method. A careful consideration was taken and examined by experimental results to explain that the distances and angles between the sensor and ultrasonic source influence not only the amplitudes, but also the initial phases, waveforms, and spectra of detected signals. Furthermore, factors, including the attachment method and the material’s geometric dimensions, were also discussed. Although these results were obtained based on PS-FBG, they are also applicable to a normal FBG sensor or even an optical fiber sensor, due to the identical physical changes induced by ultrasonic waves in all three. Thus, these results are useful for applications of optical fiber sensors in non-destructive testing and structural health monitoring.

  12. Sensitivity distribution properties of a phase-shifted fiber bragg grating sensor to ultrasonic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Okabe, Yoji; Saito, Kazuya; Yu, Fengming

    2014-01-09

    In this research, the sensitivity distribution properties of a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG) to ultrasonic waves were investigated employing the surface attachment method. A careful consideration was taken and examined by experimental results to explain that the distances and angles between the sensor and ultrasonic source influence not only the amplitudes, but also the initial phases, waveforms, and spectra of detected signals. Furthermore, factors, including the attachment method and the material's geometric dimensions, were also discussed. Although these results were obtained based on PS-FBG, they are also applicable to a normal FBG sensor or even an optical fiber sensor, due to the identical physical changes induced by ultrasonic waves in all three. Thus, these results are useful for applications of optical fiber sensors in non-destructive testing and structural health monitoring.

  13. Performance optimization of high-order Lamb wave sensors based on silicon carbide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), as a new type of material for substrates in micro-electromechanical system (MEMS), was given high consideration in virtue of the properties of high acoustic velocity, low loss, chemical resistance, and etc. In this work, five performance parameters, which are electromechanical coupling coefficients, mass sensitivities, conductivity sensitivities, insert losses and minimum detectable masses, are theoretically investigated in Lamb wave chemical sensors for gas sensing based on SiC substrates. It is presented that higher performance can be achieved based on high-order modes other than fundamental modes, and the abovementioned five parameters can be simultaneously optimized. Then, according to the optimized operating conditions, operating parameters of the SiC-based high-order Lamb wave sensors are designed, which can be easily realized in MEMS technology. Finally, it is demonstrates that the SiC-based sensor exhibits better performance than that of the sensor with a conventional silicon substrate.

  14. Characterization of an electrochemical mercury sensor using alternating current, cyclic, square wave and differential pulse voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerreiro, Gabriela V.; Zaitouna, Anita J.; Lai, Rebecca Y., E-mail: rlai2@unl.edu

    2014-01-31

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An electrochemical Hg(II) sensor based on T–Hg(II)–T sensing motif was fabricated. •A methylene blue-modified DNA probe was used to fabricate the sensor. •Sensor performance was evaluated using ACV, CV, SWV, and DPV. •The sensor behaves as a “signal-off” sensor in ACV and CV. •The sensor behaves as either a “signal-on” or “signal-off” sensor in SWV and DPV. -- Abstract: Here we report the characterization of an electrochemical mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) sensor constructed with a methylene blue (MB)-modified and thymine-containing linear DNA probe. Similar to the linear probe electrochemical DNA sensor, the resultant sensor behaved as a “signal-off” sensor in alternating current voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry. However, depending on the applied frequency or pulse width, the sensor can behave as either a “signal-off” or “signal-on” sensor in square wave voltammetry (SWV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In SWV, the sensor showed “signal-on” behavior at low frequencies and “signal-off” behavior at high frequencies. In DPV, the sensor showed “signal-off” behavior at short pulse widths and “signal-on” behavior at long pulse widths. Independent of the sensor interrogation technique, the limit of detection was found to be 10 nM, with a linear dynamic range between 10 nM and 500 nM. In addition, the sensor responded to Hg{sup 2+} rather rapidly; majority of the signal change occurred in <20 min. Overall, the sensor retains all the characteristics of this class of sensors; it is reagentless, reusable, sensitive, specific and selective. This study also highlights the feasibility of using a MB-modified probe for real-time sensing of Hg{sup 2+}, which has not been previously reported. More importantly, the observed “switching” behavior in SWV and DPV is potentially generalizable and should be applicable to most sensors in this class of dynamics-based electrochemical biosensors.

  15. Simulations of Propagation and Radiation of A0-mode Lamb Wave in Ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jin Ho; Joo, Young Sang; Kim, Jong Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Hui Nam [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    As the sodium coolant of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is opaque to light, a conventional visual inspection cannot be used for carrying out an in-service inspection of the internal structures under a sodium level. An ultrasonic wave should be applied for an under-sodium viewing of the internal structures in a reactor vessel. Recently, a new plate type ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been developed for the versatile applications in the under-sodium viewing application. In the plate type ultrasonic waveguide sensor, the A0 mode Lamb wave is utilized for the long distance propagation and the effective radiation capability in a fluid. And a radiation beam steering technique is presented which is capable of steering an ultrasonic radiation beam of a waveguide sensor without a mechanical movement of the sensor module. In this paper, the numerical simulation of the propagation and radiation of A0-mode Lamb wave in ultrasonic leaky wave generation from waveguide sensor is performed by using the finite element method (FEM). The objective of this research is to compare the previous theoretical and experimental results with its numerical simulation

  16. A finite element model of a MEMS-based surface acoustic wave hydrogen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gowini, Mohamed M; Moussa, Walied A

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen plays a significant role in various industrial applications, but careful handling and continuous monitoring are crucial since it is explosive when mixed with air. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors provide desirable characteristics for hydrogen detection due to their small size, low fabrication cost, ease of integration and high sensitivity. In this paper a finite element model of a Surface Acoustic Wave sensor is developed using ANSYS12© and tested for hydrogen detection. The sensor consists of a YZ-lithium niobate substrate with interdigital electrodes (IDT) patterned on the surface. A thin palladium (Pd) film is added on the surface of the sensor due to its high affinity for hydrogen. With increased hydrogen absorption the palladium hydride structure undergoes a phase change due to the formation of the β-phase, which deteriorates the crystal structure. Therefore with increasing hydrogen concentration the stiffness and the density are significantly reduced. The values of the modulus of elasticity and the density at different hydrogen concentrations in palladium are utilized in the finite element model to determine the corresponding SAW sensor response. Results indicate that with increasing the hydrogen concentration the wave velocity decreases and the attenuation of the wave is reduced.

  17. A Finite Element Model of a MEMS-based Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walied A. Moussa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen plays a significant role in various industrial applications, but careful handling and continuous monitoring are crucial since it is explosive when mixed with air. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW sensors provide desirable characteristics for hydrogen detection due to their small size, low fabrication cost, ease of integration and high sensitivity. In this paper a finite element model of a Surface Acoustic Wave sensor is developed using ANSYS12© and tested for hydrogen detection. The sensor consists of a YZ-lithium niobate substrate with interdigital electrodes (IDT patterned on the surface. A thin palladium (Pd film is added on the surface of the sensor due to its high affinity for hydrogen. With increased hydrogen absorption the palladium hydride structure undergoes a phase change due to the formation of the β-phase, which deteriorates the crystal structure. Therefore with increasing hydrogen concentration the stiffness and the density are significantly reduced. The values of the modulus of elasticity and the density at different hydrogen concentrations in palladium are utilized in the finite element model to determine the corresponding SAW sensor response. Results indicate that with increasing the hydrogen concentration the wave velocity decreases and the attenuation of the wave is reduced.

  18. High frequency surface acoustic wave resonator-based sensor for particulate matter detection

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Sanju; Cole, Marina; Villa-López, Farah Helue; Gardner, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of high frequency Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator-based (SAWR) sensors, for the detection of micron and sub-micron sized particles. The sensor comprises two 262 MHz ST-cut quartz based Rayleigh wave SAWRs where one is used for particle detection and the other as a reference. Electro-acoustic detection of different sized particles shows a strong relationship between mass sensitivity (Δf/Δm) and particle diameter (Dp). This enables frequency-dependent S...

  19. Threat detection in desert environment with passive millimeter-wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John P.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Dillon, Thomas E.; Murakowski, Maciej; Prather, Dennis W.

    2011-06-01

    A new technique for improvised explosive device (IED) creation uses an explosive device buried in foam and covered in a layer of dirt. These devices are difficult to detect visually, however, their material characteristics make them detectable by passive millimeter-wave (pmmW) sensors. Results are presented from a test using a mock IED and an outdoor set-up consisting of two mock IEDs on a dirt background. The results show that the mock IEDs produces a millimeter-wave signature which is distinguishable from the background surrounding the mock IEDs. Simulations based on the measured data are presented and a design for a future vehicle mounted sensor is shown.

  20. Lamb wave sensing using fiber Bragg grating sensors for delamination detection in composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, N.; Okabe, Y.; Kuwahara, J.; Kojima, S.

    2005-05-01

    The authors are constructing a damage detection system using ultrasonic waves. In this system, a piezo-ceramic actuator generates Lamb waves in a CFRP laminate. After the waves propagate in the laminate, transmitted waves are received by a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor attached on the laminate using a newly developed high-speed optical wavelength interrogation system. At first, the optimal gauge length of the FBG to detect ultrasonic waves was investigated through theoretical simulations and experiments. Then, the directional sensitivity of the FBG to ultrasonic waves was evaluated experimentally. On the basis of the above results, the 1mm FBG sensors were applied to the detection of Lamb waves propagated in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) cross-ply laminates. The piezo-actuator was put on the laminate about 50mm away from the FBG sensor glued on the laminate, and three-cycle sine waves of 300kHz were excited repeatedly. The waveforms obtained by the FBG showed that S0 and A0 modes could be detected appropriately. Then, artificial delamination was made in the laminate by removing of a Teflon sheet embedded in the 0/90 interface after the manufacturing. When the Lamb waves passed through the delamination, the amplitude decreased and a new wave mode appeared. These phenomena could be well simulated using a finite element method. Furthermore, since the amplitude and the velocity of the new mode increased with an increase in the delamination length, this system has a potential to evaluate the interlaminar delamination length quantitatively.

  1. Characterization of an electrochemical mercury sensor using alternating current, cyclic, square wave and differential pulse voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Gabriela V; Zaitouna, Anita J; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2014-01-31

    Here we report the characterization of an electrochemical mercury (Hg(2+)) sensor constructed with a methylene blue (MB)-modified and thymine-containing linear DNA probe. Similar to the linear probe electrochemical DNA sensor, the resultant sensor behaved as a "signal-off" sensor in alternating current voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry. However, depending on the applied frequency or pulse width, the sensor can behave as either a "signal-off" or "signal-on" sensor in square wave voltammetry (SWV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In SWV, the sensor showed "signal-on" behavior at low frequencies and "signal-off" behavior at high frequencies. In DPV, the sensor showed "signal-off" behavior at short pulse widths and "signal-on" behavior at long pulse widths. Independent of the sensor interrogation technique, the limit of detection was found to be 10nM, with a linear dynamic range between 10nM and 500nM. In addition, the sensor responded to Hg(2+) rather rapidly; majority of the signal change occurred in <20min. Overall, the sensor retains all the characteristics of this class of sensors; it is reagentless, reusable, sensitive, specific and selective. This study also highlights the feasibility of using a MB-modified probe for real-time sensing of Hg(2+), which has not been previously reported. More importantly, the observed "switching" behavior in SWV and DPV is potentially generalizable and should be applicable to most sensors in this class of dynamics-based electrochemical biosensors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Love Wave Reflective Delay Line with Polymer Guiding Layer for Wireless Sensor Application

    OpenAIRE

    Shitang He; Wen Wang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal design for a Love wave reflective delay line on 41o YX LiNbO3 with a polymer guiding layer for wireless sensor applications. A theoretical model was established to describe the Love wave propagation along the larger piezoelectric substrate with polymer waveguide, and the lossy mechanism from the viscoelastic waveguide was discussed, which results in the optimal guiding layer thickness. Coupling of modes (COM) was used to determine the optimal design parameters o...

  3. Development of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor for In-Situ Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome L. Wright

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW sensor that is designed to be operated continuously and in situ to detect volatile organic compounds. A ruggedized stainless-steel package that encases the SAW device and integrated circuit board allows the sensor to be deployed in a variety of media including air, soil, and even water. Polymers were optimized and chosen based on their response to chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene, which are common groundwater contaminants. Initial testing indicates that a running-average data-logging algorithm can reduce the noise and increase the sensitivity of the in-situ sensor.

  4. Theoretical investigation of conductivity sensitivities of SiC-based bio-chemical acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Li; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    The phase velocities, electromechanical coupling coefficients, conductivity sensitivities, insert losses, and minimum detectable masses of Rayleigh and Lamb waves sensors based on silicon carbide (SiC) substrates are theoretically studied. The results are compared with the performances of the sensors based on conventional silicon substrates. It is found that the sensors using SiC substrates have higher electromechanical coupling coefficients and conductivity sensitivities than the conventional silicon-based sensors in virtue of piezoelectricity of the SiC. Moreover, higher phase velocities in SiC substrates can reduce the insert losses and minimum detectable masses of the sensors. In this case, in the detection of the gas with the tiny mass as the hydrogen, in which the conductivity sensitivity is more important than the mass sensitivity, the sensor based on the SiC substrate has a higher sensitivity and exhibits the potential to detect the gas with the concentration below the ppm level. According to the results, the performances of the sensors based on the Rayleigh and Lamb waves using the SiC substrates can be optimized by properly selecting piezoelectric films, structural parameters, and operating wavelengths.

  5. Target identification and navigation performance modeling of a passive millimeter wave imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Eddie L; Furxhi, Orges

    2010-07-01

    Human task performance using a passive interferometric millimeter wave imaging sensor is modeled using a task performance modeling approach developed by the U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate. The techniques used are illustrated for an imaging system composed of an interferometric antenna array, optical upconversion, and image formation using a shortwave infrared focal plane array. Two tasks, target identification and pilotage, are modeled. The effects of sparse antenna arrays on task performance are considered. Applications of this model include system trade studies for concealed weapon identification, navigation in fog, and brownout conditions.

  6. Experimental study of an optimised Pyramid wave-front sensor for Extremely Large Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Charlotte Z.; El Hadi, Kacem; Sauvage, Jean-François; Correia, Carlos; Fauvarque, Olivier; Rabaud, Didier; Lamb, Masen; Neichel, Benoit; Fusco, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    Over the last few years the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM) has been heavily involved in R&D for adaptive optics systems dedicated to future large telescopes, particularly in preparation for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). Within this framework an investigation into a Pyramid wave-front sensor is underway. The Pyramid sensor is at the cutting edge of high order, high precision wave-front sensing for ground based telescopes. Investigations have demonstrated the ability to achieve a greater sensitivity than the standard Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor whilst the implementation of a Pyramid sensor on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) has provided compelling operational results.1, 2 The Pyramid now forms part of the baseline for several next generation Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). As such its behaviour under realistic operating conditions must be further understood in order to optimise performance. At LAM a detailed investigation into the performance of the Pyramid aims to fully characterise the behaviour of this wave-front sensor in terms of linearity, sensitivity and operation. We have implemented a Pyramid sensor using a high speed OCAM2 camera (with close to 0 readout noise and a frame rate of 1.5kHz) in order to study the performance of the Pyramid within a full closed loop adaptive optics system. This investigation involves tests on all fronts, from theoretical models and numerical simulations to experimental tests under controlled laboratory conditions, with an aim to fully understand the Pyramid sensor in both modulated and non-modulated configurations. We include results demonstrating the linearity of the Pyramid signals, compare measured interaction matrices with those derived in simulation and evaluate the performance in closed loop operation. The final goal is to provide an on sky comparison between the Pyramid and a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor, at Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (ONERA-ODISSEE bench). Here we

  7. The electromagnetic-trait imaging computation of traveling wave method in breast tumor microwave sensor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhi-Fu; Han, Zhong-Ling; Yao, Meng

    2011-01-01

    Using the difference of dielectric constant between malignant tumor tissue and normal breast tissue, breast tumor microwave sensor system (BRATUMASS) determines the detected target of imaging electromagnetic trait by analyzing the properties of target tissue back wave obtained after near-field microwave radicalization (conelrad). The key of obtained target properties relationship and reconstructed detected space is to analyze the characteristics of the whole process from microwave transmission to back wave reception. Using traveling wave method, we derive spatial transmission properties and the relationship of the relation detected points distances, and valuate the properties of each unit by statistical valuation theory. This chapter gives the experimental data analysis results.

  8. Studies on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) dosimeter sensor for organophosphorous nerve agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, M.S.; Harteveld, J.L.N.

    1997-01-01

    As a follow-up of previous work on a Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor for nerve agents, irreversible response effects have been studied in more detail. Surface analytical studies indicated that degradation products are responsible for the effects observed. In addition it was tried to explore these

  9. High sensitivity flexible Lamb-wave humidity sensors with a graphene oxide sensing layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Xingli; Chen, Jinkai; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Xiaozhi; Xu, Yang; Xu, Zhen; Fu, Y Q; Luo, J K

    2015-04-28

    This paper reports high performance flexible Lamb wave humidity sensors with a graphene oxide sensing layer. The devices were fabricated on piezoelectric ZnO thin films deposited on flexible polyimide substrates. Two resonant peaks, namely the zero order antisymmetric (A0) and symmetric (S0) mode Lamb waves, were observed and fitted well with the theoretical analysis and modelling. With graphene oxide microflakes as the sensing layer, the sensing performance of both wave modes was investigated. The humidity sensitivity of the A0 mode is 145.83 ppm per %RH (at humidity 85%RH), higher than that of S0 mode of 89.35 ppm per %RH. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the flexible humidity sensors work as usual without noticeable deterioration in performance even under severe bending conditions up to 1500 με. Also the sensors showed an excellent stability upon repeated bending for thousand times. All the results demonstrated that the Lamb wave flexible humidity sensors have a great potential for application in flexible electronics.

  10. Studies on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) dosimeter sensor for organophosphorous nerve agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, M.S.; Harteveld, J.L.N.

    1997-01-01

    As a follow-up of previous work on a Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor for nerve agents, irreversible response effects have been studied in more detail. Surface analytical studies indicated that degradation products are responsible for the effects observed. In addition it was tried to explore these

  11. Improving the reliability of multiplexed fiber optic low-coherence interferometric sensors by use of novel twin-loop network topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo; Jin, Wei

    2007-05-01

    Novel twin-loop network topologies for multiplexing fiber optic low-coherence reflectometric sensors are proposed and theoretically analyzed. The sensing fibers are made by connecting segments of standard single-mode fibers with partial reflections at the fiber joints and are completely passive. Absolute length measurement can be made for each segment of the sensing fiber so that strain or temperature distribution along the entire sensing fiber can be derived. It is expected that novel topologies would help as to improve the reliability of the sensor network by providing multiple accesses to each of the sensing segment so that most of the sensing segments can still be interrogated even when one or more point breakages occur along the transmission fibers. A nine-sensor twin-loop sensing network was constructed and experimentally tested by use of a Michelson low-coherence interferometer, and the results obtained agree with our theoretical prediction. The novel network topologies may be used for large-scale smart structure applications where breakages of transmission fibers may occur during the stages of sensor imbedding, installation, and structure-in-service cycles.

  12. A novel optimal sensitivity design scheme for yarn tension sensor using surface acoustic wave device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bingbing; Lu, Wenke; Zhu, Changchun; Liu, Qinghong; Zhang, Haoxin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel optimal sensitivity design scheme for the yarn tension sensor using surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. In order to obtain the best sensitivity, the regression model between the size of the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate and the sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor was established using the least square method. The model was validated too. Through analyzing the correspondence between the regression function monotonicity and its partial derivative sign, the effect of the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate size on the sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor was investigated. Based on the regression model, a linear programming model was established to gain the optimal sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor. The linear programming result shows that the maximum sensitivity will be achieved when the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate length is equal to 15 mm and its width is equal to 3mm within a fixed interval of the substrate size. An experiment of SAW yarn tension sensor about 15 mm long and 3mm wide was presented. Experimental results show that the maximum sensitivity 1982.39 Hz/g was accomplished, which confirms that the optimal sensitivity design scheme is useful and effective. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Mach-Zehnder interferometric photonic crystal fiber for low acoustic frequency detections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawar, Dnyandeo; Rao, Ch. N.; Kale, S. N., E-mail: sangeetakale2004@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DU), Girinagar, Pune 411 025, Maharashtra (India); Choubey, Ravi Kant [Department of Applied Physics, Amity Institute of Applied Sciences, Amity University, Noida 201 313 (India)

    2016-01-25

    Low frequency under-water acoustic signal detections are challenging, especially for marine applications. A Mach-Zehnder interferometric hydrophone is demonstrated using polarization-maintaining photonic-crystal-fiber (PM-PCF), spliced between two single-mode-fibers, operated at 1550 nm source. These data are compared with standard hydrophone, single-mode and multimode fiber. The PM-PCF sensor shows the highest response with a power shift (2.32 dBm) and a wavelength shift (392.8 pm) at 200 Hz. High birefringence values and the effect of the imparted acoustic pressure on this fiber, introducing the difference between the fast and slow axis changes, owing to the phase change in the propagation waves, demonstrate the strain-optic properties of the sensor.

  14. Mach-Zehnder interferometric photonic crystal fiber for low acoustic frequency detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Dnyandeo; Rao, Ch. N.; Choubey, Ravi Kant; Kale, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency under-water acoustic signal detections are challenging, especially for marine applications. A Mach-Zehnder interferometric hydrophone is demonstrated using polarization-maintaining photonic-crystal-fiber (PM-PCF), spliced between two single-mode-fibers, operated at 1550 nm source. These data are compared with standard hydrophone, single-mode and multimode fiber. The PM-PCF sensor shows the highest response with a power shift (2.32 dBm) and a wavelength shift (392.8 pm) at 200 Hz. High birefringence values and the effect of the imparted acoustic pressure on this fiber, introducing the difference between the fast and slow axis changes, owing to the phase change in the propagation waves, demonstrate the strain-optic properties of the sensor.

  15. Sensor Measurement Strategies for Monitoring Offshore Wind and Wave Energy Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Deirdre; Srbinovsky, Bruno; Murphy, Jimmy; Popovici, Emanuel; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2015-07-01

    While the potential of offshore wind and wave energy devices is well established and accepted, operations and maintenance issues are still not very well researched or understood. In this regard, scaled model testing has gained popularity over time for such devices at various technological readiness levels. The dynamic response of these devices are typically measured by different instruments during such scaled tests but agreed sensor choice, measurement and placement guidelines are still not in place. This paper compared the dynamic responses of some of these sensors from a scaled ocean wave testing to highlight the importance of sensor measurement strategies. The possibility of using multiple, cheaper sensors of seemingly inferior performance as opposed to the deployment of a small number of expensive and accurate sensors are also explored. An energy aware adaptive sampling theory is applied to highlight the possibility of more efficient computing when large volumes of data are available from the tested structures. Efficient sensor measurement strategies are expected to have a positive impact on the development of an device at different technological readiness levels while it is expected to be helpful in reducing operation and maintenance costs if such an approach is considered for the devices when they are in operation.

  16. Measurement of corneal topography through Hartmann-Shack wave-front sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinsheng; Rao, Xuejun; Rao, Changhui

    2008-12-01

    A corneal topography based on Hartmann-Shack Sensor is presented in this paper. In the system, the focus of an objective lens is precisely positioned on cornea's curve center. Wave-front of the reflecting beam can be measured by the Hartmann-Shack sensor which is conjugate to the cornea plane. If the corneal surface is a perfect sphere, wave-front detected by the Hartmann-Shack sensor is a plane. As a result, data measured by Hartmann-Shacks sensor is the deviation between the sphere and the real cornea surface. This paper describes a methodology for designing instrument based on Hartmann-Shack sensor. Then, applying this method, an instrument is developed for accurate measurement of corneal topography. In addition, measuring principle of Hartmann-Shack sensor which determined system parameters is also introduced. Repeatability is demonstrated by a series of data. The instrument was able to accurately measure simulative cornea's reflective aberrations, from which corneal topography and corneal refractive aberrations were derived.

  17. Determination of bacterial activity by use of an evanescent-wave fiber-optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M. Shelly; Kishen, Anil; Sing, Lim Chu; Asundi, Anand

    2002-12-01

    A novel technique based on fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy is proposed for the detection of bacterial activity in human saliva. The sensor determines the specific concentration of Streptococcus mutans in saliva, which is a major causative factor in dental caries. In this design, one prepares the fiber-optic bacterial sensor by replacing a portion of the cladding region of a multimode fiber with a dye-encapsulated xerogel, using the solgel technique. The exponential decay of the evanescent wave at the core-cladding interface of a multimode fiber is utilized for the determination of bacterial activity in saliva. The acidogenic profile of Streptococcus mutans is estimated by use of evanescent-wave absorption spectra at various levels of bacterial activity.

  18. A new surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay line sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shashank S.; Yadava, R. D. S.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a new configuration for SAW chemical sensing. A polymer coated SAW delay line device provides the coupling for synchronization of two stable self-sustained limit cycle oscillators. The dependence of synchronization frequency on the SAW delay time has been made the basis for chemical sensing. The analysis has carried out under conditions of weak phase coupling [1]. The dependence of synchronization modes on coupling parameters is analyzed. The sensitivity of a synchronization branch for vapor sorption induced delay perturbations is analyzed. This analysis shows the possibility of realizing high performance SAW sensors by this approach.

  19. Temporal window system: A new approach for dynamic detection application to surface acoustic wave gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordieu, C.; Rebiere, D.; Pistre, J. [and others

    1996-12-31

    Pattern recognition techniques based on artificial neural networks are now frequently used with good results for gas sensor signal processing (this includes the detection, the identification and the quantification of gases). In the literature, data sets needed for neural networks are practically always built with steady state sensor responses. This situation prevents these techniques from being used in real time applications. Nevertheless, for example in the case of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors, because of quite long response times due to kinetic factors concerning the gas adsorption and because gases are sometimes extremely dangerous and/or toxic (NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organophosphorus compounds,...), the detection speed is an essential parameter and hence must be monitored in a real time mode. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new dynamic approach and to illustrate it with SAW sensor responses.

  20. New Love wave liquid sensor operating at 2 GHz using an integrated micro-flow channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouar, M. B.; Kirsch, P.; Alnot, P.

    2009-09-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices based on waveguide modes with shear-horizontal polarization (Love modes) are very promising for sensor applications, especially in liquid media. We present here the realization of a 2 GHz operating frequency sensor based on the SiO2/36YX LiTaO3 structure with an integrated PDMS micro-flow channel and using electron beam lithography to realize the submicronic interdigital transducers. Using our developed sensor operating at 2 GHz, we carried out alternate cycles of nitrogen and water circulating in the PDMS micro-flow channel. We measured an absolute sensitivity of -19 001 Hz mm2 ng-1 due to the interaction of the sensor with water. This sensitivity is higher than that of other devices operating at lower frequencies. The detection mechanism, including gravimetric and permittivity effects at high frequency, will be discussed.

  1. Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor with Pd/ZnO Bilayer Structure for Room Temperature Hydrogen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viespe, Cristian; Miu, Dana

    2017-06-29

    A Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) hydrogen sensor with a Pd/ZnO bilayer structure for room temperature sensing operation has been obtained by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). The sensor structure combines a Pd layer with optimized porosity for maximizing mass effects, with the large acoustoelectric effect at the Pd/ZnO interface. The large acoustoelectric effect is due to the fact that ZnO has a surface conductivity which is highly sensitive to chemisorbed gases. The sensitivity of the sensor was determined for hydrogen concentrations between 0.2% and 2%. The limit of detection (LOD) of the bilayer sensor was about 4.5 times better than the single ZnO films and almost twice better than single Pd films.

  2. An Electronic-Nose Sensor Node Based on a Polymer-Coated Surface Acoustic Wave Array for Wireless Sensor Network Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kea-Tiong Tang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study developed an electronic-nose sensor node based on a polymer-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW sensor array. The sensor node comprised an SAW sensor array, a frequency readout circuit, and an Octopus II wireless module. The sensor array was fabricated on a large K2 128° YX LiNbO3 sensing substrate. On the surface of this substrate, an interdigital transducer (IDT was produced with a Cr/Au film as its metallic structure. A mixed-mode frequency readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC was fabricated using a TSMC 0.18 μm process. The ASIC output was connected to a wireless module to transmit sensor data to a base station for data storage and analysis. This sensor node is applicable for wireless sensor network (WSN applications.

  3. An electronic-nose sensor node based on a polymer-coated surface acoustic wave array for wireless sensor network applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kea-Tiong; Li, Cheng-Han; Chiu, Shih-Wen

    2011-01-01

    This study developed an electronic-nose sensor node based on a polymer-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor array. The sensor node comprised an SAW sensor array, a frequency readout circuit, and an Octopus II wireless module. The sensor array was fabricated on a large K(2) 128° YX LiNbO3 sensing substrate. On the surface of this substrate, an interdigital transducer (IDT) was produced with a Cr/Au film as its metallic structure. A mixed-mode frequency readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was fabricated using a TSMC 0.18 μm process. The ASIC output was connected to a wireless module to transmit sensor data to a base station for data storage and analysis. This sensor node is applicable for wireless sensor network (WSN) applications.

  4. Sensitivity of contact-free fiber Bragg grating sensor to ultrasonic Lamb wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Junghyun; Hackney, Drew; Peters, Kara; Wells, Brian; Bradford, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Networks of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can serve as structural health monitoring (SHM) systems for large-scale structures based on the collection of ultrasonic waves. The demodulation of structural Lamb waves requires a high signal-to-noise ratio because Lamb waves have a low amplitude. This paper investigates the signal transfer between Lamb waves propagating in an aluminum plate collected by an optical fiber containing a FBG. The fiber is bonded to the plate at locations away from the FBG. The Lamb waves are converted into longitudinal and flexural traveling waves propagating along the optical fiber, which are then transmitted to the Bragg grating. The signal wave amplitude is measured for different distances between the bond location and the Bragg grating. Bonding the optical fiber away from the FBG location and closer to the signal source produces a significant increase in signal amplitude, here measured to be 5.1 times that of bonding the Bragg grating itself. The arrival time of the different measured wave coupling paths are also calculated theoretically, verifying the source of the measured signals. The effect of the bond length to Lamb wavelength ratio is investigated, showing a peak response as the bond length is reduced compared to the wavelength. This study demonstrates that coupling Lamb waves into guided traveling waves in an optical fiber away from the FBG increases the signal-to-noise ratio of Lamb wave detection, as compared to direct transfer of the Lamb wave to the optical fiber at the location of the FBG.

  5. A wireless demodulation system for passive surface acoustic wave torque sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaojun; Fan, Yanping; Qi, Hongli; Chen, Jing; Han, Tao; Cai, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are utilized as torque sensors for their passive and wireless features. However, the response of a SAW torque sensor is difficult to detect because of the transient response duration and interruption of channel noise, which limit the application of SAW torque sensors. The sensitive mechanism and response function of a passive wireless SAW torque sensor are analyzed in this study. A novel demodulation system involving both hardware and software is developed for the SAW torque sensor. A clipping amplifier is utilized in the hardware to widen the dynamic response range and increase the length of the valid signal. Correlation extension and centroid algorithms are designed to lengthen the received signal and improve the estimation accuracy of the center frequency of the response signal, respectively. Meanwhile, a fast binary search algorithm is proposed to accelerate the scanning cycle according to the developed response function. Finally, the SAW torque sensor demodulation system is set up and SAW resonators with high sensitivity are fabricated on a quartz substrate. The presented demodulation system is tested, and a standard deviation of 0.28 kHz is achieved. This value is much smaller than that of classic and modern spectrum estimation methods. The sensitivity of resonance frequency shift versus torque on the shaft of the assembled senor is 2.03 kHz/Nm; the coefficient of determination is 0.999, and the linearity is 0.87%. Experimental results verify the validity and feasibility of the proposed SAW torque sensor demodulation system.

  6. Development of a Magnetostrictive FeNi Coated Surface Acoustic Wave Current Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Tong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A magnetostrictive FeNi-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW-based current sensor was proposed in this work. The weak remanence and hysteresis effect of the FeNi itself contributes to suppress the asymmetry in sensor response at increasing and decreasing current. The sensor response was simulated by solving the coupled electromechanical field equation in layered structure considering the magnetostrictive effect and an approach of effective dielectric constant. The effects from the aspect ratio and thickness of the FeNi film on sensor response were analyzed to determine the optimal design parameters. Differential oscillation structure was used to form the sensor, in which, the FeNi thin film was deposited along the SAW propagation of the sensor chip by using RF magnetron sputtering. The magnetostrictive effect of the FeNi coating induced by the magnetic loading generates the perturbation in SAW velocity, and corresponding oscillation frequency. High sensitivity of 10.7 KHz/A, good linearity and repeatability, lower hysteresis error of 0.97% were obtained from the developed prototype 150 MHz SAW FeNi coated current sensor.

  7. High-sensitivity four-layer polymer fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xin; Zhong, Nianbing; Liao, Qiang; Cen, Yanyan; Wu, Ruohua; Wang, Zhengkun

    2017-05-15

    We present a novel four-layer structure consisting of bottom, second, third, and surface layers in the sensing region, for a D-shaped step-index fiber-optic evanescent wave (FOEW) sensor. To reduce the background noise, the surface of the longitudinal section in the D-shaped region is coated with a light-absorbing film. We check the morphologies of the second and surface layers, examine the refractive indices (RIs) of the third and surface layers, and analyze the composition of the surface layer. We also investigate the effects of the thicknesses and RIs of the third and surface layers and the LA film on the light transmission and sensitivity of the FOEW sensors. The results highlight the very good sensitivity of the proposed FOEW sensor with a four-layer structure, which reached -0.077 (μg/l)(-1) in the detection of the target antibody; the sensitivity of the novel FOEW sensor was 7.60 and 1.52 times better than that of a conventional sensor with a core-cladding structure and an FOEW sensor with a three-layer structure doped with GeO2. The applications of this high-sensitivity FOEW sensor can be extended to biodefense, disease diagnosis, and biomedical and biochemical analysis.

  8. Content-Based Multi-Channel Network Coding Algorithm in the Millimeter-Wave Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the development of wireless technology, the widespread use of 5G is already an irreversible trend, and millimeter-wave sensor networks are becoming more and more common. However, due to the high degree of complexity and bandwidth bottlenecks, the millimeter-wave sensor network still faces numerous problems. In this paper, we propose a novel content-based multi-channel network coding algorithm, which uses the functions of data fusion, multi-channel and network coding to improve the data transmission; the algorithm is referred to as content-based multi-channel network coding (CMNC. The CMNC algorithm provides a fusion-driven model based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S evidence theory to classify the sensor nodes into different classes according to the data content. By using the result of the classification, the CMNC algorithm also provides the channel assignment strategy and uses network coding to further improve the quality of data transmission in the millimeter-wave sensor network. Extensive simulations are carried out and compared to other methods. Our simulation results show that the proposed CMNC algorithm can effectively improve the quality of data transmission and has better performance than the compared methods.

  9. Content-Based Multi-Channel Network Coding Algorithm in the Millimeter-Wave Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai; Wang, Di; Hu, Long

    2016-07-01

    With the development of wireless technology, the widespread use of 5G is already an irreversible trend, and millimeter-wave sensor networks are becoming more and more common. However, due to the high degree of complexity and bandwidth bottlenecks, the millimeter-wave sensor network still faces numerous problems. In this paper, we propose a novel content-based multi-channel network coding algorithm, which uses the functions of data fusion, multi-channel and network coding to improve the data transmission; the algorithm is referred to as content-based multi-channel network coding (CMNC). The CMNC algorithm provides a fusion-driven model based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S) evidence theory to classify the sensor nodes into different classes according to the data content. By using the result of the classification, the CMNC algorithm also provides the channel assignment strategy and uses network coding to further improve the quality of data transmission in the millimeter-wave sensor network. Extensive simulations are carried out and compared to other methods. Our simulation results show that the proposed CMNC algorithm can effectively improve the quality of data transmission and has better performance than the compared methods.

  10. Lamb wave detection in prepreg composite materials with fibre Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesen, Nick; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Groves, Roger M.; Sinke, Jos; Benedictus, Rinze

    2011-04-01

    This paper demonstrates that existing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques have potential during the production phase in addition to their application for maintenance and for in-flight monitoring. Flaws occur during composite fabrication in industry, due to an imperfect process control and human errors. This decreases production efficiency and increases costs. In this paper, the monitoring of Lamb waves in unidirectional carbon fibre (UD-CFRP) prepreg material is demonstrated using both Fibre Bragg Gratings (FBG)s and piezolectric acoustic sensors, and that these SHM sensors may be used for flaw detection and production monitoring. The detection of Lamb waves in a one ply thick sheet of prepreg UD-CFRP material is demonstrated for an FBG sensor aligned with the carbon fibre orientation and bonded to the surface of the prepreg, Furthermore, the velocity of Lamb waves in prepreg UD-CFRP in different orientations is investigated. Finally the successful detection of a material crack in a prepreg UD-CFRP sheet using the Lamb wave detection method is demonstrated.

  11. Development of Sensors Using Evanescent Wave Interactions in Sapphire Optical Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael W. Renfro; Eric H. Jordan

    2006-12-31

    The development of tunable diode laser absorption sensors for measurements in industrial boilers, both through direct absorption and evanescent wave absorption have been performed in the work presented here. These sensors use both direct and indirect absorption through the use of evanescent interactions within a coal firing combustion environment. For the direct absorption sensor, wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection was implemented within a physical probe designed to be placed with the flue stack of a power plant. Measurements were taken of carbon dioxide and water vapor concentration during operation at a local industrial facility. The design of this sensor probe overcomes problems of beam steering and permits a reference gas measurement. Extracted concentration data and design elements from the direct absorption measurements are presented. In addition, development of a sapphire fiber-based sensor using evanescent wave absorption along the outside of the fiber is presented. Evanescent absorption allows for the laser transmission to be maintained in the fiber at all times and may alleviate problems of background emission, beam steering, and especially scattering of the laser beam from solid particles experienced through free path direct absorption measurements in particulated flows. Laboratory measurements using evanescent fiber detection are presented.

  12. Damage evaluation based on a wave energy flow map using multiple PZT sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaolu; Hu, Ning; Xu, Hong; Yuan, Weifeng; Yan, Cheng; Li, Yuan; Goda, Riu; Alamusi, Emptyyn Y; Qiu, Jinhao; Ning, Huiming; Wu, Liangke

    2014-01-23

    A new wave energy flow (WEF) map concept was proposed in this work. Based on it, an improved technique incorporating the laser scanning method and Betti's reciprocal theorem was developed to evaluate the shape and size of damage as well as to realize visualization of wave propagation. In this technique, a simple signal processing algorithm was proposed to construct the WEF map when waves propagate through an inspection region, and multiple lead zirconate titanate (PZT) sensors were employed to improve inspection reliability. Various damages in aluminum and carbon fiber reinforced plastic laminated plates were experimentally and numerically evaluated to validate this technique. The results show that it can effectively evaluate the shape and size of damage from wave field variations around the damage in the WEF map.

  13. Influence of separating distance between atomic sensors for gravitational wave detection

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Biao; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-01-01

    We consider a recent scheme of gravitational wave detection using atomic interferometers as inertial sensors, and reinvestigate its configuration using the concept of sensitivity functions. We show that such configuration can suppress noise without influencing the gravitational wave signal. But the suppression is insufficient for the direct observation of gravitational wave signals, so we analyse the behaviour of the different noises influencing the detection scheme. As a novel method, we study the relations between the measurement sensitivity and the distance between two interferometers, and find that the results derived from vibration noise and laser frequency noise are in stark contrast to that derived from the shot noise, which is significant for the configuration design of gravitational wave detectors using atomic interferometers.

  14. Surface Acoustic WaveAmmonia Sensors Based on ST-cut Quartz under Periodic Al Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yau Su

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface acoustic wave (SAW devices are key components for sensing applications. SAW propagation under a periodic grating was investigated in this work. The theoretical method used here is the space harmonic method. We also applied the results of SAW propagation studied in this work to design a two-port resonator with an Al grating on ST-cut quartz. The measured frequency responses of the resonator were similar to the simulation ones. Then, the chemical interface of polyaniline/WO3 composites was coated on the SAW sensor for ammonia detection. The SAW sensor responded to ammonia gas and could be regenerated using dry nitrogen.

  15. Dual matter-wave inertial sensors in weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Brynle; Antoni-Micollier, Laura; Chichet, Laure; Battelier, Baptiste; Lévèque, Thomas; Landragin, Arnaud; Bouyer, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Quantum technology based on cold-atom interferometers is showing great promise for fields such as inertial sensing and fundamental physics. However, the finite free-fall time of the atoms limits the precision achievable on Earth, while in space interrogation times of many seconds will lead to unprecedented sensitivity. Here we realize simultaneous 87Rb-39K interferometers capable of operating in the weightless environment produced during parabolic flight. Large vibration levels (10-2 g Hz-1/2), variations in acceleration (0-1.8 g) and rotation rates (5° s-1) onboard the aircraft present significant challenges. We demonstrate the capability of our correlated quantum system by measuring the Eötvös parameter with systematic-limited uncertainties of 1.1 × 10-3 and 3.0 × 10-4 during standard- and microgravity, respectively. This constitutes a fundamental test of the equivalence principle using quantum sensors in a free-falling vehicle. Our results are applicable to inertial navigation, and can be extended to the trajectory of a satellite for future space missions.

  16. Visualization of stress wave propagation via air-coupled acoustic emission sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivey, Joshua C.; Lee, Gil-Yong; Yang, Jinkyu; Kim, Youngkey; Kim, Sungchan

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of visualizing stress waves propagating in plates using air-coupled acoustic emission sensors. Specifically, we employ a device that embeds arrays of microphones around an optical lens in a helical pattern. By implementing a beamforming technique, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot and full-field measurement. This is a significant improvement over the conventional wave propagation tracking approaches based on laser doppler vibrometry or digital image correlation techniques. In this paper, we focus on demonstrating the feasibility and efficacy of this air-coupled acoustic emission technique by using large metallic plates exposed to external impacts. The visualization results of stress wave propagation will be shown under various impact scenarios. The proposed technique can be used to characterize and localize damage by detecting the attenuation, reflection, and scattering of stress waves that occurs at damage locations. This can ultimately lead to the development of new structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation methods for identifying hidden cracks or delaminations in metallic or composite plate structures, simultaneously negating the need for mounted contact sensors.

  17. Surface acoustic wave ammonia sensor based on ZnO/SiO2 composite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang-Yue; Ma, Jin-Yi; Li, Zhi-Jie; Su, H Q; Alkurd, N R; Zhou, Wei-Lie; Wang, Lu; Du, Bo; Tang, Yong-Liang; Ao, Dong-Yi; Zhang, Shou-Chao; Yu, Q K; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2015-03-21

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator with ZnO/SiO2 (ZS) composite film was used as an ammonia sensor in this study. ZS composite films were deposited on the surface of SAW devices using the sol-gel method, and were characterized using SEM, AFM, and XRD. The performance of the sensors under ammonia gas was optimized by adjusting the molar ratio of ZnO:SiO2 to 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3, and the sensor with the ratio of ZnO to SiO2 equaling to 1:2 was found to have the best performance. The response of sensor was 1.132 kHz under 10 ppm NH3, which was much higher than that of the sensor based on a pristine ZnO film. Moreover, the sensor has good selectivity, reversibility and stability at room temperature. These can be attributed to the enhanced absorption of ammonia and unique surface reaction on composite films due to the existence of silica. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A room temperature surface acoustic wave hydrogen sensor with Pt coated ZnO nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fu-Chun; Chen, Yung-Yu; Wu, Tsung-Tsong

    2009-02-11

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor with Pt coated ZnO nanorods as the selective layer has been investigated for hydrogen detection. The SAW sensor was fabricated based on a 128 degrees YX-LiNbO(3) substrate with a operating frequency of 145 MHz. A dual delay line configuration was adopted to eliminate external environmental fluctuations. The Pt coated ZnO nanorods were chosen as a selective layer due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, large penetration depth, and fast charge diffusion rate. The ZnO nanorods were synthesized by an aqueous solution method and coated with the noble metal Pt as a catalyst. Finally, the SAW sensor responses to humidity and hydrogen were tested. Results show that the sensor is not sensitive to humidity; moreover, the frequency shift for a hydrogen concentration variation of 6000 ppm is 26 kHz while operating at room temperature. It can be concluded that the Pt coated ZnO nanorod based SAW hydrogen sensor exhibits fast response, good sensitivity and short-term repeatability. It is worth noting that not only is the sensor sensitive enough to operate at room temperature, but also it can avoid the influence of humidity.

  19. BP artificial neural network based wave front correction for sensor-less free space optics communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaokun; Zhao, Xiaohui

    2017-02-01

    The sensor-less adaptive optics (AO) is one of the most promising methods to compensate strong wave front disturbance in free space optics communication (FSO). The back propagation (BP) artificial neural network is applied for the sensor-less AO system to design a distortion correction scheme in this study. This method only needs one or a few online measurements to correct the wave front distortion compared with other model-based approaches, by which the real-time capacity of the system is enhanced and the Strehl Ratio (SR) is largely improved. Necessary comparisons in numerical simulation with other model-based and model-free correction methods proposed in Refs. [6,8,9,10] are given to show the validity and advantage of the proposed method.

  20. Common-Path Interferometric Wavefront Sensing for Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, James Kent

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an optical configuration for a common-path phase-shifting interferometric wavefront sensor.1 2 This sensor has a host of attractive features which make it well suited for space-based adaptive optics. First, it is strictly reflective and therefore operates broadband, second it is common mode and therefore does not suffer from systematic errors (like vibration) that are typical in other interferometers, third it is a phase-shifting interferometer and therefore benefits from both the sensitivity of interferometric sensors as well as the noise rejection afforded by synchronous detection. Unlike the Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor, it has nearly uniform sensitivity to all pupil modes. Optical configuration, theory and simulations for such a system will be discussed along with predicted performance.

  1. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Wenchang Hao; Jiuling Liu; Minghua Liu; Yong Liang; Shitang He

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of...

  2. The linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) position sensor for gravitational wave interferometer low-frequency controls

    CERN Document Server

    Tariq, H; Vetrano, F; Wang Chen Yang; Bertolini, A; Calamai, G; DeSalvo, R; Gennai, A; Holloway, L E; Losurdo, G; Marka, S; Mazzoni, M; Paoletti, F; Passuello, D; Sannibale, V; Stanga, R

    2002-01-01

    Low-power, ultra-high-vacuum compatible, non-contacting position sensors with nanometer resolution and centimeter dynamic range have been developed, built and tested. They have been designed at Virgo as the sensors for low-frequency modal damping of Seismic Attenuation System chains in Gravitational Wave interferometers and sub-micron absolute mirror positioning. One type of these linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) has been designed to be also insensitive to transversal displacement thus allowing 3D movement of the sensor head while still precisely reading its position along the sensitivity axis. A second LVDT geometry has been designed to measure the displacement of the vertical seismic attenuation filters from their nominal position. Unlike the commercial LVDTs, mostly based on magnetic cores, the LVDTs described here exert no force on the measured structure.

  3. Response Mechanism for Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors Based on Surface-Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiansheng Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model is established to describe the response mechanism of surface acoustic wave (SAW gas sensors based on physical adsorption on the detector surface. Wohljent’s method is utilized to describe the relationship of sensor output (frequency shift of SAW oscillator and the mass loaded on the detector surface. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET formula and its improved form are introduced to depict the adsorption behavior of gas on the detector surface. By combining the two methods, we obtain a theoretical model for the response mechanism of SAW gas sensors. By using a commercial SAW gas chromatography (GC analyzer, an experiment is performed to measure the frequency shifts caused by different concentration of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP. The parameters in the model are given by fitting the experimental results and the theoretical curve agrees well with the experimental data.

  4. Integration of thin film giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transponder

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2012-03-09

    Passive and remote sensing technology has many potential applications in implantable devices, automation, or structural monitoring. In this paper, a tri-layer thin film giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) sensor with the maximum sensitivity of 16%/Oe and GMI ratio of 44% was combined with a two-port surface acoustic wave(SAW) transponder on a common substrate using standard microfabrication technology resulting in a fully integrated sensor for passive and remote operation. The implementation of the two devices has been optimized by on-chip matching circuits. The measurement results clearly show a magnetic field response at the input port of the SAW transponder that reflects the impedance change of the GMI sensor.

  5. Highly Sensitive Rayleigh Wave Hydrogen Sensors with WO3 Sensing Layers at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng; FAN Li; ZHANG Shu-Yi; YANG Yue-Tao; ZHOU Ding-Mao; SHUI Xiu-Ji

    2011-01-01

    Rayleigh wave hydrogen sensors based on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates with WO3 sensing layers operating at room temperature are studied.The experimental results indicate that the WO3 layers obtained by a sol-gel method have much higher sensitivities because the sensing layers produced by the sol-gel method have small grains and high roughness and porosity.It is also confirmed that in the sol-gel method,keeping WO3 solutions at low temperature and/or decreasing the viscosity of the solutions can decrease the grain sizes and increase the hydrogen-absorbability of the sensing layer.Under the optimized preparation conditions,the high sensitivity of the hydrogen sensors at room temperature is obtained,in which 1% hydrogen in natural air induces the frequency shift of 72 kHz at the operating frequency of 124.2 MHz.Surface acoustic wave (SAW) hydrogen sensors have attracted a great deal of attention so far,in which the sensors have achieved high sensitivity as the sensors were often operated at high temperature,such as higher than 100℃.[1-4] However,in these experiments,a heater and a thermostat were required,which induced the sensors to be more complicated and unfavorable for miniaturization,and limited their application at room temperature.Furthermore,the heater can induce extra power loss and risks of fire and explosion.%Rayleigh wave hydrogen sensors based on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates with WO3 sensing layers operating at room temperature are studied. The experimental results indicate that the WO3 layers obtained by a sol-gel method have much higher sensitivities because the sensing layers produced by the sol-gel method have small grains and high roughness and porosity. It is also confirmed that in the sol-gel method, keeping WO3 solutions at low temperature and/or decreasing the viscosity of the solutions can decrease the grain sizes and increase the hydrogen-absorbability of the sensing layer. Under the optimized preparation conditions, the high sensitivity of the

  6. Blood pulse wave velocity and pressure sensing via fiber based and free space based optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkis, Talia; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Agdarov, Sergey; Beiderman, Yafim; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-02-01

    Continuous noninvasive measurement of vital bio-signs, such as cardiopulmonary parameters, is an important tool in evaluation of the patient's physiological condition and health monitoring. On the demand of new enabling technologies, some works have been done in continuous monitoring of blood pressure and pulse wave velocity. In this paper, we introduce two techniques for non-contact sensing of vital bio signs. In the first approach the optical sensor is based on single mode in-fibers Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) to detect heartbeat, respiration and pulse wave velocity (PWV). The introduced interferometer is based on a new implanted scheme. It replaces the conventional MZI realized by inserting of discontinuities in the fiber to break the total internal reflection and scatter/collect light. The proposed fiber sensor was successfully incorporated into shirt to produce smart clothing. The measurements obtained from the smart clothing could be obtained in comfortable manner and there is no need to have an initial calibration or a direct contact between the sensor and the skin of the tested individual. In the second concept we show a remote noncontact blood pulse wave velocity and pressure measurement based on tracking the temporal changes of reflected secondary speckle patterns produced in human skin when illuminated by a laser beams. In both concept experimental validation of the proposed schemes is shown and analyzed.

  7. Advanced vapor recognition materials for selective and fast responsive surface acoustic wave sensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Adeel; Iqbal, Naseer; Mujahid, Adnan; Schirhagl, Romana

    2013-07-17

    The necessity of selectively detecting various organic vapors is primitive not only with respect to regular environmental and industrial hazard monitoring, but also in detecting explosives to combat terrorism and for defense applications. Today, the huge arsenal of micro-sensors has revolutionized the traditional methods of analysis by, e.g. replacing expensive laboratory equipment, and has made the remote screening of atmospheric threats possible. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors - based on piezoelectric crystal resonators - are extremely sensitive to even very small perturbations in the external atmosphere, because the energy associated with the acoustic waves is confined to the crystal surface. Combined with suitably designed molecular recognition materials SAW devices could develop into highly selective and fast responsive miniaturized sensors, which are capable of continuously monitoring a specific organic gas, preferably in the sub-ppm regime. For this purpose, different types of recognition layers ranging from nanostructured metal oxides and carbons to pristine or molecularly imprinted polymers and self-assembled monolayers have been applied in the past decade. We present a critical review of the recent developments in nano- and micro-engineered synthetic recognition materials predominantly used for SAW-based organic vapor sensors. Besides highlighting their potential to realize real-time vapor sensing, their limitations and future perspectives are also discussed.

  8. Multilayer graphene electrodes for one-port surface acoustic wave resonator mass sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Ainan; Swamy, Varghese; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2017-02-01

    A one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator mass sensor composed of multilayer graphene (MLG) electrodes was investigated by the finite element method (FEM) and analyses were carried out to study the enhancement of sensitivity and the secondary effects caused by MLG electrodes on the performance of the resonator. Unlike metal electrodes, MLG electrode offers elastic loading to the contact surface, as evidenced by the increase in the surface velocity of the SAW device. In terms of the sensitivity of the mass sensor, MLG electrode showed the largest center frequency shift in response to a change in mass loading, as well as when used as a gas sensor to detect volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Also, MLG electrodes offered the least triple transit signal (TTS) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) generations compared with Al and Au–Cr electrodes. Thus, the one-port SAW resonator with graphene electrodes not only possesses excellent performance characteristics but also gives rise to new opportunities in the development of highly sensitive mass sensors.

  9. Passive wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for monitoring sequestration sites CO2 emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yizhong [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chyu, Minking [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Qing-Ming [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-02-14

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/°C. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/°C. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2 . The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2 . With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  10. Interferometric Astrometry of the Low-Mass Binary GL 791.2 (= HU Del) UsingHubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor 3: Parallax and Component Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Franz, Otto G.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Henry, Todd J.

    2000-08-01

    With fourteen epochs of fringe-tracking data spanning 1.7 yr from Fine Guidance Sensor 3 we have obtained a parallax (πabs=113.1+/-0.3 mas) and perturbation orbit for Gl 791.2A. Contemporaneous fringe-scanning observations yield only three clear detections of the secondary on both interferometer axes. They provide a mean component magnitude difference, ΔV=3.27+/-0.10. The period (P=1.4731 yr), from the perturbation orbit, and the semimajor axis (a=0.963+/-0.007 AU), from the measured component separations with our parallax, provide a total system mass MA+MB=0.412+/-0.009 Msolar. Component masses are MA=0.286+/-0.006 Msolar and MB=0.126+/-0.003 Msolar. Gl 791.2A and Gl 791.2B are placed in a sparsely populated region of the lower main-sequence mass-luminosity relation where they help define the relation because the masses have been determined to high accuracy, with errors of only 2%. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  11. Interferometric Astrometry of the Low-mass Binary Gl 791.2 (= HU Del) Using Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor; 3, Parallax and Component Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Benedict, G F; Franz, O G; Wasserman, L H; Henry, T J; Arthur, Barbara E. Mc; Franz, Otto G.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Henry, Todd J.

    2000-01-01

    With fourteen epochs of fringe tracking data spanning 1.7y from Fine Guidance Sensor 3 we have obtained a parallax (pi_abs=113.1 +- 0.3 mas) and perturbation orbit for Gl 791.2A. Contemporaneous fringe scanning observations yield only three clear detections of the secondary on both interferometer axes. They provide a mean component magnitude difference, Delta V = 3.27 +- 0.10. The period (P = 1.4731 yr) from the perturbation orbit and the semi-major axis (a = 0.963 +- 0.007 AU) from the measured component separations with our parallax provide a total system mass M_A + M_B = 0.412 +- 0.009 M_sun. Component masses are M_A=0.286 +- 0.006 M_sun and M_B = 0.126 +- 0.003 M_sun. Gl 791.2A and B are placed in a sparsely populated region of the lower main sequence mass-luminosity relation where they help define the relation because the masses have been determined to high accuracy, with errors of only 2%.

  12. First-Order Acoustic Wave Equation Reverse Time Migration Based on the Dual-Sensor Seismic Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jiachun; Liu, Xuewei; Wu, Ru-Shan

    2017-03-01

    We analyze the mathematical requirements for conventional reverse time migration (RTM) and summarize their rationale. The known information provided by current acquisition system is inadequate for the second-order acoustic wave equations. Therefore, we introduce a dual-sensor seismic acquisition system into the coupled first-order acoustic wave equations. We propose a new dual-sensor reverse time migration called dual-sensor RTM, which includes two input variables, the pressure and vertical particle velocity data. We focus on the performance of dual-sensor RTM in estimating reflection coefficients compared with conventional RTM. Synthetic examples are used for the study of estimating coefficients of reflectors with both dual-sensor RTM and conventional RTM. The results indicate that dual-sensor RTM with two inputs calculates amplitude information more accurately and images structural positions of complex substructures, such as the Marmousi model, more clearly than that of conventional RTM. This shows that the dual-sensor RTM has better accuracy in backpropagation and carries more information in the directivity because of particle velocity injection. Through a simple point-shape model, we demonstrate that dual-sensor RTM decreases the effect of multi-pathing of propagating waves, which is helpful for focusing the energy. In addition, compared to conventional RTM, dual-sensor RTM does not cause extra memory costs. Dual-sensor RTM is, therefore, promising for the computation of multi-component seismic data.

  13. Tunable High-Frequency Gravitational-Wave Detection with optically-levitated sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Arvanitaki, Asimina

    2012-01-01

    We propose a tunable resonant sensor to detect gravitational waves in the frequency range of 30 - 300 kHz using optically trapped and cooled dielectric microspheres or micro-discs. The technique we describe can exceed the sensitivity of laser-based gravitational wave observatories in this frequency range by 1 - 3 orders of magnitude, using an instrument of only a few percent of their size. Such a device extends the search volume for 100 kHz gravitational wave sources by more than 10^6, and could detect monochromatic gravitational radiation from the annihilation of QCD axions in the cloud they form around stellar mass black holes within our galaxy due to the superradiance effect.

  14. Studies of Elastic Waves in Ethylene Propylene Rubber Using Acoustic Emission Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Masanori; Sakoda, Tatsuya; Otsubo, Masahisa; Akaiwa, Shigeru; Iki, Masatoshi; Nakano, Shigeharu

    The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between lowering of the insulation performance of cross-linked polyethylene (CV) cable and partial discharges (PDs) followed by the dielectric breakdown and to establish a diagnostic technique using an acoustic emission (AE) sensor. In this study, we focused on characterization of AE signals detected from ethylene propylene rubbers (EPRs) used as insulating materials of CV cables. Elastic waves with various frequencies were added to the surface of the EPR, and then characteristics of the detected AE signals due to the elastic waves propagated in the EPR were evaluated. We showed characteristics of Lamb waves whose low frequency components around 100 kHz were large and their small attenuation characteristics.

  15. A Love Wave Reflective Delay Line with Polymer Guiding Layer for Wireless Sensor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; He, Shitang

    2008-12-05

    This paper presents an optimal design for a Love wave reflective delay line on 41(o) YX LiNbO₃ with a polymer guiding layer for wireless sensor applications. A theoretical model was established to describe the Love wave propagation along the larger piezoelectric substrate with polymer waveguide, and the lossy mechanism from the viscoelastic waveguide was discussed, which results in the optimal guiding layer thickness. Coupling of modes (COM) was used to determine the optimal design parameters of the reflective delay line structured by single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs) and shorted grating reflectors. Using the network analyzer, the fabricated Love wave reflective delay line was characterized, high signal noise ratio (S/N), sharp reflection peaks, and few spurious noise between the peaks were found, and the measured result agrees well with the simulated one. Also, the optimal guiding layer thickness of 1.5~1.8μm was extracted experimentally, and it is consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  16. Guided wave phased array sensor tuning for improved defect detection and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philtron, Jason H.; Rose, Joseph L.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves are finding increased use in a variety of Nondestructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring applications due to their efficiency in defect detection using a sensor at a single location to inspect a large area of a structure and an ability to inspect hidden and coated areas for example. With a thorough understanding of guided wave mechanics, researchers can predict which guided wave modes will have a high probability of success in a particular nondestructive evaluation application. For example, in a sample problem presented here to access bond integrity, researchers may choose to use a guided wave mode which has high in-plane displacement, stress, or other feature at the interface. However, since material properties used for modeling work may not be precise for the development of dispersion curves, in many cases guided wave mode and frequency selection should be adjusted for increased inspection efficiency in the field. In this work, a phased array comb transducer is used to sweep over phase velocity - frequency space to tune mode excitation for improved defect characterization performance. A thin polycarbonate layer bonded to a thick metal plate is considered with a contaminated surface prior to bonding. Physicallybased features are used to correlate wave signals with defect detection. Features assessed include arrival time and the frequency of maximum amplitude. A pseudo C-scan plot is presented which can be used to simplify data analysis. Excellent results are obtained.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of gas concentration and temperature by the ball surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Kazushi; Akao, Shingo; Takeda, Nobuo; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Oizumi, Toru; Tsukahara, Yusuke

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) trace moisture sensor with an amorphous silica sensitive film and realized wide-range measurement from 0.017 ppmv [a frost point (FP) of -99 °C] to 6.0 × 103 ppmv (0 °C FP). However, since the sensitivity of the sensor depends on the temperature, measurement results are disturbed when the temperature largely changes. To overcome this problem, we developed a method to simultaneously measure temperature and gas concentration using a ball SAW sensor. Temperature and concentration is derived by solving equations for the delay time change at two frequencies. When the temperature had a large jump, the delay time change was significantly disturbed, but the water concentration was almost correctly measured, by compensating the sensitivity change using measured temperature. The temperature measured by a ball SAW sensor will also be used to control the ball temperature. This method will make a ball SAW sensor reliable in environments of varying temperatures.

  18. ZnO nanomaterials based surface acoustic wave ethanol gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Li, X; Liu, J H; He, Y N; Yu, L M; Liu, W H

    2012-08-01

    ZnO nanomaterials based surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensor has been investigated in ethanol environment at room temperature. The ZnO nanomaterials have been prepared through thermal evaporation of high-purity zinc powder. The as-prepared ZnO nanomaterials have been characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results indicate that the obtained ZnO nanomaterials, including many types of nanostructures such as nanobelts, nanorods, nanowires as well as nanosheets, are wurtzite with hexagonal structure and well-crystallized. The SAW sensor coated with the nanostructured ZnO materials has been tested in ethanol gas of various concentrations at room temperature. A network analyzer is used to monitor the change of the insertion loss of the SAW sensor when exposed to ethanol gas. The insertion loss of the SAW sensor varies significantly with the change of ethanol concentration. The experimental results manifest that the ZnO nanomaterials based SAW ethanol gas sensor exhibits excellent sensitivity and good short-term reproducibility at room temperature.

  19. A surface acoustic wave passive and wireless sensor for magnetic fields, temperature, and humidity

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report an integrated single-chip surface acoustic wave sensor with the capability of measuring magnetic field, temperature, and humidity. The sensor is fabricated using a thermally sensitive LiNbO3 substrate, a humidity sensitive hydrogel coating, and a magnetic field sensitive impedance load. The sensor response to individually and simultaneously changing magnetic field, temperature and humidity is characterized by connecting a network analyzer directly to the sensor. Analytical models for each measurand are derived and used to compensate noise due to cross sensitivities. The results show that all three measurands can be monitored in parallel with sensitivities of 75 ppm/°C, 0.13 dB/%R.H. (at 50%R.H.), 0.18 dB/Oe and resolutions of 0.1 °C, 0.4%R.H., 1 Oe for temperature, humidity and magnetic field, respectively. A passive wireless measurement is also conducted on a current line using, which shows the sensors capability to measure both temperature and current signals simultaneously.

  20. The fresnel interferometric imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koechlin, Laurent; Serre, Denis; Deba, Paul; Pelló, Roser; Peillon, Christelle; Duchon, Paul; Gomez de Castro, Ana Ines; Karovska, Margarita; Désert, Jean-Michel; Ehrenreich, David; Hebrard, Guillaume; Lecavelier Des Etangs, Alain; Ferlet, Roger; Sing, David; Vidal-Madjar, Alfred

    2009-03-01

    The Fresnel Interferometric Imager has been proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA) Cosmic Vision plan as a class L mission. This mission addresses several themes of the CV Plan: Exoplanet study, Matter in extreme conditions, and The Universe taking shape. This paper is an abridged version of the original ESA proposal. We have removed most of the technical and financial issues, to concentrate on the instrumental design and astrophysical missions. The instrument proposed is an ultra-lightweight telescope, featuring a novel optical concept based on diffraction focussing. It yields high dynamic range images, while releasing constraints on positioning and manufacturing of the main optical elements. This concept should open the way to very large apertures in space. In this two spacecraft formation-flying instrument, one spacecraft holds the focussing element: the Fresnel interferometric array; the other spacecraft holds the field optics, focal instrumentation, and detectors. The Fresnel array proposed here is a 3.6 ×3.6 m square opaque foil punched with 105 to 106 void “subapertures”. Focusing is achieved with no other optical element: the shape and positioning of the subapertures (holes in the foil) is responsible for beam combining by diffraction, and 5% to 10% of the total incident light ends up into a sharp focus. The consequence of this high number of subapertures is high dynamic range images. In addition, as it uses only a combination of vacuum and opaque material, this focussing method is potentially efficient over a very broad wavelength domain. The focal length of such diffractive focussing devices is wavelength dependent. However, this can be corrected. We have tested optically the efficiency of the chromatism correction on artificial sources (500 < λ < 750 nm): the images are diffraction limited, and the dynamic range measured on an artificial double source reaches 6.2 10 - 6. We have also validated numerical simulation algorithms for larger Fresnel

  1. A simple and accurate model for Love wave based sensors: Dispersion equation and mass sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiansheng Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dispersion equation is an important tool for analyzing propagation properties of acoustic waves in layered structures. For Love wave (LW sensors, the dispersion equation with an isotropic-considered substrate is too rough to get accurate solutions; the full dispersion equation with a piezoelectric-considered substrate is too complicated to get simple and practical expressions for optimizing LW-based sensors. In this work, a dispersion equation is introduced for Love waves in a layered structure with an anisotropic-considered substrate and an isotropic guiding layer; an intuitive expression for mass sensitivity is also derived based on the dispersion equation. The new equations are in simple forms similar to the previously reported simplified model with an isotropic substrate. By introducing the Maxwell-Weichert model, these equations are also applicable to the LW device incorporating a viscoelastic guiding layer; the mass velocity sensitivity and the mass propagation loss sensitivity are obtained from the real part and the imaginary part of the complex mass sensitivity, respectively. With Love waves in an elastic SiO2 layer on an ST-90°X quartz structure, for example, comparisons are carried out between the velocities and normalized sensitivities calculated by using different dispersion equations and corresponding mass sensitivities. Numerical results of the method presented in this work are very close to those of the method with a piezoelectric-considered substrate. Another numerical calculation is carried out for the case of a LW sensor with a viscoelastic guiding layer. If the viscosity of the layer is not too big, the effect on the real part of the velocity and the mass velocity sensitivity is relatively small; the propagation loss and the mass loss sensitivity are proportional to the viscosity of the guiding layer.

  2. Development of Magnetically Excited Flexural Plate Wave Devices for Implementation as Physical, Chemical, and Acoustic Sensors, and as Integrated Micro-Pumps for Sensored Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, W. K.; Mitchell, M. A.; Graf, D. C.; Shul, R. J.

    2002-05-01

    The magnetically excited flexural plate wave (mag-FPW) device has great promise as a versatile sensor platform. FPW's can have better sensitivity at lower operating frequencies than surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. Lower operating frequency simplifies the control electronics and makes integration of sensor with electronics easier. Magnetic rather than piezoelectric excitation of the FPW greatly simplifies the device structure and processing by eliminating the need for piezoelectric thin films, also simplifying integration issues. The versatile mag-FPW resonator structure can potentially be configured to fulfill a number of critical functions in an autonomous sensored system. As a physical sensor, the device can be extremely sensitive to temperature, fluid flow, strain, acceleration and vibration. By coating the membrane with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), or polymer films with selective absorption properties (originally developed for SAW sensors), the mass sensitivity of the FPW allows it to be used as biological or chemical sensors. Yet another critical need in autonomous sensor systems is the ability to pump fluid. FPW structures can be configured as micro-pumps. This report describes work done to develop mag-FPW devices as physical, chemical, and acoustic sensors, and as micro-pumps for both liquid and gas-phase analytes to enable new integrated sensing platform.

  3. LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder: testing the next generation of wave front sensors at LBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Albert R.; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Baumeister, Harald; Bergomi, Maria; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Juergen; Biddick, Chris; Bizenberger, Peter; Brangier, Matthieu; Briegel, Florian; Brunelli, Alessandro; Brynnel, Joar; Busoni, Lorenzo; Cushing, Norm; De Bonis, Fulvio; De La Pena, Michele; Esposito, Simone; Farinato, Jacopo; Fini, Luca; Green, Richard F.; Herbst, Tom; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kuerster, Martin; Laun, Werner; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Pavlov, Aleksei; Pott, Jorg-Uwe; Puglisi, Alfio; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Rakich, Andrew; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Trowitzsch, Jan; Viotto, Valentina; Zhang, Xianyu

    2012-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA will employ four wave front sensors to realize multi-conjugate correction on both arms of a Fizeau interferometer for LBT. Of these, one of the two ground-layer wave front sensors, together with its infrared test camera, comprise a stand-alone test platform for LINC-NIRVANA. Pathfinder is a testbed for full LINC-NIRVANA intended to identify potential interface problems early in the game, thus reducing both technical, and schedule, risk. Pathfinder will combine light from multiple guide stars, with a pyramid sensor dedicated to each star, to achieve ground-layer AO correction via an adaptive secondary: the 672-actuator thin shell at the LBT. The ability to achieve sky coverage by optically coadding light from multiple stars has been previously demonstrated; and the ability to achieve correction with an adaptive secondary has also been previously demonstrated. Pathfinder will be the first system at LBT to combine both of these capabilities. Since reporting our progress at A04ELT2, we have advanced the project in three key areas: definition of specific goals for Pathfinder tests at LBT, more detail in the software design and planning, and calibration. We report on our progress and future plans in these three areas, and on the project overall.

  4. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors Incorporating Metallic Dot Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A new surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s−1 and good linearity were observed.

  5. Enhanced sensitivity of surface acoustic wave-based rate sensors incorporating metallic dot arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Shao, Xiuting; Liu, Xinlu; Liu, Jiuling; He, Shitang

    2014-02-26

    A new surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu) dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs) and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours) frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s(-1)) and good linearity were observed.

  6. Array of Love-wave sensors based on quartz/Novolac to detect CWA simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matatagui, D; Fontecha, J; Fernández, M J; Aleixandre, M; Gràcia, I; Cané, C; Horrillo, M C

    2011-09-15

    An array of Love-wave sensors based on quartz and Novolac has been developed to detect chemical warfare agents (CWAs). These weapons are a risk for human health due to their efficiency and high lethality; therefore an early and clear detection is of enormous importance for the people safety. Love-wave devices realized on quartz as piezoelectric substrate and Novolac as guiding layer have been used to make up an array of six sensors, which have been coated with specific polymers by spin coating. The CWAs are very dangerous and for safety reasons their well known simulants have been used: dimethylmethyl phosphonate (DMMP), dipropyleneglycol methyl ether (DPGME), dimethylmethyl acetamide (DMA), dichloroethane (DCE), dichloromethane (DCM) and dichloropentane (DCP). The array has been exposed to these CWA simulants detecting very low concentrations, such as 25 ppb of DMMP, a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Finally, principal component analysis (PCA) as data pre-processing and discrimination technique, and probabilistic neural networks (PNN) as patterns classification technique have been applied. The performance of the sensor array has shown stability, accuracy, high sensitivity and good selectivity to these simulants.

  7. Interferometric measurement of the angular velocity of moving humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanzer, Jeffrey A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the measurement of the angular velocity of walking humans using a millimeter-wave correlation interferometer. Measurement of the angular velocity of moving objects is a desirable function in remote sensing applications. Doppler radar sensors are able to measure the signature of moving humans based on micro-Doppler analysis; however, a person moving with little to no radial velocity produces negligible Doppler returns. Measurement of the angular movement of humans can be done with traditional radar techniques, however the process involves either continuous tracking with narrow beamwidth or angle-of-arrival estimation algorithms. A new method of measuring the angular velocity of moving objects using interferometry has recently been developed which measures the angular velocity of an object without tracking or complex processing. The frequency of the interferometer signal response is proportional to the angular velocity of the object as it passes through the interferometer beam pattern. In this paper, the theory of the interferometric measurement of angular velocity is covered and simulations of the response of a walking human are presented. Simulations are produced using a model of a walking human to show the significant features associated with the interferometer response, which may be used in classification algorithms.

  8. Data-driven and calibration-free Lamb wave source localization with sparse sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Joel B; Moura, José M F

    2015-08-01

    Most Lamb wave localization techniques require that we know the wave's velocity characteristics; yet, in many practical scenarios, velocity estimates can be challenging to acquire, are unavailable, or are unreliable because of the complexity of Lamb waves. As a result, there is a significant need for new methods that can reduce a system's reliance on a priori velocity information. This paper addresses this challenge through two novel source localization methods designed for sparse sensor arrays in isotropic media. Both methods exploit the fundamental sparse structure of a Lamb wave's frequency-wavenumber representation. The first method uses sparse recovery techniques to extract velocities from calibration data. The second method uses kurtosis and the support earth mover's distance to measure the sparseness of a Lamb wave's approximate frequency-wavenumber representation. These measures are then used to locate acoustic sources with no prior calibration data. We experimentally study each method with a collection of acoustic emission data measured from a 1.22 m by 1.22 m isotropic aluminum plate. We show that both methods can achieve less than 1 cm localization error and have less systematic error than traditional time-of-arrival localization methods.

  9. PARAFAC Decomposition for Ultrasonic Wave Sensing of Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors: Procedure and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rencheng Zheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic wave-sensing technology has been applied for the health monitoring of composite structures, using normal fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors with a high-speed wavelength interrogation system of arrayed waveguide grating (AWG filters; however, researchers are required to average thousands of repeated measurements to distinguish significant signals. To resolve this bottleneck problem, this study established a signal-processing strategy that improves the signal-to-noise ratio for the one-time measured signal of ultrasonic waves, by application of parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC technology that produces unique multiway decomposition without additional orthogonal or independent constraints. Through bandpass processing of the AWG filter and complex wavelet transforms, ultrasonic wave signals are preprocessed as time, phase, and frequency profiles, and then decomposed into a series of conceptual three-way atoms by PARAFAC. While an ultrasonic wave results in a Bragg wavelength shift, antiphase fluctuations can be observed at two adjacent AWG ports. Thereby, concentrating on antiphase features among the three-way atoms, a fitting atom can be chosen and then restored to three-way profiles as a final result. An experimental study has revealed that the final result is consistent with the conventional 1024-data averaging signal, and relative error evaluation has indicated that the signal-to-noise ratio of ultrasonic waves can be significantly improved.

  10. Research on sensor technology of Lamb-wave signal acquisition using optical low-coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y. K.; Yang, C.; Li, X. W.; Chong, B.

    2012-10-01

    Non-destructive testing of composite materials is a key technology issue in equipment testing. Among the emerging new testing methods, Lamb-wave technology is getting more and more attention. This paper proposed a sensing method to acquire the Lamb-wave signal in thin plate based on optical low-coherence principles. Methods to acquire Lamb-wave in thin plate using optical low-coherence technology were analyzed, and the technical path of non-contact, high-precision method was chosen. Complete in-line experimental system and methods were designed and built up for testing. A sensor system based on Michelson low-coherence interferometer was set up. The distributed optical fiber sensors were arranged on the top of sample materials for signal detection. Mirrors to enhance reflection intensity were attached on the sample. The phase of sensing arm was modulated by PZT vibration. Then signals were detected and processed by Daubechies10 wavelet and Gabor wavelet. In-line testing of thin plate with features of high-precision and high signal-noise-ratio was realized, which is meaningful to dynamic testing of large-scale structure.

  11. High-sensitivity open-loop electronics for gravimetric acoustic-wave-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, David; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Ballandras, Sylvain; Martin, Gilles; Carry, Emile; Blondeau-Patissier, Virginie

    2013-06-01

    Detecting chemical species in gas phase has recently received an increasing interest mainly for security control, trying to implement new systems allowing for extended dynamics and reactivity. In this work, an open-loop interrogation strategy is proposed to use radio-frequency acoustic transducers as micro-balances for that purpose. The resulting system is dedicated to the monitoring of chemical compounds in gaseous or liquid-phase state. A 16 Hz standard deviation is demonstrated at 125 MHz, with a working frequency band in the 60 to 133 MHz range, answering the requirements for using Rayleigh- and Love-wave-based delay lines operating with 40-μm acoustic wavelength transducers. Moreover, this electronic setup was used to interrogate a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR) microbalance, a new sensor class allowing for multi-mode interrogation for gravimetric measurement improvement. The noise source still limiting the system performance is due to the analog-to-digital converter of the microcontroller, thus leaving open degrees-of-freedom for improving the obtained results by optimizing the voltage reference and board layout. The operation of the system is illustrated using a calibrated galvanic deposition at the surface of Love-wave delay lines to assess theoretical predictions of their gravimetric sensitivity and to compare them with HBAR-based sensor sensitivity.

  12. Selective detection of elemental mercury vapor using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, K M Mohibul; Sabri, Ylias M; Matthews, Glenn I; Jones, Lathe A; Ippolito, Samuel J; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2015-08-21

    The detection of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) within industrial processes is extremely important as it is the first major step in ensuring the efficient operation of implemented mercury removal technologies. In this study, a 131 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay line sensor with gold electrodes was tested towards Hg(0) vapor (24 to 365 ppbv) with/without the presence of ammonia (NH3) and humidity (H2O), as well as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as acetaldehyde (MeCHO), ethylmercaptan (EM), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), which are all common interfering gas species that co-exist in many industrial applications requiring mercury monitoring. The developed sensor exhibited a detection limit of 0.7 ppbv and 4.85 ppbv at 35 and 55 °C, respectively. Furthermore, a repeatability of 97% and selectivity of 92% in the presence of contaminant gases was exhibited by the sensor at the chosen operating temperature of 55 °C. The response magnitude of the developed SAW sensor towards different concentrations of Hg(0) vapor fitted well with the Langmuir extension isotherm (otherwise known as loading ratio correlation (LRC)) which is in agreement with our basic finite element method (FEM) work where an LRC isotherm was observed for a simplified model of the SAW sensor responding to different Hg contents deposited on the Au based electrodes. Overall, the results indicate that the developed SAW sensor can be a potential solution for online selective detection of low concentrations of Hg(0) vapor found in industrial stack effluents.

  13. Transparent ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave based high performance ultraviolet light sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Bo; Gu, Hang; He, Xing-Li; Xuan, Wei-Peng; Chen, Jin-Kai; Wang, Xiao-Zhi; Luo, Ji-Kui

    2015-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are a type of ultraviolet (UV) light sensors with high sensitivity, and they have been extensively studied. Transparent SAW devices are very useful and can be developed into various sensors and microfluidics for sensing/monitoring and lab-on-chip applications. We report the fabrication of high sensitivity SAW UV sensors based on piezoelectric (PE) ZnO thin films deposited on glass substrates. The sensors were fabricated and their performances against the post-deposition annealing condition were investigated. It was found that the UV-light sensitivity is improved by more than one order of magnitude after annealing. The frequency response increases significantly and the response becomes much faster. The optimized devices also show a small temperature coefficient of frequency and excellent repeatability and stability, demonstrating its potential for UV-light sensing application. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274037 and 61301046) and the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20120101110031 and 20120101110054).

  14. Noise suppression algorithm of short-wave infrared star image for daytime star sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Wei, Xinguo; Li, Jian; Wang, Gangyi

    2017-09-01

    As an important development trend of star sensor technology, research on daytime star sensor technology can expand the applications of star sensor from spacecrafts to airborne vehicles. The biggest problem for daytime star sensor is the detection of dim stars from strong atmospheric background radiation. The use of short-wave infrared (SWIR) technology has been proven to be an effective approach to solve this problem. However, the SWIR star images inevitably contain stripe nonuniformity noise and defective pixels, which degrade the quality of the acquired images and affect the subsequent star spot extraction and star centroiding accuracy seriously. Because the characteristics of stripe nonuniformity and defective pixels in the SWIR star images change with time during a long term continuous operation, the method of one-time off-line calibration is not applicable. To solve this problem, an algorithm of noise suppression for SWIR star image is proposed. It firstly extracts non-background pixels by one-dimensional mean filtering. Then through one-dimensional feature point descriptor, which is used to distinguish the bright star spots pixels from defective pixels, various types of defective pixels are accurately detected. Finally, the method of moment matching is adopted to remove the stripe nonuniformity and the defective pixels are compensated effectively. The simulation experiments results indicates that the proposed algorithm can adaptively and effectively suppress the influence of stripe nonuniformity and defective pixels in SWIR star images and it is beneficial to obtain higher star centroiding accuracy.

  15. A 94-GHz Millimeter-Wave Sensor for Speech Signal Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqi Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available High frequency millimeter-wave (MMW radar-like sensors enable the detection of speech signals. This novel non-acoustic speech detection method has some special advantages not offered by traditional microphones, such as preventing strong-acoustic interference, high directional sensitivity with penetration, and long detection distance. A 94-GHz MMW radar sensor was employed in this study to test its speech acquisition ability. A 34-GHz zero intermediate frequency radar, a 34-GHz superheterodyne radar, and a microphone were also used for comparison purposes. A short-time phase-spectrum-compensation algorithm was used to enhance the detected speech. The results reveal that the 94-GHz radar sensor showed the highest sensitivity and obtained the highest speech quality subjective measurement score. This result suggests that the MMW radar sensor has better performance than a traditional microphone in terms of speech detection for detection distances longer than 1 m. As a substitute for the traditional speech acquisition method, this novel speech acquisition method demonstrates a large potential for many speech related applications.

  16. Small craft ID criteria (N50/V50) for short wave infrared sensors in maritime security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald G.; Larson, Paul; Garcia, Jose; Walden, Barry; Agheera, Sameer; Deaver, Dawne; Hixson, Jonathan; Boettcher, Evelyn

    2008-04-01

    The need for Anti-Terrorism and Force Protection (AT/FP), for both shore and sea platform protection, has resulted in a need for imager design and evaluation tools which can predict field performance against maritime asymmetric threats. In the design of tactical imaging systems for target acquisition, a discrimination criterion is required for successful sensor realization. It characterizes the difficulty of the task being performed by the observer and varies for different target sets. This criterion is used in both assessment of existing infrared sensor and in the design of new conceptual sensors. In this experiment, we collected 8 small craft signatures (military and civilian) in the short wave infrared (SWIR) band during the day. These signatures were processed to determine the targets' characteristic dimension and contrast. They were also processed to bandlimit the signature's spatial information content (simulating longer range) and a perception experiment was performed to determine the task difficulty (N50 and V50). The results are presented in this paper and can be used for maritime security imaging sensor design and evaluation.

  17. Fast Response and High Sensitivity ZnO/glass Surface Acoustic Wave Humidity Sensors Using Graphene Oxide Sensing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J. K.

    2014-11-01

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with SAW humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications.

  18. Ultra-Trace Chemical Sensing with Long-Wave Infrared Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopic Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Williams, Richard M.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-02-20

    The infrared sensors task of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project (Task B of Project PL211) is focused on the science and technology of remote and in-situ spectroscopic chemical sensors for detecting proliferation and coun-tering terrorism. Missions to be addressed by remote chemical sensor development in-clude detecting proliferation of nuclear or chemical weapons, and providing warning of terrorist use of chemical weapons. Missions to be addressed by in-situ chemical sensor development include countering terrorism by screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons, or chemical weapons residues, and mapping contaminated areas. The science and technology is also relevant to chemical weapons defense, air operations support, monitoring emissions from chemi-cal weapons destruction or industrial activities, law enforcement, medical diagnostics, and other applications. Sensors for most of these missions will require extreme chemical sensitivity and selectiv-ity because the signature chemicals of importance are expected to be present in low con-centrations or have low vapor pressures, and the ambient air is likely to contain pollutants or other chemicals with interfering spectra. Cavity-enhanced chemical sensors (CES) that draw air samples into optical cavities for laser-based interrogation of their chemical content promise real-time, in-situ chemical detection with extreme sensitivity to specified target molecules and superb immunity to spectral interference and other sources of noise. PNNL is developing CES based on quantum cascade (QC) lasers that operate in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR - 3 to 5 microns) and long-wave infrared (LWIR - 8 to 14 mi-crons), and CES based on telecommunications lasers operating in the short-wave infrared (SWIR - 1 to 2 microns). All three spectral regions are promising because smaller mo-lecular absorption cross sections in the SWIR

  19. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  20. Guided shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors for chemical and biochemical detection in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, F; Bender, F; Cernose, R W

    2001-12-15

    The design and performance of guided shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (guided SH-SAW) devices on LiTaO3 substrates are investigated for high-sensitivity chemical and biochemical sensors in liquids. Despite their structural similarity to Rayleigh SAW, SH-SAWs often propagate slightly deeper within the substrate, hence preventing the implementation of high-sensitivity detectors. The device sensitivity to mass and viscoelastic loading is increased using a thin guiding layer on the device surface. Because of their relatively low shear wave velocity, various polymers including poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and cyanoethyl cellulose (cured or cross-linked) are investigated as the guiding layers to trap the acoustic energy near the sensing surface. The devices have been tested in biosensing and chemical sensing experiments. Suitable design principles for these applications are discussed with regard to wave guidance, electrical passivation of the interdigital transducers from the liquid environments, acoustic loss, and sensor signal distortion. In biosensing experiments, using near-optimal PMMA thickness of approximately 2 microm, mass sensitivity greater than 1500 Hz/(ng/mm2) is demonstrated, resulting in a minimum detection limit less than 20 pg/mm2. For chemical sensor experiments, it is found that optimal waveguide thickness must be modified to account for the chemically sensitive layer which also acts to guide the SH-SAW. A detection limit of 780 (3 x peak-to-peak noise) or 180 ppb (3 x rms noise) is estimated from the present measurements for some organic compounds in water.

  1. The minimization of ac phase noise in interferometric systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filinski, Ignacy; Gordon, R A

    1994-01-01

    A simple step-by-step procedure, including several novel techniques discussed in the Appendices, is given for minimizing ac phase noise in typical interferometric systems such as two-beam interferometers, holographic setups, four-wave mixers, etc. Special attention is given to index of refraction...... fluctuations, direct mechanical coupling, and acoustic coupling, whose importance in determining ac phase noise in interferometric systems has not been adequately treated. The minimization procedure must be carried out while continuously monitoring the phase noise which can be done very simply by using...... with the optical table will also have to be carefully carried out regardless of the type of interferometric system employed.It is recommended that this be followed by a simple, inexpensive change to a novel type of interferometer discussed in Appendix A which is inherently less sensitive to mechanical vibration...

  2. Lamb wave generation with piezoelectric wafer active sensors for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2003-08-01

    The capability of embedded piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) to perform in-situ nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is explored. Theoretical developments and laboratory tests are used to prove that PWAS transducers can satisfactorily perform Lamb wave transmission and reception, pulse-echo, pitch-catch, and phased array functions of conventional ultrasonics thus opening the road for embedded ultrasonics. Subsequently, crack detection in an aircraft panel with the pulse-echo method is illustrated. For large area scanning, a PWAS phased array is used to create the embedded ultrasonics structural radar (EUSR). For quality assurance, PWAS self-tests with the electromechanical impedance method are discussed.

  3. Determination of dipyridamole by modified extraction-gravimetry with a surface acoustic wave resonator sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D Z; Wang, R H; Nie, L H; Yao, S Z

    1996-08-01

    A simple and sensitive extraction-gravimetric method for the determination of dipyridamole is presented. The method is based on the extraction of free dipyridamole with chloroform, after neutralization with a basic agent, followed by measurement of the frequency shift response of the specially designed surface acoustic wave resonator sensor after evaporation of the extractant from the surface of the resonator. The frequency shift response was proportional to the amount of dipyridamole in the range 0.065-1.12 micrograms. Experimental parameters and the effect of interfering substances on the assay of dipyridamole were also examined in this study. The method was applied to the determination of dipyridamole in tablets.

  4. A Solitary Wave-Based Sensor to Monitor the Setting of Fresh Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piervincenzo Rizzo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a proof-of-principle study about the use of a sensor for the nondestructive monitoring of strength development in hydrating concrete. The nondestructive evaluation technique is based on the propagation of highly nonlinear solitary waves (HNSWs, which are non-dispersive mechanical waves that can form and travel in highly nonlinear systems, such as one-dimensional particle chains. A built-in transducer is adopted to excite and detect the HNSWs. The waves are partially reflected at the transducer/concrete interface and partially transmitted into the concrete. The time-of-flight and the amplitude of the waves reflected at the interface are measured and analyzed with respect to the hydration time, and correlated to the initial and final set times established by the penetration test (ASTM C 403. The results show that certain features of the HNSWs change as the concrete curing progresses indicating that it has the potential of being an efficient, cost-effective tool for monitoring strengths/stiffness development.

  5. Surface properties of solids and surface acoustic waves: Application to chemical sensors and layer characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, V. V.

    1995-09-01

    A general phenomenological approach is given for the description of mechanical surface properties of solids and their influence on surface acoustic wave propogation. Surface properties under consideration may be changes of the stress distribution in subsurface atomic layers, the presence of adsorbed gas molecules, surface degradation as a result of impacts from an aggressive environment, damage due to mechanical manufacturing or polishing, deposition of thin films or liquid layers, surface corrugations, etc. If the characteristic thickness of the affected layers is much less than the wavelengths of the propagating surface waves, then the effects of all these irregularities can be described by means of non-classical boundary conditions incorporating the integral surface parameters such as surface tension, surface moduli of elasticity and surface mass density. The effect of surface properties on the propagation of Rayleigh surface waves is analysed in comparison with the results of traditional approaches, in particular with Auld's energy perturbation method. One of the important implications of the above-mentioned boudnary conditions is that they are adequate for the description of the effect of rarely distributed adsorbed atoms or molecules. This allows, in particular, to obtain a rigorous theoretical description of chemical sensors using surface acoustic waves and to derive analytical expressions for their sensitivity.

  6. Guided UT wave inspection of insulated feedwater piping using magnetostrictive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, J. W.; Brett, Colin R.

    1996-11-01

    Due to failures in power plant feedwater piping, inspection of these components has become a priority item. The major reason for the failures is wall loss due to flow-accelerated corrosion on the inside diameter (ID) of the pipes. It can be very costly to use standard nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques for a comprehensive inspection due to the need to remove large areas of insulation. Guided UT waves can travel through the pipe over long distances and detect cross- sectional changes in the pipe wall with minimal insulation removal. This makes the guided UT wave an excellent candidate for locating significant wall loss due to corrosion and pitting. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has developed a simple and robust technology for generating and receiving guided UT waves based on magnetorestrictive sensors. Signals are generated and detected in the pipe via multi-turn coils acting as transmitters and receivers. Insulation removal is only required where the coils are attached to the pipe and this allows many meters of pipe to be inspected from a single location. Guided UT waves detect cross-sectional changes from corrosion on both the ID and outside diameter of the pipe and can also be used to map weld locations. This paper describes SwRIs systems and the preliminary results from testing on a feedwater pipe mockup containing simulated flow-accelerated corrosion.

  7. Recovering Signals from Optical Fiber Interferometric Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    explained in numerous books on operational amplifiers (for example, see Sedra and Smith [Ref. 171) and so will not be further discussed here, except to say...618. 1 October 1982. 17. Sedra , A. S.. and Smith .- K. C.. Microelectronic CrciimHolt. Rinehart and Winston, 1982. 18. Abramowitz, M. and- Stegun. I.A...Interfcromctcrse, Applied Optics. Volume 21. Number 4. 689-693. 1982. 46. Smith , L. and Sheingold, D.H.. "Noise and Operational Amplifier Circuits’, Analog

  8. Membrane Interferometric Carbon Dioxide Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for extravehicular mobility units (EMUs) with enhanced mobility, dexterity, lifetime, maintainability, and reliability for the International...

  9. Toward an in situ phosphate sensor in seawater using Square Wave Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barus, C; Romanytsia, I; Striebig, N; Garçon, V

    2016-11-01

    A Square Wave Voltammetry electrochemical method is proposed to measure phosphate in seawater as pulse techniques offer a higher sensitivity as compared to classical cyclic voltammetry. Chronoamperometry cannot be either adapted for an in situ sensor since this method requires to have controlled convection which will be impossible in a miniaturised sensor. Tests and validation of Square Wave Voltammetry parameters have been performed using an open cell and for the first time with a small volume (<400µL) laboratory prototypes. Two designs of prototypes have been compared. Using high frequency (f=250Hz) allows to obtain a linear behaviour between 0.1 and 1µmolL(-1) with a very low limit of detection of 0.05 µmolL(-1) after 60min of complexation waiting time. In order to obtain a linear regression for a larger concentration range i.e. 0.25-4µmolL(-1), a lower frequency of 2.5Hz is needed. A limit of detection of 0.1µmolL(-1) is obtained in this case after 30min of complexation waiting time for the peak measured at E=0.12V. Changing the position of the molybdenum electrode for the complexation step and moving the detection into another electrochemical cell allow to decrease the reaction time down to 5min. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Design of acoustic wave biochemical sensors using micro-electro-mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Jane E.; Przybycien, Todd M.; Hauan, Steinar

    2007-03-01

    Acoustic wave biochemical sensors work by detecting the frequency shifts resulting from the binding of target molecules to a functionalized resonator. Resonator types currently in use or under development include macroscopic quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) as well as a number of different integrated Micro-electro-mechanical Systems (MEMS) structures. Due to an increased resonator surface area to mass ratio, we believe that membrane-based MEMS systems are particularly promising with regard to sensitivity. Prototypes have been developed [S. Hauan et al., U.S. Patent Application (filed 6 Nov. 2003)] and preliminary calculations [M. J. Bartkovsky et al., paper 385e presented at the AIChE Annual Meeting, Nov. 2003; J. E. Valentine et al., paper 197h presented at the AICHE Annual Meeting, Nov. 2003] indicate significant improvements over other methods, both macroscopic and MEMS based. In this article we describe our work on a MEMS-based acoustic wave biochemical sensor using a membrane resonator. We demonstrate the effects of spatial distributions of mass on the membrane on sensitivity and show how to use this spatial sensitivity to detect multiple targets simultaneously. To do so we derive a function approximating the membrane response surface to spatial mass loadings under the applicable range of conditions. We verify the agreement using finite element methods, and present our initial sensitivity calculations demonstrating the advantages of variable mass loadings.

  11. Evanescent wave absorption sensor based on tapered multimode fiber coated with monolayer graphene film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hengwei; Gao, Saisai; Chen, Peixi; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yang, Cheng; Huo, Yanyan; Yue, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    An evanescent wave absorption (EWA) sensor based on tapered multimode fiber (TMMF) coated with monolayer graphene film for the detection of double-stranded DNA (DS-DNA) is investigated in this work. The TMMF is a silica multimode fiber (nominally at 62.5 μm), which was tapered to symmetric taper with waist diameters of ~30 μm and total length of ~3 mm. Monolayer graphene film was grown on a copper foil via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology and transferred onto skinless tapered fiber core via dry transfer technology. All the components of the sensor are coupled together by fusion splicer in order to eliminate the external disturbance. DS-DNA is created by the assembly of two relatively complemented oligonucleotides. The measurements are obtained by using a spectrometer in the optical wavelength range of 400-900 nm. With the increase of DS-DNA concentration, the output light intensity (OPLI) arisen an obvious attenuation. Importantly, the absorbance (A) and the DS-DNA concentrations shown a reasonable linear variation in a wide range of 5-400 μM. Through a series of comparison, the accuracy of TMMF sensor with graphene (G-TMMF) is much better than that without graphene (TMMF), which can be attributed to the molecular enrichment of graphene by π-π stacking.

  12. Recent developments on surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors for harsh conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiopu, Paul; Chilibon, Irinela; Grosu, Neculai; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    The results of research into Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) devices have been recognized for their efficiency and versatility in the electrical signals processing. Actual progress in the industrial application of piezoelectric materials such as Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3), Langasite (LGS), Lanthanum-Gallium Silicate La3Ga5SiO14 and Gallium Orthophosphate (GaPO4), allows the manufacturing of devices with piezoelectric performances, which overcome the limits obtained with quartz crystals. The single crystal materials have a long term high stability - near to infinite - and moreover, some of these have an excellent behavior with temperature variation. Today, GaPO4 with its properties is by far the best suited piezoelectric material to be used in sensor applications for machine monitoring and pressure measurements, at high temperatures. SAW micro devices based on GaPO4 operate at temperatures of up to 8000C. For a particular case, of harsh-environment applications, additional challenges need to be overcome, relating to substrate integrity and operation, thin film electrode fabrication, device packaging, and sensor interrogation. This paper reviews the novel progres in the area of (SAW) sensors for harsh conditions.

  13. Mass sensitivity analysis and designing of surface acoustic wave resonators for chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshetrimayum, Roshan; Yadava, R. D. S.; Tandon, R. P.

    2009-05-01

    The sensitivity of surface acoustic wave (SAW) chemical sensors depends on several factors such as the frequency and phase point of SAW device operation, sensitivity of the SAW velocity to surface mass loading, sensitivity of the SAW oscillator resonance to the loop phase shift, film thickness and oscillator electronics. This paper analyzes the influence of the phase point of operation in SAW oscillator sensors based on two-port resonator devices. It is found that the mass sensitivity will be enhanced if the SAW device has a nonlinear dependence on the frequency (delay ~ frequency-1). This requires the device to generate and operate in a ωτg(ω) = const region in the device passband, where ω denotes the angular frequency of oscillation and τg(ω) denotes the phase slope of the SAW resonator device. A SAW coupled resonator filter (CRF) that take advantage of mode coupling is considered in realizing such a device to help in shaping the phase transfer characteristics of a high mass sensitivity sensor. The device design and simulation results are presented within the coupling-of-modes formalism.

  14. Resonance Effects of Bilayered Piezoelectric Films Used for Bulk Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; ZHANG Shu-Yi; FAN Li

    2011-01-01

    The resonance vibrations of acoustic sensors with two layers of (1120) textured hexagonal piezoelectric films are studied.When the acoustic and electric fields satisfy a special match condition,i.e.the phase variation of thickness shear mode (TSM) at each film equals π,both piezoelectric layers with opposite polarization directions reduce the first TSM and generate the second TSM with higher frequency and a higher quality factor.The excited second TSM can increase the product of the operating frequency and the quality factor,which is useful for improving the mass sensitivity and resolution of acoustic sensors.Additionally,both of the piezoelectric films have larger thickness and decrease the risk of mechanical damage in device production processes.Thin film bulk acoustic sensors have attracted great attention due to their small sizes,low power consumption and high sensitivity,etc.[1] The thickness shear mode (TSM) is more suitable for liquid sensing applications since much less acoustic energy is transferred into the liquid medium than that of longitudinal acoustic waves,due to the fact that ideal liquids cannot support propagations of shear waves.By using a TSM with a high resonance frequency,sensorsbased on thin film bulk acoustic resonator structures can be fabricated by the fixing of a sensitive coating on the surface of the device.[2] The binding events at the sensitive coating can cause a shift of the resonance frequency.[3]%The resonance vibrations of acoustic sensors with two layers of (1120) textured hexagonal piezoelectric films are studied. When the acoustic and electric fields satisfy a special match condition, I.e. The phase variation of thickness shear mode (TSM) at each film equals it, both piezoelectric layers with opposite polarization directions reduce the first TSM and generate the second TSM with higher frequency and a higher quality factor. The excited second TSM can increase the product of the operating frequency and the quality factor, which

  15. Digital Detection of Exosomes by Interferometric Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaboul, George G.; Gagni, Paola; Benussi, Luisa; Bettotti, Paolo; Ciani, Miriam; Cretich, Marina; Freedman, David S.; Ghidoni, Roberta; Ozkumur, Ayca Yalcin; Piotto, Chiara; Prosperi, Davide; Santini, Benedetta; Ünlü, M. Selim; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, which are membranous nanovesicles, are actively released by cells and have been attributed to roles in cell-cell communication, cancer metastasis, and early disease diagnostics. The small size (30–100 nm) along with low refractive index contrast of exosomes makes direct characterization and phenotypical classification very difficult. In this work we present a method based on Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS) that allows multiplexed phenotyping and digital counting of various populations of individual exosomes (>50 nm) captured on a microarray-based solid phase chip. We demonstrate these characterization concepts using purified exosomes from a HEK 293 cell culture. As a demonstration of clinical utility, we characterize exosomes directly from human cerebrospinal fluid (hCSF). Our interferometric imaging method could capture, from a very small hCSF volume (20 uL), nanoparticles that have a size compatible with exosomes, using antibodies directed against tetraspanins. With this unprecedented capability, we foresee revolutionary implications in the clinical field with improvements in diagnosis and stratification of patients affected by different disorders. PMID:27853258

  16. Evaluating the adhesion of SU-8 thin films using an AlN/Si surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gowini, Mohamed M.; Moussa, Walied A.

    2015-03-01

    A new approach is developed for evaluating the adhesion of SU-8 thin films using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor. The SAW sensor consists of a silicon (Si) substrate coated with a thin aluminum nitride (AlN) film and two sets of inter-digital electrodes (IDT) patterned on the AlN surface. Two sensor configurations are developed in order to evaluate the adhesion of SU-8. In the first configuration the SU-8 layer is patterned on top of a gold film that is deposited on the AlN surface. In the second configuration the gold film is coated with an omnicoat layer prior to patterning the SU-8 film. Omnicoat is an adhesion promoter for SU-8, which is used to increase its adhesion to gold. The frequency responses from both configurations are measured and the shift in the center frequency value is evaluated. The results illustrate that without omnicoat the center frequency shifts to a higher value indicating an increase in the wave velocity. This is because the poor adhesion of the SU-8 layer without omnicoat causes the wave to be more concentrated in the AlN/Si structure and AlN has a higher acoustic wave velocity in comparison to the SU-8 layer. In addition, four SAW sensors operating at four different center frequencies are developed to investigate the change in sensor sensitivity with the increase in center frequency. The results indicate that the sensor sensitivity increases proportionally to the increase in operating frequency. Finally, a theoretical model is developed to calculate the wave dispersion profile for the SU-8/AlN/Si configuration. The interface of the SU-8/AlN layers is modeled as a layer of mass-less springs with stiffness K(N m-3). The shifts in the wave dispersion profile at different levels of interface spring stiffness are compared to the experimental values to evaluate the adhesion of the SU-8 layer.

  17. A Love Wave Reflective Delay Line with Polymer Guiding Layer for Wireless Sensor Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shitang He

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an optimal design for a Love wave reflective delay line on 41o YX LiNbO3 with a polymer guiding layer for wireless sensor applications. A theoretical model was established to describe the Love wave propagation along the larger piezoelectric substrate with polymer waveguide, and the lossy mechanism from the viscoelastic waveguide was discussed, which results in the optimal guiding layer thickness. Coupling of modes (COM was used to determine the optimal design parameters of the reflective delay line structured by single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and shorted grating reflectors. Using the network analyzer, the fabricated Love wave reflective delay line was characterized, high signal noise ratio (S/N, sharp reflection peaks, and few spurious noise between the peaks were found, and the measured result agrees well with the simulated one. Also, the optimal guiding layer thickness of 1.5~1.8μm was extracted experimentally, and it is consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  18. Analysis of viscous losses in the chemical interface layer of Love wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakoby, B; Vellekoop, M J

    2000-01-01

    Love waves have been introduced as highly effective devices for liquid-sensing applications. For chemical sensors, a microacoustic delay line featuring a multilayered waveguide supporting a generalised Love wave mode can be used in an oscillator setup. The top layer of the waveguide is a chemical interface, which selectively adsorbs certain target molecules in the adjacent liquid. The increase in mass density caused by adsorption can be detected as changes in the oscillation frequency. Commonly used interface materials show viscoelastic losses leading to an unwanted damping of the wave. To keep the signal-to-noise ratio high, the total insertion loss of the delay line should be kept as low as possible. Furthermore, it must not exceed a certain value to allow the electronic circuitry to sustain the oscillation. We analyzed the viscoelastic losses, which strongly depend on the frequency being used. By means of the proposed theoretical approach, the maximum thickness of the interface layer can be determined not to exceed the losses that can be handled by the driving electronics.

  19. Graphene oxide as sensitive layer in Love-wave surface acoustic wave sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayago, Isabel; Matatagui, Daniel; Fernández, María Jesús; Fontecha, José Luis; Jurewicz, Izabela; Garriga, Rosa; Muñoz, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    A Love-wave device with graphene oxide (GO) as sensitive layer has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants. Sensitive films were fabricated by airbrushing GO dispersions onto Love-wave devices. The resulting Love-wave sensors detected very low CWA simulant concentrations in synthetic air at room temperature (as low as 0.2 ppm for dimethyl-methylphosphonate, DMMP, a simulant of sarin nerve gas, and 0.75 ppm for dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether, DPGME, a simulant of nitrogen mustard). High responses to DMMP and DPGME were obtained with sensitivities of 3087 and 760 Hz/ppm respectively. Very low limit of detection (LOD) values (9 and 40 ppb for DMMP and DPGME, respectively) were calculated from the achieved experimental data. The sensor exhibited outstanding sensitivity, good linearity and repeatability to all simulants tested. The detection mechanism is here explained in terms of hydrogen bonding formation between the tested CWA simulants and GO.

  20. Magnonic interferometric switch for multi-valued logic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balynsky, Michael; Kozhevnikov, Alexander; Khivintsev, Yuri; Bhowmick, Tonmoy; Gutierrez, David; Chiang, Howard; Dudko, Galina; Filimonov, Yuri; Liu, Guanxiong; Jiang, Chenglong; Balandin, Alexander A.; Lake, Roger; Khitun, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    We investigated a possible use of the magnonic interferometric switches in multi-valued logic circuits. The switch is a three-terminal device consisting of two spin channels where input, control, and output signals are spin waves. Signal modulation is achieved via the interference between the source and gate spin waves. We report experimental data on a micrometer scale prototype based on the Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 structure. The output characteristics are measured at different angles of the bias magnetic field. The On/Off ratio of the prototype exceeds 13 dB at room temperature. Experimental data are complemented by the theoretical analysis and the results of micro magnetic simulations showing spin wave propagation in a micrometer size magnetic junction. We also present the results of numerical modeling illustrating the operation of a nanometer-size switch consisting of just 20 spins in the source-drain channel. The utilization of spin wave interference as a switching mechanism makes it possible to build nanometer-scale logic gates, and minimize energy per operation, which is limited only by the noise margin. The utilization of phase in addition to amplitude for information encoding offers an innovative route towards multi-state logic circuits. We describe possible implementation of the three-value logic circuits based on the magnonic interferometric switches. The advantages and shortcomings inherent in interferometric switches are also discussed.

  1. MEMS Gyroscope with Interferometric Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a novel MEMS gyroscope that uses micro-interferometric detection to measure the motion of the proof mass. Using an interferometric...

  2. Multi-sensor millimeter-wave system for hidden objects detection by non-collaborative screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouaoui, Rhalem; Czarny, Romain; Diaz, Frédéric; Khy, Antoine; Lamarque, Thierry

    2011-05-01

    In this work, we present the development of a multi-sensor system for the detection of objects concealed under clothes using passive and active millimeter-wave (mmW) technologies. This study concerns both the optimization of a commercial passive mmW imager at 94 GHz using a phase mask and the development of an active mmW detector at 77 GHz based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR). A first wide-field inspection is done by the passive imager while the person is walking. If a suspicious area is detected, the active imager is switched-on and focused on this area in order to obtain more accurate data (shape of the object, nature of the material ...).

  3. Progressive Prediction of Turbulence Using Wave-Front Sensor Data in Adaptive Optics Using Data Mining

    CERN Document Server

    Vyas, Akondi; Prasad, B Raghavendra

    2009-01-01

    Nullifying the servo bandwidth errors improves the strehl ratio by a substantial quantity in adaptive optics systems. An effective method for predicting atmospheric turbulence to reduce servo bandwidth errors in real time closed loop correction systems is presented using data mining. Temporally evolving phase screens are simulated using Kolmogorov statistics and used for data analysis. A data cube is formed out of the simulated time series. Partial data is used to predict the subsequent phase screens using the progressive prediction method. The evolution of the phase amplitude at individual pixels is segmented by implementing the segmentation algorithms and prediction was made using linear as well as non linear regression. In this method, the data cube is augmented with the incoming wave-front sensor data and the newly formed data cube is used for further prediction. The statistics of the prediction method is studied under different experimental parameters like segment size, decorrelation timescales of turbul...

  4. Sparse aperture differential piston measurements using the pyramid wave-front sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Yan, Zhaojun; Zheng, Lixin; Agapito, Guido; Wang, Chaoyan; Zhu, Nenghong; Zhu, Liyun; Cai, Jianqing; Tang, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the laboratory experiment we settled in the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) to investigate the pyramid wavefront sensor (WFS) ability to measure the differential piston on a sparse aperture. The ultimate goal is to verify the ability of the pyramid WFS work in closed loop to perform the phasing of the primary mirrors of a sparse Fizeau imaging telescope. In the experiment we installed on the optical bench we performed various test checking the ability to flat the wave-front using a deformable mirror and to measure the signal of the differential piston on a two pupils setup. These steps represent the background from which we start to perform full closed loop operation on multiple apertures. These steps were also useful to characterize the achromatic double pyramids (double prisms) manufactured in the SHAO optical workshop.

  5. A Theoretical Study of Love Wave Sensors Based on ZnO–Glass Layered Structures for Application to Liquid Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Caliendo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of surface acoustic Love modes along ZnO/glass-based structures was modeled and analysed with the goal of designing a sensor able to detect changes in the environmental parameters, such as liquid viscosity changes and minute amounts of mass supported in the viscous liquid medium. Love mode propagation was modeled by numerically solving the system of coupled electro-mechanical field equations and Navier–Stokes equations. The phase and group velocities and the attenuation of the acoustic wave propagating along the 30° tilted c-axis ZnO/glass structure contacting a viscous non-conductive liquid were calculated for different ZnO guiding layer thicknesses, added mass thicknesses, and liquid viscosity and density. The three sensor responses, i.e., the wave phase and group velocity, and attenuation changes are calculated for different environmental parameters and related to the sensor velocity and attenuation sensitivities. The resulted sensitivities to liquid viscosity and added mass were optimized by adjusting the ZnO guiding layer thickness corresponding to a sensitivity peak. The present analysis is valuable for the manufacture and application of the ZnO-glass structure Love wave sensors for the detection of liquid properties, such as viscosity, density and mass anchored to the sensor surface.

  6. A Theoretical Study of Love Wave Sensors Based on ZnO–Glass Layered Structures for Application to Liquid Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Cinzia; Hamidullah, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of surface acoustic Love modes along ZnO/glass-based structures was modeled and analysed with the goal of designing a sensor able to detect changes in the environmental parameters, such as liquid viscosity changes and minute amounts of mass supported in the viscous liquid medium. Love mode propagation was modeled by numerically solving the system of coupled electro-mechanical field equations and Navier–Stokes equations. The phase and group velocities and the attenuation of the acoustic wave propagating along the 30° tilted c-axis ZnO/glass structure contacting a viscous non-conductive liquid were calculated for different ZnO guiding layer thicknesses, added mass thicknesses, and liquid viscosity and density. The three sensor responses, i.e., the wave phase and group velocity, and attenuation changes are calculated for different environmental parameters and related to the sensor velocity and attenuation sensitivities. The resulted sensitivities to liquid viscosity and added mass were optimized by adjusting the ZnO guiding layer thickness corresponding to a sensitivity peak. The present analysis is valuable for the manufacture and application of the ZnO-glass structure Love wave sensors for the detection of liquid properties, such as viscosity, density and mass anchored to the sensor surface. PMID:27918419

  7. A Theoretical Study of Love Wave Sensors Based on ZnO-Glass Layered Structures for Application to Liquid Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Cinzia; Hamidullah, Muhammad

    2016-12-02

    The propagation of surface acoustic Love modes along ZnO/glass-based structures was modeled and analysed with the goal of designing a sensor able to detect changes in the environmental parameters, such as liquid viscosity changes and minute amounts of mass supported in the viscous liquid medium. Love mode propagation was modeled by numerically solving the system of coupled electro-mechanical field equations and Navier-Stokes equations. The phase and group velocities and the attenuation of the acoustic wave propagating along the 30° tilted c-axis ZnO/glass structure contacting a viscous non-conductive liquid were calculated for different ZnO guiding layer thicknesses, added mass thicknesses, and liquid viscosity and density. The three sensor responses, i.e., the wave phase and group velocity, and attenuation changes are calculated for different environmental parameters and related to the sensor velocity and attenuation sensitivities. The resulted sensitivities to liquid viscosity and added mass were optimized by adjusting the ZnO guiding layer thickness corresponding to a sensitivity peak. The present analysis is valuable for the manufacture and application of the ZnO-glass structure Love wave sensors for the detection of liquid properties, such as viscosity, density and mass anchored to the sensor surface.

  8. Interferometric Plasmonic Lensing with Nanohole Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-18

    Nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) of nanohole arrays in gold films maps propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from lithographically patterned structures. Strong near field photoemission patterns are observed in the PEEM images, recorded following low angle of incidence irradiation of nanohole arrays with sub-15 fs laser pulses centered at 780 nm. The recorded photoemission patterns are attributed to constructive and destructive interferences between PSPs launched from the individual nanoholes which comprise the array. By exploiting the wave nature of PSPs, we demonstrate how varying the array geometry (hole diameter, pitch, and number of rows/columns) ultimately yields intense localized photoemission. Through a combination of PEEM and finite-difference time-domain simulations, we identify the optimal array geometry for efficient light coupling and interferometric plasmonic lensing. We show a preliminary application of inteferometric plasmonic lensing by enhancing the photoemission from the vertex of a gold triangle using nanohole array.

  9. A surface acoustic wave sensor functionalized with a polypyrrole molecularly imprinted polymer for selective dopamine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maouche, Naima; Ktari, Nadia; Bakas, Idriss; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Seydou, Mahamadou; Maurel, François; Chehimi, Mohammed Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    A surface acoustic wave sensor operating at 104 MHz and functionalized with a polypyrrole molecularly imprinted polymer has been designed for selective detection of dopamine (DA). Optimization of pyrrole/DA ratio, polymerization and immersion times permitted to obtain a highly selective sensor, which has a sensitivity of 0.55°/mM (≈ 550 Hz/mM) and a detection limit of ≈ 10 nM. Morphology and related roughness parameters of molecularly imprinted polymer surfaces, before and after extraction of DA, as well as that of the non imprinted polymer were characterized by atomic force microscopy. The developed chemosensor selectively recognized dopamine over the structurally similar compound 4-hydroxyphenethylamine (referred as tyramine), or ascorbic acid,which co-exists with DA in body fluids at a much higher concentration. Selectivity tests were also carried out with dihydroxybenzene, for which an unexpected phase variation of order of 75% of the DA one was observed. Quantum chemical calculations, based on the density functional theory, were carried out to determine the nature of interactions between each analyte and the PPy matrix and the DA imprinted PPy polypyrrole sensing layer in order to account for the important phase variation observed during dihydroxybenzene injection.

  10. Air temperature measurements based on the speed of sound to compensate long distance interferometric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrua Milena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A method to measure the real time temperature distribution along an interferometer path based on the propagation of acoustic waves is presented. It exploits the high sensitivity of the speed of sound in air to the air temperature. In particular, it takes advantage of a special set-up where the generation of the acoustic waves is synchronous with the amplitude modulation of a laser source. A photodetector converts the laser light to an electronic signal considered as reference, while the incoming acoustic waves are focused on a microphone and generate a second signal. In this condition, the phase difference between the two signals substantially depends on the temperature of the air volume interposed between the sources and the receivers. The comparison with the traditional temperature sensors highlighted the limit of the latter in case of fast temperature variations and the advantage of a measurement integrated along the optical path instead of a sampling measurement. The capability of the acoustic method to compensate the interferometric distance measurements due to air temperature variations has been demonstrated for distances up to 27 m.

  11. Interferometric detection of mode splitting for whispering gallery mode biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Knittel, Joachim; Lee, Kwan H; Bowen, Warwick P

    2010-01-01

    Sensors based on whispering gallery mode resonators can detect single nanoparticles and even single molecules. Particles attaching to the resonator induce a doublet in the transmission spectrum which provides a self-referenced detection signal. However, in practice this spectral feature is often obscured by the width of the resonance line which hides the doublet structure. This happens particularly in liquid environments that reduce the effective Q factor of the resonator. In this paper we demonstrate an interferometric set-up that allows the direct detection of the hidden doublet and thus provides a pathway for developing practical sensor applications.

  12. An S-FSCW Based Multi-Channel Reader System for Beamforming Applications using Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pfeffer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Interrogating multiple surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors located within the same radar beam require techniques to separate the multiple superposing SAW sensor responses. The presented multi-channel reader features four parallel transceiver channels, which are based on the switched frequency-stepped continuous-wave principle and high-speed parallelized baseband electronics. Thus classical beamforming applications including angle of arrival measurement of single SAW tags and the angular separation of multiple SAW sensors are presented and compared to a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO approach. Due to the larger virtual array in the MIMO approach a larger aperture can be synthesized, which leads to significantly better angular separation results. The level analysis for the given system is verified by baseband-power measurements at different readout distances, considering the hardware parameters as well as the free-space propagation aspects. Finally measurements assess the maximum interrogation distance for the system.

  13. Highly sensitive and ultrafast response surface acoustic wave humidity sensor based on electrospun polyaniline/poly(vinyl butyral) nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Qianqian [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li Yang, E-mail: liyang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang Mujie [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2012-10-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyanline/poly(vinyl butyral) nanofibers are prepared by electrospinning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofiber-based SAW humidity sensor show high sensitivity and ultrafast response. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SAW sensor can detect very low humidity. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANi) composite nanofibers were deposited on surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator with a central frequency of 433 MHz to construct humidity sensors. Electrospun nanofibers of poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), poly(ethylene oxide), poly(vinylidene fluoride), poly(vinyl butyral) (PVB) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and humidity response of corresponding SAW humidity sensors were investigated. The results indicated that PVB was suitable as a matrix to form nanofibers with PANi by electrospinning (ES). Electrospun PANi/PVB nanofibers exhibited a core-sheath structure as revealed by transmittance electron microscopy. Effects of ES collection time on humidity response of SAW sensor based on PANi/PVB nanofibers were examined at room temperature. The composite nanofiber sensor exhibited very high sensitivity of {approx}75 kHz/%RH from 20 to 90%RH, ultrafast response (1 s and 2 s for humidification and desiccation, respectively) and good sensing linearity. Furthermore, the sensor could detect humidity as low as 0.5%RH, suggesting its potentials for low humidity detection. Attempts were done to explain the attractive humidity sensing performance of the sensor by considering conductivity, hydrophilicity, viscoelasticity and morphology of the polymer composite nanofibers.

  14. Canopy reconstruction from interferometric SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varekamp, C.

    2001-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is investigated as a method for 3D tree mapping. When operational, the method may be important for monitoring forests with a persistent cloud cover such as tropical rain forests. The problem of crown displacement due to lay-over in a vegetation with a

  15. Two-Wavelength Interferometric Keratometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Eric; Page, Norman

    1991-01-01

    Proposed interferometric keratometer measures shapes of corneas without touching them. Used to test strongly aspherical optics. Resembling present commercial lens-testing interferometers, generates interferograms representative of deviation of surfaces under test from sphericity. Such interferograms used to generate contour maps of surfaces. Measures corneal topography to diameters as large as 12 mm.

  16. Temperature Frequency Characteristics of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO Polymer Coated Rayleigh Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Resonators for Gas-Phase Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina I. Radeva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Temperature induced frequency shifts may compromise the sensor response of polymer coated acoustic wave gas-phase sensors operating in environments of variable temperature. To correct the sensor data with the temperature response of the sensor the latter must be known. This study presents and discusses temperature frequency characteristics (TFCs of solid hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO polymer coated sensor resonators using the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (RSAW mode on ST-cut quartz. Using a RF-plasma polymerization process, RSAW sensor resonators optimized for maximum gas sensitivity have been coated with chemosensitive HMDSO films at 4 different thicknesses: 50, 100, 150 and 250 nm. Their TFCs have been measured over a (−100 to +110 °C temperature range and compared to the TFC of an uncoated device. An exponential 2,500 ppm downshift of the resonant frequency and a 40 K downshift of the sensor’s turn-over temperature (TOT are observed when the HMDSO thickness increases from 0 to 250 nm. A partial temperature compensation effect caused by the film is also observed. A third order polynomial fit provides excellent agreement with the experimental TFC curve. The frequency downshift due to mass loading by the film, the TOT and the temperature coefficients are unambiguously related to each other.

  17. Ultrasonic torsional guided wave sensor for flow front monitoring inside molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvanathan, Karthik; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2007-01-01

    Measuring the extent of flow of viscous fluids inside opaque molds has been a very important parameter in determining the quality of products in the manufacturing process such as injection molding and resin transfer molding. Hence, in this article, an ultrasonic torsional guided wave sensor has been discussed for monitoring the movement of flow front during filling of resins in opaque molds. A pair of piezoelectric normal shear transducers were used for generating and receiving the fundamental ultrasonic torsional guided wave mode in thin copper wires. The torsional mode was excited at one end of the wire, while the flowing viscous fluid progressively wet the other free end of the wire. The time of flight of the transient reflections of this fundamental mode from the air-fluid interface, where the wire enters the resin, was used to measure the position of the fluid flow front. Experiments were conducted on four fluids with different viscosity values. Two postprocessing algorithms were developed for enhancing the transient reflected signal and for suppressing the unwanted stationary signals. The algorithms were tested for cases where the reflected signals showed a poor signal to noise ratio.

  18. Mechanism of operation and design considerations for surface acoustic wave device vapor sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohltjen, H.

    1984-04-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices offer many attractive features for application as vapor phase chemical microsensors. This paper describes the characteristics of SAW devices and techniques by which they can be employed as vapor sensors. The perturbation of SAW amplitude and velocity by polymeric coating films was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High sensitivity can be achieved when the device is used as the resonating element in a delay line oscillator circuit. A simple equation has been developed from theoretical considerations which offers reasonably accurate quantitative predictions of SAW Device frequency shifts when subjected to a given mass loading. In this mode the SAW device behaves in a fashion very similar to conventional bulk wave quartz crystal microbalance except that the sensitivity can be several orders of magnitude higher and the device size can be several orders of magnitude smaller. Detection of mass changes of less than 1 femtogram by a SAW device having a surface area of 0.0001 square cm. is theoretically possible.

  19. A hybrid MAC protocol design for energy-efficient very-high-throughput millimeter wave, wireless sensor communication networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wei; Estevez, Claudio; Chowdhury, Arshad; Jia, Zhensheng; Wang, Jianxin; Yu, Jianguo; Chang, Gee-Kung

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents an energy-efficient Medium Access Control (MAC) protocol for very-high-throughput millimeter-wave (mm-wave) wireless sensor communication networks (VHT-MSCNs) based on hybrid multiple access techniques of frequency division multiplexing access (FDMA) and time division multiplexing access (TDMA). An energy-efficient Superframe for wireless sensor communication network employing directional mm-wave wireless access technologies is proposed for systems that require very high throughput, such as high definition video signals, for sensing, processing, transmitting, and actuating functions. Energy consumption modeling for each network element and comparisons among various multi-access technologies in term of power and MAC layer operations are investigated for evaluating the energy-efficient improvement of proposed MAC protocol.

  20. Introduction to the 30m Ring Interferometric Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Qian, S.-B.

    2007-08-01

    For the demand of astronomical limitation observations, such as exploring extra-terrestrial planets, black hole accretion disk and jet in the near-infrared and optical wave band, extremely large telescopes (optical and infrared) have become the principal ground-based astronomical instrumentation. With the maturation of interferometric imaging theory, the borderline between new generation ground-based extremely large telescope and interferometric array for aperture synthesis imaging is increasingly going blurring and the only differences in their technical methods and characteristics are also gradually disappearing. Based on the research result of interferometric imaging in Yunnan Observatory, we bring forward a new concept ground-based extremely large telescope -- 30m Ring Interferometric Telescope (30mRIT). It has the direct imaging ability and resolution like single aperture telescope, and it also can image with high resolution like the aperture synthesis imaging mode. The 30m RIT has a ring spherical primary mirror with 90 segmented mirrors, the width of the ring is 1 meter and the F/D ratio is about 0.8.This report also introduces some high resolution astronomical observe results by one meter ring which is 1 m diameter and 100 mm width. The 30mRIT project is remarkably different from the conventional ground-base ELT and its pivotal techniques have got the support of CAS and China NSF.

  1. Submersible optical sensors exposed to chemically dispersed crude oil: wave tank simulations for improved oil spill monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conmy, Robyn N; Coble, Paula G; Farr, James; Wood, A Michelle; Lee, Kenneth; Pegau, W Scott; Walsh, Ian D; Koch, Corey R; Abercrombie, Mary I; Miles, M Scott; Lewis, Marlon R; Ryan, Scott A; Robinson, Brian J; King, Thomas L; Kelble, Christopher R; Lacoste, Jordanna

    2014-01-01

    In situ fluorometers were deployed during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) Gulf of Mexico oil spill to track the subsea oil plume. Uncertainties regarding instrument specifications and capabilities necessitated performance testing of sensors exposed to simulated, dispersed oil plumes. Dynamic ranges of the Chelsea Technologies Group AQUAtracka, Turner Designs Cyclops, Satlantic SUNA and WET Labs, Inc. ECO, exposed to fresh and artificially weathered crude oil, were determined. Sensors were standardized against known oil volumes and total petroleum hydrocarbons and benzene-toluene-ethylbenzene-xylene measurements-both collected during spills, providing oil estimates during wave tank dilution experiments. All sensors estimated oil concentrations down to 300 ppb oil, refuting previous reports. Sensor performance results assist interpretation of DWH oil spill data and formulating future protocols.

  2. Thermal annealing effect on ZnO surface acoustic wave-based ultraviolet light sensors on glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbo; Gu, Hang; He, Xingli; Xuan, Weipeng; Chen, Jinkai; Wang, Xiaozhi; Luo, J. K.

    2014-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based ultraviolet (UV) light sensors have a high sensitivity and have been extensively studied and explored for application. However, all of them were made of piezoelectric (PE) bulk materials or PE thin films on crystalline substrates such as Si and sapphire. This paper reports the fabrication of ZnO thin film SAW UV-light sensors on glass substrates and the effect of post-deposition thermal annealing on the sensing performance. It was found that annealing at temperatures higher than 300 °C can improve the properties of ZnO films and the sensing performance of the UV-sensors remarkably. When the ZnO film annealed at 400 °C was used for sensors, the UV light induced resonant frequency shift increased more than 20 times with the response speed reduced to less than 2.4 s, much better than those made on ZnO films with lower temperature annealing.

  3. Mercury Sorption and Desorption on Gold: A Comparative Analysis of Surface Acoustic Wave and Quartz Crystal Microbalance-Based Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, K M Mohibul; Sabri, Ylias M; Esmaielzadeh Kandjani, Ahmad; Matthews, Glenn I; Field, Matthew; Jones, Lathe A; Nafady, Ayman; Ippolito, Samuel J; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2015-08-04

    Microelectromechanical sensors based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) transducers possess substantial potential as online elemental mercury (Hg(0)) vapor detectors in industrial stack effluents. In this study, a comparison of SAW- and QCM-based sensors is performed for the detection of low concentrations of Hg(0) vapor (ranging from 24 to 365 ppbv). Experimental measurements and finite element method (FEM) simulations allow the comparison of these sensors with regard to their sensitivity, sorption and desorption characteristics, and response time following Hg(0) vapor exposure at various operating temperatures ranging from 35 to 75 °C. Both of the sensors were fabricated on quartz substrates (ST and AT cut quartz for SAW and QCM devices, respectively) and employed thin gold (Au) layers as the electrodes. The SAW-based sensor exhibited up to ∼111 and ∼39 times higher response magnitudes than did the QCM-based sensor at 35 and 55 °C, respectively, when exposed to Hg(0) vapor concentrations ranging from 24 to 365 ppbv. The Hg(0) sorption and desorption calibration curves of both sensors were found to fit well with the Langmuir extension isotherm at different operating temperatures. Furthermore, the Hg(0) sorption and desorption rate demonstrated by the SAW-based sensor was found to decrease as the operating temperature increased, while the opposite trend was observed for the QCM-based sensor. However, the SAW-based sensor reached the maximum Hg(0) sorption rate faster than the QCM-based sensor regardless of operating temperature, whereas both sensors showed similar response times (t90) at various temperatures. Additionally, the sorption rate data was utilized in this study in order to obtain a faster response time from the sensor upon exposure to Hg(0) vapor. Furthermore, comparative analysis of the developed sensors' selectivity showed that the SAW-based sensor had a higher overall selectivity (90%) than did the QCM

  4. Lensless single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, Luis; Ferreira, Carlos; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Single Exposure Super Resolved Interferometric Microscopy (SESRIM) has been recently proposed as a way to achieve one dimensional super resolved imaging in digital holographic microscopy. SESRIM uses Red-Green-Blue (RGB) multiplexing for illuminating the sample having different propagation angles for each one of the three illumination wavelengths and it has been experimentally validated considering color (A. Calabuig, V. Mico, J. Garcia, Z. Zalevsky, and C. Ferreira, "Single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy by red-green-blue multiplexing," Opt. Lett. 36, 885-887, 2011) and monochrome (A. Calabuig, J. Garcia, C. Ferreira, Z. Zalevsky, and V. Mico, "Resolution improvement by single-exposure superresolved interferometric microscopy with a monochrome sensor," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 28, 2346-2358, 2011) digital sensors for holographic recording. In this contribution, we will first review some of the characteristics of the previously reported SESRIM approaches and second, we will present preliminary results for the extension of SESRIM to the field of lensless holographic microscopy. Experimental results are reported validating this new kind of superresolution imaging method named as lensless SESRIM (L-SESRIM).

  5. Evaluation of debonding progress in composite bonded structures by ultrasonic wave sensing with fiber Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Yoji; Kuwahara, Junichiro; Takeda, Nobuo; Ogisu, Toshimichi; Kojima, Seiji; Komatsuzaki, Shinji

    2006-03-01

    The authors are constructing a damage detection system using ultrasonic waves. In this system, a piezo-ceramic actuator generates ultrasonic waves in a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate. After the waves propagate in the laminate, transmitted waves are received by a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor using a newly developed high-speed optical wavelength interrogation system. In this research, this system was applied to the evaluation of debonding progress in CFRP bonded structures. At first, small-diameter FBG sensors, whose cladding diameter is about 1/3 of common optical fibers, were embedded in an adhesive layer of a double-lap type coupon specimen consisting of CFRP quasi-isotropic laminates, and the ultrasonic wave was propagated through the debonded region. After that, the wavelet transform was applied to the received waveforms and the results showed clear difference depending on the debonding length. Hence, a new damage index was proposed, which could be obtained from the difference in the distribution of the wavelet transform coefficient. As a result, the damage index increased with an increase in the debonded area. Furthermore this system was applied to the skin/stringer structural element of airplanes made of CFRP laminates. Both of the waves received by a bonded FBG and by an embedded FBG changed sensitively to the debonding progress. Also, the damage index could evaluate the length of the debonding between the skin and the stringer.

  6. Human Heart Pulse Wave Responses Measured Simultaneously at Several Sensor Placements by Two MR-Compatible Fibre Optic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Myllylä

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental measurements conducted using two noninvasive fibre optic methods for detecting heart pulse waves in the human body. Both methods can be used in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. For comparison, the paper also performs an MRI-compatible electrocardiogram (ECG measurement. By the simultaneous use of different measurement methods, the propagation of pressure waves generated by each heart pulse can be sensed extensively in different areas of the human body and at different depths, for example, on the chest and forehead and at the fingertip. An accurate determination of a pulse wave allows calculating the pulse transit time (PTT of a particular heart pulse in different parts of the human body. This result can then be used to estimate the pulse wave velocity of blood flow in different places. Both measurement methods are realized using magnetic resonance-compatible fibres, which makes the methods applicable to the MRI environment. One of the developed sensors is an extraordinary accelerometer sensor, while the other one is a more common sensor based on photoplethysmography. All measurements, involving several test patients, were performed both inside and outside an MRI room. Measurements inside the MRI room were conducted using a 3-Tesla strength closed MRI scanner in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology at the Oulu University Hospital.

  7. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  8. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  9. Lamb-Wave Embedded NDE with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Thin-Wall Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2004-02-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are inexpensive, non-intrusive, unobtrusive devices that can be surface-mounted on existing structures or inserted between the layers of new composite structures. The PWAS can be used in both active and passive modes. PWAS generate and detect Lamb waves and enable the development of embedded NDE concepts. This paper will present two embedded NDE concepts based on the PWAS technology and Lamb waves approach. The first concept utilizes traveling Lamb waves and could be described as embedded ultrasonics. It is shown that embedded PWAS are able to reproduce most of the conventional ultrasonic techniques, such as pitch-catch, pulse-echo, and phased array. Several experiments using Lamb waves traveling in thin-wall structures are presented.

  10. Inductive wireless sensor-actuator node for structural health monitoring of fiber reinforced polymers by means of Lamb-waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focke, Oliver; Salas, Mariugenia; Herrmann, Axel S.; Lang, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Wireless excitation of Piezo-Wafer-Active-Sensors (PWAS) was achieved using Low-frequency coils produced via Tailored-Fiber-Placement. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer behaves as conductor and depending on the frequency it shields radio waves; this effect is rising at high-frequency. A high permeability material was placed under the highfrequency antenna and re-tuning was performed to improve the quality of transmission. In this manner sensor responses were successfully transmitted wirelessly by analog amplitude modulation. The signals were evaluated to verify the functionality in presence of defects like delamination or holes. Generated power was confirmed to be enough to excite the actuator.

  11. Research on interferometric photonic crystal fiber hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Zhang, Zhen-hui; Wang, Fu-yin; Xiong, Shui-dong

    2013-08-01

    Current research on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) for acoustic sensing was focused on the PCF's pressure sensitivity enhancement. However, whether the enhancement of the PCF's pressure sensitivity can be actually realized is still controversial. Practical hydrophone, utilizing PCFs, to manifest its superior sensitivity to normal single mode fibers (SMFs) for acoustic sensing, should be made. Account to this point of view, actual hydrophone was fabricated. Index guiding PCF was used, the fiber core is solid silicon dioxide (SiO2), and the cladding is SiO2 filled with lots of periodical transverse circular air hollows. The PCF, mounted on an air-backed mandrel for structural sensitivity enhancement, was used as a sensing arm of the fiber Michelson interferometer. The other arm, so called reference arm, was made of SMF. Faraday rotator mirrors (FRM) were spliced in the end of each interferometric arm account for polarization induced phase fading, which is a common scheme in fiber interferometric sensing systems. A similar hydrophone, with all the same structure except that the PCF was exchanged into SMF, was also fabrication to make the contrast. The narrowlinewidth and frequency-tunable optical fiber laser was used to achieve high accuracy optical interferometric measurement. Meanwhile, the phase generated carrier (PGC) modulation-demodulation scheme was adopted to interrogate the measurand signal. Experiment was done by using acoustic standing-wave test apparatus. Linearity characteristics of the two hydrophones were measured at frequency 100Hz, 500Hz, and 1000Hz, experimental results showed that the maximum error of the linearity was 10%, a little larger than the theoretical results. Pressure sensitivities of the PCF hydrophone and the SMF hydrophone were measured using a reference standard PZT hydrophone in the frequency range from 20 Hz to 1600 Hz, the measurement data showed that the sensitivity of the PCF hydrophone was about -162.8 dB re. rad/μPa, with a

  12. Interferometric visibility and coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Tanmoy; García Díaz, María; Winter, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Recently, the basic concept of quantum coherence (or superposition) has gained a lot of renewed attention, after Baumgratz et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 140401. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.140401)), following Åberg (http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0612146), have proposed a resource theoretic approach to quantify it. This has resulted in a large number of papers and preprints exploring various coherence monotones, and debating possible forms for the resource theory. Here, we take the view that the operational foundation of coherence in a state, be it quantum or otherwise wave mechanical, lies in the observation of interference effects. Our approach here is to consider an idealized multi-path interferometer, with a suitable detector, in such a way that the visibility of the interference pattern provides a quantitative expression of the amount of coherence in a given probe state. We present a general framework of deriving coherence measures from visibility, and demonstrate it by analysing several concrete visibility parameters, recovering some known coherence measures and obtaining some new ones.

  13. IRAN: interferometric remapped array nulling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristidi, Eric; Vakili, Farrokh; Abe, Lyu; Belu, Adrian; Lopez, Bruno; Lanteri, Henri; Schutz, A.; Menut, Jean-Luc

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes a method of beam-combination in the so-called hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. The method we propose is an alternative to the Michelson pupil reconfiguration that suffers from the loss of the classical object-image convolution relation. From elementary theory of Fourier optics we demonstrate that this problem can be solved by observing in a combined pupil plane instead of an image plane. The point-source intensity distribution (PSID) of this interferometric "image" tends towards a psuedo Airy disc (similar to that of a giant monolithic telescope) for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. Our method is applicable to snap-shot imaging of extended sources with a field comparable to the Airy pattern of single telescopes operated in a co-phased multi-aperture interferometric array. It thus allows to apply conveniently pupil plane coronagraphy. Our technique called Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling (IRAN) is particularly suitable for high dynamic imaging of extra-solar planetary companions, circumstellar nebulosities or extra-galactic objects where long baseline interferometry would closely probe the central regions of AGNs for instance.

  14. Detection of fast transients with radio interferometric arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, N D R; Cox, P J; Gupta, Y; Prasad, J; Roy, J; Bailes, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Kudale, S S; van Straten, W

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation radio arrays, including the SKA and its pathfinders, will open up new avenues for exciting transient science at radio wavelengths. Their innovative designs, comprising a large number of small elements, pose several challenges in digital processing and optimal observing strategies. The Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT)presents an excellent test-bed for developing and validating suitable observing modes and strategies for transient experiments with future arrays. Here we describe the first phase of the ongoing development of a transient detection system for GMRT that is planned to eventually function in a commensal mode with other observing programs. It capitalizes on the GMRT's interferometric and sub-array capabilities, and the versatility of a new software backend. We outline considerations in the plan and design of transient exploration programs with interferometric arrays, and describe a pilot survey that was undertaken to aid in the development of algorithms and associated analysis s...

  15. Interferometric key readable security holograms with secrete-codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Kumar; D Mohan; A K Aggarwal

    2007-03-01

    A new method is described to create secrete-codes in the security holograms for enhancing their anti-counterfeiting characteristics. To imitate these codes is difficult as pure phase objects having complex phase distribution function are used to modulate the object beam that is recorded in conjunction with an encoded interferometric reference beam derived from a key hologram. Lloyd's folding mirror interferometer is used to convert phase variations of the reconstructed wave-front into an intensity pattern for hologram authenticity verification. Creating the secrete-codes through an interferometric reference beam from the key hologram facilitates a multi-stage authenticity verification as well as easy repositioning of the security hologram through a specific Moiré pattern generated during the verification process.

  16. Highly sensitive and ultrafast response surface acoustic wave humidity sensor based on electrospun polyaniline/poly(vinyl butyral) nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qianqian; Li, Yang; Yang, Mujie

    2012-10-20

    Polyaniline (PANi) composite nanofibers were deposited on surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator with a central frequency of 433 MHz to construct humidity sensors. Electrospun nanofibers of poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), poly(ethylene oxide), poly(vinylidene fluoride), poly(vinyl butyral) (PVB) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and humidity response of corresponding SAW humidity sensors were investigated. The results indicated that PVB was suitable as a matrix to form nanofibers with PANi by electrospinning (ES). Electrospun PANi/PVB nanofibers exhibited a core-sheath structure as revealed by transmittance electron microscopy. Effects of ES collection time on humidity response of SAW sensor based on PANi/PVB nanofibers were examined at room temperature. The composite nanofiber sensor exhibited very high sensitivity of ~75kHz/%RH from 20 to 90%RH, ultrafast response (1s and 2s for humidification and desiccation, respectively) and good sensing linearity. Furthermore, the sensor could detect humidity as low as 0.5%RH, suggesting its potentials for low humidity detection. Attempts were done to explain the attractive humidity sensing performance of the sensor by considering conductivity, hydrophilicity, viscoelasticity and morphology of the polymer composite nanofibers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sensitivity Enhancement for Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors by Four Wave Mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangbing Du

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available All-optical signal processing based on four wave mixing (FWM in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF to enhance the sensitivity of a fiber sensor is demonstrated and comprehensively reviewed in this paper. The principle is based on the frequency chirp magnification (FCM by FWM. Degenerated FWM, cascaded two-stage FWM and pump-pulsed FWM with optical parametric amplification (OPA are experimentally utilized for magnifying the frequency chirp. By using the pump pulse modulation to increase the peak power, OPA can be induced with the use of a dispersion-optimized HNLF. Therefore, ultra-highly efficient FWM can be realized due to the high peak power and OPA. By using the fiber Bragg grating (FBG laser as the FWM pump, the wavelength drift of the FBG can thus be magnified due to the FCM. We obtain a sensing performance of 13.3 pm/με strain sensitivity and 141.2 pm/°C temperature sensitivity for a conventional FBG, which has an intrinsic strain sensitivity of only ~1 pm/με and an intrinsic temperature sensitivity of only ~10 pm/°C, respectively.

  18. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchang Hao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO2 deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device.

  19. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenchang; Liu, Jiuling; Liu, Minghua; Liang, Yong; He, Shitang

    2016-04-20

    The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO₂) deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device.

  20. Iteratively Weighted Centroiding for Shack-Hartmann Wave-Front Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K L; Moallem, M M

    2007-02-28

    Several techniques have been used with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors to determine the local wave-front gradient across each lenslet. In this article we introduce an iterative weighted technique which is specifically targeted for open-loop applications such as aberrometers and metrology. In this article the iterative centroiding technique is compared to existing techniques such as center-of-mass with thresholding, weighted center-of-gravity, matched filter and cross-correlation. Under conditions of low signal-to-noise ratio, the iterative weighted centroiding algorithm is demonstrated to produce a lower variance in the reconstructed phase than existing techniques. The iteratively weighted algorithm was also compared in closed-loop and demonstrated to have the lowest error variance along with the weighted center-of-gravity, however, the iteratively weighted algorithm removes the bulk of the aberration in roughly half the iterations than the weighted center-of-gravity algorithm. This iterative weighted algorithm is also well suited to applications such as guiding on telescopes.

  1. A Synthetic Phased Array Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor for Quantifying Bolt Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasim Guldiken

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report our findings on implementing a synthetic phased array surface acoustic wave sensor to quantify bolt tension. Maintaining proper bolt tension is important in many fields such as for ensuring safe operation of civil infrastructures. Significant advantages of this relatively simple methodology is its capability to assess bolt tension without any contact with the bolt, thus enabling measurement at inaccessible locations, multiple bolt measurement capability at a time, not requiring data collection during the installation and no calibration requirements. We performed detailed experiments on a custom-built flexible bench-top experimental setup consisting of 1018 steel plate of 12.7 mm (½ in thickness, a 6.4 mm (¼ in grade 8 bolt and a stainless steel washer with 19 mm (¾ in of external diameter. Our results indicate that this method is not only capable of clearly distinguishing properly bolted joints from loosened joints but also capable of quantifying how loose the bolt actually is. We also conducted detailed signal-to-noise (SNR analysis and showed that the SNR value for the entire bolt tension range was sufficient for image reconstruction.

  2. Oscillating wave displacement sensor using the enhanced Goos-Hänchen effect in a symmetrical metal-cladding optical waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianyi; Li, Honggen; Cao, Zhuangqi; Wang, Yi; Shen, Qishun; He, Ying

    2008-05-01

    An oscillating wave displacement sensor based on the enhanced Goos-Hänchen (G-H) effect in a symmetrical metal-cladding optical waveguide is proposed. Since the detected signal is irrelevant to the power fluctuation of the incident light and the magnitude of the G-H shift is enhanced to hundreds of micrometers, a 40 pm resolution is demonstrated in our experiment without employing any complicated optical equipment and servo techniques.

  3. Travelling Wave Pulse Coupled Oscillator (TWPCO) Using a Self-Organizing Scheme for Energy-Efficient Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanapi, Zurina Mohd; Othman, Mohamed; Zukarnain, Zuriati Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Pulse Coupled Oscillator (PCO)-based travelling waves have attracted substantial attention by researchers in wireless sensor network (WSN) synchronization. Because WSNs are generally artificial occurrences that mimic natural phenomena, the PCO utilizes firefly synchronization of attracting mating partners for modelling the WSN. However, given that sensor nodes are unable to receive messages while transmitting data packets (due to deafness), the PCO model may not be efficient for sensor network modelling. To overcome this limitation, this paper proposed a new scheme called the Travelling Wave Pulse Coupled Oscillator (TWPCO). For this, the study used a self-organizing scheme for energy-efficient WSNs that adopted travelling wave biologically inspired network systems based on phase locking of the PCO model to counteract deafness. From the simulation, it was found that the proposed TWPCO scheme attained a steady state after a number of cycles. It also showed superior performance compared to other mechanisms, with a reduction in the total energy consumption of 25%. The results showed that the performance improved by 13% in terms of data gathering. Based on the results, the proposed scheme avoids the deafness that occurs in the transmit state in WSNs and increases the data collection throughout the transmission states in WSNs. PMID:28056020

  4. Travelling Wave Pulse Coupled Oscillator (TWPCO) Using a Self-Organizing Scheme for Energy-Efficient Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mekhlafi, Zeyad Ghaleb; Hanapi, Zurina Mohd; Othman, Mohamed; Zukarnain, Zuriati Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Pulse Coupled Oscillator (PCO)-based travelling waves have attracted substantial attention by researchers in wireless sensor network (WSN) synchronization. Because WSNs are generally artificial occurrences that mimic natural phenomena, the PCO utilizes firefly synchronization of attracting mating partners for modelling the WSN. However, given that sensor nodes are unable to receive messages while transmitting data packets (due to deafness), the PCO model may not be efficient for sensor network modelling. To overcome this limitation, this paper proposed a new scheme called the Travelling Wave Pulse Coupled Oscillator (TWPCO). For this, the study used a self-organizing scheme for energy-efficient WSNs that adopted travelling wave biologically inspired network systems based on phase locking of the PCO model to counteract deafness. From the simulation, it was found that the proposed TWPCO scheme attained a steady state after a number of cycles. It also showed superior performance compared to other mechanisms, with a reduction in the total energy consumption of 25%. The results showed that the performance improved by 13% in terms of data gathering. Based on the results, the proposed scheme avoids the deafness that occurs in the transmit state in WSNs and increases the data collection throughout the transmission states in WSNs.

  5. Real-time short-wave infrared hyperspectral conformal imaging sensor for the detection of threat materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Shi, Lei; Zbur, Lucas; Priore, Ryan J.; Treado, Patrick J.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems can provide sensitive and specific detection and identification of high value targets in the presence of complex backgrounds. However, current generation sensors are typically large and costly to field, and do not usually operate in real-time. Sensors that are capable of real-time operation have to compromise on the number of spectral bands, image definition, and/or the number of targets being detected. Additionally, these systems command a high cost and are typically designed and configured for specific mission profiles, making them unable to adapt to multiple threats within often rapidly evolving and dynamic missions. Despite these shortcomings, HSI-based sensors have proven to be valuable tools, thus resulting in increased demand for HSI technology. A cost-effective sensor system that can easily and quickly adapt to accomplish significantly different tasks in a changing environment is highly desirable. The capability to detect and identify user-defined targets in complex backgrounds under a range of varying conditions with an easily reconfigured, automated, real-time, portable HSI sensor is a critical need. ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISSTM) is developing a novel real-time, adaptable, compressive sensing short-wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging technology called the Reconfigurable Conformal Imaging Sensor (RCIS). RCIS will address many shortcomings of current generation systems and offer improvements in operational agility and detection performance, while addressing sensor weight, form factor and cost needs. This paper discusses the development of the RCIS system, and considers its application in various use scenarios.

  6. Airborne hyperspectral imaging in the visible-to-mid wave infrared spectral range by fusing three spectral sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Filipovs, Jevgenijs; Erinš, Gatis; Taskovs, Juris

    2014-10-01

    Airborne hyperspectral imaging is widely used for remote sensing of environment. The choice of spectral region usually depends on the availability and cost of the sensor. Visible-to-near infrared (400-1100 nm) spectral range corresponds to spectral sensitivity of relatively cheap Si detectors therefore it is the most commonly used. The implementation of shortwave infrared (1100-3000 nm) requires more expensive solutions, but can provide valuable information about the composition of the substance. Mid wave infrared (3000-8000 nm) is rarely used for civilian applications, but it provides information on the thermal emission of materials. The fusion of different sensors allows spectral analysis of a wider spectral range combining and improving already existing algorithms for the analysis of chemical content and classification. Here we introduce our Airborne Surveillance and Environmental Monitoring System (ARSENAL) that was developed by fusing seven sensors. The first test results from the fusion of three hyperspectral imaging sensors in the visible-to-mid wave infrared (365-5000 nm) are demonstrated. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to test correlation between principal components (PCs) and common vegetation indices.

  7. Inverse least-squares modeling of vapor descriptors using polymer-coated surface acoustic wave sensor array responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, J W; Patrash, S J; Kaganovet, S N; Abraham, M H; Wise, B M; Gallagher, N B

    2001-11-01

    In previous work, it was shown that, in principle, vapor descriptors could be derived from the responses of an array of polymer-coated acoustic wave devices. This new chemometric classification approach was based on polymer/vapor interactions following the well-established linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs) and the surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducers being mass sensitive. Mathematical derivations were included and were supported by simulations. In this work, an experimental data set of polymer-coated SAW vapor sensors is investigated. The data set includes 20 diverse polymers tested against 18 diverse organic vapors. It is shown that interfacial adsorption can influence the response behavior of sensors with nonpolar polymers in response to hydrogen-bonding vapors; however, in general, most sensor responses are related to vapor interactions with the polymers. It is also shown that polymer-coated SAW sensor responses can be empirically modeled with LSERs, deriving an LSER for each individual sensor based on its responses to the 18 vapors. Inverse least-squares methods are used to develop models that correlate and predict vapor descriptors from sensor array responses. Successful correlations can be developed by multiple linear regression (MLR), principal components regression (PCR), and partial least-squares (PLS) regression. MLR yields the best fits to the training data, however cross-validation shows that prediction of vapor descriptors for vapors not in the training set is significantly more successful using PCR or PLS. In addition, the optimal dimension of the PCR and PLS models supports the dimensionality of the LSER formulation and SAW response models.

  8. Temperature-compensated Love wave based gas sensor on waveguide structure of SiO2/36° YX LiTaO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Xie, Xiao; Chen, Gui; Liu, Jiuling; He, Shitang

    2015-06-01

    A temperature-compensated Love wave device was proposed for gas sensing utilizing a waveguide structure of SiO2/36° YX LiTaO3. Significant improvement in the temperature stability of the hybrid Love wave device was implemented by varying the guiding layer thickness. The optimal values yielding low cross-sensitivity to temperature and high mass sensitivity in gas sorption were determined theoretically by solving the coupled electromechanical field equation in layered media. The theoretical analysis was confirmed experimentally in dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP) detection by using a fluoroalcoholpolysiloxane (SXFA) coated Love wave sensor. The experimental results indicate that better sensitivity and excellent temperature stability were obtained from the developed Love wave gas sensor over the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensors.

  9. The Evaluation of Piezoelectric Contact Target Sensor Taking Account of the Wave Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Efremov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical fuses usually do not provide high performance in the process of destruction of such objects as the armored vehicles. Shaped and armor-piercing high-explosive shells have a heading part of low strength. This prevents from achieving a required level of contact force (reaction or inertia, which is necessary for reliable operation of the target sensor. At the same time, electromechanical fuses have higher sensitivity and operating speed rates being capable of adaptive response to the conditions of shell encountering with the target. A generalized block diagram of the fuse is analysed, and a mathematical model of the piezoelectric transducer (PT as a sensing element of the fuse contact sensor target (CST is proposed. The model takes into account the empirical dependence of the relative permittivity of piezoelectric ceramics on the electric field. An approximate method of calculating the response of PT is presented. It is oriented at evaluating the propagation of a short stress pulse of high intensity, the geometric length of which is commensurate with the length of the piezoelectric element (PE. In this case significantly increases the role of wave processes in the ammunition shell and the PT itself. The calculation is based on the use of the concept of equivalent stress, which is obtained by averaging its diagrams at each time point along the PE. The method allows to analyze the sequence of loading phases passing through the PE body, which depends on the ratio of said geometrical parameters and quantitative characteristics of the output electrical signal of the transducer. An example of estimating the performance of a real piezoelectric CTS is presented. The experimentally obtained force characteristic of the head of piezoelectric fuse is taken into account as well as the encountering speed of the shell and the threshold operating level of the firing train actuator. Calculation results are in good agreement with the results of field tests

  10. Full-Wave Algorithm to Model Effects of Bedding Slopes on the Response of Subsurface Electromagnetic Geophysical Sensors near Unconformities

    CERN Document Server

    Sainath, Kamalesh

    2015-01-01

    We propose a full-wave pseudo-analytical numerical electromagnetic (EM) algorithm to model subsurface induction sensors, traversing planar-layered geological formations of arbitrary EM material anisotropy and loss, which are used, for example, in the exploration of hydrocarbon reserves. Unlike past pseudo-analytical planar-layered modeling algorithms that impose parallelism between the formation's bed junctions however, our method involves judicious employment of Transformation Optics techniques to address challenges related to modeling arbitrarily-oriented, relative slope (i.e., tilting) between said junctions. The algorithm exhibits this flexibility, both with respect to anisotropy in the formation layers as well as junction tilting, via employing special planar slabs that coat each "flattened" (i.e., originally tilted) planar interface, locally redirecting the incident wave within the coating slabs to cause wave fronts to interact with the flattened interfaces as if they were still tilted with a specific, ...

  11. Ultrasensitive and selective detection of dopamine using cobalt-phthalocyanine nanopillar-based surface acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourati, Najla; Seydou, Mahamadou; Zerrouki, Chouki; Singh, Ajay; Samanta, Soumen; Maurel, François; Aswal, Dinesh K; Chehimi, Mohamed

    2014-12-24

    A highly selective and sensitive surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor of dopamine (DA) was developed by depositing cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) nanopillars on gold-coated sensing platform of SAW sensor. The developed biosensor presents a sensitivity of 1.6°/nM, has a low limit of detection (LOD) on the order of 0.1 nM, and imparts more selectivity toward DA, since the detection limit of the interfering ascorbic acid (AA) is as high as 1 mM. To understand the selectivity mechanisms of this sensor toward DA, density functional theory-based chemical calculations were carried out. Calculations suggest two different types of interactions: dative bond with a very strong character for DA-CoPc complexes, and significant ionic character in the case of AA-CoPc ones. The interaction energies, in liquid phase, were estimated to be equal to -81 kJ mol(-1) and -38 kJ mol(-1) for DA-CoPc and AA-CoPc complexes, respectively, therefore accounting for the selective detection of DA over AA using tandem CoPc nanopillar-based SAW sensor device. This work demonstrates a simple and efficient design of SAW sensors employing thin nanostructured CoPc biomolecular recognition layers for DA detection.

  12. Interferometric Measurement Of Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danyluk, Steven; Andonian, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Stress averaged through thickness of plate measured nondestructively. Theory of elasticity combined with laser interferometric technique into technique for measurement of residual stresses in solid objects - usually in thin, nominally-flat plates. Measurements particularly useful in inspection of wafers of single-crystal silicon for making solar cells or integrated circuits, because stresses remaining after crystal-growing process cause buckling or fracture. Used to predict deflections of plates caused by known applied loads under specified boundary condition, or to infer applied loads that cause known deflections. Also used to relate known deflections to residual stresses equivalent to stresses produced by fictitious applied loads.

  13. An All Fiber White Light Interferometric Absolute Temperature Measurement System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonggon Harrison Kim

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently the author of this article proposed a new signal processing algorithm for an all fiber white light interferometer. In this article, an all fiber white light interferometric absolute temperature measurement system is presented using the previously proposed signal processing algorithm. Stability and absolute temperature measurement were demonstrated. These two tests demonstrated the feasibility of absolute temperature measurement with an accuracy of 0.015 fringe and 0.0005 fringe, respectively. A hysteresis test from 373K to 873K was also presented. Finally, robustness of the sensor system towards laser diode temperature drift, AFMZI temperature drift and PZT non-linearity was demonstrated.

  14. Application of Motion Sensors for Beam-Tracking of Mobile Stations in mmWave Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duk-Sun Shim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In a millimeter wave (mmWave communication system with transmit/receive (Tx/Rx beamforming antennas, small variation in device behavior or an environmental change can destroy beam alignment, resulting in power loss in the received signal. In this situation, the beam-tracking technique purely based on the received signal is not effective because both behavioral changes (rotation, displacement and environmental changes (blockage result in power loss in the received signal. In this paper, a motion sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS as well as an electrical signal is used for beam tracking to identify the cause of beam error, and an efficient beam-tracking technique is proposed. The motion sensors such as accelerometers, gyroscopes, and geo-magnetic sensor are composed of an attitude heading reference system (AHRS and a zero-velocity detector (ZVD. The AHRS estimates the rotation angle and the ZVD detects whether the device moves. The proposed technique tracks a beam by handling the specific situation depending on the cause of beam error, minimizing the tracking overhead. The performance of the proposed beam-tracking technique is evaluated by simulations in three typical scenarios.

  15. Integrated Antenna Solutions for Wireless Sensor and Millimeter-Wave Systems

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents various integrated antenna solutions for different types of systems and applications, e.g. wireless sensors, broadband handsets, advanced base stations, MEMS-based reconfigurable front-ends, automotive anti-collision radars, and large area electronics. For wireless sensor applications, a T-matched dipole is proposed and integrated in an electrically small body-worn sensor node. Measurement techniques are developed to characterize the port impedance and radiation propertie...

  16. Wideband Interferometric Sensing and Imaging Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, James Salvatore; Kessler, Otto; Boerner, Wolfgang-Martin

    1996-01-01

    Wideband Interferometric Sensing and Imaging Polarimetry (WISIP) has become an important, indispensible tool in wide area military surveillance and global environmental monitoring of the terrestrial and planetary covers. It enables dynamic, real time optimal feature extraction of significant characteristics of desirable targets and/or target sections with simultaneous suppression of undesirable background clutter and propagation path speckle at hitherto unknown clarity and never before achieved quality. WISIP may be adopted to the detection, recognition, and identification (DRI) of any stationary, moving or vibrating targets or distributed scatterer segments versus arbitrary stationary, dynamical changing and/or moving geo-physical/ecological environments, provided the instantaneous 2x2 phasor and 4x4 power density matrices for forward propagation/backward scattering, respectively, can be measured with sufficient accuracy. For example, the DRI of stealthy, dynamically moving inhomogeneous volumetric scatter environments such as precipitation scatter, the ocean/sea/lake surface boundary layers, the littoral coastal surf zones, pack ice and snow or vegetative canopies, dry sands and soils, etc. can now be successfully realized. A comprehensive overview is presented on how these modern high resolution/precision, complete polarimetric co-registered signature sensing and imaging techniques, complemented by full integration of novel navigational electronic tools, such as DGPS, will advance electromagnetic vector wave sensing and imaging towards the limits of physical realization. Various examples utilizing the most recent image data take sets of airborne, space shuttle, and satellite imaging systems demonstrate the utility of WISIP.

  17. Evaluation of fatigue cracks using nonlinearities of acousto-ultrasonic waves acquired by an active sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing; Wang, Qiang; Cheng, Li

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in using the nonlinear features of acousto-ultrasonic (AU) waves to detect damage onset (e.g., micro-fatigue cracks) due to their high sensitivity to damage with small dimensions. However, most existing approaches are able to infer the existence of fatigue damage qualitatively, but fail to further ascertain its location and severity. A damage characterization approach, in conjunction with the use of an active piezoelectric sensor network, was established, capable of evaluating fatigue cracks in a quantitative manner (including the co-presence of multiple fatigue cracks, and their individual locations and severities). Fundamental investigations, using both experiment and enhanced finite element analysis dedicated to the simulation of nonlinear AU waves, were carried out to link the accumulation of nonlinearities extracted from high-order AU waves to the characteristic parameters of a fatigue crack. A probability-based diagnostic imaging algorithm was developed, facilitating an intuitive presentation of identification results in images. The approach was verified experimentally by evaluating multi-fatigue cracks near rivet holes of a fatigued aluminum plate, showing satisfactory precision in characterizing real, barely visible fatigue cracks. Compared with existing methods, this approach innovatively (i) uses permanently integrated active sensor networks, conducive to automatic and online health monitoring; (ii) characterizes fatigue cracks at a quantitative level; (iii) allows detection of multiple fatigue cracks; and (iv) visualizes identification results in intuitive images.

  18. On the GNSS-R Interferometric Complex Field Coherence Time

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, G

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the microwave bistatic scattering process, with the aim of deriving an expression for the interferometric complex field auto-correlation function from a static platform. We start from the Fresnel integral and derive the auto-correlation function in the Fraunhofer and Modified Fraunhofer regime. The autocorrelation function at short times can be expressed as a Gaussian with a direction dependent time scale. The directional modulation is a function of the angle between the scattering direction and the wave direction. The obtained relation can be used for directional sea state estimation using one or more GNSS-R coastal receivers.

  19. Real time three-dimensional space video rate sensors for millimeter waves imaging based very inexpensive plasma LED lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanon, Assaf; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Kopeika, Natan S.; Rozban, Daniel; Abramovich, Amir

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, much effort has been invested to develop inexpensive but sensitive Millimeter Wave (MMW) detectors that can be used in focal plane arrays (FPAs), in order to implement real time MMW imaging. Real time MMW imaging systems are required for many varied applications in many fields as homeland security, medicine, communications, military products and space technology. It is mainly because this radiation has high penetration and good navigability through dust storm, fog, heavy rain, dielectric materials, biological tissue, and diverse materials. Moreover, the atmospheric attenuation in this range of the spectrum is relatively low and the scattering is also low compared to NIR and VIS. The lack of inexpensive room temperature imaging systems makes it difficult to provide a suitable MMW system for many of the above applications. In last few years we advanced in research and development of sensors using very inexpensive (30-50 cents) Glow Discharge Detector (GDD) plasma indicator lamps as MMW detectors. This paper presents three kinds of GDD sensor based lamp Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). Those three kinds of cameras are different in the number of detectors, scanning operation, and detection method. The 1st and 2nd generations are 8 × 8 pixel array and an 18 × 2 mono-rail scanner array respectively, both of them for direct detection and limited to fixed imaging. The last designed sensor is a multiplexing frame rate of 16x16 GDD FPA. It permits real time video rate imaging of 30 frames/ sec and comprehensive 3D MMW imaging. The principle of detection in this sensor is a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) system while each of the 16 GDD pixel lines is sampled simultaneously. Direct detection is also possible and can be done with a friendly user interface. This FPA sensor is built over 256 commercial GDD lamps with 3 mm diameter International Light, Inc., Peabody, MA model 527 Ne indicator lamps as pixel detectors. All three sensors are fully supported

  20. Detection of coffee flavour ageing by solid-phase microextraction/surface acoustic wave sensor array technique (SPME/SAW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barié, Nicole; Bücking, Mark; Stahl, Ullrich; Rapp, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The use of polymer coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor arrays is a very promising technique for highly sensitive and selective detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We present new developments to achieve a low cost sensor setup with a sampling method enabling the highly reproducible detection of volatiles even in the ppb range. Since the VOCs of coffee are well known by gas chromatography (GC) research studies, the new sensor array was tested for an easy assessable objective: coffee ageing during storage. As reference method these changes were traced with a standard GC/FID set-up, accompanied by sensory panellists. The evaluation of GC data showed a non-linear characteristic for single compound concentrations as well as for total peak area values, disabling prediction of the coffee age. In contrast, the new SAW sensor array demonstrates a linear dependency, i.e. being capable to show a dependency between volatile concentration and storage time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Highly sensitive room-temperature surface acoustic wave (SAW) ammonia sensors based on Co₃O₄/SiO₂ composite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong-Liang; Li, Zhi-Jie; Ma, Jin-Yi; Su, Hai-Qiao; Guo, Yuan-Jun; Wang, Lu; Du, Bo; Chen, Jia-Jun; Zhou, Weilie; Yu, Qing-Kai; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2014-09-15

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors based on Co3O4/SiO2 composite sensing films for ammonia detection were investigated at room temperature. The Co3O4/SiO2 composite films were deposited onto ST-cut quartz SAW resonators by a sol-gel method. SEM and AFM characterizations showed that the films had porous structures. The existence of SiO2 was found to enhance the ammonia sensing property of the sensor significantly. The sensor based on a Co3O4/SiO2 composite film, with 50% Co3O4 loading, which had the highest RMS value (3.72), showed the best sensing property. It exhibited a positive frequency shift of 3500 Hz to 1 ppm ammonia as well as excellent selectivity, stability and reproducibility at room temperature. Moreover, a 37% decrease in the conductance of the composite film as well as a positive frequency shift of 12,500 Hz were observed when the sensor was exposed to 20 ppm ammonia, indicating the positive frequency shift was derived from the decrease in film conductance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimation of liquid properties by inverse problem analysis based on shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kento; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    A shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor can detect liquid properties, such as viscosity, density, permittivity, and conductivity. The advantage of using the SH-SAW sensors is the simultaneous detection of the mechanical and electrical properties of liquids. In this paper, we proposed a method of estimating the density and viscosity of liquids based on the inverse problem analysis. Glycerol or ethanol aqueous solutions were measured. The estimated and literature values were compared. For glycerol aqueous solutions, when the concentration is low, those values agree well. However, when the concentration is high, those values did not agree because the bulk modulus of glycerin solutions cannot be assumed as constant. On the other hand, as the bulk modulus of ethanol aqueous solutions can be assumed to be the same as that of water, the deviations between those values were small. Therefore, the proposed method is effective when the bulk modulus is assumed as constant.

  3. Titanium Dioxide-Based 64∘ YX LiNbO3 Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. Sadek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2 and gold (Au doped TiO2-based surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors have been investigated as hydrogen gas detectors. The nanocrystal-doped TiO2 films were synthesized through a sol-gel route, mixing a Ti-butoxide-based solution with diluted colloidal gold nanoparticles. The films were deposited via spin coating onto 64∘ YX LiNbO3 SAW transducers in a helium atmosphere. The SAW gas sensors were operated at various temperatures between 150 and 310∘C. It was found that gold doping on TiO2 increased the device sensitivity and reduced the optimum operating temperature.

  4. Chemical Sensing Using Infrared Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy: Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (SWIR CRDS) Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Richard M.; Harper, Warren W.; Aker, Pam M.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2003-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project is to explore and develop the science and technology behind point and stand off infrared (IR) spectroscopic chemical sensors that are needed for detecting weapons proliferation activity and countering terrorism. Missions addressed include detecting chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons and their production; counter terrorism measures that involve screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons and/or their residues; and mapping of contaminated areas. The science and technology developed in this program is dual use in that it additionally supports progress in a diverse set of agendas that include chemical weapons defense programs, air operations activities, emissions monitoring, law enforcement, and medical diagnostics. Sensors for these missions require extremely low limits of detection because many of the targeted signature species are either present in low concentrations or have extremely low vapor pressures. The sensors also need to be highly selective as the environments that they will be operated in will contain a variety of interferent species and false positive detection is not an option. PNNL has been working on developing a class of sensors that draw vapor into optical cavities and use laser-based spectroscopy to identify and quantify the vapor chemical content. The cavity enhanced spectroscopies (CES) afford extreme sensitivity, excellent selectivity, noise immunity, and rapid, real-time, in-situ chemical characterization. PNNL's CES program is currently focused on developing two types of sensors. The first one, which is based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), uses short wave infrared (SWIR) lasers to interrogate species. The second sensor, which is based on noise immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE OHMS), uses long wave infrared (LWIR

  5. Michelsonův interferometr

    OpenAIRE

    Rýc, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Diplomová práce se zabývá bezkontaktními optickými metodami měření vzdálenosti a rychlosti (vibrací). Je zde uveden základní přehled a teoretická rešerže těchto metod. Podrobně je zde rozebrána zejména problematika interferometrických metod pro měření vibrací. Obsahuje rozdělení interferometrů, popis principu jejich funkce a rovněž obsahuje kapitoly zabývající se prvky, které se v interferometrech používají, jako lasery, fotodetektory a prvky v optické trase paprsku (polarizátory, retardéry a...

  6. Coupled determination of gravimetric and elastic effects on two resonant chemical sensors: love wave and microcantilever platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Ludivine; Zimmermann, Céline; Dufour, Isabelle; Déjous, Corinne; Rebière, Dominique; Pistré, Jacques

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to couple theoretical and experimental results from microcantilevers and Love-wave acoustic devices in order to identify and separate mass loading effects from elastic effects. This is important in the perspective of sensing applications. For that, a thin-film polymer is deposited on both resonant platforms. It is demonstrated that microcantilevers are essentially mass sensitive. They allow one to determine the polymer layer thickness, which is validated by optical profilometry measurements. Then, taking into account this thickness, theoretical modeling and experimental measurements with Love-wave devices permit one to estimate an equivalent elastic shear modulus of the thin-film polymer at high frequency. Results are interesting if one is to fully understand and optimize (bio)chemical sensor responses.

  7. Analysis of measurement algorithms and modelling of interferometric signals for infrared astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Donata, Bonino

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of interferometric parameters values is affected by phase disturbance due especially to atmospheric turbulences. Algorithms of fringe sensing, aimed at fringe parameters identification, are based on interferometric models that have to be carefully adapted to the interfered beams, including variability sources. All information is contained in the collected signals, and how to extract it is subject of researches. In the first part of the thesis, we present the fringe sensing algorithms proposed for two different fringe sensors for the ESO VLTI: FINITO and PRIMA FSU. We highlight how they must adapt to the different instrumental layouts, and we summarize their performance both on simulated and on laboratory data. In the second part, we show the results of the application of some statistical techniques to real interferometric signals. With the time series analysis we examine the composition of signals before and after the combination, separating pure random effects and peculiar features from trends. W...

  8. Interferometric correlator for acoustic radiation and underlying structural vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Adela; Kilpatrick, James; Markov, Vladimir; Bendiksen, Oddvar O.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the background and principles of an optical non-contact sensor fusion concept, the Interferometric Correlator for Acoustic Radiation and Underlying Structural Vibration (ICARUSV) and give practical example of its capabilities, focusing on its ability to simultaneously capture, visualize and quantitatively characterize full-field non-stationary structural dynamics and unsteady radiated sound fields or transient flow fields around the structure of interest. The ICARUSV's multi-sensor design is based on a parallel architecture and therefore the data capture is fast and inherently support a wide variety of spatio-temporal or spatio-spectral analysis methods which characterize the structural or acoustic/flow field dynamics as it occurs in real time, including short-lived transient events. No other technology available today offers this level of multi-parameter multi-dimensional data1.

  9. All-optical phase modulation for integrated interferometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dante, Stefania; Duval, Daphné; Sepúlveda, Borja; González-Guerrero, Ana Belen; Sendra, José Ramón; Lechuga, Laura M

    2012-03-26

    We present the theoretical and the experimental implementation of an all-optical phase modulation system in integrated Mach-Zehnder Interferometers to solve the drawbacks related to the periodic nature of the interferometric signal. Sensor phase is tuned by modulating the emission wavelength of low-cost commercial laser diodes by changing their output power. FFT deconvolution of the signal allows for direct phase readout, immune to sensitivity variations and to light intensity fluctuations. This simple phase modulation scheme increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurements in one order of magnitude, rendering in a sensor with a detection limit of 1.9·10⁻⁷ RIU. The viability of the all-optical modulation approach is demonstrated with an immunoassay detection as a biosensing proof of concept.

  10. Possibility to sound the atmospheric ozone by a radiosonde equipped with two temperature sensors, sensitive and non-sensitive to the long wave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, T.; Sumi, T.

    1994-01-01

    The sensitiveness of white coated thermistor sensors and non-sensitiveness of the gold coated over white thermistor sensors (which have been manufactured by a vacuum evaporation process) to long wave radiation were ascertained by some simple experiments in-room and also by analyses of some results of experimental soundings. From results of analyses on the temperature discrepancies caused by long wave radiation, the possibility to sound the atmospheric ozone partial pressure by a radiosonde equipped with two kinds of sensors, sensitive and non-sensitive to the long wave radiation was suggested, and the test results of the newly developed software for the deduction of ozone partial pressure in upper layers was also shown. However, it was found that the following is the necessary condition to realize the purpose. The sounding should be made by a radiosonde equipped with three sensors, instead of two, one being non-sensitive to the long wave radiation perfectly, and the other two also non-sensitive partially to the downward one, with two different angles of exposure upward. It is essential for the realization of the purpose to get two different values of temperature discrepancies simultaneously observed by the three sensors mentioned above and to avoid the troublesome effects of the upward long wave radiation.

  11. Current status of gravitational-wave observations

    OpenAIRE

    Fairhurst, Stephen; Guidi, Gianluca M.; Hello, Patrice; Whelan, John T; Woan, Graham

    2009-01-01

    The first generation of gravitational wave interferometric detectors has taken data at, or close to, their design sensitivity. This data has been searched for a broad range of gravitational wave signatures. An overview of gravitational wave search methods and results are presented. Searches for gravitational waves from unmodelled burst sources, compact binary coalescences, continuous wave sources and stochastic backgrounds are discussed.

  12. Optimal Design of a Polyaniline-Coated Surface Acoustic Wave Based Humidity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Xie, Xiao; He, Shitang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal design for a new humidity sensor composed of a dual-resonator oscillator configuration with an operation frequency of 300 MHz, and a polyaniline (PANI) coating deposited along the resonation cavity of the sensing device. To improve the corrosion resistance of the sensor chip, Al/Au electrodes were used to form the SAW resonator. Prior to device fabrication, the coupling of modes (COM) model was used for the performance prediction and optimal design parameters determination. Two SAW resonators with Al/Au electrodes were fabricated on an ST-X quartz substrate, and used as the frequency control element in the feedback path of an oscillator circuit. A PANI thin coating was deposited onto the resonator cavity of the sensing device by a spinning approach as the sensor material for relative humidity (RH) detection. High detection sensitivity, quick response, good repeatability and stability were observed from the sensor experiments at room temperature.

  13. Optimal Design of a Polyaniline-Coated Surface Acoustic Wave Based Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an optimal design for a new humidity sensor composed of a dual-resonator oscillator configuration with an operation frequency of 300 MHz, and a polyaniline (PANI coating deposited along the resonation cavity of the sensing device. To improve the corrosion resistance of the sensor chip, Al/Au electrodes were used to form the SAW resonator. Prior to device fabrication, the coupling of modes (COM model was used for the performance prediction and optimal design parameters determination. Two SAW resonators with Al/Au electrodes were fabricated on an ST-X quartz substrate, and used as the frequency control element in the feedback path of an oscillator circuit. A PANI thin coating was deposited onto the resonator cavity of the sensing device by a spinning approach as the sensor material for relative humidity (RH detection. High detection sensitivity, quick response, good repeatability and stability were observed from the sensor experiments at room temperature.

  14. Low-power Broadband Digitizer for Millimeter-Wave Sensor Array Readout Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Multiplexing in frequency domain using a bank of high-Q micro-resonators is an emerging method of reading out large arrays of transition-edge sensors and...

  15. Chronology of Fabry-Perot Interferometer Fiber-Optic Sensors and Their Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rajibul Islam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical fibers have been involved in the area of sensing applications for more than four decades. Moreover, interferometric optical fiber sensors have attracted broad interest for their prospective applications in sensing temperature, refractive index, strain measurement, pressure, acoustic wave, vibration, magnetic field, and voltage. During this time, numerous types of interferometers have been developed such as Fabry-Perot, Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, Sagnac Fiber, and Common-path interferometers. Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI fiber-optic sensors have been extensively investigated for their exceedingly effective, simple fabrication as well as low cost aspects. In this study, a wide variety of FPI sensors are reviewed in terms of fabrication methods, principle of operation and their sensing applications. The chronology of the development of FPI sensors and their implementation in various applications are discussed.

  16. Chronology of Fabry-Perot interferometer fiber-optic sensors and their applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Rajibul; Ali, Muhammad Mahmood; Lai, Man-Hong; Lim, Kok-Sing; Ahmad, Harith

    2014-04-24

    Optical fibers have been involved in the area of sensing applications for more than four decades. Moreover, interferometric optical fiber sensors have attracted broad interest for their prospective applications in sensing temperature, refractive index, strain measurement, pressure, acoustic wave, vibration, magnetic field, and voltage. During this time, numerous types of interferometers have been developed such as Fabry-Perot, Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, Sagnac Fiber, and Common-path interferometers. Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) fiber-optic sensors have been extensively investigated for their exceedingly effective, simple fabrication as well as low cost aspects. In this study, a wide variety of FPI sensors are reviewed in terms of fabrication methods, principle of operation and their sensing applications. The chronology of the development of FPI sensors and their implementation in various applications are discussed.

  17. Cross-calibration of interferometric SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Generation of digital elevation models from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data is a well established technique. Achieving a high geometric fidelity calls for a calibration accounting for inaccurate navigation data and system parameters as well as system imperfections. Fully...

  18. A coatable, light-weight, fast-response nanocomposite sensor for the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance: from structural vibration to ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhihui; Liu, Menglong; Xu, Hao; Liu, Weijian; Liao, Yaozhong; Jin, Hao; Zhou, Limin; Zhang, Zhong; Su, Zhongqing

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by an innovative sensing philosophy, a light-weight nanocomposite sensor made of a hybrid of carbon black (CB)/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) has been developed. The nanoscalar architecture and percolation characteristics of the hybrid were optimized in order to fulfil the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance from low-frequency vibration to high-frequency ultrasonic waves. Dynamic particulate motion induced by elastic disturbance modulates the infrastructure of the CB conductive network in the sensor, with the introduction of the tunneling effect, leading to dynamic alteration in the piezoresistivity measured by the sensor. Electrical analysis, morphological characterization, and static/dynamic electromechanical response interrogation were implemented to advance our insight into the sensing mechanism of the sensor, and meanwhile facilitate understanding of the optimal percolation threshold. At the optimal threshold (˜6.5 wt%), the sensor exhibits high fidelity, a fast response, and high sensitivity to ultrafast elastic disturbance (in an ultrasonic regime up to 400 kHz), yet with an ultralow magnitude (on the order of micrometers). The performance of the sensor was evaluated against a conventional strain gauge and piezoelectric transducer, showing excellent coincidence, yet a much greater gauge factor and frequency-independent piezoresistive behavior. Coatable on a structure and deployable in a large quantity to form a dense sensor network, this nanocomposite sensor has blazed a trail for implementing in situ sensing for vibration- or ultrasonic-wave-based structural health monitoring, by striking a compromise between ‘sensing cost’ and ‘sensing effectiveness’.

  19. Characterization of the HIV-1 TAR RNA-Tat peptide and drug interactions by on-line acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassew, Nardos Gobena

    This thesis presents the application of the thickness shear-mode (TSM) acoustic wave sensor to the study of RNA-protein and RNA-drug interactions at the solid-liquid interface. The binding of the human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 Tat protein to the trans-activation responsive RNA element (TAR) has been studied using this sensor. Data from such measurements show that the sensor is able to discriminate between different Tat peptides derived from the parent protein based on size. The effects of mutations introduced at specific sites in the protein and RNA on the TAR-Tat binding have also been examined in detail. Reduced level of response in acoustic parameters due to mutations was observed indicating that the decrease in binding in response to site specific mutations can be acoustically detected. Data from acoustic wave sensor measurements indicate that the TAR-Tat binding is also affected by ionic strength. Both the frequency and motional resistance signals show periodic responses when varying concentrations of salt are introduced on a TAR-modified surface. The binding of the two molecules seems to be a function of the response of the nucleic acid to salt concentrations. The kinetics of binding of Tat peptides to TAR RNA and to a bulge mutant analogue (MTAR) is also examined from the rate of change of the series resonant frequency. Results from such analysis illustrate longer Tat peptides formed more stable complexes with TAR RNA and exhibited increased discrimination between mutant and wild type TAR. The binding of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, neomycin and streptomycin, to TAR RNA and their effectiveness in preventing TAR-Tat complex formation has been studied in detail. Binding affinity is directly correlated with the inhibitory potency of these molecules and the TSM sensor shows that neomycin exhibits at least a ten fold greater affinity to TAR and that it is also a more potent inhibitor than streptomycin. The results from this research involving TAR-Tat and

  20. Application of a Winch-type Towed Acoustic Sensor to a Wave-powered Unmanned Surface Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taejun Moh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although many countries have focused on anti-submarine warfare for several decades, underwater submarines can hardly be detected by current assets such as patrol aircraft, surface ships and fixed underwater surveillance systems. Due to the difficult conditions of the oceanic environment and the relative quietness of submarines, existing acoustic surveillance platforms are not able to fully cover their mission areas. To fill in the gaps, a winch-type towed acoustic sensor system was developed and integrated into a wave-powered unmanned surface vehicle by the Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology. In June 2015, sea trial tests were conducted to verify maneuvering, acoustic signal detection, and communication capabilities. During the maneuvering test, the wave-powered glider successfully moved along programmed waypoints. Despite towing the acoustic sensor system, only 20% of initial electricity was consumed in 20 days. The acoustic sensor was lowered to depths of 100–150 m by the winch system, and received signals from an acoustic simulator lowered to depths of 50–100 m by RV Jangmok. Simulated submarine noises that were refracted downward could be clearly received and classified by the hydrophone system, from distances of 2–8 km, while it was being towed silently and deeply. In addition, an optical camera provided high-resolution images of surface vessels, allowing integration with acoustic detection of underwater objects. In conclusion, this new platform using a deeply towed hydrophone system is worthy of consideration as an underwater surveillance asset. Future work is required to strengthen inter-asset communication and obstacle avoidance, and to overcome strong currents to make this technology a reliable part of the underwater surveillance network.

  1. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect "Violin-Mode" (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a "synthesized split photodiode" detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC "shadow notch" outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing "jitter" at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  2. Spin-polarizing interferometric beam splitter for free electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dellweg, Matthias M

    2016-01-01

    A spin-polarizing electron beam splitter is described which relies on an arrangement of linearly polarized laser waves of nonrelativistic intensity. An incident electron beam is first coherently scattered off a bichromatic laser field, splitting the beam into two portions, with electron spin and momentum being entangled. Afterwards, the partial beams are coherently superposed in an interferometric setup formed by standing laser waves. As a result, the outgoing electron beam is separated into its spin components along the laser magnetic field, which is shown by both analytical and numerical solutions of Pauli's equation. The proposed laser field configuration thus exerts the same effect on free electrons like an ordinary Stern-Gerlach magnet does on atoms.

  3. Development of A Surface Acoustic Wave LB MembraneImmunity Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Jie; SHU Na; REN Shu; ZHOU Xianming

    2000-01-01

    A new kind of biosensor for immunology was developed by ultrasonic technique and LB membrane. A double delay-line resonator was made by using ST-cut quartz crystal with working frequency of 149.7 MHz. Then a layer of LB membrane was covered on it. When anti-IgM antibody of various concentrations was added to it, the sensor can be used to detect IgM antigen. The biosensor was highly sensitive, small and light. The experimental results showed that the working frequency change of the sensor was proportional to the concentration of antibody with its dilution ratio between 1:10000 and 1:100. It was also first observed that the frequency curve of the sensor resulting from the reaction of IgM antigen and antibody undulated in the experiment.

  4. INTERFEROMETRIC VIEWS ON THE CEPHEIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mérand

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El método de paralaje de pulsación, o método de Baade-Wesselink (BW, es una poderosa manera de medir distancias a Cefeidas en una manera pseudo-geométrica. En la búsqueda para obtener la más precisa distancia usando interferometría de gran línea de base (alcanzamos 1.5%, nosotros obtuvimos dos resultados quizás no tan insospechados. En primer lugar, nuestros estudios demuestran que alcanzamos un punto donde la suposición que la fotósfera que pulsa se puede aproximar usando modelos estáticos no es válida en el contexto del método BW. En segundo lugar, revelamos la presencia sistemática de envolturas circunestelares (CSE en escala de algunos diámetros estelares, como un leve exceso del infrarrojo cercano, que podría ser una indicación de que está ocurriendo una pérdida de masa. No sólo estos dos resultados representan un sesgo al método BW, y merece ser estudiado observacionalmente, sino también vierten nuevas luces a nuestro conocimiento de las cefeidas y requieren un extenso modelamiento.

  5. Self-Powered Wireless Sensor Node Enabled by a Duck-Shaped Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting Water Wave Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Abdelsalam

    2016-12-08

    This paper presents a fully enclosed duck-shaped triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) for effectively scavenging energy from random and low-frequency water waves. The design of the TENG incorporates the freestanding rolling mode and the pitch motion of a duck-shaped structure generated by incident waves. By investigating the material and structural features, a unit of the TENG device is successfully designed. Furthermore, a hybrid system is constructed using three units of the TENG device. The hybrid system achieves an instantaneous peak current of 65.5 µA with an instantaneous output power density of up to 1.366 W m−2. Following the design, a fluid–solid interaction analysis is carried out on one duck-shaped TENG to understand the dynamic behavior, mechanical efficiency, and stability of the device under various water wave conditions. In addition, the hybrid system is experimentally tested to enable a commercial wireless temperature sensor node. In summary, the unique duck-shaped TENG shows a simple, cost-effective, environmentally friendly, light-weight, and highly stable system. The newly designed TENG is promising for building a network of generators to harvest existing blue energy in oceans, lakes, and rivers.

  6. Active tuning of vibration and wave propagation in elastic beams with periodically placed piezoelectric actuator/sensor pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengming; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Liu, Chunchuan

    2017-04-01

    A novel strategy is proposed to actively tune the vibration and wave propagation properties in elastic beams. By periodically placing the piezoelectric actuator/sensor pairs along the beam axis, an active periodic beam structure which exhibits special vibration and wave propagation properties such as the frequency pass-bands and stop-bands (or band-gaps) is developed. Hamilton's principle is applied to establish the equations of motion of the sub-beam elements i.e. the unit-cells, bonded by the piezoelectric patches. A negative proportional feedback control strategy is employed to design the controllers which can provide a positive active stiffness to the beam for a positive feedback control gain, which can increase the stability of the structural system. By means of the added positive active stiffness, the periodicity or the band-gap property of the beam with periodically placed piezoelectric patches can be actively tuned. From the investigation, it is shown that better band-gap characteristics can be achieved by using the negative proportional feedback control. The band-gaps can be obviously broadened by properly increasing the control gain, and they can also be greatly enlarged by appropriately designing the structural sizes of the controllers. The control voltages applied on the piezoelectric actuators are in reasonable and controllable ranges, especially, they are very low in the band-gaps. Thus, the vibration and wave propagation behaviors of the elastic beam can be actively controlled by the periodically placed piezoelectric patches.

  7. Wireless and Simultaneous Detections of Multiple Bio-Molecules in a Single Sensor Using Love Wave Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haekwan Oh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A Love wave-based biosensor with a 440 MHz center frequency was developed for the simultaneous detection of two different analytes of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG in a single sensor. The developed biosensor consists of one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW reflective delay lines on a 41° YX LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate, a poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA waveguide layer, and two different sensitive films. The Love wave biosensor was wirelessly characterized using two antennas and a network analyzer. The binding of the analytes to the sensitive layers induced a large change in the time positions of the original reflection peaks mainly due to the mass loading effect. The assessed time shifts in the reflection peaks were matched well with the predicted values from coupling of mode (COM modeling. The sensitivities evaluated from the sensitive films were ~15 deg/µg/mL for the rabbit IgG and ~1.8 deg/ng/mL for COMP.

  8. Wireless and simultaneous detections of multiple bio-molecules in a single sensor using Love wave biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Haekwan; Fu, Chen; Kim, Kunnyun; Lee, Keekeun

    2014-11-17

    A Love wave-based biosensor with a 440 MHz center frequency was developed for the simultaneous detection of two different analytes of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) in a single sensor. The developed biosensor consists of one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflective delay lines on a 41° YX LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate, a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) waveguide layer, and two different sensitive films. The Love wave biosensor was wirelessly characterized using two antennas and a network analyzer. The binding of the analytes to the sensitive layers induced a large change in the time positions of the original reflection peaks mainly due to the mass loading effect. The assessed time shifts in the reflection peaks were matched well with the predicted values from coupling of mode (COM) modeling. The sensitivities evaluated from the sensitive films were ~15 deg/µg/mL for the rabbit IgG and ~1.8 deg/ng/mL for COMP.

  9. Theoretical and experimental studies of a surface acoustic wave flow sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yizhong; Li, Zheng; Qin, Lifeng; Chyu, Minking K; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2012-03-01

    A novel SAW flow sensor is proposed based on pressure measurement. The relationship between the flow rate and the pressure difference along the flow path is evaluated. The results show a linear relationship between the flow rate and pressure difference, which agrees with the past research results. Strain analysis and FEM simulation show that phase delay depends linearly on the flow rate passing the SAW sensor, whereas SAW frequency decreases linearly upon the increase of flow rate. Phase delay experiment results agree with analysis and simulation, and the frequency change falls in a reasonable range around the predicted curve.

  10. EO-polymer waveguide based high dynamic range EM wave sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Che-Yun; Zhang, Xingyu; Lee, Beom Suk; Chen, Ray T

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and experimental demonstration of a high dynamic range electric field sensor based on electro-optic (EO) polymer directional coupler waveguides that offers the strong and ultra-fast EO response of EO polymer. As compared to conventional photonic electric field sensors, our directional coupler waveguide design offers several advantages such as bias-free operation, highly linear measurement response up to 70dB, and a wide electric field detection range from 16.7V/m to 750kV/m at a frequency of 1GHz.

  11. Concepts and Development of Bio-Inspired Distributed Embedded Wired/Wireless Sensor Array Architectures for Acoustic Wave Sensing in Integrated Aerospace Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Prosser, William H.; Kirikera, Goutham; Schulz, Mark J.; Hughes, Derke J.; Orisamolu, Wally

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of acoustic emissions in plate structures and their sensing by embedded or surface bonded piezoelectric sensor arrays. Three different modeling efforts for acoustic emission (AE) wave generation and propagation are discussed briefly along with their advantages and disadvantages. Continuous sensors placed at right angles on a plate are being discussed as a new approach to measure and locate the source of acoustic waves. Evolutionary novel signal processing algorithms and bio-inspired distributed sensor array systems are used on large structures and integrated aerospace vehicles for AE source localization and preliminary results are presented. These systems allow for a great reduction in the amount of data that needs to be processed and also reduce the chances of false alarms from ambient noises. It is envisioned that these biomimetic sensor arrays and signal processing techniques will be useful for both wireless and wired sensor arrays for real time health monitoring of large integrated aerospace vehicles and earth fixed civil structures. The sensor array architectures can also be used with other types of sensors and for other applications.

  12. Modeling, design, packing and experimental analysis of liquid-phase shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Thomas B

    Recent advances in microbiology, computational capabilities, and microelectromechanical-system fabrication techniques permit modeling, design, and fabrication of low-cost, miniature, sensitive and selective liquid-phase sensors and lab-on-a-chip systems. Such devices are expected to replace expensive, time-consuming, and bulky laboratory-based testing equipment. Potential applications for devices include: fluid characterization for material science and industry; chemical analysis in medicine and pharmacology; study of biological processes; food analysis; chemical kinetics analysis; and environmental monitoring. When combined with liquid-phase packaging, sensors based on surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) technology are considered strong candidates. For this reason such devices are focused on in this work; emphasis placed on device modeling and packaging for liquid-phase operation. Regarding modeling, topics considered include mode excitation efficiency of transducers; mode sensitivity based on guiding structure materials/geometries; and use of new piezoelectric materials. On packaging, topics considered include package interfacing with SAW devices, and minimization of packaging effects on device performance. In this work novel numerical models are theoretically developed and implemented to study propagation and transduction characteristics of sensor designs using wave/constitutive equations, Green's functions, and boundary/finite element methods. Using developed simulation tools that consider finite-thickness of all device electrodes, transduction efficiency for SAW transducers with neighboring uniform or periodic guiding electrodes is reported for the first time. Results indicate finite electrode thickness strongly affects efficiency. Using dense electrodes, efficiency is shown to approach 92% and 100% for uniform and periodic electrode guiding, respectively; yielding improved sensor detection limits. A numerical sensitivity analysis is presented targeting viscosity

  13. A finite state machine read-out chip for integrated surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshit, Sambarta; Iliadis, Agis A.

    2015-01-01

    A finite state machine based integrated sensor circuit suitable for the read-out module of a monolithically integrated SAW sensor on Si is reported. The primary sensor closed loop consists of a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO), a peak detecting comparator, a finite state machine (FSM), and a monolithically integrated SAW sensor device. The output of the system oscillates within a narrow voltage range that correlates with the SAW pass-band response. The period of oscillation is of the order of the SAW phase delay. We use timing information from the FSM to convert SAW phase delay to an on-chip 10 bit digital output operating on the principle of time to digital conversion (TDC). The control inputs of this digital conversion block are generated by a second finite state machine operating under a divided system clock. The average output varies with changes in SAW center frequency, thus tracking mass sensing events in real time. Based on measured VCO gain of 16 MHz/V our system will convert a 10 kHz SAW frequency shift to a corresponding mean voltage shift of 0.7 mV. A corresponding shift in phase delay is converted to a one or two bit shift in the TDC output code. The system can handle alternate SAW center frequencies and group delays simply by adjusting the VCO control and TDC delay control inputs. Because of frequency to voltage and phase to digital conversion, this topology does not require external frequency counter setups and is uniquely suitable for full monolithic integration of autonomous sensor systems and tags.

  14. Study on Directivity of Rectangular Piezoelectric Sensors Sensing Lamb Waves%矩形压电片对Lamb波传感的方向性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈西府; 刘建; 周海; 葛友华

    2012-01-01

    矩形压电片被广泛用作超声Lamb波的传感器与驱动器.理论推导了矩形压电片对Lamb波(A0模式)的传感灵敏度系数的函数表达式,同时对推导结果进行了实验验证.研究结果表明矩形压电片对Lamb波的传感具有很强的方向性.当Lamb波传播方向沿着矩形压电片长度方向时,矩形压电片传感响应电压最大.随着Lamb波入射角度的增大,响应电压幅值越来越小,当入射方向与矩形压电片长度方向垂直时,响应幅值达到最小.%Rectangular piezoelectric sensors are widely used as Lamb waves sensors and actuators. The function of sensitivity of rectangular piezoelectric sensors sensing Lamb waves (A0 mode) is deduced, and the results are testified by experiments. Results show that rectangular piezoelectric sensors have high directivity to sense Lamb waves. The amplitude of response gets its maximum when Lamb waves are in line with sensor lengthwise direction, the amplitude will turn smaller as the propagating angle increasing and the amplitude of response gets its minimum when Lamb waves are perpendicular to sensor lengthwise direction.

  15. A novel lightweight Fizeau infrared interferometric imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Douglas A.; Hart, Michael; Warner, Steve; Durney, Oli; Romeo, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Aperture synthesis imaging techniques using an interferometer provide a means to achieve imagery with spatial resolution equivalent to a conventional filled aperture telescope at a significantly reduced size, weight and cost, an important implication for air- and space-borne persistent observing platforms. These concepts have been realized in SIRII (Space-based IR-imaging interferometer), a new light-weight, compact SWIR and MWIR imaging interferometer designed for space-based surveillance. The sensor design is configured as a six-element Fizeau interferometer; it is scalable, light-weight, and uses structural components and main optics made of carbon fiber replicated polymer (CFRP) that are easy to fabricate and inexpensive. A three-element prototype of the SIRII imager has been constructed. The optics, detectors, and interferometric signal processing principles draw on experience developed in ground-based astronomical applications designed to yield the highest sensitivity and resolution with cost-effective optical solutions. SIRII is being designed for technical intelligence from geo-stationary orbit. It has an instantaneous 6 x 6 mrad FOV and the ability to rapidly scan a 6x6 deg FOV, with a minimal SNR. The interferometric design can be scaled to larger equivalent filled aperture, while minimizing weight and costs when compared to a filled aperture telescope with equivalent resolution. This scalability in SIRII allows it address a range of IR-imaging scenarios.

  16. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  17. Metamaterial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials have attracted a great deal of attention due to their intriguing properties, as well as the large potential applications for designing functional devices. In this paper, we review the current status of metamaterial sensors, with an emphasis on the evanescent wave amplification and the accompanying local field enhancement characteristics. Examples of the sensors are given to illustrate the principle and the performance of the metamaterial sensor. The paper concludes with an optimistic outlook regarding the future of metamaterial sensor.

  18. Regularized discriminant analysis for multi-sensor decision fusion and damage detection with Lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Spandan; Vanli, O. Arda; Huffer, Fred W.; Jung, Sungmoon

    2016-04-01

    In this study we propose a regularized linear discriminant analysis approach for damage detection which does not require an intermediate feature extraction step and therefore more efficient in handling data with high-dimensionality. A robust discriminant model is obtained by shrinking of the covariance matrix to a diagonal matrix and thresholding redundant predictors without hurting the predictive power of the model. The shrinking and threshold parameters of the discriminant function (decision boundary) are estimated to minimize the classification error. Furthermore, it is shown how the damage classification achieved by the proposed method can be extended to multiple sensors by following a Bayesian decision-fusion formulation. The detection probability of each sensor is used as a prior condition to estimate the posterior detection probability of the entire network and the posterior detection probability is used as a quantitative basis to make the final decision about the damage.

  19. Damage detection tomography based on guided waves in composite structures using a distributed sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmolo, Vittorio; Maio, Leandro; Boffa, Natalino Daniele; Monaco, Ernesto; Ricci, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on guided waves allows assessing the health of a structure due to the sensitivity to the occurrence of delamination. However, wave propagation presents several complexities for effective damage identification in composite structures. An efficient implementation of a guided wave-based SHM system requires an accurate analysis of collected data to obtain a useful detection. This paper is concerned with the identification of small emerging delaminations in composite structural components using a sparse array of surface ultrasonic transducers. An ultrasonic-guided wave tomography technique focused on impact damage detection in composite plate-like structures is presented. A statistical damage index approach is adopted to interpret the recorded signals, and a subsequent graphic interpolation is implemented to reconstruct the damage appearance. Experimental tests carried out on a typical composite structure demonstrated the effectiveness of the developed technique with the aim to investigate the presence and location of damage using simple imaging reports and a limited number of measurements. A traditional ultrasonic inspection (C-scan) is used to assess the methodology.

  20. Love-wave bacteria-based sensor for the detection of heavy metal toxicity in liquid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammoudi, I; Tarbague, H; Othmane, A; Moynet, D; Rebière, D; Kalfat, R; Dejous, C

    2010-12-15

    The present work deals with the development of a Love-wave bacteria-based sensor platform for the detection of heavy metals in liquid medium. The acoustic delay-line is inserted in an oscillation loop in order to record the resonance frequency in real-time. A Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip with a liquid chamber is maintained by pressure above the acoustic wave propagation path. Bacteria (Escherichia coli) were fixed as bioreceptors onto the sensitive surface of the sensor coated with a polyelectrolyte (PE) multilayer using a simple and efficient layer-by-layer (LbL) electrostatic self-assembly procedure. Poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH cation) and poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS anion) were alternatively deposited so that the strong attraction between oppositely charged polyelectrolytes resulted in the formation of a (PAH-PSS)(n)-PAH molecular multilayer. The real-time characterization of PE multilayer and bacteria deposition is based on the measurement of the resonance frequency perturbation due to mass loading during material deposition. Real-time response to various concentrations of cadmium (Cd(2+)) and mercury (Hg(2+)) has been investigated. A detection limit as low as 10(-12) mol/l has been achieved, above which the frequency increases gradually up to 10(-3) mol/l, after a delay of 60 s subsequent to their introduction onto bacterial cell-based biosensors. Beyond a 10(-3) mol/l a steep drop in frequency was observed. This response has been attributed to changes in viscoelastic properties, related to modifications in bacteria metabolism.

  1. Chemical etching of Tungsten thin films for high-temperature surface acoustic wave-based sensor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, M., E-mail: m.spindler@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, SAWLab Saxony, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Herold, S.; Acker, J. [BTU Cottbus – Senftenberg, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 101548, 01968 Senftenberg (Germany); Brachmann, E.; Oswald, S.; Menzel, S.; Rane, G. [IFW Dresden, SAWLab Saxony, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    Surface acoustic wave devices are widely used as wireless sensors in different application fields. Recent developments aimed to utilize those devices as temperature sensors even in the high temperature range (T > 300 °C) and in harsh environmental conditions. Therefore, conventional materials, which are used for the substrate and for the interdigital transducer finger electrodes such as multilayers or alloys based on Al or Cu have to be exchanged by materials, which fulfill some important criteria regarding temperature related effects. Electron beam evaporation as a standard fabrication method is not well applicable for depositing high temperature stable electrode materials because of their very high melting points. Magnetron sputtering is an alternative deposition process but is also not applicable for lift-off structuring without any further improvement of the structuring process. Due to a relatively high Ar gas pressure of about 10{sup −1} Pa, the sidewalls of the photoresist line structures are also covered by the metallization, which subsequently prevents a successful lift-off process. In this study, we investigate the chemical etching of thin tungsten films as an intermediate step between magnetron sputtering deposition of thin tungsten finger electrodes and the lift-off process to remove sidewall covering for a successful patterning process of interdigital transducers. - Highlights: • We fabricated Tungsten SAW Electrodes by magnetron sputtering technology. • An etching process removes sidewall covering of photoresist, which allows lift-off. • Tungsten etching rates based on a hydrogen peroxide solutions were determined.

  2. Triboelectric nanogenerator built on suspended 3D spiral structure as vibration and positioning sensor and wave energy harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Youfan; Yang, Jin; Jing, Qingshen; Niu, Simiao; Wu, Wenzhuo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-11-26

    An unstable mechanical structure that can self-balance when perturbed is a superior choice for vibration energy harvesting and vibration detection. In this work, a suspended 3D spiral structure is integrated with a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) for energy harvesting and sensor applications. The newly designed vertical contact-separation mode TENG has a wide working bandwidth of 30 Hz in low-frequency range with a maximum output power density of 2.76 W/m(2) on a load of 6 MΩ. The position of an in-plane vibration source was identified by placing TENGs at multiple positions as multichannel, self-powered active sensors, and the location of the vibration source was determined with an error less than 6%. The magnitude of the vibration is also measured by the output voltage and current signal of the TENG. By integrating the TENG inside a buoy ball, wave energy harvesting at water surface has been demonstrated and used for lighting illumination light, which shows great potential applications in marine science and environmental/infrastructure monitoring.

  3. Measurement of Spatial Pulse Wave Velocity by Using a Clip-Type Pulsimeter Equipped with a Hall Sensor and Photoplethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Suk Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A prototype of a clip-type pulsimeter equipped with a magnetic field-sensing semiconductor Hall sensor was developed. It has a permanent magnet attached in the “Chwan” position to the center of a radial artery. The clip-type pulsimeter is composed of a hardware system measuring voltage signals. To measure spatial pulse wave velocity (SPWV, the signal from the radial artery pulsimeter and that from the photoplethysmography (PPG were simultaneously compared. The pulse wave data from a clinical test of 39 clinical participants (male:female = 25:14 with a mean age of 24.36 (±2.35 years was analyzed. The mean SPWV, which was simultaneously measured from the radial artery pulsimeter and PPG, was 0.8 m/s. We suggest the SPWV results were higher for men than women, because of the better vascularity of terminal tissue in men. The findings of this research may be useful for developing a biomedical signal storage device for a U-health-care system.

  4. Possibility of the Application of the Ultra-long Electromagnetic Wave Remote Sensor to Marine Geological Exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The ultra-long electromagnetic wave remote sensing technique developed by Peking University is one of new future techniques, which can detect the submarine geological information from the depth of 20 to 10000 m below the surface by receiving natural ultra-long electromagnetic waves (n Hz to n 100 Hz). The new remote sensor is composed of three parts: a main instrument with a portable computer, an antenna with an amplifier and an external power. The new remote sensing technique is characterized by good stability and reproducibility at the same spot but at different times and high sensitivity and high signal-to-noise ratio, and can reveal geological and lithologic boundaries as well as strata and related mineral sources. Two years of marine geological experiments on this technique have indicated that it can solve many problems in marine geological exploration, e.g. the burial depths of sea-floor mud, Quaternary sediments and submarine structures. This technique can be applied to detecting the sea bed depth and submarine sediment thickness.

  5. Precision Laser Development for Interferometric Space Missions NGO, SGO, and GRACE Follow-On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Optical fiber and semiconductor laser technologies have evolved dramatically over the last decade due to the increased demands from optical communications. We are developing a laser (master oscillator) and optical amplifier based on those technologies for interferometric space missions, including the gravitational-wave missions NGO/SGO (formerly LISA) and the climate monitoring mission GRACE Follow-On, by fully utilizing the matured wave-guided optics technologies. In space, where simpler and more reliable system is preferred, the wave-guided components are advantageous over bulk, crystal-based, free-space laser, such as NPRO (Nonplanar Ring Oscillator) and bulk-crystal amplifier.

  6. Lamb wave detection in prepreg composite materials with fibre Bragg grating sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Miesen. N.; Mizutani, Y; Groves, R.M.; Sinke, J.; Benedictus, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that existing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques have potential during the production phase in addition to their application for maintenance and for in-flight monitoring. Flaws occur during composite fabrication in industry, due to an imperfect process control and human errors. This decreases production efficiency and increases costs. In this paper, the monitoring of Lamb waves in unidirectional carbon fibre (UD-CFRP) prepreg material is demonstrated using b...

  7. Radio Interferometric Calibration Using a Riemannian Manifold

    CERN Document Server

    Yatawatta, Sarod

    2013-01-01

    In order to cope with the increased data volumes generated by modern radio interferometers such as LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) or SKA (Square Kilometre Array), fast and efficient calibration algorithms are essential. Traditional radio interferometric calibration is performed using nonlinear optimization techniques such as the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm in Euclidean space. In this paper, we reformulate radio interferometric calibration as a nonlinear optimization problem on a Riemannian manifold. The reformulated calibration problem is solved using the Riemannian trust-region method. We show that calibration on a Riemannian manifold has faster convergence with reduced computational cost compared to conventional calibration in Euclidean space.

  8. Applications of interferometrically derived terrain slopes: Normalization of SAR backscatter and the interferometric correlation coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Charles L.; Wegmueller, Urs; Small, David L.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Terrain slopes, which can be measured with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry either from a height map or from the interferometric phase gradient, were used to calculate the local incidence angle and the correct pixel area. Both are required for correct thematic interpretation of SAR data. The interferometric correlation depends on the pixel area projected on a plane perpendicular to the look vector and requires correction for slope effects. Methods for normalization of the backscatter and interferometric correlation for ERS-1 SAR are presented.

  9. All-fiber Michelson interferometric high-temperature sensor based on edge-deformation%基于单侧几何形变结构的全光纤Michelson干涉高温传感器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩猛; 朱涛; 邓明; 黄维; 饶云江

    2012-01-01

    利用CO2激光脉冲对标准单模光纤(SMF)单向形成较小的几何形变,把部分基模能量耦合到光纤包层,制作了一种新型的在线型Michelson干涉传感器。理论分析了这种几何微扰激发的包层模特性,并利用芯模-包层模较大的热光系数差,把这种传感器应用于高温测量。实验结果表明,这种干涉传感器的温度灵敏度为0.0937nm/℃,并且在800℃温度范围内具有良好的线性和重复性。这种制作简单、结构稳定、体积小和灵敏度高的全光纤在线型Michelson温度传感器将具有较大的潜在应用价值。%A novel all-fiber inline Michelson interferometer by using CO2 laser pulses to introduce edgedeformation in single mode fiber is demonstrated. The simple fabrication technique can couple a part of light from the core mode into the fiber cladding, and the coupling mechanism is analyzed theoretically. Based on the larger thermal optical coefficient difference between the core mode and the cladding modes, the interferometer can be used for high temperature measurement. The experimental results show that the temperature sensitivity of the sensor could be - 0. 093 7 nm/℃, and it exhibits good linearity and repetition within 800 ℃. Such an all-fiber inline Michelson interferometer with simple fabrication, good stability, small size and high sensitivity may find potential applications in national defense and civilian industry.

  10. Standing-wave resonances in plasmonic nanoumbrella cavities for color generation and colorimetric refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiaorong; Li, Zhongyuan; Chen, Zhuojie; Wu, Wengang

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically investigate the hybridization of the elemental surface plasmons in umbrella-shape plasmonic nanostructures and experimentally demonstrate the implementation of plasmonic multicolor metasurfaces as well as their application in colorimetric sensing. The three-dimension metallic umbrella arrays consist of a periodic canopy-capped-nanopillars with metal-coated sidewall and a backplane metal-film to form vertical nanocavity of canopy and film. Plasmonic coupling and energy confinement in nanocavity induce a noticeably resonance narrowing of multispectral reflection. The metasurfaced nanostructures appeared in vibrant and tunable colors with broad gamut derived from color blending mechanism due to multiple, narrow-band resonances. Vivid colors varied from red, yellow, green, blue to violet are easily achieved. It is also shown that such plasmonic metasurfaces can work as the feasible and real-time colorimetric refractive index sensor by measuring the distinct color variation to glucose concentration changes. Our sensor scheme shows its spectral sensitivity in the periodic umbrella array with respect to the refractive index change to be 242.5 nm/RIU with a figure of merit of 7.3. Furthermore, a refractive index resolution of colorimetric sensing up to 0.025 RIU has been accomplished.

  11. 空间激光干涉引力波探测与早期宇宙结构形成%Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detection in Space and Structure Formation in the Early Universe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚雪飞; 高伟; 黄双林; 李玉龙; 刘影; 罗子人; 邵明学; 孙宝三; 唐文林; 于品; 徐鹏; 徐生年; 臧云龙; 张海鹏; 刘润球; 袁业飞; 白姗; 边星; 曹周键; 陈葛锐; 董鹏; 高天舒

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report on the feasibility study of gravitational wave detection in space commissioned by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. We consider the relative merits between scientific significance and viability in technologies of a few representative mission options. The primary science driver is targeted at the detection of mergers of intermediate to super massive binary black holes in the structure assembly history as well as in dense stellar environments within our local Universe. By striking a balance between science and techno-logical feasibility, a preliminary mission design is put forward for future Chinese gravitational wave detection mission alternative to eLISA. Our study indicates that, with suitable design of baseline parameters of a mission, gravitational wave detection in space holds the promise of being a new observation window to the structure formation stage at early Universe and shed light on certain outstanding issues, among which are the evolution of PopIII stars after the dark age, the co-evolution of galaxies and their central black holes, etc.%空间引力波探测是研究宇宙早期恒星演化和星系形成、黑洞和星系的共同成长等天文学和宇宙学重大问题的一条重要可能途径。经过两期科学院先导科技专项空间科学预研究课题的开展,通过权衡技术的可行性与科学的前瞻性,选择以高红移开始的中至大质量双黑洞并合系统、星团等稠密动力学环境中涉及中等质量黑洞的双黑洞引力波波源为主要科学目标,给出了我国毫赫兹至赫兹频段空间引力波探测任务计划的初步设计。以该任务设计建议为依据,简要介绍空间引力波探测及其作为一种新的天文观测手段的科学内涵,以及我国空间引力波探测任务设计的科学目标和探测潜力。

  12. Interferometric measurements of silicon carbide mirrors at liquid helium temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Paul N.; Huff, Lynn W.; Forney, Paul B.; Petrovsky, Gury T.; Ljubarsky, Sergey V.; Khimitch, Yuri P.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents the results of interferometric tests of two silicon carbide mirrors tested at room temperature and 6 K. The first mirror has a spherical f/1.73 surface, a diameter of 170 mm, and is of solid, plano-concave construction. The other mirror, a plano measuring 308 mm by 210 mm, is of lightweighted, closed-back construction. The mirrors were manufactured by the Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia, and were loaned to Lockheed for these tests. Optical tests on both mirrors were performed using the Lockheed cryogenic optical test facility at liquid helium temperature and a Zygo Mark II interferometer. There was no change in the surface figure of the mirrors, within the test uncertainty of approximately plus or minus 0.02 waves at 0.6328-micrometer wavelength.

  13. INTERFEROMETRIC SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR (INSAR TECHNOLOGY AND GEOMORPHOLOGY INTERPRETATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maghsoudi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphology is briefly the study of landforms and their formative processes on the surface of the planet earth as human habitat. The landforms evolution and the formative processes can best be studied by technologies with main application in study of elevation. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR is the appropriate technology for this application. With phase differences calculations in radar waves, the results of this technology can extensively be interpreted for geomorphologic researches. The purpose of the study is to review the geomorphologic studies using InSAR and also the technical studies about InSAR with geomorphologic interpretations. This study states that the InSAR technology can be recommended to be employed as a fundamental for geomorphology researches.

  14. Photonic crystal fiber based evanescent-wave sensor for detection of biomolecules in aqueous solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm; Pedersen, Lars H.; Hoiby, Poul E.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient evanescent-wave detection of fluorophore-labeled biomolecules in aqueous solutions positioned in the air holes of the microstructured part of a photonic crystal fiber. The air-suspended silica structures located between three neighboring air holes in the cladding...... crystal guide light with a large fraction of the optical field penetrating into the sample even at wavelengths in the visible range. An effective interaction length of several centimeters is obtained when a sample volume of less than 1 µL is used....

  15. Photonic crystal fiber based evanescent-wave sensor for detection of biomolecules in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jesper B; Pedersen, Lars H; Hoiby, Poul E; Nielsen, Lars B; Hansen, T P; Folkenberg, J R; Riishede, J; Noordegraaf, Danny; Nielsen, Kristian; Carlsen, A; Bjarklev, A

    2004-09-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient evanescent-wave detection of fluorophore-labeled biomolecules in aqueous solutions positioned in the air holes of the microstructured part of a photonic crystal fiber. The air-suspended silica structures located between three neighboring air holes in the cladding crystal guide light with a large fraction of the optical field penetrating into the sample even at wavelengths in the visible range. An effective interaction length of several centimeters is obtained when a sample volume of less than 1 microL is used.

  16. A high-sensitivity fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor with a three-layer structure composed of Canada balsam doped with GeO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Nianbing; Zhao, Mingfu; Zhong, Lianchao; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Luo, Binbin; Li, Yishan

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, we present a high-sensitivity polymer fiber-optic evanescent wave (FOEW) sensor with a three-layer structure that includes bottom, inter-, and surface layers in the sensing region. The bottom layer and inter-layer are POFs composed of standard cladding and the core of the plastic optical fiber, and the surface layer is made of dilute Canada balsam in xylene doped with GeO2. We examine the morphology of the doped GeO2, the refractive index and composition of the surface layer and the surface luminous properties of the sensing region. We investigate the effects of the content and morphology of the GeO2 particles on the sensitivity of the FOEW sensors by using glucose solutions. In addition, we examine the response of sensors incubated with staphylococcal protein A plus mouse IgG isotype to goat anti-mouse IgG solutions. Results indicate very good sensitivity of the three-layer FOEW sensor, which showed a 3.91-fold improvement in the detection of the target antibody relative to a conventional sensor with a core-cladding structure, and the novel sensor showed a lower limit of detection of 0.2ng/l and a response time around 320s. The application of this high-sensitivity FOEW sensor can be extended to biodefense, disease diagnosis, biomedical and biochemical analysis.

  17. Love波传感器的分析与测试%Analysis and measurement of Love wave sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李正刚; 苗圃; 李锋; 吴一辉

    2011-01-01

    为了制作出具有高灵敏度的Love波传感器,分析了Love波在ST石英和二氧化硅薄膜分层结构中的传播特性,并对该分层结构进行了相关的理论推导和计算.从该结构的声学动力学方程出发,分析求解了该分层结构的波动方程,并得到了在该分层结构的色散关系式和结构中的位移表达式.然后在所得到的解析表达式的基础上进行了相应的波结构分析和特性曲线的绘制,并得到了Love波在该结构中的传播特性.最后应用MEMS工艺制作了由ST石英为基底、二氧化硅为波导层的Love波传感器,并通过电化学微电铸的方法进行了实验验证,对理论灵敏度与实验灵敏度之间不一致的原因进行了分析.测试数据表明:该传感器的质量灵敏度为100 cm2/g,最低检出限为3.65 ng.实验结果基本满足Love波传感器进行高灵敏度生化检测的要求.%In order to get the propagation characteristics of Love wave in the layered structure consists of ST-quartz and silica, and fabricate the Love wave biosensor with higher sensitivity,theoretical derivation and numerical computations have been achieved. The wave equations have been solved from the dynamic equations of the layered structure. The expressions of displacement field have been derived with the dispersion curve of the Love wave in this structure. Based on the analytical expressions which have been derived,the structures are analyzed and the characteristic curves of Love wave are drawn. The Love wave propagation features in laminar structure are also studied. According to the computing results with the structure, the Love wave sensor is fabricated with MEMS processes and is tested by the electro deposition experiment. The difference between theoretical sensitivity and experimental sensitivity are analyzed. The results indicate that the mass sensitivity of the device is 100 cmVg and the detection limit is 3.65 ng. The demand for the high sensitive biochemical

  18. Note: Near infrared interferometric silicon wafer metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M S; Park, H M; Joo, K N

    2016-04-01

    In this investigation, two near infrared (NIR) interferometric techniques for silicon wafer metrology are described and verified with experimental results. Based on the transparent characteristic of NIR light to a silicon wafer, the fiber based spectrally resolved interferometry can measure the optical thickness of the wafer and stitching low coherence scanning interferometry can reconstruct entire surfaces of the wafer.

  19. Applications of passive remote surface acoustic wave sensors in high-voltage systems; Einsatz von passiven funkabfragbaren Oberflaechenwellensensoren in der elektrischen Energietechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teminova, R.

    2007-06-29

    Passive remote Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors have been applied e.g. as temperature, pressure or torque sensors. Their important advantages over standard methods are their passive operating principle, which allows operation without any power supply, as well as the wireless high-frequency signal transmission over distances up to about 10..15 m even through (non metallic) housings. These properties of SAW sensors particularly qualify them for applications in high voltage operational equipment. First experience was gained in a long time field test of surge arrester monitoring based on SAW temperature sensors in a German high-voltage substation. Now, this system has been further developed at Darmstadt University of Technology for other applications, the first of them being an overhead line (OHL) conductor temperature measurement, the second one a temperature monitoring system for of high-voltage disconnectors. After designing and building the sensors, extensive laboratory tests were carried out applying high-voltage, high-current and thermal stress in order to approve the suitability for the intended application. All these tests confirmed the assumption that SAW sensors, due to their passive working principle, are not affected at all by any kind of electrical, magnetic or thermal stress that may occur during service. The complete temperature sensor consists of three parts: a sensor chip, an antenna which receives and transmits the signal from and to the radar unit and a body for installation and for protection against environmental impact. One must find a good compromise between optimizing of thermal, dielectric and high-frequency characteristics and at the same time taking into consideration a simple installation. These requirements on the SAW sensors turned out to be difficult to coordinate. To achieve a high measuring precision is especially difficult. First, a new sensor for OHL application was developed. The OHL conductor temperature sensor had been optimized

  20. Love-Wave Sensors Combined with Microfluidics for Fast Detection of Biological Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matatagui, Daniel; Fontecha, José Luis; Fernández, María Jesús; Gràcia, Isabel; Cané, Carles; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, María Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13), and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG) has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR). Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved. PMID:25029282

  1. Love-Wave Sensors Combined with Microfluidics for Fast Detection of Biological Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Matatagui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs. The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13, and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR. Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved.

  2. Love-wave sensors combined with microfluidics for fast detection of biological warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matatagui, Daniel; Fontecha, José Luis; Fernández, María Jesús; Gràcia, Isabel; Cané, Carles; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, María Carmen

    2014-07-15

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13), and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG) has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR). Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved.

  3. Vacuum-deposited wave-guiding layers on STW resonators based on LiTaO(3) substrate as love wave sensors for chemical and biochemical sensing in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barié, Nicole; Stahl, Ullrich; Rapp, Michael

    2010-05-01

    A promising approach to apply the Love wave concept to commercially available low-loss surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices of the type Murata SAF 380 is presented. Thin wave-guiding layers of variable thickness are coated on the piezoelectric substrate of the devices. Two different layer materials were used: sputtered SiO(2) and a new polymer in this field, paryleneC (poly-[2-chloro-p-xylylene]). Insertion loss, resonance frequency, frequency changes during protein precipitation and noise of the devices are discussed as a function of the thickness of the wave-guiding layer. It is demonstrated that the application of an optimized wave-guiding layer increases the sensitivity. When using SiO(2) as wave-guiding layer, an optimum layer thickness of 4 microm leads to a detection limit of 1.7 pg/mm(2). Therefore, the detection limit is improved by factor 7.7 as compared to uncoated SAW devices. Parylene-coated devices reach a detection limit of 2.9 pg/mm(2) at an optimum layer thickness of 0.5 microm. This corresponds to an improvement by factor 4.3. As the SAW devices used in this study are commercially available at low costs, applying appropriate wave-guiding layers permits an application as chemical or biochemical sensors with excellent sensitivities. Moreover, parylene-coated devices combine the sensitivity increase by excitation of Love waves with an excellent protective effect against corrosive attacks by the surrounding medium. Therefore, these sensors are most suitable for biosensing in conducting buffer solutions.

  4. Statistics of Turbulence Parameters at Maunakea using multiple wave-front sensor data of RAVEN

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Yoshito H; Andersen, Dave R; Lardiere, Olivier; Oya, Shin; Akiyama, Masayuki; Jackson, Kate; Bradley, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Prior statistical knowledge of the atmospheric turbulence is essential for designing, optimizing and evaluating tomographic adaptive optics systems. We present the statistics of the vertical profiles of $C_N^2$ and the outer scale at Maunakea estimated using a Slope Detection And Ranging (SLODAR) method from on-sky telemetry taken by RAVEN, which is a MOAO demonstrator in the Subaru telescope. In our SLODAR method, the profiles are estimated by a fit of the theoretical auto- and cross-correlation of measurements from multiple Shack-Haltmann wavefront sensors to the observed correlations via the non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm (LMA), and the analytic derivatives of the spatial phase structure function with respect to its parameters for the LMA are also developed. The estimated profile has the median total seeing of 0.460$^{\\prime\\prime}$ and large $C_N^2$ fraction of the ground layer of 54.3%. The $C_N^2$ profile has a good agreement with the result from literatures, except for the ground layer. The m...

  5. Detection of the tumor marker mucine with a diode-laser-based evanescent wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Daniel; Kaul, Sepp; Loescher, Frank; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Schulz, V.; Ueberfeld, J.; Seeger, Stefan

    1996-11-01

    Optical sensors based on the utilization of the evanescent field arising at the interface between two media in the case of total internal reflection are an excellent tool for the reduction of time consuming and complex chemical analysis. We developed a fiber-optic based set-up with visible diode lasers as excitation sources. As recognition element an optical fiber covered with a photopolymerized antibody monolayer was used. Beside the commercially available cyanine fluorescent dye Cy 5, newly developed fluorescent dyes in the red spectral region were coupled to antibodies. In order to test the set-up in a clinically relevant system the antibodies BM-2 and BM-7 were chosen. With this antibody system the tumor marker mucine in a sandwich immunoassay was investigated. This protein shows increased concentrations in serum and ascites in the case of breast cancer. The combination of semiconductor devices and ultrathin antibody layers together with an antibody system directed against mucine offers the possibility of an on-line detection of the tumor marker.

  6. Nuclear Containment Inspection Using AN Array of Guided Wave Sensors for Damage Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, A. C.; Fisher, J. L.

    2010-02-01

    Nuclear power plant containments are typically both the last line of defense against the release of radioactivity to the environment and the first line of defense to protect against intrusion from external objects. As such, it is important to be able to locate any damage that would limit the integrity of the containment itself. Typically, a portion of the containment consists of a metallic pressure boundary that encloses the reactor primary circuit. It is made of thick steel plates welded together, lined with concrete and partially buried, limiting areas that can be visually inspected for corrosion damage. This study presents a strategy using low frequency (corrosion-like damage several meters from the probe in a mock-up of the containment vessel. A magnetostrictive sensor (MsS) is scanned across the width of the vessel, acquiring waveforms at a fixed interval. A beam forming strategy is used to localize the defects. Experimental results are presented for a variety of damage configurations, demonstrating the efficacy of this technique for detecting damage smaller than the ultrasonic wavelength.

  7. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  8. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  9. Real-time monitoring of methanol concentration using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor for direct methanol fuel cell without reference liquid measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kyosuke; Nozawa, Takuya; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing demand for sensors that continuously measure liquid concentrations and detect abnormalities in liquid environments. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied for the continuous monitoring of liquid concentrations. As the SH-SAW sensor functions using the relative measurement method, it normally needs a reference at each measurement. However, if the sensor is installed in a liquid flow cell, it is difficult to measure a reference liquid. Therefore, it is important to establish an estimation method for liquid concentrations using the SH-SAW sensor without requiring a reference measurement. In this study, the SH-SAW sensor is installed in a direct methanol fuel cell to monitor the methanol concentration. The estimated concentration is compared with a conventional density meter. Moreover, the effect of formic acid is examined. When the fuel temperature is higher than 70 °C, it is necessary to consider the influence of liquid conductivity. Here, an estimation method for these cases is also proposed.

  10. Boron doped diamond sensor for sensitive determination of metronidazole: Mechanistic and analytical study by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammar, Hafedh Belhadj, E-mail: hbelhadjammar@yahoo.fr; Brahim, Mabrouk Ben; Abdelhédi, Ridha; Samet, Youssef

    2016-02-01

    The performance of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode for the detection of metronidazole (MTZ) as the most important drug of the group of 5-nitroimidazole was proven using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV) techniques. A comparison study between BDD, glassy carbon and silver electrodes on the electrochemical response was carried out. The process is pH-dependent. In neutral and alkaline media, one irreversible reduction peak related to the hydroxylamine derivative formation was registered, involving a total of four electrons. In acidic medium, a prepeak appears probably related to the adsorption affinity of hydroxylamine at the electrode surface. The BDD electrode showed higher sensitivity and reproducibility analytical response, compared with the other electrodes. The higher reduction peak current was registered at pH 11. Under optimal conditions, a linear analytical curve was obtained for the MTZ concentration in the range of 0.2–4.2 μmol L{sup −1}, with a detection limit of 0.065 μmol L{sup −1}. - Highlights: • SWV for the determination of MTZ • Boron-doped diamond as a new electrochemical sensor • Simple and rapid detection of MTZ • Efficiency of BDD for sensitive determination of MTZ.

  11. Characterization of an array of Love-wave gas sensors developed using electrospinning technique to deposit nanofibers as sensitive layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matatagui, D; Fernández, M J; Fontecha, J; Sayago, I; Gràcia, I; Cané, C; Horrillo, M C; Santos, J P

    2014-03-01

    The electrospinning technique has allowed that very different materials are deposited as sensitive layers on Love-wave devices forming a low cost and successful sensor array. Their excellent sensitivity, good linearity and short response time are reported in this paper. Several materials have been used to produce the nanofibers: polymers as Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and Polystirene (PS); composites with polymers as PVA+SnCl4; combined polymers as PS+Poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PS+PSMA) and metal oxides (SnO2). In order to test the array, well-known chemical warfare agent simulants (CWAs) have been chosen among the volatile organic compounds due to their importance in the security field. Very low concentrations of these compounds have been detected by the array, such as 0.2 ppm of DMMP, a simulant of sarin nerve gas, and 1 ppm of DPGME, a simulant of nitrogen mustard. Additionally, the CWA simulants used in the experiment have been discriminated and classified using pattern recognition techniques, such as principal component analysis and artificial neural networks.

  12. Theoretical and experimental study on white light interferometric sensing network with double-ring topology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun; YUAN Li-bo

    2006-01-01

    A white-light interferometric fiber-optic sensing network based on the double-ring topology is demonstrated,which can be applied to the measurements of quasidistributed strain and temperature in a smart structure.In order to increase the multiplexing capacity,decrease the measurement cost of each sensor,and improve the ability of reliability of the sensor network,a double-port interrogating technology was used.The double- ring fiber optical sensing network based on the space division multiplexing (SDM) is further developed,The low coherent multiplexing principle in the double-ring network structure is analyzed.Based on the optical path matching condition of SDM,the intensity characteristic of the interference signal in the sensor is deduced.The characteristics of the double-ring sensing network connecting 9 sensors and its property of robust resisting destruction are verified by experiments,and the results are analyzed and discussed.

  13. Lamb waves propagation along 3C-SiC/AlN membranes for application in temperature-compensated, high-sensitivity gravimetric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Cinzia; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Lo Castro, Fabio

    2013-01-02

    The propagation of the fundamental quasi-symmetric Lamb mode S(0) travelling along 3C-SiC/c-AlN composite plates is theoretically studied with respect to the AlN and SiC film thickness, the acoustic wave propagation direction and the electrical boundary conditions. The temperature effects on the phase velocity have been considered for four AlN/SiC-based electroacoustic coupling configurations, specifically addressing the design of temperature-compensated, enhanced-coupling, GHz-range electroacoustic devices. The gravimetric sensitivity and resolution of the four temperature-stable SiC/AlN composite structures are theoretically investigated with respect to both the AlN and SiC sensing surface. The SiC/AlN-based sensor performances are compared to those of surface acoustic waves and Lamb S(0) mode mass sensors implemented on bulk conventional piezoelectric materials and on thin suspended membranes.

  14. Lamb Waves Propagation along 3C-SiC/AlN Membranes for Application in Temperature-Compensated, High-Sensitivity Gravimetric Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Cinzia; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Castro, Fabio Lo

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of the fundamental quasi-symmetric Lamb mode S0 travelling along 3C-SiC/c-AlN composite plates is theoretically studied with respect to the AlN and SiC film thickness, the acoustic wave propagation direction and the electrical boundary conditions. The temperature effects on the phase velocity have been considered for four AlN/SiC-based electroacoustic coupling configurations, specifically addressing the design of temperature-compensated, enhanced-coupling, GHz-range electroacoustic devices. The gravimetric sensitivity and resolution of the four temperature-stable SiC/AlN composite structures are theoretically investigated with respect to both the AlN and SiC sensing surface. The SiC/AlN-based sensor performances are compared to those of surface acoustic waves and Lamb S0 mode mass sensors implemented on bulk conventional piezoelectric materials and on thin suspended membranes. PMID:23282585

  15. A multi-parameter decoupling method with a Lamb wave sensor for improving the selectivity of label-free liquid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lianqun; Wu, Yihui; Xuan, Ming; Manceau, Jean-François; Bastien, François

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a liquid multi-parameter decoupling method with only one Lamb wave sensor is presented. In a Lamb wave sensor, antisymmetric modes (A(01) mode for low frequency, A(03) mode for high frequency) and symmetric modes (S(0) mode) are used to detect multiple parameters of a liquid, such as its density, sound velocity, and viscosity. We found they can play very different roles in the detections. For example, the A(01) mode is very sensitive to the liquid's density but the A(03) mode is sensitive to the sound velocity. Here, the A(0) mode is used to identify the density of the detected liquid and with this density value we obtained the viscosity by the amplitude shifts of the S(0) mode. This could be a way to distinguish an unknown liquid with high sensitivity or to solve the problem of selectivity of label-free detection on biosensors.

  16. Lamb Waves Propagation along 3C-SiC/AlN Membranes for Application in Temperature-Compensated, High-Sensitivity Gravimetric Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Caliendo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of the fundamental quasi-symmetric Lamb mode S0 travelling along 3C-SiC/c-AlN composite plates is theoretically studied with respect to the AlN and SiC film thickness, the acoustic wave propagation direction and the electrical boundary conditions. The temperature effects on the phase velocity have been considered for four AlN/SiC-based electroacoustic coupling configurations, specifically addressing the design of temperature-compensated, enhanced-coupling, GHz-range electroacoustic devices. The gravimetric sensitivity and resolution of the four temperature-stable SiC/AlN composite structures are theoretically investigated with respect to both the AlN and SiC sensing surface. The SiC/AlN-based sensor performances are compared to those of surface acoustic waves and Lamb S0 mode mass sensors implemented on bulk conventional piezoelectric materials and on thin suspended membranes.

  17. SAR Interferometric Analysis Of Ground Deformation At Santorini Volcano (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Elena; Foumelis, Michael; Parcharidis, Issaak

    2012-01-01

    The core of the present study builds on ground deformation monitoring by SAR Interferometry at Santorini Volcanic Complex (Greece). Dataset used for this case study, include the entire archive of ERS SAR and ENVISAT ASAR data for both ascending and descending orbits covering almost two decades of observations (1992-2010). Deformation signals of millimeter-level accuracy were retrieved from both SAR and ASAR datasets, by way of the Interferometric Stacking technique. The linear rate of differential phases and the corresponding errors were estimated by averaging the unwrapped differential interferograms. Subsequently, vertical deformation rates were calculated by the combination of LOS measurements in ascending and descending acquisition geometries. The observed ground deformation shows mainly subsidence in the central part of Santorini Caldera, at Nea Kammeni Island, equal to -5.1 ±0.7 mm/yr, and -6.3 ±1.2 mm/yr for the periods 1992-2000 and 2003-2010 respectively, while both signs of movements (uplift and subsidence) of lower scale magnitude were recognized elsewhere on the volcano. In fact, higher deformation rates for the period after 2003 (ranging between -4.6 mm/yr and 5.6 mm/yr), compared to the lower values of the period 1992-2000 (from -1.7 mm/yr to 2.7 mm/yr), indicate increase in the undergoing deformation of the volcanic complex. Finally, this work presents an attempt to obtain integrated interferometric results of ground deformation from both ERS and ENVISAT sensors in order to allow future investigations on the deformation sources of the volcanic complex, which could be further exploited in the volcanic hazard and risk assessment.

  18. Scalable splitting algorithms for big-data interferometric imaging in the SKA era

    CERN Document Server

    Onose, Alexandru; McEwen, Jason D; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Pesquet, Jean-Christophe; Wiaux, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array will be the largest sensor ever built by humankind and will acquire unprecedented amounts of data in radio astronomy. Recently, convex optimisation algorithms coupled with sparsity priors have been shown to outperform traditional radio interferometric imaging methods such as CLEAN. Thus, it is of paramount importance to extend these techniques to handle large-scale data sets efficiently. In this article, we propose two convex optimisation algorithms for solving the radio interferometric imaging problem. They are tailored for big-data and employ parallel and distributed computations to achieve scalability, in terms of memory and computational requirements. One of them also exploits randomisation, over data blocks at each iteration, offering further flexibility. We present simulation results showing the feasibility of the proposed methods as well as their advantages compared to state-of-the-art reconstruction algorithms. The code is available online.

  19. Selective Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Organophosphorus Sensor Employing a Host-Guest Self-Assembly Monolayer of β-Cyclodextrin Derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yong; Mu, Ning; Shao, Shengyu; Yang, Liu; Wang, Wen; Xie, Xiao; He, Shitang

    2015-07-23

    Self-assembly and molecular imprinting technologies are very attractive technologies for the development of artificial recognition systems and provide chemical recognition based on need and not happenstance. In this paper, we employed a b-cyclodextrin derivative surface acoustic wave (SAW) chemical sensor for detecting the chemical warfare agents (CWAs) sarin (O-Isoprophyl methylphosphonofluoridate, GB). Using sarin acid (isoprophyl hydrogen methylphosphonate) as an imprinting template, mono[6-deoxy-6-[(mercaptodecamethylene)thio

  20. Selective Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Organophosphorus Sensor Employing a Host-Guest Self-Assembly Monolayer of β-Cyclodextrin Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Pan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembly and molecular imprinting technologies are very attractive technologies for the development of artificial recognition systems and provide chemical recognition based on need and not happenstance. In this paper, we employed a b-cyclodextrin derivative surface acoustic wave (SAW chemical sensor for detecting the chemical warfare agents (CWAs sarin (O-Isoprophyl methylphosphonofluoridate, GB. Using sarin acid (isoprophyl hydrogen methylphosphonate as an imprinting template, mono[6-deoxy-6-[(mercaptodecamethylenethio

  1. Aluminum nitride thin film based acoustic wave sensors for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzeng

    In recent years, SAW devices have drawn enormous interest from the analytical assay and sensing business, especially in the biosensing area where highly sensitive, cost efficient and miniaturized sensors are in urgent needs. This dissertation focuses on the development of AIN thin film based SAW devices suitable for biosensing applications. AIN thin films have been synthesized on different orientations of sapphire substrates by a plasma source molecular beam epitaxy system. Surface and structural characterization techniques have been applied to investigate the film quality and the results show that high quality c-plane AIN was epitaxially grown on both c-plane and a-plane sapphire substrates. Complete process flows have been developed for the fabrication of SAW delay line and resonator devices. Important electrical parameters such as the insertion loss, bandwidth, and impedance have been measured to assist the design optimization and derivation the phase velocity, electromechanical coupling coefficient, and temperature coefficient of frequency. On both c-plane and a-plane sapphire substrates, the SAW phase velocities (˜5700 m/s) and electromechanical coupling coefficients (˜0.3%) have been thoroughly mapped out with respect to the propagation direction and film thickness to wavelength ratio. The data are of practical importance for designing AIN-based SAW devices. A higher velocity (>6000 m/s) shear horizontal SAW mode has been discovered only at isolated propagating directions. This mode is especially suitable for aqueous biosensing due to its weak energy coupling to liquid. Much stronger response of the SH-SAW mode has been detected on the c-plane AIN on a-plane sapphire structure than on the c-plane AIN on c-plane sapphire structure, which could be attributed to large anisotropy in a-plane sapphire substrate. Linear frequency-temperature relationship has also been observed for both modes. We further quantify the mass sensitivity of the SAW and SH-SAW by

  2. Hydrogen gas sensor fabricated from polyanisidine nanofibers deposited on 36° YX LiTaO 3 layered surface acoustic wave transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mashat, Laith; Tran, Henry D.; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Kaner, Richard B.; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2007-12-01

    Polyanisidine nanofibers gas sensor based on a ZnO/36° YX LiTaO 3 surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer was developed and tested at different concentrations of hydrogen gas in synthetic air. Nanofibrous mats of polyanisidine were synthesized without the need for templates or functional dopants by simply introducing an initiator into the reaction mixture of a rapidly mixed reaction between the monomer (anisidine) and the oxidant. The polyanisidine nanofibers are characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-vis). Polyanisidine nanofibers were deposited onto the SAW transducer and exposed to different concentrations of hydrogen gas. The frequency shift due to the sensor response was 294 kHz towards 1% of H II. All tests were conducted at room temperature and the sensor performance was assessed for a two day period with a high degree of reproducibility obtained.

  3. Torsion-bar antenna for low-frequency gravitational-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masaki; Ishidoshiro, Koji; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Kent; Kokuyama, Wataru; Tsubono, Kimio; Takamori, Akiteru

    2010-10-15

    We propose a novel type of gravitational-wave antenna, formed by two bar-shaped test masses and laser-interferometric sensors to monitor their differential angular fluctuations. This antenna has a fundamental sensitivity to low-frequency signals below 1 Hz, even with a ground-based configuration. In addition, it is possible to expand the observation band to a lower limit determined by the observation time, by using modulation and up-conversion of gravitational-wave signals by rotation of the antenna. The potential sensitivity of this antenna is superior to those of current detectors in a 1 mHz-10 Hz frequency band and is sufficient for observations of gravitational waves radiated from in-spiral and merger events of intermediate-mass black holes.

  4. Ring-Interferometric Sol-Gel Bio-Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Gregory (Inventor); Cohen, David (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A biosensor embodying the invention includes a sensing volume having an array of pores sized for immobilizing a first biological entity tending to bind to a second biological entity in such a manner as to change an index of refraction of the sensing volume. The biosensor further includes a ring interferometer, one volumetric section of the ring interferometer being the sensing volume, a laser for supplying light to the ring interferometer, and a photodetector for receiving light from the interferometer.

  5. Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) P-wave velocity, gamma-ray density, and magnetic susceptibility whole-core logs of sediment cores collected in 2009 offshore from Palos Verdes, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release includes Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) P-wave velocity, gamma-ray density, and magnetic susceptibility whole-core logs of sediment...

  6. Physical and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 10 March 1976 to 23 March 1976 (NODC Accession 7601227)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory...

  7. Calibration of mixed-polarization interferometric observations

    CERN Document Server

    Marti-Vidal, Ivan; Conway, John; Zensus, Anton J

    2016-01-01

    Heterodyne receivers register the sky signal on either a circular polarization basis (where it is split into left-hand and right-hand circular polarization) or a linear polarization basis (where it is split into horizontal and vertical linear polarization). We study the problem of interferometric observations performed with telescopes that observe on different polarization bases, hence producing visibilities that we call "mixed basis" (i.e., linear in one telescope and circular in the other). We present novel algorithms for the proper calibration and treatment of such interferometric observations and test our algorithms with both simulations and real data. The use of our algorithms will be important for the optimum calibration of forthcoming observations with the Atacama Large mm/submm Array (ALMA) in very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) mode. Our algorithms will also allow us to optimally calibrate future VLBI observations at very high data rates (i.e., wide bandwidths), where linear-polarization feeds w...

  8. Analysis of the interferometric Ronchi test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacara, D

    1990-09-01

    It is well known that the Ronchi test has two equivalent interpretations, Physical, as an interferometer, or geometrical, as if the fringes were just shadows from the fringes on the ruling. The second interpretation is nearly always used in practice because it is simpler. However, the disadvantage is that the irradiance profile of the fringes cannot be calculated with this theory. Here, the interferometric interpretation of the test will be used to obtain the irradiance profile and the sharpness of the fringes.

  9. Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maram, Jonathan M.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed sensor measures temperatures over wide range, from cryogenic liquids to burning gases. Made in part of optical fibers, sensor lighter in weight than thermocouple and immune to electromagnetic interference. Device does not respond to temperatures elsewhere than at sensing tip. Thermal expansion and contraction of distance between fiber end and mirror alters interference between light reflected from those two surfaces, thereby giving interferometric indication of temperatures.

  10. Optimization of a digital lock-in algorithm with a square-wave reference for frequency-divided multi-channel sensor signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengzhao; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling; Zhao, Jing

    2016-08-01

    A digital lock-in detection technique is commonly used to measure the amplitude and phase of a selected frequency signal. A technique that uses a square wave as the reference signal has an advantage over the one using a sinusoidal wave due to its easier implementation and higher computational efficiency. However, demodulating multiple-frequency composite signals using square wave reference may result in interference between channels. To avoid interference between channels and reduce the computational complexity, we modify the calculations and determine the optimal parameter settings of the low-pass filter and carrier frequency, as detailed in this paper. The results of our analysis show that when the length of the average filter and carrier frequencies are properly set, the interference between the channels is removed. This optimization produces the digital lock-in detection suitable for measuring multi-channel sensor signals.

  11. Optimization of a digital lock-in algorithm with a square-wave reference for frequency-divided multi-channel sensor signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengzhao; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling; Zhao, Jing

    2016-08-01

    A digital lock-in detection technique is commonly used to measure the amplitude and phase of a selected frequency signal. A technique that uses a square wave as the reference signal has an advantage over the one using a sinusoidal wave due to its easier implementation and higher computational efficiency. However, demodulating multiple-frequency composite signals using square wave reference may result in interference between channels. To avoid interference between channels and reduce the computational complexity, we modify the calculations and determine the optimal parameter settings of the low-pass filter and carrier frequency, as detailed in this paper. The results of our analysis show that when the length of the average filter and carrier frequencies are properly set, the interference between the channels is removed. This optimization produces the digital lock-in detection suitable for measuring multi-channel sensor signals.

  12. Interferometric pump-probe characterization of the nonlocal response of optically transparent ion implanted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, Ivan L.; Hadjichristov, Georgi B.

    2012-03-01

    Optical interferometric technique is applied to characterize the nonlocal response of optically transparent ion implanted polymers. The thermal nonlinearity of the ion-modified material in the near-surface region is induced by continuous wave (cw) laser irradiation at a relatively low intensity. The interferometry approach is demonstrated for a subsurface layer of a thickness of about 100 nm formed in bulk polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by implantation with silicon ions at an energy of 50 keV and fluence in the range 1014-1017 cm-2. The laser-induced thermooptic effect in this layer is finely probed by interferometric imaging. The interference phase distribution in the plane of the ion implanted layer is indicative for the thermal nonlinearity of the near-surface region of ion implanted optically transparent polymeric materials.

  13. Low-intensity ultraviolet detection using a surface acoustic-wave sensor with a Ag-doped ZnO nanoparticle film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chen; Lee, Ki Jung; Lee, Keekeun; Yang, Sang Sik

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor with a Ag-doped ZnO nanoparticle film for low-intensity ultraviolet (UV) light detection. With this sensor, Ag doping is shown to effectively enhance ZnO thin film conductivity, thereby improving the SAW sensor sensitivity. Furthermore, it also enlarges the sensor’s linear response range. Prior to fabrication, the response mechanism was analyzed and the SAW device was designed. The ZnO film was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. The sensor response under UV light (365 nm) irradiation was measured using a network analyzer. The characteristic improvement of the SAW UV sensor due to Ag-doping was verified by the amplitude shift of S21 from 0.31 dB to 0.97 dB under UV irradiation of 4 μW cm-2. Also, the enhanced sensitivity and lowest detection limit were evaluated as 0.2 dB/(μW cm-2) and 0.05 μW cm-2, respectively.

  14. The linearized inversion of the generalized interferometric multiple imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2016-09-06

    The generalized interferometric multiple imaging (GIMI) procedure can be used to image duplex waves and other higher order internal multiples. Imaging duplex waves could help illuminate subsurface zones that are not easily illuminated by primaries such as vertical and nearly vertical fault planes, and salt flanks. To image first-order internal multiple, the GIMI framework consists of three datuming steps, followed by applying the zero-lag cross-correlation imaging condition. However, the standard GIMI procedure yields migrated images that suffer from low spatial resolution, migration artifacts, and cross-talk noise. To alleviate these problems, we propose a least-squares GIMI framework in which we formulate the first two steps as a linearized inversion problem when imaging first-order internal multiples. Tests on synthetic datasets demonstrate the ability to localize subsurface scatterers in their true positions, and delineate a vertical fault plane using the proposed method. We, also, demonstrate the robustness of the proposed framework when imaging the scatterers or the vertical fault plane with erroneous migration velocities.

  15. Improving terrain height estimates from RADARSAT interferometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, P.A.; Eichel, P.H.; Calloway, T.M.

    1998-03-01

    The authors describe two methods of combining two-pass RADAR-SAT interferometric phase maps with existing DTED (digital terrain elevation data) to produce improved terrain height estimates. The first is a least-squares estimation procedure that fits the unwrapped phase data to a phase map computed from the DTED. The second is a filtering technique that combines the interferometric height map with the DTED map based on spatial frequency content. Both methods preserve the high fidelity of the interferometric data.

  16. Properties of high sensitivity ZnO surface acoustic wave sensors on SiO 2/(1 0 0) Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Soumya; Iliadis, Agis A.

    2008-11-01

    The properties of ZnO/SiO2/Si surface acoustic wave (SAW) Love mode sensors were examined and optimized to achieve high mass sensitivity. SAW devices A and B, were designed and fabricated to operate at resonant frequencies around 0.7 and 1.5 GHz. The ZnO films grown by pulsed laser deposition on SiO2/Si demonstrated c-axis growth and the fabricated devices showed guided shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (or Love mode) propagation. Acoustic phase velocity in the ZnO layer was measured in both devices A and B and theoretical and experimental evaluation of the mass sensitivity showed that the maximum sensitivity is obtained for devices with ZnO guiding layer thicknesses of 340 nm and 160 nm for devices A and B, respectively. The performance of the SAW sensors was validated by measuring the mass of a well-characterized polystyrene-polyacrylic acid diblock copolymer film. For the optimized sensors, maximum mass sensitivity values were as high as 4.309 μm2/pg for device A operating at 0.7477 GHz, and 8.643 μm2/pg for device B operating at 1.5860 GHz. The sensors demonstrated large frequency shifts per applied mass (0.1-4 MHz), excellent linearity, and extended range in the femto-gram region. The large frequency shifts indicated that these sensors have the potential to measure mass two to three orders of magnitude lower in the atto-gram range.

  17. Analysis of binary mixtures of aqueous aromatic hydrocarbons with low-phase-noise shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors using multielectrode transducer designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Florian; Mohler, Rachel E; Ricco, Antonio J; Josse, Fabien

    2014-11-18

    The present work investigates a compact sensor system that provides rapid, real-time, in situ measurements of the identities and concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons at parts-per-billion concentrations in water through the combined use of kinetic and thermodynamic response parameters. The system uses shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensors operating directly in the liquid phase. The 103 MHz SAW sensors are coated with thin sorbent polymer films to provide the appropriate limits of detection as well as partial selectivity for the analytes of interest, the BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), which are common indicators of fuel and oil accidental releases in groundwater. Particular emphasis is placed on benzene, a known carcinogen and the most challenging BTEX analyte with regard to both regulated levels and its solubility properties. To demonstrate the identification and quantification of individual compounds in multicomponent aqueous samples, responses to binary mixtures of benzene with toluene as well as ethylbenzene were characterized at concentrations below 1 ppm (1 mg/L). The use of both thermodynamic and kinetic (i.e., steady-state and transient) responses from a single polymer-coated SH-SAW sensor enabled identification and quantification of the two BTEX compounds in binary mixtures in aqueous solution. The signal-to-noise ratio was improved, resulting in lower limits of detection and improved identification at low concentrations, by designing and implementing a type of multielectrode transducer pattern, not previously reported for chemical sensor applications. The design significantly reduces signal distortion and root-mean-square (RMS) phase noise by minimizing acoustic wave reflections from electrode edges, thus enabling limits of detection for BTEX analytes of 9-83 ppb (calculated from RMS noise); concentrations of benzene in water as low as ~100 ppb were measured directly. Reliable quantification of BTEX

  18. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-10-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  19. Parallel phase modulation scheme for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, M T; Quetschke, V; Tanner, D B; Reitze, D H; Mueller, G

    2014-11-17

    Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) requires multiple frequency sidebands to disentangle all of the main interferometer's length signals. This paper presents the results of a risk reduction experiment to produce two sets of frequency sidebands in parallel, avoiding mixed 'sidebands on sidebands'. Two phase modulation frequencies are applied to separate Electro-Optic Modulators (EOMs), with one EOM in each of the two arms of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In this system the Mach-Zehnder's arm lengths are stabilized to reduce relative intensity noise in the recombined carrier beam by feeding a corrective control signal back to the Rubidium Titanyl Phosphate (RTP) EOM crystals to drive the optical path length difference to zero. This setup's use of the RTP crystals as length actuators provides enough bandwidth in the feedback to meet arm length stability requirements for aLIGO.

  20. Squeezed state generation for interferometric gravitational-wave detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Kirk; Gray, Malcolm B; Gossler, Stefan; Lam, Ping Koy; McClelland, David E [Center for Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2006-04-21

    In this paper we present results demonstrating the development of a squeezed state at sideband frequencies as low as 100 Hz. The squeezed source was generated in a doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) operated below threshold. The OPO resonance condition is achieved using the pump field, allowing the OPO to produce a squeezed vacuum state stably. We describe limitations to the experiment and discuss future work.