WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave induced ring

  1. Evolution of Ring Current Protons Induced by Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fu-Liang; TIAN Tian; CHEN Liang-Xu; SU Zhen-Peng; ZHENG Hui-Nan

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the phase space density (PSD) of ring current protons induced by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves at the location L=3.5, calculate the diffusion coefficients in pitch angle and momentum, and solve the standard two-dimensional Fokker-Planck diffusion equation. The pitch angle diffusion coefficient is found to be larger than the momentum diffusion coefficient by a factor of about 10~3 or above at lower pitch angles. We show that EMIC waves can produce efficient pitch angle scattering of energetic (~100 keV) protons, yielding a rapid decrement in PSD, typically by a factor of ~10 within a few hours, consistent with observational data. This result further supports previous findings that wave-particle interaction is responsible for the rapid ring current decay.

  2. Electromagnetic fields induced by surface ring waves in the deep sea

    OpenAIRE

    Kozitskiy, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with electromagnetic effects associated with a radially symmetric system of progressive surface waves in the deep sea, induced by underwater oscillating sources or by dispersive decay of the initial localized perturbations of the sea surface.

  3. Aharonov-Anandan effect induced by spin-orbit interaction and charge-density waves in mesoscopic rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Y.; Bishop, A.R. [Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-08-01

    We study the spin-dependent geometric phase effect in mesoscopic rings of charge-density-wave (CDW) materials. When electron spin is explicitly taken into account, we show that the spin-dependent Aharonov-Casher phase can have pronounced frustration effects on such CDW materials with appropriate electron filling. We show that this frustration has observable consequences for transport experiments. We identify a phase transition from a Peierls insulator to metal, which is induced by spin-dependent phase interference effects. Mesoscopic CDW materials and spin-dependent geometric phase effects, and their interplay, are becoming attractive opportunities for exploitation with the rapid development of modern fabrication technology. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Photoisomerization among ring-open merocyanines. I. Reaction dynamics and wave-packet oscillations induced by tunable femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruetzel, Stefan; Diekmann, Meike; Nuernberger, Patrick; Walter, Christof; Engels, Bernd; Brixner, Tobias

    2014-06-01

    Upon ultraviolet excitation, photochromic spiropyran compounds can be converted by a ring-opening reaction into merocyanine molecules, which in turn can form several isomers differing by cis and trans configurations in the methine bridge. Whereas the spiropyran-merocyanine conversion reaction of the nitro-substituted indolinobenzopyran 6-nitro-1',3',3'-trimethylspiro[2H-1-benzopyran-2,2'-indoline] (6-nitro BIPS) has been studied extensively in theory and experiments, little is known about photoisomerization among the merocyanine isomers. In this article, we employ femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with variable excitation wavelengths to investigate the excited-state dynamics of the merocyanine in acetonitrile at room temperature, where exclusively the trans-trans-cis (TTC) and trans-trans-trans (TTT) isomers contribute. No photochemical ring-closure pathways exist for the two isomers. Instead, we found that (18±4)% of excited TTC isomers undergo an ultrafast excited-state cis→trans photoisomerization to TTT within 200 fs, while the excited-state lifetime of TTC molecules that do not isomerize is 35 ps. No photoisomerization was detected for the TTT isomer, which relaxes to the ground state with a lifetime of roughly 160 ps. Moreover, signal oscillations at 170 cm-1 and 360 cm-1 were observed, which can be ascribed to excited-state wave-packet dynamics occurring in the course of the TTC→TTT isomerization. The results of high-level time-dependent density functional theory in conjunction with polarizable continuum models are presented in the subsequent article [C. Walter, S. Ruetzel, M. Diekmann, P. Nuernberger, T. Brixner, and B. Engels, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 224311 (2014)].

  5. Superconducting travelling wave ring with high gradient accelerating section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avrakhov, P.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure instead of a standing wave cavity has major advantages in increasing the accelerating gradient in the ILC. In contrast with standing wave cavity STWA requires feedback loop, which sends wave from the structure output to input, making a superconducting traveling wave ring (STWR). One or few input couplers need to excite STWR and compensate power dissipations due to beam loading. To control traveling wave regime in the structure two independent knobs can be used for tuning both resonant ring frequency and backward wave. We discuss two variants of the STWR with one and two feed couplers.

  6. Cassini RSS occultation observations of density waves in Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, C. A.; French, R. G.; Marouf, E. A.; Rappaport, N. J.; Schinder, P. J.; Anabtawi, A.; Asmar, S.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Goltz, G.; Johnston, D.; Rochblatt, D.

    2005-08-01

    On May 3, 2005, the first of a series of eight nearly diametric occultations by Saturn's rings and atmosphere took place, observed by the Cassini Radio Science (RSS) team. Simultaneous high SNR measurements at the Deep Space Network (DSN) at S, X, and Ka bands (λ = 13, 3.6, and 0.9 cm) have provided a remarkably detailed look at the radial structure and particle scattering behavior of the rings. By virtue of the relatively large ring opening angle (B=-23.6o), the slant path optical depth of the rings was much lower than during the Voyager epoch (B=5.9o), making it possible to detect many density waves and other ring features in the Cassini RSS data that were lost in the noise in the Voyager RSS experiment. Ultimately, diffraction correction of the ring optical depth profiles will yield radial resolution as small as tens of meters for the highest SNR data. At Ka band, the Fresnel scale is only 1--1.5 km, and thus even without diffraction correction, the ring profiles show a stunning array of density waves. The A ring is replete with dozens of Pandora and Prometheus inner Lindblad resonance features, and the Janus 2:1 density wave in the B ring is revealed with exceptional clarity for the first time at radio wavelengths. Weaker waves are abundant as well, and multiple occultation chords sample a variety of wave phases. We estimate the surface mass density of the rings from linear density wave models of the weaker waves. For stronger waves, non-linear models are required, providing more accurate estimates of the wave dispersion relation, the ring surface mass density, and the angular momentum exchange between the rings and satellite. We thank the DSN staff for their superb support of these complex observations.

  7. Damping of Resonantly Forced Density Waves in Dense Planetary Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marius; Schmidt, Jürgen; Salo, Heikki

    2016-10-01

    We address the stability of resonantly forced density waves in dense planetary rings.Already by Goldreich and Tremaine (1978) it has been argued that density waves might be unstable, depending on the relationship between the ring's viscosity and the surface mass density. In the recent paper (Schmidt et al. 2016) we have pointed out that when - within a fluid description of the ring dynamics - the criterion for viscous overstability is satisfied, forced spiral density waves become unstable as well. In this case, linear theory fails to describe the damping.We apply the multiple scale formalism to derive a weakly nonlinear damping relation from a hydrodynamical model.This relation describes the resonant excitation and nonlinear viscous damping of spiral density waves in a vertically integrated fluid disk with density dependent transport coefficients. The model consistently predicts linear instability of density waves in a ring region where the conditions for viscous overstability are met. In this case, sufficiently far away from the Lindblad resonance, the surface mass density perturbation is predicted to saturate to a constant value due to nonlinear viscous damping. In general the model wave damping lengths depend on a set of input parameters, such as the distance to the threshold for viscous overstability and the ground state surface mass density.Our new model compares reasonably well with the streamline model for nonlinear density waves of Borderies et al. 1986.Deviations become substantial in the highly nonlinear regime, corresponding to strong satellite forcing.Nevertheless, we generally observe good or at least qualitative agreement between the wave amplitude profiles of both models. The streamline approach is superior at matching the total wave profile of waves observed in Saturn's rings, while our new damping relation is a comparably handy tool to gain insight in the evolution of the wave amplitude with distance from resonance, and the different regimes of

  8. Optical Leaky-Wave Antenna Integrated in Ring Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Guclu, Caner; Boyraz, Ozdal; Capolino, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    A leaky-wave antenna at optical frequencies is designed and integrated with a ring resonator at 1550 nm wavelength. The leaky wave is generated by using periodic perturbations in the integrated dielectric waveguide that excite the -1 spatial harmonic. The antenna consists of a dielectric waveguides with semiconductor corrugations, and it is compatible with CMOS fabrication technology. We show that integrating the leaky wave antenna in an optical ring resonator that is fed by directional couplers, we can improve the electronic control of the radiation through carrier injection into the semiconductor corrugations.

  9. Kronoseismology: An update on Saturnian waves in the C Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; French, Richard G.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Cassini VIMS Team, Cassini RSS Team

    2016-10-01

    In previous work (Hedman & Nicholson [2013] Astron. J. 146, 12; Ibid [2014] MNRAS 444, 1369; French et al. [2016] Icarus, in press) we have identified 9 inward-propagating density waves in Saturn's middle C ring with resonances generated by internal oscillations in Saturn. The oscillations involved are sectoral f-modes (ie., fundamental modes with l = m) with m = 1, 2, 3, 4 and 10. In addition, 5 outward-propagating waves in the outer C ring have been identified as density waves driven by 3:2 resonances with fixed gravitational anomalies within the planet (see abstract by El Moutamid et al.)We have now examined several additional C ring waves from the catalog of Baillie et al. [2011], in an attempt to identify weaker and shorter-wavelength waves in the inner C ring. We use a modified version of our previous wavelet-based technique to co-add phase-corrected spectra from multiple occultations, using trial values of `m' and the pattern speed to predict their relative phases. This enables us to detect waves too weak to see in individual occultations. To date, 6 new waves have been identified. Two appear to be due to additional saturnian f-modes, but at unexpected locations. The other 4 waves appear to be a new variety: outward-propagating bending waves driven at vertical resonances with Saturn internal oscillations with l = m + 1. We find bending waves with m = 4, 7, 8 & 9. Only the m = 4 wave is near the location predicted by Marley & Porco [1993].

  10. Ring Current Ion Coupling with Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, George V.

    2002-01-01

    A new ring current global model has been developed for the first time that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes wave evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (EMIC). The coupled model is able to simulate, for the first time self-consistently calculated RC ion kinetic and evolution of EMIC waves that propagate along geomagnetic field lines and reflect from the ionosphere. Ionospheric properties affect the reflection index through the integral Pedersen and Hall coductivities. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions, intensities of EMIC, global RC energy balance, and some other parameters will be studied in detail for the selected geomagnetic storms. The space whether aspects of RC modelling and comparison with the data will also be discussed.

  11. Spin wave spectra in perpendicularly magnetized permalloy rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.; Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O., E-mail: eleaao@nus.edu.sg [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Kostylev, M. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2015-03-16

    The dynamic behavior of perpendicularly magnetized permalloy circular rings is systematically investigated as a function of film thickness using broadband field modulated ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. We observed the splitting of one spin wave mode into a family of dense resonance peaks for the rings, which is markedly different from the single mode observed for continuous films of the same thickness. As the excitation frequency is increased, the mode family observed for the rings gradually converges into one mode. With the increase in the film thickness, a sparser spectrum of modes is observed. Our experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the dynamic micromagnetic simulations.

  12. Self-Consistent Ring Current/Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    The self-consistent treatment of the RC ion dynamics and EMIC waves, which are thought to exert important influences on the ion dynamical evolution, is an important missing element in our understanding of the storm-and recovery-time ring current evolution. For example, the EMlC waves cause the RC decay on a time scale of about one hour or less during the main phase of storms. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the modeling of EMIC waves is critical and timely issue in magnetospheric physics. This study will generalize the self-consistent theoretical description of RC ions and EMIC waves that has been developed by Khazanov et al. [2002, 2003] and include the heavy ions and propagation effects of EMIC waves in the global dynamic of self-consistent RC - EMIC waves coupling. The results of our newly developed model that will be presented at the meeting, focusing mainly on the dynamic of EMIC waves and comparison of these results with the previous global RC modeling studies devoted to EMIC waves formation. We also discuss RC ion precipitations and wave induced thermal electron fluxes into the ionosphere.

  13. Ring Current-Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, generated by ion temperature anisotropy in Earth s ring current (RC), is the best known example of wave- particle interaction in the magnetosphere. Also, there is much controversy over the importance of EMIC waves on RC depletion. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt (RB) by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the calculation of EMIC waves must be a very critical part of the space weather studies. The new RC model that we have developed and present for the first time has several new features that we have combine together in a one single model: (a) several lower frequency cold plasma wave modes are taken into account; (b) wave tracing of these wave has been incorporated in the energy EMIC wave equation; (c) no assumptions regarding wave shape spectra have been made; (d) no assumptions regarding the shape of particle distribution have been made to calculate the growth rate; (e) pitch-angle, energy, and mix diffusions are taken into account together for the first time; (f) the exact loss-cone RC analytical solution has been found and coupled with bounce-averaged numerical solution of kinetic equation; (g) the EMIC waves saturation due to their modulation instability and LHW generation are included as an additional factor that contributes to this process; and (h) the hot ions were included in the real part of dielectric permittivity tensor. We compare our theoretical results with the different EMIC waves models as well as RC experimental data.

  14. Hamiltonian theory of nonlinear waves in planetary rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, G. R.

    1987-01-01

    The derivation of a Hamiltonian field theory for nonlinear density waves in Saturn's rings is discussed. Starting with a Hamiltonian for a discrete system of gravitating streamlines, an averaged Hamiltonian is obtained by successive applications of Lie transforms. The transformation may be carried out to any desired order in q, where q is the nonlinearity parameter defined in the work of Shu, et al (1985) and Borderies et al (1985). Subsequent application of the Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin Method approximation yields an asymptotic field Hamiltonian. Both the nonlinear dispersion relation and the wave action transport equation are easily derived from the corresponding Lagrangian by the standard variational principle.

  15. Resonant Charge Current in a Rashba Ring Induced by Spin-Dependent Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhan-Feng; LI Hong

    2008-01-01

    A one-dimensional ring subject to Rashba spin-orbit coupling is investigated. When it is attached to a lead with spin-dependent chemical potential, there will be charge current in the ring. The charge current response is resonantly maximized when the Fermi energy of the lead is equal to any energy level of the 1D ring. And if two probes are attached to the ring, the electric voltage between them creates sawtooth-like wave, which indicates the direction of the charge current. A ferromagnetic lead can also induce persistent charge current, which can be detected by magnetization intensity measurement.

  16. Effects of ring current ions on the ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere based on a 5-D drift kinetic ring current model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K.; Amano, T.; Saito, S.; Kamiya, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Keika, K.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial inner magnetosphere is the region where different plasma regimes over a wide range of energy such as the plasmasphere, ring current, and radiation belt coexist. Among them, the ring current carries most of plasma pressure and is thus responsible for deformation of the magnetic field. Since the deformation changes drift paths of charged particles including the ring current ions, it is important to describe this coupling between the ring current and electric/magnetic fields self-consistently. It is known that short-timescale phenomena such as ULF waves and substorm related ion injections from the plasma sheet play important roles in the inner magnetospheric dynamics during magnetic storms. While ULF waves contribute to the radial transport of relativistic electrons to form the radiation belt, the ion injections contribute to excitation of storm-time Pc5 ULF waves as well as to plasma supply to the ring current from the magnetotail. Aiming at a self-consistent description of the coupling between ring current ions and electric/magnetic fields, we have developed a global ring current model (GEMSIS-RC model). The model is a self-consistent and kinetic numerical simulation code solving the five-dimensional collisionless drift-kinetic equation for the ring-current ions coupled with Maxwell equations. Without assuming a force-balanced equilibrium, the GEMSIS-RC model allows the force-imbalance to exist, which generates induced electric field through the polarization current. In this study, we applied the GEMSIS-RC model for simulation of ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere with a focus on the short-timescale phenomena described above. Comparison between runs with/without ring current ions show that the existence of hot ring current ions can deform and amplify the original sinusoidal waveforms. The deformation causes the energy cascade to higher frequency range (Pc4 and Pc3 ranges). The cascade is more pronounced in high plasma beta cases. It is also shown that

  17. Analysis of Origin of Multi-Ring Basins by Theory of Deep Water Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jian-Chun; MA Yue-Hua; CHEN Dao-Han; BAO Gang

    2008-01-01

    The tsunami model of the origin of multi-ring basins is analysed with the theory of deep water waves generated by an initial surface deformation,which is set as a parabolic crater.We obtain an approximate formula for calculating the ring radius.The formula applied to some multi-ring basins on the Moon,Mercury and Mars gives almost equidistant spacing of the rings within the main ring (the IV ring); this agrees with the previous conclusion that the IV ring marks the end of the fluidized region.Besides this,the theory of deep water waves does not require similar crustal structure at each basin-impact site on all three planets which is required in the theory of shallow water waves.

  18. Prometheus Induced Vorticity In Saturns F Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Sutton, Phil J

    2016-01-01

    Saturns rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of grea...

  19. Response of Charged Particles in a Storage Ring to Gravitational Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Dong; HUANG Chao-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravitational waves on the charged particles in a storage ring is studied. It shows thatthe gravitational waves might be directly detected by monitoring the motion of charged particles in a storage ring. Theangular velocity of the charged particles is continually adjustable by changing the initial energy of particles and thestrength of the magnetic field. This feature is very useful for finding the gravitational waves with different frequencies.

  20. Response of Charged Particles in a Storage Ring to Gravitational Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGDong; HUANGChao-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravitational waves on the charged particles in a storage ring is studied. It shows that the gravitational waves might be directly detected by monitoring the motion of charged particles in a storage ring. The angular velocity of the charged particles is continually adjustable by changing the initial energy of particles and the strength of the magnetic field. This feature is very useful for finding the gravitational waves with different frequencies.

  1. Prometheus Induced Vorticity in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2016-11-01

    Saturn's rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non-zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of great interest to planet and planetesimals in proto-planetary disks where vortices and turbulence are suspected of having a significant role in their formation and migrations. Additionally, it is found that the immediate channel edges created by the close passage of Prometheus actually show high radial dispersions in the order 20-50 cm/s, up to a maximum of 1 m/s. This is much greater than the value required by Toomre for a disk to be unstable to the growth of axisymmetric oscillations. However, an area a few hundred km away from the edge shows a more promising location for the growth of coherent objects.

  2. Prometheus Induced Vorticity in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2016-09-01

    Saturn's rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non-zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of great interest to planet and planetesimals in proto-planetary disks where vortices and turbulence are suspected of having a significant role in their formation and migrations. Additionally, it is found that the immediate channel edges created by the close passage of Prometheus actually show high radial dispersions in the order ~20-50 cm/s, up to a maximum of 1 m/s. This is much greater than the value required by Toomre for a disk to be unstable to the growth of axisymmetric oscillations. However, an area a few hundred km away from the edge shows a more promising location for the growth of coherent objects.

  3. Coexistence of up- and downstream traffic waves on a ring road

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weele, K.; Kanellopoulos, G.

    2016-09-01

    It is an observational fact that density waves in vehicle traffic can move in either direction: small-amplitude waves travel in the same direction as the cars (downstream) whereas high-amplitude waves or "jams" travel in the opposite direction (upstream). We construct a model of ring road traffic to demonstrate how this comes about. Our model shows the spontaneous generation of these density waves, explains their stability properties, and pinpoints the precise density level at which the wave speed changes direction.

  4. The Nonlinear Coupling of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Waves in the Ring Current Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2004-01-01

    The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space, and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. In this paper we present the morphology, dynamics, and level of LHW activity generated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves during the May 2-7, 1998 storm period on the global scale. The LHWs were calculated based on a newly developed self-consistent model (Khazanov et. al., 2002, 2003) that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes the evolution of EMIC waves. It is found that the LHWs are excited by helium ions due to their mass dependent drift in the electric field of EMIC waves. The level of LHW activity is calculated assuming that the induced scattering process is the main saturation mechanism for these waves. The calculated LHWs electric fields are consistent with the observational data.

  5. Characteristics of ring type traveling wave ultrasonic motor in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jianjun; Zhou, Ningning; Tian, Xiu; Jin, Long; Xu, Zhike

    2009-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrasonic motor strongly depend on the properties of stator/rotor contact interface which are affected by ambient environment. With the developed apparatus, load properties of two ring type traveling wave ultrasonic motors in atmosphere, low vacuum and high vacuum were studied, respectively. Wear of friction material, variations of vacuum degree and the temperature of motor during the experiment were also measured. The results show that load properties of motor A in vacuum were poorer than those in atmosphere, when load torque M(f) was less than 0.55 N m. Compared to motor A, load properties of motor B were affected a little by environmental pressure. Wear of friction material in vacuum was more severe than wear in atmosphere. The temperature of motor in vacuum rose more quickly than it in atmosphere and had not reached equilibrium in 2 h experiment. However, the temperature of motor in atmosphere had reached equilibrium in about forth minutes. Furthermore, outgas was also observed during experiment under vacuum conditions.

  6. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopic Analysis of Aromatics from One Ring to Four Rings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hai-feng; Yue, Zong-yu; Chen, Bei-ling; Yao, Ming-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to distinguish small aromatics preferably, a Nd : YAG Laser was used to supply an excitation laser, which was adjusted to 0.085 J x cm(-2) at 266 nm. Benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene and chrysene were used as the representative of different rings aromatics. The fluorescence emission spectra were researched for each aromatic hydrocarbon and mixtures by Laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Results showed that the rings number determined the fluorescence emission spectra, and the structure with same rings number did not affect the emission fluorescence spectrum ranges. This was due to the fact that the absorption efficiency difference at 266 nm resulted in that the fluorescence intensities of each aromatic hydrocarbon with same rings number were different and the fluorescence intensities difference were more apparently with aromatic ring number increasing. When the absorption efficiency was similar at 266 nm and the concentrations of each aromatic hydrocarbon were same, the fluorescence intensities were increased with aromatic ring number increasing. With aromatic ring number increasing, the fluorescence spectrum and emission peak wavelength were all red-shifted from ultraviolet to visible and the fluorescence spectrum range was also wider as the absorption efficiency was similar. The fluorescence emission spectra from one to four rings could be discriminated in the following wavelengths, 275 to 320 nm, 320 to 375 nm, 375 to 425 nm, 425 to 556 nm, respectively. It can be used for distinguish the type of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as it exists in single type. As PAHs are usually exist in a variety of different rings number at the same time, the results for each aromatic hydrocarbon may not apply to the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures. For the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures, results showed that the one- or two-ring PAHs in mixtures could not be detected by fluorescence as three- or four-ring PAHs existed in mixture

  7. Loss of stability of a solitary wave through exciting a cnoidal wave on a Fermi-Pasta-Ulam ring

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Zongqiang; Chu, Min; Xia, Guodong; Zheng, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal propagation behavior of a solitary wave is investigated on a Fermi-Pasta-Ulam ring. We observe the emergence of a cnoidal wave excited by the solitary wave. The cnoidal wave may coexist with the solitary wave for a long time associated with the periodic exchange of energy between these two nonlinear waves. The module of the cnoidal wave, which is considered as an indicator of the nonlinearity, is found to oscillate with the same period of the energy exchange. After the stage of coexistence, the interaction between these two nonlinear waves leads to the destruction of the cnoidal wave by the radiation of phonons. Finally, the interaction of the solitary wave with phonons leads to the loss of stability of the solitary wave.

  8. Density waves in Saturn's rings probed by radio and optical occultation - Observational tests of theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Thomas G.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    A parallel examination is conducted of Voyager radio and photopolarimeter occultation observations of the Saturn A ring's density waves. The radio instrument waves exhibit an average -90 deg offset from the dynamical phase. A warping height of about 100-m amplitude can qualtitatively reproduce this phase shift, while preserving the overall model wave shape. These results may be profoundly relevant for satellite-ring torque calculations in Saturn's rings, given the deposition of all of the net torque of the standard model in the first wavelength.

  9. Are Ring Current Ions Lost in Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  10. Effect of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  11. Giant black hole ringings induced by massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Decanini, Yves; Hadj, Mohamed Ould El

    2014-01-01

    A distorted black hole radiates gravitational waves in order to settle down in one of the geometries permitted by the no-hair theorem. During that relaxation phase, a characteristic damped ringing is generated. It can be theoretically constructed from the black hole quasinormal frequencies (which govern its oscillating behavior and its decay) and from the associated excitation factors (which determine intrinsically its amplitude) by carefully taking into account the source of the distortion. Here, by considering the Schwarzschild black hole in the framework of massive gravity, we show that the excitation factors have an unexpected strong resonant behavior leading to giant ringings which are, moreover, slowly decaying. Such extraordinary black hole ringings could be observed by the next generations of gravitational wave detectors and allow us to test the various massive gravity theories or their absence could be used to impose strong constraints on the graviton mass.

  12. Explosive-driven shock wave and vortex ring interaction with a propane flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannuzzi, P. M.; Hargather, M. J.; Doig, G. C.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments were performed to analyze the interaction of an explosively driven shock wave and a propane flame. A 30 g explosive charge was detonated at one end of a 3-m-long, 0.6-m-diameter shock tube to produce a shock wave which propagated into the atmosphere. A propane flame source was positioned at various locations outside of the shock tube to investigate the effect of different strength shock waves. High-speed retroreflective shadowgraph imaging visualized the shock wave motion and flame response, while a synchronized color camera imaged the flame directly. The explosively driven shock tube was shown to produce a repeatable shock wave and vortex ring. Digital streak images show the shock wave and vortex ring propagation and expansion. The shadowgrams show that the shock wave extinguishes the propane flame by pushing it off of the fuel source. Even a weak shock wave was found to be capable of extinguishing the flame.

  13. Er-doped fiber ring laser gyroscopes operating in continuous waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingren Qian; Jue Su; Xuxu Wang; Bing Zhu

    2007-01-01

    A direction related polarizer was inserted into a ring laser cavity to eliminate one of the two eigen-modes as well as spatial hole burning of the gain medium in a bidirectional Er-doped fiber ring laser. Thus, a fiber ring laser gyroscope (FRLG) operating in continuous wave was demonstrated. A beat signal of over 30-dB noise was observed and a good inear relation between the beat frequency shift and cavity rotation rate was obtained.

  14. The B-ring's surface mass density from hidden density waves: Less than meets the eye?

    CERN Document Server

    Hedman, M M

    2016-01-01

    Saturn's B ring is the most opaque ring in our solar system, but many of its fundamental parameters, including its total mass, are not well constrained. Spiral density waves generated by mean-motion resonances with Saturn's moons provide some of the best constraints on the rings' mass density, but detecting and quantifying such waves in the B ring has been challenging because of this ring's high opacity and abundant fine-scale structure. Using a wavelet-based analyses of 17 occultations of the star gamma Crucis observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft, we are able to examine five density waves in the B ring. Two of these waves are generated by the Janus 2:1 and Mimas 5:2 Inner Lindblad Resonances at 96,427 km and 101,311 km from Saturn's center, respectively. Both of these waves can be detected in individual occultation profiles, but the multi-profile wavelet analysis reveals unexpected variations in the pattern speed of the Janus 2:1 wave that might arise...

  15. Theory of Optical Leaky-Wave Antenna Integrated in a Ring Resonator for Radiation Control

    CERN Document Server

    Guclu, Caner; Capolino, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    The integration of a leaky-wave antenna with a ring resonator is presented using analytical guided wave models. The device consists of a ring resonator fed by a directional coupler, where the ring resonator path includes a leaky-wave antenna segment. The resonator integration provides two main advantages: the high-quality factor ensures effective control of radiation intensity by controlling the resonance conditions and the efficient radiation from a leaky-wave antenna even when its length is much smaller than the propagation length of the leaky wave. We devise an analytical model of the guided wave propagation along a directional coupler and the ring resonator path including the antenna and non-radiating segments. The trade-offs regarding the quality factor of resonance and the antenna efficiency of such a design is reported in terms of the coupler parameters, leaky-wave constant and radiation length. Finally a CMOS-compatible OLWA design suitable for the ring resonator integration is designed where Silicon ...

  16. Structure of the Mimas 5:3 Bending Wave in Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sega, Daniel D.; Colwell, Josh E.

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's moon Mimas is on an inclined orbit with several strong vertical orbital resonances in Saturn's rings. The 5:3 inner vertical resonance with Mimas lies in the outer A ring and produces a prominent spiral bending wave (BW) that propagates away from Mimas. While dozens of density waves in Saturn's rings have been analyzed to determine local surface mass densities and viscosities, the number of bending waves is limited by the requirement for a moon on an inclined orbit and because, unlike the Lindblad resonances that excite density waves, there can be no first order vertical resonances. The Mimas 5:3 BW is the most prominent in the ring system. Bending wave theory was initially developed by Shu et al. (1983, Icarus, 53, 185-206) following the Voyager encounters with Saturn. Later, Gresh et al. (1986, Icarus, 68, 481-502) modeled radio science occultation data of the Mimas 5:3 BW with an imperfect fit to the theory. The multitude of high resolution stellar occultations observed by Cassini UVIS provides an opportunity to reconstruct the full three-dimensional structure of this wave and learn more about local ring properties. Occultations at high elevation angles out of the ring plane are insensitive to the wave structure due to the small angles of the vertical warping of the rings in the wave. They thus reveal the underlying structure in the wave region. There is a symmetric increase in optical depth throughout the Mimas 5:3 BW region. This may be due to an increase in the abundance of small particles without a corresponding increase in surface mass density. We include this feature in a ray-tracing model of the vertical structure of the wave and fit it to multiple UVIS occultations. The observed amplitude of the wave and its damping behavior of are not well-described by the Shu et al. model, which assumes a fluid-like damping mechanism. A different damping behavior of the ring, perhaps radially varying across the wave region due to differences in the particle

  17. Oscillator strength reduction induced by external electric fields in self-assembled quantum dots and rings

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    We have carried out continuous wave and time resolved photoluminescence experiments in self-assembled In(Ga)As quantum dots and quantum rings embedded in field effect structure devices. In both kinds of nanostructures, we find a noticeable increase of the exciton radiative lifetime with the external voltage bias that must be attributed to the field-induced polarizability of the confined electron hole pair. The interplay between the exciton radiative recombination and the electronic carrier tu...

  18. Quantum time crystal by decoherence: Proposal with an incommensurate charge density wave ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsugawa, K.; Fujii, T.; Tanda, S.

    2017-09-01

    We show that time translation symmetry of a ring system with a macroscopic quantum ground state is broken by decoherence. In particular, we consider a ring-shaped incommensurate charge density wave (ICDW ring) threaded by a fluctuating magnetic flux: the Caldeira-Leggett model is used to model the fluctuating flux as a bath of harmonic oscillators. We show that the charge density expectation value of a quantized ICDW ring coupled to its environment oscillates periodically. The Hamiltonians considered in this model are time independent unlike "Floquet time crystals" considered recently. Our model forms a metastable quantum time crystal with a finite length in space and in time.

  19. Multiple four-wave mixing and Kerr combs in a bichromatically pumped nonlinear fiber ring cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceoldo, D; Bendahmane, A; Fatome, J; Millot, G; Hansson, T; Modotto, D; Wabnitz, S; Kibler, B

    2016-12-01

    We report numerical and experimental studies of multiple four-wave mixing processes emerging from dual-frequency pumping of a passive nonlinear fiber ring cavity. We observe the formation of a periodic train of nearly background-free soliton pulses associated with Kerr frequency combs. The generation of resonant dispersive waves is also reported.

  20. YBCO superconducting ring resonators at millimeter-wave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorey, Christopher M.; Kong, Keon-Shik; Bhasin, Kul B.; Warner, J. D.; Itoh, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Microstrip ring resonators operating at 35 GHz were fabricated from laser ablated YBCO films deposited on lanthanum aluminate substrates. They were measured over a range of temperatures and their performances compared to identical resonators made of evaporated gold. Below 60 Kelvin the superconducting strip performed better than the gold, reaching an unloaded Q approximately 1.5 times that of gold at 25 K. A shift in the resonant frequency follows the form predicted by the London equations. The Phenomenological Loss Equivalence Method is applied to the ring resonator and the theoretically calculated Q values are compared to the experimental results.

  1. Modal Ring Method for the Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Kreider, Kevin L.

    1993-01-01

    The modal ring method for electromagnetic scattering from perfectly electric conducting (PEC) symmetrical bodies is presented. The scattering body is represented by a line of finite elements (triangular) on its outer surface. The infinite computational region surrounding the body is represented analytically by an eigenfunction expansion. The modal ring method effectively reduces the two dimensional scattering problem to a one-dimensional problem similar to the method of moments. The modal element method is capable of handling very high frequency scattering because it has a highly banded solution matrix.

  2. Convective Amplification of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves From Ring-distribution Protons in the Inner Magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Mithaiwala, Manish; Ganguli, Gurudas; Rudakov, Leonid; Keika, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    The growth of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (EMIC) due to a ring distribution of Hydrogen ions is examined. Though these distributions are more commonly implicated in the generation of equatorial noise, their potential for exciting EMIC waves is considered here. It is shown that since the ring distribution is non-monotonic in perpendicular velocity, the amplification achieved by this instability is greater than bi-Maxwellian distributions for typical anisotropies, because the waves can maintain resonance over a much longer part of its trajectory. For ring speeds V_R close to the Alfven speed V_A, the growth rate is maximum at parallel propagation but is much larger at oblique angles compared with a bi-Maxwellian, and can have a second peak approximately at kperp c/omegaPH V_R/V_A ~2.3 for ring speeds about the parallel thermal speed. Strong wave gain is achieved for moderate ring speeds V_R~V_A . The analysis suggests that EMIC wave activity should be closely associated with equatorial noise.

  3. A Study of Saturn's Normal Mode Oscillations and Their Forcing of Density Waves in the Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedson, Andrew James; Cao, Lyra

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) ring occultation profiles has revealed the presence of spiral density waves in Saturn's C ring that are consistent with being driven by gravitational perturbations associated with normal-mode oscillations of the planet [1]. These waves allow the C ring to serve as a sort of seismometer, since their pattern speeds (i.e., azimuthal phase speeds) can in principle be mapped onto the frequencies of the predominant normal oscillations of the planet. The resonant mode frequencies in turn are sensitive to Saturn's internal structure and rotational state. Characterization of the normal modes responsible for the forcing holds the potential to supply important new constraints on Saturn's internal structure and rotation. We perform numerical calculations to determine the resonant frequencies of the normal modes of a uniformly rotating planet for various assumptions regarding its internal stratification and compare the implied pattern speeds to those of density waves observed in the C ring. A question of particular interest that we address is whether quasi-toroidal modes are responsible for exciting a mysterious class of slowly propagating density waves in the ring. We also explore the implications of avoided crossings between modes for explaining observed fine splitting in the pattern speeds of spiral density waves having the same number of spiral arms, and weigh the role that convective overstability may play in exciting large-scale quasi-toroidal modes in Saturn. [1] Hedman, M.M. and Nicholson, P.D. 2014. MNRAS 444, 1369.

  4. Kronoseismology: Using density waves in Saturn's C ring to probe the planet's interior

    CERN Document Server

    Hedman, M M

    2013-01-01

    Saturn's C ring contains multiple spiral patterns that appear to be density waves driven by periodic gravitational perturbations. In other parts of Saturn's rings, such waves are generated by Lindblad resonances with Saturn's various moons, but most of the wave-like C-ring features are not situated near any strong resonance with any known moon. Using stellar occultation data obtained by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft, we investigate the origin of six unidentified C-ring waves located between 80,900 and 87,200 km from Saturn's center. By measuring differences in the waves' phases among the different occultations, we are able to determine both the number of arms in each spiral pattern and the speeds at which these patterns rotate around the planet. We find that all six of these waves have between 2 and 4 arms and pattern speeds between 1660 degrees/day and 1861 degrees/day. These speeds are too large to be attributed to any satellite resonance. Instead they ar...

  5. Theory of a ring laser. [electromagnetic field and wave equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegozzi, L. N.; Lamb, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Development of a systematic formulation of the theory of a ring laser which is based on first principles and uses a well-known model for laser operation. A simple physical derivation of the electromagnetic field equations for a noninertial reference frame in uniform rotation is presented, and an attempt is made to clarify the nature of the Fox-Li modes for an open polygonal resonator. The polarization of the active medium is obtained by using a Fourier-series method which permits the formulation of a strong-signal theory, and solutions are given in terms of continued fractions. It is shown that when such a continued fraction is expanded to third order in the fields, the familiar small-signal ring-laser theory is obtained.

  6. Hydrocarbon emission rings in protoplanetary disks induced by dust evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bergin, Edwin A; Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Blake, Geoffrey A; Schwarz, Kamber; Visser, Ruud; Zhang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    We report observations of resolved C2H emission rings within the gas-rich protoplanetary disks of TW Hya and DM Tau using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). In each case the emission ring is found to arise at the edge of the observable disk of mm-sized grains (pebbles) traced by (sub)mm-wave continuum emission. In addition, we detect a C3H2 emission ring with an identical spatial distribution to C2H in the TW Hya disk. This suggests that these are hydrocarbon rings (i.e. not limited to C2H). Using a detailed thermo-chemical model we show that reproducing the emission from C2H requires a strong UV field and C/O > 1 in the upper disk atmosphere and outer disk, beyond the edge of the pebble disk. This naturally arises in a disk where the ice-coated dust mass is spatially stratified due to the combined effects of coagulation, gravitational settling and drift. This stratification causes the disk surface and outer disk to have a greater permeability to UV photons. Furthermore the concentration of ices that ...

  7. Hydrocarbon Emission Rings in Protoplanetary Disks Induced by Dust Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Edwin A.; Du, Fujun; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Blake, G. A.; Schwarz, K.; Visser, R.; Zhang, K.

    2016-11-01

    We report observations of resolved C2H emission rings within the gas-rich protoplanetary disks of TW Hya and DM Tau using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array. In each case the emission ring is found to arise at the edge of the observable disk of millimeter-sized grains (pebbles) traced by submillimeter-wave continuum emission. In addition, we detect a C3H2 emission ring with an identical spatial distribution to C2H in the TW Hya disk. This suggests that these are hydrocarbon rings (i.e., not limited to C2H). Using a detailed thermo-chemical model we show that reproducing the emission from C2H requires a strong UV field and C/O > 1 in the upper disk atmosphere and outer disk, beyond the edge of the pebble disk. This naturally arises in a disk where the ice-coated dust mass is spatially stratified due to the combined effects of coagulation, gravitational settling and drift. This stratification causes the disk surface and outer disk to have a greater permeability to UV photons. Furthermore the concentration of ices that transport key volatile carriers of oxygen and carbon in the midplane, along with photochemical erosion of CO, leads to an elemental C/O ratio that exceeds unity in the UV-dominated disk. Thus the motions of the grains, and not the gas, lead to a rich hydrocarbon chemistry in disk surface layers and in the outer disk midplane.

  8. Kronoseismology III: An update on Saturn-driven waves in the C ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; French, Richard G.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-05-01

    In previous work (Hedman & Nicholson [2013] Astron. J. 146, 12; Ibid [2014] MNRAS 444, 1369; French et al. [2016] Icarus, in press) we have identified 9 inward-propagating density waves in Saturn's C ring with outer Lindblad resonances (OLRs) generated by internal oscillations in Saturn. The oscillations involved are sectoral f-modes (ie., fundamental modes with l = m) with m = 1, 2, 3, 4 and 10. In addition, 5 outward-propagating waves between radii of 84,800 and 86,600 km have been identified as density waves driven by 3:2 tesseral resonances with fixed gravitational anomalies within the planet. (See Hedman et al., this conference.)We have now examined additional C ring waves from the catalog of Baillie et al. [2011], in an attempt to identify several weaker and shorter-wavelength waves in the inner C ring. We use a modified version of our previous wavelet-based technique to coadd phase-corrected spectra from multiple occultations, using trial values of `m` and the pattern speed to predict their relative phases. This enables us to detect waves too weak to see in individual occultations. To date, 6 new waves have been identified. Two appear to be due to additional saturnian f-modes, with m = 2 and m = 9. The other 4 waves appear to be a new variety: outward-propagating bending waves driven at outer vertical resonances (OVRs) with Saturn internal oscillations with l = m + 1. We find waves with m = 4, 7, 8 & 9. All of the newly-identified waves are at radii less than 77,000 km and only the m = 4 OVR is near the location predicted by Marley & Porco [1993].

  9. Reconfigurable heat-induced spin wave lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyapko, O.; Borisenko, I. V.; Demidov, V. E.; Pernice, W.; Demokritov, S. O.

    2016-12-01

    We study the control and manipulation of propagating spin waves in yttrium iron garnet films using a local laser-induced heating. We show that, due to the refraction of spin waves in the thermal gradients, the heated region acts as a defocusing lens for Damon-Eshbach spin waves and as a focusing lens for backward volume waves enabling collimation of spin-wave beams in the latter case. In addition to the focusing/defocusing functionality, the local heating allows one to manipulate the propagation direction of the spin-wave beams and to efficiently suppress their diffraction spreading by utilizing caustic effects.

  10. Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xing

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations o...

  11. High-energy terahertz wave parametric oscillator with a surface-emitted ring-cavity configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Xu, Wentao; Duan, Pan; Yan, Chao; Tang, Longhuang; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-05-15

    A surface-emitted ring-cavity terahertz (THz) wave parametric oscillator has been demonstrated for high-energy THz output and fast frequency tuning in a wide frequency range. Through the special optical design with a galvano-optical scanner and four-mirror ring-cavity structure, the maximum THz wave output energy of 12.9 μJ/pulse is achieved at 1.359 THz under the pump energy of 172.8 mJ. The fast THz frequency tuning in the range of 0.7-2.8 THz can be accessed with the step response of 600 μs. Moreover, the maximum THz wave output energy from this configuration is 3.29 times as large as that obtained from the conventional surface-emitted THz wave parametric oscillator with the same experimental conditions.

  12. Second-Order Resonant Interaction of Ring Current Protons with Whistler-Mode Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fu-Liang; CHEN Liang-Xu; HE Hui-Yong; ZHOU Qing-Hua

    2008-01-01

    We present a study on the second-order resonant interaction between the ring current protons with Whistler-mode waves propagating near the quasi electrostatic limit following the previous second-order resonant theory.The diffusion coefficients are proportional to the electric field amplitude E,much greater than those for the regular first-order resonance.which are proportional to the electric field amplitudes square E2.Numerical calculations for the pitch angle scattering are performed for typical energies of protons Ek=50ke V and 100ke V at locations L=2 and L=3.5.The timescale for the loss process of protons by the Whistler waves is found to approach one hour,comparable to that by the EMIC waves,suggesting that Whistler waves may also contribute significantly to the ring current decay under appropriate conditions.

  13. Straw Formation and Enhanced Damping of Strong Density Waves in Saturn’s Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2017-06-01

    High resolution Cassini images of strong density waves in Saturn’s rings often show kilometer-scale structures in the wave troughs that are sometimes described as straw-like structures. These structures are likely formed by transient gravitational instabilities within the density wave and have the potential to greatly enhance the local viscous angular momentum transport and thereby limit the maximum amplitude of the density wave. A Hamiltonian theory for density waves has been developed that can describe the rate of local gravitational instabilities in the wave train. The Hamiltonian for single particle motion in the vicinity of an inner Lindblad resonance with a Saturnian satellite can be formulated such that the angle variable conjugate to the radial action is the resonant argument for the resonance. The density wave can then be derived using Hamiltonian perturbation methods to remove the satellite perturbation such that the transformed radial action and conjugate angles include the usual solution for self-gravitating density waves. Local gravitational instabilities in the density wave can now be formulated using a linearized collisionless Boltzmann equation that is expressed in terms of the transformed action-angle variables that contain the density wave solution. The gravitational potential of the linearized perturbation is found to be enhanced by a factor of ten or more in strong density waves, which likely explains the observation of kilometer-scale structures in these waves. The Hamiltonian formalism can also be used to derive an enhanced effective viscosity that results from these straw-like structures.

  14. A Weakly Nonlinear Model for the Damping of Resonantly Forced Density Waves in Dense Planetary Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marius; Schmidt, Jürgen; Salo, Heikki

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we address the stability of resonantly forced density waves in dense planetary rings. Goldreich & Tremaine have already argued that density waves might be unstable, depending on the relationship between the ring’s viscosity and the surface mass density. In the recent paper Schmidt et al., we have pointed out that when—within a fluid description of the ring dynamics—the criterion for viscous overstability is satisfied, forced spiral density waves become unstable as well. In this case, linear theory fails to describe the damping, but nonlinearity of the underlying equations guarantees a finite amplitude and eventually a damping of the wave. We apply the multiple scale formalism to derive a weakly nonlinear damping relation from a hydrodynamical model. This relation describes the resonant excitation and nonlinear viscous damping of spiral density waves in a vertically integrated fluid disk with density dependent transport coefficients. The model consistently predicts density waves to be (linearly) unstable in a ring region where the conditions for viscous overstability are met. Sufficiently far away from the Lindblad resonance, the surface mass density perturbation is predicted to saturate to a constant value due to nonlinear viscous damping. The wave’s damping lengths of the model depend on certain input parameters, such as the distance to the threshold for viscous overstability in parameter space and the ground state surface mass density.

  15. An upper ocean current jet and internal waves in a Gulf Stream warm core ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, T. M.; Stalcup, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    On June 22, 1982, the R/V Endeavor, while participating in a multi-ship study of a warm core ring 82B, encountered a strong front in the core of the ring. The vessel was headed on a radial section outward from ring center while a CTD was repeatedly raised and lowered between 10 and 300 m. Current profiles in the upper 100 m were obtained continuously with a Doppler acoustic profiling system. Above the shallow 45 m seasonal thermocline, a current jet of 4 km width was encountered having a central core of relatively light water and a maximum current of 1.1 m/s. This jet was both highly nonlinear and totally unexpected. A high frequency packet of directional internal waves was acoustically observed in the seasonal thermocline at the outer edge of the jet. Vertical velocities were large enough (6 cm/s) as to be directly observable in the Doppler returns. The waves were propagating from the northeast, parallel to the ship track, and orthogonal to the jet toward the center of the warm core ring. While a nonlinear, centrifugal term was required for the force balance of the jet, the high-frequency internal wave packet could be explained with linear, gravest-mode wave dynamics.

  16. Analytical model for ring heater thermal compensation in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramette, Joshua; Kasprzack, Marie; Brooks, Aidan; Blair, Carl; Wang, Haoyu; Heintze, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Advanced laser interferometer gravitational-wave detectors use high laser power to achieve design sensitivity. A small part of this power is absorbed in the interferometer cavity mirrors where it creates thermal lenses, causing aberrations in the main laser beam that must be minimized by the actuation of "ring heaters," which are additional heater elements that are aimed to reduce the temperature gradients in the mirrors. In this article we derive the first, to the best of our knowledge, analytical model of the temperature field generated by an ideal ring heater. We express the resulting optical aberration contribution to the main laser beam in this axisymmetric case. Used in conjunction with wavefront measurements, our model provides a more complete understanding of the thermal state of the cavity mirrors and will allow a more efficient use of the ring heaters in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

  17. High power, low divergent, substrate emitting quantum cascade ring laser in continuous wave operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a surface grating coupled substrate emitting quantum cascade ring laser with high power room temperature continuous wave operation at 4.64 μm. A second order surface metal/semiconductor distributed-feedback grating is used for in-plane feedback and vertical out-coupling. A device with 400 μm radius ring cavity exhibits an output power of 202 mW in room temperature continuous wave operation. Single mode operation with a side mode suppression ratio of 25 dB is obtained along with a good linear tuning with temperature. The far field measurement exhibits a low divergent concentric ring beam pattern with a lobe separation of ∼0.34°, which indicates that the device operates in fundamental mode (n = 1.

  18. Revised NASA axially symmetric ring model for coupled-cavity traveling-wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1987-01-01

    A versatile large-signal, two-dimensional computer program is used by NASA to model coupled-cavity travelling-wave tubes (TWTs). In this model, the electron beam is divided into a series of disks, each of which is further divided into axially symmetric rings which can expand and contract. The trajectories of the electron rings and the radiofrequency (RF) fields are determined from the calculated axial and radial space-charge, RF, and magnetic forces as the rings pass through a sequence of cavities. By varying electrical and geometric properties of individual cavities, the model is capable of simulating severs, velocity tapers, and voltage jumps. The calculated electron ring trajectories can be used in designing magnetic focusing and multidepressed collectors. The details of using the program are presented, and results are compared with experimental data.

  19. Identification of Saturn-driven bending waves in Saturn's inner C ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Richard; Colwell, Joshua; Nicholson, Phillip; Marouf, Essam; McGhee-French, Colleen; Hedman, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Saturn's C ring is host to more than a dozen wavelike features whose detailed nature has been a mystery since their discovery in high-resolution Voyager radio occultations of the rings. Rosen et al. (1991 Icarus 93, 25) enumerated several of these, and the list was augmented by Baillié et al. (2011 Icarus 216, 292), based on a detailed analysis of Cassini UVIS stellar occultation profiles. Recently, Hedman and Nicholson (2013 Astron. J. 146, 12; 2014 MNRAS 444, 1369) were able to identify the wavenumbers and pattern speeds for several of the waves. They showed that several Outer Lindblad Resonances (OLR) density waves had properties that were in general quite consistent with the predictions of Marley and Porco (1993 Icarus, 106, 508) and Marley (2014 Icarus, 234, 194) that Saturn's acoustic oscillations had pattern speeds with corresponding resonance radii in the C ring. Hedman and Nicholson also identified a set of Inner Lindblad Resonance density waves with pattern speeds very close to Saturn's rotation period. Finally, French et al. (2016 Icarus, in press) identified an inward-propagating m=2 wave in the Maxwell Ringlet. These new identifications ushered in the field of Kronoseismology -- the probing of the nature of Saturn's interior from the analysis of Saturn-driven waves in the rings. Here, we report the identification of six additional wave features, all in the inner C ring, from Cassini occultation measurements. Two of the waves are OLRs: Baillié feature #5 (B1 = W76.022 (i.e., r=76022 km)) with wavenumber m=-9, and Baillié #9 (B9 = W76.435) with m=-2. The first of these is presumably Saturn-driven, but of unknown origin; W76.435 fits very nicely in the pattern predicted by Marley (2014) for an m=l-2, q=2 internal oscillation. We also report the identification of a new class of Saturn-driven waves: B1 (W74.666), B3 (W74.936), B4 (W74.941), and B6 (W76.234) are all bending waves at Outer Vertical Resonances (OVR) with wavenumbers between m=-4 and m=-9

  20. Single and multi-band electromagnetic induced transparency-like metamaterials with coupled split ring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, Fulya; Akaoglu, Baris

    2017-08-01

    We present a metamaterial configuration exhibiting single and multi-band electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT)-like properties. The unit cell of the single band EIT-like metamaterial consists of a multi-split ring resonator surrounded by a split ring resonator. The multi-split ring resonator acts as a quasi-dark or dark resonator, depending on the polarization of the incident wave, and the split ring resonator serves as the bright resonator. Combination of these two resonators results in a single band EIT-like transmission inside the stop band. EIT-like transmission phenomenon is also clearly observed in the measured transmission spectrum at almost the same frequencies for vertical and horizontal polarized waves, and the numerical results are verified for normal incidence. Moreover, multi-band transmission windows are created within a wide band by combining the two slightly different single band EIT-like metamaterial unit cells that exhibit two different coupling strengths inside a supercell configuration. Group indices as high as 123 for single band and 488 for tri-band transmission, accompanying with high transmission rates (over 80%), are achieved, rendering the metamaterial very suitable for multi-band slow light applications. It is shown that the group delay of the propagating wave can be increased and dynamically controlled by changing the polarization angle. Multi-band EIT-like transmission is also verified experimentally, and a good agreement with simulations is obtained. The proposed novel methodology for obtaining multi-band EIT, which takes advantage of a supercell configuration by hosting slightly different configured unit cells, can be utilized for easily formation and manipulation of multi-band transmission windows inside a stop band.

  1. Low-Beta Insertions inducing Chromatic Aberrations in Storage Rings and their Local and Global Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, S

    2010-01-01

    The chromatic aberrations induced by low-β insertions can seriously limit the performance of circular colliders. The impact is twofold: (1) a substantial off-momentum beta-beating wave traveling around the ring and leading to a net reduction of the mechanical aperture of the low-beta quadrupoles but also impacting on the hierarchy of the collimator and protection devices of the machine, (2) a huge non-linear chromaticity which, when combined with the magnetic imperfections of the machine, could substantially reduce the momentum acceptance of the ring by pushing slightly off-momentum particles towards non-linear resonances. These effects will be analyzed and illustrated in the framework of the LHC insertions upgrade Phase I [1] and a strategy for correction will be developed, requiring a deep modification of the LHC overall optics.

  2. Low-Beta insertions inducing chromatic aberrations in storage rings and their local and global correction

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, S

    2010-01-01

    The chromatic aberrations induced by low-β insertions can seriously limit the performance of circular colliders. The impact is twofold: (1) a substantial off-momentum beta-beating wave traveling around the ring and leading to a net reduction of the mechanical aperture of the lowbeta quadrupoles but also impacting on the hierarchy of the collimator and protection devices of the machine, (2) a huge non-linear chromaticity which, when combined with the magnetic imperfections of the machine, could substantially reduce the momentum acceptance of the ring by pushing slightly off-momentum particles towards non-linear resonances. These effects will be analyzed and illustrated in the framework of the LHC insertions upgrade Phase I [1] and a strategy for correction will be developed, requiring a deep modification of the LHC overall optics.

  3. Ring-plane traveling-wave tube slow-wave circuit design simulations at V-Band frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kory, Carol L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1995-01-01

    The V-Band frequency range of 59-64 GHz is a region of the millimeter-wave spectrum that has been designated for intersatellite communications. As a first effort to develop a high-efficiency V-band TWT, variations on a ring-plane slow-wave circuit were computationally investigated to develop an alternative to the more conventional ferruled coupled-cavity circuit. The ring-plane circuit was chosen because of its high interaction impedance, large beam aperture, and excellent thermal dissipation properties. Despite the high-power capabilities of the ring-plane TWT, disadvantages of low bandwidth and high voltage requirements have until now prevented its acceptance outside the laboratory. In this paper, we use the three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation code MAFIA to investigate methods of increasing the bandwidth and lowering the operating voltage. Dispersion, impedance, and attenuation calculations for various geometric variations and loading distributions were performed. Based on the results of the variations, a circuit termed the finned-ladder TWT slowwave circuit was designed and is compared here to the scaled ring-plane prototype and the conventional ferruled coupled-cavity TWT circuit over the V-band frequency range.

  4. Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe using Earth's ring

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The search for gravitational waves is one of today's major scientific endeavors. A gravitational wave can interact with matter by exciting vibrations of elastic bodies. Earth itself is a large elastic body whose so-called normal-mode oscillations ring up when a gravitational wave passes. Therefore, precise measurement of vibration amplitudes can be used to search for the elusive gravitational-wave signals. Earth's free oscillations that can be observed after high-magnitude earthquakes have been studied extensively with gravimeters and low-frequency seismometers over many decades leading to invaluable insight into Earth's structure. Making use of our detailed understanding of Earth's normal modes, numerical models are employed for the first time to accurately calculate Earth's gravitational-wave response, and thereby turn a network of sensors that so far has served to improve our understanding of Earth, into an astrophysical observatory exploring our Universe. In this article, we constrain the energy density o...

  5. Dust Acoustic Solitary Waves in Saturn F-ring's Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.K. El-Shewy; M.I. Abo el Maaty; H.G. Abdelwahed; M.A.Elmessary

    2011-01-01

    Effect of hot and cold dust charge on the propagation of dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) in unmagnetized plasma having electrons, singly charged ions, hot and cold dust grains has been investigated.The reductive perturbation method is employed to reduce the basic set of fluid equations to the Kortewege-de Vries (KdV) equation.At the critical hot dusty plasma density NhO, the KdV equation is not appropriate for describing the system.Hence, a set of stretched coordinates is considered to derive the modified KdV equation.It is found that the presence of hot and cold dust charge grains not only significantly modifies the basic properties of solitary structure, but also changes the polarity of the solitary profiles.In the vicinity of the critical hot dusty plasma density NhO, neither KdV nor mKdV equation is appropriate for describing the DAWs.Therefore, a further modified KdV (fmKdV) equation is derived, which admits both soliton and double layer solutions.

  6. Energy transfer between energetic ring current H(+) and O(+) by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the frequency range below the helium gyrofrequency can be excited in the equatorial region of the outer magnetosphere by cyclotron resonant instability with anisotropic ring current H(+) ions. As the unducted waves propagate to higher latitudes, the wave normal should become highly inclined to the ambient magnetic field. Under such conditions, wave energy can be absorbed by cyclotron resonant interactions with ambient O(+), leading to ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Resonant wave absorption peaks in the vicinity of the bi-ion frequency and the second harmonic of the O(+) gyrofrequrency. This absorption should mainly occur at latitudes between 10 deg and 30 deg along auroral field lines (L is greater than or equal to 7) in the postnoon sector. The concomitant ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can contribute to the isotropization and geomagnetic trapping of collapsed O(+) ion conics (or beams) that originate from a low-altitude ionospheric source region. During geomagnetic storms when the O(+) content of the magnetosphere is significantly enhanced, the absorption of EMIC waves should become more efficient, and it may contribute to the observed acceleration of O(+) ions of ionospheric origin up to ring current energies.

  7. Effect of hydrostatic pressure and magnetic field on electromagnetically induced transparency based nonlinear frequency conversion in quantum ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumber, Sukirti; Gambhir, Monica; Jha, Pradip Kumar; Mohan, Man

    2016-10-01

    We study the combined effect of hydrostatic pressure and magnetic field on electromagnetically induced transparency in quantum ring. The high flexibility in size and shape of ring makes it possible to fabricate a nearly perfect two-dimensional quantum structure. We also explore the dependence of frequency conversion, measured in terms of third order nonlinear susceptibility χ(3) , on coupling field, hydrostatic pressure and magnetic field. Although, a dip in χ(3) is observed with the introduction of strong coupling field, it renders the ring structure transparent to generated wave thus effectively enhancing the output of nonlinear frequency conversion process. At a fixed coupling strength, the output can be further enhanced by increasing the magnetic field while it shows an inverse relationship with pressure. These parameters, being externally controlled, provide an easy handle to control the output of quantum ring which can be used as frequency converter in communication networks.

  8. Estimate of Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism by colocated ring laser and seismograph

    OpenAIRE

    Tanimoto, T; Hadziioannou, C; H. Igel; Wasserman, J.; U. Schreiber; Gebauer, A.

    2015-01-01

    ©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Using a colocated ring laser and an STS-2 seismograph, we estimate the ratio of Rayleigh-to-Love waves in the secondary microseism at Wettzell, Germany, for frequencies between 0.13 and 0.30 Hz. Rayleigh wave surface acceleration was derived from the vertical component of STS-2, and Love wave surface acceleration was derived from the ring laser. Surface wave amplitudes are comparable; near the spectral peak about 0.22 Hz, Rayleigh wave a...

  9. Numerical analysis of multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser exploiting four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochuan; Yao, Yong; Chen, Deying

    2008-08-04

    In this paper, a model is proposed to study the behavior of four-wave mixing assisted multiwavelength erbium doped fiber ring laser based on the theoretical model of the multiple FWM processes and Gile's theory of erbium-doped fiber. It is demonstrated that the mode competition can be effectively suppressed through FWM. The effect of phase matching, the nonlinear coefficient, the power in the cavity and the length of the nonlinear medium on output spectrum uniformity are also investigated.

  10. Self-gravity density waves in Saturn's rings A, B, and C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griv, Evgeny

    The presence of fine-scale of the order of 100 m density structure in Saturn's brightest rings A and B with the appearance of record-grooves has been revealed by Voyager PPS stellar occultation, and Cassini scince images, UVIS and radio occultations. Both spacecraft missions have shown that these relatively large "irregular variations" in optical depth are not associated with any resonances with known or embedded satellites. This microstructure explains an azimuthal brightness assymetry in Saturn's A ring observed first by Camichel in 1958. We examine the problem of the linear stability of the Saturnian ring system of mutually gravitating particles with special emphasis on its fine-scale density wave structure (almost regularly spaced, aligned cylindric density enhancements and rarefications). In our theory, the density pattern is the manifestation of a compression (longitudinal) density wave propagating around the ring disk at a fixed angular phase velocity despite the general differential rotation of a system; the density enhancements consist of different material at different times. Jeans' gravitational instabilities of small-amolitude gravity perturbations (e.g., those produced by a spontaneous disturbance) are analysed through the use of hydrodynamic equations. An essential feature of this study is that the theory is not restricted by any assumptions regarding the thickness of the system. The ring disk is considered to be thin and its vertical structure is considered in a horizontally local approximation. In the dynamically equilibrium state, the density is regarded as nonuniform between two sharp surfaces, with a vacuum exterior. A plasma physics analytical method is given for the solution of the self-consistent system of the gasdynamical equations and the Poisson equation describing the stability of Saturn's rings when the system is perturbed in an arbitrary manner. That is, when a gravity perturbation does not distort the rings' plane (modes of even

  11. Characterization of Ring Wave Spectra for Natural Rain: Measurements and Model for Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliven, L.; Sobieski, P.; Craeye, C.

    1998-01-01

    Ring waves generated by natural rains from 1 to 100 mm/hr were measured in a small tank located in a field. Time series were obtained: (a) from a wire capacitance probe that measured surface elevation, (b) from an optical gauge that measured rain rates R, (c) from an anemometer that measured wind speeds and (d) from a 13.5 GHz scatterometer (w polarization, and 30 degree incidence angle). Ring wave frequency spectra are computed from the surface elevation data for each minute of rain. All the spectra have a similar shape, with a maximum near 5 Hz, and with a more rapid decay towards higher frequencies than towards lower frequencies. A log-Gaussian spectral model provides a useful representation of these data and analysis of the model coefficients shows that the peak frequency and bandwidth are approximately constant, but the magnitude increases as R increases, Additionally, the normalized radar cross section from the scatterometer varies approximately linearly with the spectral line corresponding to the Bragg-wavelength, so together the log-Gaussian ring wave model and the Bragg scattering theory should be useful for a broad range of applications. These findings can be used to help interpret remote sensing data during rain events and to guide model development for radar scattering from rain roughened seas.

  12. Weak localization of electromagnetic waves and radar polarimetry of Saturn's rings

    CERN Document Server

    Mishchenko, Michael I

    2008-01-01

    We use a state-of-the-art physics-based model of electromagnetic scattering to analyze average circular polarization ratios measured for the A and B rings of Saturn at a wavelength of 12.6 cm. This model is directly based on the Maxwell equations and accounts for the effects of polarization, multiple scattering, weak localization of electromagnetic waves, and ring particle nonsphericity. Our analysis is based on the assumption that the observed polarization ratios are accurate, mutually consistent, and show a quasi-linear dependence on the opening angle. Also, we assume that the ring system is not strongly stratified in the vertical direction. Our numerical simulations rule out the model of spherical ring particles, favor the model of ring bodies in the form of nearly spherical particles with small-scale surface roughness, and rule out nonspherical particles with aspect ratios significantly exceeding 1.2. They also favor particles with effective radii in the range 4-10 cm and definitely rule out effective rad...

  13. Generation of a sub-diffraction hollow ring by shaping an azimuthally polarized wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Wu, Zhi-Xiang; Yu, An-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Hai; Wen, Zhong-Quan; Zhang, Kun; Dai, Lu-Ru; Jiang, Sen-Lin; Li, Yu-Yan; Chen, Li; Wang, Chang-Tao; Luo, Xian-Gang

    2016-11-01

    The generation of a sub-diffraction optical hollow ring is of great interest in various applications, such as optical microscopy, optical tweezers, and nanolithography. Azimuthally polarized light is a good candidate for creating an optical hollow ring structure. Various of methods have been proposed theoretically for generation of sub-wavelength hollow ring by focusing azimuthally polarized light, but without experimental demonstrations, especially for sub-diffraction focusing. Super-oscillation is a promising approach for shaping sub-diffraction optical focusing. In this paper, a planar sub-diffraction diffractive lens is proposed, which has an ultra-long focal length of 600 λ and small numerical aperture of 0.64. A sub-diffraction hollow ring is experimentally created by shaping an azimuthally polarized wave. The full-width-at-half-maximum of the hollow ring is 0.61 λ, which is smaller than the lens diffraction limit 0.78 λ, and the observed largest sidelobe intensity is only 10% of the peak intensity.

  14. The Nonlinear Coupling of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Waves in the Ring Current Region: The Magnetic Storm May 1-7 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E.; Gamayunov, K.; Avanov, L.

    2003-01-01

    The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space, and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. In this paper we present the morphology, dynamics, and level of LHW activity generated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves during the May 2-7, 1998 storm period on the global scale. The LHWs were calculated based on our newly developed self-consistent model that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes the evolution of EMIC waves. It is found that the LHWs are excited by helium ions due to their mass dependent drift in the electric field of EMIC waves. The level of LHW activity is calculated assuming that the induced scattering process is the main saturation mechanism for these waves. The calculated LHWs electric fields are consistent with the observational data.

  15. Wave Induced Loads on the LEANCON Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Beserra, Eliab Ricarte

    This report is a product of the co-operation agreement between Aalborg University and LEANCON (by Kurt Due Rasmussen) on the evaluation and development of the LEANCON wave energy converter (WEC). The work reported here has focused on evaluation of the wave induced loads on the device, based...... on a desktop study based on available literature, supplemented by laboratory testing of models of the WEC provided by LEANCON. LEANCON, represented by Kurt Due Rasmussen, has been heavily involved in the testing of the device, including the instrumentation, model setup and execution of the tests...... in the laboratory, all under the supervision of the personnel of the Wave Energy Research Group at Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University....

  16. Unified Homogenization Theory for Magnetoinductive and Electromagnetic Waves in Split Ring Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Baena, J D; Marques, R; Silveirinha, M

    2007-01-01

    A unified homogenization procedure for split ring metamaterials taking into account time and spatial dispersion is introduced. The procedure is based on two coupled systems of equations. The first one comes from an approximation of the metamaterial as a cubic arrangement of coupled LC circuits, giving the relation between currents and local magnetic field. The second equation comes from macroscopic Maxwell equations, and gives the relation between the macroscopic magnetic field and the average magnetization of the metamaterial. It is shown that electromagnetic and magnetoinductive waves propagating in the metamaterial are obtained from this analysis. Therefore, the proposed time and spatially dispersive permeability accounts for the characterization of the complete spectrum of waves of the metamaterial. Finally, it is shown that the proposed theory is in good quantitative and qualitative agreement with full wave simulations.

  17. Excitation of Electromagnetic Waves by an Electron Ring Beam in a Magnetized Plasma Waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周国成; 吴京生; 王德驹; 陈雁萍

    2002-01-01

    We study the resonant interactions between an electron ring beam and plasma waveguide modes. This is motivatedby the research of radio emission in low solar corona. We consider a density-depleted duct (above an active regionnear a flare site) that may be treated as a magnetized plasma waveguide. The electromagnetic waves excited inthe waveguide are classified into the so-called E-type and B-type waves. The results show that there are twounstable modes of B-type waves propagating parallel and anti-parallel to the direction of the electron beam. Theeffect of the finite radius and boundary conditions of the waveguide on the excitation of waveguide modes isimportant. For a given B-type mode, the smaller the radius R, the larger the temporal and spatial amplificationrate. We suggest that these excited waveguide modes could be one of the processes responsible for the observedsolar radio emission.

  18. Weak Waves and Wakes in Saturn's Rings: Observations by Cassini ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. A.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Porco, C. C.; Dones, H.; Murray, C. D.; Cassini Imaging

    2004-11-01

    At Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI), the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) imaged the rings of Saturn with unprecedented resolution and signal/noise. Many features are present with remarkable clarity, including density waves excited by first-order Lindblad resonances with the tiny satellite Atlas, as well as density waves excited by second-order Lindblad resonances with Janus, Prometheus, and Pandora. Additionally, we find much structure due to Pan, the satellite embedded in the Encke Gap. As one moves away from the gap, the Pan disturbances undergo a transition, from features best described as gravitional wakes to features best described as density waves. We will present examples of these phenomena and discuss their implications.

  19. Long ring waves in a stratified fluid over a shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Khusnutdinova, K R

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic waves registered by satellite observations often have curvilinear fronts and propagate over various currents. In this paper, we study long linear and weakly-nonlinear ring waves in a stratified fluid in the presence of a depth-dependent horizontal shear flow. It is shown that despite the clashing geometries of the waves and the shear flow, there exists a linear modal decomposition (different from the known decomposition in Cartesian geometry), which can be used to describe distortion of the wavefronts of surface and internal waves, and systematically derive a 2+1 - dimensional cylindrical Korteweg - de Vries - type equation for the amplitudes of the waves. The general theory is applied to the case of the waves in a two-layer fluid with a piecewise - constant shear flow, with an emphasis on the effect of the shear flow on the geometry of the wavefronts. The distortion of the wavefronts is described by the singular solution (envelope of the general solution) of the nonlinear first-order differential equ...

  20. A procedure to analyze nonlinear density waves in Saturn's rings using several occultation profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Rappaport, N J; French, R G; Marouf, E A; McGhee, C A

    2010-01-01

    Cassini radio science experiments have provided multiple occultation optical depth profiles of Saturn's rings that can be used in combination to analyze density waves. This paper establishes an accurate procedure of inversion of the wave profiles to reconstruct the wave kinematic parameters as a function of semi-major axis, in the nonlinear regime. This procedure is achieved from simulated data in the presence of realistic noise perturbations, to control the reconstruction error. By way of illustration we have applied our procedure to the Mimas 5:3 density wave. We were able to recover precisely the kinematic parameters from the radio experiment occultation data in most of the propagation region; a preliminary analysis of the pressure-corrected dispersion allowed us to determine new but still uncertain values for the opacity ($K\\simeq 0.02$ cm$^2$/g) and velocity dispersion of ($c_o\\simeq 0.6$ cm/s) in the wave region. Our procedure constitutes the first step in our planned analysis of the density waves of Sa...

  1. A new omnidirectional shear horizontal wave transducer using face-shear (d24) piezoelectric ring array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hongchen; Huan, Qiang; Wang, Qiangzhong; Li, Faxin

    2017-02-01

    The non-dispersive fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave in plate-like structures is of practical importance in non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM). Theoretically, an omnidirectional SH0 transducer phased array system can be used to inspect defects in a large plate in the similar manner to the phased array transducers used in medical B-scan ultrasonics. However, very few omnidirectional SH0 transducers have been proposed so far. In this work, an omnidirectional SH0 wave piezoelectric transducer (OSH-PT) was proposed, which consists of a ring array of twelve face-shear (d24) trapezoidal PZT elements. Each PZT element can produce face-shear deformation under applied voltage, resulting in circumferential shear deformation in the OSH-PT and omnidirectional SH0 waves in the hosting plate. Both finite element simulations and experiments were conducted to examine the performance of the proposed OSH-PT. Experimental testing shows that the OSH-PT exhibits good omnidirectional properties, no matter it is used as a SH0 wave transmitter or a SH0 wave receiver. This work may greatly promote the applications of SH0 waves in NDT and SHM.

  2. A Sagittarius-Induced Origin for the Monoceros Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Michel-Dansac, Leo; Navarro, Julio F; Steinmetz, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    The Monoceros ring is a collection of stars in nearly-circular orbits at roughly 18 kpc from the Galactic center. It may have originated (i) as the response of the disc to perturbations excited by satellite companions or (ii) from the tidal debris of a disrupted dwarf galaxy. The metallicity of Monoceros stars differs from that of disc stars at comparable Galactocentric distances, an observation that disfavours the first scenario. On the other hand, circular orbits are difficult to accommodate in the tidal-disruption scenario, since it requires a satellite which at the time of disruption was itself in a nearly circular orbit. Such satellite could not have formed at the location of the ring and, given its low mass, dynamical friction is unlikely to have played a major role in its orbital evolution. We search cosmological simulations for low-mass satellites in nearly-circular orbits and find that they result, almost invariably, from orbital changes induced by collisions with more massive satellites: the radius ...

  3. Evidence of differential rotation inside Saturn from waves of its rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moutamid, Maryame; Hedman, Matthew M.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Burns, Joseph A.

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's average interior rotation rate has been estimated based on various analyses of its shape (Anderson and Schubert, 2007; Read et al., 2009; Helled et al., 2015), but we still have no clear information on its exact value and the degree of differential rotation versus depth.However, Hedman et al., (2009), Hedman and Nicholson (2014) and El Moutamid et al., (2016) have identified several structures in the main rings of Saturn which appear to be related to the planet's rotation rate.These structures (waves and perturbed edges) appear to be generated by so-called Tesseral Resonances, which are associated with gravity anomalies that rotate with Saturn's interior, rather than being driven by a satellite. Their locations are given by the usual formula for inner or outer Lindblad resonances.We have searched for additional wave-like signatures in stellar occultation data for the main rings which are related to the rotation period of Saturn and have identified several signatures consistent with other differential rotation in Saturn's interior. Our study of the behavior of the A, B and C rings uses images and occultation data obtained by the Cassini spacecraft over a period of 10 years from 2006 to 2015.

  4. Effects of asymmetric coupling and self-coupling on metastable dynamical transient rotating waves in a ring of sigmoidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Yo

    2014-05-01

    Transient rotating waves in a ring of sigmoidal neurons with asymmetric bidirectional coupling and self-coupling were studied. When a pair of stable steady states and an unstable traveling wave coexisted, rotating waves propagating in a ring were generated in transients. The pinning (propagation failure) of the traveling wave occurred in the presence of asymmetric coupling and self-coupling, and its conditions were obtained. A kinematical equation for the propagation of wave fronts of the traveling and rotating waves was then derived for a large output gain of neurons. The kinematical equation showed that the duration of transient rotating waves increases exponentially with the number of neurons as that in a ring of unidirectionally coupled neurons (metastable dynamical transients). However, the exponential growth rate depended on the asymmetry of bidirectional coupling and the strength of self-coupling. The rate was equal to the propagation time of the traveling wave (a reciprocal of the propagation speed), and it increased near pinned regions. Then transient rotating waves could show metastable dynamics (extremely long duration) even in a ring of a small number of neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Emittance growth induced by electron cloud in proton storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Coppa, G

    2006-01-01

    In proton and positron storage rings with many closely spaced bunches, a large number of electrons can accumulate in the beam pipe due to various mechanisms (photoemission, residual gas ionization, beam-induced multipacting). The so-formed electron cloud interacts with the positively charged bunches, giving rise to instabilities, emittance growth and losses. This phenomenon has been observed in several existing machines such as the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), whose operation has been constrained by the electron-cloud problem, and it is a concern for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN. The interaction between the beam and the electron cloud has features which cannot be fully taken into account by the conventional and known theories from accelerators and plasma physics. Computer simulations are indispensable for a proper prediction and understanding of the instability dynamics. The main feature which renders the beam-cloud interactions so peculiar is that the the electron cloud...

  6. Electroinductive waves role in left-handed stacked complementary split rings resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beruete, M; Aznabet, M; Navarro-Cía, M; El Mrabet, O; Falcone, F; Aknin, N; Essaaidi, M; Sorolla, M

    2009-02-01

    In this letter it is presented a Left-Handed Metamaterial design route based upon stacked arrays of screens made of complementary split rings resonators under normal incidence in the microwave regime. Computation of the dispersion diagram highlights the possibility to obtain backward waves provided the longitudinal lattice is small enough. The experimental results are in good agreement with the computed ones. The physics underlying the Left-Handed behavior is found to rely on electroinductive waves, playing the mutual capacitive coupling the major role to explain the phenomenon. Our route to Left-Handed metamaterial introduced in this paper based on stacking CSRRs screens can be scaled to millimeter and terahertz for future applications.

  7. Gravitational waves induced by spinor fields

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Kaixi

    2015-01-01

    In realistic model-building, spinor fields with various masses are present. During inflation, spinor field may induce gravitational waves as a second order effect. In this paper, we calculate the contribution of single massive spinor field to the power spectrum of primordial gravitational wave by using retarded Green propagator. We find that the correction is scale-invariant and of order $H^4/M_P^4$ for arbitrary spinor mass $m_{\\psi}$. Additionally, we also observe that when $m_\\psi \\gtrsim H$, the dependence of correction on $m_\\psi/H$ is nontrivial.

  8. Vertical variations of wave-induced radiation stress tensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jinhai; Yan Yixin

    2001-01-01

    The distributions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor over depth are studied by using the linear wave theory, which are divided into three regions, i.e., above the mean water level, below the wave trough level, and between these two levels. The computational expressions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor at the arbitrary wave angle are established by means of the Eulerian coordinate transformation, and the asymptotic forms for deep and shallow water are also presented. The vertical variations of a 30° incident wave-induced radiation stress tensor in deep water, intermediate water and shallow water are calculated respectively. The following conclusions are obtained from computations.The wave-induced radiation stress tensor below the wave trough level is induced by the water wave particle velocities only, whereas both the water wave particle velocities and the wave pressure contribute to the tensor above the wave trough level. The vertical variations of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor are influenced substantially by the velocity component in the direction of wave propagation. The distributions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor over depth are nonuniform and the proportion of the tensor below the wave trough level becomes considerable in the shallow water. From the water surface to the seabed, the reversed variations occur for the predominant tensor components.

  9. Dynamical analysis of mesoscale eddy-induced ocean internal waves using linear theories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qing; ZHENG Quanan; LIN Hui; LIU Yuguang; SONG YTony; YUAN Yeli

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to explore generation mechanisms of the ocean internal wave using the dynamical analysis methods based on linear theories. Historical cruise measurements and recent synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations of mesoscale eddies with diame-ter of several tens of kilometers to hundreds of kilometers show that the internal wave packets with wavelength of hundreds of me-ters to kilometer exist inside the mesoscale eddies. This coexistence phenomenon and inherent links between the two different scale processes are revealed in the solutions of governing equations and boundary conditions for the internal wave disturbance with a horizontally slowly variable amplitude in a cylindrical coordinate system. The theoretical solutions indicate that the instability of eddy current field provides the dynamical mechanism to internal wave generation. The derived dispersion relation indicates that the internal wave propagation is modified by the eddy current field structure. The energy equation of the internal waves clearly shows the internal wave energy increment comes from the eddy. The theoretical models are used to explain the observation of the mesoscale ed-dy-induced internal waves off the Norwegian coast. The two-dimensional waveform solution of the anticyclonic eddy-induced internal wave packet appears as ring-shaped curves, which contains the typical features of eddy stream lines. The comparison of theoretical solutions to the structure of the internal wave packets on SAR image shows a good agreement on the major features.

  10. KRONOSEISMOLOGY: USING DENSITY WAVES IN SATURN'S C RING TO PROBE THE PLANET'S INTERIOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P. D., E-mail: mmhedman@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Saturn's C ring contains multiple spiral patterns that appear to be density waves driven by periodic gravitational perturbations. In other parts of Saturn's rings, such waves are generated by Lindblad resonances with Saturn's various moons, but most of the wave-like C-ring features are not situated near any strong resonance with any known moon. Using stellar occultation data obtained by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft, we investigate the origin of six unidentified C-ring waves located between 80,900 and 87,200 km from Saturn's center. By measuring differences in the waves' phases among the different occultations, we are able to determine both the number of arms in each spiral pattern and the speeds at which these patterns rotate around the planet. We find that all six of these waves have between two and four arms and pattern speeds between 1660 Degree-Sign day{sup -1} and 1861 Degree-Sign day{sup -1}. These speeds are too large to be attributed to any satellite resonance. Instead, they are comparable to the predicted pattern speeds of waves generated by low-order normal-mode oscillations within the planet. The precise pattern speeds associated with these waves should therefore provide strong constraints on Saturn's internal structure. Furthermore, we identify multiple waves with the same number of arms and very similar pattern speeds, indicating that multiple m = 3 and m = 2 sectoral (l = m) modes may exist within the planet.

  11. Chromosome therapy. Correction of large chromosomal aberrations by inducing ring chromosomes in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehyun; Bershteyn, Marina; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of the short (p) and long (q) arms of a chromosome is referred to as a "ring chromosome." Ring chromosome disorders occur in approximately 1 in 50,000-100,000 patients. Ring chromosomes can result in birth defects, mental disabilities, and growth retardation if additional genes are deleted during the formation of the ring. Due to the severity of these large-scale aberrations affecting multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have so far been proposed. Our recent study (Bershteyn et al.) using patient-derived fibroblast lines containing ring chromosomes, found that cellular reprogramming of these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resulted in the cell-autonomous correction of the ring chromosomal aberration via compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD). These observations have important implications for studying the mechanism of chromosomal number control and may lead to the development of effective therapies for other, more common, chromosomal aberrations.

  12. Influence of plasma beta on the generation of lower hybrid and whistler waves by an ion velocity ring distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winske, D., E-mail: winske@lanl.gov; Daughton, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We present results of three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the lower hybrid ion ring instability, similar to our earlier results [D. Winske and W. Daughton, Phys. Plasma 19, 072109 (2012)], but at higher electron beta (β{sub e} = ratio of electron thermal pressure to magnetic pressure = 0.06, rather than at 0.006) with T{sub i} = T{sub e}. At higher electron beta, the level of lower hybrid waves at saturation normalized to the ion thermal energy (β{sub i} = 0.06 also) is only slightly smaller, but the corresponding magnetic fluctuations are about an order of magnitude larger, consistent with linear theory. After saturation, the waves evolve into whistler waves, through a number of possible mechanisms, with an average growth rate considerably smaller than the linear growth rate of the lower hybrid waves, to a peak fluctuation level that is about 20% above the lower hybrid wave saturation level. The ratio of the peak magnetic fluctuations associated with the whistler waves relative to those of the saturated lower hybrid waves, the ratio of the nonlinear growth rate of whistlers relative to the linear growth rate of lower hybrid waves, the amount of energy extracted from the ring, and the amount of heating of the background ions and electrons are comparable to those in the lower electron beta 3D simulation. This suggests that even at higher electron beta, the linear and nonlinear physics of the lower hybrid ion ring instability is dominated by electrostatic, wave-particle rather than wave-wave interactions.

  13. Influence of plasma beta on the generation of lower hybrid and whistler waves by an ion velocity ring distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winske, D.; Daughton, W.

    2015-02-01

    We present results of three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the lower hybrid ion ring instability, similar to our earlier results [D. Winske and W. Daughton, Phys. Plasma 19, 072109 (2012)], but at higher electron beta (βe = ratio of electron thermal pressure to magnetic pressure = 0.06, rather than at 0.006) with Ti = Te. At higher electron beta, the level of lower hybrid waves at saturation normalized to the ion thermal energy (βi = 0.06 also) is only slightly smaller, but the corresponding magnetic fluctuations are about an order of magnitude larger, consistent with linear theory. After saturation, the waves evolve into whistler waves, through a number of possible mechanisms, with an average growth rate considerably smaller than the linear growth rate of the lower hybrid waves, to a peak fluctuation level that is about 20% above the lower hybrid wave saturation level. The ratio of the peak magnetic fluctuations associated with the whistler waves relative to those of the saturated lower hybrid waves, the ratio of the nonlinear growth rate of whistlers relative to the linear growth rate of lower hybrid waves, the amount of energy extracted from the ring, and the amount of heating of the background ions and electrons are comparable to those in the lower electron beta 3D simulation. This suggests that even at higher electron beta, the linear and nonlinear physics of the lower hybrid ion ring instability is dominated by electrostatic, wave-particle rather than wave-wave interactions.

  14. Influence of Ring Oxidation-Induced Stack Faults on Efficiency in Silicon Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Chun-Lan; WANG Wen-Jing; LI Hai-Ling; ZHAO Lei; DIAO Hong-Wei; LI Xu-Dong

    2008-01-01

    @@ We observe a strong correlation between the ring oxidation-induced stack faults (OISF) formed in the course of phosphor diffusion and the efficiency of Czochralski-grown silicon solar cells. The main reason for ring-OISF formation and growth in substrate is the silicon oxidation and phosphorus diffusion process induced silicon self-interstitial point defect during POCl3 diffusion. The decreasing of minority carrier diffusion length in crystal silicon solar cell induced by ring-OISF defects is identified to be one of the major causes of efficiency loss.

  15. Formation of ring calcium oxalate patterns induced by domains in DPPC Langmuir-Blodgett films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Ming Liu; Sui Ping Deng; Hui Zheng; Jian Ming Ouyang

    2007-01-01

    The ring patterns of calcium oxalate crystals were induced by domains in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of dipalmitoylpho-sphatidylcholine (DPPC). The result was explained by the defects at the ring boundaries of liquid condensed (LC) and liquid expanded (LE) phases of LB film. These boundaries could provide less free energy and much more nucleating sites for COM crystals.

  16. Longitudinal elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves in off-diagonal magnetoelectric split-ring composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, S T; Wang, Weihua; Zhou, L; Lin, Z F

    2009-07-22

    We study the propagation of plane electromagnetic waves through different systems consisting of arrays of split rings of different orientations. Many extraordinary EM phenomena were discovered in such systems, contributed by the off-diagonal magnetoelectric susceptibilities. We find a mode such that the electric field becomes elliptically polarized with a component in the longitudinal direction (i.e. parallel to the wavevector). Even though the group velocity [Formula: see text] and the wavevector k are parallel, in the presence of damping, the Poynting vector does not just get 'broadened', but can possess a component perpendicular to the wavevector. The speed of light can be real even when the product ϵμ is negative. Other novel properties are explored.

  17. Lamb Wave-Based Acoustic Radiation Force-Driven Particle Ring Formation Inside a Sessile Droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Ha, Byunghang; Park, Jinsoo; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-04-05

    We demonstrate an acoustofluidic device using Lamb waves (LWs) to manipulate polystyrene (PS) microparticles suspended in a sessile droplet of water. The LW-based acoustofluidic platform used in this study is advantageous in that the device is actuated over a range of frequencies without changing the device structure or electrode pattern. In addition, the device is simple to operate and cheap to fabricate. The LWs, produced on a piezoelectric substrate, attenuate inside the fluid and create acoustic streaming flow (ASF) in the form of a poloidal flow with toroidal vortices. The PS particles experience direct acoustic radiation force (ARF) in addition to being influenced by the ASF, which drive the concentration of particles to form a ring. This phenomenon was previously attributed to the ASF alone, but the present experimental results confirm that the ARF plays an important role in forming the particle ring, which would not be possible in the presence of only the ASF. We used a range of actuation frequencies (45-280 MHz), PS particle diameters (1-10 μm), and droplet volumes (5, 7.5, and 10 μL) to experimentally demonstrate this phenomenon.

  18. MEMS-based redundancy ring for low-noise millimeter-wave front-end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Patrick; Dubuc, David; Flourens, Federic; Saddaoui, Mohammad; Melle, Samuel; Tackacs, Alex; Tao, Junwu; Aubert, Herve; Boukabache, Ali; Paillot, T.; Blondy, Pierre; Vendier, Olivier; Grenier, Katia M.; Plana, Robert

    2004-08-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of the potentialities of the MEMS technologies to develop innovative microsystem for millimetre wave communication essentially for space applications. One main issue deals with the robustness and the reliability of the equipment as it may difficult to replace or to repair them when a satellite has been launched. One solution deals with the development of redundancy rings that are making the front end more robust. Usually, the architecture of such system involves waveguide or diode technologies, which present severe limitations in term of weight, volume and insertion loss. The concept considered in this paper is to replace some key elements of such system by MEMS based devices (Micromachined transmission lines, switches) in order to optimize both the weight and the microwave performance of the module. A specific technological process has been developed consisting in the fabrication of the devices on a dielectric membrane on air suspended in order to improve the insertion loss and the isolation. To prove the concept, building blocks have been already fabricated and measured (i.e micromachined transmission and filter featuring very low insertion loss, single pole double through circuits to address the appropriate path of the redundancy ring). We have to outline that MEMS technology have allowed a simplification of the architecture and a different system partitioning which gives more degree of freedom for the system designer. Furthermore, it has been conducted an exhaustive reliability study in order to identify the failure mechanisms. Again, from the results obtained, we have proposed an original topology for the SPDT circuit that takes into account the reliability behaviour of the MEMS devices and that allow to prevent most of the failure mechanisms reported so far (mainly related to the dielectric charging effect). Finally, the active device (millimetre wave low noise amplifier) will be reported on the MEMS based chip using

  19. Analysis of the broadband chaotic spin-wave excitations in an active ring oscillator based on a metalized ferrite film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashov, A. V.; Ustinov, A. B.; Kalinikos, B. A.; Demokritov, S. O.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the first experimental study of broadband chaotic nonlinear spin- wave excitations which is formed through development of four-wave parametric processes in active ring oscillator based on metallized ferrite film. We find that an increase in the oscillation power leads to Hopf bifurcations sequence. Monochromatic, periodic quasi-periodic and chaotic excitations are observed. Spectra of the chaotic excitations consist of series of chaotic bands separated well in frequency. Parameters of the chaotic attractors are discussed.

  20. Wave-induced dynamics of flexible blades

    CERN Document Server

    Luhar, M

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental and numerical study that describes the motion of flexible blades, scaled to be dynamically similar to natural aquatic vegetation, forced by wave-induced oscillatory flows. For the conditions tested, blade motion is governed primarily by two dimensionless variables: (i) the Cauchy number, $Ca$, which represents the ratio of the hydrodynamic forcing to the restoring force due to blade stiffness, and (ii) the ratio of the blade length to the wave orbital excursion, $L$. For flexible blades with $Ca \\gg 1$, the relationship between drag and velocity can be described by two different scaling laws at the large- and small-excursion limits. For large excursions ($L \\ll 1$), the flow resembles a unidirectional current and the scaling laws developed for steady-flow reconfiguration studies hold. For small excursions ($L \\gg 1$), the beam equations may be linearized and a different scaling law for drag applies. The experimental force measurements suggest that the small-excursion scaling applies...

  1. ElectronTransfer Induced Ring Opening of α-Epoxyketones: Spirodioxolane Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Nikpour

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereospecific formation of spirodioxolanes has been observed on electron transfer induced ring opening of α-epoxyketones by 2,4,6-triphenylpyrylium tetrafluoroborate in the presence of cyclohexanone

  2. Fluctuation-induced forces between rings threaded around a polymer chain under tension

    CERN Document Server

    Gilles, F M; Pastorino, C

    2016-01-01

    We characterize the fluctuation properties of a polymer chain under external tension and the fluctuation-induced forces between two ring molecules threaded around the chain. The problem is relevant in the context of fluctuation-induced forces in soft matter systems, features of liquid interfaces and to describe properties of polyrotaxanes and slide-ring materials. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer-Grest bead-spring model for the polymer and a simple ring-molecule model, in the canonical ensemble. We study transverse fluctuations of the stretched chain, as a function of chain stretching and in the presence of ring-shaped threaded molecules. The fluctuation spectra of the chains are analyzed in equilibrium at constant temperature and the differences in presence of two ring molecules are compared. For the rings located at fixed distances, we find an attractive fluctuation-induced force between the rings, proportional to the temperature and decaying with the ring distance. We characterize th...

  3. Mid-infrared continuous wave cavity ring down spectroscopy of molecular ions using an optical parametric oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbraak, H.; Ngai, A.K.Y.; Persijn, S.T.; Harren, F.J.M.; Linnartz, H.

    2007-01-01

    A sensitive infrared detection scheme is presented in which continuous wave cavity ring down spectroscopy is used to record rovibrational spectra of molecular ions in direct absorption through supersonically expanding planar plasma. A cw optical parametric oscillator is used as a light source and

  4. Ultrathin Terahertz Quarter-wave plate based on Split Ring Resonator and Wire Grating hybrid Metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouman, Muhammad Tayyab; Hwang, Ji Hyun; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2016-12-01

    Planar metasurface based quarter-wave plates offer various advantages over conventional waveplates in terms of compactness, flexibility and simple fabrication; however they offer very narrow bandwidth of operation. Here, we demonstrate a planar terahertz (THz) metasurface capable of linear to circular polarization conversion and vice versa in a wide frequency range. The proposed metasurface is based on horizontally connected split ring resonators and is realized on an ultrathin (0.05λ) zeonor substrate. The fabricated quarter waveplate realizes linear to circular polarization conversion in two broad frequency bands comprising 0.64-0.82 THz and 0.96-1.3 THz with an insertion loss ranging from -3.9 to -10 dB. By virtue of ultrathin sub wavelength thickness, the proposed waveplate design is well suited for application in near field THz optical systems. Additionally, the proposed metasurface design offers novel transmission phase characteristics that present further opportunities to realize dynamic polarization control of incident waves.

  5. A new traveling wave ultrasonic motor using thick ring stator with nested PZT excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weishan; Shi, Shengjun; Liu, Yingxiang; Li, Pei

    2010-05-01

    To avoid the disadvantages of conventional traveling wave ultrasonic motors--lower efficiency PZT working mode of d(31), fragility of the PZT element under strong excitation, fatigue of the adhesive layer under harsh environmental conditions, and low volume of the PZT material in the stator--a new type of traveling wave ultrasonic motor is presented in this paper. Here we implement the stator by nesting 64 PZT stacks in 64 slots specifically cut in a thick metal ring and 64 block springs nested within another 64 slots to produce preloading on the PZT stacks. In this new design, the d33 mode of the PZT is used to excite the flexural vibrations of the stator, and fragility of the PZT ceramics and fatigue of the adhesive layer are no longer an issue. The working principle, FEM simulation, fabrication, and performance measurements of a prototype motor were demonstrated to validate the proposed ideas. Typical output of the prototype motor is no-load speed of 15 rpm and maximum torque of 7.96 N x m. Further improvement will potentially enhance its features by increasing the accuracy in fabrication and adopting appropriate frictional material into the interface between the stator and the rotor.

  6. Wound-induced contractile ring: a model for cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darenfed, Hassina; Mandato, Craig A

    2005-12-01

    The actomyosin-based contractile ring is required for several biological processes, such as wound healing and cytokinesis of animal cells. Despite progress in defining the roles of this structure in both wound closure and cell division, we still do not fully understand how an actomyosin ring is spatially and temporally assembled, nor do we understand the molecular mechanism of its contraction. Recent results have demonstrated that microtubule-dependent local assembly of F-actin and myosin-II is present in wound closure and is similar to that in cytokinesis in animal cells. Furthermore, signalling factors such as small Rho GTPases have been shown to be involved in the regulation of actin dynamics during both processes. In this review we address recent findings in an attempt to better understand the dynamics of actomyosin contractile rings during wound healing as compared with the final step of animal cell division.

  7. Ion-Induced Beam Instability in an Electron Storage Ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-Jun; JIN Yu-Ming; LI Wei-Min; LIU Zu-Ping

    2000-01-01

    In a small electron storage ring, such as the Hefei Light Source (HLS) ring, the newly generated ions, which can not escape from the beam potential and then are trapped from turn to turn, will lead to the beam instability. The ions created by the leading bunches can perturb the trailing bunches and also themselves during their subsequent passage, which will make the amplitude of beam oscillation be damped and anti-damped periodically. A computer simulation based on the strong-weak model shows a good agreement with our analytical model using the linear theory.

  8. Topography-induced focusing of random waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, P.B.; Janssen, T.T.; Herbers, T.H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Refraction of narrow-band surface waves in coastal areas can result in wave-focal zones where due to interference, wave statistics vary rapidly and on similar length scales as those of individual waves. However such interference patterns, or wave coherence, are not accounted for in conventional stoc

  9. Hypocellular scar formation or aberrant fibrosis induced by an intrastromal corneal ring: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Hema L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intrastromal corneal rings or segments are approved for the treatment of myopia and astigmatism associated with keratoconus. We describe a clinicopathological case of intrastromal corneal rings. For the first time, the molecular pathological findings of intrastromal corneal rings in the cornea are illustrated. Case presentation A 47-year-old African-American man with a history of keratoconus and failure in using a Rigid Gas Permeable contact lens received an intrastromal corneal ring implant in his left eye. Due to complications, penetrating keratoplasty was performed. The intrastromal corneal ring channels were surrounded by a dense acellular (channel haze and/or hypocellular (acidophilic densification collagen scar and slightly edematous keratocytes. Mild macrophage infiltration was found near the inner aspect of the intrastromal corneal rings. Molecular analyses of the microdissected cells surrounding the intrastromal corneal ring channels and central corneal stroma revealed 10 times lower relative expression of IP-10/CXCL10 mRNA and two times higher CCL5 mRNA in the cells surrounding the intrastromal corneal ring, as compared to the central corneal stroma. IP-10/CXCL10 is a fibrotic and angiostatic chemokine produced by macrophages, endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Conclusion An intrastromal corneal ring implant can induce hypocellular scar formation and mild inflammation, which may result from aberrant release of fibrosis-related chemokines.

  10. Modeling of Mud-Wave Interaction: Mud-Induced Wave Transport & Wave-Induced Mud Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    seabed. This can be a fairly rapid process (i.e. of the order of tens of seconds, up to a few minutes at most, e.g. Foda and Zhang (1994); Lindenberg...response of cohesive sediments to water waves, PhD-dissertation, University of California, Berkeley, USA. Chou, H.-T., M.A. Foda and J.R. Hunt, 1993...Dingemans, M.W., 1997, Water wave propagation over uneven bottoms; Part I & II, World Scientific, Singapore. Foda , M.A. and S.-Y. Tzang, 1994

  11. Seasonal variations in the Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism from colocated ring laser and seismograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Hadziioannou, Céline; Igel, Heiner; Wassermann, Joachim; Schreiber, Ulrich; Gebauer, André; Chow, Bryant

    2016-04-01

    Monthly variations in the ratio of Rayleigh-to-Love waves in the secondary microseism are obtained from a colocated ring laser and an STS-2 seismograph at Wettzell, Germany. Two main conclusions are derived for the Rayleigh-to-Love wave kinetic energy ratios in the secondary microseism; first, the energy ratio is in the range 0.8-0.9 (Love wave energy is larger than Rayleigh wave energy most of the year by about 10-20%. Second, this ratio suddenly increases to 1.0-1.2 in June and July, indicating a larger fraction of Rayleigh wave energy. This change suggests that the locations and behaviors of excitation sources are different in these months.

  12. Laser pulse induced multiple exciton kinetics in molecular ring structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiao; Wang, Luxia

    2016-11-01

    Multiple excitons can be formed upon strong optical excitation of molecular aggregates and complexes. Based on a theoretical approach on exciton-exciton annihilation dynamics in supramolecular systems (May et al., 2014), exciton interaction kinetics in ring aggregates of two-level molecules are investigated. Excited by the sub-picosecond laser pulse, multiple excitons keep stable in the molecular ring shaped as a regular polygon. If the symmetry is destroyed by changing the dipole of a single molecule, the excitation of different molecules becomes not identical, and the changed dipole-dipole interaction initiates subsequent energy redistribution. Depending on the molecular distance and the dipole configuration, the kinetics undergo different types of processes, but all get stable within some hundreds of femtoseconds. The study of exciton kinetics will be helpful for further investigations of the efficiency of optical devices based on molecular aggregates.

  13. Vortex ring induced large bubble entrainment during drop impact

    CERN Document Server

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2016-01-01

    For a limited set of impact conditions, a drop impacting onto a pool can entrap an air bubble as large as its own size. The subsequent rise and rupture of this large bubble plays an important role in aerosol formation and gas transport at the air-sea interface. The large bubble is formed when the impact crater closes up near the pool surface and is known to occur only for drops which are prolate at impact. Herein we use experiments and numerical simulations to show that a concentrated vortex ring, produced in the neck between the drop and pool, controls the crater deformations and pinch-off. However, it is not the strongest vortex rings which are responsible for the large bubbles, as they interact too strongly with the pool surface and self-destruct. Rather, it is somewhat weaker vortices which can deform the deeper craters, which manage to pinch off the large bubbles. These observations also explain why the strongest and most penetrating vortex rings emerging from drop impacts, are not produced by oblate dro...

  14. Vortex-ring-induced large bubble entrainment during drop impact

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2016-03-29

    For a limited set of impact conditions, a drop impacting onto a pool can entrap an air bubble as large as its own size. The subsequent rise and rupture of this large bubble plays an important role in aerosol formation and gas transport at the air-sea interface. The large bubble is formed when the impact crater closes up near the pool surface and is known to occur only for drops that are prolate at impact. Herein we use experiments and numerical simulations to show that a concentrated vortex ring, produced in the neck between the drop and the pool, controls the crater deformations and pinchoff. However, it is not the strongest vortex rings that are responsible for the large bubbles, as they interact too strongly with the pool surface and self-destruct. Rather, it is somewhat weaker vortices that can deform the deeper craters, which manage to pinch off the large bubbles. These observations also explain why the strongest and most penetrating vortex rings emerging from drop impacts are not produced by oblate drops but by more prolate drop shapes, as had been observed in previous experiments.

  15. Thermally induced acoustic waves in porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilchenko, Iryna V.; Shulimov, Yuriy G.; Skryshevsky, Valeriy A. [Radiophysics Department, Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Benilov, Arthur I. [Radiophysics Department, Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Laboratoire d' Electronique, Optoelectronique et Microsystemes, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Ecully (France)

    2009-07-15

    Thermally induced acoustic waves in structures with porous silicon have been studied. Two different schemas of acoustic phenomena recording are compared: in the first one a signal from microphone was measured as function of output frequency, in second one the resistance of porous silicon was measured using Wheatstone bridge. For both methods, the resonance peak is situated in same frequencies depending on difference in thermal properties between porous silicon and c-Si as well as geometry of studied structures. 1.0 kHz shifting of resonance peak in saturated alcohol vapors comparing to ambient air is observed. It can be applied as new transducer for chemical sensors based on porous silicon. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Electric Field, Ring Current, Plasmasphere, and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fok, M.-C.; Ridley, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Further development of our self-consistent model of interacting ring current (RC) ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is presented. This model incorporates large scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and treats self-consistently not only EMIC waves and RC ions, but also the magnetospheric electric field, RC, and plasmasphere. Initial simulations indicate that the region beyond geostationary orbit should be included in the simulation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Additionally, a self-consistent description, based on first principles, of the ionospheric conductance is required. These initial simulations further show that in order to model the EMIC wave distribution and wave spectral properties accurately, the plasmasphere should also be simulated self-consistently, since its fine structure requires as much care as that of the RC. Finally, an effect of the finite time needed to reestablish a new potential pattern throughout the ionosphere and to communicate between the ionosphere and the equatorial magnetosphere cannot be ignored.

  17. A high-sensitivity 135 GHz millimeter-wave imager by compact split-ring-resonator in 65-nm CMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Yu, Hao; Yang, Chang; Shang, Yang; Li, Xiuping; Liu, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    A high-sensitivity 135 GHz millimeter-wave imager is demonstrated in 65 nm CMOS by on-chip metamaterial resonator: a differential transmission-line (T-line) loaded with split-ring-resonator (DTL-SRR). Due to sharp stop-band introduced by the metamaterial load, high-Q oscillatory amplification can be achieved with high sensitivity when utilizing DTL-SRR as quench-controlled oscillator to provide regenerative detection. The developed 135 GHz mm-wave imager pixel has a compact core chip area of 0.0085 mm2 with measured power consumption of 6.2 mW, sensitivity of -76.8 dBm, noise figure of 9.7 dB, and noise equivalent power of 0.9 fW/√{HZ } Hz. Millimeter-wave images has been demonstrated with millimeter-wave imager integrated with antenna array.

  18. Frequency translation of light waves by propagation around an optical ring circuit containing a frequency shifter: I. Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K; Horiguchi, T; Koyamada, Y

    1993-11-20

    A technique for the external frequency translation of light waves is reported. The technique permits the stepwise sweeping of an optical frequency over a wide range with high linearity with respect to time. The frequency translator is composed of an optical pulse modulator and an optical ring circuit containing an acousto-optic frequency shifter and an optical amplifier. The pulse launched into the ring circuit undergoes a constant frequency shift for each circulation around the circuit and the frequency can be translated to a considerable degree from that of the original input pulse. We report a stepwise frequency translation over approximately 68 GHz for a 1.5-µm light wave with a strictly constant frequency-sweep rate and an approximately constant intensity.

  19. Estimation of Impulsive Wave-induced Loads on a FPSO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Mansour, Alaa E.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of impulsive loads like slamming and green water on deck on the wave-induced bending moment is estimated by a semi-analytical approach. The impulse loads leading to transient vibrations are described in terms of magnitude, phase lag relative to the wave-induced peak and decay rate...

  20. Continuous-wave singly resonant optical parametric oscillator placed inside a ring laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Buchhave, Preben

    2003-01-01

    A cw singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) was built and placed inside the cavity of a ring laser. The system consists of a diode-end-pumped Nd:YVO4 ring laser with intracavity periodically poled lithium niobate as the nonlinear gain medium of the SRO. When the laser was operated...... the laser was coupled with the SRO. The results show that it is preferable to couple a SRO with a unidirectional ring laser....

  1. Chemical leucoderma induced by ear-ring stoppers made of polyvinyl chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of chemical leucoderma (CL in a 15-year-old girl, who developed patterned depigmentation at the back of both ear lobules after contact with plastic ear-ring stoppers made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC after continuous use for 6-7 months. Patch test with Indian standard series and cosmetic series was negative after 48 h, but she refused patch testing for extended duration as the possibility of induced depigmentation at the test site was unacceptable to her. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of plastic ear-ring stopper induced CL.

  2. A suppressor to prevent direct wave-induced cavitation in shock wave therapy devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matula, Thomas J.; Hilmo, Paul R.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2005-07-01

    Cavitation plays a varied but important role in lithotripsy. Cavitation facilitates stone comminution, but can also form an acoustic barrier that may shield stones from subsequent shock waves. In addition, cavitation damages tissue. Spark-gap lithotripters generate cavitation with both a direct and a focused wave. The direct wave propagates as a spherically diverging wave, arriving at the focus ahead of the focused shock wave. It can be modeled with the same waveform (but lower amplitude) as the focused wave. We show with both simulations and experiments that bubbles are forced to grow in response to the direct wave, and that these bubbles can still be large when the focused shock wave arrives. A baffle or ``suppressor'' that blocks the propagation of the direct wave is shown to significantly reduce the direct wave pressure amplitude, as well as direct wave-induced bubble growth. These results are applicable to spark-gap lithotripters and extracorporeal shock wave therapy devices, where cavitation from the direct wave may interfere with treatment. A simple direct-wave suppressor might therefore be used to improve the therapeutic efficacy of these devices.

  3. Gravitational perturbation induced by a rotating ring around a Kerr black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Sano, Yasumichi

    2014-01-01

    The linear perturbation of a Kerr black hole induced by a rotating massive circular ring is discussed by using the formalism by Teukolsky, Chrzanowski, Cohen and Kegeles. In these formalism, the perturbed Weyl scalars, $\\psi_0$ and $\\psi_4$, are first obtained from the Teukolsky equation. The perturbed metric is obtained in a radiation gauge via the Hertz potential. The computation can be done in the same way as in our previous paper, in which we considered the perturbation of a Schwarzschild black hole induced by a rotating ring. By adding lower multipole modes such as mass and angular momentum perturbation which are not computed by the Teukolsky equation, and by appropriately setting the parameters which are related to the gauge freedom, we obtain the perturbed gravitational field which is smooth except on the equatorial plane outside the ring.

  4. Numerical simulation of sediment transport in coastal waves and wave-induced currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun; LYU Yigang; SHEN Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of coastal sediment transport is of particularly importance for analyzing coast erosion accurately and solving the corresponding coast protection engineering problems. The present study provided a numerical scheme for sediment transport in coastal waves and wave-induced currents. In the scheme, the sand transport model was implemented with wave refraction-diffraction model and near-shore current model. Coastal water wave was simulated by using the parabolic mild-slope equation in which wave refraction, diffraction and breaking effects are considered. Wave-induced current was simulated by using the nonlinear shallow water equations in which wave provides radiation stresses for driving current. Then, sediment transport in waves and wave-induced currents was simulated by using the two-dimensional suspended sediment transport equations for suspended sediment and the bed-load transport equation for bed load. The numerical scheme was validated by experiment results from the Large-scale Sediment Transport Facility at the US Army Corps of Engineer Research and Development Center in Vicksburg. The numerical results showed that the present scheme is an effective tool for modeling coastal sediment transport in waves and near-shore currents.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Wave-Induced Hydroelastic Vibrations of Trimaran in Oblique Irregular Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyun Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The irregular wave condition, especially the oblique irregular wave condition, is the actual circumstances when trimaran is sailing in sea. In order to identify the characteristic of the wave-induced hydroelastic vibration in irregular waves, as well as investigate the change of vibration in different oblique irregular wave conditions, trimaran model tests were conducted to measure vibrations, wave impact, and motion under different azimuth and wave height. The vibration on main hull, side hull, and cross-desk is measured and analyzed separately to observe the influence of irregular wave in different structural parts. The longitudinal vibration, transverse vibration, and torsion are also included in the model tests measurement to investigate the relationship between these vibration deformation components and parameters of the irregular waves. The wave-induced hydroelastic vibrations and whipping effect is extracted and analyzed to find influence of whipping and springing on the total vibration. Based on the analysis, the dangerous positions and the critical waves condition is introduced to ensure that the subsequent structural strength assessment is more reliable.

  6. Cell-autonomous correction of ring chromosomes in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershteyn, Marina; Hayashi, Yohei; Desachy, Guillaume; Hsiao, Edward C.; Sami, Salma; Tsang, Kathryn M.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Ring chromosomes are structural aberrations commonly associated with birth defects, mental disabilities and growth retardation. Rings form after fusion of the long and short arms of a chromosome, and are sometimes associated with large terminal deletions. Owing to the severity of these large aberrations that can affect multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have been proposed. During cell division, ring chromosomes can exhibit unstable behaviour leading to continuous production of aneuploid progeny with low viability and high cellular death rate. The overall consequences of this chromosomal instability have been largely unexplored in experimental model systems. Here we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient fibroblasts containing ring chromosomes with large deletions and found that reprogrammed cells lost the abnormal chromosome and duplicated the wild-type homologue through the compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD) mechanism. The karyotypically normal iPSCs with isodisomy for the corrected chromosome outgrew co-existing aneuploid populations, enabling rapid and efficient isolation of patient-derived iPSCs devoid of the original chromosomal aberration. Our results suggest a fundamentally different function for cellular reprogramming as a means of `chromosome therapy' to reverse combined loss-of-function across many genes in cells with large-scale aberrations involving ring structures. In addition, our work provides an experimentally tractable human cellular system for studying mechanisms of chromosomal number control, which is of critical relevance to human development and disease.

  7. Identification of rocket-induced acoustic waves in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabie, Justin; Bullett, Terence; Moore, Prentiss; Vieira, Gerald

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic waves can create plasma disturbances in the ionosphere, but the number of observations is limited. Large-amplitude acoustic waves generated by energetic sources like large earthquakes and tsunamis are more readily observed than acoustic waves generated by weaker sources. New observations of plasma displacements caused by rocket-generated acoustic waves were made using the Vertically Incident Pulsed Ionospheric Radar (VIPIR), an advanced high-frequency radar. Rocket-induced acoustic waves which are characterized by low amplitudes relative to those induced by more energetic sources can be detected in the ionosphere using the phase data from fixed frequency radar observations of a plasma layer. This work is important for increasing the number and quality of observations of acoustic waves in the ionosphere and could help improve the understanding of energy transport from the lower atmosphere to the thermosphere.

  8. Reduction of the 1/f Noise Induced Phase Noise in a CMOS Ring Oscillator by Increasing the Amplitude of Oscillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gierkink, S.L.J.; Wel, van der A.P.; Hoogzaad, G.; Klumperink, E.A.M.; Tuijl, van A.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Spectrum measurement results of a CMOS ring oscillator are presented that show a 10 dB decrease in 1/f noise induced phase noise at a 2 dB increase in carrier power. Simple ring oscillator theory predicts that the 1/f noise induced phase noise is independent of carrier power. It is shown that an inc

  9. Unfocused Extracorporeal Shock Waves Induce Anabolic Effects in Rat Bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.P. van der Jagt (Olav); T.M. Piscaer (Tom); W. Schaden (Wolfgang); J. Li; N. Kops (Nicole); H. Jahr (Holger); J.C. van der Linden (Jacqueline); J.H. Waarsing (Jan); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); M. de Jong (Marion); H.H. Weinans (Harrie)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract. BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal shock waves are known to stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells toward osteoprogenitors and induce the expression of osteogenic-related growth hormones. The aim of this study was to investigate if and how extracorporeal shock waves af

  10. Unfocused Extracorporeal Shock Waves Induce Anabolic Effects in Rat Bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.P. van der Jagt (Olav); T.M. Piscaer (Tom); W. Schaden (Wolfgang); J. Li; N. Kops (Nicole); H. Jahr (Holger); J.C. van der Linden (Jacqueline); J.H. Waarsing (Jan); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); M. de Jong (Marion); H.H. Weinans (Harrie)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract. BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal shock waves are known to stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells toward osteoprogenitors and induce the expression of osteogenic-related growth hormones. The aim of this study was to investigate if and how extracorporeal shock waves

  11. Wave-Induced Groundwater Flows in a Freshwater Beach Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malott, S. S.; Robinson, C. E.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Wave-induced recirculation across the sediment-water interface can impact the transport of pollutants through a beach aquifer and their ultimate flux into coastal waters. The fate of nutrients (e.g. from septic and agricultural sources) and fecal indicator bacteria (e.g. E. coil) near the sediment-water interface are of particular concern as these pollutants often lead to degradation of recreational water quality and nearshore ecosystems. This paper presents detailed field measurements of groundwater flows in a freshwater beach aquifer on Lake Huron over periods of intensified wave conditions. Quantifying wave-driven processes in a freshwater beach aquifer enables wave effects to be studied in isolation from density and tidal effects that complicate groundwater flows in marine beaches. Water exchange across the sediment-water interface and groundwater flow patterns were measured using groundwater wells, arrays of vertically nested pressure transducers and manometers. Results show that wave action induces rapid infiltration/exfiltration across the sediment-water interface and a larger recirculation cell through the beach aquifer. Field data is used to validate a numerical groundwater model of wave-induced groundwater flows. While prior studies have simulated the effects of waves on beach groundwater flows, this study is the first attempt to validate these sophisticated modeling approaches. Finally, field data illustrating the impact of wave-induced groundwater flows on nutrient and bacteria fate and transport in beach aquifers will also be presented.

  12. Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Residual Stress and Distortion in an Eccentric Ring Induced by Quenching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAOXin; ZHULi-hua; LIM.Victor

    2004-01-01

    The residual stresses and distortion induced by quenching in an eccentric ring were investigated in this study with finite element method. The ring was made of AISI 52100 steel. A fully coupled 3D temperature-displacement analysis was performed to simulate heat transfer, phase transformations, and mechanical stresses and strains during the heating and subsequent quenching processes. Commercial FEA package ABAQUS/Standard 6.4 was used for the analyses along with user subroutines developed by the authors to model the thermal and mechanical constitutive behavior. The simulation results show that transformation plasticity plays an important role on the residual stress distribution.

  14. Scanning Gate Microscopy of Kondo Dots: Fabry-P\\'erot Interferences and Thermally Induced Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Fleury, Geneviève; Pichard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    We study the conductance of an electron interferometer formed in a two dimensional electron gas between a nanostructured quantum contact and the charged tip of a scanning gate microscope. Measuring the conductance as a function of the tip position, thermally induced rings may be observed in addition to Fabry-P\\'erot interference fringes spaced by half the Fermi wavelength. If the contact is made of a quantum dot opened in the middle of a Kondo valley, we show how the location of the rings all...

  15. Generation of surface-wave microwave microplasmas in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber based on a split-ring resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Florian; Gadonna, Katell; Debord, Benoît; Delahaye, Frédéric; Amrani, Foued; Leroy, Olivier; Gérôme, Frédéric; Benabid, Fetah

    2016-05-15

    We report on a new and highly compact scheme for the generation and sustainment of microwave-driven plasmas inside the core of an inhibited coupling Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The microwave plasma generator consists of a split-ring resonator that efficiently couples the microwave field into the gas-filled fiber. This coupling induces the concomitant generation of a microwave surface wave at the fiber core surround and a stable plasma column confined in the fiber core. The scheme allowed the generation of several centimeters long argon microplasma columns with a very low excitation power threshold. This result represents an important step toward highly compact plasma lasers or plasma-based photonic components.

  16. Numerical study on wave dynamics and wave-induced bed erosion characteristics in Potter Cove, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chai Heng; Lettmann, Karsten; Wolff, Jörg-Olaf

    2013-12-01

    Wave generation, propagation, and transformation from deep ocean over complex bathymetric terrains to coastal waters around Potter Cove (King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica) have been simulated for an austral summer month using the Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN) wave model. This study aims to examine and understand the wave patterns, energy fluxes, and dissipations in Potter Cove. Bed shear stress due to waves is also calculated to provide a general insight on the bed sediment erosion characteristics in Potter Cove.A nesting approach has been implemented from an oceanic scale to a high-resolution coastal scale around Potter Cove. The results of the simulations were compared with buoy observations obtained from the National Data Buoy Center, the WAVEWATCH III model results, and GlobWave altimeter data. The quality of the modelling results has been assessed using two statistical parameters, namely the Willmott's index of agreement D and the bias index. Under various wave conditions, the significant wave heights at the inner cove were found to be about 40-50 % smaller than the ones near the mouth of Potter Cove. The wave power in Potter Cove is generally low. The spatial distributions of the wave-induced bed shear stress and active energy dissipation were found to be following the pattern of the bathymetry, and waves were identified as a potential major driving force for bed sediment erosion in Potter Cove, especially in shallow water regions. This study also gives some results on global ocean applications of SWAN.

  17. Tunable optical analog to electromagnetically induced transparency in graphene-ring resonators system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonghua; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Zengxing; Zheng, Hua; Zhang, Wendong; Yan, Shubin

    2016-12-01

    The analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in optical ways has shown great potential in optical delay and quantum-information technology due to its flexible design and easy implementation. The chief drawback for these devices is the bad tunability. Here we demonstrate a tunable optical transparency system formed by graphene-silicon microrings which could control the transparent window by electro-optical means. The device consists of cascaded coupled ring resonators and a graphene/graphene capacitor which integrated on one of the rings. By tuning the Fermi level of the graphene sheets, we can modulate the round-trip ring loss so that the transparency window can be dynamically tuned. The results provide a new method for the manipulation and transmission of light in highly integrated optical circuits and quantum information storage devices.

  18. Time-dependent wave packet simulations of transport through Aharanov–Bohm rings with an embedded quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisbeck, C.; Kramer, T.; Molina, R. A.

    2017-04-01

    We have performed time-dependent wave packet simulations of realistic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) devices with a quantum dot embedded in one of the arms of the interferometer. The AB ring can function as a measurement device for the intrinsic transmission phase through the quantum dot, however, care has to be taken in analyzing the influence of scattering processes in the junctions of the interferometer arms. We consider a harmonic quantum dot and show how the Darwin–Fock spectrum emerges as a unique pattern in the interference fringes of the AB oscillations.

  19. Curvature-Induced Asymmetric Spin-Wave Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otálora, Jorge A.; Yan, Ming; Schultheiss, Helmut; Hertel, Riccardo; Kákay, Attila

    2016-11-01

    In magnonics, spin waves are conceived of as electron-charge-free information carriers. Their wave behavior has established them as the key elements to achieve low power consumption, fast operative rates, and good packaging in magnon-based computational technologies. Hence, knowing alternative ways that reveal certain properties of their undulatory motion is an important task. Here, we show using micromagnetic simulations and analytical calculations that spin-wave propagation in ferromagnetic nanotubes is fundamentally different than in thin films. The dispersion relation is asymmetric regarding the sign of the wave vector. It is a purely curvature-induced effect and its fundamental origin is identified to be the classical dipole-dipole interaction. The analytical expression of the dispersion relation has the same mathematical form as in thin films with the Dzyalonshiinsky-Moriya interaction. Therefore, this curvature-induced effect can be seen as a "dipole-induced Dzyalonshiinsky-Moriya-like" effect.

  20. Numerical study on water waves and wave-induced longshore currents in Obaköy coastal water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun; LYU Yigang; SHEN Yongming

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the water waves and wave-induced longshore currents in Obaköy coastal water which is lo-cated at the Mediterranean coast of Turkey were numerically studied. The numerical model is based on the parabolic mild-slope equation for coastal water waves and the nonlinear shallow water equation for the wave-induced currents. The wave transformation under the effects of shoaling, refraction, diffraction and breaking is considered, and the wave provides radiation stresses for driving currents in the model. The numerical results for the water wave-induced longshore currents were validated by the measured data to demonstrate the efficiency of the numerical model. Then the water waves and longshore currents induced by the waves from main directions were numerically simulated and analyzed based on the numerical re-sults. The numerical results show that the movement of the longshore currents was different while the wave propagated to a coastal zone from different directions.

  1. A NOVEL SIW BPF BASED ON CIRCULAR COMPLIMENTARY SPLIT RING RESONATORS FOR MILLIMETER WAVE APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.KAREEMULLA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel Substrate Integrated Waveguide Band Pass Filter based on circular complimentary split ring resonators (CSRR is proposed in this paper. By etching Circular Complimentary Split Ring Resonators on the surface of the substrate integrated waveguide, the SIW gets BPF characteristics for particular band of frequencies. This filter is small size and low profile, is useful in designing single substrate front-end broad band communication system. The current BPF is designed at 8 GHz to 9 GHz in X-Band and presented with Simulation results.

  2. Highly precise acoustic calibration method of ring-shaped ultrasound transducer array for plane-wave-based ultrasound tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Takahide; Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Atsuro; Tsubota, Yushi; Wu, Wenjing; Kawabata, Ken-ichi

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) is promising for a non-invasive, painless, operator-independent and quantitative system for breast-cancer screening. Assembly error, production tolerance, and aging-degradation variations of the hardwire components, particularly of plane-wave-based USCT systems, may hamper cost effectiveness, precise imaging, and robust operation. The plane wave is transmitted from a ring-shaped transducer array for receiving the signal at a high signal-to-noise-ratio and fast aperture synthesis. There are four signal-delay components: response delays in the transmitters and receivers and propagation delays depending on the positions of the transducer elements and their directivity. We developed a highly precise calibration method for calibrating these delay components and evaluated it with our prototype plane-wave-based USCT system. Our calibration method was found to be effective in reducing delay errors. Gaps and curves were eliminated from the plane wave, and echo images of wires were sharpened in the entire imaging area.

  3. Cadmium toxicity to ringed seals (Phoca hispida): an epidemiological study of possible cadmium-induced nephropathy and osteodystrophy in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Qaanaaq in Northwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne-Hansen, C; Dietz, R; Leifsson, P S;

    2002-01-01

    . Experience from cadmium-poisoned humans and laboratory mammals indicates that concentrations above 50-200 microg/g wet wt. may induce histopathological changes. Overall, 31 of the ringed seals had cadmium concentrations in the kidney cortex above 50 microg/g wet wt., 11 had concentrations above 100 and one......The Greenland marine food chains contain high levels of cadmium, mercury and selenium. Concentrations of cadmium in the kidney of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from the municipalities of Qaanaaq and Upernavik (Northwest Greenland) are among the highest recorded in the Arctic. The purpose...... of the study was to determine whether cadmium-induced damage in the kidneys and the skeletal system could be detected among 100 ringed seals from Northwest Greenland. The cadmium concentrations in the kidney cortex ranged from 0 to 248 microg/g wet weight (mean=44.5, N=100) in the 99 kidneys examined...

  4. An Induced Representation Method for Studying the Stability of Saturn's Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Soumangsu Bhusan

    2016-01-01

    MacKey constructed a set of induced representation character formulas to calculate the sum of different powers of the eigenvalues of a matrix with finite group symmetry. We show that these results of MacKey can be used to derive the stability condition, m > Cn3, of Maxwell using his symmetric model for a ring of Saturn, as a collection of n identical unit mass particles revolving round Saturn, which has mass m, in a circular orbit.

  5. Cadmium toxicity to ringed seals (Phoca hispida): an epidemiological study of possible cadmium-induced nephropathy and osteodystrophy in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Qaanaaq in Northwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne-Hansen, C; Dietz, R; Leifsson, P S

    2002-01-01

    . Experience from cadmium-poisoned humans and laboratory mammals indicates that concentrations above 50-200 microg/g wet wt. may induce histopathological changes. Overall, 31 of the ringed seals had cadmium concentrations in the kidney cortex above 50 microg/g wet wt., 11 had concentrations above 100 and one...

  6. (-)Epicatechin induces and modulates endothelium-dependent relaxation in isolated rat mesenteric artery rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Xiao-Qiang; CHAN Franky Leung; LAU Chi-Wai; HUANG Yu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: The present study was aimed to examine the role of endothelial nitric oxide in the relaxant response to green tea (-)epicatechin and its modulation of endothelium-mediated relaxation in the isolated rat mesenteric artery rings.METHODS: Changes in the isometric tension were measured with Grass force-displacement transducers. RESULTS:The (-)epicatechin-induced relaxation was largely dependent on the presence of intact endothelium and was reversed by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester 10 μmol/L or methylene blue 10 μmol/L, the inhibitors of nitric oxidemediated relaxation. L-Arginine at 1 mmol/L antagonized the effect of L-NAME or methylene blue. Pretreatment of endothelium-intact rings with (-)epicatechin 10 μmol/L enhanced the relaxation induced by endothelium-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine, while this concentration did not influence the endothelium-independent relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside in the endothelium-denuded artery rings. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the endothelium-dependent vasodilation by (-)epicatechin is mainly mediated through nitric oxide and low concentration of (-)epicatechin augments endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in the rat mesenteric arteries.

  7. Pacemaker interactions induce reentrant wave dynamics in engineered cardiac culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Bartłomiej; Shajahan, T. K.; Gabriels, James; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Pacemaker interactions can lead to complex wave dynamics seen in certain types of cardiac arrhythmias. We use experimental and mathematical models of pacemakers in heterogeneous excitable media to investigate how pacemaker interactions can be a mechanism for wave break and reentrant wave dynamics. Embryonic chick ventricular cells are cultured invitro so as to create a dominant central pacemaker site that entrains other pacemakers in the medium. Exposure of those cultures to a potassium channel blocker, E-4031, leads to emergence of peripheral pacemakers that compete with each other and with the central pacemaker. Waves emitted by faster pacemakers break up over the slower pacemaker to form reentrant waves. Similar dynamics are observed in a modified FitzHugh-Nagumo model of heterogeneous excitable media with two distinct sites of pacemaking. These findings elucidate a mechanism of pacemaker-induced reentry in excitable media.

  8. Planetary Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Tiscareno, Matthew S

    2011-01-01

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks, and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft. Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 1e-7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close-range and in real-time in planetary rings. We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The main rings of Saturn comprise our system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty...

  9. Buoyancy-induced squeezing of a deformable drop through an axisymmetric ring constriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Thomas; Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Davis, Robert H.

    2010-08-01

    Axisymmetric boundary-integral (BI) simulations were made for buoyancy-induced squeezing of a deformable drop through a ring constriction. The algorithm uses the Hebeker representation for the solid-particle contribution. A high-order, near-singularity subtraction technique is essential for near-critical squeezing. The drop velocity and minimum drop-solid spacing were determined for different ring and hole sizes, viscosity ratios, and Bond numbers, where the latter is a dimensionless ratio of gravitational to interfacial forces. The drop velocity decelerates typically 100-fold or more, and the drop-solid spacing reduces to typically 0.1%-1% of the nondeformed drop radius as the drop passes through the constriction. The critical Bond number (below which trapping occurs) was determined for different conditions. For supercritical conditions, the nondimensional time required for the drop to pass through the ring increases for a fixed drop-to-hole size with increasing viscosity ratio and decreasing Bond number, but it has a nonmonotonic dependence on the ratio of the radii of the drop and ring cross section. Numerical results indicate that the square of the drop squeezing time is inversely proportional to the Bond number minus the critical Bond number for near-critical squeezing. The critical Bond number, determined from dynamic BI calculations, compares favorably to that obtained precisely from a static algorithm. The static algorithm uses the Young-Laplace equation to calculate the pendant and sessile portions of the drop interface coupled through the conditions of global pressure continuity and total drop volume conservation. Over a limited parameter space, the critical Bond number increases almost linearly with the drop-to-hole ratio and is a weak function of the ratio of the ring cross-sectional radius to the hole radius. Another dynamic phenomenon, in addition to drop squeezing, is a drop "dripping" around the outer edge of the ring constriction, and a critical

  10. High-Q Contacted Ring Microcavities with Scatterer-Avoiding "Wiggler" Bloch Wave Supermode Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yangyang

    2014-01-01

    High-Q ring resonators with contacts to the waveguide core provide a versatile platform for various applications in chip-scale optomechanics, thermo- and electro-optics. We propose and demonstrate a novel approach to implement azimuthally periodic contacted ring resonators based on multi-mode Bloch matching that support contacts on both the inner and outer radius edges with small degradation to the optical Q. Radiative coupling between degenerate modes of adjacent transverse spatial order leads to imaginary frequency (Q) splitting and a scatterer avoiding high-Q "wiggler" supermode field. We experimentally measure Q's up to 258,000 in devices fabricated in a silicon device layer on buried oxide undercladding, and up to 139,000 in devices fully suspended in air using an undercut step. Wiggler supermodes are true modes of the microphotonic system that offer new degrees of freedom in electrical, thermal and mechanical design.

  11. Shock Wave Induced Separation Control by Streamwise Vortices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryszard SZWABA

    2005-01-01

    Control of shock wave and boundary layer interaction finds still a lot of attention. Methods of this interaction control have been especially investigated in recent decade. This research was mostly concerned with flows without separation. However, in many applications shock waves induce separation often leads to strong unsteady effects. In this context it is proposed to use streamwise vortices for the interaction control. The results of experimental investigations are presented here. The very promising results were obtained, meaning that the incipient separation was postponed and the separation size was reduced for the higher Mach numbers. The decrease of the RMS of average shock wave oscillation was also achieved.

  12. An omnidirectional shear horizontal wave transducer based on ring array of face-shear (d24) piezoelectric ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, Hongchen; Wang, Qiangzhong; Li, Faxin

    2016-01-01

    The non-dispersive fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave in plate-like structures is of practical importance in non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM). Theoretically, an omnidirectional SH0 transducer phased array system can be used to inspect defects in a large plate in the similar manner to the phased array transducers used in medical B-scan ultrasonics. However, very few omnidirectional SH transducers have been proposed so far. In this work, an omnidirectional SH wave piezoelectric transducer (OSH-PT) was proposed which consists of a ring array of twelve face-shear (d24) trapezoidal PZT elements. Each PZT element can produce face-shear deformation under applied voltage, resulting in circumferential shear deformation in the OSH-PT and omnidirectional SH waves in the hosting plate. Both finite element simulations and experiments were conducted to examine the performance of the proposed OSH-PT. Experimental testing shows that the OSH-PT exhibits good omnidirectional properties,...

  13. Deep-water bedforms induced by refracting Internal Solitary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcini, Federico; Droghei, Riccardo; Casalbore, Daniele; Martorelli, Eleonora; Mosetti, Renzo; Sannino, Gianmaria; Santoleri, Rosalia; Latino Chiocci, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Subaqueous bedforms (or sand waves) are typically observed in those environments that are exposed to strong currents, characterized by a dominant unidirectional flow. However, sand-wave fields may be also observed in marine environments where no such current exists; the physical processes driving their formation are enigmatic or not well understood. We propose that internal solitary waves (ISWs), induced by tides, can produce an effective, unidirectional boundary flow filed that forms asymmetric sand waves. We test this idea by examining a sand-wave field off the Messina Strait, where we hypothesize that ISWs formed at the interface between intermediate and surface waters are refracted by topography. Hence, we argue that the deflected pattern (i.e., the depth-dependent orientation) of the sand-wave field is due to refraction of such ISWs. Combining field observations and numerical modelling, we show that ISWs can account for three key features: ISWs produce fluid velocities capable of mobilizing bottom sediments; the predicted refraction pattern resulting from the interaction of ISWs with bottom topography matches the observed deflection of the sand waves; and predicted migration rates of sand waves match empirical estimates. This work shows how ISWs may contribute to sculpting the structure of continental margins and it represents a promising link between the geological and oceanographic communities.

  14. Noise induced intercellular propagation of calcium waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nchange, A. K.; Kepseu, W. D.; Woafo, P.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a bidirectional coupled chain of cells, in which a cell is subjected to an external noise. Noisy oscillations of calcium (Ca 2+), that is, a bursting-like phenomenon induced by noise with fluctuations in the baseline values of calcium, are induced in the first cell and propagated along the chain with noise suppression. This phenomenon of noise suppression is further investigated by computing the normalized fluctuation of pulse durations. It is therefore found that the noise induced coherence resonance phenomenon occurs at the cellular level. Coherence biresonance behaviour appears in the transmission of noise induced oscillations at appropriate noise intensity or noise coupling (for low noise intensity) and the information flow in each cell can be simultaneously optimized at the optimal value of noise or coupling.

  15. Wave Effect on the Ocean Circulations Through Mass Transport and Wave-Induced Pumping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Fan; WU Kejian

    2014-01-01

    The wave Coriolis-Stokes-Force-modified ocean momentum equations are reviewed in this paper and the wave Stokes transport is pointed out to be part of the ocean circulations. Using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts 40-year reanalysis data (ERA-40 data) and the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) version 2.2.4 data, the magnitude of this transport is compared with that of wind-driven Sverdrup transport and a 5-to-10-precent contribution by the wave Stokes transport is found. Both transports are stronger in boreal winter than in summers. The wave effect can be either contribution or cancellation in different seasons. Examination with Kuroshio transport verifies similar seasonal variations. The clarification of the efficient wave boundary condition helps to understand the role of waves in mass transport. It acts as surface wind stress and can be functional down to the bottom of the ageostrophic layer. The pumping velocities resulting from wave-induced stress are zonally distributed and are significant in relatively high latitudes. Further work will focus on the model performance of the wave-stress-changed-boundary and the role of swells in the eastern part of the oceans.

  16. Induced fermionic charge and current densities in two-dimensional rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, S; Grigoryan, A Kh

    2016-01-01

    For a massive quantum fermionic field, we investigate the vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of the charge and current densities induced by an external magnetic flux in a two-dimensional circular ring. Both the irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra are considered. On the ring edges the bag (infinite mass) boundary conditions are imposed for the field operator. This leads to the Casimir type effect on the vacuum characteristics. The radial current vanishes. The charge and the azimuthal current are decomposed into the boundary-free and boundary-induced contributions. Both these contributions are odd periodic functions of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. An important feature that distinguishes the VEVs of the charge and current densities from the VEV of the energy density, is their finiteness on the ring edges. The current density is equal to the charge density for the outer edge and has the opposite sign on the inner edge. The VEVs are peaked near the inner edge and, as f...

  17. Mesoscale heat waves induced by orography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladich, I.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Mordacchini, Gp.; Palazzo, A.; Stel, F.

    2008-07-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of an unusual and sudden thermal fluctuation that interested portions of Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy) during the night of 27 July 1983. The whole 1983 summer was extremely warm in Europe and in particular on the Italian peninsula, from the Alps down to Sicily. Nevertheless, the day of 27 July 1983 in Friuli Venezia Giulia deserves special attention because the observed maximum temperatures did not occur during day-time but during night-time (from 23:00 up to 24:00 LT, 21:00-22:00 UTC). Peaks of 34.8°C and values of relative humidity of the order of 28% were registered by the official network of weather stations. This event interested mainly the central-eastern part of the plain of Friuli Venezia Giulia, a few kilometers far from the Slovenian border and relieves. The thermal anomalies lasted up to an hour, then temperatures decreased toward values more usual for the climate of the month. The study of this event is carried out with the aid of the AR-WRF numerical atmospheric model, initialized through the ECMWF analysis. The numerical simulations highlight the important role played by orography, jointly with the peculiar thermal structure of the atmosphere, for the enhancing of the internal wave pattern over that area. According to the sensitivity studies realized, the amplification of the internal wave pattern might represent a possible explanation for that meteorological enigma.

  18. Mesoscale heat waves induced by orography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Gladich

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the analysis of an unusual and sudden thermal fluctuation that interested portions of Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy during the night of 27 July 1983. The whole 1983 summer was extremely warm in Europe and in particular on the Italian peninsula, from the Alps down to Sicily. Nevertheless, the day of 27 July 1983 in Friuli Venezia Giulia deserves special attention because the observed maximum temperatures did not occur during day-time but during night-time (from 23:00 up to 24:00 LT, 21:00–22:00 UTC. Peaks of 34.8°C and values of relative humidity of the order of 28% were registered by the official network of weather stations. This event interested mainly the central-eastern part of the plain of Friuli Venezia Giulia, a few kilometers far from the Slovenian border and relieves. The thermal anomalies lasted up to an hour, then temperatures decreased toward values more usual for the climate of the month. The study of this event is carried out with the aid of the AR-WRF numerical atmospheric model, initialized through the ECMWF analysis. The numerical simulations highlight the important role played by orography, jointly with the peculiar thermal structure of the atmosphere, for the enhancing of the internal wave pattern over that area. According to the sensitivity studies realized, the amplification of the internal wave pattern might represent a possible explanation for that meteorological enigma.

  19. Parametrically Amplified Bright-state Polariton of Four- and Six-wave Mixing in an Optical Ring Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Yiqi; Yao, Xin; Wu, Zhenkun; Zhang, Xun; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental studies of bright-state polaritons of four-wave mixing (FWM) and six-wave mixing (SWM) signals through cascade nonlinear optical parametric amplification processes in an atom-cavity composite system for the first time. Also, the coexisting cavity transmission modes of parametrically amplified FWM and SWM signals are observed. Finally, electromagnetically induced absorption by the FWM cavity modes in the probe beam is investigated. The investigations can find potential applications in multi-channel narrow-band long-distance quantum communication. PMID:24401795

  20. Improved Optical Magnetometer Based on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in a Ring-Cavity Setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Bhaskar Roy; Kim, Moochan; Dowling, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    We propose and simulate a ring-gyro optical magnetometer based on polarization rotation of an optical field in an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) system. By properly choosing the polarization orientations of the optical field and the transition energy levels, the transparency conditions for the polarization components are derived for the EIT system inserted into the ring-cavity setup as a cell. As the optical field passes through the cell, the fluctuations of the Rabi frequency as well as the density inside the cell, due to the fluctuations in the laser field, give rise to the dephasing of the polarization vector. We show that using the setup it is possible to achieve very sensitive measurement of the magnetic field. Besides, by making several round trips of the photons, the dephasing effects can be removed by some suitable dynamical decoupling schemes implemented with additional waveplates in the setup. This enables us to obtain long interrogation length for the EIT based optical magnetometer.

  1. Control of quantum interference of an excitonic wave in a chlorophyll chain with a chlorophyll ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Suc-Kyoung; Nam, Seog-Woo [Korea University, Jochiwon, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Yeon, Kyu-Hwang [Chungbuk National University, Cheonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The quantum interference of an excitonic wave and its coherent control in a nanochain with a nanoring are studied. The nanochain is comprised of six chlorophylls, where four chlorophylls compose the nanoring and two chlorophylls are attached at two opposite sites on the nanoring. The exciton dynamics and the correlation of the excitation between chlorophylls are analyzed for a given configurational arrangement and dipolar orientation of the chlorophylls. The results of this study show that the excitation at specified chlorophylls is suppressed or enhanced by destructive or constructive interference of the excitonic wave in the chlorophyll nanochain.

  2. Depth-dependent expression of obliquely incident wave induced radiation stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The vertically dependent expressions of obliquely incident waves induced radiation stress are derived by use of the second order Stokes wave theory within three regions of the water column, that is, above the mean water level, below the wave trough level, and between these two levels. Computations indicate that the wave-induced radiation stress below the wave trough level is from the water wave particle velocity only, whereas both the water wave particle velocity and the wave pressure contribute to the tensor above the wave trough level; the vertical variations of the wave-induced radiation stress are influenced substantially by the velocity component in the direction of wave propagation; the distributions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor over depth are non-uniform and the proportion of the tensor below the wave trough level becomes considerable in the shallow water; from water surface to seabed, the reversed variations occur for the predominant tensor components.

  3. A uniform-sensitivity omnidirectional shear-horizontal (SH) wave transducer based on a thickness poled, thickness-shear (d15) piezoelectric ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Qiang; Miao, Hongchen; Li, Faxin

    2017-08-01

    The fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave in plates is of great importance in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) since it is the unique non-dispersive guided wave mode. For practical applications, a phased array system based on omnidirectional SH0 wave transducers is most useful as it can cover a wide range of a plate. However, so far very few omnidirectional SH wave transducers have been developed. In this work, we proposed an omnidirectional SH wave piezoelectric transducer (OSH-PT) based on a thickness poled piezoelectric ring. The ring is equally divided into twelve sectors and the electric field is circumferentially applied, resulting in a new thickness-shear (d15) mode. Finite element analysis shows that the proposed OSH-PT can excite single-mode SH0 wave and receive the SH0 wave only. Experiments were then conducted to examine the performance of the proposed OSH-PT. Results indicated that it can generate and receive single-mode SH0 wave in a wide frequency range with nearly uniform sensitivities along all directions. Considering its quite simple configuration, compact size and low cost, the proposed OSH-PT is expected to greatly promote the applications of SH waves in the field of NDT and SHM.

  4. Reply to "Comment on 'A Self-Consistent Model of the Interacting Ring Current Ions and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves, Initial Results: Waves and Precipitation Fluxes' and 'Self-Consistent Model of the Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: Waves in Multi-Ion Magnetosphere' by Khazanov et al. et al."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wavenormal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and[ particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. [2002, 2006, 2007]. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. Thome and Home [2007] (hereafter referred to as TH2007) call the Khazanov et al. [2002, 2006] results into question in their Comment. The points in contention can be summarized as follows. TH2007 claim that: (1) "the important damping of waves by thermal heavy ions is completely ignored", and Landau damping during resonant interaction with thermal electrons is not included in our model; (2) EMIC wave damping due to RC O + is not included in our simulation; (3) non-linear processes limiting EMIC wave amplitude are not included in our model; (4) growth of the background fluctuations to a physically significantamplitude"must occur during a single transit of the unstable region" with subsequent damping below bi-ion latitudes,and consequently"the bounce averaged wave kinetic equation employed in the code contains a physically erroneous 'assumption". Our reply will address each of these points as well as other criticisms mentioned in the Comment. TH2007 are focused on two of our papers that are separated by four years. Significant progress in the self-consistent treatment of the RC-EMIC wave system has been achieved during those years. The paper by Khazanov et al. [2006] presents the latest version of our model, and in

  5. Continuous-wave supercontinuum laser based on an erbium-doped fiber ring cavity incorporating a highly nonlinear optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Han; Takushima, Yuichi; Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2005-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel erbium-doped fiber based continuous-wave (cw) supercontinuum laser. The laser has a simple ring-cavity structure incorporating an erbium-doped fiber and a highly nonlinear dispersion-shifted fiber (HNL-DSF). Differently from previously demonstrated cw supercontinuum sources based on single propagation of a strong Raman pump laser beam through a highly nonlinear fiber, erbium gain inside the cavity generates a seed light oscillation, and the oscillated light subsequently evolves into a supercontinuum by nonlinear effects such as modulation instability and stimulated Raman scattering in the HNL-DSF. High quality of the depolarized supercontinuum laser output with a spectral bandwidth larger than 250 nm is readily achieved.

  6. Implementation features of the microstrip filters with traveling wave ring resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushechenko E. N.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article prsents a block diagram of a traveling wave directional filter, and a system of analytic expressions which defines the levels of the signals in the filter branches. Implementation features of the filter in the microstrip design are considered. The block diagram of such filter, its base topology and signal system are given.

  7. Ring-down gravity waves: How far wormhole observables can mimic those of a black hole?

    CERN Document Server

    Nandi, Kamal K; Yanbekov, Almir A; Shayakhmetov, Azat A

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that the recently detected ring-down gravity waveforms could be indicative only of the presence of light rings in a horizonless object, such as a surgical Schwarzschild wormhole, with the frequencies differing drastically from those of the horizon quasinormal mode frequencies $\\omega _{\\text{QNM}}$. While the possibility of such a horizonless alternative is novel by itself, we show by an appropriate example that the difference in frequencies need not be drastic. We shall consider here an analytic (as opposed to surgical) stable traversable Ellis-Bronnikov wormhole and show that observables such as the $\\omega _{\\text{QNM}}$, strong field Bozza lensing parameters and the accretion disk signatures of the Ellis-Bronnikov wormhole could actually be very close to those of a black hole (say, SgrA$^{\\ast }$ hosted by our galaxy) of the same mass. This situation indicates that the wormhole observables could remarkably mimic those of a black hole unless highly precise measurements distinguishing the...

  8. Exact solutions for chemical concentration waves of self-propelling camphor particles racing on a ring: A novel potential dynamics perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, T D

    2015-01-01

    A potential dynamics approach is developed to determine the periodic standing and traveling wave patterns associated with self-propelling camphor objects floating on ring-shaped water channels. Exact solutions of the wave patterns are derived. The bifurcation diagram describing the transition between the immobile and self-propelling modes of camphor objects is derived semi-analytically. The bifurcation is of a pitchfork type which is consistent with earlier theoretical work in which natural boundary conditions have been considered.

  9. Shear flow induced wave couplings in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poedts, S. [KULeuven, Heverlee (Belgium). Centre for Plasma Astrophysics; Rogava, A.D. [Tbilisi State Univ. (Georgia). Dept. of Physics]|[International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Mahajan, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies]|[International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    1998-01-01

    A sheared background flow in a plasma induces coupling between different MHD wave modes, resulting in their mutual transformations with corresponding energy redistributing between the modes. In this way, the energy can be transfered from one wave mode to the other, but energy can also be added to or extracted from the background flow. In the present paper it is investigated whether the wave coupling and energy transfer mechanisms can operate under solar wind conditions. It is shown that this is indeed the case. Hence, the long-period waves observed in the solar wind at r > 0.3 AU might be generated by much faster periodic oscillations in the photosphere of the Sun. Other possible consequences for observable beat phenomena in the wind and the acceleration of the solar wind particles are also discussed.

  10. Mechanisms of relaxation induced by flavonoid ayanin in isolated aorta rings from Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalía Carrón

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study shows the relaxant effect induced by ayanin in aorta rings from Wistar rats linked to nitric oxide/cyclic-GMP pathway.  This flavonoid is the prevalent compound obtained from Croton schiedeanus Schlecht (Euphorbiaceae, specie used in Colombian folk medicine for the treatment of arterial hypertension. Objectives: To identify possible action mechanisms of vascular relaxation induced by ayanin (quercetin 3,4',7-trimethyl ether. Methodology: Isolated aorta rings from Wistar rats obtained at the Animal House of the University of Salamanca were contracted with KCl (80 mM or phenylephrine (PE, 10-6 M and exposed to ayanin (10-6-10-4 M.  Then, the effect of ayanin was assessed in deendothelized rings contracted with PE and in intact rings contracted with PE previously incubated with: ODQ (10-6 M, L-NAME (10-4 M, L-NAME plus D- and L-arginine (10-4 M, indomethacin (5x10-6 M, dipyridamole (3x10-7 M, glibenclamide (10-6 M, propranolol (10-6 M, verapamil (10-7 M or atropine (3x10-5 M.  In addition, the relaxant effect of acetylcholine (Ach, 10-8-3x10-4 M, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 10-9-3x10-5 M was assessed in the presence and absence of ayanin (10-6 M. Results: Ayanin induced a greater concentration-dependent relaxation in vessels contracted with phenylephrine (pEC50: 5.84±0.05, an effect significantly reduced by deendothelization and by both ODQ and L-NAME.  L-arginine was able to reverse the effect of L-NAME.  Indomethacin weakly inhibited ayanin response.  Dipyridamole, glibenclamide, propranolol, verapamil, and atropine did not affect ayanin relaxation.  Ayanin did not have any effect on the relaxation elicited by acetylcholine (ACh, while weakly decreasing the relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP. Conclusion: Ayanin induces endothelium-dependent relaxation in the rat aorta mainly related to nitric oxide/cGMP pathway, according to the response observed in the presence of L-NAME, L-arginine and ODQ.

  11. Wave Induced Stresses Measured at the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corona, L.; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the wave induced loading on the overtopping based wave energy converter Wave Dragon. Focus is put on the junction between the main body and the reflector, also called the "shoulder part", where large cross sectional forces and bending moments acts. There are two main objectives...... for this paper, first to verify the FEM results obtained by Niras, Danish society in charge of the finite element modelling and structural design, and then to make a first experimental fatigue analysis of a particular part of the Wave Dragon. This last part shall be considered as an exercise for the further work...... that is to be done for the fatigue analysis, and which is not part of this paper....

  12. Image reconstruction with acoustic radiation force induced shear waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleavey, Stephen A.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Stutz, Deborah L.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2003-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force may be used to induce localized displacements within tissue. This phenomenon is used in Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI), where short bursts of ultrasound deliver an impulsive force to a small region. The application of this transient force launches shear waves which propagate normally to the ultrasound beam axis. Measurements of the displacements induced by the propagating shear wave allow reconstruction of the local shear modulus, by wave tracking and inversion techniques. Here we present in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo measurements and images of shear modulus. Data were obtained with a single transducer, a conventional ultrasound scanner and specialized pulse sequences. Young's modulus values of 4 kPa, 13 kPa and 14 kPa were observed for fat, breast fibroadenoma, and skin. Shear modulus anisotropy in beef muscle was observed.

  13. Vortex induced vibrations of pipe in high waves. Field measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen Ottesen, N.-E.; Pedersen, B.

    1999-07-01

    Vortex induced vibrations have been measured full scale on an instrumented pipe placed vertically in the crest zone of high and steep waves. The Reynolds numbers were in the range 105 to 106. It was found that the vortex induced vibrations in the wave motion were generated within a reduced velocity range of 4 and 8. The vibrations grew intermittently with the passing waves. The vibrations took place in 2-3 modes simultaneously. One mode, however, dominated over the other. The growths of the VIV using a modal analysis were consistent with a basic correlation length of 3 diameters for a stationary pipe with a linear growth of the correlation length of 10 diameter for each 0.1 diameter amplitude. (au)

  14. Wave-induced Ship Hull Vibrations in Stochastic Seaways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Dogliani, M.

    1996-01-01

    -Gaussian in stationary stochastic seaways. The statistical properties of a response are here described by the first four statistical moments through a Hermite series approximation to the probability density function. The peak value distributions of the low and high frequency responses are treated independently, due......A theoretical Study is undertaken on the determination of wave-induced loads in flexible ship hulls. The calculations are performed within the framework of a non-linear, quadratic strip theory formulated in the frequency domain. Included are non-linear effects due to changes in added mass...... to the large separation between dominating wave frequencies and the lowest two-node frequency of the hull beam. Both extreme value predictions and fatigue damage are considered.For a fast container ship the rigid body and two-node (springing) vertical wave-induced bending moments amidship are calculated...

  15. Evanescent wave induced fluorescence. A tool for quantitative interfacial analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, C D

    2000-01-01

    Time-resolved angle-resolved evanescent wave induced fluorescence spectroscopy (EWIFS) has been used, for the first time, to determine interfacial concentration distributions of molecular species. Theoretical calculations demonstrate that in dynamic systems the non-radiative fluorescence decay coefficients of molecular species are effected only in a minor way by the presence of a dielectric interface. Consequently, measurements of interfacial fluorescence decay times are used to probe variations in molecular fluorescence quantum efficiencies, caused by the presence of an interface. The understanding of these variations is combined with angle-resolved evanescent wave theory. Examination of derived theoretical models using simulated data demonstrates that angle-resolved EWIFS is capable of measuring interfacial interactions on a nanometer scale. An evanescent wave induced fluorescence spectrometer is designed and fabricated to allow the measurement of the time-integrated and time-resolved interfacial emission. ...

  16. Continuous-wave four-wave mixing with linear growth based on electromagnetically dual induced transparency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahua Li(李家华); Wenxing Yang(杨文星); Jucun Peng(彭菊村)

    2004-01-01

    Using Schrodinger-Maxwell formalism, we propose and analyze a continuous-wave four-wave mixing (FWM) scheme for the generation of coherent light in a six-level atomic system based on electromagnetically dual induced transparency. We derive the corresponding explicit analytical expressions for the generated mixing field. We find that the scheme greatly enhances FWM production efficiency and is also capable of inhibiting and delaying the onset of the detrimental three-photon destructive interference by choosing the proper decay rate in the second electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) process.In addition, such an optical process also provides possibilities for producing short-wave-length coherent radiation at low pump intensities.

  17. On the effectiveness of mangroves in attenuating cyclone induced waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narayan, S.; Suzuki, T.; Stive, M.J.F.; Verhagen, H.J.; Ursem, W.N.J.; Ranasinghe, R.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the effectiveness of mangroves in attenuating cyclone- induced waves was done using the SWAN 40.81 numerical model. Hydraulic parameters during extreme events and local mangrove vegetation parameters were estimated for the Kanika Sands mangrove island near the upcoming Dhamra Port in Oris

  18. On the effectiveness of mangroves in attenuating cyclone induced waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narayan, S.; Suzuki, T.; Stive, M.J.F.; Verhagen, H.J.; Ursem, W.N.J.; Ranasinghe, R.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the effectiveness of mangroves in attenuating cyclone- induced waves was done using the SWAN 40.81 numerical model. Hydraulic parameters during extreme events and local mangrove vegetation parameters were estimated for the Kanika Sands mangrove island near the upcoming Dhamra Port in

  19. Magnetization dynamics and spin pumping induced by standing elastic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azovtsev, A. V.; Pertsev, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    The magnetization dynamics induced by standing elastic waves excited in a thin ferromagnetic film is described with the aid of micromagnetic simulations taking into account the magnetoelastic coupling between spins and lattice strains. Our calculations are based on the numerical solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation comprising the damping term and the effective magnetic field with all relevant contributions. The simulations have been performed for 2-nm-thick F e81G a19 film dynamically strained by longitudinal and transverse standing waves with various frequencies, which span a wide range around the resonance frequency νres of coherent magnetization precession in unstrained F e81G a19 film. It is found that standing elastic waves give rise to complex local magnetization dynamics and spatially inhomogeneous dynamic patterns in the form of standing spin waves with the same wavelength. Remarkably, the amplitude of magnetization precession does not go to zero at nodes of these spin waves, which cannot be precisely described by simple analytical formulae. In the steady-state regime, magnetization oscillates with the frequency of the elastic wave, except in the case of longitudinal waves with frequencies well below νres, where the magnetization precesses with variable frequency strongly exceeding the wave frequency. The results obtained for the magnetization dynamics driven by elastic waves are used to calculate the spin current pumped from the dynamically strained ferromagnet into adjacent paramagnetic metal. Numerical calculations demonstrate that the transverse charge current in the paramagnetic layer, which is created by the spin current via inverse spin Hall effect, is high enough to be measured experimentally.

  20. Codimension 2 and 3 situations in a ring cavity with elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, D A

    2015-01-01

    We study pattern formation on the plane transverse to propagation direction, in a ring cavity filled with a Kerr-like medium, subject to an elliptically polarized incoming field, by means of two coupled Lugiato-Lefever equations. We consider a wide range of possible values for the coupling parameter between different polarizations, *B*, as may happen in composite materials. Positive and also negative refraction index materials are considered. Examples of marginal instability diagrams are shown. It is shown that, within the model, instabilities cannot be of codimension higher than 3. A method for finding parameters for which codimension 2 or 3 takes place is given. The method allows us to choose parameters for which unstable wavenumbers fulfill different relations. Numerical integration results where different instabilities coexist and compete are shown.

  1. Continuous Tera-Hertz wave transmission spectroscopy of Nb double superconducting split-ring resonator array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, JunWei; Liu, RuiYuan; Zhou, YuRong; Li, YanRong; Wang, YunPing

    2012-02-01

    Transmission spectroscopy of two Nb double superconducting split-ring samples with different thicknesses on MgO substrates was measured by a continuous Tera-Hertz spectrometer. The transmission curves of two different samples with the thicknesses of 50 and 150 nm at 7.5 K show dips at 480, 545 GHz, respectively, which origin from the different capacities and inductances of the samples. For the sample of 50 nm, the dip shifts to lower frequency, also decreases in depth and increases in width with temperature or field increasing below T c of Nb film, while the sample of 150 nm does not show such a phenomenon. This thickness-dependent transmission behavior is due to the kinetic inductance and conductivity change of superfluid electrons in Nb film and may suggest a practical tunable THz filter based on the thinner samples.

  2. Fano resonance and wave transmission through a chain structure with an isolated ring composed of defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Cun-Xi; Ding Xiu-Huan; Wang Rui; Zhou Yun-Qing; Kong Ling-Min

    2012-01-01

    We consider a discrete model that describes a linear chain of particles coupled to an isolated ring composed of N defects.This simple system can be regarded as a generalization of the familiar Fano-Anderson model.It can be used to model discrete networks of coupled defect modes in photonic crystals and simple waveguide arrays in two-dimensional lattices.The analytical result of the transmission coefficient is obtained,along with the conditions for perfect reflections and transmissions due to either destructive or constructive interferences.Using a simple example,we further investigate the relationship between the resonant frequencies and the number of defects N,and study how to affect the numbers of perfect reflections and transmissions.In addition,we demonstrate how these resonance transmissions and refections can be tuned by one nonlinear defect of the network that possesses a nonlinear Kerr-like response.

  3. Codimension 2 and 3 situations in a ring cavity with elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mártin, D. A.; Hoyuelos, M.

    2013-09-01

    We study pattern formation on the plane transverse to propagation direction, in a ring cavity filled with a Kerr-like medium, subject to an elliptically polarized incoming field, by means of two coupled Lugiato-Lefever equations. We consider a wide range of possible values for the coupling parameter between different polarizations, B¯, as may happen in composite materials. Positive and also negative refraction index materials are considered. Examples of marginal instability diagrams are shown. It is shown that, within the model, instabilities cannot be of codimension higher than 3. A method for finding parameters for which codimension 2 or 3 takes place is given. The method allows us to choose parameters for which unstable wavenumbers fulfill different relations. Numerical integration results where different instabilities coexist and compete are shown.

  4. Scanning Gate Microscopy of Kondo Dots: Fabry-Pérot Interferences and Thermally Induced Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Fleury, Geneviève; Pichard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    5 pages, 4 figures; We study the conductance of an electron interferometer formed in a two dimensional electron gas between a nanostructured quantum contact and the charged tip of a scanning gate microscope. Measuring the conductance as a function of the tip position, thermally induced rings may be observed in addition to Fabry-Pérot interference fringes spaced by half the Fermi wavelength. If the contact is made of a quantum dot opened in the middle of a Kondo valley, we show how the locatio...

  5. Numerical study of pollutant movement in waves and wave-induced long-shore currents in surf zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun; SHEN Yongming; QIU Dahong

    2008-01-01

    Water waves,wave-induced long-shore currents and movement of pollutants in waves and currents have been numerically studied based on the hyperbolic mild-slope equation,the shallow water equation,as well as the pollutant movement equation,and the nu- merical results have also been validated by experimental data.It is shown that the long-shore current velocity and wave set-up in- crease with the increasing incident wave amplitude and slope steepness of the shore plane;the wave set-up increases with the in- creasing incident wave period;and the pollutant morement proceeds more quiekly with the increasing incident wave amplitude and slope steepness of the shore palane.In surf zones,the long-shore currents induced by the inclined incident waves have effectively affected the pollutant movement.

  6. Intensity improvement of shock waves induced by liquid electrical discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Xian-Dong; Liu, Si-Wei; Zhou, Gu-Yue; Lin, Fu-Chang

    2017-04-01

    When shock waves induced by pulsed electrical discharges in dielectric liquids are widely applied in industrial fields, it is necessary to improve the energy transfer efficiency from electrical energy to mechanical energy to improve the shock wave intensity. In order to investigate the effect of the plasma channel length created by the liquid electrical discharge on the shock wave intensity, a test stand of dielectric liquid pulsed electrical discharge is designed and constructed. The main capacitor is 3 μF, and the charging voltage is 0-30 kV. Based on the needle-needle electrode geometry with different gap distances, the intensities of shock waves corresponding to the electrical parameters, the relationship between the plasma channel length and the deposited energy, and the time-resolved observation of the plasma channel development by a high speed camera are presented and compared. The shock wave intensity is closely related to the power and energy dissipated into the plasma channel. The longer plasma channel and the quicker arc expansion can lead to a higher power and energy deposited into the plasma channel, which can activate a stronger shock wave.

  7. Stratospheric Annular Modes Induced By Stationary Wave Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körnich, H.; Schmitz, G.

    The variability of the winter stratosphere shows distinguishable features in the north- ern and southern hemisphere. Since these differences are based on the different plan- etary waves of the underlying atmosphere, we explore the mechanism how stationary wave forcing in the troposphere can induce a stratospheric Annular Mode using a simple GCM. The model KMCM (Kühlungsborn Mechanistic Circulation Model) extends from the ground up to 60 km height and produces a reasonable winter climate. It takes into account the different large-scale wave forcings in the troposphere as prescribed pro- cesses. This allows us to examine the stratospheric Annular-Mode generation depend- ing on different wave forcings under perpetual January conditions. Principal com- ponent analysis is applied to identify the variability patterns of the geopotential and of the zonally averaged zonal wind. By this way, it is shown that the amplitude and composition of the orographic and thermal eddy forcing determines the stratospheric Annular Mode and the related downward propagation in the temperature field. Further model simplifications are introduced in order to understand the mechanism of the stratospheric AM-generation. Using a linear model version we illuminate the influence of the different wave forcing processes on the Annular Modes. Addition- ally, a constant-troposphere model is used to clarify the importance of transient and stationary waves. Finally, the Annular Mode is interpreted in terms of the dynamical coupling of the troposphere and stratosphere.

  8. Identification of Laser-induced Lamb waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro C, M.; Lopez, J.A. [Physics Department, U. 1: El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Osegueda, R. [FAST Center, Burgess Hall, U. 1: El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    We studied experimentally the ultrasonic propagating modes produced by a laser pulse of 532 nm while impinging on an aluminum plate. The beam, shaped as a line, induced various Lamb modes whose relative power varied with the laser line length. Identification of their mode was performed by detecting the ultrasonic modes with piezoelectric detectors along a propagation direction orthogonal to the line, and using two dimensional fast Fourier transform. Good agreement is observed between theoretical and experimental dispersion curves for the first fundamental symmetric and anti-symmetric modes. Results are shown for 12 and 24 mm laser line-length at 13.6 and 16.8 ns pulse-width. (Author)

  9. Multiple structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Hayasaka, Keisuke; Kameda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    The structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave is examined. Plasma formation, shock-wave expansion, and temporal evolution of shock pressure are observed simultaneously using a combined measurement system that obtains high-resolution nanosecond-order image sequences. In contrast to a well-known spherical-shock model, these detailed measurements reveal a non-spherically-symmteric distribution of pressure peak for a wide range of experimental parameters. The structure is determined to be a collection of multiple spherical shocks originated from elongated plasmas.

  10. Wave induced extreme hull girder loads on containerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Shi, Bill;

    2009-01-01

    , forward speed and hull flexibility. The vertical hull girder loads are evaluated for specific operational profiles. Firstly a quadratic strip theory is presented which can give separate predictions for the hogging and sagging bending moments and shear forces and for hull girder loads. Then this procedure...... is used as a base to derive semi-analytical formulas such that approximate wave load calculations can be performed by a simple spreadsheet program. Due to the few input parameters this procedure can be used to estimate the wave-induced bending moments at the conceptual design phase. Since the procedure...

  11. Shear wave induced resonance elastography of spherical masses with polarized torsional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj Henni, Anis; Schmitt, Cédric; Trop, Isabelle; Cloutier, Guy

    2012-03-01

    Shear wave induced resonance (SWIR) is a technique for dynamic ultrasound elastography of confined mechanical inclusions. It was developed for breast tumor imaging and tissue characterization. This method relies on the polarization of torsional shear waves modeled with the Helmholtz equation in spherical coordinates. To validate modeling, an invitro set-up was used to measure and image the first three eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes of a soft sphere. A preliminary invivo SWIR measurement on a breast fibroadenoma is also reported. Results revealed the potential of SWIR elastography to detect and mechanically characterize breast lesions for early cancer detection.

  12. Electronic confinement in graphene quantum rings due to substrate-induced mass radial kink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, L. J. P.; da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Pereira, J. M., Jr.; Farias, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate localized states of a quantum ring confinement in monolayer graphene defined by a circular mass-related potential, which can be induced e.g. by interaction with a substrate that breaks the sublattice symmetry, where a circular line defect provides a change in the sign of the induced mass term along the radial direction. Electronic properties are calculated analytically within the Dirac-Weyl approximation in the presence of an external magnetic field. Analytical results are also compared with those obtained by the tight-binding approach. Regardless of its sign, a mass term Δ is expected to open a gap for low-energy electrons in Dirac cones in graphene. Both approaches confirm the existence of confined states with energies inside the gap, even when the width of the kink modelling the mass sign transition is infinitely thin. We observe that such energy levels are inversely proportional to the defect line ring radius and independent on the mass kink height. An external magnetic field is demonstrated to lift the valley degeneracy in this system and easily tune the valley index of the ground state in this system, which can be polarized on either K or {{K}\\prime} valleys of the Brillouin zone, depending on the magnetic field intensity. Geometrical changes in the defect line shape are considered by assuming an elliptic line with different eccentricities. Our results suggest that any defect line that is closed in a loop, with any geometry, would produce the same qualitative results as the circular ones, as a manifestation of the topologically protected nature of the ring-like states investigated here.

  13. Cadmium toxicity to ringed seals (Phoca hispida): an epidemiological study of possible cadmium-induced nephropathy and osteodystrophy in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Qaanaaq in Northwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne-Hansen, C; Dietz, R; Leifsson, P S;

    2002-01-01

    of the study was to determine whether cadmium-induced damage in the kidneys and the skeletal system could be detected among 100 ringed seals from Northwest Greenland. The cadmium concentrations in the kidney cortex ranged from 0 to 248 microg/g wet weight (mean=44.5, N=100) in the 99 kidneys examined...... to the proximal kidney tubules is known to induce demineralisation of the skeletal system (Fanconi's syndrome). Therefore, the three lowest lumbar vertebrae were scanned in 91 seals to measure the content of calcium. The 10 cases of nephropathy could neither be linked to the degree of mineralisation...

  14. Wave induced density modification in RF sheaths and close to wave launchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eester, D., E-mail: d.van.eester@fz-juelich.de [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, EUROfusion Consortium Member, Brussels (Belgium); Crombé, K. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, EUROfusion Consortium Member, Brussels (Belgium); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Lu, Ling-Feng [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-12-10

    With the return to full metal walls - a necessary step towards viable fusion machines - and due to the high power densities of current-day ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) or RF (radio frequency) antennas, there is ample renewed interest in exploring the reasons for wave-induced sputtering and formation of hot spots. Moreover, there is experimental evidence on various machines that RF waves influence the density profile close to the wave launchers so that waves indirectly influence their own coupling efficiency. The present study presents a return to first principles and describes the wave-particle interaction using a 2-time scale model involving the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the wave equation on each of the time scales. Through the changing density pattern, the fast time scale dynamics is affected by the slow time scale events. In turn, the slow time scale density and flows are modified by the presence of the RF waves through quasilinear terms. Although finite zero order flows are identified, the usual cold plasma dielectric tensor - ignoring such flows - is adopted as a first approximation to describe the wave response to the RF driver. The resulting set of equations is composed of linear and nonlinear equations and is tackled in 1D in the present paper. Whereas the former can be solved using standard numerical techniques, the latter require special handling. At the price of multiple iterations, a simple ’derivative switch-on’ procedure allows to reformulate the nonlinear problem as a sequence of linear problems. Analytical expressions allow a first crude assessment - revealing that the ponderomotive potential plays a role similar to that of the electrostatic potential arising from charge separation - but numerical implementation is required to get a feeling of the full dynamics. A few tentative examples are provided to illustrate the phenomena involved.

  15. Wave induced density modification in RF sheaths and close to wave launchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eester, D.; Crombé, K.; Lu, Ling-Feng

    2015-12-01

    With the return to full metal walls - a necessary step towards viable fusion machines - and due to the high power densities of current-day ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) or RF (radio frequency) antennas, there is ample renewed interest in exploring the reasons for wave-induced sputtering and formation of hot spots. Moreover, there is experimental evidence on various machines that RF waves influence the density profile close to the wave launchers so that waves indirectly influence their own coupling efficiency. The present study presents a return to first principles and describes the wave-particle interaction using a 2-time scale model involving the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the wave equation on each of the time scales. Through the changing density pattern, the fast time scale dynamics is affected by the slow time scale events. In turn, the slow time scale density and flows are modified by the presence of the RF waves through quasilinear terms. Although finite zero order flows are identified, the usual cold plasma dielectric tensor - ignoring such flows - is adopted as a first approximation to describe the wave response to the RF driver. The resulting set of equations is composed of linear and nonlinear equations and is tackled in 1D in the present paper. Whereas the former can be solved using standard numerical techniques, the latter require special handling. At the price of multiple iterations, a simple 'derivative switch-on' procedure allows to reformulate the nonlinear problem as a sequence of linear problems. Analytical expressions allow a first crude assessment - revealing that the ponderomotive potential plays a role similar to that of the electrostatic potential arising from charge separation - but numerical implementation is required to get a feeling of the full dynamics. A few tentative examples are provided to illustrate the phenomena involved.

  16. Optical Analog to Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Cascaded Ring-Resonator Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonghua; Zheng, Hua; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    The analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in optical methods has shown great potential in slow light and sensing applications. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a coupled resonator induced transparency system with three cascaded ring coupled resonators in a silicon chip. The structure was modeled by using the transfer matrix method. Influences of various parameters including coupling ratio of couplers, waveguide loss and additional loss of couplers on transmission characteristic and group index have been investigated theoretically and numerically in detail. The transmission character of the system was measured by the vertical grating coupling method. The enhanced quality factor reached 1.22 × 105. In addition, we further test the temperature performance of the device. The results provide a new method for the manipulation of light in highly integrated optical circuits and sensing applications. PMID:27463720

  17. Spin-transfer torque induced spin waves in antiferromagnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Matthew; Guo, Wei; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Xiao, Di; Xiao, Jiang

    2015-03-01

    We explore the possibility of exciting spin waves in insulating antiferromagnetic films by injecting spin current at the surface. We analyze both magnetically compensated and uncompensated interfaces. We find that the spin current induced spin-transfer torque can excite spin waves in insulating antiferromagnetic materials and that the chirality of the excited spin wave is determined by the polarization of the injected spin current. Furthermore, the presence of magnetic surface anisotropy can greatly increase the accessibility of these excitations. Supported by NSF EFRI-1433496 (M.W.D), U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering (D.X. & G.M.S.), Major State Basic Research Project of China and National Natural Science Foundation of China (W.G. and J.X.).

  18. Linear Growth of Continuous-Wave Four-Wave Mixing with Dual Induced Transparency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-Yi; LI Jia-Hua

    2005-01-01

    Using Schrodinger-Maxwell formalism, we propose and analyze an optical four-wave mixing (FWM) scheme for the generation of coherent light in a coherent six-level atomic medium based on dual electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We show that the significantly enhanced conversion efficiency enabled by ultraslow propagation of pump waves has no direct relationship with the single-photon detuning, which is different from the FWM with a single EIT. The most important feature is that our scheme is also capable of inhibiting and delaying the onset of the detrimental three-photon destructive interference that looks like a recent scheme [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 243902] andmay be used for generating short-wave-length coherent radiation.

  19. Ballistic quench-induced correlation waves in ultracold gases

    CERN Document Server

    Corson, John P

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the wave packet dynamics of a pair of particles that undergoes a rapid change of scattering length. The short-range interactions are modeled in the zero-range limit, where the quench is accomplished by switching the boundary condition of the wave function at vanishing particle separation. This generates a correlation wave that propagates rapidly to nonzero particle separations. We have derived universal, analytic results for this process that lead to a simple phase-space picture of the quench-induced scattering. Intuitively, the strength of the correlation wave relates to the initial contact of the system. We find that, in one spatial dimension, the $k^{-4}$ tail of the momentum distribution contains a ballistic contribution that does not originate from short-range pair correlations, and a similar conclusion can hold in other dimensionalities depending on the quench protocol. We examine the resultant quench-induced transport in an optical lattice in 1D, and a semiclassical treatment is found to...

  20. Continuous-Wave Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy in a Pulsed Uniform Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawoos, Shameemah; Suas-David, Nicolas; Suits, Arthur

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a new approach that couples a pulsed uniform supersonic flow with high sensitivity continuous wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (UF-CRDS) operated in the near infrared (NIR). This combination is related to the CRESU technique developed in France and used for many years to study reaction kinetics at low temperature, and to the microwave based chirped-pulse uniform supersonic flow spectrometer (CPUF) developed in our group which has successfully demonstrated the use of pulsed uniform supersonic flow to probe reaction dynamics at temperatures as low as 22 K. CRDS operated with NIR permits access to the first overtones of C-H and O-H stretching/bending which, in combination with its extraordinary sensitivity opens new experiments complementary to the CPUF technique. The UF-CRDS apparatus (Figure) utilizes the pulsed uniform flow produced by means of a piezo-electric stack valve in combination with a Laval nozzle. At present, two machined aluminum Laval nozzles designed for carrier gases Ar and He generate flows with a temperature of approximately 25 K and pressure around 0.15 mbar. This flow is probed by an external cavity diode laser in the NIR (1280-1380 nm). Laval nozzles designed using a newly developed MATLAB-based program will be used in the future. A detailed illustration of the novel UF-CRDS instrumentation and its performance will be presented along with future directions and applications. I. Sims, J. L. Queffelec, A. Defrance, C. Rebrion-Rowe, D. Travers, P. Bocherel, B. Rowe, I. W. Smith, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 4229-4241, (1994). C. Abeysekera, B. Joalland, N. Ariyasingha, L. N. Zack, I. R. Sims, R. W. Field, A. G. Suits, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 1599-1604, (2015). N. Suas-David, T. Vanfleteren, T. Foldes, S. Kassi, R. Georges, M. Herman, J. Phys. Chem.A, 119, 10022-10034, (2015). C. Abeysekera, B. Joalland, Y. Shi, A. Kamasah, J. M. Oldham, A. G. Suits, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 116107, (2014).

  1. Analogy of electromagnetically induced transparency in plasmonic nanodisk with a square ring resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xianping; Wei, Zhongchao, E-mail: wzc@scnu.edu.cn; Liu, Yuebo; Zhong, Nianfa; Tan, Xiaopei; Shi, Songsong; Liu, Hongzhan; Liang, Ruisheng

    2016-01-08

    We have demonstrated the analogy of electromagnetically induced transparency in plasmonic nanodisk with a square ring resonator. A reasonable analysis of the transmission feature based on the temporal coupled-mode theory is given and shows good agreement with the Finit-Difference Time-Domain simulation. The transparency window can be easily tuned by changing the geometrical parameters and the insulator filled in the resonator. The transmission of the resonator system is close to 80% and the full width at half maximum is less than 46 nm. The sensitivity of the structure is about 812 nm/RIU. These characteristics make the new system with potential to apply for optical storage, ultrafast plasmonic switch and slow-light devices.

  2. Analysis of the magnetically induced current density of molecules consisting of annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundholm, Dage; Berger, Raphael J F; Fliegl, Heike

    2016-06-21

    Magnetically induced current susceptibilities and current pathways have been calculated for molecules consisting of two pentalene groups annelated with a benzene (1) or naphthalene (2) moiety. Current strength susceptibilities have been obtained by numerically integrating separately the diatropic and paratropic contributions to the current flow passing planes through chosen bonds of the molecules. The current density calculations provide novel and unambiguous current pathways for the unusual molecules with annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon moieties. The calculations show that the benzene and naphthalene moieties annelated with two pentalene units as in molecules 1 and 2, respectively, are unexpectedly antiaromatic sustaining only a local paratropic ring current around the ring, whereas a weak diatropic current flows around the C-H moiety of the benzene ring. For 1 and 2, the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are antiaromatic and a slightly weaker semilocal paratropic current flows around the two pentalene rings. Molecules 1 and 2 do not sustain any net global ring current. The naphthalene moiety of the molecule consisting of a naphthalene annelated with two pentalene units (3) does not sustain any strong ring current that is typical for naphthalene. Instead, half of the diatropic current passing the naphthalene moiety forms a zig-zag pattern along the C-C bonds of the naphthalene moiety that are not shared with the pentalene moieties and one third of the current continues around the whole molecule partially cancelling the very strong paratropic semilocal ring current of the pentalenes. For molecule 3, the pentalene moieties and the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are more antiaromatic than for 1 and 2. The calculated current patterns elucidate why the compounds with formally [4n + 2] π-electrons have unusual aromatic properties violating the Hückel π-electron count rule. The current density calculations also provide

  3. Quasi-phase-matched DC-induced three wave mixing versus four wave mixing: a simulated comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiano, Christopher A; Aitchison, J Stewart; Qian, Li

    2012-04-01

    A comparison is made between DC-induced three-wave mixing under an on-off quasi-phase-matching scheme and a perfectly phase-matched four wave mixing process. It is shown that the DC-induced process is capable of producing a significantly larger conversion efficiency than the four wave mixing process. Despite the fact that it suffers greater effects of dispersion, the enhanced growth rate of the DC-induced process provides a conversion efficiency roughly 300× larger than that of four wave mixing. Over a sample length of 20 cm the DC-induced process is able to generate idler power more than 270 times greater than that produced by the equivalent four wave mixing process.

  4. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  5. Analysis of Wave Fields induced by Offshore Pile Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnau, M.; Heitmann, K.; Lippert, T.; Lippert, S.; von Estorff, O.

    2015-12-01

    Impact pile driving is the common technique to install foundations for offshore wind turbines. With each hammer strike the steel pile - often exceeding 6 m in diameter and 80 m in length - radiates energy into the surrounding water and soil, until reaching its targeted penetration depth. Several European authorities introduced limitations regarding hydroacoustic emissions during the construction process to protect marine wildlife. Satisfying these regulations made the development and application of sound mitigation systems (e.g. bubble curtains or insulation screens) inevitable, which are commonly installed within the water column surrounding the pile or even the complete construction site. Last years' advances have led to a point, where the seismic energy tunneling the sound mitigation systems through the soil and radiating back towards the water column gains importance, as it confines the maximum achievable sound mitigation. From an engineering point of view, the challenge of deciding on an effective noise mitigation layout arises, which especially requires a good understanding of the soil-dependent wave field. From a geophysical point of view, the pile acts like a very unique line source, generating a characteristic wave field dominated by inclined wave fronts, diving as well as head waves. Monitoring the seismic arrivals while the pile penetration steadily increases enables to perform quasi-vertical seismic profiling. This work is based on datasets that have been collected within the frame of three comprehensive offshore measurement campaigns during pile driving and demonstrates the potential of seismic arrivals induced by pile driving for further soil characterization.

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) induce vasodilation in isolated rat aortic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Hernández, J M; Ramirez-Lee, M A; Rosas-Hernandez, H; Salazar-García, S; Maldonado-Ortega, D A; González, F J; Gonzalez, C

    2015-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are used in biological systems with impact in biomedicine in order to improve diagnostics and treatment of diseases. However, their effects upon the vascular system, are not fully understood. Endothelium and smooth muscle cells (SMC) communicate through release of vasoactive factors as nitric oxide (NO) to maintain vascular tone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SWCNTs on vascular tone using isolated rat aortic rings, which were exposed to SWCNTs (0.1, 1 and 10 μg/mL) in presence and absence of endothelium. SWCNTs induced vasodilation in both conditions, indicating that this effect was independent on endothelium; moreover that vasodilation was NO-independent, since its blockage with L-NAME did not modify the observed effect. Together, these results indicate that SWCNTs induce vasodilation in the macrovasculature, may be through a direct interaction with SMC rather than endothelium independent of NO production. Further investigation is required to fully understand the mechanisms of action and mediators involved in the signaling pathway induced by SWCNTs on the vascular system.

  7. Excitation and reception of single torsional wave T(0,1) mode in pipes using face-shear d24 piezoelectric ring array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hongchen; Huan, Qiang; Wang, Qiangzhong; Li, Faxin

    2017-02-01

    Excitation of single fundamental torsional wave T(0, 1) mode is of practical importance in inspecting or monitoring the structural integrity of pipelines, as T(0, 1) wave is the only non-dispersive mode in pipe-like structures. This work presents a piezoelectric ring array to excite and receive single T(0, 1) mode which is made up of a series of equally-spaced face-shear d24 PZT elements around the pipe. Firstly, we proposed that single T(0, 1) mode can be excited by the piezoelectric ring, when the number of d24 PZT elements is slightly greater than n, where F(n, 2) is the highest circumferential order flexural torsional mode within the frequency bandwidth of the drive signal. Then this proposed principle was confirmed by finite element simulations. Later, experimental testing was conducted on a 100 mm outer diameter, 3 mm thick aluminum pipe. Results show that the ring of 24 face-shear d24 PZT elements can suppress all the non-axisymmetric flexural modes at the excitation frequency of 150 kHz so that single T(0, 1) mode is generated. Moreover, such a piezoelectric ring transducer can also filter flexural modes and receive the T(0, 1) mode only at 150 kHz. Note that here the highest circumferential order flexural torsional mode within the frequency bandwidth is F(20, 2), so the experimental results are in good agreement with the proposed principle. The presented ring of face-shear d24 PZT elements is very suitable for severing as the T(0, 1) wave transducer in structural health monitoring system, as it is cost-effective and no external load is required for operation.

  8. Use of an atrial lead with very short tip-to-ring spacing avoids oversensing of far-field R-wave.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Kolb

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The AVOID-FFS (Avoidance of Far-Field R-wave Sensing study aimed to investigate whether an atrial lead with a very short tip-to-ring spacing without optimization of pacemaker settings shows equally low incidence of far-field R-wave sensing (FFS when compared to a conventional atrial lead in combination with optimization of the programming. METHODS: Patients receiving a dual chamber pacemaker were randomly assigned to receive an atrial lead with a tip-to-ring spacing of 1.1 mm or a lead with a conventional tip-to-ring spacing of 10 mm. Postventricular atrial blanking (PVAB was programmed to the shortest possible value of 60 ms in the study group, and to an individually determined optimized value in the control group. Atrial sensing threshold was programmed to 0.3 mV in both groups. False positive mode switch caused by FFS was evaluated at one and three months post implantation. RESULTS: A total of 204 patients (121 male; age 73±10 years were included in the study. False positive mode switch caused by FFS was detected in one (1% patient of the study group and two (2% patients of the control group (p = 0.62. CONCLUSION: The use of an atrial electrode with a very short tip-to-ring spacing avoids inappropriate mode switch caused by FFS without the need for individual PVAB optimization. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00512915.

  9. Wave Induced Loading and Stability of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tue

    conducting model tests very large variability in e.g. the degree of stability is observed. This background motivated the investigations conducted in the present study. The objective was to investigate and clarify which wave parameters are important for the hydraulic stability of the armour layer on typical...... related to the hydraulic stability was discussed. Further, governing parameters influencing the stability were identified and their influence quantified to retrieve the state- of-the-art. Model tests were conducted at SINTEF with scale models of prototype breakwaters and both the wave induced loading......The present state of knowledge when designing coastal structures has improved in the recent years. However the available design methods concerning especially rubble mound structures are characterized by a number of empirical and semi-empirical formulae making model tests inevitable and even when...

  10. Chemical Sensing Using Infrared Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy: Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (SWIR CRDS) Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Richard M.; Harper, Warren W.; Aker, Pam M.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2003-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project is to explore and develop the science and technology behind point and stand off infrared (IR) spectroscopic chemical sensors that are needed for detecting weapons proliferation activity and countering terrorism. Missions addressed include detecting chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons and their production; counter terrorism measures that involve screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons and/or their residues; and mapping of contaminated areas. The science and technology developed in this program is dual use in that it additionally supports progress in a diverse set of agendas that include chemical weapons defense programs, air operations activities, emissions monitoring, law enforcement, and medical diagnostics. Sensors for these missions require extremely low limits of detection because many of the targeted signature species are either present in low concentrations or have extremely low vapor pressures. The sensors also need to be highly selective as the environments that they will be operated in will contain a variety of interferent species and false positive detection is not an option. PNNL has been working on developing a class of sensors that draw vapor into optical cavities and use laser-based spectroscopy to identify and quantify the vapor chemical content. The cavity enhanced spectroscopies (CES) afford extreme sensitivity, excellent selectivity, noise immunity, and rapid, real-time, in-situ chemical characterization. PNNL's CES program is currently focused on developing two types of sensors. The first one, which is based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), uses short wave infrared (SWIR) lasers to interrogate species. The second sensor, which is based on noise immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE OHMS), uses long wave infrared (LWIR

  11. Influence of chemical structure on hypersensitivity reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs: the role of the aromatic ring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handoko, K.B.; Puijenbroek, E.P. van; Bijl, A.H.; Hermens, W.A.; Rijkom, JE Zwart-van; Hekster, Y.A.; Egberts, T.C.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can cause various 'idiosyncratic' hypersensitivity reactions, i.e. the mechanism by which AEDs induce hypersensitivity is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of an aromatic ring as a commonality in chemical structures of AEDs can ex

  12. Influence of chemical structure on hypersensitivity reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs : the role of the aromatic ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handoko, Kim B; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P; Bijl, Annemarie H; Hermens, Walter A J J; Zwart-van Rijkom, Jeannette E F; Hekster, Yechiel A; Egberts, Toine C G

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can cause various 'idiosyncratic' hypersensitivity reactions, i.e. the mechanism by which AEDs induce hypersensitivity is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of an aromatic ring as a commonality in chemical structures of AEDs can ex

  13. Muscle RING finger-1 promotes a maladaptive phenotype in chronic hypoxia-induced right ventricular remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Campen

    Full Text Available Exposure to chronic hypoxia (CH induces elevated pulmonary artery pressure/resistance, leading to an eventual maladaptive right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH. Muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1 is a muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase that mediates myocyte atrophy and has been shown to play a role in left ventricular hypertrophy and altered cardiac bioenergetics in pressure overloaded hearts. However, little is known about the contribution of MuRF1 impacting RVH in the setting of CH. Therefore, we hypothesized that MuRF1 deletion would enhance RVH compared to their wild-type littermates, while cardiac-specific overexpression would reduce hypertrophy following CH-induced pulmonary hypertension. We assessed right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP, right ventricle to left ventricle plus septal weight ratio (RV/LV+S and hematocrit (Hct following a 3-wk isobaric CH exposure. Additionally, we conducted dual-isotope SPECT/CT imaging with cardiac function agent 201Tl-chloride and cell death agent 99mTc-annexin V. Predictably, CH induced pulmonary hypertension, measured by increased RVSP, RV/LV+S and Hct in WT mice compared to normoxic WT mice. Normoxic WT and MuRF1-null mice exhibited no significant differences in RVSP, RV/LV+S or Hct. CH-induced increases in RVSP were also similar between WT and MuRF1-null mice; however, RV/LV+S and Hct were significantly elevated in CH-exposed MuRF1-null mice compared to WT. In cardiac-specific MuRF1 overexpressing mice, RV/LV+S increased significantly due to CH exposure, even greater than in WT mice. This remodeling appeared eccentric, maladaptive and led to reduced systemic perfusion. In conclusion, these results are consistent with an atrophic role for MuRF1 regulating the magnitude of right ventricular hypertrophy following CH-induction of pulmonary hypertension.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Spatial Lag Between Wave Breaking Point and Location of Maximum Wave-Induced Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jin-hai; TANG Yu

    2009-01-01

    A quasi three-dimensional numerical model of wave-driven coastal currents with the effects of surface rollers is developed for the study of the spatial lag between the location of the maximum wave-induced current and the wave breaking point.The governing equations are derived from Navier-Stokes equations and solved by the hybrid method combining the fractional step finite different method in the horizontal plane with a Galerkin finite element method in the vertical direction.The surface rollers effects are considered through incorporating the creation and evolution of the roller area into the free surface shear stress.An energy equation facilitates the computation process which transfers the wave breaking energy dissipation to the surface roller energy.The wave driver model is a phase-averaged wave model based on the wave action balance equation.Two sets of laboratory experiments producing breaking waves that generated longshore currents on a planar beach are used to evaluate the model's performance.The present wave-driven coastal current model with the roller effect in the surface shear stress term can produce satisfactory results by increasing the wave-induced nearshore current velocity inside the surf zone and shifting the location of the maximum longshore current velocity landward.

  15. Saturn's Other Ring Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, F. J.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's main rings orbit the planet within an atmosphere and ionosphere of water, oxygen and hydrogen, produced by meteoritic impacts on and ultraviolet photodesorbtion of the ring particles [Johnson et al., 2006; Luhmann et al., 2006; Tseng et al., 2010]. The neutral atmosphere itself has only been tentatively detected through ultraviolet fluorescents of OH [Hall et al., 1996] while the ionosphere was observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft shortly after orbital insertion [Coates et al.,2005; Tokar et al. 2005, Waite et al. 2005]. Although the plasma flow velocity of this ionosphere is not well-constrained, but the close association with the rings suggests that its speed would be couppled to the keplarian velocity of the rings themselves. As a result, the motion of the plasma through Saturn's magnetic field would produce an induced voltage, oriented away from the planet outside synchronous orbit and towards the planet inside synchronous orbit. Such a potential could result in currents flowing across the ring plane and closeing along magnetic field lines and through Saturn's ionosphere at latitudes between 36o and 48o. Cassini observations of whistler-mode plasma wave emissions [Xin et al.,2006] centered on synchronous orbit (1.76 Rs, mapping to 41o latitude) have been interpreted as a product of field-aligned electron beams associated with such a current. This presentation will investigate the magnitude of these currents and the resulting Joule heating of the ionosphere. An important constraint is that no auroral ultraviolet emissions have been observed at the relevant latitudes. In contrast, Joule heating could affect infrared emissions from H3+. Variations in H3+ emission associated with Saturn's rings have been reported by O'Donoghue et al., 2013, and interpreted as a result of ring "rain", i.e. precipitating water group species from the rings which alter ionosphereic chemistry and H3+ densities. As noted by O'Donoghue et al., this interpretation may be

  16. A finite element analysis of the time-delay periodic ring arrays for guided wave generation and reception in hollow cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W

    2001-09-01

    A new guided wave transducer model, time-delay periodic ring arrays (TDPRAs), is proposed and investigated in this paper for guided cylindrical wave generation and reception in hollow cylinders with application interests focusing on non-destructive testing (NDT) of piping/tubing. A finite element simulation has been performed for axisymmetric guided-mode excitation and reception with TDPRAs. By arranging a proper configuration of the time-delay profile and the electric-connection pattern of a ring array, unidirectional excitation and reception of guided waves can be achieved. The numerical results are obtained for the first three axisymmetrical modes and are compared with respect to generation efficiency and mode selectivity. Parametric influences on the performance of TDPRAs are discussed, combining a 2-D phase velocity-frequency spectrum approach with the mode dispersion and displacement structure analyses. The identification of converted modes in guided cylindrical wave reflections with a flexible TDPRA receiver has also been studied through sample notch reflection.

  17. Wave-Induced Pressure Under an Internal Solitary Wave and Its Impact at the Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Gustavo; Diamesis, Peter; Jenkins, James; Berzi, Diego

    2015-11-01

    The bottom boundary layer (BBL) under a mode-1 internal solitary wave (ISW) of depression propagating against an oncoming model barotropic current is examined using 2-D direct numerical simulation based on a spectral multidomain penalty method model. Particular emphasis is placed on the diffusion into the bed of the pressure field driven by the wake and any near-bed instabilities produced under specific conditions. To this end, a spectral nodal Galerkin approach is used for solving the diffusion equation for the wave-induced pressure. At sufficiently high ISW amplitude, the BBL undergoes a global instability which produces intermittent vortex shedding from within the separation bubble in the lee of the wave. The interplay between the bottom shear stress field and pressure perturbations during vortex ejection events and the subsequent evolution of the vortices is examined. The potential for bed failure upon the passage of the ISW trough and implications for resuspension of bottom particulate matter are both discussed in the context of specific sediment transport models.

  18. Effects of the ring current and plasmasphere on ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere based on the GEMSIS-RC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K.; Amano, T.; saito, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Matsumoto, Y.; Umeda, T.; Miyashita, Y.; Ebihara, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Acceleration mechanisms of electrons to cause drastic variation of the Earth's outer radiation belt is one of outstanding issues of the geospace researches. While the radial diffusion of the electrons driven by ULF waves has been considered as one of the candidate mechanisms, efficiency of the mechanism under realistic ULF characteristics and distribution is far from understood. GEMSIS (Geospace Environment Modeling System for Integrated Studies) of STEL, Nagoya University, is the observation-based modeling project for understanding energy and mass transportation from the Sun to the Earth in the geospace environment. Aiming at understanding the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere during the geospace storms, the GEMSIS-Magnetosphere working team has developed a new physics-based model for the global dynamics of the ring current (GEMSIS-RC model). The GEMSIS-RC model is a self-consistent and kinetic numerical simulation code solving the five-dimensional collisionless drift-kinetic equation for the ring-current ions in the inner-magnetosphere coupled with Maxwell equations. We applied the GEMSIS-RC model for simulation of global distribution of ULF waves to test its capability of describing fast time scale phenomena like SCs and ULF waves. Two cases of background profile, i.e., cases without/with plasmapause in the simulation domain, are compared. The result shows that existence of plasmapause strengthens ULFs outside the plasmapause and widens the MLT region where the E_r (toroidal) component is excited from initially-given E_phi (poloidal) component. Comparison between runs with/without ring current ions show that the existence of hot ring current ions can deform and amplify the original sinusoidal waveforms. The deformation causes the energy cascade to higher frequency range (Pc4 and Pc3 ranges). The cascade is more pronounced in the high beta case. Combination with GEMSIS-RB model reproduced rapid radial transport by the drift resonance for ions with drift period

  19. Longitudinal and transverse heating of a relativistic electron bunch induced by a storage ring free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Labat

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The new trend is to operate storage ring based light sources in a “chromatic mode” with a distributed dispersive function in the straight sections for low emittance. The electron bunch heating induced by a storage ring free electron laser (FEL has been investigated for such optics, and exhibits a more complex saturation process as compared to a usual achromatic mode of operation without dispersion in the straight sections. The correlated measured FEL power is then interpreted in terms of the electron bunch heating and compared to theoretical expectations. Experiments performed at UVSOR-II are here reported. The theoretical interpretation of the new saturation phenomenon is then discussed.

  20. Candidates for a possible third-generation gravitational wave detector: comparison of ring-Sagnac and sloshing-Sagnac speedmeter interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttner, S. H.; Danilishin, S. L.; Barr, B. W.; Bell, A. S.; Gräf, C.; Hennig, J. S.; Hild, S.; Houston, E. A.; Leavey, S. S.; Pascucci, D.; Sorazu, B.; Spencer, A. P.; Steinlechner, S.; Wright, J. L.; Zhang, T.; Strain, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    Speedmeters are known to be quantum non-demolition devices and, by potentially providing sensitivity beyond the standard quantum limit, become interesting for third generation gravitational wave detectors. Here we introduce a new configuration, the sloshing-Sagnac interferometer, and compare it to the more established ring-Sagnac interferometer. The sloshing-Sagnac interferometer is designed to provide improved quantum noise limited sensitivity and lower coating thermal noise than standard position meter interferometers employed in current gravitational wave detectors. We compare the quantum noise limited sensitivity of the ring-Sagnac and the sloshing-Sagnac interferometers, in the frequency range, from 5 Hz to 100 Hz, where they provide the greatest potential benefit. We evaluate the improvement in terms of the unweighted noise reduction below the standard quantum limit, and by finding the range up to which binary black hole inspirals may be observed. The sloshing-Sagnac was found to give approximately similar or better sensitivity than the ring-Sagnac in all cases. We also show that by eliminating the requirement for maximally-reflecting cavity end mirrors with correspondingly-thick multi-layer coatings, coating noise can be reduced by a factor of approximately 2.2 compared to conventional interferometers.

  1. Highly adaptive RF excitation scheme based on conformal resonant CRLH metamaterial ring antennas for 7-Tesla traveling-wave magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erni, Daniel; Liebig, Thorsten; Rennings, Andreas; Koster, Norbert H L; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2011-01-01

    We propose an adaptive RF antenna system for the excitation (and manipulation) of the fundamental circular waveguide mode (TE(11)) in the context of high-field (7T) traveling-wave magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The system consists of composite right-/left-handed (CRLH) meta-material ring antennas that fully conforms to the inner surface of the MRI bore. The specific use of CRLH metamaterials is motivated by its inherent dispersion engineering capabilities, which is needed when designing resonant ring structures for virtually any predefined diameter operating at the given Larmor frequency (i.e. 298 MHz). Each functional group of the RF antenna system consists of a pair of subsequently spaced and correspondingly fed CRLH ring antennas, allowing for the unidirectional excitation of propagating, circularly polarized B(1) mode fields. The same functional group is also capable to simultaneously mold an incoming, counter-propagating mode. Given these functionalities we are proposing now a compound scheme (i.e. periodically arranged multiple antenna pairs)--termed as "MetaBore"--that is apt to provide a tailored RF power distribution as well as full wave reflection compensation virtually at any desired location along the bore.

  2. X-ray-induced acoustic computed tomography with an ultrasound transducer ring-array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S.; Nguyen, D. H.; Zarafshani, A.; Ramseyer, C.; Zheng, B.; Liu, H.; Xiang, L.

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and test a unique X-ray-induced acoustic computed tomography system that combines the advantages of high X-ray imaging contrast and high ultrasonic spatial resolution. The system features a 5 MHz 128-element ultrasound transducer ring-array formed into a full circular aperture. A parallel data receiver, which consists of a dedicated 128-channel preamplifier and a 128-channel data acquisition module, provides full tomographic imaging at a speed of up to 25 frames per second. Details of the system design and calibration are presented, along with the characteristic results of the imaging resolution. The tomographic imaging performance is demonstrated through images of a phantom with a spatial resolution up to 138 μm. The study results indicate that this imaging device and the methodology provide a rapid and high resolution approach for the dynamic imaging of information, and it may have the potential for becoming a promising noninvasive imaging modality to be used in future applications.

  3. Tree ring carbon isotopes record predisposition to drought-induced mortality and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, N.; Allen, C.; Levanič, T.; Marshall, L.

    2009-04-01

    Drought-induced tree mortality is predicted to increase in intensity and frequency in mid-latitude regions over the next 50 years. We report on tree ring records of growth and carbon isotope discrimination in a variety of species from N. America and Europe that demonstrate a consistent pattern of predisposition to mortality during drought. Trees that die show greater sensitivity of growth to climate as has been previously demonstrated. Trees that die; however, have consistently lower discrimination and significantly less sensitivity of discrimination to climate than trees that survive. A simple hydraulic model based on Darcy's law successfully recreated the observed patterns of discrimination, and supports the interpretation that trees that die have consistently lower leaf-level stomatal conductance than trees that survive. Furthermore, the model supports the conclusion that these trees are less responsive to inter-annual climate variation due to chronic water stress. It appears that such chronic water stress predisposes trees to mortality. Consideration of the sensitivity of these isotope records to mesophyll conductance, photosynthetic capacity, photorespiration, and carbon recyling is critical to robust conclusions. Continued intensification of drought in mid-latitude regions may force trees undergoing chronic water stress to undergo increased mortality, resulting in ecotone shifts and regional mortality events in temperate forests.

  4. Mechanism of laser-induced plasma shock wave evolution in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Rui; Liang Zhong-Cheng; Han Bing; Zhang Hong-Chao; Xu Rong-Qing; Lu Jian; Ni Xiao-Wu

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe the mechanism of laser-induced plasma shock wave evolution in air. To verify the validity of the theoretical model, an optical beam deflection technique is employed to track the plasma shock wave evolution process. The theoretical model and the experimental signals are found to be in good agreement with each other. It is shown that the laser-induced plasma shock wave undergoes formation, increase and decay processes; the increase and the decay processes of the laser-induced plasma shock wave result from the overlapping of the compression wave and the rarefaction wave, respectively. In addition, the laser-induced plasma shock wave speed and pressure distributions, both a function of distance, are presented.

  5. Parameterization of ocean wave-induced mixing processes for finite water depth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yongzeng; ZHAN Run; TENG Yong

    2009-01-01

    Three dimensional wave-induced mixing plays an important role in shallow water area. A quite direct approach through the Reynolds average upon characteristic length scale is proposed to parameterize the horizontal and vertical shallow water mixing. Comparison of finite depth case with infinite depth results indicates that the difference of the wave-induced mixing strength is evident. In the shallow water condition, the infinite water depth approximation overestimates the mixing strength in the lower layers. The nonzero horizontal wave-induced mixing presents anisotropic property near the shore. The Prandtl's mixing length theory underestimated the wave-induced mixing in the previous studies.

  6. Modeling of random wave transformation with strong wave-induced coastal currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jinhai; H. Mase; Li Tongfei

    2008-01-01

    The propagation and transformation of multi-directional and uni-directional random waves over a coast with complicated bathymetric and geometric features are studied experimentally and numerically. Laboratory investigation indicates that wave energy convergence and divergence cause strong coastal currents to develop and inversely modify the wave fields. A coastal spectral wave model, based on the wave action balance equation with diffraction effect (WABED), is used to simulate the transformation of random waves over the complicated bathymetry. The diffraction effect in the wave model is derived from a parabolic approximation of wave theory, and the mean energy dissipation rate per unit horizontal area due to wave breaking is parameterized by the bore-based formulation with a breaker index of 0.73. The numerically simulated wave field without considering coastal currents is different from that of experiments, whereas model results considering currents clearly reproduce the intensification of wave height in front of concave shorelines.

  7. Intraluminal bubble dynamics induced by lithotripsy shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Bai, Jiaming; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been the first option in the treatment of calculi in the upper urinary tract since its introduction. ESWL-induced renal injury is also found after treatment and is assumed to associate with intraluminal bubble dynamics. To further understand the interaction of bubble expansion and collapse with the vessel wall, the finite element method (FEM) was used to simulate intraluminal bubble dynamics and calculate the distribution of stress in the vessel wall and surrounding soft tissue during cavitation. The effects of peak pressure, vessel size, and stiffness of soft tissue were investigated. Significant dilation on the vessel wall occurs after contacting with rapid and large bubble expansion, and then vessel deformation propagates in the axial direction. During bubble collapse, large shear stress is found to be applied to the vessel wall at a clinical lithotripter setting (i.e. 40 MPa peak pressure), which may be the mechanism of ESWL-induced vessel rupture. The decrease of vessel size and viscosity of soft tissue would enhance vessel deformation and, consequently, increase the generated shear stress and normal stresses. Meanwhile, a significantly asymmetric bubble boundary is also found due to faster axial bubble expansion and shrinkage than in radial direction, and deformation of the vessel wall may result in the formation of microjets in the axial direction. Therefore, this numerical work would illustrate the mechanism of ESWL-induced tissue injury in order to develop appropriate counteractive strategies for reduced adverse effects.

  8. Seismic attenuation due to wave-induced flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pride, S.R.; Berryman, J.G.; Harris, J.M.

    2003-10-09

    Analytical expressions for three P-wave attenuation mechanisms in sedimentary rocks are given a unified theoretical framework. Two of the models concern wave-induced flow due to heterogeneity in the elastic moduli at mesoscopic scales (scales greater than grain sizes but smaller than wavelengths). In the first model, the heterogeneity is due to lithological variations (e.g., mixtures of sands and clays) with a single fluid saturating all the pores. In the second model, a single uniform lithology is saturated in mesoscopic ''patches'' by two immiscible fluids (e.g., air and water). In the third model, the heterogeneity is at ''microscopic'' grain scales (broken grain contacts and/or micro-cracks in the grains) and the associated fluid response corresponds to ''squirt flow''. The model of squirt flow derived here reduces to proper limits as any of the fluid bulk modulus, crack porosity, and/or frequency is reduced to zero. It is shown that squirt flow is incapable of explaining the measured level of loss (10{sup -2} < Q{sup -1} < 10{sup -1}) within the seismic band of frequencies (1 to 10{sup 4} Hz); however, either of the two mesoscopic scale models easily produce enough attenuation to explain the field data.

  9. Wave-induced stresses and pore pressures near a mudline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Sawicki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for the determination of water-wave induced stresses inseabeds composed of granular soils are based on Biot-type models, in which the soilskeleton is treated as an elastic medium. Such methods predict effective stressesin the soil that are unacceptable from the physical point of view, as they permittensile stresses to occur near the upper surface of the seabed. Therefore, in thispaper the granular soil is assumed to behave as an elastic-ideally plastic material,with the Coulomb-Mohr yield criterion adopted to bound admissible stress states inthe seabed. The governing equations are solved numerically by a~finite differencemethod. The results of simulations, carried out for the case of time-harmonicwater waves, illustrate the depth distributions of the excess pore pressures and theeffective stresses in the seabed, and show the shapes of zones of soil in the plastic state.~In particular, the effects on the seabed behaviour of suchparameters as the degree of pore water saturation, the soil permeability, and theearth pressure coefficient, are illustrated.

  10. Shock-Induced Borehole Waves and Fracture Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H.; Smeulders, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    We perform wave experiments using a vertical shock tube setup. Shock waves are generated by the rupture of a thin membrane. In the test section, the incident pressure waves generate borehole-guided waves along water-saturated samples. The tube is equipped with side wall gages and a mobile pressure p

  11. Shock-Induced Borehole Waves and Fracture Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H.; Smeulders, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    We perform wave experiments using a vertical shock tube setup. Shock waves are generated by the rupture of a thin membrane. In the test section, the incident pressure waves generate borehole-guided waves along water-saturated samples. The tube is equipped with side wall gages and a mobile pressure p

  12. Widely tunable, narrow line width and low optical noise continuous-wave all fiber Er:Yb co-doped double-clad ring laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guesmi, Khmaies; Bahloul, Faouzi; Semaan, Georges; Meng, Yichang; Salhi, Mohamed; Sanchez, François

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report a widely tunable, narrow linewidth, low noise continuous-wave double-clad Er:Yb doped fiber ring laser. Tunability is demonstrated in wide range spanning from 1520 to almost 1620 nm covering the C and L spectral bands. The cavity design is optimized in order to achieve the largest tuning range with very high optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The output coupling ratio greatly influences the tuning range of the laser while the position of the spectral filter determines the SNR. The obtained laser exhibits a tuning range over 98 nm with a nearly constant SNR of about 58.5 dB.

  13. Brillouin/Raman compensation of the Kerr-effect-induced bias in a nonlinear ring laser gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhang; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zhihong; Liu, Ken; Ye, Weimin; Zeng, Chun; Ji, Jiarong

    2013-04-01

    In this Letter, the beat frequency at rest of a ring laser gyroscope with nonlinear effects is discussed in detail. Even without an additional intensity-stabilizing system, the random nullshift bias induced by the Kerr effect is compensated by the phase shift associated with the stimulated Brillouin/Raman scattering. And the nonlinear stimulated scattering also serves as the gain mechanism of the gyroscope. And thus the influence of the fluctuation of the injected pump intensity on the beat frequency is eliminated.

  14. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  15. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-08-25

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence.

  16. Spurious shear induced by the tree rings of the LSST CCDs

    CERN Document Server

    Okura, Yuki; May, Morgan; Tamagawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the impact of the tree rings seen in the candidate sensors of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) on galaxy-shape measurements. The tree rings are a consequence of transverse electric fields caused by circularly symmetric impurity gradients in the silicon of the sensors. They effectively modify the pixel area and shift the photogenerated charge around, displacing the observed photon positions. The displacement distribution generates distortions that cause spurious shears correlated with the tree-rings patterns, potentially biasing cosmic shear measurements. In this paper we quantify the amplitude of the spurious shear caused by the tree rings on the LSST candidate sensors, and calculate its 2-point correlation function. We find that 2-point correlation function of the spurious shear on an area equivalent to the LSST field of view is order of about $10^{-13}$, providing a negligible contribution to the 2-point correlation of the cosmic shear signal. Additional work is underway,...

  17. Wave-induced release of methane : littoral zones as a source of methane in lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Hilmar; Federwisch, Luisa; Peeters, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the role of surface waves and the associated disturbance of littoral sediments for the release and later distribution of dissolved methane in lakes. Surface wave field, wave-induced currents, acoustic backscatter strength, and the concentration and distribution of dissolved methane were measured simultaneously in Lake Constance, Germany. The data indicate that surface waves enhance the release of dissolved methane in the shallow littoral zone via burst-like releases of...

  18. Benzoylureas as removable cis amide inducers: synthesis of cyclic amides via ring closing metathesis (RCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Ryan M; Khakham, Yelena; Lessene, Guillaume; Baell, Jonathan B

    2011-02-07

    Rapid and high yielding synthesis of medium ring lactams was made possible through the use of a benzoylurea auxiliary that serves to stabilize a cisoid amide conformation, facilitating cyclization. The auxiliary is released after activation under the mild conditions required to deprotect a primary amine, such as acidolysis of a Boc group in the examples given here. This methodology is a promising tool for the synthesis of medium ring lactams, macrocyclic natural products and peptides.

  19. Charge Order Induced in an Orbital Density-Wave State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Takimoto, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent angle resolved photoemission measurements [D. V. Evtushinsky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 147201 (2010)] and evidence of the density-wave state for the charge and orbital ordering [J. García et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 107202 (2012)] in La0.5Sr1.5MnO4, the issue of charge and orbital ordering in a two-orbital tight-binding model for layered manganite near half doping is revisited. We find that the charge order with the ordering wavevector 2{Q} = (π ,π ) is induced by the orbital order of d-/d+-type having B1g representation with a different ordering wavevector Q, where the orbital order as the primary order results from the strong Fermi-surface nesting. It is shown that the induced charge order parameter develops according to TCO - T by decreasing the temperature below the orbital ordering temperature TCO, in addition to the usual mean-field behavior of the orbital order parameter. Moreover, the same orbital order is found to stabilize the CE-type spin arrangement observed experimentally below TCE < TCO.

  20. The criterion of gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry in summer polar mesopause region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jiyao(徐寄遥); WU; Yongfu(吴永富); WANG; Yongmei(王咏梅); FU; Liping(傅利平)

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of photochemistry on the gravity wave instability in summer polar mesopause region. The calculation method of the effects of eddy viscosity, conductivity and eddy diffusion of chemical species on the gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry are studied. The critical wavelength of the instability is given in this paper. The influences of some parameters on it are discussed. The study shows that the gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry is sensitive to the temperature and atomic oxygen profiles.

  1. Frequency translation of light waves by propagation around an optical ring circuit containing a frequency shifter: II. Theoretical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K; Horiguchi, T; Koyamada, Y

    1994-05-20

    Theoretical aspects of the frequency-translation ring circuit are considered through numerical simulations. We analyze the signal and noise propagation around an optical ring circuit that contains a frequency shifter, an erbium-doped fiber amplifier and a bandpass filter (BPF). The relations between the frequency-translation limit and some important parameters such as the BPF bandwidth and the polarization state are clarified. Numerical results for the frequency-translation limit are compared with reported experiments and a frequency translation of more than 100 GHz is predicted.

  2. Rosmarinic Acid Alleviates the Endothelial Dysfunction Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Rat Aortic Rings via Activation of AMPK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction is the key player in the development and progression of vascular events. Oxidative stress is involved in endothelial injury. Rosmarinic acid (RA is a natural polyphenol with antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigates the protective effect of RA on endothelial dysfunction induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Compared with endothelium-denuded aortic rings, the endothelium significantly alleviated the decrease of vasoconstrictive reactivity to PE and KCl induced by H2O2. H2O2 pretreatment significantly injured the vasodilative reactivity to ACh in endothelium-intact aortic rings in a concentration-dependent manner. RA individual pretreatment had no obvious effect on the vasoconstrictive reaction to PE and KCl, while its cotreatment obviously mitigated the endothelium-dependent relaxation impairments and the oxidative stress induced by H2O2. The RA cotreatment reversed the downregulation of AMPK and eNOS phosphorylation induced by H2O2 in HAEC cells. The pretreatment with the inhibitors of AMPK (compound C and eNOS (L-NAME wiped off RA’s beneficial effects. All these results demonstrated that RA attenuated the endothelial dysfunction induced by oxidative stress by activating the AMPK/eNOS pathway.

  3. Nonbreaking wave-induced mixing in upper ocean during tropical cyclones using coupled hurricane-ocean-wave modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijaz, S.; Ghantous, M.; Babanin, A. V.; Ginis, I.; Thomas, B.; Wake, G.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of turbulence generated by nonbreaking waves have been investigated by testing and evaluating a new nonbreaking wave parameterization in a coupled hurricane-ocean-wave model. The MPI version of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) with hurricane forcing is coupled with the WAVEWATCH-III (WW3) surface wave model. Hurricane Ivan is chosen as the test case due to its extreme intensity and availability of field data during its passage. The model results are validated against field observations of wave heights and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the National Data Buoy Centre (NDBC) during Hurricane Ivan and against limited in situ current and bottom temperature data. A series of numerical experiments is set up to examine the influence of the nonbreaking wave parameterization on the mixing of upper ocean. The SST response from the modeling experiments indicates that the nonbreaking wave-induced mixing leads to significant cooling of the SST and deepening of the mixed layer. It was found that the nondimensional constant b1 in the nonbreaking wave parameterization has different impacts on the weak and the strong sides of the storm track. A constant value of b1 leads to improved predictions on the strong side of the storm while a steepness-dependent b1 provides a better agreement with in situ observations on the weak side. A separate simulation of the intense tropical cyclone Olwyn in north-west Australia revealed the same trend for b1 on the strong side of the tropical cyclone.

  4. Nucleotide-induced asymmetry within ATPase activator ring drives σ54-RNAP interaction and ATP hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; Nixon, B. Tracy [IIT; (Penn)

    2013-12-10

    It is largely unknown how the typical homomeric ring geometry of ATPases associated with various cellular activities enables them to perform mechanical work. Small-angle solution X-ray scattering, crystallography, and electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions revealed that partial ATP occupancy caused the heptameric closed ring of the bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) NtrC1 to rearrange into a hexameric split ring of striking asymmetry. The highly conserved and functionally crucial GAFTGA loops responsible for interacting with σ54–RNA polymerase formed a spiral staircase. We propose that splitting of the ensemble directs ATP hydrolysis within the oligomer, and the ring's asymmetry guides interaction between ATPase and the complex of σ54 and promoter DNA. Similarity between the structure of the transcriptional activator NtrC1 and those of distantly related helicases Rho and E1 reveals a general mechanism in homomeric ATPases whereby complex allostery within the ring geometry forms asymmetric functional states that allow these biological motors to exert directional forces on their target macromolecules.

  5. Sintering-induced Dust Ring Formation in Protoplanetary Disks: Application to the HL Tau Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Sirono, Sin-iti; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    The latest observation of HL Tau by ALMA revealed spectacular concentric dust rings in its circumstellar disk. We attempt to explain the multiple ring structure as a consequence of aggregate sintering. Sintering is a process that reduces the sticking efficiency of dust aggregates, and takes place where the temperature is slightly below the sublimation point of some constituent material. We here present a dust growth model that incorporates sintering, and use it to simulate global dust evolution in a modeled HL Tau disk taking into account coagulation, fragmentation, and radial inward drift. We show that the aggregates collisionally disrupt and pile up at multiple locations where different volatiles cause sintering. At wavelengths of 0.87--1.3 mm, these "sintering zones" appear as bright, optically thick rings with spectral slope $\\approx$ 2, whereas the non-sintering zones as darker, optically thinner rings of spectral slope $\\approx$ 2.3--2.5, consistent with major bright and dark rings found in the HL Tau d...

  6. Spatial-mode-interaction-induced dispersive-waves and their active tuning in microresonators

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Qi-Fan; Yang, Ki Youl; Vahala, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear propagation of optical pulses in dielectric waveguides and resonators provides a laboratory to investigate a wide range of remarkable interactions. Many of the resulting phenomena find applications in optical systems. One example is dispersive wave generation, the optical analog of Cherenkov radiation. These waves have an essential role in fiber spectral broadeners that are routinely used in spectrocopy and metrology. Dispersive waves form when a soliton pulse begins to radiate power as a result of higher-order dispersion. Recently, dispersive wave generation in microcavities has been reported by phase matching the waves to dissipative Kerr cavity (DKC) solitons. Here, it is shown that spatial mode interactions within a microcavity can also be used to induce dispersive waves. These interactions are normally avoided altogether in DKC soliton generation. The soliton self frequency shift is also shown to induce fine tuning control of the dispersive wave frequency. Both this mechanism and spatial mo...

  7. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM) and its ring-substituted halogenated analogs (ring-DIMs) induce differential mechanisms of survival and death in androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Alexander A; Draz, Hossam; Montes-Grajales, Diana; Olivero-Verbél, Jesus; Safe, Stephen H; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2015-05-01

    We recently reported that novel ring-substituted analogs of 3,3'-diindolylmethane (ring-DIMs) induce apoptosis and necrosis in androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancer cells. In this paper, we have focused on the mechanism(s) associated with ring-DIM-mediated cell death, and on identifying the specific intracellular target(s) of these compounds. The 4,4'- and 7,7'-dichloroDIMs and 4,4'- and 7,7'-dibromoDIMs induced the death of LNCaP, C42B and DU145 prostate cancer cells, but not that of immortalized normal human prostate epithelial (RWPE-1) cells. Ring-DIMs caused the early loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and decreased mitochondrial ATP generation in prostate cancer cells. Cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, inhibited ring-DIM-mediated cell death, and salubrinal, an inhibitor of ER stress, inhibited cell death mediated only by 4,4'-dihaloDIMs. We found that although salubrinal did not inhibit the onset of ER stress, it prevented 4,4'-dibromoDIM mediated loss of MMP. Salubrinal potentiated cell death in response to 7,7'-dihaloDIMs and DIM, and this effect concurred with increased loss of MMP. Using in silico 3-D docking affinity analysis, we identified Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) as a potential direct target for the most toxic ring-DIM, 4,4'-dibromoDIM. An inhibitor of CaMKII, KN93, but not its inactive analog KN92, abrogated cell death mediated by 4,4'-dibromoDIM. The ring-DIMs induced ER stress and autophagy, but these processes were not necessary for ring-DIM-mediated cell death. Inhibition of autophagy with bafilomycin A1, 3-methyladenine or by LC3B gene silencing sensitized LNCaP and C42B, but not ATG5-deficient DU145 cells to ring-DIM- and DIM-mediated cell death. We propose that autophagy induced by the ring-DIMs and DIM has a cytoprotective function in prostate cancer cells.

  8. Research on the Wave-Induced Ship Motions in Front of Different Types of Wharf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan Bao; Jiang, Xue Lian

    One important function of the port is to protect ship or some other facilities from wave attack so as to stably handle cargoes. In current design codes, there are mainly two expressions of the tranquility standard of harbor basin: one is the acceptable wave height in front of wharf; the other is the tolerable amplitude of ship motion. However, ship motions are affected by some more factors simultaneously, such as wave frequency, wave height, incident wave direction, ship properties and wharf type. This paper presents some computed results of the wave-induced ship motions on the basis of a port case in China. First, the Simple Green Function method is employed to solve and compare the 2-dimension hydrodynamic coefficients in front of open or bulkhead wharf. The results show a great difference between them. Then, this paper computes and discusses the ship motions in front of open wharf at different wave frequencies and incident wave directions.

  9. Implementation of electromagnetically induced transparency in a metamaterial controlled with auxiliary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Nakanishi, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial to realize true electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), where the incidence of an auxiliary electromagnetic wave called the control wave induces transparency for a probe wave. The analogy to the original EIT effect in an atomic medium is shown through analytical and numerical calculations derived from a circuit model for the metamaterial. We performed experiments to demonstrate the EIT effect of the metamaterial in the microwave region. The width and position of the transparent region can be controlled by the power and frequency of the control wave. We also observed asymmetric transmission spectra unique to the Fano resonance.

  10. Experimental and theoretical investigations on shock wave induced phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Satish C.; Sikka, S. K.

    2001-06-01

    Shock wave loading of a material can cause variety of phase transitions, like polymorphism, amorphization, metallization and molecular dissociations. As the shocked state lasts only for a very short duration (about a few microseconds or less), in-situ microscopic measurements are very difficult. Although such studies are beginning to be possible, most of the shock-induced phase transitions are detected using macroscopic measurements. The microscopic nature of the transition is then inferred from comparison with static pressure data or interpreted by theoretical methods. For irreversible phase transitions, microscopic measurements on recovered samples, together with orientation relations determined from selected area electron diffraction and examination of the morphology of growth of the new phase can provide insight into mechanism of phase transitions. On theoretical side, the current ab initio band structure techniques based on density functional formalism provide capability for accurate computation of the small energy differences (a few mRy or smaller) between different plausible structures. Total energy calculation along the path of a phase transition can furnish estimates of activation barrier, which has implications for understanding kinetics of phase transitions. Molecular dynamics calculations, where the new structure evolves naturally, are becoming increasingly popular especially for understanding crystal to amorphous phase transitions. Illustrations from work at our laboratory will be presented.

  11. Characterization of electron clouds in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator using TE-wave transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Santis, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Billing, M.; Palmer, M.; Sikora, J.; Carlson, B.

    2010-01-02

    A relatively new technique for measuring the electron cloud density in storage rings has been developed and successfully demonstrated [S. De Santis, J.M. Byrd, F. Caspers, A. Krasnykh, T. Kroyer, M.T.F. Pivi, and K.G. Sonnad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 094801 (2008).]. We present the experimental results of a systematic application of this technique at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator. The technique is based on the phase modulation of the TE mode transmitted in a synchrotron beam pipe caused by the periodic variation of the density of electron plasma. Because of the relatively simple hardware requirements, this method has become increasingly popular and has been since successfully implemented in several machines. While the principles of this technique are straightforward, quantitative derivation of the electron cloud density from the measurement requires consideration of several effects, which we address in detail.

  12. Dispersive radiation induced by shock waves in passive resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguti, Stefania; Conforti, Matteo; Trillo, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    We show that passive Kerr resonators pumped close to zero dispersion wavelengths on the normal dispersion side can develop the resonant generation of linear waves driven by cavity (mixed dispersive-dissipative) shock waves. The resonance mechanism can be successfully described in the framework of the generalized Lugiato-Lefever equation with higher-order dispersive terms. Substantial differences with radiation from cavity solitons and purely dispersive shock waves dispersion are highlighted.

  13. A modified criterion for wave-induced momentary liquefaction of sandy seabed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Gang Qi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the wave-induced soil liquefaction plays a key role in the geotechnical design for offshore foundations. The underlying shortcomings of the existing momentary liquefaction criteria are identified and clarified by mechanism analyses and the recent field observations. A modified criterion for the wave-induced momentary liquefaction of a sandy seabed is given to describe the vertical pore-pressure distributions. An improved approximation of the momentary liquefaction depth is further presented. Parametric study of the effects of the saturation degree of soils indicates that this modification is significant for the evaluation of wave-induced momentary liquefaction.

  14. Analytical Solution for Wave-Induced Response of Seabed with Variable Shear Modulus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A plane strain analysis based on the generalized Biot's equation is utilized to investigate the wave-induced response of a poro-elastic seabed with variable shear modulus. By employing integral transform and Frobenius methods, the transient and steady solutions for the wave-induced pore water pressure, effective stresses and displacements are analytically derived in detail. Verification is available through the reduction to the simple case of homogeneous seabed. The numerical results indicate that the inclusion of variable shear modulus significantly affects the wave-induced seabed response.

  15. Thon rings from amorphous ice and implications of beam-induced Brownian motion in single particle electron cryo-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, G; Vinothkumar, K R; Henderson, R

    2015-11-01

    We have recorded dose-fractionated electron cryo-microscope images of thin films of pure flash-frozen amorphous ice and pre-irradiated amorphous carbon on a Falcon II direct electron detector using 300 keV electrons. We observe Thon rings [1] in both the power spectrum of the summed frames and the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. The Thon rings from amorphous carbon images are always more visible in the power spectrum of the summed frames whereas those of amorphous ice are more visible in the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. This difference indicates that while pre-irradiated carbon behaves like a solid during the exposure, amorphous ice behaves like a fluid with the individual water molecules undergoing beam-induced motion. Using the measured variation in the power spectra amplitude with number of electrons per image we deduce that water molecules are randomly displaced by a mean squared distance of ∼1.1 Å(2) for every incident 300 keV e(-)/Å(2). The induced motion leads to an optimal exposure with 300 keV electrons of 4.0 e(-)/Å(2) per image with which to observe Thon rings centred around the strong 3.7 Å scattering peak from amorphous ice. The beam-induced movement of the water molecules generates pseudo-Brownian motion of embedded macromolecules. The resulting blurring of single particle images contributes an additional term, on top of that from radiation damage, to the minimum achievable B-factor for macromolecular structure determination.

  16. The gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry in summer polar mesopause region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effect of diabatic process due to the photochemical heating and cooling on the gravity wave propagation in middle atmosphere is studied. A linear gravity wave model which considers the diabatic process is established. The unstable region and the growth rate of the gravity wave caused by photochemistry are calculated. And the comparison between the model and the adiabatic gravity wave theory of pure dynamics is made. The results indicate that the photochemical heating process can induce the instability of gravity wave at mesopause. The intensity of the instability becomes stronger as the temperature decreases. The temperature feature and the altitude characteristics of the instability are consistent with the observation. Therefore, the instability of the gravity wave induced by photochemistry may be an important mechanism in polar mesopause region in summer.

  17. Universal mechanism for breaking the hc/2e periodicity of flux-induced oscillations in small superconducting rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakaryuk, Victor

    2008-10-17

    A universal mechanism of restoration of minimal hc/e periodicity in the response of small superconducting rings or cylinders to the magnetic flux is proposed. The mechanism is based on the dependence of the Cooper pair's internal energy on its motion as a whole and does not rely on the presence of quasiparticles in the system. The thermal equilibrium hc/2e periodicity is broken by an offset of the transition between different current-carrying states. The magnitude of the offset is calculated for an s-wave superconducting cylinder of radius R in the limit R>xi_{0}, where xi_{0} is the BCS coherence length and turns out to be exponentially small. A possible enhancement of the effect for nodal superconductors is suggested. Similar conclusions should also apply to the response of charged or neutral superfluids to rotation.

  18. Noise-induced standing waves in oscillatory systems with time-delayed feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Stich, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In oscillatory reaction-diffusion systems, time-delay feedback can lead to the instability of uniform oscillations with respect to formation of standing waves. Here, we investigate how the presence of additive, Gaussian white noise can induce the appearance of standing waves. Combining analytical solutions of the model with spatio-temporal simulations, we find that noise can promote standing waves in regimes where the deterministic uniform oscillatory modes are stabilized. As the deterministic phase boundary is approached, the spatio-temporal correlations become stronger, such that even small noise can induce standing waves in this parameter regime. With larger noise strengths, standing waves could be induced at finite distances from the (deterministic) phase boundary. The overall dynamics is defined through the interplay of noisy forcing with the inherent reaction-diffusion dynamics.

  19. Wave-induced stress and estimation of its driven effect on currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Fu; GAO Shan; WANG Wei; QIAN Chengchun

    2004-01-01

    A genuine geostrophic small amplitude wave solution is deduced for the first time from the general form of linear fluid dynamic equations with the f-plane approximation, where the horizontal component of angular velocity of the earth rotation is taken into account. The Coriolisinduced stress obtained from this solution consists of lateral and reverse component, while its first order approximation is reduced to the result of Hasselmann or Xu Zhigang. Accordingly,combining the Coriolis-induced wave stress with the virtual wave stress proposed by Longuet-Higgins, the ratio of total wave-induced stress to wind stress on the sea surface is estimated, through which the importance of the wave-induced stress is emphasized in the study of the currents in the seas around China, especially in the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea.

  20. Spin current-induced by a sound wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapilin, Igor I

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of conduction electrons with a longitudinal sound wave propagating in a crystal in a constant magnetic field is investigated. It is shown that the transverse spin current arises when the longitudinal sound wave propagation through the system. The average power absorbed by the spin subsystem of the conduction electrons and the spin-Hall conductivity have a resonant character.

  1. Rice chalky ring formation caused by temporal reduction in starch biosynthesis during osmotic adjustment under foehn-induced dry wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Hiroshi; Masumoto-Kubo, Chisato; Gholipour, Yousef; Nonami, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Fukuyo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Tsutsumi, Koichi; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Morita, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Foehn-like extreme hot and dry wind conditions (34°C, >2.5 kPa vapor pressure deficit, and 7 m s(-1)) strongly affect grain quality in rice (Oryza sativa L.). This is a current concern because of the increasing frequency and intensity of combined heat and water-deficit stress under climate change. Foehn-induced dry wind conditions during the grain-filling stage increase ring-shaped chalkiness as a result of spatiotemporal reduction in starch accumulation in the endosperm, but kernel growth is sometimes maintained by osmotic adjustment. Here, we assess the effects of dry wind on chalky ring formation in environmentally controlled growth chambers. Our results showed that hot and dry wind conditions that lasted for >24 h dramatically increased chalky ring formation. Hot and dry wind conditions temporarily reduced panicle water potential to -0.65 MPa; however, kernel growth was maintained by osmotic adjustment at control levels with increased transport of assimilate to the growing kernels. Dynamic tracer analysis with a nano-electrospray-ionization Orbitrap mass spectrometer and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that starch degradation was negligible in the short-term treatment. Overall expression of starch synthesis-related genes was found to be down-regulated at moderately low water potential. Because the events observed at low water potential preceded the packing of starch granules in cells, we concluded that reduced rates of starch biosynthesis play a central role in the events of cellular metabolism that are altered at osmotic adjustment, which leads to chalky ring formation under short-term hot and dry wind conditions.

  2. Multiple scattering induced negative refraction of matter waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsker, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Starting from fundamental multiple scattering theory it is shown that negative refraction indices are feasible for matter waves passing a well-defined ensemble of scatterers. A simple approach to this topic is presented and explicit examples for systems of scatterers in 1D and 3D are stated that imply negative refraction for a generic incoming quantum wave packet. Essential features of the effective scattering field, densities and frequency spectrum of scatterers are considered. Additionally it is shown that negative refraction indices allow perfect transmission of the wave passing the ensemble of scatterers. Finally the concept of the superlens is discussed, since it is based on negative refraction and can be extended to matter waves utilizing the observations presented in this paper which thus paves the way to ‘untouchable’ quantum systems in analogy to cloaking devices for electromagnetic waves. PMID:26857266

  3. Ship-induced solitary Riemann waves of depression in Venice Lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parnell, Kevin E. [College of Marine and Environmental Sciences and Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Sciences, James Cook University, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Soomere, Tarmo, E-mail: soomere@cs.ioc.ee [Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Estonian Academy of Sciences, Kohtu 6, 10130 Tallinn (Estonia); Zaggia, Luca [Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council, Castello 2737/F, 30122 Venice (Italy); Rodin, Artem [Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Lorenzetti, Giuliano [Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council, Castello 2737/F, 30122 Venice (Italy); Rapaglia, John [Sacred Heart University Department of Biology, 5151 Park Avenue, Fairfield, CT 06825 (United States); Scarpa, Gian Marco [Università Ca' Foscari, Dorsoduro 3246, 30123 Venice (Italy)

    2015-03-06

    We demonstrate that ships of moderate size, sailing at low depth Froude numbers (0.37–0.5) in a navigation channel surrounded by shallow banks, produce depressions with depths up to 2.5 m. These depressions (Bernoulli wakes) propagate as long-living strongly nonlinear solitary Riemann waves of depression substantial distances into Venice Lagoon. They gradually become strongly asymmetric with the rear of the depression becoming extremely steep, similar to a bore. As they are dynamically similar, air pressure fluctuations moving over variable-depth coastal areas could generate meteorological tsunamis with a leading depression wave followed by a devastating bore-like feature. - Highlights: • Unprecedently deep long-living ship-induced waves of depression detected. • Such waves are generated in channels with side banks under low Froude numbers. • The propagation of these waves is replicated using Riemann waves. • Long-living waves of depression form bore-like features at rear slope.

  4. Four waves of hepatocyte proliferation linked with three waves of hepatic fat accumulation during partial hepatectomy-induced liver regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Zou

    Full Text Available Partial hepatectomy (PH triggers hepatocyte proliferation-mediated liver repair and is widely used to study the mechanisms governing liver regeneration in mice. However, the dynamics of the hepatocyte proliferative response to PH remain unclear. We found that PH-induced mouse liver regrowth was driven by four consecutive waves of hepatocyte replication. The first wave exhibited the highest magnitude followed by two moderate waves and one minor wave. Underlying this continuous hepatocyte replication was persistent activation of cell cycle components throughout the period of liver regeneration. Hepatocyte mitotic activity in the first three proliferative cycles showed a circadian rhythm manifested by three corresponding mitosis peaks, which were always observed at Zeitgeber time 0. The Bmal1-Clock/Wee1/Cdc2 pathway has been proposed by others to govern the circadian rhythm of hepatocyte mitosis during liver regeneration. However, we did not observe the correlations in the expression or phosphorylation of these proteins in regenerating livers. Notably, Bmal1 protein displayed frequent changes in hepatic distribution and cellular localization as the liver regrowth progressed. Further, three waves of hepatic fat accumulation occurred during hepatic regeneration. The first started before and lasted through the first round of hepatocyte proliferation, whereas the second and third occurred concomitantly with the second and third mitotic peaks, respectively.PH-induced liver regeneration consists of four continuous waves of hepatocyte proliferation coupled with three waves of hepatic fat accumulation. Bmal1, Wee1, and Cdc2 may not form a pathway regulating the circadian rhythm of hepatocyte mitosis during liver regeneration.

  5. Storage of Electromagnetic Waves in a Metamaterial that Mimics Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Tamayama, Yasuhiro; Kitano, Masao

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method for dynamically controlling the properties of a metamaterial that mimics electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) by introducing varactor diodes to manipulate the structural symmetry of the metamaterial. Dynamic modulation of the EIT property enables the storage and retrieval of electromagnetic waves. We confirmed that the electromagnetic waves were stored and released, while maintaining the phase distribution in the propagating direction.

  6. Wave-induced nearshore circulation along the Calangute-Candolim beach, Goa, West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumar, V.; Murty, C.S.; Heblekar, A.K.

    The wave-induced nearshore circulation model suggested by Noda has been modified and applied for three small segments along the coast of Goa. The present model incorporates the prevailing bottom topography and considers its variation along...

  7. Ultrasound-induced thermal therapy of hyperplasia in ringed expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (eptfe) access grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Query, Michael Earl

    Hemodialysis vascular access, the interface between a dialysis patient and a dialysis machine, is quite literally the lifeblood of a patient's health. Vascular access dysfunction is the leading cause of hospitalization in hemodialysis patients. The occlusive growth of neointimal hyperplasia (NH) in expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) ringed grafts is the primary cause of failure. To further develop a proposed thermal ultrasound treatment to reduce or prevent NH in arteriovenous vascular grafts, the acoustic properties of ePTFE were studied in water and alcohol solutions. Previous reports of ePTFE acoustic properties are critiqued. It was found that the acoustic transmission and attenuation through ePTFE, and therefore the potential for an ultrasound-based therapy for NH, are heavily dependent on the medium in which the graft is immersed, suggesting that the acoustic properties of implanted grafts will change as grafts mature in vivo. The acoustic impedance and attenuation of water-soaked ePTFE were 0.478 +/- 1.43 x 10-2 MRayl and 1.78 +/- 0.111 Np/cm*MHz, respectively, while the acoustic impedance and attenuation of ePTFE in alcohol were 1.49 +/- 0.149 MRayl and 0.77 +/- 1.1 x 10-2 Np/cm*MHz, respectively. The use of focused ultrasound to heat implanted ringed ePTFE grafts was numerically modeled from 1.35- and 1.443-MHz transducers for in vitro geometries. Power deposition and heating, in turn, differed by an order of magnitude between various graft acoustic properties. Graft rings were predicted to be substantial absorbing and scattering features. In vitro phantom models were constructed: one with and one without thermocouples. At 1 W of acoustic power, the maximum temperature rise was 8˚ C. The thermocouple model containing a water-soaked graft did not experience heating in the far graft wall. The MRTI model confirmed that the graft rings are an absorbing/scattering feature. Heating was not prevented in the presence of water flow through the graft. Water

  8. Boussinesq modeling of wave-induced hydrodynamics in coastal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Agnimitro; Brandt, Steven R.; Chen, Qin; Shi, Fengyan

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, an improved formulation of the vegetation drag force, applicable for the fully nonlinear Boussinesq equations and based on the use of the depth-varying, higher-order expansion of the horizontal velocity, in the quadratic vegetation drag law has been presented. The model uses the same numerical schemes as FUNWAVE TVD but is based on the CACTUS framework. The model is validated for wave height and setup, against laboratory experiments with and without vegetation cover. The wave attenuation results using the improved formulation were compared with those using the first-order reference velocity as well as with analytical solutions using linear wave theory. The analytical solution using the depth-varying velocity, predicted by the linear wave theory, was shown to match the model results with the fully expanded velocity approach very well for all wave cases, except under near-emergent and emergent conditions (when the ratio of stem height to water depth is greater than 0.75) and when the Ursell (Ur) number is less than 5. Simulations during peak storm waves, during Hurricane Isaac, showed that vegetation is very effective in reducing setup on platforms and in reducing the wave energy within the first few hundred meters.

  9. A hydrodynamic model of nearshore waves and wave-induced currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khaled Seif

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In This study develops a quasi-three dimensional numerical model of wave driven coastal currents with accounting the effects of the wave-current interaction and the surface rollers. In the wave model, the current effects on wave breaking and energy dissipation are taken into account as well as the wave diffraction effect. The surface roller associated with wave breaking was modeled based on a modification of the equations by Dally and Brown (1995 and Larson and Kraus (2002. Furthermore, the quasi-three dimensional model, which based on Navier-Stokes equations, was modified in association with the surface roller effect, and solved using frictional step method. The model was validated by data sets obtained during experiments on the Large Scale Sediment Transport Facility (LSTF basin and the Hazaki Oceanographical Research Station (HORS. Then, a model test against detached breakwater was carried out to investigate the performance of the model around coastal structures. Finally, the model was applied to Akasaki port to verify the hydrodynamics around coastal structures. Good agreements between computations and measurements were obtained with regard to the cross-shore variation in waves and currents in nearshore and surf zone.

  10. Primordial Gravitational Waves Induced by Magnetic Fields in Ekpyrotic Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Asuka

    2016-01-01

    Both inflationary and ekpyrotic scenarios can account for the origin of the large scale structure of the universe. It is often said that detecting primordial gravitational waves is the key to distinguish both scenarios. We show that this is not true if the gauge kinetic function is present in the ekpyrotic scenario. In fact, primordial gravitational waves sourced by the gauge field can be produced in an ekpyrotic universe. We also study scalar fluctuations sourced by the gauge field and show that it is negligible compared to primordial gravitational waves. This comes from the fact that the fast roll condition holds in ekpyrotic models.

  11. Flow and sediment transport induced by a plunging solitary wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Sen, M.Berke; Karagali, Ioanna

    2011-01-01

    , and for observation of the morphological changes. The two experimental conditions were maintained as similar as possible. The experiments showed that the complete sequence of the plunging solitary wave involves the following processes: Shoaling and wave breaking; Runup; Rundown and hydraulic jump; and Trailing wave...... affected, by as much as a factor of 2, in the runup and hydraulic jump stages. The pore-water pressure measurements showed that the sediment at (or near) the surface of the bed experiences upward-directed pressure gradient forces during the downrush phase. The magnitude of this force can reach values...

  12. Flexural waves induced by electro-impulse deicing forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gien, P. H.

    1990-01-01

    The generation, reflection and propagation of flexural waves created by electroimpulsive deicing forces are demonstrated both experimentally and analytically in a thin circular plate and a thin semicylindrical shell. Analytical prediction of these waves with finite element models shows good correlation with acceleration and displacement measurements at discrete points on the structures studied. However, sensitivity to spurious flexural waves resulting from the spatial discretization of the structures is shown to be significant. Consideration is also given to composite structures as an extension of these studies.

  13. A modified criterion for wave-induced momentary liquefaction of sandy seabed

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Gang Qi; Fu-Ping Gao

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of the wave-induced soil liquefaction plays a key role in the geotechnical design for offshore foundations. The underlying shortcomings of the existing momentary liquefaction criteria are identified and clarified by mechanism analyses and the recent field observations. A modified criterion for the wave-induced momentary liquefaction of a sandy seabed is given to describe the vertical pore-pressure distributions. An improved approximation of the momentary liquefaction depth is f...

  14. Influence of thermal effects induced by nonlinear absorption on four-wave mixing in silicon waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Chen, Yaohui; Yvind, Kresten

    2014-01-01

    Influence of thermal effects induced by nonlinear absorption on four-wave mixing in silicon waveguides is investigated. A conversion bandwidth reduction up to 63% is observed in simulation due to the thermal effects.......Influence of thermal effects induced by nonlinear absorption on four-wave mixing in silicon waveguides is investigated. A conversion bandwidth reduction up to 63% is observed in simulation due to the thermal effects....

  15. Traveling solitary wave induced by nonlocality in dispersive shock wave generation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Hélène; Odent, Vincent; Louvergneaux, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Shock waves are well-known nonlinear waves, displaying an abrupt discontinuity. Observation can be made in a lot of physical fields, as in water wave, plasma and nonlinear optics. Shock waves can either break or relax through either catastrophic or regularization phenomena. In this work, we restrain our study to dispersive shock waves. This regularization phenomenon implies the emission of dispersive waves. We demonstrate experimentally and numerically the generation of spatial dispersive shock waves in a nonlocal focusing media. The generation of dispersive shock wave in a focusing media is more problematic than in a defocusing one. Indeed, the modulational instability has to be frustrated to observe this phenomenon. In 2010, the dispersive shock wave was demonstrated experimentally in a focusing media with a partially coherent beam [1]. Another way is to use a nonlocal media [2]. The impact of nonlocality is more important than the modulational instability frustration. Here, we use nematic liquid crystals (NLC) as Kerr-like nonlocal medium. To achieve shock formation, we use the Riemann condition as initial spatial condition (edge at the beam entrance of the NLC cell). In these experimental conditions, we generate, experimentally and numerically, shock waves that relax through the emission of dispersive waves. Associated with this phenomenon, we evidence the emergence of a localized wave that travels through the transverse beam profile. The beam steepness, which is a good indicator of the shock formation, is maximal at the shock point position. This latter follows a power law versus the injected power as in [3]. Increasing the injected power, we found multiple shock points. We have good agreements between the numerical simulations and the experimental results. [1] W. Wan, D. V Dylov, C. Barsi, and J. W. Fleischer, Opt. Lett. 35, 2819 (2010). [2] G. Assanto, T. R. Marchant, and N. F. Smyth, Phys. Rev. A - At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 78, 1 (2008). [3] N. Ghofraniha, L. S

  16. Hydralazine decreases sodium nitroprusside-induced rat aortic ring relaxation and increased cGMP production by rat aortic myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, Horacio; González-Romo, Pilar; Alvarez, Ezequiel; Alcaide, Carlos; Orallo, Francisco

    2005-10-28

    Association of hydralazine with nitrova-sodilators has long been known to be beneficial in the vasodilator treatment of heart failure. We previously found that hydralazine appeared to reduce the increase in cGMP induced by sodium nitroprusside in cultured rat aortic myocytes. In order to further explore this seemingly paradoxical interaction, we extended our initial observations in rat aortic myocytes and also determined the influence of hydralazine on sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation of rat aortic rings. Hydralazine produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of sodium nitroprusside stimulation of cGMP production and caused a rightward shift of concentration-relaxation curves in aortic rings. A possible mechanism of the hydralazine-nitroprusside interaction could be the interference with bioactivation of the nitro-vasodilator to release nitric oxide. Recent evidence indicates that vascular NADH oxidase, an enzyme known to be inhibited by hydralazine, could be involved in this process. Accordingly, hydralazine was found to inhibit NADH oxidase activity in rat aortic myocytes at concentrations similar to those reducing sodium nitroprusside responses. It was concluded that antagonism of sodium nitroprusside action by hydralazine could be a consequence of interference with bioactivation of the former, apparently through inhibition of vascular NADH oxidase.

  17. Determination of hydrocarbon levels in water via laser-induced acoustics wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidin, Noriah; Hossenian, Raheleh; Duralim, Maisarah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Marsin, Faridah Mohd; Nughro, Waskito; Zainal, Jasman

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination in water is a major environmental concern in terms of foreseen collapse of the natural ecosystem. Hydrocarbon level in water was determined by generating acoustic wave via an innovative laser-induced breakdown in conjunction with high-speed photographic coupling with piezoelectric transducer to trace acoustic wave propagation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG (40 mJ) was focused in cuvette-filled hydrocarbon solution at various concentrations (0-2000 ppm) to induce optical breakdown, shock wave generation and later acoustic wave propagation. A nitro-dye (ND) laser (10 mJ) was used as a flash to illuminate and frozen the acoustic wave propagation. Lasers were synchronised using a digital delay generator. The image of acoustic waves was grabbed and recorded via charged couple device (CCD) video camera at the speed of 30 frames/second with the aid of Matrox software version 9. The optical delay (0.8-10.0 μs) between the acoustic wave formation and its frozen time is recorded through photodetectors. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) was used to trace the acoustic wave (sound signal), which cascades to a digital oscilloscope. The acoustic speed is calculated from the ratio of acoustic wave radius (1-8 mm) and optical time delay. Acoustic wave speed is found to linearly increase with hydrocarbon concentrations. The acoustic signal generation at higher hydrocarbon levels in water is attributed to supplementary mass transfer and impact on the probe. Integrated high-speed photography with transducer detection system authenticated that the signals indeed emerged from the laser-induced acoustic wave instead of photothermal processes. It is established that the acoustic wave speed in water is used as a fingerprint to detect the hydrocarbon levels.

  18. Geometric phase and Pancharatnam phase induced by light wave polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Lages, J; Vigoureux, J -M

    2013-01-01

    We use the quantum kinematic approach to revisit geometric phases associated with polarizing processes of a monochromatic light wave. We give the expressions of geometric phases for any, unitary or non-unitary, cyclic or non-cyclic transformations of the light wave state. Contrarily to the usually considered case of absorbing polarizers, we found that a light wave passing through a polarizer may acquire in general a non zero geometric phase. This geometric phase exists despite the fact that initial and final polarization states are in phase according to the Pancharatnam criterion and can not be measured using interferometric superposition. Consequently, there is a difference between the Pancharatnam phase and the complete geometric phase acquired by a light wave passing through a polarizer. We illustrate our work with the particular example of total reflection based polarizers.

  19. Measurement and modelling of bed shear induced by solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.

    to combined waves and current. Ocean Engineering, 29(7): 753-768. Coussot, P., 1997. Mudflow rheology and dynamics, xvi, Balkema, Rotterdam, 255 pp. DHI, 2009. Mike21 flow model - hydrodynamic module - scientific documentation. DHI, Denmark, 60 pp...

  20. Transport of Spin-Polarized Current Through a Mesoscopic Ring with Two Leads Induced by Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher Phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ying-Fang; ZHANG Yong-Ping; LIANG Jiu-Qing

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study the transport of spin-polarized current induced by the Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher phases in a mesoscopic ring with two leads in the presence of a cylindrically symmetric electric field and the magnetic flux at the centre of the same ring. An exact solution for the quantum transport is obtained. It is shown that the transport spin-polarized current and its polarizability can be controlled by the electric field and the magnetic flux as well.

  1. Wave-particle interactions induced by SEPAC on Spacelab 1 Wave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, W. W. L.; Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Sasaki, S.; Yanagisawa, M.; Burch, J. L.; Reasoner, D. L.; Roberts, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) flew on Spacelab 1 in November and December 1983. SEPAC included an accelerator which emitted electrons into the ionospheric plasma with energies up to 5 keV and currents up to 300 mA. The SEPAC equipment also included an energetic plasma generator, a neutral gas generator, and an extensive array of diagnostics. The diagnostics included plasma wave detectors, and energetic electron analyzer, a photometer, a high sensitivity television camera, a Langmuir probe and a pressure gage. Twenty-eight experiments were performed during the mission to investigate beam-plasma interactions, electron beam dynamics, plasma beam propagation, and vehicle charging. The wave-particle interactions were monitored by the plasma wave instrumentation, by the energetic electron detector and by the optical detectors. All show evidence of wave-particle interactions, which are described in this paper.

  2. Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, V. E.; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse is analyzed within the kinetic approach. It is shown that the most efficient source of plasma waves is the nonlinear current arising due to the gradient of the energy density of the high-frequency field. Generation of plasma waves by the drag current is usually less efficient but not negligibly small at relatively high frequencies of electron–ion collisions. The influence of electron collisions on the excitation of plasma waves by pulses of different duration is described quantitatively.

  3. Volcano-induced regime shifts in millennial tree-ring chronologies from northeastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaretti, Fabio; Arseneault, Dominique; Nicault, Antoine; Perreault, Luc; Bégin, Yves

    2014-07-15

    Dated records of ice-cap growth from Arctic Canada recently suggested that a succession of strong volcanic eruptions forced an abrupt onset of the Little Ice Age between A.D. 1275 and 1300 [Miller GH, et al. (2012) Geophys Res Lett 39(2):L02708, 10.1029/2011GL050168]. Although this idea is supported by simulation experiments with general circulation models, additional support from field data are limited. In particular, the Northern Hemisphere network of temperature-sensitive millennial tree-ring chronologies, which principally comprises Eurasian sites, suggests that the strongest eruptions only caused cooling episodes lasting less than about 10 y. Here we present a new network of millennial tree-ring chronologies from the taiga of northeastern North America, which fills a wide gap in the network of the Northern Hemisphere's chronologies suitable for temperature reconstructions and supports the hypothesis that volcanoes triggered both the onset and the coldest episode of the Little Ice Age. Following the well-expressed Medieval Climate Anomaly (approximately A.D. 910-1257), which comprised the warmest decades of the last millennium, our tree-ring-based temperature reconstruction displays an abrupt regime shift toward lower average summer temperatures precisely coinciding with a series of 13th century eruptions centered around the 1257 Samalas event and closely preceding ice-cap expansion in Arctic Canada. Furthermore, the successive 1809 (unknown volcano) and 1815 (Tambora) eruptions triggered a subsequent shift to the coldest 40-y period of the last 1100 y. These results confirm that series of large eruptions may cause region-specific regime shifts in the climate system and that the climate of northeastern North America is especially sensitive to volcanic forcing.

  4. Mode decoupling in solid state ring laser based on stimulated Raman effect in polar crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zhang; Yuan Xiao-Dong; Ye Wei-Min; Zeng Chun; Ji Jia-Rong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the gain saturation induced mode-coupling control in solid state ring laser devices based on the stimulated Raman effect of the polar crystals in order to realize solid state ring laser gyroscopes. We theoretically investigate the mode coupling induced by gain saturation between clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) propagating laser modes. Because the CW and CCW running waves are pumped with counter-propagating lasers respectively, the independent coexistence can be ensured.

  5. Excitation of Light-Induced Acoustic Waves in Doped Lithium Niobate Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The phenomena of acoustic emission in doped lithium niobate crystals were observed in the process of light-induced quasi-breakdown. It is found that the ultrasonic waves introduce into the crystal have been modulated by the low frequency acoustic waves. Its frequency increases with the rise of the intensity of incident light and its jump period of breakdown is the same as that of the photovoltaic current Ic, the change of light-induced refractive index Δn and the diffracted light intensity L. This effect was explained with the interaction of the three waves and resonant state theory. The experimental results and the theoretical analysis are in conformity.

  6. Enhanced acceleration of injected electrons in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, S Ya; Narang, R; Filip, C V; Musumeci, P; Clayton, C E; Yoder, R B; Marsh, K A; Rosenzweig, J B; Pellegrini, C; Joshi, C

    2004-03-05

    Enhanced energy gain of externally injected electrons by a approximately 3 cm long, high-gradient relativistic plasma wave (RPW) is demonstrated. Using a CO2 laser beat wave of duration longer than the ion motion time across the laser spot size, a laser self-guiding process is initiated in a plasma channel. Guiding compensates for ionization-induced defocusing (IID) creating a longer plasma, which extends the interaction length between electrons and the RPW. In contrast to a maximum energy gain of 10 MeV when IID is dominant, the electrons gain up to 38 MeV energy in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

  7. Simulation of Wave-Plus-Current Induced Scour Beneath Submarine Pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltard-Larsen, Bjarke; Fuhrman, David R.; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    of combined wave-plus-current scour processes beneath pipelines. The results of 77 simulated wave-plus-current scour cases will be presented and analysed. The cases considered will consist of waves characterized by 10 different Keulegan-Carpenter numbers, KC=UmTw/D and up to eight different values of m......-plus-current environments. The present study, which is published in Larsen et al. (2016) focuses on the numerical simulation of wave-plus-current induced scour beneath submarine pipelines, based on a model solving Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, fully coupled with turbulence closure, bed and suspended...... load sediment transport descriptions, and a seabed morphological model. The model was utilized in simulating breaker bar development by Jacobsen et al. (2014) and has been used in simulating wave induced scour beneath pipelines by Fuhrman et al. (2014) . The model is utilized for the numerical study...

  8. Vascular ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... Vascular ring is rare. It accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition ...

  9. Controlling the profile of ion-cyclotron-resonant ions in JET with the wave-induced pinch effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Ingesson, L. C.; Johnson, T.; Kiptily, V. G.; Mayoral, M. L.; Sharapov, S. E.; Alper, B.; Bertalot, L.; Conroy, S.; Eriksson, L. G.; Hellsten, T.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Popovichev, S.; Righi, E.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments on the JET tokamak show that the wave-induced pinch in the presence of toroidally asymmetric waves can provide a tool for controlling the profile of ion-cyclotron-resonant He-3 ions. Direct evidence for the wave-induced pinch has been obtained from the measured gamma-ray emission profile

  10. Reduction in courtship behavior induced by DDE in male ringed turtle doves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, M.A.; Hudson, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of p,p?-DDE on the intensity of male Ringed Turtle Doves? courtship behavior were determined for dietary levels of 10 ppm and 50 ppm (dry weight). Pairs of doves were placed in cages for 12.5 min on 5 consecutive days for behavioral observation before dietary treatment and for periods 31-35 and 5963 days after initiation of the treated diet. Total amount of time spent displaying courtship behavior and bow-coo frequency were analyzed through video tape recording..... The 50.ppm diet caused a reduction in total courtship activity time and in bow-coo frequency for both posttreatment observation periods. The 10-ppm diet did not affect bow-coo frequency and total activity time at 31-35 days but did cause a significant reduction in courtship behavior during the 59-63.day observation period. The DDE residues found in the male Ringed Turtle Doves showing reduced courtship behavior were lower than residues found in many species of birds that have shown reproductive failures in the wild.

  11. Bifurcation analysis of delay-induced patterns in a ring of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, Markus; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2013-09-28

    Rings of delay-coupled neurons possess a striking capability to produce various stable spiking patterns. In order to reveal the mechanisms of their appearance, we present a bifurcation analysis of the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) system with delayed feedback as well as a closed loop of HH neurons. We consider mainly the effects of external currents and communication delays. It is shown that typically periodic patterns of different spatial form (wavenumber) appear via Hopf bifurcations as the external current or time delay changes. The Hopf bifurcations are shown to occur in relatively narrow regions of the external current values, which are independent of the delays. Additional patterns, which have the same wavenumbers as the existing ones, appear via saddle-node bifurcations of limit cycles. The obtained bifurcation diagrams are evidence for the important role of communication delays for the emergence of multiple coexistent spiking patterns. The effects of a short-cut, which destroys the rotational symmetry of the ring, are also briefly discussed.

  12. Extreme Wave-Induced Oscillation in Paradip Port Under the Resonance Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Gulshan

    2017-08-01

    A mathematical model is constructed to analyze the long wave-induced oscillation in Paradip Port, Odisha, India under the resonance conditions to avert any extreme wave hazards. Boundary element method (BEM) with corner contribution is utilized to solve the Helmholtz equation under the partial reflection boundary conditions. Furthermore, convergence analysis is also performed for the boundary element scheme with uniform and non-uniform discretization of the boundary. The numerical scheme is also validated with analytic approximation and existing studies based on harbor resonance. Then, the amplification factor is estimated at six key record stations in the Paradip Port with multidirectional incident waves and resonance modes are also estimated at the boundary of the port. Ocean surface wave field is predicted in the interior of Paradip Port for the different directional incident wave at various resonance modes. Moreover, the safe locations in the port have been identified for loading and unloading of moored ship with different resonance modes and directional incident waves.

  13. Dispersive waves induced by self-defocusing temporal solitons in a beta-barium-borate crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally observe dispersive waves in the anomalous dispersion regime of a beta-barium-borate (BBO) crystal, induced by a self-defocusing few-cycle temporal soliton. Together the soliton and dispersive waves form an energetic octave-spanning supercontinuum. The soliton was excited...... in the normal dispersion regime of BBO through a negative cascaded quadratic nonlinearity. Using pump wavelengths from 1.24 to 1.4 μm, dispersive waves are found from 1.9 to 2.2 μm, agreeing well with calculated resonant phasematching wavelengths due to degenerate four-wave mixing to the soliton. We also...... observe resonant radiation from nondegenerate four-wave mixing between the soliton and a probe wave, which was formed by leaking part of the pump spectrum into the anomalous dispersion regime. We confirm the experimental results through simulations....

  14. Dispersive waves induced by self-defocusing temporal solitons in a beta-barium-borate crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2015-09-15

    We experimentally observe dispersive waves in the anomalous dispersion regime of a beta-barium-borate (BBO) crystal, induced by a self-defocusing few-cycle temporal soliton. Together the soliton and dispersive waves form an energetic octave-spanning supercontinuum. The soliton was excited in the normal dispersion regime of BBO through a negative cascaded quadratic nonlinearity. Using pump wavelengths from 1.24 to 1.4 μm, dispersive waves are found from 1.9 to 2.2 μm, agreeing well with calculated resonant phase-matching wavelengths due to degenerate four-wave mixing to the soliton. We also observe resonant radiation from nondegenerate four-wave mixing between the soliton and a probe wave, which was formed by leaking part of the pump spectrum into the anomalous dispersion regime. We confirm the experimental results through simulations.

  15. Coherent π-electron dynamics of (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses: angular momentum and ring current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineo, H; Lin, S H; Fujimura, Y

    2013-02-21

    The results of a theoretical investigation of coherent π-electron dynamics for nonplanar (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are presented. Expressions for the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current are derived by using the density matrix method. The time dependence of these coherences is determined by the off-diagonal density matrix element, which can be obtained by solving the coupled equations of motion of the electronic-state density matrix. Dephasing effects on coherent angular momentum and ring current are taken into account within the Markov approximation. The magnitudes of the electronic angular momentum and current are expressed as the sum of expectation values of the corresponding operators in the two phenol rings (L and R rings). Here, L (R) denotes the phenol ring in the left (right)-hand side of (P)-2,2'-biphenol. We define the bond current between the nearest neighbor carbon atoms Ci and Cj as an electric current through a half plane perpendicular to the Ci-Cj bond. The bond current can be expressed in terms of the inter-atomic bond current. The inter-atomic bond current (bond current) depends on the position of the half plane on the bond and has the maximum value at the center. The coherent ring current in each ring is defined by averaging over the bond currents. Since (P)-2,2'-biphenol is nonplanar, the resultant angular momentum is not one-dimensional. Simulations of the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current of (P)-2,2'-biphenol excited by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are carried out using the molecular parameters obtained by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method. Oscillatory behaviors in the time-dependent angular momentum (ring current), which can be called angular momentum (ring current) quantum beats, are classified by the symmetry of the coherent state, symmetric or antisymmetric. The bond current of the bridge bond linking the L and R

  16. "J waves" induced after short coupling intervals: a manifestations of latent depolarization abnormality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Nakayama, Masafumi; Sato, Masahito; Okabe, Masaaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Takatsuki, Seiji; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2017-04-24

    To confirm the presence of tachycardia-induced slur or notch in the terminal portion of the QRS complexes in a general patient population. A tachycardia-induced J wave was defined as a slur or notch in the terminal portion of the QRS complexes newly induced at short RR intervals during atrial premature contractions (APCs) or atrial electrical stimulation in the electrophysiological study (EPS). Twenty-three out of 2000 patients with general diseases were involved. All patients with aborted sudden cardiac death, ventricular fibrillation or a family history of sudden cardiac death were excluded. The mean age was 72 ± 9 years, and 11 patients were male (47.8%). When the RR interval was shortened from 821 ± 142 ms to 464 ± 52 ms in the conducted APCs (P waves became diagnostic (0.02 ± 0.03 mV to 0.20 ± 0.07 mV, P waves were confined to the inferior leads in 22 (95.7%) patients and were notched in 11 (47.8%) and slurred in 12 (52.2%) patients. The induction of J waves was accompanied by visible changes of the QRS morphology. When the post-APC RR interval was prolonged to 992 ± 305 ms (P = 0.0154 vs. baseline), the J waves were similar to baseline levels. During the EPS, J wave induction was confirmed during atrial stimulation. There were no characteristic clinical or ECG features in the patients with tachycardia-induced J waves. J waves can be newly induced by short RR intervals in a general patient population, and a conduction delay is the likely mechanism causing such J waves.

  17. Experimental and numerical study of wave-induced backfilling beneath submarine pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayraktar, Deniz; Ahmad, Joseph; Eltard-Larsen, Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    utilizing a fully-coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic CFD model. The numerical simulations demonstrate the ability of the model to predict backfilling towards expected equilibrium scour depths based on the new wave climate, with time scales reasonably inline with experimental expectations....... velocities, synchronized flow visualizations using digital image technology, along with live-bed scour and backfilling measurements. Each experiment is based on a two-stage process: (1) initial scour induced by a pure current, followed by: (2) backfilling induced by pure waves (either regular or irregular...... primarily by the Shields parameter).The developed expression is strictly valid for the current-to-wave backfilling scenarios considered, while likely serving as an upper limit for more general wave-induced backfilling circumstances. The experiments are complemented by similar backfilling simulations...

  18. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitfield, A. J., E-mail: ashley.whitfield.12@ucl.ac.uk; Johnson, E. R., E-mail: e.johnson@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  19. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, A. J.; Johnson, E. R.

    2014-05-01

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  20. Influence of clay content on wave-induced liquefaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    of measurements were carried out: (1) pore-water pressure measurements across the soil depth and (2) water-surface elevation measurements. These measurements were synchronized with video recordings of the liquefaction process from the side. The ranges of the various quantities in the experiments were wave height......:17 mmwas partially liquefied with CC as small as 2.9%. Remarks are made as to how to check for liquefaction of clayey soils exposed to waves in real-life situations......This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (CC) on liquefaction of seabed beneath progressive waves. Experiments were, for the most part, conducted with silt and silt-clay mixtures; in supplementary tests, sand-clay mixtures were used. Two types...

  1. Thermally-induced vacuum instability in a single plane wave

    CERN Document Server

    King, B; Di Piazza, A

    2012-01-01

    Ever since Schwinger published his influential paper [J. Schwinger, Phys. Rev. \\textbf{82}, 664 (1951)], it has been unanimously accepted that the vacuum is stable in the presence of an electromagnetic plane wave. However, we advance an analysis that indicates this statement is not rigorously valid in a real situation, where thermal effects are present. We show that the thermal vacuum, in the presence of a single plane-wave field, even in the limit of zero frequency (a constant crossed field), decays into electron-positron pairs. Interestingly, the pair-production rate is found to depend nonperturbatively on both the amplitude of the constant crossed field and on the temperature.

  2. Fatty acid synthesis and pyruvate metabolism pathways remain active in dihydroartemisinin-induced dormant ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nanhua; LaCrue, Alexis N; Teuscher, Franka; Waters, Norman C; Gatton, Michelle L; Kyle, Dennis E; Cheng, Qin

    2014-08-01

    Artemisinin (ART)-based combination therapy (ACT) is used as the first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria worldwide. However, despite high potency and rapid action, there is a high rate of recrudescence associated with ART monotherapy or ACT long before the recent emergence of ART resistance. ART-induced ring-stage dormancy and recovery have been implicated as possible causes of recrudescence; however, little is known about the characteristics of dormant parasites, including whether dormant parasites are metabolically active. We investigated the transcription of 12 genes encoding key enzymes in various metabolic pathways in P. falciparum during dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-induced dormancy and recovery. Transcription analysis showed an immediate downregulation for 10 genes following exposure to DHA but continued transcription of 2 genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins. Transcription of several additional genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins, particularly of genes encoding enzymes in pyruvate metabolism and fatty acid synthesis pathways, was also maintained. Additions of inhibitors for biotin acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase and enoyl-acyl carrier reductase of the fatty acid synthesis pathways delayed the recovery of dormant parasites by 6 and 4 days, respectively, following DHA treatment. Our results demonstrate that most metabolic pathways are downregulated in DHA-induced dormant parasites. In contrast, fatty acid and pyruvate metabolic pathways remain active. These findings highlight new targets to interrupt recovery of parasites from ART-induced dormancy and to reduce the rate of recrudescence following ART treatment.

  3. Nonlinear optical signatures of ultraviolet light-induced ring opening in α-terpinene

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Brantley A.; Molesky, Brian P.; Montoni, Nicholas P.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2013-02-01

    Photoinduced electrocyclic ring opening reactions in conjugated cylcoalkenes are among the most elementary processes in organic chemistry. One prototypical ring opening reaction transforms cyclohexadiene into hexatriene. It is known that a sequence of sub-100 fs internal conversion transitions precedes bond breaking in cyclohexadiene and some of its derivatives. However, these excited state dynamics have never been directly monitored in solution because of insufficient time resolution. Here we aim to uncover the extraordinary photophysics behind related ultrafast internal conversion processes in a derivative of cyclohexadiene, α-terpinene (α-TP), solvated in cyclohexane. Transient absorption anisotropy experiments conducted with 20 fs laser pulses at 267 nm expose non-exponential depopulation kinetics for the ππ* electronic state of α-TP. Our data show that population transfer rapidly accelerates within the first 100 fs after photoexcitation. In addition, recurrences in two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) line shapes reveal strong vibronic coupling in a normal mode near 523 cm-1, which involves torsions of the C=C bonds and hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP) wagging on a vinyl group. With the support of several experiments, we hypothesize that the excited state wavepacket in α-TP undergoes several recurrences in the C=C stretching coordinate before displacement along the C=C torsion/vinyl HOOP coordinate finally sets it free from the Franck-Condon region of the potential energy surface. The unconfined wavepacket departs the ππ* electronic state by way of a conical intersection with a lower energy excited state. The present observations are made possible by recent improvements to both the time resolution and detection sensitivity of our experimental setup. This work demonstrates that it is now possible to acquire 2DPE signals in the deep ultraviolet, which are comparable with high-quality measurements in the visible spectral region. These technical developments

  4. Mass transport induced by internal Kelvin waves beneath shore-fast ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    StøYlen, Eivind; Weber, Jan Erik H.

    2010-03-01

    A one-layer reduced-gravity model is used to investigate the wave-induced mass flux in internal Kelvin waves along a straight coast beneath shore-fast ice. The waves are generated by barotropic tidal pumping at narrow sounds, and the ice lid introduces a no-slip condition for the horizontal wave motion. The mean Lagrangian fluxes to second order in wave steepness are obtained by integrating the equations of momentum and mass between the material interface and the surface. The mean flow is forced by the conventional radiation stress for internal wave motion, the mean pressure gradient due to the sloping surface, and the frictional drag at the boundaries. The equations that govern the mean fluxes are expressed in terms of mean Eulerian variables, while the wave forcing terms are given by the horizontal divergence of the Stokes flux. Analytical results show that the effect of friction induces a mean Eulerian flux along the coast that is comparable to the Stokes flux. In addition, the horizontal divergence of the total mean flux along the coast induces a small mass flux in the cross-shore direction. This flux changes the mean thickness of the upper layer outside the trapping region and may facilitate geostrophically balanced boundary currents in enclosed basins. This is indeed demonstrated by numerical solutions of the flux equations for confined areas larger than the trapping region. Application of the theory to Arctic waters is discussed, with emphasis on the transport of biological material and pollutants in nearshore regions.

  5. Experimental investigation on the wave-induced pore pressure around shallowly embedded pipelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A series of regular wave experiments have been done in a large-scale wave flume to investigate the wave-induced pore pressure around the submarine shallowly embedded pipelines. The model pipelines are buried in three kinds of soils, including gravel, sand and silt with different burial depth. The input waves change with height and period. The results show that the amplitudes of wave-induced pore pressure increase as the wave period increase, and decay from the surface to the bottom of seabed. Higher pore pressures are recorded at the pipeline top and the lower pore pressures at the bottom, especially in the sand seabed. The normalized pressure around pipeline decreases as the relative water depth, burial depth or scattering parameters increase. For the silt seabed, the wavelet transform has been successfully used to analyze the signals of wave-induced pore pressure, and the oscillatory and residual pore pressure can be extracted by wavelet analysis. Higher oscillatory pressures are recorded at the bottom and the lower pressures at the top of the pipeline. However, higher residual pressures are recorded at the top and the lower pressures at the bottom of the pipeline.

  6. Whistler wave-induced ionospheric plasma turbulence: Source mechanisms and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipta, R.; Rooker, L. A.; Whitehurst, L. N.; Lee, M. C.; Ross, L. M.; Sulzer, M. P.; Gonzalez, S.; Tepley, C.; Aponte, N.; See, B. Z.; Hu, K. P.

    2013-10-01

    We report a series of experiments conducted at Arecibo Observatory in the past, aimed at the investigation of 40.75 kHz whistler wave interactions with ionospheric plasmas and the inner radiation belts at L=1.35. The whistler waves are launched from a Naval transmitter (code-named NAU) operating in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico at the frequency and power of 40.75 kHz and 100 kW, respectively. Arecibo radar, CADI, and optical instruments were used to monitor the background ionospheric conditions and detect the induced ionospheric plasma effects. Four-wave interaction processes produced by whistler waves in the ionosphere can excite lower hybrid waves, which can accelerate ionospheric electrons. Furthermore, whistler waves propagating into the magnetosphere can trigger precipitation of energetic electrons from the radiation belts. Radar and optical measurements can distinguish wave-wave and wave-particle interaction processes occurring at different altitudes. Electron acceleration by different mechanisms can be verified from the radar measurements of plasma lines. To facilitate the coupling of NAU-launched 40.75 kHz whistler waves into the ionosphere, we can rely on naturally occurring spread F irregularities to serve as ionospheric ducts. We can also use HF wave-created ducts/artificial waveguides, as demonstrated in our earlier Arecibo experiments and recent Gakona experiments at HAARP. The newly constructed Arecibo HF heater will be employed in our future experiments, which can extend the study of whistler wave interactions with the ionosphere and the magnetosphere/radiation belts as well as the whistler wave conjugate propagation between Arecibo and Puerto Madryn, Argentina.

  7. On Plasma Rotation Induced by Traveling Fast Alfvin Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; and V.S. Chan

    2001-08-09

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the minority fundamental ion-cyclotron resonance, coupled with finite banana width physics, generates torque distributions and ultimately rotational shear layers in the bulk plasma, even when the toroidal wavenumber k(subscript ''phi'') = n/R of the fast wave vanishes (n=0) and cyclotron absorption introduces no angular momentum nor canonical angular momentum [F.W. Perkins, R.B. White, P.T. Bonoli, and V.S. Chan, Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2181]. The present work extends these results to travelling waves with non-zero n where heating directly introduces angular momentum. Since tokamak fast-wave antennas have approximately one wavelength per toroidal field coil, the toroidal mode number n lies in the range n = 10-20, independent of machine size. A zero-dimensional analysis shows that the rotation rate arising from direct torque is comparable to that of the rotational shear layer and has the same scaling. Nondimensional rotation profiles for n = (-10, 10) show modest changes from the n = 0 case in the expected direction. For a balanced antenna spectrum, the nondimensional rotational profile (averaged over n = -10, 10) lies quite close to the n = 0 profile.

  8. Unfocused extracorporeal shock waves induce anabolic effects in osteoporotic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Jagt, Olav P.; Waarsing, Jan H.; Kops, Nicole; Schaden, Wolfgang; Jahr, Holger; Verhaar, Jan A. N.; Weinans, Harrie

    2013-01-01

    Unfocused extracorporeal shock waves (UESW) have been shown to have an anabolic effect on bone mass. Therefore we investigated the effects of UESW on bone in osteoporotic rats with and without anti-resorptive treatment. Twenty-week-old rats were ovariectomized (n=27). One group was treated with sali

  9. Utilization of sparker induced pressure waves to tenderize meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the feasibility of tenderizing meat using high pressure waves generated from a sparker source. Beef strip loins were cut into steaks from the anterior end and one to two steaks from each strip loin were randomly selected to serve as non-treated controls and the remaining ste...

  10. The sequence of sediment behaviour during wave-induced liquefaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Hatipoglu, Figen; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the complete sequence of sediment behaviour beneath progressive waves. The sediment was silty with d(50) = 0.060 mm. Two kinds of measurements were carried out: pore-water pressure measurements (across the sediment depth), and wa......This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the complete sequence of sediment behaviour beneath progressive waves. The sediment was silty with d(50) = 0.060 mm. Two kinds of measurements were carried out: pore-water pressure measurements (across the sediment depth......), and water-surface elevation measurements. The process of liquefaction/compaction was videotaped from the side simultaneously with the pressure and water-surface elevation measurements. The video records were then analysed to measure: (i) the time development of the mudline, (ii) the time development.......6 sec, water depth = 42 cm, and the Shields parameter = 0.34-0.59. The experiments reveal that, with the introduction of waves, excess pore pressure builds up, which is followed by liquefaction during which internal waves are experienced at the interface of the water body and the liquefied sediment...

  11. The effects of antiepileptic drugs on estrogen-induced electrographic spike-wave discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, R M; Fowler, G W; Danielson, M G

    1975-05-01

    In locally anesthetized, paralyzed cats with bilateral conjugated estrogen (CE)-induced foci in sensory motor cortex, electrographic activity was characterized by 2 to 3 Hz spike and slow wave discharge. Commonly used anti-petit mal drugs (esthosuximide, trimethadione, acetazolamide and diazepam) all reduced CE-induced spike wave activity while diphenylhydantoin converted such activity into 9 to 12 Hz polyspike bursts separated by periods of interictal silence. Correlation appears to exist, therefore, between the ability of the drug to reduce CE-induced spike wave activity and its clinical utility in petit mal epilepsy. In addition to the above compounds, five drugs of less proven utility were evaluated. Of these, two benzodiazepine derivatives (clonazepam and clorazepate) were found to exert a potent and prolonged depressant action on CE-induced activity. The relation of CE to clinical petit mal epilepsy and the potential usefulness of CE as a laboratory model for the evaluation of anti-petit mal drugs are discussed.

  12. Wave-induced extreme water levels in the Puerto Morelos fringing reef lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Torres-Freyermuth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Wave-induced extreme water levels in the Puerto Morelos fringing reef lagoon are investigated by means of a phase-resolving non-hydrostatic wave model (SWASH. This model solves the nonlinear shallow water equations including non-hydrostatic pressure. The one-dimensional version of the model is implemented in order to investigate wave transformation in fringing reefs. Firstly, the numerical model is validated with (i laboratory experiments conducted on a physical model (Demirbilek et al., 2007and (ii field observations (Coronado et al., 2007. Numerical results show good agreement with both experimental and field data. The comparison against the physical model results, for energetic wave conditions, indicates that high- and low-frequency wave transformation is well reproduced. Moreover, extreme water-level conditions measured during the passage of Hurricane Ivan in Puerto Morelos are also estimated by the numerical tool. Subsequently, the model is implemented at different along-reef locations in Puerto Morelos. Extreme water levels, wave-induced setup, and infragravity wave energy are estimated inside the reef lagoon for different storm wave conditions (Hs >2 m. The numerical results revealed a strong correlation between the offshore sea-swell wave energy and the setup. In contrast, infragravity waves are shown to be the result of a more complex pattern which heavily relies on the reef geometry. Indeed, the southern end of the reef lagoon provides evidence of resonance excitation, suggesting that the reef barrier may act as either a natural flood protection morphological feature, or as an inundation hazard enhancer depending on the incident wave conditions.

  13. Linkage of Aromatic Ring Structures in Saturates, Aromatics, Resins and Asphaltenes Fractions of Vacuum Residues Determined by Collision-Induced Dissociation Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei; Liu Yingrong; Liu Zelong; Hou Huandi; Tian Songbai

    2016-01-01

    The linkage of aromatic ring structures in vacuum residues was important for the reifning process. The Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) combined with collision-induced dissociation (CID) is a powerful method to characterize the molecular structure of petroleum fractions. In this work, model compounds with differ-ent aromatic ring structures were measured by CID FT-ICR MS. The cracking of the parent ions and the generated fragment ions were able to distinguish different linkage of the model compounds. Then, vacuum residues were separated into saturates, aromat-ics, resins and asphaltenes fractions (SARA), and each fraction was characterized by CID technology. According to the experi-mental results, the aromatic rings in saturates and aromatics fractions were mainly of the island-type structures, while the aromatic rings in resins and asphaltenes fractions had a signiifcant amount of archipelago-type structures.

  14. Ring blowers. Ring blower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Y.; Okamura, T.; Takahashi, M. (Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-06-10

    Features, structures and several products of ring blowers were outlined. The ring blower is featured by its medium characteristics because it is higher in air pressure than a turboblower and larger in airflow than a vane blower, and it is applicable flexibly to not only air blasting but various industrial fields such as suction transfer. As several products corresponding to various fields, the followings were outlined: the low noise type with optimum shapes of inlet, outlet and casing cover for reducing noises by 10 dB or more, the heat resistant, water-tight and explosion-proof types suitable for severe environmental conditions, the multi-voltage type for every country served at different voltages, the high air pressure type with two pressure rise stages, and the large airflow type with a wide impeller. In addition, as special use products, the glass fiber reinforced unsatulated polyester ring blower for respiration apparatus, and the variable speed blushless DC motor-driven one for medical beds were outlined. 2 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Analytical solution for wave-induced response of isotropic poro-elastic seabed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    By use of separation of variables,the governing equations describing the Biot consolidation model is firstly transformed into a complex coefficient linear homogeneous ordinary differential equation,and the general solution of the horizontal displacement of seabed is constructed by employing a complex wave number,thus,all the explicit analytical solutions of the Biot consolidation model are determined. By comparing with the experimental results and analytical solution of Yamamoto etc. and the analytical solution of Hsu and Jeng,the validity and superiority of the suggested solution are verified. After investigating the influence of seabed depth on the wave-induced response of isotropic poro-elastic seabed based on the present theory,it can be concluded that the influence depth of wave-induced hydrodynamic pressure in the seabed is equal to the wave length.

  16. Numerical simulation of wave-induced scour and backfilling processes beneath submarine pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Baykal, Cüneyt; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    A fully-coupled hydrodynamic/morphodynamic numerical model is presented and utilized for the simulation of wave-induced scour and backfilling processes beneath submarine pipelines. The model is based on solutions to Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations, coupled with k−ω turbulence closure......≤30 demonstrate reasonable match with previous experiments, both in terms of the equilibrium scour depth as well as the scour time scale. Wave-induced backfilling processes are additionally studied by subjecting initial conditions taken from scour simulations with larger KC to new wave climates...... characterized by lower KC values. The simulations considered demonstrate the ability of the model to predict backfilling toward expected equilibrium scour depths based on the new wave climate, in line with experimental expectations. The simulated backfilling process is characterized by two stages: (1...

  17. Analysis of silt behavior induced by water waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the weak non-elastic porous model, the expressions of pore pressure, effective stress and displacements of soil skeletal frame and pore water have been deduced for a finite depth seabed. The distributions of several physical parameters have been analyzed for three kinds of marine sediment, including pore pressure, effective stress, stress angle, displacement of skeletal frame and pore fluid, and the variations of elastic waves with wave period. According to the experimental results, the resonant phenomena in the silt bed and the mechanism underlying such events have been discussed. It is proposed that the existence of a stiff soil layer inside the silt bed is a necessary condition for resonance to occur, and the possible location of resonance can be forecasted.

  18. Stochastic procedures for extreme wave induced responses in flexible ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Jørgen Juncher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Different procedures for estimation of the extreme global wave hydroelastic responses in ships are discussed. Firstly, stochastic procedures for application in detailed numerical studies (CFD are outlined. The use of the First Order Reliability Method (FORM to generate critical wave episodes of short duration, less than 1 minute, with prescribed probability content is discussed for use in extreme response predictions including hydroelastic behaviour and slamming load events. The possibility of combining FORM results with Monte Carlo simulations is discussed for faster but still very accurate estimation of extreme responses. Secondly, stochastic procedures using measured time series of responses as input are considered. The Peak-over-Threshold procedure and the Weibull fitting are applied and discussed for the extreme value predictions including possible corrections for clustering effects.

  19. Irregular Wave-Induced Velocities in Shallow Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    and Acceleration of the Surface of Wind Waves," Rep. Res. Inst. Appl . Mech. (Kyushu Univ.), 24, No. 76, 31-48. 19, Hughes, S.A. (1991) "Estimating...8217 siilk 2 i- (D½ 0 0 411 0 Ursoll No. 0.1 10 100 1000 10000 Ursell No. W (.), z-mid-depth W (#), z-bottom W (-), z-mid-depth W (-), z-bottom (b) Figure 72

  20. Emission of radiation induced by pervading Alfven waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, G. Q. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu, C. S. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China); Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China)

    2013-03-15

    It is shown that under certain conditions, propagating Alfven waves can energize electrons so that consequently a new cyclotron maser instability is born. The necessary condition is that the plasma frequency is lower than electron gyrofrequency. This condition implies high Alfven speed, which can pitch-angle scatter electrons effectively and therefore the electrons are able to acquire free energy which are needed for the instability.

  1. Optical rogue waves and W-shaped solitons in the multiple self-induced transparency system

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    We study localized nonlinear waves on a plane wave background in the multiple self-induced transparency (SIT) system, which describes an important enhancement of the amplification and control of optical waves compared to the single SIT system. A hierarchy of exact multiparametric rational solutions in a compact determinant representation are presented. We demonstrate that, this family of solutions contains known rogue wave solution and unusual W-shaped soliton solution, which strictly corresponds to the linear stability analysis that involves modulation instability and stability regimes in the low perturbation frequency region. State transitions between rogue waves and W-shaped solitons as well as the higher-order nonlinear superposition modes are revealed by the suitable choice for the background wavenumber of electric field component. In particular, our results show that, the multiple SIT system admits stationary and nonstationary nonlinear modes in contrast to the results in the single SIT system. Correspo...

  2. Six-wave mixing induced by free-carrier plasma in silicon nanowire waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Heng; Huang, Shu-Wei; Zhou, Linjie; Qiu, Kun; Wong, Chee Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear wave mixing in mesoscopic silicon structures is a fundamental nonlinear process with broad impact and applications. Silicon nanowire waveguides, in particular, have large third-order Kerr nonlinearity, enabling salient and abundant four-wave-mixing dynamics and functionalities. Besides the Kerr effect, in silicon waveguides two-photon absorption generates high free-carrier densities, with corresponding fifth-order nonlinearity in the forms of free-carrier dispersion and free-carrier absorption. However, whether these fifth-order free-carrier nonlinear effects can lead to six-wave-mixing dynamics still remains an open question until now. Here we report the demonstration of free-carrier-induced six-wave mixing in silicon nanowires. Unique features, including inverse detuning dependence of six-wave-mixing efficiency and its higher sensitivity to pump power, are originally observed and verfied by analytical prediction and numerical modeling. Additionally, asymmetric sideband generation is observed for d...

  3. Evaluation of thermally induced non-Fourier stress wave disturbances via tailored hybrid transfinite element formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate solutions have been obtained for a class of non-Fourier models in dynamic thermoelasticity which are relevant to the understanding of thermally-induced stress wave disturbances. The method employs tailored hybrid formulations based on the transfinite element approach. The results show that significant thermal stresses may arise due to non-Fourier effects, especially when the speeds of propagation of the thermal and stress waves are equal.

  4. The effect of instanton-induced interaction on -wave meson spectra in constituent quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhavyashri; S Sarangi; Godfrey Saldanha; K B Vijaya Kumar

    2008-01-01

    The mass spectrum of the -wave mesons is considered in a non-relativistic constituent quark model. The full Hamiltonian used in the investigation includes the kinetic energy, the confinement potential, the one-gluon-exchange potential (OGEP) and the instanton-induced quark-antiquark interaction (III). A good description of the mass spectrum is obtained. The respective role of III and OGEP in the P-wave meson spectrum is discussed.

  5. Roughness-induced streaming in turbulent wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    -averaged streaming characteristics induced by bottom roughness variations are systematically assessed. The effects of variable roughness ratio, gradual roughness transitions, as well as changing flow orientation in plan are all considered. As part of the latter, roughness-induced secondary flows are predicted...

  6. Reduced sodium current in the lateral ventricular wall induces inferolateral J-waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronique Marlinde Frederica Meijborg

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: J-waves in inferolateral leads are associated with a higher risk for idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. We aimed to test potential mechanisms (depolarization or repolarization dependent responsible for inferolateral J-waves. We hypothesized that inferolateral J-waves can be caused by regional delayed activation of myocardium that is activated late during normal conditions. Methods: Computer simulations were performed to evaluate how J-point elevation is influenced by reducing sodium current conductivity (GNa, increasing transient outward current conductivity (Gto or cellular uncoupling in three predefined ventricular regions (lateral, anterior or septal. Two pig hearts were Langendorff-perfused with selective perfusion with a sodium channel blocker of lateral or anterior/septal regions. Volume-conducted pseudo-electrocardiograms (ECG were recorded to detect the presence of J-waves. Epicardial unipolar electrograms were simultaneously recorded to obtain activation times (AT.Results: Simulation data showed that conduction slowing, caused by reduced sodium current, in lateral, but not in other regions induced inferolateral J-waves. An increase in transient outward potassium current or cellular uncoupling in the lateral zone elicited slight J-point elevations which did not meet J-wave criteria. Additional conduction slowing in the entire heart attenuated J-waves and J-point elevations on the ECG, because of masking by the QRS. Experimental data confirmed that conduction slowing attributed to sodium channel blockade in the left lateral but not in the anterior/septal ventricular region induced inferolateral J-waves. J-waves coincided with the delayed activation.Conclusion: Reduced sodium current in the left lateral ventricular myocardium can cause inferolateral J-waves on the ECG.

  7. Scroll wave meandering induced by phase difference in a three-dimensional excitable medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao; Gao, Shiyuan; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Hongli

    2012-11-01

    We investigated scroll waves in an inhomogeneous excitable 3D system with gradient of excitability. The gradient promotes twisting of the scroll waves. Sufficiently large excitability gradient enhances the twisting and causes simple scroll waves to transition to meandering scroll waves. For the twist-induced instability of scroll waves, we analyzed the stability of 2D spiral waves sliced from the twisted scroll in the vertical direction. The 3D problem is simplified by taking into account the diffusive coupling in the third direction as a time-delayed perturbation to the 2D spiral wave. An additional "negative mass" term measuring the twist thus arises in the 2D system and induces the transition from simple rotation to meandering. A further increase in the gradient ruins partially the unity of the meandering scrolls and generates semiturbulence, the analogs of which were observed in the Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction. We also generated the phase diagram in the parameter space by adjusting the threshold for excitation of the media.

  8. Secondary current properties generated by wind-induced water waves in experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michio Sanjou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Secondary currents such as the Langmuir circulation are of high interest in natural rivers and the ocean because they have striking impacts on scour, sedimentation, and mass transport. Basic characteristics have been well-studied in straight open-channel flows. However, little is known regarding secondary circulation induced by wind waves. The presented study describes the generation properties of wind waves observed in the laboratory tank. Wind-induced water waves are known to produce large scale circulations. The phenomenon is observed together with high-speed and low-speed streaks, convergence and divergence zones, respectively. Therefore, it is important to determine the hydrodynamic properties of secondary currents for wind-induced water waves within rivers and lakes. In this study, using two high-speed CMOS cameras, stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV measurements were conducted in order to reveal the distribution of all three components of velocity vectors. The experiments allowed us to investigate the three-dimensional turbulent structure under water waves and the generation mechanism of large-scale circulations. Additionally, a third CMOS camera was used to measure the spanwise profile of thefree-surface elevation. The time-series of velocity components and the free-surface were obtained simultaneously. From our experiments, free-surface variations were found to influence the instantaneous velocity distributions of the cross-sectional plane. We also considered thegeneration process by the phase analysis related to gravity waves and compared the contribution of the apparent stress.

  9. Investigating the thermally induced acoustoelastic effect in isotropic media with Lamb waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Jacob C; Inman, Daniel J

    2014-11-01

    Elastic wave velocities in metallic structures are affected by variations in environmental conditions such as changing temperature. This paper extends the theory of acoustoelasticity by allowing thermally induced strains in unconstrained isotropic media, and it experimentally examines the velocity variation of Lamb waves in aluminum plates (AL-6061) due to isothermal temperature deviations. This paper presents both thermally induced acoustoelastic constants and thermally varying effective Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio which include the third order elastic material constants. The experimental thermal sensitivity of the phase velocity (∂v(P)/∂θ) for both the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are bounded by two theories, the acoustoelastic Lamb wave theory with thermo-acoustoelastic tensors and the thermoelastic Lamb wave theory using an effective thermo-acoustoelastic moduli. This paper shows the theoretical thermally induced acoustoelastic Lamb wave thermal sensitivity (∂v(P)/∂θ) is an upper bound approximation of the experimental thermal changes, but the acoustoelastic Lamb wave theory is not valid for predicting the antisymmetric (A0) phase velocity at low frequency-thickness values, <1.55 MHz mm for various temperatures.

  10. Retrograde diurnal motion of the instantaneous rotation axis observed by a large ring laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, W.

    2016-07-01

    Ring laser gyroscope technique directly senses the Earth's instantaneous rotation pole (IRP), whose polar motion contains strong retrograde diurnal components induced by external torques due to the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun. The first direct measurement of this retrograde diurnal motion with three large ring lasers was reported by Schreiber et al. (J Geophys Res 109(B18):B06405, 2004). Since then many technical improvements led to a significant increase in precision and stability of ring laser gyroscopes; however, precise determination of amplitude and phase at main partial waves has not been given in the literature. In this paper, I will report on determination of the retrograde diurnal motion of the IRP at main partial waves (Oo_1, J_1, K_1, M_1, O_1, Q_1 ) by the ring laser "G", located in Wettzell, Germany, which is the most stable one amongst the currently running large ring laser gyroscopes.

  11. Retrograde diurnal motion of the instantaneous rotation axis observed by a large ring laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, W.

    2017-01-01

    Ring laser gyroscope technique directly senses the Earth's instantaneous rotation pole (IRP), whose polar motion contains strong retrograde diurnal components induced by external torques due to the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun. The first direct measurement of this retrograde diurnal motion with three large ring lasers was reported by Schreiber et al. (J Geophys Res 109(B18):B06405, significant increase in precision and stability of ring laser gyroscopes; however, precise determination of amplitude and phase at main partial waves has not been given in the literature. In this paper, I will report on determination of the retrograde diurnal motion of the IRP at main partial waves (Oo_1, J_1, K_1, M_1, O_1, Q_1) by the ring laser "G", located in Wettzell, Germany, which is the most stable one amongst the currently running large ring laser gyroscopes.

  12. Measurements in a container ship of wave-induced hull girder stresses in excess of design values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes full-scale measurements of the wave-induced vertical bending moment amidships a 9400 TEU container carrier and focuses on the effect of the hydro-elastic high-frequency vibration on the extreme hogging wave bending moment. One extreme event, where the vertical wave-induced ho......This paper describes full-scale measurements of the wave-induced vertical bending moment amidships a 9400 TEU container carrier and focuses on the effect of the hydro-elastic high-frequency vibration on the extreme hogging wave bending moment. One extreme event, where the vertical wave......-frequency vibrations caused by impulsive loads are observed to be of the same magnitude as the rigid-body wave-induced response and thus acts to double the total vertical bending moment amidships. It was also found that even though the ship is sailing in bow quartering seas, only the 2-node vertical vibration mode...

  13. Imaging of shear waves induced by Lorentz force in soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasland-Mongrain, P; Souchon, R; Cartellier, F; Zorgani, A; Chapelon, J Y; Lafon, C; Catheline, S

    2014-07-18

    This study presents the first observation of elastic shear waves generated in soft solids using a dynamic electromagnetic field. The first and second experiments of this study showed that Lorentz force can induce a displacement in a soft phantom and that this displacement was detectable by an ultrasound scanner using speckle-tracking algorithms. For a 100 mT magnetic field and a 10 ms, 100 mA peak-to-peak electrical burst, the displacement reached a magnitude of 1 μm. In the third experiment, we showed that Lorentz force can induce shear waves in a phantom. A physical model using electromagnetic and elasticity equations was proposed. Computer simulations were in good agreement with experimental results. The shear waves induced by Lorentz force were used in the last experiment to estimate the elasticity of a swine liver sample.

  14. Imaging of Shear Waves Induced by Lorentz Force in Soft Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Cartellier, Florian; Zorgani, Ali; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril; Catheline, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the first observation of elastic shear waves generated in soft solids using a dynamic electromagnetic field. The first and second experiments of this 5 study showed that Lorentz force can induce a displacement in a soft phantom and that this displacement was detectable by an ultrasound scanner using speckle-tracking algorithms. For a 100 mT magnetic field and a 10 ms, 100 mA peak-to-peak electrical burst, the displacement reached a magnitude of 1 um. In the third experiment, we showed that Lorentz force can induce shear waves in a phantom. A physical model 10 using electromagnetic and elasticity equations was proposed. Computer simulations were in good agreement with experimental results. The shear waves induced by Lorentz force were used in the last experiment to estimate the elasticity of a swine liver sample.

  15. Thermal waves induced by a rapidly moving line source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, A. A.; Shamsai, M.

    For the cases involving a fast moving heat source or extremely short pulses emitted by lasers or short time after the start of transients, the classical theory of heat conduction breaks down since the wave nature of heat transport dominates. In this study, the temperature field due to a fast moving line source was determined analytically using the wave concept. The results are given for different values of thermal Mach number (M=V/C). For M>1 the heat affected zone is confined in a wedge shape region behind the source. The wedge half angle is equal to sin-1 (1/M). It was confirmed that the difference between the results of diffusion and wave models depends on the corresponding time scale and the relaxation time. Zusammenfassung Im Falle schnell bewegter Wärmequellen oder extrem kurzer Laserpulse sowie unmittelbar nach Beginn transienter Vorgänge versagt die klassische Theorie der Wärmeleitung, da die Wellennatur des Wärmetransportes dominiert. In der vorliegenden Studie wurde das durch eine raschbewegte Linienquelle ausgelöste Temperaturfeld auf der Basis des Wellenkonzepts analytisch bestimmt, und zwar für verschiedene Werte der thermischen Mach-Zahl (M=V/C). Für M>1 bleibt der von der Wärmeausbreitung erfaßte Bereich auf eine keilförmige Zone hinter der Quelle beschränkt, wobei der halbe Keilwinkel gleich sin-1 (1/M) ist. Es konnte gezeigt werden, daß der Unterschied zwischen den Ergebnissen des Diffusions- und des Wellenmodells von der entsprechenden Zeitskala und von der Relaxationszeit abhängt.

  16. A Computer Simulation Study of Anatomy Induced Drift of Spiral Waves in the Human Atrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay R. Kharche

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of spiral waves of excitation with atrial anatomy remains unclear. This simulation study isolates the role of atrial anatomical structures on spiral wave spontaneous drift in the human atrium. We implemented realistic and idealised 3D human atria models to investigate the functional impact of anatomical structures on the long-term (∼40 s behaviour of spiral waves. The drift of a spiral wave was quantified by tracing its tip trajectory, which was correlated to atrial anatomical features. The interaction of spiral waves with the following idealised geometries was investigated: (a a wedge-like structure with a continuously varying atrial wall thickness; (b a ridge-like structure with a sudden change in atrial wall thickness; (c multiple bridge-like structures consisting of a bridge connected to the atrial wall. Spiral waves drifted from thicker to thinner regions and along ridge-like structures. Breakthrough patterns caused by pectinate muscles (PM bridges were also observed, albeit infrequently. Apparent anchoring close to PM-atrial wall junctions was observed. These observations were similar in both the realistic and the idealised models. We conclude that spatially altering atrial wall thickness is a significant cause of drift of spiral waves. PM bridges cause breakthrough patterns and induce transient anchoring of spiral waves.

  17. Highly asymmetric interaction forces induced by acoustic waves in coupled plate structures

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Xiying; Zhang, Shenwei; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-01-01

    Mutual forces can be induced between coupled structures when illuminated by external acoustic waves. In this Letter, we propose a concept of asymmetric interaction between two coupled plate-like structures, which is generated by oppositely incident plane waves. Besides the striking contrast in magnitude, the mutual force induced by one of the incidences can be tuned extremely strong due to the resonant excitation of the flexural plate modes. The highly asymmetric interaction with enhanced strength in single side should be potentially useful, such as in designing ultrasound instruments and sensors.

  18. Direct analysis of radiation-induced chromosome fragments and rings in unstimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes by means of the premature chromosome condensation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelias, G E; Maillie, H D

    1985-03-01

    Development of the procedure to stimulate peripheral blood lymphocytes has greatly facilitated the understanding of chromosome aberration formation and repair mechanisms in human cells. Yet, because radiation induces far more initial chromosome breaks than are observed as aberrations in metaphase, it has not been possible to examine the kinetics of primary chromosome breakage and rejoining with this procedure. An improved method to induce premature chromosome condensation in unstimulated lymphocytes has been used to study primary chromosome breakage, rejoining, and ring formation at various times after irradiation with up to 800 rad of X-rays. The dose-response relations for chromosome fragments analyzed immediately or 1, 2, or 24 h after exposure were found to be linear. Rapid rejoining of chromosome fragments, which takes place in the first 3 h after X-ray exposure, was not correlated with a simultaneous increase in the formation of rings. The yield of rings per cell scored 24 h after irradiation, however, increased significantly and fit a linear quadratic equation. Both chromosome fragment rejoining and ring formation were completed about 6 h after irradiation. The frequency distributions of rings among cells followed a Poisson distribution, whereas chromosome fragments were overdispersed.

  19. Five Years of Mid-Infrared Evolution of the Remnant of SN 1987A: The Encounter Between the Blast Wave and the Dusty Equatorial Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Bouchet, Patrice; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Danziger, I. John; De Buizer, James M.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Park, Sangwook; Polomski, Elisha F.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We have used the Spitzer satellite to monitor the laid-IR evolution of SN 1987A over a 5 year period spanning the epochs between days 6000 and 8000 since the explosion. The supernova (SN) has evolved into a supernova remnant (SNR) and its radiative output, is dominated by the interaction of the SN blast wave with the pre-existing equatorial ring (ER). The mid-IR spectrum is dominated by emission from approximately 180 K silicate dust, collisionally-heated by the hot X-ray emitting gas with a temperature and density of 5 x 10(exp 6) K and approximately 3 x 10(exp 4) per cubic centimeter, respectively. The mass of the radiating dust is approximately 1.2 x 10(exp -6) solar mass on day 7554, and scales linearly with IR flux. Comparison of the IR data with the soft X-ray flux derived from Chandra observations shows that the IR-to-X-ray flux ratio, IRX, is roughly constant with a value of 2.5. Gas-grain collisions therefore dominate the cooling of the shocked gas. The constancy of IRX is most consistent with the scenario that very little grain processing or gas cooling have occurred throughout this epoch. The shape of the dust spectrum remained unchanged during the observations while the total flux increased by a factor of approximately 5 with a time dependence of t(sup '0.87 plus or minus 0.20), t' being the time since the first encounter between the blast wave and the ER. These observations are consistent with the transitioning of the blast wave from free expansion to a Sedov phase as it propagates into the main body of the ER, as also suggested by X-ray observations. The constant spectral shape of they IR, emission provides strong constraints on the density and temperature of the shocked gas in which the interaction takes place. The IR spectra also suggest the presence of a secondary population of very small, hot (T greater than or equal to 350 K), featureless dust. If these grains spatially coexists with the silicates, then they must have shorter lifetimes. The data

  20. Effects of wave-induced forcing on a circulation model of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Alari, Victor; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian

    2017-04-01

    The effect of wind waves on water level and currents during two storms in the North Sea is investigated using a high-resolution NEMO model forced with fluxes and fields from a high-resolution wave model. The additional terms accounting for wave-current interaction that are considered in this study are the Stokes-Coriolis force and the sea-state dependent energy and momentum fluxes. The individual and collective role of these processes is quantified and the results are compared with a control run without wave effects as well as against current and water level measurements from coastal stations. We find a better agreement with observations when the circulation model is forced by sea-state dependent fluxes, especially in extreme events. The two extreme events, the storm Christian (25-27 October 2013), and about a month later, the storm Xaver (5-7 December 2013), induce different wave and surge conditions over the North Sea. Including the wave effects in the circulation model for the storm Xaver raises the modelled surge by more than 40 cm compared with the control run in the German Bight area. For the storm Christian, a difference of 20-30 cm in the surge level between the wave-forced and the stand-alone ocean model is found over the whole southern part of the North Sea. Moreover, the modelled vertical velocity profile fits the observations very well when the wave forcing is accounted for. The contribution of wave-induced forcing has been quantified indicating that this represents an important mechanism for improving water level and current predictions.

  1. Effects of wave-induced forcing on a circulation model of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Alari, Victor; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The effect of wind waves on water level and currents during two storms in the North Sea is investigated using a high-resolution Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) model forced with fluxes and fields from a high-resolution wave model. The additional terms accounting for wave-current interaction that are considered in this study are the Stokes-Coriolis force, the sea-state-dependent energy and momentum fluxes. The individual and collective role of these processes is quantified and the results are compared with a control run without wave effects as well as against current and water-level measurements from coastal stations. We find a better agreement with observations when the circulation model is forced by sea-state-dependent fluxes, especially in extreme events. The two extreme events, the storm Christian (25-27 October 2013), and about a month later, the storm Xaver (5-7 December 2013), induce different wave and surge conditions over the North Sea. Including the wave effects in the circulation model for the storm Xaver raises the modelled surge by more than 40 cm compared with the control run in the German Bight area. For the storm Christian, a difference of 20-30 cm in the surge level between the wave-forced and the stand-alone ocean model is found over the whole southern part of the North Sea. Moreover, the modelled vertical velocity profile fits the observations very well when the wave forcing is accounted for. The contribution of wave-induced forcing has been quantified indicating that this represents an important mechanism for improving water-level and current predictions.

  2. Width dependent transition of quantized spin-wave modes in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} square nanorings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Chandrima; Saha, Susmita; Barman, Saswati; Barman, Anjan, E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Thematic Unit of Excellence on Nanodevice Technology, Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Rousseau, Olivier [CEMS-RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Otani, YoshiChika [CEMS-RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2014-10-28

    We investigated optically induced ultrafast magnetization dynamics in square shaped Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanorings with varying ring width. Rich spin-wave spectra are observed whose frequencies showed a strong dependence on the ring width. Micromagnetic simulations showed different types of spin-wave modes, which are quantized upto very high quantization number. In the case of widest ring, the spin-wave mode spectrum shows quantized modes along the applied field direction, which is similar to the mode spectrum of an antidot array. As the ring width decreases, additional quantization in the azimuthal direction appears causing mixed modes. In the narrowest ring, the spin-waves exhibit quantization solely in azimuthal direction. The different quantization is attributed to the variation in the internal field distribution for different ring width as obtained from micromagnetic analysis and supported by magnetic force microscopy.

  3. Study on the storm surges induced by cold waves in the Northern East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Dongxue; Hou, Yijun; Li, Jian; Liu, Yahao

    2016-08-01

    Cold wave, a kind of severe weather system, can bring strong wind and induce significant sea level rise to the Northern East China Sea. Based on CFSR data, the study shows the monthly distributions of invaded days and the spatiotemporal distributions of cold-wave wind direction and wind speed. A three-dimensional numerical model (ROMS) was developed to study storm surges induced by cold waves. The role of wind direction, wind speed, wind duration, extratropical cyclone and tide-surge interaction is investigated by conducting different sensitivity experiments. The results indicate that storm surges mainly happen at the coasts perpendicular to the wind directions. Surge range and time lag are related to the geometry of the basin and the continental shelf. The response of the sea-level fluctuations to cold wave indicates that there is a positive correlation between crests and wind speed, a negative correlation between troughs and wind speed, but no obvious correlations to wind duration. Coupled weather cold waves, which yield a larger range and a multi-peak structure of surges, can be classified according to cold wave tracks and extratropical cyclones. The tide-surge interaction has an obvious and different effect on the magnitudes and phases of storm surges for different tidal stages.

  4. One-Directional Fluidic Flow Induced by Chemical Wave Propagation in a Microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Miyu; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Hattori, Mika; Hasegawa, Takahiko; Sato, Mami; Unoura, Kei; Nabika, Hideki

    2016-05-26

    A one-directional flow induced by chemical wave propagation was investigated to understand the origin of its dynamic flow. A cylindrical injection port was connected with a straight propagation channel; the chemical wave was initiated at the injection port. Chemical waves propagated with a constant velocity irrespective of the channel width, indicating that the dynamics of the chemical waves were governed by a geometry-independent interplay between the chemical reaction and diffusion. In contrast, the velocity of the one-directional flow was dependent on the channel width. Furthermore, enlargement of the injection port volume increased the flow velocity and volume flux. These results imply that the one-directional flow in the microchannel is due to a hydrodynamic effect induced in the injection port. Spectroscopic analysis of a pH indicator revealed the simultaneous behavior between the pH increase near the injection port and the one-directional flow. Hence, we can conclude that the one-directional flow in the microchannel with chemical wave propagation was caused by a proton consumption reaction in the injection port, probably through liquid volume expansion by the reaction products and the reaction heat. It is a characteristic feature of the present system that the hydrodynamic flow started from the chemical wave initiation point and not the propagation wavefront, as observed for previous systems.

  5. Heterogeneous Nucleation Induced by Capillary Wave During Acoustic Levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕勇军; 解文军; 魏炳波

    2003-01-01

    The rapid solidification of acoustically levitated drops of Pb-61.9 wt. %Sn eutectic alloy is accomplished. A surface morphology of spreading ripples is observed on a sample undercooled by 15 K. The ripples originate from the centre of sample surface, which is also the heterogeneous nucleation site for eutectic growth. The Faraday instability excited by forced surface vibration has brought about these ripples. They are retained in the solidified sample if the sound pressure level exceeds the threshold pressure required for the appearance of capillary waves.Theoretical calculations indicate that both the pressure and displacement maxima exist in the central part of a levitated drop. The pressure near the sample centre can promote heterogeneous nucleation, which is in agreement qualitatively with the experimental results.

  6. Electromagnetically induced transparency and quadripartite macroscopic entanglement generated in a ring cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yong-Hong; Zhou Ling

    2013-01-01

    We propose a feasible scheme to generate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and quadripartite macroscopic entanglement in an optomechanical system with one fixed mirror and three movable perfectly reflecting mirrors.We explore the EIT phenomena in this optomechanical system.Results show the appearance of EIT dips in the output field.Moreover,we demonstrate how steady-state quadripartite entanglement can be generated via radiation pressure.We also quantify the bipartite entanglement in each field-mirror subsystem and in the mirror-mirror subsystem.Findings show that a high intensity of entanglement between two subsystems can be achieved.

  7. Quantitative two-dimensional measurement of oil-film thickness by laser-induced fluorescence in a piston-ring model experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigger, Stefan; Füßer, Hans-Jürgen; Fuhrmann, Daniel; Schulz, Christof; Kaiser, Sebastian A

    2016-01-10

    This paper describes advances in using laser-induced fluorescence of dyes for imaging the thickness of oil films in a rotating ring tribometer with optical access, an experiment representing a sliding piston ring in an internal combustion engine. A method for quantitative imaging of the oil-film thickness is developed that overcomes the main challenge, the accurate calibration of the detected fluorescence signal for film thicknesses in the micrometer range. The influence of the background material and its surface roughness is examined, and a method for flat-field correction is introduced. Experiments in the tribometer show that the method yields quantitative, physically plausible results, visualizing features with submicrometer thickness.

  8. Vortex rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, D.G. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    This book presents a comprehensive coverage of the wide field of vortex rings. The book presents the results of systematic experimental investigations, theoretical foundation, as well as the practical applications of vortex rings, such as the extinction of fires at gushing gas and oil wells. All the basic properties of vortex rings as well as their hydrodynamic structures are presented. Special attention is paid to the formation and motion of turbulent vortex rings. (orig.)

  9. Numerical Simulation of Wave-Induced Currents Combined with Parabolic Mild-Slope Equation in Curvilinear Coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Lei; TONG Fei-fei; SHI Feng

    2011-01-01

    Researches on breaking-induced currents by waves are summarized firstly in this paper.Then,a combined numerical model in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates is presented to simulate wave-induced current in areas with curved boundary or irregular coastline.The proposed wave-induced current model includes a nearshore current module established through orthogonal curvilinear transformation form of shallow water equations and a wave module based on the curvilinear parabolic approximation wave equation.The wave module actually serves as the driving force to provide the current module with required radiation stresses.The Crank-Nicolson finite difference scheme and the alternating directions implicit method are used to solve the wave and current module,respectively.The established surf zone currents model is validated by two numerical experiments about longshore currents and rip currents in basins with rip channel and breakwater.The numerical results are compared with the measured data and published numerical results.

  10. Palm oil tocotrienol fractions restore endothelium dependent relaxation in aortic rings of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muharis, Syed Putra; Top, Abdul Gapor Md; Murugan, Dharmani; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes and hypertension are closely associated with impaired endothelial function. Studies have demonstrated that regular consumption of edible palm oil may reverse endothelial dysfunction. The present study investigates the effect of palm oil fractions: tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF), alpha-tocopherol and refined palm olein (vitamin E-free fraction) on the vascular relaxation responses in the aortic rings of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). We hypothesize that the TRF and alpha-tocopherol fractions are able to improve endothelial function in both diabetic and hypertensive rat aortic tissue. A 1,1-diphenyl picryl hydrazyl assay was performed on the various palm oil fractions to evaluate their antioxidant activities. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine) and endothelium-independent (sodium nitroprusside) relaxations were examined on streptozotocin-induced diabetic and SHR rat aorta following preincubation with the different fractions. In 1-diphenyl picryl hydrazyl antioxidant assay, TRF and alpha-tocopherol fractions exhibited a similar degree of activity while palm olein exhibited poor activity. TRF and alpha-tocopherol significantly improved acetylcholine-induced relaxations in both diabetic (TRF, 88.5% +/- 4.5%; alpha-tocopherol, 87.4% +/- 3.4%; vehicle, 65.0 +/- 1.6%) and SHR aorta (TRF, 72.1% +/- 7.9%; alpha-tocopherol, 69.8% +/- 4.0%, vehicle, 51.1% +/- 4.7%), while palm olein exhibited no observable effect. These results suggest that TRF and alpha-tocopherol fractions possess potent antioxidant activities and provide further support to the cardiovascular protective effects of palm oil vitamin E. TRF and alpha-tocopherol may potentially improve vascular endothelial function in diabetes and hypertension by their sparing effect on endothelium derived nitric oxide bioavailability.

  11. Waves induced by a submerged moving dipole in a two-layer fluid of finite depth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Wei; Dongqiang Lu; Shiqiang Dai

    2005-01-01

    The waves induced by a moving dipole in a twofluid system are analytically and experimentally investigated.The velocity potential of a dipole moving horizontally in the lower layer of a two-layer fluid with finite depth is derived by superposing Green's functions of sources (or sinks). The far-field waves are studied by using the method of stationary phase. The effects of two resulting modes, i.e. the surfaceand internal-wave modes, on both the surface divergence field and the interfacial elevation are analyzed. A laboratory study on the internal waves generated by a moving sphere in a two-layer fluid is conducted in a towing tank under the same conditions as in the theoretical approach. The qualitative consistency between the present theory and the laboratory study is examined and confirmed.

  12. Influence of deposited energy on shock wave induced by underwater pulsed current discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian-Dong; Liu, Yi; Liu, Si-Wei; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Zhou, Gu-Yue; Li, Hua; Lin, Fu-Chang; Pan, Yuan

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, an integrated experimental system is established to study the influence of deposited energy on the intensity of the shock wave induced by underwater pulse discharge. Considering the time varying behavior of the arc, the calculation methods of the deposited energy into the plasma channel and the average arc resistance are proposed and presented. The effect of the breakdown process on the deposited energy and the shock wave is analyzed. It can be concluded that the shock wave intensity can be improved by depositing more energy in the first half oscillation period and increasing the arc resistance. It is also found that the energy deposition and the shock wave intensity are significantly influenced by the breakdown time delay and the shape of the initial plasma channel.

  13. Anisotropy induced wave birefringence in bounded supercritical plasma confined in a multicusp magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Indranuj; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2011-04-01

    Laboratory observation of rotation of the polarization axis (θc˜20°-40° with respect to vacuum) of a penetrating electromagnetic wave through a bounded supercritical plasma (plasma frequency ωp>wave frequency ω), confined in a multicusp magnetic field is reported. Birefringence of the radial and polar wave electric field components (Er and Eθ) has been identified as the cause for the rotation, similar to a magneto-optic medium, however, with distinct differences owing to the presence of wave induced resonances. Numerical simulation results obtained by solving the Maxwell's equations by incorporating the plasma and magnetostatic field inhomogeneities within a conducting boundary shows a reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Storage and retrieval of electromagnetic waves with orbital angular momentum via plasmon-induced transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhengyang; Xu, Datang; Huang, Guoxiang

    2017-01-23

    We propose a scheme to realize the storage and retrieval of high-dimensional electromagnetic waves with orbital angular momentum (OAM) via plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) in a metamaterial, which consists of an array of meta-atoms constructed by a metallic structure loaded with two varactors. We show that due to PIT effect the system allows the existence of shape-preserving dark-mode plasmonic polaritons, which are mixture of electromagnetic-wave modes and dark oscillatory modes of the meta-atoms and may carry various OAMs. We demonstrate that the slowdown, storage and retrieval of multi-mode electromagnetic waves with OAMs can be achieved through the active manipulation of a control field. Our work raises the possibility for realizing PIT-based spatial multi-mode memory of electromagnetic waves and is promising for practical application of information processing with large capacity by using room-temperature metamaterials.

  15. Numerical simulation of four-wave mixing efficiency and its induced relative intensity noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wei; Meng Zhou; Zhou Hui-Juan; Luo Hong

    2012-01-01

    Four-wave mixing,as well as its induced intensity noise,is harmful to wavelength division multiplexing systems.The efficiency and the relative intensity noise of four-wave mixing are numerically simulated for the two-wave and the three-wave fiber transmissions.It is found that the efficiency decreases with the increase of both the frequency spacing and the fiber length,which can be explained using the quasi-phase-matching condition.Furthermore,the relative intensity noise decreases with the increase of frequency spacing,while it increases with the increase of fiber length,which is due to the considerable power loss of the pump light.This investigation presents a good reference for the practical application of wavelength division multiplexing systems.

  16. Slow-light Airy wave packets and their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Hang, Chao

    2014-01-01

    We propose a scheme to generate (3+1)-dimensional slow-light Airy wave packets in a resonant $\\Lambda$-type three-level atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency. We show that in the absence of dispersion the Airy wave packets formed by a probe field consist of two Airy wave packets accelerated in transverse directions and a longitudinal Gaussian pulse with a constant propagating velocity lowered to $10^{-5}\\,c$ ($c$ is the light speed in vacuum). We also show that in the presence of dispersion it is possible to generate another type of slow-light Airy wave packets consisting of two Airy beams in transverse directions and an Airy wave packet in the longitudinal direction. In this case, the longitudinal velocity of the Airy wave packet can be further reduced during propagation. Additionally, we further show that the transverse accelerations (or bending) of the both types of slow-light Airy wave packets can be completely eliminated and the motional trajectories of them can be actively manipulated ...

  17. Analysis of a jet stream induced gravity wave associated with an observed ice cloud over Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Buss

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A polar stratospheric ice cloud (PSC type II was observed by airborne lidar above Greenland on 14 January 2000. It was the unique observation of an ice cloud over Greenland during the SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign. Mesoscale simulations with the hydrostatic HRM model are presented which, in contrast to global analyses, are capable to produce a vertically propagating gravity wave that induces the low temperatures at the level of the PSC afforded for the ice formation. The simulated minimum temperature is ~8 K below the driving analyses and ~4.5 K below the frost point, exactly coinciding with the location of the observed ice cloud. Despite the high elevations of the Greenland orography the simulated gravity wave is not a mountain wave. Analyses of the horizontal wind divergence, of the background wind profiles, of backward gravity wave ray-tracing trajectories, of HRM experiments with reduced Greenland topography and of several diagnostics near the tropopause level provide evidence that the wave is emitted from an intense, rapidly evolving, anticyclonically curved jet stream. The precise physical process responsible for the wave emission could not be identified definitely, but geostrophic adjustment and shear instability are likely candidates. In order to evaluate the potential frequency of such non-orographic polar stratospheric cloud events, the non-linear balance equation diagnostic is performed for the winter 1999/2000. It indicates that ice-PSCs are only occasionally generated by gravity waves emanating from spontaneous adjustment.

  18. Controlled generation of high-intensity optical rogue waves by induced modulation instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Saili; Yang, Hua; Chen, Nengsong; Zhao, Chujun

    2017-01-04

    Optical rogue waves are featured as the generation of high amplitude events at low probability in optical systems. Moreover, the formation of optical rogue waves is unpredictable and transient in photonic crystal fibers. In this paper, we put forward a method to generate high-intensity optical rogue waves in a more controlled way based on induced modulation instability, which can suppress the noise effect and hence play a leading role in the process of pulse evolution. Our numerical simulations indicate that the generation of rogue wave can be controlled when seeding at the optimal modulation frequency and the intensity of rogue wave can be enhanced with appropriate modulation depth. Further, high-intensity rogue wave can also be ejected in the fiber with a shorter propagation length by regulating the modulation depth. These results all provide a better understanding of optical rogue wave, which can contribute to the generation of tunable long-wavelength spectral components and selective excitation of mid-infrared supercontinuum.

  19. HF wave propagation and induced ionospheric turbulence in the magnetic equatorial region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, B.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-03-01

    The propagation and excitation of artificial ionospheric turbulence in the magnetic equatorial region by high-frequency electromagnetic (EM) waves injected into the overhead ionospheric layer is examined. EM waves with ordinary (O) mode polarization reach the critical layer only if their incidence angle is within the Spitze cone. Near the critical layer the wave electric field is linearly polarized and directed parallel to the magnetic field lines. For large enough amplitudes, the O mode becomes unstable to the four-wave oscillating two-stream instability and the three-wave parametric decay instability driving large-amplitude Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. The interaction between the induced Langmuir turbulence and electrons located within the 50-100 km wide transmitter heating cone at an altitude of 230 km can potentially accelerate the electrons along the magnetic field to several tens to a few hundreds of eV, far beyond the thresholds for optical emissions and ionization of the neutral gas. It could furthermore result in generation of shear Alfvén waves such as those recently observed in laboratory experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles Large Plasma Device.

  20. Laboratory observations of flow and sediment transport induced by plunging regular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Güner, Anil; Hansen, Nilas Mandrup

    2013-01-01

    Two parallel experiments involving the evolution and runup induced by plunging regular waves near the shoreline of a sloping bed are considered: (1) a rigid-bed experiment, allowing direct (hot film) measurements of bed shear stresses and (2) a sediment-bed experiment, allowing for the measurement...... of pore-water pressures as well as observation of sediment suspension and bed morphological changes. Both experiments utilize the same initial bed profile and wave forcing. The experiments show that the mean bed shear stresses experienced onshore of incipient breaking are amplified by nearly a factor of 2...... breaking event. These findings are related to the induced morphological changes over both short and long time scales. The present results are also compared and contrasted with previous experiments utilizing a similar methodology, but involving plunging solitary waves....

  1. Efficient non-hydrostatic modelling of 3D wave-induced currents using a subgrid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnsdorp, Dirk P.; Smit, Pieter B.; Zijlema, Marcel; Reniers, Ad J. H. M.

    2017-08-01

    Wave-induced currents are an ubiquitous feature in coastal waters that can spread material over the surf zone and the inner shelf. These currents are typically under resolved in non-hydrostatic wave-flow models due to computational constraints. Specifically, the low vertical resolutions adequate to describe the wave dynamics - and required to feasibly compute at the scales of a field site - are too coarse to account for the relevant details of the three-dimensional (3D) flow field. To describe the relevant dynamics of both wave and currents, while retaining a model framework that can be applied at field scales, we propose a two grid approach to solve the governing equations. With this approach, the vertical accelerations and non-hydrostatic pressures are resolved on a relatively coarse vertical grid (which is sufficient to accurately resolve the wave dynamics), whereas the horizontal velocities and turbulent stresses are resolved on a much finer subgrid (of which the resolution is dictated by the vertical scale of the mean flows). This approach ensures that the discrete pressure Poisson equation - the solution of which dominates the computational effort - is evaluated on the coarse grid scale, thereby greatly improving efficiency, while providing a fine vertical resolution to resolve the vertical variation of the mean flow. This work presents the general methodology, and discusses the numerical implementation in the SWASH wave-flow model. Model predictions are compared with observations of three flume experiments to demonstrate that the subgrid approach captures both the nearshore evolution of the waves, and the wave-induced flows like the undertow profile and longshore current. The accuracy of the subgrid predictions is comparable to fully resolved 3D simulations - but at much reduced computational costs. The findings of this work thereby demonstrate that the subgrid approach has the potential to make 3D non-hydrostatic simulations feasible at the scale of a

  2. Sinking of irregular shape blocks into marine seabed under wave-induced liquefaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür

    2013-01-01

    The sinking of initially buried irregular blocks into the seabed under wave-induced liquefaction was investigated by experimental methods. Pore-water pressure in the soil, water surface elevation time series and block displacements were measured. Results indicated that initiation of sinking...

  3. Convective and Diffusive Energetic Particle Losses Induced by Shear Alfven Waves in the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Hicks, N.; van Voornveld, R.; Classen, I.G.J.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Bruedgam, M.; Fahrbach, H. U.; Igochine, V.; Jaemsae, S.; Maraschek, M.; Sassenberg, K.

    2010-01-01

    We present here the first phase-space characterization of convective and diffusive energetic particle losses induced by shear Alfven waves in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. While single toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) and Alfven cascades (AC) eject resonant fast ions in a convective process

  4. Body-wave seismic interferometry applied to earthquake- and storm-induced wavefield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, E.N.

    2012-01-01

    Seismology is the study of the vibration of the Earth. Seismologists pay much attention to the main source of Earth vibration: earthquakes. But also other seismic sources, like mining blasts, ocean storms and windmills, are studied. All these sources induce seismic waves, which can eventually be rec

  5. Body-wave seismic interferometry applied to earthquake- and storm-induced wavefield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, E.N.

    2012-01-01

    Seismology is the study of the vibration of the Earth. Seismologists pay much attention to the main source of Earth vibration: earthquakes. But also other seismic sources, like mining blasts, ocean storms and windmills, are studied. All these sources induce seismic waves, which can eventually be

  6. Experimental Study and Numerical Modeling of Wave Induced Pore Pressure Attenuation Inside a Rubble Mound Breakwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troch, Peter; Rouck, Julien De; Burcharth, Hans Falk

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to study the attenuation of the wave induced pore pressures inside the core of a rubble mound breakwater. The knowledge of the distribution and the attenuation of the pore pressures is important for the design of a stable and safe breakwater. The pore pressure...

  7. Shear driven waves in the induced magnetosphere of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunell, H; Koepke, M [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 (United States); Amerstorfer, U V; Biernat, H K [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Schmiedlstr. 6, A-8042 Graz (Austria); Nilsson, H; Holmstroem, M; Lundin, R; Barabash, S [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, P.O. Box 812, SE-981 28 Kiruna (Sweden); Grima, C [Laboratoire de Planetologie de Grenoble, BP-53, F-38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Fraenz, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Winningham, J D; Frahm, R A [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 7228-0510 (United States); Sauvaud, J-A; Fedorov, A [Centre d' Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, BP-4346, F-31028 Toulouse (France); Erkaev, N V [Institute of Computational Modelling, Russian Academy of Sciences, 660036 Krasnoyarsk-36 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: herbert.gunell@physics.org

    2008-07-15

    We present measurements of oscillations in the electron density, ion density and ion velocity in the induced magnetosphere of Mars. The fundamental frequency of the oscillations is a few millihertz, but higher harmonics are present in the spectrum. The oscillations are observed in a region where there is a velocity shear in the plasma flow. The fundamental frequency is in agreement with computational results from an ideal-MHD model. An interpretation based on velocity-shear instabilities is described.

  8. Ring theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rowen, Louis H

    1991-01-01

    This is an abridged edition of the author's previous two-volume work, Ring Theory, which concentrates on essential material for a general ring theory course while ommitting much of the material intended for ring theory specialists. It has been praised by reviewers:**""As a textbook for graduate students, Ring Theory joins the best....The experts will find several attractive and pleasant features in Ring Theory. The most noteworthy is the inclusion, usually in supplements and appendices, of many useful constructions which are hard to locate outside of the original sources....The audience of non

  9. Pulse-induced focusing of Rydberg wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbó, D. G.; Reinhold, C. O.; Burgdörfer, J.; Pattanayak, A. K.; Stokely, C. L.; Zhao, W.; Lancaster, J. C.; Dunning, F. B.

    2003-06-01

    We demonstrate that strong transient phase-space localization can be achieved by the application of a single impulsive “kick” in the form of a short (600 ps) unidirectional electric-field pulse to a strongly polarized, quasi-one-dimensional Rydberg atom. The underlying classical dynamics is analyzed and it is shown that phase-space localization results from a focusing effect analogous to rainbow scattering. Moreover, it is shown that the essential features of the classical analysis remain valid in a quantum-mechanical treatment of the system in terms of its phase-space Husimi distribution. The degree of phase-space localization is characterized by the coarse-grained Renyi entropy. Transient phase-space localization is demonstrated experimentally using extreme redshifted m=0 potassium Stark states in the n=351 manifold and a short probe pulse. The experimental data are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The localized state provides an excellent starting point for further control and manipulation of the electron wave packet.

  10. Nonlinear mechanisms for drift wave saturation and induced particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimits, A.M. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (USA). Lab. for Plasma Research); Lee, W.W. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the nonlinear dynamics of gyrokinetic particle simulations of electrostatic collisionless and weakly collisional drift waves is presented. In previous studies it was shown that, in the nonlinearly saturated phase of the evolution, the saturation levels and especially the particle fluxes have an unexpected dependence on collisionality. In this paper, the explanations for these collisionality dependences are found to be as follows: The saturation level is determined by a balance between the electron and ion fluxes. The ion flux is small for levels of the potential below an E {times} B-trapping threshold and increases sharply once this threshold is crossed. Due to the presence of resonant electrons, the electron flux has a much smoother dependence on the potential. In the 2-1/2-dimensional ( pseudo-3D'') geometry, the electrons are accelerated away from the resonance as they diffuse spatially, resulting in an inhibition of their diffusion. Collisions and three-dimensional effects can repopulate the resonance thereby increasing the value of the particle flux. 30 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Inducing rostrum interfacial waves by fluid-solid coupling in a Chinese river dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhongchang; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Chong; Wang, Xianyan

    2016-01-01

    Through numerically solving the appropriate wave equations, propagation of biosonar signals in a Chinese river dolphin (baiji) was studied. The interfacial waves along the rostrum-tissue interfaces, including both compressional (longitudinal) and shear (transverse) waves in the solid rostrum through fluid-solid coupling were examined. The baiji's rostrum was found to effect acoustic beam formation not only as an interfacial wave generator but also as a sound reflector. The wave propagation patterns in the solid rostrum were found to significantly change the wave movement through the bone. Vibrations in the rostrum, expressed in solid displacement, initially increased but eventually decreased from posterior to anterior sides, indicating a complex physical process. Furthermore, the comparisons among seven cases, including the combination of (1) the rostrum, melon, and air sacs; (2) rostrum-air sacs; (3) rostrum-melon; (4) only rostrum; (5) air sacs-melon; (6) only air sacs; and (7) only melon revealed that the cases including the rostrum were better able to approach the complete system by inducing rostrum-tissue interfacial waves and reducing the differences in main beam angle and -3 dB beam width. The interfacial waves in the rostrum were considered complementary with reflection to determine the obbligato role of the rostrum in the baiji's biosonar emission. The far-field beams formed from complete fluid-solid models and non-fluid-solid models were compared to reveal the effects brought by the consideration of shear waves of the solid structures of the baiji. The results may provide useful information for further understanding the role of the rostrum in this odontocete species.

  12. Enhanced Chondrocyte Proliferation in a Prototyped Culture System with Wave-Induced Agitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilarek Maciej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the actual challenges in tissue engineering applications is to efficiently produce as high of number of cells as it is only possible, in the shortest time. In static cultures, the production of animal cell biomass in integrated forms (i.e. aggregates, inoculated scaffolds is limited due to inefficient diffusion of culture medium components observed in such non-mixed culture systems, especially in the case of cell-inoculated fiber-based dense 3D scaffolds, inside which the intensification of mass transfer is particularly important. The applicability of a prototyped, small-scale, continuously wave-induced agitated system for intensification of anchorage-dependent CP5 chondrocytes proliferation outside and inside three-dimensional poly(lactic acid (PLA scaffolds has been discussed. Fibrous PLA-based constructs have been inoculated with CP5 cells and then maintained in two independent incubation systems: (i non-agitated conditions and (ii culture with wave-induced agitation. Significantly higher values of the volumetric glucose consumption rate have been noted for the system with the wave-induced agitation. The advantage of the presented wave-induced agitation culture system has been confirmed by lower activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH released from the cells in the samples of culture medium harvested from the agitated cultures, in contrast to rather high values of LDH activity measured for static conditions. Results of the proceeded experiments and their analysis clearly exhibited the feasibility of the culture system supported with continuously wave-induced agitation for robust proliferation of the CP5 chondrocytes on PLA-based structures. Aside from the practicability of the prototyped system, we believe that it could also be applied as a standard method offering advantages for all types of the daily routine laboratory-scale animal cell cultures utilizing various fiber-based biomaterials, with the use of only regular laboratory

  13. Inhibition of cullin RING ligases by cycle inhibiting factor: evidence for interference with Nedd8-induced conformational control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boh, Boon Kim; Ng, Mei Ying; Leck, Yee Chin; Shaw, Barry; Long, Jed; Sun, Guang Wen; Gan, Yunn Hwen; Searle, Mark S; Layfield, Robert; Hagen, Thilo

    2011-10-21

    Cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is produced by pathogenic intracellular bacteria and injected into the host cells via a type III secretion system. Cif is known to interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle by inhibiting the function of cullin RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs). Cullin proteins form the scaffold protein of CRLs and are modified with the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8, which exerts important conformational control required for CRL activity. Cif has recently been shown to catalyze the deamidation of Gln40 in Nedd8 to Glu. Here, we addressed how Nedd8 deamidation inhibits CRL activity. Our results indicate that Burkholderia pseudomallei Cif (also known as CHBP) inhibits the deconjugation of Nedd8 in vivo by inhibiting binding of the deneddylating COP9 signalosome (CSN) complex. We provide evidence that the reduced binding of CSN and the inhibition of CRL activity by Cif are due to interference with Nedd8-induced conformational control, which is dependent on the interaction between the Nedd8 hydrophobic patch and the cullin winged-helix B subdomain. Of note, mutation of Gln40 to Glu in ubiquitin, an additional target of Cif, inhibits the interaction between the hydrophobic surface of ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-binding protein p62/SQSTM1, showing conceptually that Cif activity can impair ubiquitin/ubiquitin-like protein non-covalent interactions. Our results also suggest that Cif may exert additional cellular effects by interfering with the association between ubiquitin and ubiquitin-binding proteins.

  14. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  15. Ultrafast ignition with relativistic shock waves induced by high power lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shalom; Eliezer; Noaz; Nissim; Shirly; Vinikman; Pinhasi; Erez; Raicher; José; Maria; Martinez; Val

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider laser intensities greater than 1016 W cm-2where the ablation pressure is negligible in comparison with the radiation pressure.The radiation pressure is caused by the ponderomotive force acting mainly on the electrons that are separated from the ions to create a double layer(DL).This DL is accelerated into the target,like a piston that pushes the matter in such a way that a shock wave is created.Here we discuss two novel ideas.Firstly,the transition domain between the relativistic and non-relativistic laser-induced shock waves.Our solution is based on relativistic hydrodynamics also for the above transition domain.The relativistic shock wave parameters,such as compression,pressure,shock wave and particle flow velocities,sound velocity and rarefaction wave velocity in the compressed target,and temperature are calculated.Secondly,we would like to use this transition domain for shockwave-induced ultrafast ignition of a pre-compressed target.The laser parameters for these purposes are calculated and the main advantages of this scheme are described.If this scheme is successful a new source of energy in large quantities may become feasible.

  16. Velocity Measurement of Induced Flow by a Laser Focusing Shock Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki HIRAHARA; Masaru FUJINAMI; Masaaki KAWAHASHI

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply the shock wave for control in a micro channel. The shock wave was generated by a laser focusing of pulsed laser beam in the channel. Using a pulse laser to generate a shock wave,a non-stationary flow was induced in the small space between the parallel plates. The spherical and cylindrical shock propagations were observed with schlieren method. The shock Mach number decreases with time and approaches to unity. As reported in the previous investigations, the shock speed was attenuated in a short distance and time. In the present experiment, It was not found a remarkable difference in the shock speed between the spherical and cylindrical shock experiments. Subsequently, the flow induced by the cylindrical shock wave was studied using PIV technique. A smoke tracer was used in the experiment and its velocity was measured within 100 μs. A numerical simulation was carried out to investigate the momentum relaxation between the gas and smoke particle. A suitable shock initiation model was introduced in the simulation. The experimental results show that a wide acceleration and deceleration zone exist behind the shock wave. Also,the relaxation distance in the experimental data is much longer than that in numerical simulation.

  17. Saturn's Rings and Associated Ring Plasma Cavity: Evidence for Slow Ring Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    We re-examine the radio and plasma wave observations obtained during the Cassini Saturn orbit insertion period, as the spacecraft flew over the northern ring surface into a radial distance of 1.3 Rs (over the C-ring). Voyager era studies suggest the rings are a source of micro-meteoroid generated plasma and dust, with theorized peak impact-created plasma outflows over the densest portion of the rings (central B-ring). In sharp contrast, the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave System (RPWS) observations identify the presence of a ring-plasma cavity located in the central portion of the B-ring, with little evidence of impact-related plasma. While previous Voyager era studies have predicted unstable ion orbits over the C- ring, leading to field-aligned plasma transport to Saturns ionosphere, the Cassini RPWS observations do not reveal evidence for such instability-created plasma fountains. Given the passive ring loss processes observed by Cassini, we find that the ring lifetimes should extend >10(exp 9) years, and that there is limited evidence for prompt destruction (loss in <100 Myrs).

  18. Characteristics of laser-induced shock wave injury to the inner ear of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Niwa, Katsuki; Tamura, Atsushi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the number of blast injuries of the inner ear has increased in the general population. In blast-induced inner ear injury, a shock wave (SW) component in the blast wave is considered to play an important role in sensorineural hearing loss. However, the mechanisms by which an SW affects inner ear tissue remain largely unknown. We aimed to establish a new animal model for SW-induced inner ear injury by using laser-induced SWs (LISWs) on rats. The LISWs were generated by irradiating an elastic laser target with 694-nm nanosecond pulses of a ruby laser. After LISW application to the cochlea through bone conduction, auditory measurements revealed the presence of inner ear dysfunction, the extent of which depended on LISW overpressure. A significantly lower survival rate of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons, as well as severe oxidative damage, were observed in the inner ear exposed to an LISW. Although considerable differences in the pressure characteristics exist between LISWs and SWs in real blast waves, the functional and morphological changes shown by the present LISW-based model were similar to those observed in real blast-induced injury. Thus, our animal model is expected to be useful for laboratory-based research of blast-induced inner ear injury.

  19. Analysis of Excitation Characteristics of Ultra High Frequency Electromagnetic Waves Induced by PD in GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Dengwei; GAO Wensheng; YAO Senjing; LIU Weidong; HE Jiaxi

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the excitation mechanism of ultra high frequency (UHF) electromagnetic waves (EW) is essential for applying UHF method to partial discharge (PD) detection.Since the EW induced by PD in gas insulated switchgear (GIS) contains not only transverse electromagnetic (TEM) wave,but also high-order transverse electric (TE) and high-order transverse magnetic (TM) waves,we analyzed the proportions between the TEM wave and the high order waves,as well as the influence of the PD position on this proportion,using the finite different time domain (FDTD) method.According to the unique characteristics of the waves,they are separated only approximately.It is found that the high-order mode is the main component,more than 70%,of the electric field around the enclosure of GIS,and that with the increasing distance between PD source and inner conductors,the low frequency (below about 800 MHz) component of EW decreases,but the high frequency component (above 1 GHz) increases,meanwhile the proportion of high-order components in EW could reach 77% from 70%.It concluded that the closer the PD source to the enclosure is,the easier high order EW may be excited.

  20. Experimental study of millimeter wave-induced differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guang-Wen; Liu, Xian-Xiang; Wu, Ming-Xia; Zhao, Jin-Yan; Chen, Wen-Lie; Lin, Ru-Hui; Lin, Jiu-Mao

    2009-04-01

    Low power millimeter wave irradiation is widely used in clinical medicine. We describe the effects of this treatment on cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and attempted to identify the underlying mechanism. Cells cultured using the whole marrow attachment culture method proliferated dispersedly or in clones. Flow cytometric analyses showed that the MSCs were CD90 positive, but negative for CD45. The negative control group (A) did not express detectable levels of Cbfa1 or Sox9 mRNA at any time point, while cells in the millimeter wave-induced groups (B and C) increasingly expressed both genes after the fourth day post-induction. Statistical analysis showed that starting on the fourth day post-induction, there were very significant differences in the expression of Cbfa1 and Sox9 mRNA between groups A and B as well as A and C at any given time point, between treated groups B and C after identical periods of induction, and within each treated group at different induction times. Transition electron microscopy analysis showed that the rough endoplasmic reticulum of cells in the induced groups was richer and more developed than in cells of the negative control group, and that the shape of cells shifted from long-spindle to near ellipse. Toluidine blue staining revealed heterochromia in the cytoplasm and extracellular matrix of cells in the induced groups, whereas no obvious heterochromia was observed in negative control cells. Induced cells also exhibited positive immunohistochemical staining of collagen II, in contrast to the negative controls. These results show that millimeter wave treatment successfully induced MSCs to differentiate as chondrocytes and the extent of differentiation increased with treatment duration. Our findings suggest that millimeter wave irradiation can be employed as a novel non-drug inducing method for the differentiation of MSCs into chondrocytes.

  1. The Effect of Air Humidity on Shock Wave Induced Incipient Spearation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PiotrDOERFFER; AndrzejSZUMOWSKI; 等

    2000-01-01

    During earlier research on shock wave/boundary layer interaction control,the effect of air humidity on flow separation has been observed.This has inspired a more detailed study on the effect of air humidity on shock induced incipient separation and on the involved preocesses.The phenomenon has a twofold nature.In supersonic flow the condensation of humidity causes flow retadation due to heat addition.The consequent weakenling of the shock wave reduces the tendency towards separatio.On the other hand,the incipient separation is postponed at the same Mach numers of interaction.

  2. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Wave-Induced Ship Hydroelastic Vibrations by Large-Scale Model Measurement in Coastal Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialong Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ship hydroelastic vibration is an issue involving mutual interactions among inertial, hydrodynamic, and elastic forces. The conventional laboratory tests for wave-induced hydroelastic vibrations of ships are performed in tank conditions. An alternative approach to the conventional laboratory basin measurement, proposed in this paper, is to perform tests by large-scale model measurement in real sea waves. In order to perform this kind of novel experimental measurement, a large-scale free running model and the experiment scheme are proposed and introduced. The proposed testing methodology is quite general and applicable to a wide range of ship hydrodynamic experimental research. The testing procedure is presented by illustrating a 5-hour voyage trial of the large-scale model carried out at Huludao harbor of China in August 2015. Hammer tests were performed to identify the natural frequencies of the ship model at the beginning of the tests. Then a series of tests under different sailing conditions were carried out to investigate the vibrational characteristics of the model. As a postvoyage analysis, load, pressure, acceleration, and motion responses of the model are studied with respect to different time durations based on the measured data.

  4. Seismic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in rocks with strong permeability fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germán Rubino, J; Monachesi, Leonardo B; Müller, Tobias M; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Oscillatory fluid movements in heterogeneous porous rocks induced by seismic waves cause dissipation of wave field energy. The resulting seismic signature depends not only on the rock compressibility distribution, but also on a statistically averaged permeability. This so-called equivalent seismic permeability does not, however, coincide with the respective equivalent flow permeability. While this issue has been analyzed for one-dimensional (1D) media, the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cases remain unexplored. In this work, this topic is analyzed for 2D random medium realizations having strong permeability fluctuations. With this objective, oscillatory compressibility simulations based on the quasi-static poroelasticity equations are performed. Numerical analysis shows that strong permeability fluctuations diminish the magnitude of attenuation and velocity dispersion due to fluid flow, while the frequency range where these effects are significant gets broader. By comparing the acoustic responses obtained using different permeability averages, it is also shown that at very low frequencies the equivalent seismic permeability is similar to the equivalent flow permeability, while for very high frequencies this parameter approaches the arithmetic average of the permeability field. These seemingly generic findings have potentially important implications with regard to the estimation of equivalent flow permeability from seismic data.

  5. Generation of calcium waves in living cells induced by 1 kHz femtosecond laser protuberance microsurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M.; Zhao, E. L.; Yang, H. F.; Gong, A. H.; di, J. K.; Zhang, Z. J.

    2009-07-01

    We have demonstrated that intracellular calcium waves in a living olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) can be induced by femtosecond laser surgery on cellular protuberance. In this paper, calcium wave generation mechanisms are further investigated using different culture mediums and protuberance diameters. The protuberances of living OECs are cut by home-made 1 kHz femtosecond laser surgery system with 130 fs pulsewidth and 800 nm wavelength, and the average power of 200 μW is chosen for stable and effective cell surgery. Whether the cells are cultured in mediums with Ca2+ or not, intracellular calcium waves can be induced after cell surgery. The generation of calcium waves is independent on the dimension of protuberance diameter. Based on these results, we analyze generation mechanisms of calcium wave and conclude that shockwave-induced mechanical force and laser-induced cytoskeleton depolymerization are two key factors.

  6. Relation between hippocampal gamma waves and behavioral disturbances induced by phencyclidine and methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Leung, L S

    2000-06-15

    The relationship between hippocampal electrical activity and behavioral hyperactivity induced by either phencyclidine (PCP) or methamphetamine (MAP) was examined in freely behaving rats. The EEGs at the hippocampal CA1 region were simultaneously recorded with the animal's behavior for 2 h after administration of either PCP or MAP. PCP (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) significantly increased locomotor activity including rearing, walking, head-weaving and circling. Spectral analysis of the EEG showed that hippocampal gamma waves (30-70 Hz), but not other frequency bands, were significantly increased from 5 to 120 min after systemic injection of PCP. Inactivation of the medial septum with muscimol, a gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor A agonist, 15 min prior to injection of PCP, suppressed both hippocampal gamma waves and locomotor activity. MAP (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) also increased locomotor activity for longer than 2 h. During the behavioral hyperactivity induced by MAP, hippocampal EEG showed θ and gamma rhythms that were not significantly different from those during walking before MAP. However, MAP-induced behavioral activity was suppressed by pre-injection of muscimol in the medial septum, which also decreased hippocampal gamma activity. It is suggested that the medial septum plays a role in mediating behavioral disturbances induced by both PCP and MAP through control of the hippocampal electrical activity, and that hippocampal gamma waves may play a permissible role in the expression of behaviors.

  7. Rapid assessment of high-dose radiation exposures through scoring of cell-fusion-induced premature chromosome condensation and ring chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamadrid Boada, A I; Romero Aguilera, I; Terzoudi, G I; González Mesa, J E; Pantelias, G; García, O

    2013-09-18

    Analysis of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) mediated by fusion of G0-lymphocytes with mitotic CHO cells in combination with rapid visualization and quantification of rings (PCC-Rf) is proposed as an alternative technique for dose assessment of radiation-exposed individuals. Isolated lymphocytes or whole blood from six individuals were γ-irradiated with 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy at a dose rate of 0.5Gy/min. Following either 8- or 24-h post-exposure incubation of irradiated samples at 37°C, chromosome spreads were prepared by standard PCC cytogenetic procedures. The protocol for PCC fusion proved to be effective at doses as high as 20Gy, enabling the analysis of ring chromosomes and excess PCC fragments. The ring frequencies remained constant during the 8-24-h repair time; the pooled dose relationship between ring frequency (Y) and dose (D) was linear: Y=(0.088±0.005)×D. During the repair time, excess fragments decreased from 0.91 to 0.59 chromatid pieces per Gy, revealing the importance of information about the exact time of exposure for dose assessment on the basis of fragments. Compared with other cytogenetic assays to estimate radiation dose, the PCC-Rf method has the following benefits: a 48-h culture time is not required, allowing a much faster assessment of dose in comparison with conventional scoring of dicentrics and rings in assays for chemically-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC-Rch), and it allows the analysis of heavily irradiated lymphocytes that are delayed or never reach mitosis, thus avoiding the problem of saturation at high doses. In conclusion, the use of the PCC fusion assay in conjunction with scoring of rings in G0-lymphocytes offers a suitable alternative for fast dose estimation following accidental exposure to high radiation doses.

  8. Ultra-compact terahertz switch with graphene ring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Le; Gao, Fei

    2016-10-01

    We propose and numerically demonstrate a compact terahertz wave switch which is composed of two graphene waveguides and three graphene ring resonators. Changing the bias voltage of the Fermi level in the center graphene ring, the resonant mode can be tuned when the plasmon waves in the waveguides and rings are coupled. We theoretically explain their mechanisms as being due to bias voltage change induced carrier density of graphene modification and the coupling coefficients of graphene plasmon effect after carrier density change, respectively. The mechanism of such a terahertz wave switch is further theoretically analyzed and numerically investigated with the aid of the finite element method. With an appropriate design, the proposed device offers the opportunity to ‘tune’ the terahertz wave ON-OFF with an ultra-fast, high extinction ratio and compact size. This structure has the potential applications in terahertz wave integrated circuits. Project supported by the Public Technology Research Project of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. 2015C31116).

  9. Molecular dynamics study of accelerated ion-induced shock waves in biological media

    CERN Document Server

    de Vera, Pablo; Currell, Fred J; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the effects of carbon- and iron-ion induced shock waves in DNA duplexes in liquid water. We use the CHARMM force field implemented within the MBN Explorer simulation package to optimize and equilibrate DNA duplexes in liquid water boxes of different sizes and shapes. The translational and vibrational degrees of freedom of water molecules are excited according to the energy deposited by the ions and the subsequent shock waves in liquid water are simulated. The pressure waves generated are studied and compared with an analytical hydrodynamics model which serves as a benchmark for evaluating the suitability of the simulation boxes. The energy deposition in the DNA backbone bonds is also monitored as an estimation of biological damage, something which lies beyond the possibilities of the analytical model.

  10. Parametric instability induced by X-mode wave heating at EISCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Zhou, Chen; Liu, Moran; Honary, Farideh; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present results of parametric instability induced by X-mode wave heating observed by EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association) radar at Tromsø, Norway. Three typical X-mode ionospheric heating experiments on 22 October 2013, 19 October 2012, and 21 February 2013 are investigated in details. Both parametric decay instability (PDI) and oscillating two-stream instability are observed during the X-mode heating period. We suggest that the full dispersion relationship of the Langmuir wave can be employed to analyze the X-mode parametric instability excitation. A modified kinetic electron distribution is proposed and analyzed, which is able to satisfy the matching condition of parametric instability excitation. Parallel electric field component of X-mode heating wave can also exceed the parametric instability excitation threshold under certain conditions.

  11. Study of laser-induced plasma shock waves by the probe beam deflection technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Qian; Jian Lu; Xiaowu Ni

    2009-01-01

    Laser probe beam deflection technique is used for the analysis of laser-induced plasma shock waves in air and distilled water.The temporal and spatial variations of the parameters on shock fronts are studied as funotions of focal lens position and laser energy.The influences of the characteristics of media are investigated on the well-designed experimental setup.It is found that the shock wave in distilled water attenuates to an acoustic wave faster than in air under the same laser energy.Good agreement is obtained between our experimental results and those attained with other techniques.This technique is versatile,economic,and simple to implement,being a pronmising diagnostic tool for pulsed laser processing.

  12. Heating of the Solar Corona by Alfven Waves: Self-Induced Opacity

    CERN Document Server

    Zahariev, N I

    2011-01-01

    There have been derived equations describing the static distributions of temperature and wind velocity at the transition region within the framework of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of fully ionized hydrogen plasma . We have also calculated the width of the transition between the chromosphere and corona as a self-induced opacity of the high-frequency Alfven waves (AWs). The domain wall is a direct consequence of the self-consistent MHD treatment of AWs propagation. We predict considerable spectral density of the high-frequency AWs in the photosphere. The idea that Alfven waves might heat the solar corona belong to Alfven - we simply derived the corresponding MHD equations. The comparison of the solutions to those equations with the observational/measured data will be crucial for revealing the heating mechanism. The analysis of those solutions will explain how Alfven waves brick unto the corona and dissipate their energy there.

  13. Toward Improving Prediction of Sediment Transport over Wave-Induced Ripples

    CERN Document Server

    Absi, Rafik

    2011-01-01

    Sediment transport over wave-induced ripples is a very complex phenomenon where available models fail to provide accurate predictions. For coastal engineering applications, the 1-DV advection-diffusion equation could be used with an additional parameter {\\alpha} related to the process of vortex shedding above ripples (Absi, 2010). The aim of this study is to provide simple practical analytical tools. An analytical eddy viscosity profile was validated by DNS data of turbulent channel flows (Absi et al., 2011). In this study, we will show that: (1) the period-averaged eddy viscosity in oscillatory boundary layers could be described by this simple analytical formulation; (2) The shape of the vertical profile is validated by period-averaged eddy viscosity of baseline (BSL) k-{\\omega} model (Suntoyo and Tanaka, 2009) for sinusoidal and asymmetric waves; (3) The vertical eddy viscosity profile depends on the wave non-linearity parameter and requires therefore a specific calibration.

  14. Modeling wave-induced pore pressure and effective stress in a granular seabed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtès, Luc; Chareyre, Bruno; Michallet, Hervé; Catalano, Emanuele; Marzougui, Donia

    2015-01-01

    The response of a sandy seabed under wave loading is investigated on the basis of numerical modeling using a multi-scale approach. To that aim, the discrete element method is coupled to a finite volume method specially enhanced to describe compressible fluid flow. Both solid and fluid phase mechanics are upscaled from considerations established at the pore level. Model's predictions are validated against poroelasticity theory and discussed in comparison with experiments where a sediment analog is subjected to wave action in a flume. Special emphasis is put on the mechanisms leading the seabed to liquefy under wave-induced pressure variation on its surface. Liquefaction is observed in both dilative and compactive regimes. It is shown that the instability can be triggered for a well-identified range of hydraulic conditions. Particularly, the results confirm that the gas content, together with the permeability of the medium are key parameters affecting the transmission of pressure inside the soil.

  15. The bryostatin 1 A-ring acetate is not the critical determinant for antagonism of phorbol ester-induced biological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Gary E; Li, Wei; Kraft, Matthew B; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Blumberg, Peter M

    2009-06-04

    The contribution of the A-ring C(7) acetate to the function of bryostatin 1 has been investigated through synthesis and biological evaluation of an analogue incorporating this feature into the bryopyran core structure. No enhanced binding affinity for protein kinase C (PKC) was observed, relative to previously characterized analogues lacking the C(7) acetate. Functional assays showed biological responses characteristic of those induced by the phorbol ester PMA and distinctly different from those observed with bryostatin 1.

  16. Cytoprotective Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) and Catechol Ring-Fluorinated CAPE Derivatives Against Menadione-Induced Oxidative Stress in Human Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-31

    chlorogenic acid , and rosmari- nic acid did not display any cytoprotective effect in this assay at 15 lM (data not shown). Within the same pas- sage of HUVEC...Cytoprotective effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and catechol ring-fluorinated CAPE derivatives against menadione-induced oxidative...accepted 13 March 2006 Available online 31 March 2006 Abstract—Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural polyphenolic compound with many

  17. Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa

    2014-07-01

    The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

  18. Radiation from structured-ring resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Maling, B; Craster, R V

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the scalar-wave resonances of systems composed of identical Neumann-type inclusions arranged periodically around a circular ring. Drawing on natural similarities with the undamped Rayleigh-Bloch waves supported by infinite linear arrays, we deduce asymptotically the exponentially small radiative damping in the limit where the ring radius is large relative to the periodicity. In our asymptotic approach, locally linear Rayleigh-Bloch waves that attenuate exponentially away from the ring are matched to a ring-scale WKB-type wave field. The latter provides a descriptive physical picture of how the mode energy is transferred via tunnelling to a circular evanescent-to-propagating transition region a finite distance away from the ring, from where radiative grazing rays emanate to the far field. Excluding the zeroth-order standing-wave modes, the position of the transition circle bifurcates with respect to clockwise and anti-clockwise contributions, resulting in striking spiral wavefronts.

  19. Photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels with a double-ring sensor featuring a narrow angular aperture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, Roy G.M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Leeuwen, van Ton G.; Mul, de Frits F.M.

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic double-ring sensor, featuring a narrow angular aperture, is developed for laser-induced photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels. An integrated optical fiber enables reflection-mode detection of ultrasonic waves. By using the cross-correlation between the signals detected by the two ri

  20. Higher Harmonics Induced by Waves Propagating over A Submerged Obstacle in the Presence of Uniform Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁德志; 林红星; 滕斌; 邹青萍

    2014-01-01

    To investigate higher harmonics induced by a submerged obstacle in the presence of uniform current, a 2D fully nonlinear numerical wave flume (NWF) is developed by use of a time-domain higher-order boundary element method (HOBEM) based on potential flow theory. A four-point method is developed to decompose higher bound and free harmonic waves propagating upstream and downstream around the obstacle. The model predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data for free harmonics induced by a submerged horizontal cylinder in the absence of currents. This serves as a benchmark to reveal the current effects on higher harmonic waves. The peak value of non-dimensional second free harmonic amplitude is shifted upstream for the opposing current relative to that for zero current with the variation of current-free incident wave amplitude, and it is vice versa for the following current. The second-order analysis shows a resonant behavior which is related to the ratio of the cylinder diameter to the second bound mode wavelength over the cylinder. The second-order resonant position slightly downshifted for the opposing current and upshifted for the following current.

  1. Multiphase flow modeling of landslide induced impulse wave by VOF method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, J.; Shin, C.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations of impulse waves induced by landslides are carried out using a multiphase modeling approach. The three-dimensional filtered Navier-Stokes equations are used for reproduces the propagation and interaction of Newtonian water wave and non-Newtonian debris flow along the bottom. A multiphase volume of fluid (VOF) method is employed for tracking of fluid interfaces. The governing equations are solved by a second-order-accurate in space and time, finite volume methods and the no-slip conditions are applied for all solid wall. The turbulent shear stress is calculated the Smagorinsky model and the non-Newtonian behavior of debris flow is computed by the Hershel-Bulkley fluid model. The multiphase flow model is applied to reproduce the laboratory measurements of Fritz (Pure Appl. Geophys., 166, 153, 2009) who experimentally investigated the propagation of impulse wave induced by the 1958 Lituya Bay Landslide. The numerical results shows that the proper treatment of the non-Newtonian behavior of debris flow is essential to reproduce its head speed and shape which control the deformation and propagation of the resulting impulse wave.

  2. Full-scale field measurements of wave kinematics and vortex shedding induced vibrations in slender structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, J.R.; Pedersen, B. [LIC Engineering (Denmark); Nielsen, K.G.; Bryndum, M.B. [Dansk Hydraulisk Inst., (Denmark)

    1999-07-01

    Vortex induced vibrations of pipes generated by high and steep waves in the crest zone have been investigated by full-scale field testing, An instrumented cylinder has been suspended from a platform bridge in the North Sea. Adjacent to it a newly developed acoustic system capable of measuring the three dimensional wave kinematics was placed. The kinematics were measured all the way up to the instantaneous water surface elevation, i.e. it included the wave crest. The paper presents time series of measured water surface elevations and orbital velocities at the instantaneous water surface together with the response of the instrumented pipe in a storm. The sea state was measured to H{sub s} {approx_equal} 6.4 m and T{sub z} = 8.4 sec. It was clearly seen that vortex shedding locking-on takes place in some of the rather high modes at the passage of large waves. Intermittent cross flow vortex induced vibrations of between 0.3 diameters up to 0.8 diameters were found in the 8th and the 4th mode respectively. The Reynolds numbers and KC numbers were up to 5 . 10{sup 5} and KC {approx} 250 respectively. (au)

  3. Preliminary assessment of landslide-induced wave hazards, Tidal Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Jakob, Matthias; Motyka, Roman J.; Zirnheld, Sandra L.; Craw, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    A large potential rock avalanche above the northern shore of Tidal Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska, was investigated to determine hazards and risks of landslide-induced waves to cruise ships and other park visitors. Field and photographic examination revealed that the 5 to 10 million cubic meter landslide moved between AD 1892 and 1919 after the retreat of Little Ice Age glaciers from Tidal Inlet by AD 1890. The timing of landslide movement and the glacial history suggest that glacial debuttressing caused weakening of the slope and that the landslide could have been triggered by large earthquakes of 1899-1900 in Yakutat Bay. Evidence of recent movement includes fresh scarps, back-rotated blocks, and smaller secondary landslide movements. However, until there is evidence of current movement, the mass is classified as a dormant rock slump. An earthquake on the nearby active Fairweather fault system could reactivate the landslide and trigger a massive rock slump and debris avalanche into Tidal Inlet. Preliminary analyses show that waves induced by such a landslide could travel at speeds of 45 to 50 m/s and reach heights up to 76 m with wave runups of 200 m on the opposite shore of Tidal Inlet. Such waves would not only threaten vessels in Tidal Inlet, but would also travel into the western arm of Glacier Bay endangering large cruise ships and their passengers.

  4. Observations of near-inertial waves induced by parametric subharmonic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingtian; Cao, Anzhou; Lü, Xianqing

    2017-06-01

    Near-inertial waves (NIWs), which can be generated by wind or the parametric subharmonic instability (PSI) of internal tides, are common in the South China Sea (SCS). Moored current observations from the northern SCS have revealed that the PSI of semidiurnal (D2) internal tides is another source of NIWs. The objective of this study was to examine the energy variance in the PSI of D2 tides. The PSI of D2 internal tides generated NIWs and waves with frequencies around the difference frequency of D2 and f. The observed NIWs induced by PSI could be distinguished clearly from those elicited by typhoon Krosa. Shortly after Krosa entered the SCS, NIWs began to intensify on the surface and they propagated downward over subsequent days. The near-inertial currents were damped quickly and they became relatively weak before the waves were reinforced beneath the mixed layer when wind stress was relatively weak. Rotation spectra indicated an energy peak at exactly the difference frequency D2-f of the NIWs and D2, indicating nonlinear wave-wave interaction among D2, f, and D2-f. Depth-time maps of band-pass filtered velocities of D2-f showed the waves amplified when the NIWs were reinforced, and they intensified at depths with strong D2 tides. The energies of the NIWs and D2-f had high correlation with the D2 tides. The PSI transferred energy of low-mode D2 internal tides to high-mode NIWs and D2-f waves. For the entire observational period, PSI reinforcement was observed only when mesoscale eddies emerged and when D2 was in spring tide, revealing a close connection between mesoscale eddies and NIWs. Mesoscale eddies could increase the energy in the f-band by enhancing the PSI of D2 internal tides. Thus, this represents another mechanism linking the energy of mesoscale eddies to that of NIWs.

  5. The stability of travelling waves induced by crossed electric and magnetic fields in nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, I. W.; Faulkner, T. R.

    A theoretical study is carried out into the stability of travelling wave solutions to an approximate dynamic equation for the problem in which a nematic liquid crystal is subjected to crossed electric and magnetic fields. The authors recently found three types of travelling wave solutions for this problem [2], each characterised by the control parameter q which describes the relationship between the magnitudes of the fields and their crossed angle. Two types of stability are ex amined: the first considers perturbations which vanish outside some finite interval in the moving coordinate of the travelling wave, while the second considers quite general perturbations belonging to a weighted L2( R) space, the weighting function being determined by the particular solution and the control parameter q. When the first type of stability occurs, perturbations decay to zero as time increases. In the second type of stability perturbations may eith er decay to zero or induce a small phase shift to the original travelling wave. Both these versions of stability depend crucially on q and on the type of travelling wave solution being considered.

  6. Thermally induced transparency for short spin wave pulses in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez Romero, Cesar Leonardo; Kolokoltsev, Oleg; Gomez Arista, Ivan; Qureshi, Naser; Monsiváis Galindo, Guillermo; Vargas Hernández, Hesiquio

    2014-03-01

    The compensation of spin wave propagation losses plays a very important role in the development of novel magnonic devices. Up to now, however, most of the known amplification methods present relative narrow frequency bandwidths due to their resonant nature. In this work, we present compensation of the propagation losses or pseudo-amplification of travelling spin waves by tailoring the bias magnetic field profile. The thermally-induced non-uniform profile of the magnetization introduced on an Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) thin film by a localized spot of a cw argon-ion laser creates the conditions to observe the complete compensation of the spin wave propagation losses. The spin wave evolution was mapped with a time and spaced resolved inductive magneto-dynamic prove system. The experiment was carried out using a uniform sample of single-crystal YIG film grown on a gallium-gadolinium garnet (GGG) substrate. The 2mm-wide, 20mm-long and 6microns-thick YIG strip was saturated with an external magnetic field enabling the set up for the propagation of magneto-static surface waves. This work was supported by the UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT IA100413.

  7. Stress wave propagation analysis on vortex-induced vibration of marine risers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua-jun; Wang, Chao; Liu, Fu-shun; Hu, Sau-Lon James

    2017-03-01

    To analyze the stress wave propagation associated with the vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a marine riser, this paper employed a multi-signal complex exponential method. This method is an extension of the classical Prony's method which decomposes a complicated signal into a number of complex exponential components. Because the proposed method processes multiple signals simultaneously, it can estimate the "global" dominating frequencies (poles) shared by those signals. The complex amplitude (residues) corresponding to the estimated frequencies for those signals is also obtained in the process. As the signals were collected at different locations along the axial direction of a marine riser, the phenomena of the stress wave propagation could be analyzed through the obtained residues of those signals. The Norwegian Deepwater Program (NDP) high mode test data were utilized in the numerical studies, including data sets in both the in-line (IL) and cross-flow (CF) directions. It was found that the most dominant component in the IL direction has its stress wave propagation along the riser being dominated by a standing wave, while that in the CF direction dominated by a traveling wave.

  8. Visualization of thermally induced delamination by means of guided waves processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzienski, Maciej; Kudela, Pawel; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a method for visualization thermally induced delamination in composite material based on guided wave propagation phenomenon. Tested specimen was submitted to short time period high temperature source, which generated thermal degradation. In particular, delamination in material occurred. This procedure simulates some real case scenarios damage like one cased by atmospheric discharge striking wind turbine blade. Proposed method utilizes processing of full wavefield data acquired by the Scanning Doppler Laser Vibrometer. Registered wavefield images are transformed to wavenumber domain where the wave propagation pattern is removed. In this way after transformation signal back to space domain it contains only information about changes in wave propagation and may be used for damage visualization. However, attenuation of waves cause that visualized anomalies has lower amplitudes with increased distance from the actuator. The proposed enhancement of signal processing algorithm enables quantification of the size of the damage. The enhancement is a technique for compensation of the wave attenuation so that the effects of structural damages have the same influence regardless of the location.

  9. Impact-induced tensile waves in a kind of phase-transforming materials

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Shou-Jun

    2010-01-01

    This paper concerns the global propagation of impact-induced tensile waves in a kind of phase-transforming materials. It is well-known that the governing system of partial differential equations is hyperbolic-elliptic and the initial-boundary value problem is not well-posed at all levels of loading. By making use of fully nonlinear stress-strain curve to model this material, Dai and Kong succeeded in constructing a physical solution of the above initial-boundary value problem. For the impact of intermediate range, they assumed that $\\beta<3\\alpha$ in the stress-response function for simplicity. In this paper, we revisit the impact problem and consider the propagation of impact-induced tensile waves for all values of the parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$. The physical solutions for all levels of loading are obtained completely.

  10. Universal Field-Induced Charge-Density-Wave Phase Diagram: Theory versus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebed, A. G.

    2009-07-01

    We suggest a theory of field-induced charge-density-wave phases, generated by high magnetic fields in quasi-low-dimensional conductors. We demonstrate that, in layered quasi-one-dimensional conductors, the corresponding critical magnetic field ratios are universal and do not depend on any fitting parameter. In particular, we find that H1/H0=0.73, H2/H0=0.59, H3/H0=0.49, and H4/H0=0.42, where Hn is a critical field of a phase transition between the field-induced charge-density-wave phases with numbers n and n+1. The suggested theory is in very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the existing experimental data in α-(ET)2KHg(SCN)4 material.

  11. Planetary Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  12. Field-Induced Dynamic Diamagnetism in a Charge-Density-Wave System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, N.; Mielke, C. H.; Christianson, A. D.; Brooks, J. S.; Tokumoto, M.

    2001-02-01

    ac susceptibility measurements of the charge-density-wave (CDW) compound α-\\(BEDT-TTF\\)2-KHg\\(SCN\\)4 at magnetic fields, μ0H>23 T, above its Pauli paramagnetic limit, reveal unambiguously that the magnetic hysteresis observed previously within this CDW phase is diamagnetic and can only be explained by induced currents. It is argued that the ensemble of experimental techniques amounts to a strong case for dissipationless conductivity within this phase.

  13. Oligomeric ferrocene rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkpen, Michael S.; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J. P.; Winter, Rainer F.; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J.

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category—differently sized rings comprising only 1,1‧-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5-7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp-Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e- waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (˜107 s-1), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ˜1-2 nm).

  14. Resonant scattering of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt by HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shanshan; Zhu, Zhengping; Ni, Binbin; Cao, Xing; Luo, Weihua

    2016-10-01

    Several extremely low-frequency (ELF)/very low-frequency (VLF) wave generation experiments have been performed successfully at High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility and the artificial ELF/VLF signals can leak into the outer radiation belt and contribute to resonant interactions with energetic electrons. Based on the artificial wave properties revealed by many of in situ observations, we implement test particle simulations to evaluate the effects of energetic electron resonant scattering driven by the HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves. The results indicate that for both single-frequency/monotonic wave and multi-frequency/broadband waves, the behavior of each electron is stochastic while the averaged diffusion effect exhibits temporal linearity in the wave-particle interaction process. The computed local diffusion coefficients show that, the local pitch-angle scattering due to HARRP-induced single-frequency ELF/VLF whistlers with an amplitude of ∼10 pT can be intense near the loss cone with a rate of ∼10-2 rad2 s-1, suggesting the feasibility of HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves for removal of outer radiation belt energetic electrons. In contrast, the energy diffusion of energetic electrons is relatively weak, which confirms that pitch-angle scattering by artificial ELF/VLF waves can dominantly lead to the precipitation of energetic electrons. Moreover, diffusion rates of the discrete, broadband waves, with the same amplitude of each discrete frequency as the monotonic waves, can be much larger, which suggests that it is feasible to trigger a reasonable broadband wave instead of the monotonic wave to achieve better performance of controlled precipitation of energetic electrons. Moreover, our test particle scattering simulation show good agreement with the predictions of the quasi-linear theory, confirming that both methods are applied to evaluate the effects of resonant interactions between radiation belt electrons and artificially generated

  15. Extreme Value Predictions for Wave- and Wind-induced Loads on Floating Offshore Wind Turbines using FORM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Sunvard; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Mansour, Alaa E.

    2007-01-01

    probable wave episodes leading to given re-sponses. As an example the motions of floating foundations for offshore wind turbines are analysed taking into consid-eration both the wave and wind induced loads and con-sidering different mooring systems. The possible large horizontal motions make it important...

  16. Syrinx fluid transport: modeling pressure-wave-induced flux across the spinal pial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, N S J

    2012-03-01

    Syrinxes are fluid-filled cavities of the spinal cord that characterize syringomyelia, a disease involving neurological damage. Their formation and expansion is poorly understood, which has hindered successful treatment. Syrinx cavities are hydraulically connected with the spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) enveloping the spinal cord via the cord interstitium and the network of perivascular spaces (PVSs), which surround blood vessels penetrating the pial membrane that is adherent to the cord surface. Since the spinal canal supports pressure wave propagation, it has been hypothesized that wave-induced fluid exchange across the pial membrane may play a role in syrinx filling. To investigate this conjecture a pair of one-dimensional (1-d) analytical models were developed from classical elastic tube theory coupled with Darcy's law for either perivascular or interstitial flow. The results show that transpial flux serves as a mechanism for damping pressure waves by alleviating hoop stress in the pial membrane. The timescale ratio over which viscous and inertial forces compete was explicitly determined, which predicts that dilated PVS, SSS flow obstructions, and a stiffer and thicker pial membrane-all associated with syringomyelia-will increase transpial flux and retard wave travel. It was also revealed that the propagation of a pressure wave is aided by a less-permeable pial membrane and, in contrast, by a more-permeable spinal cord. This is the first modeling of the spinal canal to include both pressure-wave propagation along the spinal axis and a pathway for fluid to enter and leave the cord, which provides an analytical foundation from which to approach the full poroelastic problem.

  17. SUPRAMITRAL RING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Supra mitral ring is a rare cause for congenital mitral valve obstr uction. The reported incidence of supramitral ring is 0.2-0.4% in general population and 8% in patients with congenital mitral valve disease. The condition is characterized by an abnormal ridge of connective tissue often circumferential in shape ,on the atrial side of the mitral valve encroaching on the orifice of the mitral valve. It may adhere to the leaflets of the valve and restrict their movements. Although a supramitral ring may be rarely nonobstructive, it often results in mitral valve inflow obstruction.

  18. Wave-induced flow and its influence on ridge erosion and channel deposition in Lanshayang channel of radial sand ridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈可峰; 安翔; 陆培东; 张玮; 徐卓

    2014-01-01

    Very limited modeling studies were available of the wave-induced current under the complex hydrodynamic conditions in the South Yellow Sea Radial Sand Ridge area (SYSRSR). Partly it is due to the difficulties in estimating the influence of the wave-induced current in this area. In this study, a coupled 3-D storm-surge-wave model is built. In this model, the time-dependent varying Collins coefficient with the water level method (TCL) are used. The wave-flow environment in the Lanshayang Channel (LSYC) during the “Winnie” typhoon is successfully represented by this model. According to the modelling results, at a high water level (HWL), the wave-induced current similar to the long-shore current will emerge in the shallow area of the ridges, and has two different motion trends correlated with the morphological characteristics of the ridges. The wave-induced current velocity could be as strong as 1 m/s, which is at the same magnitude as the tidal current. This result is verified by the bathymetric changes in the LSYC during the “Matsa” typhoon. Thus, the wave-induced current may be one of the driven force of the ridge erosion and channel deposition in the SYSRSR. These conclusions will help to further study the mechanism of the ridge erosion and channel deposition in the SYSRSR.

  19. Influence of chemical structure on skin reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs--the role of the aromatic ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Qing; Shi, Xiao-Bing; Au, Ran; Chen, Fu-Shun; Wang, Fang; Lang, Sen-Yang

    2011-05-01

    Here we assessed whether the presence of an aromatic ring as a commonality in chemical structures of AEDs can explain skin reaction. We found that 164 cases of skin reactions associated with the use of AEDs were reported. Aromatic AEDs were suspected in 88.41% (145/164) of patients with skin reactions versus 59.80% (2316/3873) of patients without skin reactions. The presence of an aromatic ring in the chemical structure was associated with a significant increased risk of skin reactions (adjusted ROR 3.50; 95% CI 2.29, 5.35). Among the aromatic AEDs, skin reactions were significantly associated with carbamazepine, lamotrigine, and oxarbazepine. These results confirm that the presence of an aromatic ring as a common feature in chemical structures of AEDs partly explains AED-skin reactions. Skin reactions were reported triple as frequently with aromatic AEDs than with non-aromatic AEDs.

  20. Experimental study on impact-induced seismic wave propagating through quartz sand simulating asteroid regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsue, Kazuma; Arakawa, Masahiko; Yasui, Minami; Matsumoto, Rie; Tsujido, Sayaka; Takano, Shota; Hasegawa, Sunao

    2015-08-01

    Introduction: Recent spacecraft surveys clarified that asteroid surfaces were covered with regolith made of boulders and pebbles such as that found on the asteroid Itokawa. It was also found that surface morphologies of asteroids formed on the regolith layer were modified. For example, the high-resolution images of the asteroid Eros revealed the evidence of the downslope movement of the regolith layer, then it could cause the degradation and the erasure of small impact crater. One possible process to explain these observations is the regolith layer collapse caused by seismic vibration after projectile impacts. The impact-induced seismic wave might be an important physical process affecting the morphology change of regolith layer on asteroid surfaces. Therefore, it is significant for us to know the relationship between the impact energy and the impact-induced seismic wave. So in this study, we carried out impact cratering experiments in order to observe the seismic wave propagating through the target far from the impact crater.Experimental method: Impact cratering experiments were conducted by using a single stage vertical gas gun set at Kobe Univ and a two-stage vertical gas gun set at ISAS. We used quartz sands with the particle diameter of 500μm, and the bulk density of 1.48g/cm3. The projectile was a ball made of polycarbonate with the diameter of 4.75mm and aluminum, titan, zirconia, stainless steel, cupper, tungsten carbide projectile with the diameter of 2mm. These projectiles were launched at the impact velocity from 0.2 to 7km/s. The target was set in a vacuum chamber evacuated below 10 Pa. We measured the seismic wave by using a piezoelectric uniaxial accelerometer.Result: The impact-induced seismic wave was measured to show a large single peak and found to attenuate with the propagation distance. The maximum acceleration of the seismic wave was recognized to have a good relationship with the normalized distance x/R, where x is the propagation distance

  1. Laser-induced pressure-wave and barocaloric effect during flash diffusivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Porter, W. D.; Dinwiddie, R. B.

    2017-07-01

    We report the laser-induced pressure-wave and the barocaloric effect captured by an infrared detector during thermal diffusivity measurements. Very fast (laser flash measurements were captured using the infrared detector on thin, high thermal conductivity samples. The standard thermal diffusivity analysis only focuses on the longer time scale thermal transient measured from the back-surface due to heat conduction. Previously, these negative transients or spikes were filtered out and ignored as noise or anomaly from the instrument. This study confirmed that the initial negative signal was indeed a temperature drop induced by the laser pulse. The laser pulse induced instantaneous volume expansion and the associated cooling in the specimen can be explained by the barocaloric effect. The initial cooling (<100 μs) is also known as the thermoelastic effect in which a negative temperature change is generated when the material is elastically deformed by volume expansion. A subsequent temperature oscillation in the sample was observed and only lasted about 1 ms. The pressure-wave induced thermal signal was systematically studied and analyzed. The underlying physics of photon-mechanical-thermal energy conversions and the potential of using this signal to study barocaloric effects in solids are discussed.

  2. A season in Saturn's rings: Cycling, recycling and ring history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Albers, N.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cassini experiments have watched Saturn's ring system evolve before our eyes. Images and occultations show changes and transient events. The rings are a dynamic and complex geophysical system, incompletely modeled as a single-phase fluid. Key Cassini observations: High resolution images show straw, propellers, embedded moonlets, and F ring objects. Multiple UVIS, RSS and VIMS occutlations indicate multimodal ringlet and edge structure, including free and forced modes along with stochastic perturbations that are most likely caused by nearby mass concentrations. Vertical excursions are evident at ring edges and in other perturbed regions. The rings are occasionally hit by meteorites that leave a signature that may last centuries; meteoritic dust pollutes the rings. Temperature, reflectance and transmission spectra are influenced by the dynamical state of the ring particles. Saturn's Equinox 2009: Oblique lighting exposed vertical structure and embedded objects. The rings were the coldest ever. Images inspired new occultation and spectral analysis that show abundant structure in the perturbed regions. The rings are more variable and complex than we had expected prior to this seasonal viewing geometry. Sub-kilometer structure in power spectral analysis: Wavelet analysis shows features in the strongest density waves and at the shepherded outer edge of the B ring. Edges are variable as shown by multiple occultations and occultations of double stars. F ring kittens: 25 features seen in the first 102 occultations show a weak correlation with Prometheus location. We interpret these features as temporary aggregations. Simulation results indicate that accretion must be enhanced to match the kittens' size distribution. Images show that Prometheus triggers the formation of transient objects. Propellers and ghosts: Occulations and images provide evidence for small moonlets in the A, B and C rings. These indicate accretion occurs inside the classical Roche limit. Implications

  3. Numerical simulation of terrain-induced vortex/wave shedding at the Hong Kong International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at simulating the shedding of vortex/wave from a mountain nearby the Hong Kong International Airport using a computational fluid dynamics model by employing high resolution terrain data without smoothing. The successful simulation of this shedding would have an important application in the short-term forecasting of the chance of occurrence of terrain-induced windshear at an operating airport. Two typical cases of vortex/wave shedding are considered, namely, in neutral atmosphere associated with the passage of a typhoon, and in stably stratified atmosphere in spring-time easterly flow with continental origin. The model is found to successfully capture the salient features of the shedding. The simulated radial velocity fields of weather radar/LIDAR compare well with actual observations. In particular, the creation and the propagation of the vortex/wave through shedding from a mountain nearby the airport are captured well in the model simulation. The shedding periods are also reproduced. From the limited number of cases studied in this paper, it appears that the model has the capability of forecasting the occurrence of vortex/wave shedding by coupling with a mesoscale meteorological model.

  4. THREE-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL MODELLING OF THE WAVE-INDUCED RIP CURRENTS UNDER IRREGULAR BATHYMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ming-xiao

    2012-01-01

    A process-based 3-D hydrodynamic model is established to simulate the rip current structures under irregular bathymetty.The depth-varying wave-induced residual momentum,the surface rollers,the turbulent mixing and the wave-current interactions are considered.Experimental datasets are used to validate the model,and it is shown that the model can effectively describe the 3-D structures of the rip currents in both normal and oblique wave incident cases.The flow patterns of the rip currents see various characteristics for different incident wave directions.In the normal incident case,pairs of counter-rotating primary circulation cells are formed,and an offshore rip flow occurs in the embayment troughs.The peak seaward velocities occur at the top of the bed boundary layer,and the undertow is incorporated in addition to the rip currents.In the oblique incident case,the longshore currents are dominant,which result in a meandering flow along the depth contour,and the undertow is weaker compared to that in the normal incident condition.

  5. Wave propagation and induced steady streaming in viscous fluid contained in a prestressed viscoelastic tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ye; Ng, Chiu-On

    2009-05-01

    The oscillatory and time-mean motions induced by a propagating wave of small amplitude through a viscous incompressible fluid contained in a prestressed and viscoelastic (modeled as a Voigt material) tube are studied by a perturbation analysis based on equations of motion in the Lagrangian system. The classical problem of oscillatory viscous flow in a flexible tube is re-examined in the contexts of blood flow in arteries or pulmonary gas flow in airways. The wave kinematics and dynamics, including wavenumber, wave attenuation, velocity, and stress fields, are found as analytical functions of the wall and fluid properties, prestress, and the Womersley number for the cases of a free or tethered tube. On extending the analysis to the second order in terms of the small wave steepness, it is shown that the time-mean motion of the viscoelastic tube with sufficient strength is short lived and dies out quickly as a limit of finite deformation is approached. Once the tube has attained its steady deformation, the steady streaming in the fluid can be solved analytically. Results are generated to illustrate the combined effects on the first-order oscillatory flow and the second-order steady streaming due to elasticity, viscosity, and initial stresses of the wall. The present model as applied to blood flow in arteries and gas flow in pulmonary airways during high-frequency ventilation is examined in detail through comparison with models in the literature.

  6. Numerical simulation of terrain-induced vortex/wave shedding at the Hong Kong International Airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Li-Jie; Mao, Hui [Shenzhen National Climate Observatory, Meteorological Bureau of Shenzhen Municipality (China); Chan, P.W. [Hong Kong Observatory (China)

    2013-10-15

    The present study aims at simulating the shedding of vortex/wave from a mountain nearby the Hong Kong International Airport using a computational fluid dynamics model by employing high resolution terrain data without smoothing. The successful simulation of this shedding would have an important application in the short-term forecasting of the chance of occurrence of terrain-induced windshear at an operating airport. Two typical cases of vortex/wave shedding are considered, namely, in neutral atmosphere associated with the passage of a typhoon, and in stably stratified atmosphere in spring-time easterly flow with continental origin. The model is found to successfully capture the salient features of the shedding. The simulated radial velocity fields of weather radar/LIDAR compare well with actual observations. In particular, the creation and the propagation of the vortex/wave through shedding from a mountain nearby the airport are captured well in the model simulation. The shedding periods are also reproduced. From the limited number of cases studied in this paper, it appears that the model has the capability of forecasting the occurrence of vortex/wave shedding by coupling with a mesoscale meteorological model. (orig.)

  7. Determinantal rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bruns, Winfried

    1988-01-01

    Determinantal rings and varieties have been a central topic of commutative algebra and algebraic geometry. Their study has attracted many prominent researchers and has motivated the creation of theories which may now be considered part of general commutative ring theory. The book gives a first coherent treatment of the structure of determinantal rings. The main approach is via the theory of algebras with straightening law. This approach suggest (and is simplified by) the simultaneous treatment of the Schubert subvarieties of Grassmannian. Other methods have not been neglected, however. Principal radical systems are discussed in detail, and one section is devoted to each of invariant and representation theory. While the book is primarily a research monograph, it serves also as a reference source and the reader requires only the basics of commutative algebra together with some supplementary material found in the appendix. The text may be useful for seminars following a course in commutative ring theory since a ...

  8. THE COUNTER-JET FORMATION IN AN AIR BUBBLE INDUCED BY THE IMPACT OF SHOCK WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Li-xin; XU Wei-lin; LI Chao; GAO Yan-dong

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of an air bubble (isolated in water or attached to a boundary) with shock waves induced by electric sparks is investigated by high-speed photography.The interaction is closely related to the counter-jet induced by the impact of shock waves.The formation of a counter-jet in an air bubble is related to the liquid jet formed in the same air bubble,but the mechanism is different with that of the counter-jet formation in a collapsing cavitation bubble.The formation of a counter-jet in an air bubble is related to discharge energy,air bubble size and radius of shock wave.With a given energy of the spark discharge,the formation of a counter-jet in an air bubble is related to δ/ε (the ratio of the dimensionless bubble-bubble distance to the dimensionless air bubble radius).The counter-jet will only be produced when δ/ε is in the range of 1.2-2.2.The counter-jet in an air bubble is of an important nuclei-generating mechanism.

  9. Measurements of frequency dependent shear wave attenuation in sedimentary basins using induced earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Modeling of peak ground velocity caused by induced earthquakes requires detailed knowledge about seismic attenuation properties of the subsurface. Especially shear wave attenuation is important, because shear waves usually show the largest amplitude in high frequency seismograms. We report intrinsic and scattering attenuation coefficients of shear waves near three geothermal reservoirs in Germany for frequencies between 2 Hz and 50 Hz. The geothermal plants are located in the sedimentary basins of the upper Rhine graben (Insheim and Landau) and the Molasse basin (Unterhaching). The method optimizes the fit between Green's functions for the acoustic, isotropic radiative transfer theory and observed energy densities of induced earthquakes. The inversion allows the determination of scattering and intrinsic attenuation, site corrections, and spectral source energies for the investigated frequency bands. We performed the inversion at the three sites for events with a magnitude between 0.7 and 2. We determined a transport mean free path of 70 km for Unterhaching. For Landau and Insheim the transport mean free path depends on frequency. It ranges from 2 km (at 2 Hz) to 30 km (at 40 Hz) for Landau and from 9 km to 50 km for Insheim. The quality factor for intrinsic attenuation is constant for frequencies smaller than 10 Hz at all three sites. It is around 100 for Unterhaching and 200 for Landau and Insheim with higher values above 10 Hz.

  10. A model of TMS-induced I-waves in motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Cătălin V; Murakami, Max; Ziemann, Ulf; Triesch, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows to manipulate neural activity non-invasively, and much research is trying to exploit this ability in clinical and basic research settings. In a standard TMS paradigm, single-pulse stimulation over motor cortex produces repetitive responses in descending motor pathways called I-waves. However, the details of how TMS induces neural activity patterns in cortical circuits to produce these responses remain poorly understood. According to a traditional view, I-waves are due to repetitive synaptic inputs to pyramidal neurons in layer 5 (L5) of motor cortex, but the potential origin of such repetitive inputs is unclear. Here we aim to test the plausibility of an alternative mechanism behind D- and I-wave generation through computational modeling. This mechanism relies on the broad distribution of conduction delays of synaptic inputs arriving at different parts of L5 cells' dendritic trees and their spike generation mechanism. Our model consists of a detailed L5 pyramidal cell and a population of layer 2 and 3 (L2/3) neurons projecting onto it with synapses exhibiting short-term depression. I-waves are simulated as superpositions of spike trains from a large population of L5 cells. Our model successfully reproduces all basic characteristics of I-waves observed in epidural responses during in vivo recordings of conscious humans. In addition, it shows how the complex morphology of L5 neurons might play an important role in the generation of I-waves. In the model, later I-waves are formed due to inputs to distal synapses, while earlier ones are driven by synapses closer to the soma. Finally, the model offers an explanation for the inhibition and facilitation effects in paired-pulse stimulation protocols. In contrast to previous models, which required either neural oscillators or chains of inhibitory interneurons acting upon L5 cells, our model is fully feed-forward without lateral connections or loops. It parsimoniously explains

  11. Cave Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by...who expanded on Deegan et al.[3] to find an exact form for the evaporation flux over a sessile drop . It turns out that solving 179 for the flux is

  12. Currents induced by vertical varied radiation stress in standing waves and evolution of the bed composed of fine sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Xin ZHANG; Hua LIU

    2009-01-01

    This paper extends the conventional concept of radiation stress (Longuet-Higgins and Stewart, 1964)in progressive water waves to standing waves, so that its vertical profile could be defined and calculated in a new technical way. The hydrodynamic numerical model being coupled with the vertically varying radiation stress in standing waves is used to simulate the currents being induced by standing waves in the vertical section. Numerical modeling of suspended sediment transport is then carried out to simulate the evolution of the bed composed of fine sediments by the currents. The scour and deposition patterns simulated are in qualitative agreement with prior laboratory and field observations.

  13. Black Hole Ringing, Quasinormal Modes, and Light Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Modelling of gravitational waves from binary black hole inspiral has played an important role in the recent observations of such signals. The late-stage ringdown phase of the gravitational waveform is often associated with the null particle orbit (\\light ring") of the black hole spacetime. With simple models we show that this link between the light ring and spacetime ringing is based more on the history of applications than on an actual constraining relationship. We also show, in particular, that a better understanding of the disassociation between the two, may be relevant to the astrophysically interesting case of rotating (Kerr) black holes.

  14. Vascular rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Spiral Waves and Multiple Spatial Coherence Resonances Induced by Colored Noise in Neuronal Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐昭; 李玉叶; 惠磊; 贾冰; 吉华光

    2012-01-01

    Gaussian colored noise induced spatial patterns and spatial coherence resonances in a square lattice neuronal network composed of Morris-Lecar neurons are studied. Each neuron is at resting state near a saddle-node bifurcation on invariant circle, coupled to its nearest neighbors by electronic coupling. Spiral waves with different structures and disordered spatial structures can be alternately induced within a large range of noise intensity. By calculating spatial structure function and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is found that SNR values are higher when the spiral structures are simple and are lower when the spatial patterns are complex or disordered, respectively. SNR manifest multiple local maximal peaks, indicating that the colored noise can induce multiple spatial coherence resonances. The maximal SNR values decrease as the correlation time of the noise increases. These results not only provide an example of multiple resonances, but also show that Gaussian colored noise play constructive roles in neuronal network.

  16. Numerical simulation and experimental detection of leaky Lamb waves induced by pulse laser at air-solid interfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan; SHEN ZhongHua; LU Jian; NI XiaoWu

    2008-01-01

    Based on the thermoelastic mechanism of laser ultrasonic,the problems of the thermal conduction and the coupling between the motion of solid and fluid are solved by using the finite element method.And then the transient waveforms of leaky Lamb waves induced by pulse laser action on the air-aluminum interface are obtained.Experimental signals of laser-induced leaky Lamb waves at the air-alu-minum interface are detected by applying an our-developed detector,based on the light deflection principle.The dispersion and attenuation properties of leaky Lamb waves are analyzed through the phase spectral analysis.

  17. Numerical simulation and experimental detection of leaky Lamb waves induced by pulse laser at air-solid interfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the thermoelastic mechanism of laser ultrasonic, the problems of the thermal conduction and the coupling between the motion of solid and fluid are solved by using the finite element method. And then the transient waveforms of leaky Lamb waves induced by pulse laser action on the air-aluminum interface are obtained. Experimental signals of laser-induced leaky Lamb waves at the air-alu- minum interface are detected by applying an our-developed detector, based on the light deflection principle. The dispersion and attenuation properties of leaky Lamb waves are analyzed through the phase spectral analysis.

  18. Fibre-Coupling Zig-Zag Beam Deflection Technology for Investigation of Attenuation Process of Laser-Induced Shock Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ping; BIAN Bao-Min; LI Zhen-Hua

    2005-01-01

    @@ A novel fibre-coupling zig-zag beam deflection technology is developed to investigate the attenuation process of laser-induced shock waves in air. Utilizing ordinal reflections of probe beams by a pair of parallel mirrors,a zig-zag beam field is formed, which has eleven probe beams in the horizontal plane. When a laser-induced shock wave propagates through the testing field, it causes eleven deflection signals one after another. The whole attenuation process of the shock wave in air can be detected and illuminated clearly on one experimental curve.

  19. Interaction of Al-induced peptide backbone ring structure with the sidechains of His, Phe, Trp and Tyr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴清雷; 宋波

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is widely used as an antimicrobial coagulant, food additive, and cookware. However, many reports indicate that aluminium may be a critical factor in many amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood, which limits efforts to prevent and treat these diseases. In this paper, using an ab initio method, we studied the interaction of Al-backbone ring structure with theπ-electron-rich sidechains of His, Phe, Trp, and Tyr. We found that in the absence of water, the Al-backbone ring can stably bind with those sidechains. In the presence of water, the Al-backbone ring can bind to the His sidechain and cannot bind to the other sidechains. As revealed by further investigations, this could be attributed to the fact that there was a coordinate bond of the Al-backbone ring with the His sidechain, while there were theπ-πstacking and cation-π-like interactions with the other sidechains. These findings potentially provide a molecular understanding of Al-related toxicity, and may be helpful in designing drugs for those aforementioned aluminum-linked diseases and encourage treatment of Al-polluted water.

  20. The Eulerian- and Lagrangian-mean flows induced by stationary, dissipating planetary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M.; Uryu, M.

    1981-01-01

    The Eulerian- and the Lagrangian-mean flows induced by stationary, dissipating planetary waves are discussed by employing a simple channel model on a beta-plane. It is assumed that the wave is excited by the bottom undulation and dissipated by Newtonian cooling with relaxation time alpha and by Rayleigh friction with (lambda)(alpha), lambda being constant. Three cases where lambda is equal to one are discussed: (1) the basic zonal wind U sub 0 and the dissipation rate alpha are both constant; (2) U sub 0 varies with height while alpha is constant; and (3) U sub 0 and alpha both vary with height. In case (1), the Eulerian- and the Lagrangian-mean fields are shown to depend on the difference between the dissipation scale-height and the density scale-height. In case (2) and case (3), it is shown that the results for case (1) are modified under slightly more realistic situations.

  1. Wave-induced precipitation as a loss process for radiation belt particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, U. S.; Chang, H. C.; Helliwell, R. A.; Katsufrakis, J. P.; Imhof, W. L.

    Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by VLF waves injected from ground based transmitters was achieved during the Stimulated Emission of Energetic Particles (SEEP) experiments (Imhof et al., 1983), the first direct satellite based observation of modulated precipitation of electrons in the bounce loss cone. This paper considers the temporal and spectral shape as well as the absolute flux level of the observed precipitation pulses. In order to model these results, both the pitch angle dependence of the particle distribution near the edge of the loss cone and atmospheric backscatter which leads to multiple interactions of the particles with the wave are considered. Based on a comparison of theory with observations, the leverage of the precipitation process is estimated. Crude estimates of the percentage depletion of the radiation belt population due to the observed transmitter induced precipitation are also made.

  2. Field-induced spin-density wave beyond hidden order in URu2Si2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knafo, W.; Duc, F.; Bourdarot, F.; Kuwahara, K.; Nojiri, H.; Aoki, D.; Billette, J.; Frings, P.; Tonon, X.; Lelièvre-Berna, E.; Flouquet, J.; Regnault, L.-P.

    2016-10-01

    URu2Si2 is one of the most enigmatic strongly correlated electron systems and offers a fertile testing ground for new concepts in condensed matter science. In spite of >30 years of intense research, no consensus on the order parameter of its low-temperature hidden-order phase exists. A strong magnetic field transforms the hidden order into magnetically ordered phases, whose order parameter has also been defying experimental observation. Here, thanks to neutron diffraction under pulsed magnetic fields up to 40 T, we identify the field-induced phases of URu2Si2 as a spin-density-wave state. The transition to the spin-density wave represents a unique touchstone for understanding the hidden-order phase. An intimate relationship between this magnetic structure, the magnetic fluctuations and the Fermi surface is emphasized, calling for dedicated band-structure calculations.

  3. Analog electromagnetically induced transparency for circularly polarized wave using three dimensional chiral metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Hai; Han, Song; Liu, Yangjie; Yang, Helin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate a three dimensional metamaterial that can motivate electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT) by using circular polarized wave as stimulations. The unit cell consists of a pair of metallic strips printed on both sides of the printed circuit board (PCB), where a conductive cylinder junction is used to connect the metal strips by drilling a hole inside the substrate. When a right circularly polarized wave is incident, destructive interference is excited between meta-atoms of the 3D structure, the transmission spectrum demonstrates a sharp transparency window. A coupled oscillator model and an electrical equivalent circuit model are applied to quantitatively and qualitatively analyze the coupling mechanism in the EIT-like metamaterial. Analysis in detail shows the EIT window's amplitude and frequency are modulated by changing the degree of symmetry breaking. The proposed metamaterial may achieve potential applications in developing chiral slow light ...

  4. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C.; Usanova, Maria E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Agapitov, Oleksiy V.; Zhelavskaya, Irina S.; Raita, Tero J.; Spence, Harlan E.; Baker, Daniel N.; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A.

    2016-01-01

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes. PMID:27678050

  5. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri Y; Drozdov, Alexander Y; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C; Usanova, Maria E; Engebretson, Mark J; Agapitov, Oleksiy V; Zhelavskaya, Irina S; Raita, Tero J; Spence, Harlan E; Baker, Daniel N; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A

    2016-09-28

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Shear-Horizontal-Wave-Induced Electromagnetic Field in Borehole Surrounded by Porous Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Zhi-Wen; WANG Ke-Xie; SUN Jian-Cuo; ZHU Zheng-Ya; YAO Gui-Jin; HU Heng-Shan

    2007-01-01

    Seismoelectric field excited by purely torsional loading applied directJy to the borehole wall is considered.A brief formulation and some computed waveforms show the advantage of using shear-horizontal (SH) transverseelectric(TE) seismoelectric waves logging to measure shear velocity in a fluid-saturated porous lormation.By assuming that the acoustic field is not influenced by its induced electromagnetic field due to seismoelectric effect,the coupling governing equations for electromagnetic field are reduced to Maxwell equations with a propagation current source.It is shown that this simplification is valid and the borehole seismoelectric conversion effcient is mainly dependent on the electrokinetic coupling coeffcient.The receivers to detect the conversion electromagnetic field and to obtain shear veloeity can be set in the borehole fluid in the SH-TE seismoelectric wave log.

  7. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C.; Usanova, Maria E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Agapitov, Oleksiy V.; Zhelavskaya, Irina S.; Raita, Tero J.; Spence, Harlan E.; Baker, Daniel N.; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A.

    2016-09-01

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes.

  8. Elastic characterization of Au thin films utilizing laser induced acoustic Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, A.; Bar-Ad, S.; Azoulay, A.

    2011-01-01

    Wide frequency-band Rayleigh waves (~100 MHz) were utilized to characterize the elastic constants of thin Au/Cr films deposited on glass substrates. The Rayleigh waves were excited utilizing laser induced thermoelastic mechanism and detected using a knife-edge technique apparatus. The dispersion of the signals in glass substrates coated with Au/Cr was measured and fitted to theory using a non-linear regression algorithm. From the fitting, the Au films Young modulus and the film thickness were extracted. The results were analyzed with regards to AFM scans performed on the samples and independent thickness measurement done by a dektak3 profiler. Results show a good agreement between the two measurements.

  9. Elastic characterization of Au thin films utilizing laser induced acoustic Rayleigh waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haim, A; Azoulay, A [Ultrasonic Section, NDT Department, Soreq - Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Bar-Ad, S, E-mail: arbelhai@gmail.com [School of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2011-01-01

    Wide frequency-band Rayleigh waves ({approx}100 MHz) were utilized to characterize the elastic constants of thin Au/Cr films deposited on glass substrates. The Rayleigh waves were excited utilizing laser induced thermoelastic mechanism and detected using a knife-edge technique apparatus. The dispersion of the signals in glass substrates coated with Au/Cr was measured and fitted to theory using a non-linear regression algorithm. From the fitting, the Au films Young modulus and the film thickness were extracted. The results were analyzed with regards to AFM scans performed on the samples and independent thickness measurement done by a dektak{sup 3} profiler. Results show a good agreement between the two measurements.

  10. Pyrimidine-pyridine ring interconversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, van der H.C.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discusses the pyrimidine-to-pyridine ring transformation and pyridine-to-pyrimidine ring transformation. In nucleophile-induced pyrimidine-to-pyridine rearrangements, two types of reactions can be distinguished depending on the structure of the nucleophile: (1) reactions in which the ni

  11. Electromagnetic fields induced at the seafloor by Rayleigh-Stoneley waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, S.; Cobb, C.

    1982-05-10

    We model oceanic acoustic and seismic disturbances as Rayeigh-Stoneley waves in the layered medium consisting of ocean, sediment and rock. The waves induce electromagnetic fields because of motion of conducting materials through the geomagnetic field. Low-frequency disturbances in deep water are efficient electromagnetic generators because the motions are coherent over large volumes of highly conducting seawater. For wave frequencies below 0.1 Hz in deep water, the geomagnetic field is nearly frozen to the moving water. Consequently, the electric field measured by a voltmeter attached to the seabed is approximately ..delta..u x F, where ..delta..u is the difference between the velocity of the water and of the voltmeter itself as it is moved by the motion of the seafloor, and F is the geomagnetic field. This result applied to Love waves suggests that the electric field will result largely from the movement of the detector but detailed calculations have not been made. Although the fields are weak they should be detectable because the main interference is from ionospheric sources and the fields from, these sources are greatly attenuated at the seabed by the overlying oceanic shield. The effectiveness of the shield diminishes sharply at frequencies below 0.03 Hz. At high frequencies the principal limitation to detectability is in the inherent noise level of detectors whether electric or magnetic. At present, electric detectors are more effective than magnetic. They appear to be competitive with accelerometers for seismic detection in the deep ocean in a restricted frequency band near 0.05 Hz. A layer of unconsolidated sediment underlying the ocean profoundly affects the dispersion relation of Rayleigh-Stonely waves and thereby affects the electromagnetic induction process.

  12. Laser light scattering in a laser-induced argon plasma: Investigations of the shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrzywka, B. [Obserwatorium Astronomiczne na Suhorze, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, ulica Podchorazych 2, 30-084 Krakow (Poland); Mendys, A., E-mail: agata.mendys@uj.edu.pl [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dzierzega, K.; Grabiec, M. [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S. [GREMI, site de Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France)

    2012-08-15

    Shock wave produced by a laser induced spark in argon at atmospheric pressure was examined using Rayleigh and Thomson scattering. The spark was generated by focusing a laser pulse from the second harmonic ({lambda} = 532 nm) of a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser using an 80 mm focal length lens, with a fluence of 2 kJ{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. Images of the spark emission were recorded for times between 30 ns and 100 {mu}s after the laser pulse in order to characterize its spatial evolution. The position of the shock wave at several instants of its evolution and for several plasma regions was determined from the Rayleigh-scattered light of another nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 40 J{center_dot}cm{sup -2} fluence). Simultaneously, Thomson scattering technique was applied to determine the electron density and temperature in the hot plasma core. Attempts were made to describe the temporal evolution of the shock wave within a self-similar model, both by the simple Sedov-Taylor formula as well as its extension deduced by de Izarra. The temporal radial evolution of the shock position is similar to that obtained within theory taking into account the counter pressure of the ambient gas. Density profiles just behind the shock front are in qualitative agreement with those obtained by numerically solving the Euler equations for instantaneous explosion at a point with counter pressure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated shock wave evolution by Rayleigh scattering method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D map of shockwave position for several times after plasma generation is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shock wave evolution is not satisfactorily described within self-similar models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evolution of shock position similar to theory taking into account counter pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density profile behind the shock similar to numerical solution of Euler equations.

  13. Effects of the Gulf Stream on ocean waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthuijsen, L. H.; Tolman, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study a third-generation numerical wave model is used to study effects of a straight Gulf Stream ring on ocean waves in swell and storm conditions. The model accounts for all relevant processes of propagation, generation, and dissipation of the waves (including current effects) without imposing a priori restraints on the spectral development of the waves. The dominating mechanism affecting the waves appears to be current-induced refraction even though the short-crestedness of the incoming waves tends to mask its effects (also in swell conditions). Depending on wind and wave conditions, refraction may trap locally generated waves in the straight Gulf Stream or it may reflect wave energy back to the open ocean. In the Gulf Stream ring, refraction induces a considerable variation in significant wave height and short-crestedness, but it hardly affects the mean wave direction. In storm conditions the processes of generation and dissipation are considerably enhanced in countercurrent situations and reduced following-current situations.

  14. Sound Waves Induce Neural Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Ryanodine Receptor-Induced Calcium Release and Pyk2 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yura; Park, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Jong Seob; Park, Jung-Keug; Kim, Jongpil; Jeon, Songhee

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown considerable promise as an adaptable cell source for use in tissue engineering and other therapeutic applications. The aims of this study were to develop methods to test the hypothesis that human MSCs could be differentiated using sound wave stimulation alone and to find the underlying mechanism. Human bone marrow (hBM)-MSCs were stimulated with sound waves (1 kHz, 81 dB) for 7 days and the expression of neural markers were analyzed. Sound waves induced neural differentiation of hBM-MSC at 1 kHz and 81 dB but not at 1 kHz and 100 dB. To determine the signaling pathways involved in the neural differentiation of hBM-MSCs by sound wave stimulation, we examined the Pyk2 and CREB phosphorylation. Sound wave induced an increase in the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and CREB at 45 min and 90 min, respectively, in hBM-MSCs. To find out the upstream activator of Pyk2, we examined the intracellular calcium source that was released by sound wave stimulation. When we used ryanodine as a ryanodine receptor antagonist, sound wave-induced calcium release was suppressed. Moreover, pre-treatment with a Pyk2 inhibitor, PF431396, prevented the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and suppressed sound wave-induced neural differentiation in hBM-MSCs. These results suggest that specific sound wave stimulation could be used as a neural differentiation inducer of hBM-MSCs.

  15. Numerical analysis to four-wave mixing induced spectral broadening in high power fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yujun; Wang, Xiaojun; Ke, Weiwei; Sun, Yinhong; Zhang, Kai; Ma, Yi; Li, Tenglong; Wang, Yanshan; Wu, Juan

    2015-02-01

    For powers exceeding a threshold the spectral broadening in fiber amplifiers becomes a significant challenge for the development of high power narrow bandwidth fiber lasers. In this letter, we show that the spectral broadening can be partly caused by four-wave mixing(FWM) process in which the power of the central wavelength would transfer to the side ones. A practical FWM induced spectral broadening theory has been derived from the early works. A numerical model of fiber amplifier has been established and FWM process has been added to the model. During the simulation process, we find that when a 10 GHz, several watts narrow bandwidth laser is seeded into a few modes fiber laser amplifier, the FWM induced spectral broadening effect might continually increase the FWHM of the spectra of the continuum laser to 100 GHz within the amplification process to several hundred watts which has been convinced by our experiments. Some other results have also been analyzed in this paper to complete the four-wave mixing induced spectral broadening theory in fiber amplifiers.

  16. Superconductivity and magnetic field induced spin density waves in the (TMTTF)2X family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balicas, L.; Behnia, K.; Kang, W.; Canadell, E.; Auban-Senzier, P.; Jérome, D.; Ribault, M.; Fabre, J. M.

    1994-10-01

    We report magnetotransport measurements in the quasi one dimensional (Q-1-D) organic conductor (TMTTF)2Br at pressures up to 26 kbar, clown to 0.45 K in magnetic fields up to 19 T along the c^{ast} direction. It is found that a superconducting ground state is stabilized under 26 kbar at T_C = 0.8 K. No magnetic field induced spin density wave (FISDW) transitions are observed below 19T unlike other Q-1-D superconductors pertaining to the selenium series. The computed amplitude of the interchain coupling along transverse directions is unable to explain the missing; FISDW instability.

  17. Optical Multi-wave Mixing Process Based on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Hua; PENG Ju-Cun; CHEN Ai-Xi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and analyze an optical multi-wave mixing scheme for the generation of coherent light in a five-level atomic system in the context of electromagnetically induced transparency. A detailed semiclassical study of the propagation of generated mixing and probe fields is demonstrated. The analytical dependence of the generated mixing field on the probe field and the respective detuning is predicted. Such a nonlinear optical process can be used for generating short-wavelength radiation at low pump intensities.

  18. Low-Cost Fabrication of Printed Electronics Devices through Continuous Wave Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopeña, Pol; Arrese, Javier; González-Torres, Sergio; Fernández-Pradas, Juan Marcos; Cirera, Albert; Serra, Pere

    2017-09-06

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique that allows printing inks from a liquid film in a similar way to inkjet printing but with fewer limitations concerning ink viscosity and loading particle size. In this work, we prove that liquid inks can be printed through LIFT by using continuous wave (CW) instead of pulsed lasers, which allows a substantial reduction in the cost of the printing system. Through the fabrication of a functional circuit on both rigid and flexible substrates (plastic and paper), we provide a proof-of-concept that demonstrates the versatility of the technique for printed electronics applications.

  19. Magnetization of two coupled rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avishai, Y [Department of Physics and Ilse Katz Center for Nanotechnology, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Luck, J M [Institut de Physique Theorique, IPhT, CEA Saclay, and URA 2306, CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)], E-mail: yshai@bgu.ac.il, E-mail: jean-marc.luck@cea.fr

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the persistent currents and magnetization of a mesoscopic system consisting of two clean metallic rings sharing a single contact point in a magnetic field. Many novel features with respect to the single-ring geometry are underlined, including the explicit dependence of wavefunctions on the Aharonov-Bohm fluxes, the complex pattern of two-fold and three-fold degeneracies, the key role of length and flux commensurability, and in the case of commensurate ring lengths the occurrence of idle levels which do not carry any current. Spin-orbit interactions, induced by the electric fields of charged wires threading the rings, give rise to a peculiar version of the Aharonov-Casher effect where, unlike for a single ring, spin is not conserved. Remarkably enough, this can only be realized when the Aharonov-Bohm fluxes in both rings are neither integer nor half-integer multiples of the flux quantum.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Study of Wave-Induced Long-Shore Currents on A Mild Slope Beach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Tao; TAO Jian-hua

    2005-01-01

    The long-shore current distribution on a mild slope beach is studied by combining the numerical model and the physical experiment. The experiments of long-shore currents under the action of regular and irregular waves are conducted on mild beaches with different slopes in a wave basin. A numerical model is established, which includes a wave propagation model, a wave breaking model and a long-shore current model. The validity of the numerical model is proved by the comparison of its results with the results of the experimental model. It is concluded that the wave-induced long-shore current is influenced significantly by the incident wave height, the wave angle and the beach slope. Its application to the Bohai Bay indicates that the wave-induced currents have the same order of magnitude as the tide currents in the near-shore zone of mill slope beach. In the design of wastewater outfall locations on a mild-slope beach with shallow water of the Bohai Bay, the position of the outfall should be 10 km away from the shoreline, which is outside of the surf-zone.

  1. Application of background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Shota; Kameda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    We build an ultra-high-speed imaging system based on the background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique in order to capture a laser-induced underwater shock wave. This BOS technique is able to provide two-dimensional density-gradient field of fluid and requires a simple setup. The imaging system consists of an ultra-high speed video camera, a laser stroboscope, and a patterned background. This system takes images every 0.2 $\\mu$s. Furthermore, since the density change of water disturbed by the shock is exceedingly small, the system has high spatial resolution $\\sim$ 10 $\\mu$m/pixel. Using this BOS system, we examine temporal position of a shock wave. The position agrees well with that measured by conventional shadowgraph, which indicates that the high-speed imaging system can successfully capture the instantaneous position of the underwater shock wave that propagates with the speed of about 1500 m/s. The local density gradient can be determined up to $O$(10$^3$ kg/m$^4$), which is confirmed by the gradient est...

  2. Chiral Primordial Gravitational Waves from Dilaton Induced Delayed Chromo-natural Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Obata, Ippei

    2016-01-01

    We study inflation driven by a dilaton and an axion, both of which are coupled to a SU(2) gauge field. We find that the inflation driven by the dilaton occurs in the early stage of inflation during which the gauge field grows due to the gauge kinetic function. When the energy density of magnetic fields catches up with that of electric fields, chromo-natural inflation takes over in the late stage of inflation, which we call delayed chromo-natural inflation. Thus, the delayed chromo-natural inflation driven by the axion and the gauge field is induced by the dilaton. The interesting outcome of the model is generation of chiral primordial gravitational waves on small scales. Since the gauge field is inert in the early stage of inflation, it is viable in contrast to the conventinal chromo-natural inflation. We find the parameter region where chiral gravitational waves are generated in a frequency range higher than nHz, which are potentially detectable in future gravitational wave interferometers and pulsar timing ...

  3. In situ measurements of impact-induced pressure waves in sandstone targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerth, Tobias; Schäfer, Frank; Nau, Siegfried; Kuder, Jürgen; Poelchau, Michael H.; Thoma, Klaus; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    In the present study we introduce an innovative method for the measurement of impact-induced pressure waves within geological materials. Impact experiments on dry and water-saturated sandstone targets were conducted at a velocity of 4600 m/s using 12 mm steel projectiles to investigate amplitudes, decay behavior, and speed of the waves propagating through the target material. For this purpose a special kind of piezoresistive sensor capable of recording transient stress pulses within solid brittle materials was developed and calibrated using a Split-Hopkinson pressure bar. Experimental impact parameters (projectile size and speed) were kept constant and yielded reproducible signal curves in terms of rise time and peak amplitudes. Pressure amplitudes decreased by 3 orders of magnitude within the first 250 mm (i.e., 42 projectile radii). The attenuation for water-saturated sandstone is higher compared to dry sandstone which is attributed to dissipation effects caused by relative motion between bulk material and interstitial water. The proportion of the impact energy radiated as seismic energy (seismic efficiency) is in the order of 10-3. The present study shows the feasibility of real-time measurements of waves caused by hypervelocity impacts on geological materials. Experiments of this kind lead to a better understanding of the processes in the crater subsurface during a hypervelocity impact.

  4. Gas dynamics of heat-release-induced waves in supercritical fluids: revisiting the Piston Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorino, Mario Tindaro; Scalo, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a gasdynamic approach to the modeling of heat-release-induced compression waves in supercritical fluids. We rely on highly resolved one-dimensional fully compressible Navier-Stokes simulations of CO2 at pseudo-boiling conditions in a closed duct inspired by the experiments of Miura et al.. Near-critical fluids exhibit anomalous variations of thermodynamic variables taken into account by adopting the Peng-Robinson equation of state and Chung's Method. An idealized heat source is applied, away from the boundaries, resulting in the generation of compression waves followed by contact discontinuities bounding a region of hot expanding fluid. For higher heat-release rates such compressions are coalescent with distinct shock-like features (i.e. non-isentropicity and propagation Mach numbers measurably greater than unity) and a non-uniform post-shock state, not present in ideal gas simulations, caused by the highly nonlinear equation of state. Thermoacoustic effects are limited to: (1) a one-way/one-time thermal-to-acoustic energy conversion, and (2) cumulative non-isentropic bulk heating due to the resonating compression waves, resulting in what is commonly referred to as the Piston Effect.

  5. Topological rings

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, S

    1993-01-01

    This text brings the reader to the frontiers of current research in topological rings. The exercises illustrate many results and theorems while a comprehensive bibliography is also included. The book is aimed at those readers acquainted with some very basic point-set topology and algebra, as normally presented in semester courses at the beginning graduate level or even at the advanced undergraduate level. Familiarity with Hausdorff, metric, compact and locally compact spaces and basic properties of continuous functions, also with groups, rings, fields, vector spaces and modules, and with Zorn''s Lemma, is also expected.

  6. Horizontal rotation signals detected by "G-Pisa" ring laser for the Mw=9.0, March 2011, Japan earthquake

    CERN Document Server

    Belfi, J; Carelli, G; Di Virgilio, A; Maccioni, E; Saccorotti, G; Stefani, F; Velikoseltsev, A

    2012-01-01

    We report the observation of the ground rotation induced by the Mw=9.0, 11th of March 2011, Japan earthquake. The rotation measurements have been conducted with a ring laser gyroscope operating in a vertical plane, thus detecting rotations around the horizontal axis. Comparison of ground rotations with vertical accelerations from a co-located force-balance accelerometer shows excellent ring laser coupling at periods longer than 100s. Under the plane wave assumption, we derive a theoretical relationship between horizontal rotation and vertical acceleration for Rayleigh waves. Due to the oblique mounting of the gyroscope with respect to the wave direction-of-arrival, apparent velocities derived from the acceleration / rotation rate ratio are expected to be always larger than, or equal to the true wave propagation velocity. This hypothesis is confirmed through comparison with fundamental-mode, Rayleigh wave phase velocities predicted for a standard Earth model.

  7. Analysis and correction of ocean wave pattern induced systematic coordinate errors in airborne LiDAR bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfeld, Patrick; Maas, Hans-Gerd; Richter, Katja; Weiß, Robert

    2017-06-01

    This contribution investigates the effects of ocean wave patterns on 3D underwater point coordinate accuracy for LiDAR bathymetry. The refraction of the finite diameter laser pulse passing the air/water interface is modeled differentially in a strict manner. Typical wave patterns and sensor configurations are simulated, and their impact on the 3D coordinates at the bottom of the water body are systematically analyzed. It can be shown that waves have a significant effect on both the planimetry and depth coordinates of underwater topography 3D point cloud coordinates, especially for modern small footprint LiDAR systems. Planimetric effects may reach several decimeters or even meters, and depth coordinate errors also reach several decimeters, even in the case of a horizontal water body bottom. The simulations show that the simplified assumption, that wave effects average out (as is made in most LiDAR bathymetry data processing tools) is not even fulfilled for large footprint systems (spreading the laser beam to a diameter of several meters at the water surface) under certain wave pattern conditions. Modern systems with smaller beam divergence are much more sensitive to wave-induced variations of the refraction conditions and will experience significant wave pattern dependent coordinate errors. The results presented here form a basis for a more strict coordinate correction, if the wave pattern can be modeled from the LiDAR bathymetry water surface reflections or from other observations. Moreover, it will be shown that the induced coordinate errors contain a non-zero bias in addition to a local wave surface dependent quasi-random part, which allows for the formulation of wave pattern dependent correction terms in order to increase the accuracy of LiDAR bathymetry by removing systematic wave pattern dependent effects.

  8. Probe beam-free detection of terahertz wave by electroluminescence induced by intense THz pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J.; Jin, Z.; Nosaka, Y.; Nakazawa, T.; Kodama, R.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, a table-top fs laser system can generate MW terahertz (THz) pulse with its electric field higher than 100 kV/cm can be generated by several schemes. Such a strong THz field can directly drive electrons inside various materials. Here, we demonstrated a direct THz electric field detection method by measuring the electroluminescence induced by intense THz pulse inside commonly available light emitting diode. An intense THz wave obtained by the two-color laser scheme was focused onto LED along with an external DC bias to induce luminescence which we found proportional to the amplitude of the incident THz field. The scheme can be useful to realize a low-cost, probe-free THz detection and imaging system.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Study of Wave-Induced Backfilling Beneath Submarine Pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayraktar, Deniz; Ahmad, Joseph; Eltard-Larsen, Bjarke

    -coupled hydrodynamicand morphodynamic CFD model (Jacobsen et al., 2014),extending previous pipeline scour-related applications ofFuhrman et al. (2014) and Larsen et al. (2016). Comparison of the numerical and experimental results demonstrate the ability of the CFD model to reasonably simulate the current......Through complementary experimental and numerical efforts, the present paper aims to make a significant contribution to the overall understanding of backfilling processes beneath submarine pipelines. For this purpose, we aim to simplify the experimental backfilling process to an elementary two......-stage process: (1) initial scour induced by a pure current, followed by: (2) backfilling induced by pure waves. A steady current is introduced via a re-circulating pump, and is kept constant with a cross-sectional velocity of V = 0.48 m/s until an initial equilibrium scour depth, S0, is reached. Then...

  10. Impurity- and magnetic-field-induced quasiparticle states in chiral p-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yao-Wu; Li, Wei; Chen, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Both impurity- and magnetic-field-induced quasiparticle states in chiral p-wave superconductors are investigated theoretically by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations self-consistently. At the strong scattering limit, we find that a universal state bound to the impurity can be induced for both a single nonmagnetic impurity and a single magnetic impurity. Furthermore, we find that different chiral order parameters and the corresponding supercurrents have uniform distributions around linear impurities. Calculations of the local density of states in the presence of an external magnetic field show that the intensity peak of the zero-energy Majorana mode in the vortex core can be enhanced dramatically by tuning the strength of the external magnetic field or pairing interaction.

  11. Research of microstrip square split ring structure and efficient terahertz wave absorber%微带方形开口环的高效太赫兹波吸收器研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程伟; 李九生; 孙超

    2013-01-01

    A terahertz wave absorber based on microstrip square split ring structure was designed. It consisted of a top square opening ring layer, an underlying metal plate layer, and a dielectric layer between them. An equivalent circuit model was used to design the terahertz wave absorber. We processed and tested the designed absorber as well and the experimental results showed that the absorber achieved an absorption peak at 0. 575 THz with an absorptivity of 0. 993. The component could be optimized to achieve high absorption of different frequencies of the incident electromagnetic wave by flexibly adjusting the physical dimensions and material parameters. The proposed absorber has a simple structure with small size and high absorptivity. It may play an important role in applications such as the spectrum imaging, thermal radiation detection and so on.%设计了一种基于微带方形开口环结构的太赫兹波吸收器,它由顶层方形开口环、中间电介质层基体和底层金属板组成.提出一种等效电路模型,利用该模型完成了对太赫兹波吸收器的设计、加工与测试.研究结果表明,吸收器在0.575 THz处吸收率高达0.993.通过对器件的物理尺寸及材料参数的灵活调节,经优化设计即可实现对不同频率入射电磁波的高吸收.该吸收器具有结构简单、体积小、吸收率高等优点,有望在频谱成像、热辐射探测等应用中发挥重要作用.

  12. A novel method for analyzing seismic energy loss associated with wave-induced fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solazzi, Santiago G.; Germán Rubino, J.; Müller, Tobias M.; Milani, Marco; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Whenever a seismic wave propagates through a fluid saturated porous rock that contains heterogeneities in the mesoscopic scale, that is, heterogeneities larger than the typical pore size but smaller than the predominant wavelengths, local gradients in the pore-fluid pressure arise. These pressure gradients, which are due to the uneven response of the heterogeneities to the stress applied by the passing seismic wavefield, induce viscous fluid flow and energy dissipation. Consequently, seismic waves tend to be strongly attenuated and dispersed in this kind of media. This attenuation mechanism scales with the compressibility contrast between heterogeneities and the background. Correspondingly, environments characterized by patchy saturation as well as fractured media represent two prominent scenarios where seismic attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow is expected to be the predominant energy dissipation mechanism. Numerical oscillatory compressibility and shear tests based on the quasistatic poroelasticity equations provide an effective means to compute equivalent viscoelastic moduli for representative rock samples of the heterogeneous media under study. Approaches of this type rely on the existence of a dynamic-equivalent medium, that is, the heterogeneous porous rock is represented by an equivalent homogeneous viscoelastic solid that exhibits an overall response similar to that of the original heterogeneous porous sample. This methodology allows for extracting the equivalent seismic attenuation and phase velocity of the sample, but fails to provide any information with regard to the underlying physical processes. In this work, we present a novel approach based on the quantification of the energy loss taking place in the interior of the considered heterogeneous rock sample. To this end, we first determine the spatial distribution of the energy dissipation in response to the applied oscillatory stresses. Next, we quantify the total dissipated energy as well as

  13. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaiswal, S., E-mail: surabhijaiswal73@gmail.com; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2016-08-15

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a Π shaped direct current glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change in the gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers type equation.

  14. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, S; Sen, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves (DASW) in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a $\\Pi$ shaped DC glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a m...

  15. An imaging algorithm for damage detection with dispersion compensation using piezoceramic induced lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangmin; Gao, Weihang; Song, Gangbing; Song, Yue

    2017-02-01

    Piezoceramic induced Lamb waves are often used for imaging based damage detection, especially for plate like structures. The dispersion effect of the Lamb waves deteriorates the performance of most of imaging methods, since the waveform of the dispersion signals will spread out. In this paper, an imaging method which can compensate the dispersion is developed. In the proposed method, the phase induced by the propagation distance is compensated firstly. After that, the phase deviation generated by the dispersion effect is compensated. Via the two compensations, the proposed method can derive an accurate location of the target with a clean imaging map. An experiment using a plate like structure with four piezoceramic transducer was conducted. In the experiment, the four piezoceramic sensors were used to obtain the signals of the scatterer that simulated the damage on an aluminum plate. The experimental results show that since the dispersion effect is compensated, the target’s image based on the proposed method is about 10 cm × 14 cm, which is about a quarter of that of using the back-projection imaging method.

  16. Analysis of Winske-Daughton 3D Electromagnetic Particle Simulation of Ion Ring Generated Lower Hybrid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Rudakov, Leonid; Mithaiwala, Manish; Ganguli, Gurudas

    2012-01-01

    Using electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations Winske and Daughton [Phys Plasmas, 19, 072109, 2012] have recently demonstrated that the nonlinear evolution of a wave turbulence initiated by cold ion ring beam is vastly different in three dimensions than in two dimensions. We further analyze the Winske-Daughton three dimensional simulation data and show that the nonlinear induced scattering by thermal plasma particles is crucial for understanding the evolution of lower hybrid/whistler wave turbulence as described in the simulation.

  17. Ring interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Malykin, Grigorii B; Zhurov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the creation of a comprehensive formalism for quantitative description of polarized modes' linear interaction in modern single-mode optic fibers. The theory of random connections between polarized modes, developed in the monograph, allows calculations of the zero shift deviations for a fiber ring interferometer. The monograph addresses also the

  18. Scattering-induced changes in the degree of polarization of a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chaoliang; Cai, Yangjian; Zhang, Yongtao; Pan, Liuzhan

    2012-06-01

    The scattering of a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse on a deterministic spherical medium is investigated. An analytical formula for the degree of polarization (DOP) of the scattered field in the far zone is derived. Letting pulse duration T(0) → ∞, our formula can be applied to study the scattering of a stationary stochastic electromagnetic light wave. Numerical results show that the DOP of the far zone field is closely determined by the size of the spherical medium when the incident field is a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse. This is much different from the case when the incident field is a stationary stochastic electromagnetic light wave, where the DOP of the far zone field is independent of the size of the medium. One may obtain the information of the spherical medium by measuring the scattering-induced changes in the DOP of a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse.

  19. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  20. Coupled wave analysis of holographically induced transparency (HIT) generated by two multiplexed volume gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, Luis; Blaya, Salvador; Acebal, Pablo; Fimia, Antonio; Madrigal, Roque; Murciano, Angel

    2011-04-11

    We present a holographic system that can be used to manipulate the group velocity of light pulses. The proposed structure is based on the multiplexing of two sequential holographic volume gratings, one in transmission and the other in reflection geometry, where one of the recording beams must be the same for both structures. As in other systems such as grating induced transparency (GIT) or coupled-resonator-induced transparency (CRIT), by using the coupled wave theory it is shown that this holographic structure represents a classical analogue of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Analytical expressions were obtained for the transmittance induced at the forbidden band (spectral hole) and conditions where the group velocity was slowed down were analyzed. Moreover, the propagation of Gaussian pulses is analyzed for this system by obtaining, after further approximations, analytical expressions for the distortion of the transmitted field. As a result, we demonstrate the conditions where the transmitted pulse is slowed down and its shape is only slightly distorted. Finally, by comparing with the exact solutions obtained, the range of validity of all the analytical formulae was verified, demonstrating that the error is very low.

  1. A Traveling Feature in Saturn's Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Rehnberg, Morgan E; Brown, Zarah L; Albers, Nicole; Sremčević, Miodrag; Stewart, Glen R

    2016-01-01

    The co-orbital satellites of Saturn, Janus and Epimetheus, swap radial positions every 4.0 years. Since \\textit{Cassini} has been in orbit about Saturn, this has occurred on 21 January in 2006, 2010, and 2014. We describe the effects of this radial migration in the Lindblad resonance locations of Janus within the rings. When the swap occurs such that Janus moves towards Saturn and Epimetheus away, nonlinear interference between now-relocated density waves launches a solitary wave that travels through the rings with a velocity approximately twice that of the local spiral density wave group velocity in the A ring and commensurate with the spiral density wave group velocity in the B ring.

  2. LES Study on the Mechanism of Vortex Rings behind Supersonic MVG with Turbulent Inflow

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Yonghua; Lu, Ping; Liu, Chaoqun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the interaction between vortex rings behind MVG and the oblique shocks in the MVG controlled ramp flow at M=2.5 and Req=5760. Implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) method is used by solving the unfiltered form of the Navier-Stokes equations with the 5th order Bandwidth-optimized WENO scheme. The fully developed inflow is given by a series of turbulent profiles obtained from previous DNS simulation. It shows that the ring structure does not break down and keeps its topology after penetrating the strong shock wave and the oblique shocks is influenced a lot by the induced flow field from rings. The bump of the 3D shock wave surface is discovered and its mechanism is explained.

  3. TRIM4; a novel mitochondrial interacting RING E3 ligase, sensitizes the cells to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Dhanendra; Prajapati, Paresh; Lavie, Julie; Singh, Kritarth; Lakshmi, Sripada; Bhatelia, Khyati; Roy, Milton; Singh, Rochika; Bénard, Giovanni; Singh, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    The emerging evidences suggest that posttranslational modification of target protein by ubiquitin (Ub) not only regulate its turnover through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) but is a critical regulator of various signaling pathways. During ubiquitination, E3 ligase recognizes the target protein and determines the topology of ubiquitin chains. In current study, we studied the role of TRIM4, a member of the TRIM/RBCC protein family of RING E3 ligase, in regulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death. TRIM4 is expressed differentially in human tissues and expressed in most of the analyzed human cancer cell lines. The subcellular localization studies showed that TRIM4 forms distinct cytoplasmic speckle like structures which transiently interacts with mitochondria. The expression of TRIM4 induces mitochondrial aggregation and increased level of mitochondrial ROS in the presence of H2O2. It sensitizes the cells to H2O2 induced death whereas knockdown reversed the effect. TRIM4 potentiates the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cytochrome c release in the presence of H2O2. The analysis of TRIM4 interacting proteins showed its interaction with peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1), including other proteins involved in regulation of mitochondrial and redox homeostasis. TRIM4 interaction with PRX1 is critical for the regulation of H2O2 induced cell death. Collectively, the evidences in the current study suggest the role of TRIM4 in regulation of oxidative stress induced cell death.

  4. On SAP-rings

    OpenAIRE

    Zhixiang, Wu

    2006-01-01

    The rings whose simple right modules are absolutely pure are called right $SAP$-rings. We give a new characterization of right $SAP$ rings, right $V$ rings, and von Neumann regular rings. We also obtain a new decomposition theory of right selfinjective von Neumann regular rings. The relationships between $SAP$-rings, $V$-rings, and von Neumann regular rings are explored. Some recent results obtained by Faith are generalized and the results of Wu-Xia are strengthened.

  5. The effect of the wave-induced mixing on the upper ocean temperature in a climate model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Chuanjiang; QIAO Fangli; SONG Zhenya

    2008-01-01

    The significant underestimation of sea surface temperature (SST) and the temperature in the upper ocean is one of common prob-lems in present climate models. The influence of the wave-induced mixing on SST and the temperature in the upper ocean was ex-amined based on a global climate model. The results from the model coupled with wave-induced mixing showed a significant im-provement in the simulation of SST and the temperature in the upper ocean compared with those of the original model without wave effects. Although there has still a cold bias, the new simulation is much closer to the climatology,especially in the northern ocean and tropical ocean. This study indicates that some important physical processes in the accurate simulation of the ocean may be ig-nored in present climate models, and the wave-inducod mixing is one of those factors. Thus, the wave-induced mixing (or the effect of surface waves) should be incorporated properly into climate models in order to simulate or forecast the ocean, then cli-mate system, more accurately.

  6. Ringing phenomenon in silica microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunhua Dong; Changling Zou; Jinming Cui; Yong Yang; Zhengfu Han; Guangcan Guo

    2009-01-01

    Whispering gallery modes in silica microspheres are excited by a tunable continuous-wave laser through the fiber taper. Ringing phenomenon can be observed with high frequency sweeping speed. The thermal nonlinearity in the microsphere can enhance this phenomenon. Our measurement results agree very well with the theoretical predictions by the dynamic equation.

  7. Influence of exothermic chemical reactions on laser-induced shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2014-10-21

    Differences in the excitation of non-energetic and energetic residues with a 900 mJ, 6 ns laser pulse (1064 nm) have been investigated. Emission from the laser-induced plasma of energetic materials (e.g. triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], cyclotrimethylene trinitramine [RDX], and hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane [CL-20]) is significantly reduced compared to non-energetic materials (e.g. sugar, melamine, and l-glutamine). Expansion of the resulting laser-induced shock wave into the air above the sample surface was imaged on a microsecond timescale with a high-speed camera recording multiple frames from each laser shot; the excitation of energetic materials produces larger heat-affected zones in the surrounding atmosphere (facilitating deflagration of particles ejected from the sample surface), results in the formation of additional shock fronts, and generates faster external shock front velocities (>750 m s(-1)) compared to non-energetic materials (550-600 m s(-1)). Non-explosive materials that undergo exothermic chemical reactions in air at high temperatures such as ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate produce shock velocities which exceed those of the inert materials but are less than those generated by the exothermic reactions of explosive materials (650-700 m s(-1)). The most powerful explosives produced the highest shock velocities. A comparison to several existing shock models demonstrated that no single model describes the shock propagation for both non-energetic and energetic materials. The influence of the exothermic chemical reactions initiated by the pulsed laser on the velocity of the laser-induced shock waves has thus been demonstrated for the first time.

  8. Multiwavelength Raman fiber ring laser with the spectrum profile broadened by parametric four wave mixing in highly nonlinear dispersion-shifted fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Qing Wang; Wei Zhang; Xiaoming Liu; Jiangde Peng

    2005-01-01

    @@ A broadband multiwavelength Raman fiber ring laser (RFRL) covering the whole C-band at room temperature are presented. The effect of the intracavity highly nonlinear dispersion-shifted fiber on broadening and flattening the output spectrum envelope is discussed and experimentally demonstrated. More than 45-dB extinction-ratio multiwavelength output from 1527.76 to 1566.86 nm with 100-GHz channel spacing and 2.1-dB power ripple has been achieved by carefully controlling the individual powers of three pump lasers.

  9. Pilot Study of Propofol-induced Slow Waves as a Pharmacologic Test for Brain Dysfunction after Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortelainen, Jukka; Väyrynen, Eero; Huuskonen, Usko; Laurila, Jouko; Koskenkari, Juha; Backman, Janne T; Alahuhta, Seppo; Seppänen, Tapio; Ala-Kokko, Tero

    2017-01-01

    Slow waves (less than 1 Hz) are the most important electroencephalogram signatures of nonrapid eye movement sleep. While considered to have a substantial importance in, for example, providing conditions for single-cell rest and preventing long-term neural damage, a disturbance in this neurophysiologic phenomenon is a potential indicator of brain dysfunction. Since, in healthy individuals, slow waves can be induced with anesthetics, the authors tested the possible association between hypoxic brain injury and slow-wave activity in comatose postcardiac arrest patients (n = 10) using controlled propofol exposure. The slow-wave activity was determined by calculating the low-frequency (less than 1 Hz) power of the electroencephalograms recorded approximately 48 h after cardiac arrest. To define the association between the slow waves and the potential brain injury, the patients' neurologic recovery was then followed up for 6 months. In the patients with good neurologic outcome (n = 6), the low-frequency power of electroencephalogram representing the slow-wave activity was found to substantially increase (mean ± SD, 190 ± 83%) due to the administration of propofol. By contrast, the patients with poor neurologic outcome (n = 4) were unable to generate propofol-induced slow waves. In this experimental pilot study, the comatose postcardiac arrest patients with poor neurologic outcome were unable to generate normal propofol-induced electroencephalographic slow-wave activity 48 h after cardiac arrest. The finding might offer potential for developing a pharmacologic test for prognostication of brain injury by measuring the electroencephalographic response to propofol.

  10. Dynamic magnetization switching and spin wave excitations by voltage-induced torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Yoichi

    2013-03-01

    The effect of electric fields on ultrathin ferromagnetic metal layer is one of the promising approaches for manipulating the spin direction with low-energy consumption, localization, and coherent behavior. Several experimental approaches to realize it have been investigated using ferromagnetic semiconductors, magnetostriction together with piezo-electric materials, multiferroic materials, and ultrathin ferromagnetic layer. In this talk, we will present a dynamic control of spins by voltage-induced torque. We used the magnetic tunnel junctions with ultrathin ferromagnetic layer, which shows voltage-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy change. By applying the voltage to the junction, the magnetic easy-axis in the ultrathin ferromagnetic layer changes from in-plane to out-of-plane, which causes a precession of the spins. This precession resulted in a two-way toggle switching by determining an appropriate pulse length. On the other hand, an application of rf-voltage causes an excitation of a uniform spin-wave. Since the precession of spin associates with an oscillation in the resistance of the junction, the applied rf-signal is rectified and produces a dc-voltage. From the spectrum of the dc-voltage as a function of frequency, we could estimate the voltage-induced torque. This research was supported by CREST-JST, G-COE program, and JSPS for the fellowship. Collaborators include T. Nozaki, S. Miwa, F. Bonell, N. Mizuochi, T. Shinjo, and Y. Suzuki.

  11. EMIC-wave-moderated flux limitations of ring current energetic ion intensities in the multi-species plasmas of Earth's inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, B.

    2013-12-01

    One of the early sophisticated integrations of theory and observations of the space age was the development in 1966 of the integral Kennel-Petschek flux limit for trapped energetic electrons and ions within Earth's inner magnetosphere. Specifically, it was proposed that: 1) trapped particle distributions in the magnetic bottle configuration of the inner magnetosphere are intrinsically unstable to the generation various plasma waves and 2) ionospheric reflection of some waves back into the trapped populations leads to runaway growth of the waves and dramatic loss of particles for particle integral intensities that rise above a fairly rigidly specified upper limit. While there has been a long hiatus in utilization of the KP limit in inner magnetospheric research, there have been recent highly successful reconsiderations of more general forms of the KP limit for understanding radiation belt electron intensities and spectral shapes, resulting from improvements in theoretical tools. Such a reconsideration has not happened for energetic trapped ions, perhaps due to the perceived immense complexity of the generation of the Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, that scatter the energetic ions, for plasmas containing multiple ionic species (H, He, O). Here, a differential Kennel-Petschek (KP) flux limit for magnetospheric energetic ions is devised taking into account multiple ion species effects on the EMIC waves. This new theoretical approach is applied to measured Earth magnetosphere energetic ion spectra (~ keV to ~ 1 MeV) for radial positions (L) 3 to 6.7 RE. The flatness of the most intense spectral shapes for mechanism, but modifications of traditional KP parameters are needed to account for maximum intensities up to 5 times greater than expected. Future work using the Van Allen Probes mission will likely resolve outstanding uncertainties.

  12. Beam instability induced by rf deflectors in the combiner ring of the CLIC test facility and mitigation by damped deflecting structures

    CERN Document Server

    Alesini, D; Biscari, C; Ghigo, A; Corsini, R

    2011-01-01

    In the CTF3 (CLIC test facility 3) run of November 2007, a vertical beam instability has been found in the combiner ring during operation. After a careful analysis, the source of the instability has been identified in the vertical deflecting modes trapped in the rf deflectors and excited by the beam passage. A dedicated tracking code that includes the induced transverse wakefield and the multibunch multipassage effects has been written and the results of the beam dynamics analysis are presented in the paper. The mechanism of the instability was similar to the beam breakup in a linear accelerator or in an energy recovery linac. The results of the code allowed identifying the main key parameters driving such instability and allowed finding the main knobs to mitigate it. To completely suppress such beam instability, two new rf deflectors have been designed, constructed, and installed in the ring. In the new structures the frequency separation between the vertical and horizontal deflecting modes has been increase...

  13. Heat transfer with thermal radiation on MHD particle-fluid suspension induced by metachronal wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, M. M.; Zeeshan, A.; Ellahi, R.

    2017-09-01

    In this article, effects of heat transfer on particle-fluid suspension induced by metachronal wave have been examined. The influence of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and thermal radiation are also taken into account with the help of Ohm's law and Roseland's approximation. The governing flow problem for Casson fluid model is based on continuity, momentum and thermal energy equation for fluid phase and particle phase. Taking the approximation of long wavelength and zero Reynolds number, the governing equations are simplified. Exact solutions are obtained for the coupled partial differential equations. The impact of all the embedding parameters is discussed with the help of graphs. In particular, velocity profile, pressure rise, temperature profile and trapping phenomena are discussed for all the emerging parameters. It is observed that while fluid parameter enhances the velocity profile, Hartmann number and particle volume fraction oppose the flow.

  14. Vibrational wave packet induced oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectra. I. Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nemeth, Alexandra; Mancal, Tomas; Lukes, Vladimir; Hauer, Juergen; Kauffmann, Harald F; Sperling, Jaroslaw

    2010-01-01

    This is the first in a series of two papers investigating the effect of electron-phonon coupling in two-dimensional Fourier transformed electronic spectroscopy. We present a series of one- and two-dimensional nonlinear spectroscopic techniques for studying a dye molecule in solution. Ultrafast laser pulse excitation of an electronic transition coupled to vibrational modes induces a propagating vibrational wave packet that manifests itself in oscillating signal intensities and line-shapes. For the two-dimensional electronic spectra we can attribute the observed modulations to periodic enhancement and decrement of the relative amplitudes of rephasing and non-rephasing contributions to the total response. Different metrics of the two-dimensional signals are shown to relate to the frequency-frequency correlation function which provides the connection between experimentally accessible observations and the underlying microscopic molecular dynamics. A detailed theory of the time-dependent two-dimensional spectral li...

  15. Extreme value prediction of the wave-induced vertical bending moment in large container ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2015-01-01

    in the present paper is based on time series of full scale measurements from three large container ships of 8600, 9400 and 14000 TEU. When carrying out the extreme value estimation the peak-over-threshold (POT) method combined with an appropriate extreme value distribution is applied. The choice of a proper...... increase the extreme hull girder response significantly. Focus in the present paper is on the influence of the hull girder flexibility on the extreme response amidships, namely the wave-induced vertical bending moment (VBM) in hogging, and the prediction of the extreme value of the same. The analysis...... threshold level as well as the statistical correlation between clustered peaks influence the extreme value prediction and are taken into consideration in the present paper....

  16. Goos-Hänchen shift in a standing-wave-coupled electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Hai-Hua; Liang, Zhi-Peng; Xu, Yan; Fan, Cun-Bo; Liu, Cheng-Zhi; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2015-03-01

    The Goos-Hänchen shift of the system composed by two cavity walls and an intracavity atomic sample is presented. The atomic sample is treated as a four-level double-Λ system, driven by the two counterpropagating coupling fields. The probe field experiences the discontinuous refractive index variation and is reflected. Moreover, under the phase-matching condition, the four-wave mixing effect based on electromagnetically induced transparency can cause effective reflection. The Goos-Hänchen shifts appear in both situations and are carefully investigated in this article. We refer to the first one with the incident and reflected light having identical wavelength as the linear Goos-Hänchen shift, and the second one with the reflection wavelength determined by the phase-matching condition as the nonlinear Goos-Hänchen shift. The differences between the two kinds of shifts, such as the incident angle range, conditions for the shift peaks, and controllability, are discussed.

  17. Heat transfer with thermal radiation on MHD particle–fluid suspension induced by metachronal wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M M BHATTI; A ZEESHAN; R ELLAHI

    2017-09-01

    In this article, effects of heat transfer on particle–fluid suspension induced by metachronal wave have been examined. The influence of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and thermal radiation are also taken into account with the help of Ohm’s law and Roseland’s approximation. The governing flow problem for Casson fluid model is based on continuity, momentum and thermal energy equation for fluid phase and particle phase. Taking the approximation of long wavelength and zero Reynolds number, the governing equations are simplified. Exact solutions are obtained for the coupled partial differential equations. The impact of all the embedding parameters is discussed with the help of graphs. In particular, velocity profile, pressure rise, temperature profile and trapping phenomena are discussed for all the emerging parameters. It is observed that while fluid parameter enhances the velocity profile, Hartmann number and particle volume fraction oppose the flow.

  18. Influence of collisions on parametric instabilities induced by lower hybrid waves in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, C.; Di Siena, A.; Fedele, R.; Napoli, F.; Amicucci, L.; Cesario, R.; Schettini, G.

    2016-01-01

    Parametric instabilities induced at the plasma edge by lower hybrid wave power externally coupled to tokamak plasmas have, via broadening of the antenna spectrum, strong influence on the power deposition and current drive in the core. For modeling the parametric instabilities at the tokamak plasma edge in lower hybrid current drive experiments, the effect of the collisions has been neglected so far. In the present work, a specific collisional parametric dispersion relation, useful to analyze these nonlinear phenomena near the lower hybrid antenna mouth, is derived for the first time, based on a kinetic model. Numerical solutions show that in such cold plasma regions the collisions prevent the onset of the parametric instabilities. This result is important for present lower hybrid current drive experiments, as well as in fusion reactor scenarios.

  19. Intrinsic structure in Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, N.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's rings are the most prominent in our Solar system and one example of granular matter in space. Dominated by tides and inelastic collisions the system is highly flattened being almost 300000km wide while only tens of meters thick. Individual particles are composed of primarily water ice and range from microns to few tens of meters in size. Apparent patterns comprise ringlets, gaps, kinematic wakes, propellers, bending waves, and the winding spiral arms of density waves. These large-scale structures are perturbations foremost created by external as well as embedded moons. Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn show these structures in unprecedented detail. But high-resolution measurements reveal the presence of small-scale structures throughout the system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), overstable waves (100-300m), subkm structure at the A and B ring edges, "straw" and "ropy" structures (1-3km), and the C ring "ghosts". Most of these had not been anticipated and are found in perturbed regions, driven by resonances with external moons, where the system undergoes periodic phases of compression and relaxation that correlate with the presence of structure. High velocity dispersion and the presence of large clumps imply structure formation on time scales as short as one orbit (about 10 hours). The presence of these intrinsic structures is seemingly the response to varying local conditions such as internal density, optical depth, underlying particle size distribution, granular temperature, and distance from the central planet. Their abundance provides evidence for an active and dynamic ring system where aggregation and fragmentation are ongoing on orbital timescales. Thus a kinetic description of the rings may be more appropriate than the fluid one. I will present Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) occultations, Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and high

  20. A Numerical Study on the Screening of Blast-Induced Waves for Reducing Ground Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dohyun; Jeon, Byungkyu; Jeon, Seokwon

    2009-06-01

    Blasting is often a necessary part of mining and construction operations, and is the most cost-effective way to break rock, but blasting generates both noise and ground vibration. In urban areas, noise and vibration have an environmental impact, and cause structural damage to nearby structures. Various wave-screening methods have been used for many years to reduce blast-induced ground vibration. However, these methods have not been quantitatively studied for their reduction effect of ground vibration. The present study focused on the quantitative assessment of the effectiveness in vibration reduction of line-drilling as a screening method using a numerical method. Two numerical methods were used to analyze the reduction effect toward ground vibration, namely, the “distinct element method” and the “non-linear hydrocode.” The distinct element method, by particle flow code in two dimensions (PFC 2D), was used for two-dimensional parametric analyses, and some cases of two-dimensional analyses were analyzed three-dimensionally using AUTODYN 3D, the program of the non-linear hydrocode. To analyze the screening effectiveness of line-drilling, parametric analyses were carried out under various conditions, with the spacing, diameter of drill holes, distance between the blasthole and line-drilling, and the number of rows of drill holes, including their arrangement, used as parameters. The screening effectiveness was assessed via a comparison of the vibration amplitude between cases both with and without screening. Also, the frequency distribution of ground motion of the two cases was investigated through fast Fourier transform (FFT), with the differences also examined. From our study, it was concluded that line-drilling as a screening method of blast-induced waves was considerably effective under certain design conditions. The design details for field application have also been proposed.