WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave heating experiments

  1. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and ... having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - Slow down. Avoid strenuous ...

  2. Anomalous attenuation of extraordinary waves in ionosphere heating experiments experimental results of 2000-2001

    CERN Document Server

    Zabotin, N A; Kovalenko, E S; Frolov, V L; Komrakov, G P; Mityakov, N A; Sergeev, E N

    2001-01-01

    Multiple scattering from artificial random irregularities HF-induced in the ionosphere F region causes significant attenuation of both ordinary and extraordinary radio waves together with the conventional anomalous absorption of ordinary waves due to their conversion into the plasma waves. To study in detail features of this effect, purposeful measurements of the attenuation of weak probing waves of the extraordinary polarization have been performed at the Sura heating facility. Characteristic scale lengths of the involved irregularities are ~0.1-1 km across the geomagnetic field lines. To determine the spectral characteristics of these irregularities from the extraordinary probing wave attenuation measurements, a simple procedure of the inverse problem solving has been implemented and some conclusions about the artificial irregularity features have been drawn. Theory and details of experiments have been stated earlier. This paper reports results of two experimental campaigns carried out in August 2000 and Ju...

  3. Investigation of acoustic gravity waves created by anomalous heat sources: experiments and theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipta, R.; Lee, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    We have been investigating high-power radio wave-induced acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) at Gakona, Alaska, using the High-frequency Active Aurora Research Program (HAARP) heating facility (i.e. HF heater) and extensive diagnostic instruments. This work was aimed at performing a controlled study of the space plasma turbulence triggered by the AGWs originating from anomalous heat sources, as observed in our earlier experiments at Arecibo, Puerto Rico (Pradipta 2007 MS Thesis MIT Press, Cambridge, MA). The HF heater operated in continuous wave (CW) O-mode can heat ionospheric plasmas effectively to yield a depleted magnetic flux tube as rising plasma bubbles (Lee et al 1998 Geophys. Res. Lett. 25 579). Two processes are responsible for the depletion of the magnetic flux tube: (i) thermal expansion and (ii) chemical reactions caused by heated ions. The depleted plasmas create large density gradients that can augment spread F processes via generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (Lee et al 1999 Geophys. Res. Lett. 26 37). It is thus expected that the temperature of neutral particles in the heated ionospheric region can be increased. Such a heat source in the neutral atmosphere may potentially generate AGWs in the form of traveling ionospheric plasma disturbances (TIPDs). We should point out that these TIPDs have features distinctively different from electric and magnetic field (ExB) drifts of HF wave-induced large-scale non-propagating plasma structures. Moreover, it was noted in our recent study of naturally occurring AGW-induced TIDs that only large-scale AGWs can propagate upward to reach higher altitudes. Thus, in our Gakona experiments we select optimum heating schemes for HF wave-induced AGWs that can be distinguished from the naturally occurring ones. The generation and propagation of AGWs are monitored by MUIR (Modular Ultra high-frequency Ionospheric Radar), Digisonde and GPS/low-earth-orbit satellites. Our theoretical and experimental studies have shown that

  4. Exposure to a heat wave under food limitation makes an agricultural insecticide lethal: a mechanistic laboratory experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinh, Khuong Van; Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby

    2016-01-01

    Extreme temperatures and exposure to agricultural pesticides are becoming more frequent and intense under global change. Their combination may be especially problematic when animals suffer food limitation. We exposed Coenagrion puella damselfly larvae to a simulated heat wave combined with food...... limitation and subsequently to a widespread agricultural pesticide (chlorpyrifos) in an indoor laboratory experiment designed to obtain mechanistic insights in the direct effects of these stressors in isolation and when combined. The heat wave reduced immune function (activity of phenoloxidase, PO...... variables. While the immediate effects of the heat wave were subtle, our results indicate the importance of delayed effects in shaping the total fitness impact of a heat wave when followed by pesticide exposure. Firstly, the combination of delayed negative effects of the heat wave and starvation...

  5. Experiments on transitions of baroclinic waves in a differentially heated rotating annulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. von Larcher

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments of baroclinic waves in a rotating, baroclinic annulus of fluid are presented for two gap widths. The apparatus is a differentially heated cylindrical gap, rotated around its vertical axis of symmetry, cooled from within, with a free surface, and filled with de-ionised water as working fluid. The surface flow was observed with visualisation technique while thermographic measurements gave a detailed understanding of the temperature distribution and its time-dependent behaviour. We focus in particular on transitions between different flow regimes. Using a wide gap, the first transition from axisymmetric flow to the regular wave regime was characterised by complex flows. The transition to irregular flows was smooth, where a coexistence of the large-scale jet-stream and small-scale vortices was observed. Furthermore, temperature measurements showed a repetitive separation of cold vortices from the inner wall. Experiments using a narrow gap showed no complex flows but strong hysteresis in the steady wave regime, with up to five different azimuthal wave modes as potential steady and stable solutions.

  6. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K; Kajiwara, K; Oda, Y; Kasugai, A; Kobayashi, N; Sakamoto, K; Doane, J; Olstad, R; Henderson, M

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  7. An analysis of JET fast-wave heating and current drive experiments directly related to ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, V.P.; Eriksson, L.; Gormezano, C.; Jacquinot, J.; Kaye, A.; Start, D.F.H. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    The ITER fast-wave system is required to serve a variety of purposes, in particular, plasma heating to ignition, current profile and burn control and eventually, in conjunction with other schemes, a central non-inductive current drive (CD) for the steady-state operation of ITER. The ICRF heating and current drive data that has been obtained in JET are analyzed in terms of dimensionless parameters, with a view to ascertaining its direct relevance to key ITER requirements. The analysis is then used to identify areas both in physics and technological aspects of ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and CD that require further experimentation in ITER-relevant devices such as JET to establish the required data base. (authors). 12 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Heating and current drive by fast wave in lower hybrid range of frequency on Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun-Ho, E-mail: shkim95@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyunwoo; Lee, Byungje [KwangWoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jong-Gab; Lee, Hyun-Young; Hwang, Yong-Seok [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    An efficient heating and current drive scheme in central or off-axis region is required to realize steady state operation of tokamak fusion reactor. And the fast wave in lower hybrid resonance range of frequency could be a candidate for such an efficient scheme in high density and high temperature plasmas. Its propagation and absorption characteristics including current drive and coupling efficiency are analyzed for Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus and it is shown that it is possible to drive current with considerable current drive efficiency in central region. The RF system for the fast wave experiment including klystron, transmission systems, inter-digital antenna, and RF diagnostics are given as well in this paper.

  9. Macroscopic heat transport equations and heat waves in nonequilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yangyu; Jou, David; Wang, Moran

    2017-03-01

    Heat transport may behave as wave propagation when the time scale of processes decreases to be comparable to or smaller than the relaxation time of heat carriers. In this work, a generalized heat transport equation including nonlinear, nonlocal and relaxation terms is proposed, which sums up the Cattaneo-Vernotte, dual-phase-lag and phonon hydrodynamic models as special cases. In the frame of this equation, the heat wave propagations are investigated systematically in nonequilibrium steady states, which were usually studied around equilibrium states. The phase (or front) speed of heat waves is obtained through a perturbation solution to the heat differential equation, and found to be intimately related to the nonlinear and nonlocal terms. Thus, potential heat wave experiments in nonequilibrium states are devised to measure the coefficients in the generalized equation, which may throw light on understanding the physical mechanisms and macroscopic modeling of nanoscale heat transport.

  10. SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions - Iterated Finite-Orbit Monte Carlo Simulations with Full-Wave Fields for Modeling Tokamak ICRF Wave Heating Experiments - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myunghee [Retired; Chan, Vincent S. [General Atomics

    2014-02-28

    This final report describes the work performed under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-08ER54954 for the period April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2013. The goal of this project was to perform iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wall fields for modeling tokamak ICRF wave heating experiments. In year 1, the finite-orbit Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF and its iteration algorithms with the full-wave code AORSA were improved to enable systematical study of the factors responsible for the discrepancy in the simulated and the measured fast-ion FIDA signals in the DIII-D and NSTX ICRF fast-wave (FW) experiments. In year 2, ORBIT-RF was coupled to the TORIC full-wave code for a comparative study of ORBIT-RF/TORIC and ORBIT-RF/AORSA results in FW experiments.

  11. Urban Heat Wave Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, D. A.; Jedlovec, G.; Crane, D. L.; Meyer, P. J.; LaFontaine, F.

    2016-12-01

    Heat waves are one of the largest causes of environmentally-related deaths globally and are likely to become more numerous as a result of climate change. The intensification of heat waves by the urban heat island effect and elevated humidity, combined with urban demographics, are key elements leading to these disasters. Better warning of the potential hazards may help lower risks associated with heat waves. Moderate resolution thermal data from NASA satellites is used to derive high spatial resolution estimates of apparent temperature (heat index) over urban regions. These data, combined with demographic data, are used to produce a daily heat hazard/risk map for selected cities. MODIS data are used to derive daily composite maximum and minimum land surface temperature (LST) fields to represent the amplitude of the diurnal temperature cycle and identify extreme heat days. Compositing routines are used to generate representative daily maximum and minimum LSTs for the urban environment. The limited effect of relative humidity on the apparent temperature (typically 10-15%) allows for the use of modeled moisture fields to convert LST to apparent temperature without loss of spatial variability. The daily max/min apparent temperature fields are used to identify abnormally extreme heat days relative to climatological values in order to produce a heat wave hazard map. Reference to climatological values normalizes the hazard for a particular region (e.g., the impact of an extreme heat day). A heat wave hazard map has been produced for several case study periods and then computed on a quasi-operational basis during the summer of 2016 for Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, St. Louis, MO, and Huntsville, AL. A hazard does not become a risk until someone or something is exposed to that hazard at a level that might do harm. Demographic information is used to assess the urban risk associated with the heat wave hazard. Collectively, the heat wave hazard product can warn people in urban

  12. Full-wave and Fokker Planck analysis of ICRF heating experiments in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Golovato, S.; Porkolab, M.; Takase, Y. [MIT Plasma Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Alcator C-Mod device is a high field, high density, shaped tokamak with parameters a = 0.22 m, R{sub 0} = 0.67 m, B{sub 0} {le} 9.0 T, {kappa} {le} 1.8, {delta} {le} 0.8, and 1.0 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} n{sub e} (0) {le} 1.0 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3}. Four megawatt of ICRF power is available at 80 MHz. The wide operating range in magnetic field makes several heating schemes possible: (i) Second harmonic heating of hydrogen (f{sub 0} = 2f{sub CH}) at 2.6 T in (D-H); (ii) Fundamental heating of (H) (f{sub 0} = f{sub CH}) at 5.3T in a D-(H) plasma; and (iii) Fundamental heating of ({sup 3}He) (f{sub 0} = f{sub C{sup 3}He}) at 7.9 T in a D-({sup 3}He) plasma. The most successful heating regime to date has been (H)-minority heating at 5.3 T. Pellet enhanced performance (PEP) modes have also been achieved in C-Mod in D-(H) at 5.3 T and in D-({sup 3}He) at 7.9 T, with a combination of intense ICRF heating and Li-pellet injection. A variety of numerical models are used to analyze these heating schemes. A 1-D full-wave code (FELICE) is used to study {open_quotes}single pass{close_quotes} damping of the ICRF wavefront and damping of mode-converted ion Bernstein waves. A toroidal full-wave code (FISIC) is used to study interference and focussing effects of the ICRF waves as well as damping of the ICRF power upon multiple passes of the ICRF wavefront. A combined bounce averaged Fokker Planck and toroidal full-wave code (FPPRF) is used to study the ion tail formation, orbit losses, and the power partition of the ICRF tail to the background electrons and ions. Full-wave and Fokker Planck analyses confirm the strong single pass absorption of the ICRF power in D-(H) at 5.3 T. Analysis of PEP-mode plasmas in D-({sup 3}He) indicates improved wave focussing and {sup 3}He-cyclotron absorption of the ICRF waves relative to L-mode. A dramatic increase in the transfer of {sup 3}He tail power to the background deuterium is also found for PEP-mode plasmas.

  13. Phase coherence of parametric-decay modes during high-harmonic fast-wave heating in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, J. A., E-mail: carlsson@pppl.gov [Crow Radio and Plasma Science, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Wilson, J. R.; Hosea, J. C.; Greenough, N. L.; Perkins, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Third-order spectral analysis, in particular, the auto bicoherence, was applied to probe signals from high-harmonic fast-wave heating experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Strong evidence was found for parametric decay of the 30 MHz radio-frequency (RF) pump wave, with a low-frequency daughter wave at 2.7 MHz, the local majority-ion cyclotron frequency. The primary decay modes have auto bicoherence values around 0.85, very close to the theoretical value of one, which corresponds to total phase coherence with the pump wave. The threshold RF pump power for onset of parametric decay was found to be between 200 kW and 400 kW.

  14. Ion Bernstein wave heating research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masayuki.

    1992-03-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW's low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW's that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW's can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

  15. Ion Bernstein wave heating research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masayuki

    1992-03-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW`s low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much_lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW`s that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW`s can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

  16. Experimental observation of radiation heat waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DingYao-Nan; YaoZhen-Yu; 等

    1997-01-01

    Radiation heat waves play an important role in high-temperature hydrodrnamic phenomena which is very important for laser fusion.Therefore,the propagation of a radiation heat wave through a thin foil of solid aluminium is observed.The wave is driven by the intense solft-X-ray radiation in a cylindrical cavity heated by the intense laser pulse.Experiments are carried out with two beams of λ=1.05μm light form the Shenguang Nd-glass laser facility.The pulse energy is about 600 J and the pulse duration 0.8ns.Evidence of radiation heat wave is obtained by observing the delayes signal of intense thermal emission from the outside of the foil.The delay is 850ps for 1.5μm thick foil and the mass ablation rate is about 4.8×105g/(cm2.s) under the X-ray flux of about 1×1013W/cm2.Also.the radiation-driven shock waves of (2±1)TPa are observed from different shots in the experiments.

  17. Ionospheric heating with oblique HF waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Edward C., Jr.; Bloom, Ron M.

    1990-10-01

    Calculations of ionospheric electron density perturbations and ground-level signal changes produce by intense oblique high frequency (HF) transmitters are presented. This analysis considers radio field focusing at caustics, the consequent joule-heating of the surrounding plasma, heat conduction, diffusion, and recombination processes: these being the effects of a powerful oblique 'modifying' wave. It neglects whatever plasma instabilities might occur. Then effects on a secondary 'test' wave that is propagated along the same path as the first are investigated. Calculations predict ground-level field-strength reductions of several dB in the test wave for modifying waves having ERP in the 85 to 90 dBW range. These field-strength changes are similar in sign, magnitude, and location to ones measured in Soviet experiments. The results are sensitive to the model ionosphere assumed, so future experiments should employ the widest possible range of frequencies and propagation conditions. An effective power of 90 dBW seems to be a sort of threshold that, if exceeded, results in substantial rather than small signal changes. The conclusions are based solely on joule-heating and subsequent defocusing of waves passing through caustic regions.

  18. Reconfigurable heat-induced spin wave lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyapko, O.; Borisenko, I. V.; Demidov, V. E.; Pernice, W.; Demokritov, S. O.

    2016-12-01

    We study the control and manipulation of propagating spin waves in yttrium iron garnet films using a local laser-induced heating. We show that, due to the refraction of spin waves in the thermal gradients, the heated region acts as a defocusing lens for Damon-Eshbach spin waves and as a focusing lens for backward volume waves enabling collimation of spin-wave beams in the latter case. In addition to the focusing/defocusing functionality, the local heating allows one to manipulate the propagation direction of the spin-wave beams and to efficiently suppress their diffraction spreading by utilizing caustic effects.

  19. Heat, heat waves, and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Si-Hyuck; Oh, Il-Young; Heo, Jongbae; Lee, Hyewon; Kim, Jungeun; Lim, Woo-Hyun; Cho, Youngjin; Choi, Eue-Keun; Yi, Seung-Muk; Sang, Do Shin; Kim, Ho; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Oh, Seil

    2016-10-15

    Cardiac arrest is one of the common presentations of cardiovascular disorders and a leading cause of death. There are limited data on the relationship between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and ambient temperatures, specifically extreme heat. This study investigated how heat and heat waves affect the occurrence of OHCA. Seven major cities in Korea with more than 1 million residents were included in this study. A heat wave was defined as a daily mean temperature above the 98th percentile of the yearly distribution for at least two consecutive days. A total of 50,318 OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin were identified from the nationwide emergency medical service database between 2006 and 2013. Ambient temperature and OHCA had a J-shaped relationship with a trough at 28°C. Heat waves were shown to be associated with a 14-% increase in the risk of OHCA. Adverse effects were apparent from the beginning of each heat wave period and slightly increased during its continuation. Excess OHCA events during heat waves occurred between 3PM and 5PM. Subgroup analysis showed that those 65years or older were significantly more susceptible to heat waves. Ambient temperature and OHCA had a J-shaped relationship. The risk of OHCA was significantly increased with heat waves. Excess OHCA events primarily occurred during the afternoon when the temperature was high. We found that the elderly were more susceptible to the deleterious effects of heat waves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Spencer P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, 5 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  1. Wave heating of the solar atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregui, Iñigo

    2015-05-28

    Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding of coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding of the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us to understand and quantify magnetic wave heating of the solar atmosphere.

  2. Low-Frequency Waves in HF Heating of the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. S.; Eliasson, B.; Milikh, G. M.; Najmi, A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, X.; Vartanyan, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ionospheric heating experiments have enabled an exploration of the ionosphere as a large-scale natural laboratory for the study of many plasma processes. These experiments inject high-frequency (HF) radio waves using high-power transmitters and an array of ground- and space-based diagnostics. This chapter discusses the excitation and propagation of low-frequency waves in HF heating of the ionosphere. The theoretical aspects and the associated models and simulations, and the results from experiments, mostly from the HAARP facility, are presented together to provide a comprehensive interpretation of the relevant plasma processes. The chapter presents the plasma model of the ionosphere for describing the physical processes during HF heating, the numerical code, and the simulations of the excitation of low-frequency waves by HF heating. It then gives the simulations of the high-latitude ionosphere and mid-latitude ionosphere. The chapter also briefly discusses the role of kinetic processes associated with wave generation.

  3. Wave Heating of the Solar Chromosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wolfgang Kalkofen

    2008-03-01

    The nonmagnetic interior of supergranulation cells has been thought since the 1940s to be heated by the dissipation of acoustic waves. But all attempts to measure the acoustic flux have failed to show sufficient energy for chromospheric heating. Recent space observations with TRACE, for example, have found 10% or less of the necessary flux. To explain the missing energy it has been speculated that the nonmagnetic chromosphere is heated mainly by waves related to the magnetic field. If that were correct, the whole chromosphere, magnetic as well as nonmagnetic, would be heated mainly by waves related to the magnetic field. But contrary to expectation, the radiation emerging from the nonmagnetic chromosphere shows none of the signatures of magnetic waves, only those of acoustic waves. Nearly all the heating of the nonmagnetic chromosphere must therefore be due to acoustic waves. In the magnetic network on the boundary of supergranulation cells, on the other hand, the small filling factor of the magnetic field in the photosphere implies that only a small fraction of the wave flux that travels upward to heat the chromosphere can be channeled by the magnetic field. Hence, while some of the energy that is dissipated in the magnetic network is in the form of magnetic waves, most of it must be in the form of acoustic waves. Thus, the quiet solar chromosphere, instead of being heated mainly by magneticwaves throughout, must be heated mainly by acoustic waves throughout. The full wave flux heating the quiet chromosphere must travel through the photosphere. In the nonmagnetic medium, this flux is essentially all in the form of acoustic waves; TRACE registers at most 10% of it, perhaps because of limited spatial resolution.

  4. Heat Waves in the United States: Mortality Risk during Heat Waves and Effect Modification by Heat Wave Characteristics in 43 U.S. Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. Brooke; Bell, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Devastating health effects from recent heat waves, and projected increases in frequency, duration, and severity of heat waves from climate change, highlight the importance of understanding health consequences of heat waves. Objectives We analyzed mortality risk for heat waves in 43 U.S. cities (1987–2005) and investigated how effects relate to heat waves’ intensity, duration, or timing in season. Methods Heat waves were defined as ≥ 2 days with temperature ≥ 95th percentile for the community for 1 May through 30 September. Heat waves were characterized by their intensity, duration, and timing in season. Within each community, we estimated mortality risk during each heat wave compared with non-heat wave days, controlling for potential confounders. We combined individual heat wave effect estimates using Bayesian hierarchical modeling to generate overall effects at the community, regional, and national levels. We estimated how heat wave mortality effects were modified by heat wave characteristics (intensity, duration, timing in season). Results Nationally, mortality increased 3.74% [95% posterior interval (PI), 2.29–5.22%] during heat waves compared with non-heat wave days. Heat wave mortality risk increased 2.49% for every 1°F increase in heat wave intensity and 0.38% for every 1-day increase in heat wave duration. Mortality increased 5.04% (95% PI, 3.06–7.06%) during the first heat wave of the summer versus 2.65% (95% PI, 1.14–4.18%) during later heat waves, compared with non-heat wave days. Heat wave mortality impacts and effect modification by heat wave characteristics were more pronounced in the Northeast and Midwest compared with the South. Conclusions We found higher mortality risk from heat waves that were more intense or longer, or those occurring earlier in summer. These findings have implications for decision makers and researchers estimating health effects from climate change. PMID:21084239

  5. Closing the Gap on Measuring Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, S. E.; Alexander, L.

    2012-12-01

    Since the 4th IPCC assessment report, the scientific literature has established that anthropogenic climate change encompasses adverse changes in both mean climate conditions and extreme events, such as heat waves. Indeed, the affects of heat waves are felt across many different sectors, and have high economic, human, and physical impacts over many global regions. The spatial and monetary scale of heat wave impacts emphasizes the necessity of measuring and studying such events in an informative manner, which gives justice to the geographical region affected, the communities impacted, and the climatic fields involved. However, due to such wide interest in heat waves, their definition remains broad in describing a period of consecutive days where conditions are excessively hotter than normal. This has allowed for the employment of a plethora of metrics, which are usually unique to a given sector, or do not appropriately describe some of the important features of heat wave events. As such, it is difficult to ascertain a clear message regarding changes in heat waves, both in the observed record and in projections of future climate. This study addresses this issue by developing a multi-index, multi-aspect framework in which to measure heat waves. The methodology was constructed by assessing a wide range of heat wave and heat wave-related indices, both proposed and employed in the scientific literature. The broad implications of the occurrences, frequency and duration of heat waves and respective changes were also highly considered. The resulting indices measure three or more consecutive days where 1) maximum temperature exceeds the 90th percentile (TX90pct); 2) minimum temperature exceeds the 90th percentile (TN90pct); and 3) daily average temperature has a positive excess heat factor (EHF). The 90th percentiles from which TX90pct and TN90pct are calculated are based on 15-day windows for each calendar day, whereas the EHF is based upon two pre-calculated indices that

  6. Future Heat Waves in Paris Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulant, A.; Lemonsu, A.; Somot, S.; Masson, V.

    2010-12-01

    Cities are particularly vulnerable to heat waves, firstly because they concentrate the majority of the population and, secondly because the heat island that characterizes the urban climate exacerbates heat wave effects. This work is part of the interdisciplinary VURCA project (Vulnerability of cities to heat waves), which deals with the evolution of heat wave events in the context of global warming, urban vulnerability and adaptation strategies. The aim of this study is to analyse urban heat wave events in present climate (1950-2009) and their evolution in an enhanced greenhouse gazes future climate (2010-2100). We used daily observations of temperature from several stations covering Paris metropolitan area and climate projections following three different IPCC-SRES scenarios (B1, A1B, A2) and issued from several ENSEMBLES regional climate models. The heat wave definition is based on the indexes of the operational French warning system. A heat wave is detected within observed or simulated time-series by a heat wave peak, when the temperatures exceed the value of the 99.9th percentile. Its duration is determined by all adjacent days to this peak, for which the temperatures are not durably smaller than the 99.9th percentile value minus 2 °C. The 99.9th percentile threshold is inferred from quantile-quantile plots produced for each climate model in comparison with observations for the reference period 1950-2000. Heat waves have been extracted within observations and 12 climatic simulations. The number of heat wave events and cumulated HW days per year have been calculated, the maximum being seven heat waves cumulating more than 60 HW days in one year in the case of the A2 scenario and until 50 days in the case of the more moderate A1B scenario. From 2050, the occurrence of three or four HW events per year is becoming the norm all scenarios taken together. The evolution of heat wave features has been analysed, highlighting the large variability of the climatic

  7. Heat waves in urban heat islands: interactions, impacts, and mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Zeid, E.; Li, D.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization rates and the intensity of anthropogenic global warming are both on the rise. By the middle of this century, climate change impacts on humans will be largely manifested in urban regions and will result from a combination of global to regional impacts related to greenhouse gas emissions, as well as regional to local impacts related to land-cover changes associated with urbanization. Alarmingly, our understanding of how these two distinct impacts will interact remains very poor. One example, which is the focus of this study, is the interaction of urban heat islands and heat waves. Urban heat islands (UHIs) are spatial anomalies consisting of higher temperatures over built terrain; while their intensity varies with many factors, it consistently increases with city size. UHIs will hence intensify in the future as cities expand. Heat waves are temporal anomalies in the regional temperatures that affect both urban and rural areas; there is high certainty that the frequency and intensity of such waves will increase as a result global warming. However, whether urban and rural temperatures respond in the same way to heat waves remains a critical unanswered question. In this study, a combination of observational and modeling analyses of a heat wave event over the Baltimore-Washington urban corridor reveals synergistic interactions between urban heat islands and heat waves. Not only do heat waves increase the regional temperatures, but they also intensify the difference between urban and rural temperatures. That is, their impact is stronger in cities and the urban heat stress during such waves is larger than the sum of the background urban heat island effect and the heat wave effect. We also develop a simple analytical model of this interaction that suggests that this exacerbated impact in urban areas is primarily to the lack of surface moisture, with low wind speeds also playing a smaller role. Finally, the effectiveness of cool and green roofs as UHI mitigation

  8. Heat wave flash droughts in decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Kingtse C.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2015-04-01

    Flash drought is a term that was popularized during rapidly evolving droughts in the Central U.S. in 2012 that were associated with heat waves. We posit that there are two kinds of flash droughts, and we will focus on heat wave flash droughts, of which the 2012 events were typical. We find, based on an analysis of temperature observations and model-reconstructed soil moisture (SM) and evapotranspiration from 1916 to 2013, that heat wave flash droughts in the conterminous U.S. (CONUS) are most likely to occur over the Midwest and the Pacific Northwest during the growing season. We also find that the number of such events across the CONUS has been decreasing over the last century but rebounded after 2011. The long-term downward trends appear to be associated with generally increasing trends in SM resulting from increasing trends in precipitation over the areas where heat wave flash droughts are most likely to occur.

  9. Wave heating in magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    The bright chromosphere in the quiet sun is confined to magnetic elements (flux tubes), which are located in the interior of the supergranulation cells and within the network that surrounds the cells. The paper discusses the heating of the gas in the magnetic elements of the cell interior. These intranetwork flux tubes are closely associated with bright points, which are heated by large-amplitude compressive waves with periods near the acoustic cutoff that travel outward from the photosphere and dissipate their energy in the chromosphere. The energy flux of these long-period waves appears to be sufficient for the heating of the low and middle chromosphere in the bright points.

  10. Whirling waves in Interference experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Urbasi; Sawant, Rahul; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Aninda; Sinha, Supurna

    2014-03-01

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well- known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption, the wave function hypothesis, which is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from non-classical paths in interference experiments which provide a measurable deviation from the wave function hypothesis. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these non-classical paths is hard. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence. I will also describe some ongoing experimental efforts towards testing our theoretical findings.

  11. Heating Cooling Flows with Weak Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Mathews, W G; Brighenti, F

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of extended, approximately spherical weak shock waves in the hot intercluster gas in Perseus and Virgo has precipitated the notion that these waves may be the primary heating process that explains why so little gas cools to low temperatures. This type of heating has received additional support from recent gasdynamical models. We show here that outward propagating, dissipating waves deposit most of their energy near the center of the cluster atmosphere. Consequently, if the gas is heated by (intermittent) weak shocks for several Gyrs, the gas within 30-50 kpc is heated to temperatures that far exceed observed values. This heating can be avoided if dissipating shocks are sufficiently infrequent or weak so as not to be the primary source of global heating. Local PV and viscous heating associated with newly formed X-ray cavities are likely to be small, which is consistent with the low gas temperatures generally observed near the centers of groups and clusters where the cavities are located.

  12. Chiral heat wave and mixing of magnetic, vortical and heat waves in chiral media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernodub, M.N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique,Université de Tours, 37200 (France); Soft Matter Physics Laboratory, Far Eastern Federal University,Sukhanova 8, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent,Krijgslaan 281, S9, Gent (Belgium)

    2016-01-18

    We show that a hot rotating fluid of relativistic chiral fermions possesses a new gapless collective mode associated with coherent propagation of energy density and chiral density waves along the axis of rotation. This mode, which we call the Chiral Heat Wave, emerges due to a mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly. At finite density the Chiral Heat Wave couples to the Chiral Vortical Wave while in the presence of an external magnetic field it mixes with the Chiral Magnetic Wave. The coupling of the Chiral Magnetic and Chiral Vortical Waves is also demonstrated. We find that the coupled waves — which are coherent fluctuations of the vector, axial and energy currents — have generally different velocities compared to the velocities of the individual waves.

  13. Inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshi, E; Todo, Y

    2003-03-14

    The inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas is derived. This inductance represents the inductance of fast electrons located in a plateau during their acceleration due to electric field or deceleration due to collisions and electric field. This inductance has been calculated for small electric fields from the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation as the flux crossing the surface of critical energy mv(2)(ph)/2 in the velocity space. The new expression may be important for radio-frequency current drive ramp-up, current drive efficiency, current profile control, and so on in tokamaks. This inductance may be incorporated into transport codes that study plasma heating by rf waves.

  14. Climate Change Effects on Heat Waves and Future Heat Wave-Associated IHD Mortality in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Zacharias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of future climate change on the occurrence of heat waves and its implications for heat wave-related mortality due to ischemic heart diseases (IHD in Germany is studied. Simulations of 19 regional climate models with a spatial resolution of 0.25° × 0.25° forced by the moderate climate change scenario A1B are analyzed. Three model time periods of 30 years are evaluated, representing present climate (1971–2000, near future climate (2021–2050, and remote future climate (2069–2098. Heat waves are defined as periods of at least three consecutive days with daily mean air temperature above the 97.5th percentile of the all-season temperature distribution. Based on the model simulations, future heat waves in Germany will be significantly more frequent, longer lasting and more intense. By the end of the 21st century, the number of heat waves will be tripled compared to present climate. Additionally, the average duration of heat waves will increase by 25%, accompanied by an increase of the average temperature during heat waves by about 1 K. Regional analyses show that stronger than average climate change effects are observed particularly in the southern regions of Germany. Furthermore, we investigated climate change impacts on IHD mortality in Germany applying temperature projections from 19 regional climate models to heat wave mortality relationships identified in a previous study. Future IHD excess deaths were calculated both in the absence and presence of some acclimatization (i.e., that people are able to physiologically acclimatize to enhanced temperature levels in the future time periods by 0% and 50%, respectively. In addition to changes in heat wave frequency, we incorporated also changes in heat wave intensity and duration into the future mortality evaluations. The results indicate that by the end of the 21st century the annual number of IHD excess deaths in Germany attributable to heat waves is expected to rise by factor 2

  15. Heat transport experiments on the HSX stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Gavin McCabe

    It has been observed in tokamaks that temperature profiles are resilient to changes in heating, and that this effect has not been observed in conventional stellarators. Electron temperature profile resiliency is attributed to anomalous transport driven by turbulent micro-instabilities, and the resulting stiffness in the electron heat flux is measured using a combination of steady-state and perturbative experiments. In this work, stiffness measurements are presented in the quasihelically symmetric configuration of the Helically Symmetric eXperiment (HSX), in which the neoclassical transport is comparable to a tokamak and turbulent transport dominates throughout the plasma. A second gyrotron and transmission line have been installed and tested to facilitate modulated heating experiments on HSX, and a multi-pass absorption model accurately predicts the total absorption and spatial extent of the electron cyclotron resonance heating during a modulation experiment. The electron cyclotron emission measured by an absolutely calibrated 16-channel radiometer is used to measure the local electron temperature and its response to the modulated heating. The amplitude and phase of the heat wave through the foot of the steep electron temperature gradient region of the plasma, 0.2It has been observed in tokamaks that temperature profiles are resilient to changes in heating, and that this effect has not been observed in conventional stellarators. Electron temperature profile resiliency is attributed to anomalous transport driven by turbulent micro-instabilities, and the resulting stiffness in the electron heat flux is measured using a combination of steady-state and perturbative experiments. In this work, stiffness measurements are presented in the quasihelically symmetric configuration of the Helically Symmetric eXperiment (HSX), in which the neoclassical transport is comparable to a tokamak and turbulent transport dominates throughout the plasma. A second gyrotron and transmission

  16. Heat Wave Vulnerability Mapping for India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Gulrez; Saha, Shubhayu; Ganguly, Partha; Mavalankar, Dileep; Madrigano, Jaime

    2017-03-30

    Assessing geographic variability in heat wave vulnerability forms the basis for planning appropriate targeted adaptation strategies. Given several recent deadly heatwaves in India, heat is increasingly being recognized as a public health problem. However, to date there has not been a country-wide assessment of heat vulnerability in India. We evaluated demographic, socioeconomic, and environmental vulnerability factors and combined district level data from several sources including the most recent census, health reports, and satellite remote sensing data. We then applied principal component analysis (PCA) on 17 normalized variables for each of the 640 districts to create a composite Heat Vulnerability Index (HVI) for India. Of the total 640 districts, our analysis identified 10 and 97 districts in the very high and high risk categories (> 2SD and 2-1SD HVI) respectively. Mapping showed that the districts with higher heat vulnerability are located in the central parts of the country. On examination, these are less urbanized and have low rates of literacy, access to water and sanitation, and presence of household amenities. Therefore, we concluded that creating and mapping a heat vulnerability index is a useful first step in protecting the public from the health burden of heat. Future work should incorporate heat exposure and health outcome data to validate the index, as well as examine sub-district levels of vulnerability.

  17. Mortalidad por hipertermia en Bizkaia durante la ola de calor del verano de 2003: experiencia forense Heat-related mortality in Bizkaia during the Summer 2003 heat wave: Forensic experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Morentin

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Durante las olas de calor la mortalidad puede incrementar marcadamente, a veces hasta alcanzar proporciones epidémicas, como ha ocurrido en Francia este verano. Según las estadísticas oficiales provisionales en el País Vasco hubo 3 casos de muerte por golpe de calor. Describimos 2 casos de muerte por golpe de calor (hipertermia diagnosticas en el Departamento de Patología Forense de Bizkaia ocurridas durante la ola de calor que azotó a Europa el pasado verano. Ninguna de ellas fue incluida en las estadísticas oficiales provisionales. Se trataba de 2 varones adultos con factores de riesgo: alcoholismo e intoxicación alcohólica en uno y cardiopatía y posible sobreejercicio en el otro. Se describen los resultados de la autopsia que mostraron quemaduras térmicas de 2º grado y hallazgos histopatológicos inespecíficos. El estudio bioquímico de humor vítreo mostró un patrón de deshidratación en uno de ellos. La temperatura rectal fue de 41º C en uno y de 43º C en el otro. Este trabajo demuestra la importancia de la toma de la temperatura rectal y ambiente en situaciones de posible muerte por golpe de calor. El diagnóstico final requiere una valoración integrada de todos los datos circunstanciales, médicos, patológicos y de laboratorio. También subraya la conveniencia de un flujo rápido de la información desde el sistema forense al sistema sanitario encargado de la epidemiología y prevención del golpe de calor en situaciones de alarma.During severe heat waves, like that experienced in the summer of 2003 in southern Europe, mortality can increase sharply, sometimes even acquiring epidemic proportions. According to the provisional official reports in the Basque Country there were 3 deaths by heatstroke. In this article we describe the experience of the Forensic Pathologhy Departament of Bizkaia during the heat wave last summer- Autopsy reports were reviewed. Two deaths were due to heat stroke (fatal hyperthermia, but neither

  18. Bulk ion heating with ICRF waves in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsinen, M. J., E-mail: mervi.mantsinen@bsc.es [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, Barcelona (Spain); Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Barcelona (Spain); Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V. V.; Kappatou, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Odstrčil, T.; Tardini, G.; Bernert, M.; Dux, R.; Maraschek, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Ryter, F.; Stober, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Nocente, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, CNR, Milano (Italy); Hellsten, T. [Dept. of Fusion Plasma Physics, EES, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Mantica, P.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, CNR, Milano (Italy); Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics, Lyngby (Denmark); and others

    2015-12-10

    Heating with ICRF waves is a well-established method on present-day tokamaks and one of the heating systems foreseen for ITER. However, further work is still needed to test and optimize its performance in fusion devices with metallic high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs) in preparation of ITER and DEMO operation. This is of particular importance for the bulk ion heating capabilities of ICRF waves. Efficient bulk ion heating with the standard ITER ICRF scheme, i.e. the second harmonic heating of tritium with or without {sup 3}He minority, was demonstrated in experiments carried out in deuterium-tritium plasmas on JET and TFTR and is confirmed by ICRF modelling. This paper focuses on recent experiments with {sup 3}He minority heating for bulk ion heating on the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak with ITER-relevant all-tungsten PFCs. An increase of 80% in the central ion temperature T{sub i} from 3 to 5.5 keV was achieved when 3 MW of ICRF power tuned to the central {sup 3}He ion cyclotron resonance was added to 4.5 MW of deuterium NBI. The radial gradient of the T{sub i} profile reached locally values up to about 50 keV/m and the normalized logarithmic ion temperature gradients R/LT{sub i} of about 20, which are unusually large for AUG plasmas. The large changes in the T{sub i} profiles were accompanied by significant changes in measured plasma toroidal rotation, plasma impurity profiles and MHD activity, which indicate concomitant changes in plasma properties with the application of ICRF waves. When the {sup 3}He concentration was increased above the optimum range for bulk ion heating, a weaker peaking of the ion temperature profile was observed, in line with theoretical expectations.

  19. Aerodynamic Heating in Hypersonic Boundary Layers:\\ Role of Dilatational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yiding; Wu, Jiezhi; Chen, Shiyi; Lee, Cunbiao; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of multi-mode instabilities in a hypersonic boundary layer and their effects on aerodynamic heating are investigated. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering flow visualization, fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint (TSP), and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Calculations are also performed based on both parabolized stability equations (PSE) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). It is found that second-mode dilatational waves, accompanied by high-frequency alternating fluid compression and expansion, produce intense aerodynamic heating in a small region that rapidly heats the fluid passing through it. As a result, the surface temperature rapidly increases and results in an overshoot over the nominal transitional value. When the dilatation waves decay downstream, the surface temperature decreases gradually until transition is completed. A theoretical analysis is provided to interpret the temperature distribution affected by ...

  20. Effects of Simulated Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Functions in Senile Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the effects of simulated heat waves on cardiovascular disease in senile mice was investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a TEM1880 meteorological environment simulation chamber, according to a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen senile mice were divided into control, heat wave, and heat wave BH4 groups, respectively. Mice in the heat wave and heat wave BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. The levels of ET-1, NO, HSP60, SOD, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α in each group of mice were measured after heat wave simulation. Results show that heat waves decreased SOD activity in the myocardial tissue of senile mice, increased NO, HSP60, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α levels, and slightly decreased ET-1 levels, BH4 can relieve the effects of heat waves on various biological indicators. After a comprehensive analysis of the experiments above, we draw the followings conclusions regarding the influence of heat waves on senile mice: excess HSP60 activated immune cells, and induced endothelial cells and macrophages to secrete large amounts of ICAM-1, TNF-α, and other inflammatory cytokines, it also activated the inflammation response in the body and damaged the coronary endothelial cell structure, which increased the permeability of blood vessel intima and decreased SOD activity in cardiac tissues. The oxidation of lipoproteins in the blood increased, and large amounts of cholesterol were generated. Cholesterol penetrated the intima and deposited on the blood vessel wall, forming atherosclerosis and leading to the occurrence of cardiovascular disease in senile mice. These results maybe are useful for studying the effects of heat waves on elderly humans, which we discussed in the discussion chapter.

  1. Radiation Heat Waves in Gold Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jia-Min; XU Yan; DING Yao-Nan; LAI Dong-Xian; DING Yong-Kun; JIANG Shao-En; ZHENG Zhi-Jian; MIAO Wen-Yong

    2003-01-01

    Eight beams 0.35/um laser with pulse duration of about 1.0ns and energy of 260 J per beam was injected into a cylindrical cavity to generate intense x-ray radiation on the "Shengguang I" high power laser facility. Gold foils with a thickness in the range of 0.09-0.52/j,m were attached on the diagnostic hole of the cavity and ablated by the intense x-ray radiation. The propagating radiation heat wave in the high-Z gold plasma was observed clearly. For comparison, we also simulated the experimental results.

  2. [Selective Heating of Membrane-forming Holes in Teflon Film Exposed to Decimeter Waves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, S I; Fesenko, E E; Fesenko, E E

    2015-01-01

    Calculations of heating of membrane-forming holes in Teflon film exposed to decimeter waves were performed. The dependence of the temperature increment in holes on the geometry of holes, electrolyte concentration, and decimeter wave frequency was studied. The kinetics of heating depending on the hole diameter was also obtained. It was concluded that the observed in the experiment effects of the decimeter wave on bilayer lipid membranes resulted from the elevated concentration of decimeter electromagnetic waves in membrane-forming hole that led to selective heating of electrolyte in hole and bilayer lipid membranes.

  3. Determining Heat Waves from Observations and COSMO-CLM Simulations in Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuruk, Cemre; Unal, Yurdanur; Irem Bilgen, Simge; Topcu, Sema; Mentes, Sibel

    2016-04-01

    Climate change has crucial effects on cities and especially for informal settlements, urban poor and other vulnerable groups by influencing human health, assets and livelihoods. These impacts directly result from the variations in temperature and precipitation, and emergence of heat waves, droughts, floods and fires (IPCC, 2014). Summertime episodes with extremely high air temperatures which last for several days or longer are addressed to as heat waves and affect the weather and climate in the globe. The aim of this study is to analyze the occurrence of heat waves in terms of quantity, duration and frequency and also to evaluate the accuracy of the COSMO-CLM (CCLM) model coupled with MPI-ESM-LR in reproducing the characteristics of heat waves in Istanbul. The summer maximum temperatures of six Turkish State Meteorological Service (TSMS) stations are selected between 1960 and 2013 to estimate the characteristics of heat waves in Istanbul. We define the heat wave if the maximum temperatures exceed a threshold value for at least three consecutive days. The threshold value is determined as 30.5 °C from the 90th percentile of all six station's observations. Then it is used in the detection of the hot days, heat waves and their durations. The results show that not only the number of heat waves but also duration of heat waves increase towards the end of the study period. Especially, a significant increase in heat wave events is evident after 1990s. An example of this situation is observed in a Kilyos station located northern part of the city. Kilyos experiences only one heat wave in the beginning of 1970s whereas the number of heat waves increases in years and reaches to the maximum value of 5 in 2000. Furthermore, Kartal as an urban area in the Asian side of the city, exhibits highest heat wave duration with 18 consecutive days in 1998. In addition to station data analyses, the local climate of Istanbul and its vicinity is simulated by CCLM model with approximately 3

  4. Heat Waves, Urban Vegetation, and Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churkina, G.; Grote, R.; Butler, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fast-track programs to plant millions of trees in cities around the world aim at the reduction of summer temperatures, increase carbon storage, storm water control, provision of space for recreation, as well as poverty alleviation. Although these multiple benefits speak positively for urban greening programs, the programs do not take into account how close human and natural systems are coupled in urban areas. Elevated temperatures together with anthropogenic emissions of air and water pollutants distinguish the urban system. Urban and sub-urban vegetation responds to ambient changes and reacts with pollutants. Neglecting the existence of this coupling may lead to unforeseen drawbacks of urban greening programs. The potential for emissions from urban vegetation combined with anthropogenic emissions to produce ozone has long been recognized. This potential increases under rising temperatures. Here we investigate how global change induced heat waves affect emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from urban vegetation and corresponding ground-level ozone levels. We also quantify other ecosystem services provided by urban vegetation (e.g., cooling and carbon storage) and their sensitivity to climate change. In this study we use Weather Research and Forecasting Model with coupled atmospheric chemistry (WRF-CHEM) to quantify these feedbacks in Berlin, Germany during the heat waves in 2003 and 2006. We highlight the importance of the vegetation for urban areas under changing climate and discuss associated tradeoffs.

  5. Characterizing extreme and oppressive heat waves in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Trent W.; Schoof, Justin T.

    2017-01-01

    Heat waves are characteristic features of summertime climate in the Midwest United States and can have significant agricultural, hydrological, and societal impacts. Historically, heat waves in the Midwest state of Illinois have been either extreme (high temperature and low humidity) or oppressive (high temperature and high humidity) in nature, but our knowledge of the factors determining which heat wave type occurs is limited. We use self-organizing maps to classify synoptic-scale atmospheric circulation patterns associated with oppressive and extreme heat events and analysis of variance to evaluate the atmospheric and land surface features responsible for differences in humidity that characterize the two. We find that the majority of extreme and oppressive heat events are associated with similar synoptic-scale atmospheric conditions. Additionally, both locally evaporated moisture and advected moisture sources were important for determining which of the two heat wave types occurred. Specifically, oppressive heat waves were characterized by abundant antecedent precipitation, surplus soil moisture, and elevated evapotranspiration and related atmospheric humidity. Lower humidity levels during extreme heat wave events were driven by relative reductions in evapotranspiration due to limited soil water content. Overall, our results suggest that the onset of heat waves in Illinois is primarily driven by circulation features in the upper atmosphere; however, the distinction of extreme or oppressive heat wave is due to differences in boundary layer humidity, driven in part by land surface moisture availability for evapotranspiration.

  6. North Atlantic Ocean drivers of the 2015 European heat wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchez, Aurélie; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Josey, Simon A.; Hirschi, Joël; Evans, Gwyn

    2016-04-01

    Major European heat waves have occurred on several occasions in the past two decades, including the summer of 2015, with dramatic socioeconomic impacts and in a globally warming world, heat waves are expected to become longer, more frequent and more intense. Nevertheless, our understanding of heat wave causes remains at a basic level, limiting the usefulness of event prediction. We show that 2015 was the most extreme heat wave in central Europe in the past 35 years. We find that the heat wave was preceded by cold mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean surface temperatures, which contributed to its development. In order to explain the genesis of the cold ocean anomaly, we consider surface heat loss, ocean heat content and wind driven upwelling. The anomaly is primarily due to extreme ocean heat loss in the preceding two winters and re-emergent cold ocean water masses. Further analysis indicates that this ocean anomaly was a driver for the 2015 heat wave as it favoured a stationary position of the Jet Stream, which steered Atlantic cyclones away from central Europe towards northern Europe. The cold Atlantic anomaly was also present during the most devastating European heat waves since the 1980s indicating that it is a common factor in the development of these extreme events.

  7. Impact of Heat Wave Definitions on the Added Effect of Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Mortality in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentan Dong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Heat waves are associated with increased mortality, however, few studies have examined the added effect of heat waves. Moreover, there is limited evidence for the influence of different heat wave definitions (HWs on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, the capital of China. The aim of this study was to find the best HW definitions for cardiovascular mortality, and we examined the effect modification by an individual characteristic on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, a typical northern city in China. We applied a Poisson generalized additive approach to estimate the differences in cardiovascular mortality during heat waves (using 12 HWs compared with non-heat-wave days in Beijing from 2006 to 2009. We also validated the model fit by checking the residuals to ensure that the autocorrelation was successfully removed. In addition, the effect modifications by individual characteristics were explored in different HWs. Our results showed that the associations between heat waves and cardiovascular mortality differed from different HWs. HWs using the 93th percentile of the daily average temperature (27.7 °C and a duration ≥5 days had the greatest risk, with an increase of 18% (95% confidence interval (CI: 6%, 31% in the overall population, 24% (95% CI: 10%, 39% in an older group (ages ≥65 years, and 22% (95% CI: 3%, 44% in a female group. The added effect of heat waves was apparent after 5 consecutive heat wave days for the overall population and the older group. Females and the elderly were at higher risk than males and younger subjects (ages <65 years. Our findings suggest that heat wave definitions play a significant role in the relationship between heat wave and cardiovascular mortality. Using a suitable definition may have implications for designing local heat early warning systems and protecting the susceptible populations during heat waves.

  8. Experiments Demonstrate Geothermal Heating Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    When engineers design heat-pump-based geothermal heating systems for homes and other buildings, they can use coil loops buried around the perimeter of the structure to gather low-grade heat from the earth. As an alternative approach, they can drill well casings and store the summer's heat deep in the earth, then bring it back in the winter to warm…

  9. Perturbative Heat Transport Experiments on TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguilor, S.; Castejon, F.; Luna, E. de la; Cappa, A.; Likin, K.; Fernandez, A.; Tj-II, T.

    2002-07-01

    Heat wave experiments are performed on TJ-II stellarator plasmas to estimate both heat diffusivity and power deposition profiles. High frequency ECRH modulation experiments are used to obtain the power deposition profiles, which is observed to be wider and duller than estimated by tracing techniques. The causes of this difference are discussed in the paper. Fourier analysis techniques are used to estimate the heat diffusivity in low frequency ECRH modulation experiments. This include the power deposition profile as a new ingredient. ECHR switch on/off experiments are exploited to obtain power deposition and heat diffusivities profile. Those quantities are compared with the obtained by modulation experiments and transport analysis, showing a good agreement. (Author) 18 refs.

  10. Heat Wave Changes in the Eastern Mediterranean since 1960

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuglitsch, Franz G.; Toreti, Andrea; Xoplaki, Elena; Della-Marta, Paul M.; Zerefos, Christos S.; Türkes, Murat; Luterbacher, Jürg

    2010-05-01

    Heat waves have discernible impacts on mortality and morbidity, infrastructure, agricultural resources, the retail industry, ecosystem and tourism and consequently affect human societies. A new definition of socially relevant heat waves is presented and applied to new data sets of high-quality homogenized daily maximum and minimum summer air temperature series from 246 stations in the eastern Mediterranean region (including Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, Turkey). Changes in heat wave number, length and intensity between 1960 and 2006 are quantified. Daily temperature homogeneity analysis suggest that many instrumental measurements in the 1960s are warm-biased, correcting for these biases regionally averaged heat wave trends are up to 8% higher. We find significant changes across the western Balkans, southwestern and western Turkey, and along the southern Black Sea coastline. Since the 1960s, the mean heat wave intensity, heat wave length and heat wave number across the eastern Mediterranean region have increased by a factor 7.6 ±1.3, 7.5 ±1.3 and 6.2 ±1.1, respectively. These findings suggest that the heat wave increase in this region is higher than previously reported.

  11. Impact of Heat Wave Definitions on the Added Effect of Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Mortality in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wentan; Zeng, Qiang; Ma, Yue; Li, Guoxing; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-09-21

    Heat waves are associated with increased mortality, however, few studies have examined the added effect of heat waves. Moreover, there is limited evidence for the influence of different heat wave definitions (HWs) on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, the capital of China. The aim of this study was to find the best HW definitions for cardiovascular mortality, and we examined the effect modification by an individual characteristic on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, a typical northern city in China. We applied a Poisson generalized additive approach to estimate the differences in cardiovascular mortality during heat waves (using 12 HWs) compared with non-heat-wave days in Beijing from 2006 to 2009. We also validated the model fit by checking the residuals to ensure that the autocorrelation was successfully removed. In addition, the effect modifications by individual characteristics were explored in different HWs. Our results showed that the associations between heat waves and cardiovascular mortality differed from different HWs. HWs using the 93th percentile of the daily average temperature (27.7 °C) and a duration ≥5 days had the greatest risk, with an increase of 18% (95% confidence interval (CI): 6%, 31%) in the overall population, 24% (95% CI: 10%, 39%) in an older group (ages ≥65 years), and 22% (95% CI: 3%, 44%) in a female group. The added effect of heat waves was apparent after 5 consecutive heat wave days for the overall population and the older group. Females and the elderly were at higher risk than males and younger subjects (ages wave definitions play a significant role in the relationship between heat wave and cardiovascular mortality. Using a suitable definition may have implications for designing local heat early warning systems and protecting the susceptible populations during heat waves.

  12. Stochastic Ion Heating by the Lower-Hybrid Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G.; Tel'nikhin, A.; Krotov, A.

    2011-01-01

    The resonance lower-hybrid wave-ion interaction is described by a group (differentiable map) of transformations of phase space of the system. All solutions to the map belong to a strange attractor, and chaotic motion of the attractor manifests itself in a number of macroscopic effects, such as the energy spectrum and particle heating. The applicability of the model to the problem of ion heating by waves at the front of collisionless shock as well as ion acceleration by a spectrum of waves is discussed. Keywords: plasma; ion-cyclotron heating; shocks; beat-wave accelerator.

  13. Seasonal mean temperature changes control future heat waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüeso, Daniel; Di Luca, Alejandro; Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Sarah E.; Evans, Jason P.

    2016-07-01

    Increased temperature will result in longer, more frequent, and more intense heat waves. Changes in temperature variability have been deemed necessary to account for future heat wave characteristics. However, this has been quantified only in Europe and North America, while the rest of the globe remains unexplored. Using late century global climate projections, we show that annual mean temperature increases is the key factor defining heat wave changes in most regions. We find that commonly studied areas are an exception rather than the standard and the mean climate change signal generally outweighs any influence from variability changes. More importantly, differences in warming across seasons are responsible for most of the heat wave changes and their consideration relegates the contribution of variability to a marginal role. This reveals that accurately capturing mean seasonal changes is crucial to estimate future heat waves and reframes our interpretation of future temperature extremes.

  14. Heat waves and urban heat islands in Europe: A review of relevant drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kathrin; Lauf, Steffen; Kleinschmit, Birgit; Endlicher, Wilfried

    2016-11-01

    The climate change and the proceeding urbanization create future health challenges. Consequently, more people around the globe will be impaired by extreme weather events, such as heat waves. This study investigates the causes for the emergence of surface urban heat islands and its change during heat waves in 70 European cities. A newly created climate class indicator, a set of meaningful landscape metrics, and two population-related parameters were applied to describe the Surface Urban Heat Island Magnitude (SUHIM) - the mean temperature increase within the urban heat island compared to its surrounding, as well as the Heat Magnitude (HM) - the extra heat load added to the average summer SUHIM during heat waves. We evaluated the relevance of varying urban parameters within linear models. The exemplary European-wide heat wave in July 2006 was chosen and compared to the average summer conditions using MODIS land surface temperature with an improved spatial resolution of 250m. The results revealed that the initial size of the urban heat island had significant influence on SUHIM. For the explanation of HM the size of the heat island, the regional climate and the share of central urban green spaces showed to be critical. Interestingly, cities of cooler climates and cities with higher shares of urban green spaces were more affected by additional heat during heat waves. Accordingly, cooler northern European cities seem to be more vulnerable to heat waves, whereas southern European cities appear to be better adapted. Within the ascertained population and climate clusters more detailed explanations were found. Our findings improve the understanding of the urban heat island effect across European cities and its behavior under heat waves. Also, they provide some indications for urban planners on case-specific adaptation strategies to adverse urban heat caused by heat waves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of heat wave definitions to the added effect of heat waves on daily mortality in Nanjing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Bi, Jun; Chen, Jin; Chen, Xiaodong; Huang, Lei; Zhou, Lian

    2015-02-15

    Few studies have explored the added effect of heat waves, especially in China. Moreover, no prior studies have assessed whether the choice of heat wave definitions affected this added effect. This study compared the associations between heat waves defined by different heat wave definitions (HWs) and cause-specific mortality in warm season in Nanjing, China. A distributed lag model was applied to evaluate the differences in daily mortality during heat-wave days (defined using 15 HWs) compared with non-heat-wave days in Nanjing, during 2007 to 2013. For different HWs, model fits were examined by the Akaike Information Criterion for quasi-Poisson and effects were compared by stratified analysis and bootstrapping. In addition, we explored the effect modifications by individual characteristics under different HWs. Different HWs resulted in considerable differences in associations between heat waves and mortality. Heat waves defined as ≥4 consecutive days with daily average temperature >98th percentile had the best model fit and were associated with an increase of 24.6% (95% CI: 15.6%, 34.3%) total mortality, 46.9% (95% CI: 33.0%, 62.3%) cardiovascular mortality, 32.0% (95% CI: 8.5%, 60.5%) respiratory mortality, 51.3% (95% CI: 23.4%, 85.6%) stroke mortality, 63.4% (95% CI: 41.5%, 88.8%) ischemic heart disease mortality, and 47.6% (95% CI: 14.5%, 90.3%) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality at lag day 2. Under different HWs, added effects of heat waves on mortality were higher for females versus males, the elderly versus young residents, and people with low education versus those with high education. Results were less sensitive to the inclusion of air pollutants. Heat wave definition plays a critical role in the relationship between heat waves and mortality. Selecting an appropriate definition of heat waves is therefore important to design local heat warning systems and to reduce the burden of disease during heat waves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  16. The role of torsional Alfven waves in coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Antolin, P

    2009-01-01

    In the context of coronal heating, among the zoo of MHD waves that exist in the solar atmosphere, Alfven waves receive special attention. Indeed, these waves constitute an attractive heating agent due to their ability to carry over the many different layers of the solar atmosphere sufficient energy to heat and maintain a corona. However, due to their incompressible nature these waves need a mechanism such as mode conversion (leading to shock heating), phase mixing, resonant absorption or turbulent cascade in order to heat the plasma. New observations with polarimetric, spectroscopic and imaging instruments such as those on board of the japanese satellite Hinode, or the SST or CoMP, are bringing strong evidence for the existence of energetic Alfven waves in the solar corona. In order to assess the role of Alfven waves in coronal heating, in this work we model a magnetic flux tube being subject to Alfven wave heating through the mode conversion mechanism. Using a 1.5-dimensional MHD code we carry out a paramete...

  17. First ICRF heating experiment in the large helical device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutoh, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)] [and others

    1999-07-01

    Initial ICRF heating experiment in the LHD was carried out in 1998. One pair of the movable loop antennas was used and the coupling resistance was around one ohm for the low density ECH plasma. The loading characteristics were consistent with the fast wave excitation. By applying the ICRF heating of 300 kW to the ECH target plasma, the diamagnetic energy was increased from 13 kJ to 26 kJ. The heating performance was decided by hydrogen mixture rate on puffing gas. Efficient electron heating was observed at the higher hydrogen gas ratio. These results can be explained by the one dimensional wave analysis calculation on slab plasma model. (J.P.N.)

  18. Capillary waves and ellipsometry experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn, D.; Wegdam, G. H.

    1992-09-01

    The inclusion of higher-order terms in the capillary-wave Hamiltonian may reduce the contributions of these fluctuations to the ellipsometric coefficients. We show that the renormalization of capillary waves at a fluid-fluid interface by Sengers and van Leeuwen [Phys. Rev. A 39 (1989) 6346] using the wave vector-dependent surface tension that follows from the coupled mode theory by Meunier [Phys. France 48 (1987)1819] yields a satisfactory agreement with recent ellipsometry measurements by Schmidt [Phys. Rev. A 38 (1988) 567]. The interface is viewed upon as an intrinsic interface broadened by capillary waves. We suppose that the cutoff wave vector q_{max} that follows from mode-coupling theory marks the transition from the short-wavelength bulk-like fluctuations that contribute to the bare surface tension to the long-wavelength capillary wave-like fluctuations that contribute to the full surface tension. This enables us to calculate, without any adjustable parameters, both the ratio of the bare and experimental surface tension and the universal constant for the elliptical thickness of the interface. Both agree remarkably well with experimental values.

  19. Projection of heat waves over China for eight different global warming targets using 12 CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaojun; Huang, Jianbin; Luo, Yong; Zhao, Zongci; Xu, Ying

    2017-05-01

    Simulation and projection of the characteristics of heat waves over China were investigated using 12 CMIP5 global climate models and the CN05.1 observational gridded dataset. Four heat wave indices (heat wave frequency, longest heat wave duration, heat wave days, and high temperature days) were adopted in the analysis. Evaluations of the 12 CMIP5 models and their ensemble indicated that the multi-model ensemble could capture the spatiotemporal characteristics of heat wave variation over China. The inter-decadal variations of heat waves during 1961-2005 can be well simulated by multi-model ensemble. Based on model projections, the features of heat waves over China for eight different global warming targets (1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0 °C) were explored. The results showed that the frequency and intensity of heat waves would increase more dramatically as the global mean temperature rise attained higher warming targets. Under the RCP8.5 scenario, the four China-averaged heat wave indices would increase from about 1.0 times/year, 2.5, 5.4, and 13.8 days/year to about 3.2 times/year, 14.0, 32.0, and 31.9 days/year for 1.5 and 5.0 °C warming targets, respectively. Those regions that suffer severe heat waves in the base climate would experience the heat waves with greater frequency and severity following global temperature rise. It is also noteworthy that the areas in which a greater number of severe heat waves occur displayed considerable expansion. Moreover, the model uncertainties exhibit a gradual enhancement with projected time extending from 2006 to 2099.

  20. Added effect of heat wave on mortality in Seoul, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Kyung; Lee, Hye Ah; Lim, Youn Hee; Park, Hyesook

    2016-05-01

    A heat wave could increase mortality owing to high temperature. However, little is known about the added (duration) effect of heat wave from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and different effect sizes depending on the definition of heat waves and models. A distributed lag non-linear model with a quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the added effect of heat wave on mortality after adjusting for long-term and intra-seasonal trends and apparent temperature. We evaluated the cumulative relative risk of the added wave effect on mortality on lag days 0-30. The models were constructed using nine definitions of heat wave and two relationships (cubic spline and linear threshold model) between temperature and mortality to leave out the high temperature effect. Further, we performed sensitivity analysis to evaluate the changes in the effect of heat wave on mortality according to the different degrees of freedom for time trend and cubic spline of temperature. We found that heat wave had the added effect from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and it was considerable in the aspect of cumulative risk because of the lagged influence. When heat wave was defined with a threshold of 98th percentile temperature and ≥2, 3, and 4 consecutive days, mortality increased by 14.8 % (7.5-22.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI)), 18.1 % (10.8-26.0, 95 % CI), 18.1 % (10.7-25.9, 95 % CI), respectively, in cubic spline model. When it came to the definitions of 90th and 95th percentile, the risk increase in mortality declined to 3.7-5.8 % and 8.6-11.3 %, respectively. This effect was robust to the flexibility of the model for temperature and time trend, while the definitions of a heat wave were critical in estimating its relationship with mortality. This finding could help deepen our understanding and quantifying of the relationship between heat wave and mortality and select an appropriate definition of heat wave and temperature model in the future

  1. Waves and Sound, An Experiment that Walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunschwig, Fernand

    An experiment on sound waves, developed for non-science majors in a college physics course, is described. The student investigates the interference of two sound waves and measures and wavelength as he uses a prerecorded tape and a cassette player. The student is tutored by the cassette tape recorder, which also produces the overlapping sound…

  2. Generalized thermoelastic diffusive waves in heat conducting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, J. N.

    2007-04-01

    Keeping in view the applications of diffusion processes in geophysics and electronics industry, the aim of the present paper is to give a detail account of the plane harmonic generalized thermoelastic diffusive waves in heat conducting solids. According to the characteristic equation, three longitudinal waves namely, elastodiffusive (ED), mass diffusion (MD-mode) and thermodiffusive (TD-mode), can propagate in such solids in addition to transverse waves. The transverse waves get decoupled from rest of the fields and hence remain unaffected due to temperature change and mass diffusion effects. These waves travel without attenuation and dispersion. The other generalized thermoelastic diffusive waves are significantly influenced by the interacting fields and hence suffer both attenuation and dispersion. At low frequency mass diffusion and thermal waves do not exist but at high-frequency limits these waves propagate with infinite velocity being diffusive in character. Moreover, in the low-frequency regions, the disturbance is mainly dominant by mechanical process of transportation of energy and at high-frequency regions it is significantly dominated by a close to diffusive process (heat conduction or mass diffusion). Therefore, at low-frequency limits the waves like modes are identifiable with small amplitude waves in elastic materials that do not conduct heat. The general complex characteristic equation is solved by using irreducible case of Cardano's method with the help of DeMoivre's theorem in order to obtain phase speeds, attenuation coefficients and specific loss factor of energy dissipation of various modes. The propagation of waves in case of non-heat conducting solids is also discussed. Finally, the numerical solution is carried out for copper (solvent) and zinc (solute) materials and the obtained phase velocities, attenuation coefficients and specific loss factor of various thermoelastic diffusive waves are presented graphically.

  3. Bulk Ion Heating with ICRF Waves in Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    Heating with ICRF waves is a well-established method on present-day tokamaks and one of the heating systems foreseen for ITER. However, further work is still needed to test and optimize its performance in fusion devices with metallic high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs) in preparation of ITER a...

  4. Blast Wave Experiments at Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    radiation flows upward, it passes though a 1.7-mm high, tapered, 25-μm thick gold wall cone that is filled 20 ± 3 mg/cm3 silica aerogel (SiO2). Above...this cone is a 20 ± 3 mg/cm3 silica aerogel filled, 1-mm high, 2.4-mm inner diameter, 25-μm thick gold wall cylinder. On the cylinder rests a 4-mm...diameter gold platform that supports a higher density (40-60 mg/cm3) silica aerogel . This aerogel is the region where the blast wave forms after

  5. Intense heat waves: dynamical-physical factors and characteristics of these heat waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Demirtaş

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamical and physical factors that trigger and maintain heat waves (HW were examined. Since high pressure systems play a role in HW processes, an atmospheric blocking method was introduced. A HW detection method which employs spatially and temporally changing reference temperature to compute HW parameters was used. Departures from climate averages of 500-hPa geopotential height, 850-hPa temperature, sea-surface-temperatures and soil wetness of 2003, 2012 and 2015 June-July-August were analyzed. HWs were examined together with dynamical and physical factors, atmospheric blocking and HW characteristics. Results indicate that HWs were influential over the Aegean region. Year-to-year variability in summer temperatures is considered as signs of climate variability.

  6. Parametric instability induced by X-mode wave heating at EISCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Zhou, Chen; Liu, Moran; Honary, Farideh; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present results of parametric instability induced by X-mode wave heating observed by EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association) radar at Tromsø, Norway. Three typical X-mode ionospheric heating experiments on 22 October 2013, 19 October 2012, and 21 February 2013 are investigated in details. Both parametric decay instability (PDI) and oscillating two-stream instability are observed during the X-mode heating period. We suggest that the full dispersion relationship of the Langmuir wave can be employed to analyze the X-mode parametric instability excitation. A modified kinetic electron distribution is proposed and analyzed, which is able to satisfy the matching condition of parametric instability excitation. Parallel electric field component of X-mode heating wave can also exceed the parametric instability excitation threshold under certain conditions.

  7. Social media responses to heat waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jihoon; Uejio, Christopher K.

    2017-01-01

    Social network services (SNSs) may benefit public health by augmenting surveillance and distributing information to the public. In this study, we collected Twitter data focusing on six different heat-related themes (air conditioning, cooling center, dehydration, electrical outage, energy assistance, and heat) for 182 days from May 7 to November 3, 2014. First, exploratory linear regression associated outdoor heat exposure to the theme-specific tweet counts for five study cities (Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Houston, and Atlanta). Next, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) time series models formally associated heat exposure to the combined count of heat and air conditioning tweets while controlling for temporal autocorrelation. Finally, we examined the spatial and temporal distribution of energy assistance and cooling center tweets. The result indicates that the number of tweets in most themes exhibited a significant positive relationship with maximum temperature. The ARIMA model results suggest that each city shows a slightly different relationship between heat exposure and the tweet count. A one-degree change in the temperature correspondingly increased the Box-Cox transformed tweets by 0.09 for Atlanta, 0.07 for Los Angeles, and 0.01 for New York City. The energy assistance and cooling center theme tweets suggest that only a few municipalities used Twitter for public service announcements. The timing of the energy assistance tweets suggests that most jurisdictions provide heating instead of cooling energy assistance.

  8. Social media responses to heat waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jihoon; Uejio, Christopher K.

    2017-07-01

    Social network services (SNSs) may benefit public health by augmenting surveillance and distributing information to the public. In this study, we collected Twitter data focusing on six different heat-related themes (air conditioning, cooling center, dehydration, electrical outage, energy assistance, and heat) for 182 days from May 7 to November 3, 2014. First, exploratory linear regression associated outdoor heat exposure to the theme-specific tweet counts for five study cities (Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Houston, and Atlanta). Next, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) time series models formally associated heat exposure to the combined count of heat and air conditioning tweets while controlling for temporal autocorrelation. Finally, we examined the spatial and temporal distribution of energy assistance and cooling center tweets. The result indicates that the number of tweets in most themes exhibited a significant positive relationship with maximum temperature. The ARIMA model results suggest that each city shows a slightly different relationship between heat exposure and the tweet count. A one-degree change in the temperature correspondingly increased the Box-Cox transformed tweets by 0.09 for Atlanta, 0.07 for Los Angeles, and 0.01 for New York City. The energy assistance and cooling center theme tweets suggest that only a few municipalities used Twitter for public service announcements. The timing of the energy assistance tweets suggests that most jurisdictions provide heating instead of cooling energy assistance.

  9. Public crowdsensing of heat waves by social media data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Grasso

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigating on society-related heat wave hazards is a global issue concerning the people health. In the last two decades, Europe experienced several severe heat wave episodes with catastrophic effects in term of human mortality (2003, 2010 and 2015. Recent climate investigations confirm that this threat will represent a key issue for the resiliency of urban communities in next decades. Several important mitigation actions (Heat-Health Action Plans against heat hazards have been already implemented in some WHO (World Health Organization European region member states to encourage preparedness and response to extreme heat events. Nowadays, social media (SM offer new opportunities to indirectly measure the impact of heat waves on society. Using the crowdsensing concept, a micro-blogging platform like Twitter may be used as a distributed network of mobile sensors that react to external events by exchanging messages (tweets. This work presents a preliminary analysis of tweets related to heat waves that occurred in Italy in summer 2015. Using TwitterVigilance dashboard, developed by the University of Florence, a sample of tweets related to heat conditions was retrieved, stored and analyzed for main features. Significant associations between the daily increase in tweets and extreme temperatures were presented. The daily volume of Twitter users and messages revealed to be a valuable indicator of heat wave impact at the local level, in urban areas. Furthermore, with the help of Generalized Additive Model (GAM, the volume of tweets in certain locations has been used to estimate thresholds of local discomfort conditions. These city-specific thresholds are the result of dissimilar climatic conditions and risk cultures.

  10. Public crowdsensing of heat waves by social media data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Valentina; Crisci, Alfonso; Morabito, Marco; Nesi, Paolo; Pantaleo, Gianni

    2017-07-01

    Investigating on society-related heat wave hazards is a global issue concerning the people health. In the last two decades, Europe experienced several severe heat wave episodes with catastrophic effects in term of human mortality (2003, 2010 and 2015). Recent climate investigations confirm that this threat will represent a key issue for the resiliency of urban communities in next decades. Several important mitigation actions (Heat-Health Action Plans) against heat hazards have been already implemented in some WHO (World Health Organization) European region member states to encourage preparedness and response to extreme heat events. Nowadays, social media (SM) offer new opportunities to indirectly measure the impact of heat waves on society. Using the crowdsensing concept, a micro-blogging platform like Twitter may be used as a distributed network of mobile sensors that react to external events by exchanging messages (tweets). This work presents a preliminary analysis of tweets related to heat waves that occurred in Italy in summer 2015. Using TwitterVigilance dashboard, developed by the University of Florence, a sample of tweets related to heat conditions was retrieved, stored and analyzed for main features. Significant associations between the daily increase in tweets and extreme temperatures were presented. The daily volume of Twitter users and messages revealed to be a valuable indicator of heat wave impact at the local level, in urban areas. Furthermore, with the help of Generalized Additive Model (GAM), the volume of tweets in certain locations has been used to estimate thresholds of local discomfort conditions. These city-specific thresholds are the result of dissimilar climatic conditions and risk cultures.

  11. Evidence for wave heating in the solar corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The temperature of the Sun increases over a short distance from a few thousand degrees in the photosphere to over a million degrees in the corona. To understand coronal heating is one of the major problems in astrophysics. There is general agreement that the energy source is convective motion in and below the photosphere. It remains to determine how this mechanical energy is transported outward into the corona and then deposited as heat. Two classes of models have been proposed, namely those that rely on magnetic reconnection and those that rely on waves, particularly Alfvén waves. There is increasing evidence that waves are ubiquitous in the corona. However, a difficulty for wave-driven models has been that most theories predict Alfvén waves to be undamped in the corona, and therefore they cannot dissipate their energy into heat. Our research has shown unambiguous observational evidence that the waves do damp at sufficiently low heights in the corona to be important for coronal heating.

  12. Heating and Current Drive by Electron Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, R.

    2003-10-01

    The physics model of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) is becoming well validated through systematic comparisons of theory and experiment. Work has shown that ECCD can be highly localized and robustly controlled, leading to applications including stabilization of MHD instabilities like neoclassical tearing modes, control and sustainment of desired profiles of current density and plasma pressure, and studies of localized transport. These physics applications and the study of the basic physics of ECH and ECCD were enabled by the advent of the gyrotron in the 1980s and of the diamond window for megawatt gyrotrons in the 1990s. The experimental work stimulated a broad base of theory based on first principles which is encapsulated in linear ray tracing codes and fully relativistic quasilinear Fokker-Planck codes. Recent experiments use measurements of the local poloidal magnetic field through the motional Stark effect to determine the magnitude and profile of the locally driven current. The subtle balance between wave-induced diffusion and Coulomb relaxation in velocity space provides an understanding of the effects of trapping of current-carrying electrons in the magnetic well, an effect which can be used to advantage. Strong quasilinear effects and radial transport of electrons which may broaden the driven current profile have also been observed under some conditions and appear to be consistent with theory, but in large devices these are usually insignificant. Additional advantages of ECH compared with other rf heating methods are that the antenna can be far removed from the plasma and the power density can be very high. The agreement of theory and experiment, the broad base of established applications, and the technical advantages of ECH support the application of ECH in next-step tokamaks and stellarators.

  13. A new perspective on the 1930s mega-heat waves across central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Tim; Hegerl, Gabi

    2016-04-01

    suggests that land surface feedbacks, resulting from anomalously dry soil prior to summer, amplified the heat extremes triggering the mega-heat waves. Using the model experiments, we assess whether the combined warm phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation provide a necessary condition to trigger decade-long droughts that spawn mega-heat waves to cluster across consecutive summers.

  14. Indirect Effects of Climate Change on Heat Waves in the Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branstator, G.; Teng, H.

    2015-12-01

    When we analyze a large ensemble RCP8.5 climate change experiment we find that heat waves have become more common and intense in the Great Plains during 2070-2100 compared to 1980-2010. Much of this can be attributed to the simple direct additive effect of a 5.8°C increase in Jun-Aug surface mean temperatures in that region. But there is also a non-additive effect in that daily temperature departures from the new mean during heat waves are about 0.6°C warmer in the future epoch. Here we consider two often-proposed mechanisms by which this change in the variability of surface temperature could result from indirect influences of changes in the mean state. One mechanism involves changes in the variability of upper tropospheric planetary waves, which we are especially interested in because we have found planetary wave structures that both affect the likelihood of heat waves and have unusually high predictability on subseasonal time scales. Our analysis does show that the amplitude of planetary wave variability has been modified in the future modeled climate. And calculations with a mechanistic model show this is indeed a consequence of the change in the mean circulation. But further analysis indicates this modification of planetary wave fluctuations is probably not responsible for the increase in Great Plains heat waves. By contrast we find changes in the magnitude of surface fluxes during heat wave events could be responsible for their strengthening and these can be attributed to the decrease in soil moisture that occurs during the future period. Hence it is changes in zonally asymmetric mean land surface quantities rather than changes in upper tropospheric fluctuations brought on by changes to the mean circulation that are of primary importance in producing the enhanced variability of surface temperature in the future climate.

  15. Climate change increases the likelihood of catastrophic avian mortality events during extreme heat waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O

    2010-04-23

    Severe heat waves have occasionally led to catastrophic avian mortality in hot desert environments. Climate change models predict increases in the intensity, frequency and duration of heat waves. A model of avian evaporative water requirements and survival times during the hottest part of day reveals that the predicted increases in maximum air temperatures will result in large fractional increases in water requirements (in small birds, equivalent to 150-200 % of current values), which will severely reduce survival times during extremely hot weather. By the 2080s, desert birds will experience reduced survival times much more frequently during mid-summer, increasing the frequency of catastrophic mortality events.

  16. Should electric fans be used during a heat wave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Ollie; Cramer, Matthew N; Ravanelli, Nicholas M; Hodder, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Heat waves continue to claim lives, with the elderly and poor at greatest risk. A simple and cost-effective intervention is an electric fan, but public health agencies warn against their use despite no evidence refuting their efficacy in heat waves. A conceptual human heat balance model can be used to estimate the evaporative requirement for heat balance, the potential for evaporative heat loss from the skin, and the predicted sweat rate, with and without an electrical fan during heat wave conditions. Using criteria defined by the literature, it is clear that fans increase the predicted critical environmental limits for both the physiological compensation of endogenous/exogenous heat, and the onset of cardiovascular strain by an air temperature of ∼3-4 °C, irrespective of relative humidity (RH) for the young and elderly. Even above these critical limits, fans would apparently still provide marginal benefits at air temperatures as high as 51.1 °C at 10%RH for young adults and 48.1 °C at 10%RH for the elderly. Previous concerns that dehydration would be exacerbated with fan use do not seem likely, except under very hot (>40 °C) and dry (conditions, when predicted sweat losses are only greater with fans by a minor amount (∼20-30 mL/h). Relative to the peak outdoor environmental conditions reported during ten of the most severe heat waves in recent history, fan use would be advisable in all of these situations, even when reducing the predicted maximum sweat output for the elderly. The protective benefit of fans appears to be underestimated by current guidelines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Compact star cooling by means of heat waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Falcón

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Compact star cooling theory is revised using the Cattaneo law for the heat flux. It is shown changes in the energy transport equation, insinuates quasiperiodic pulses in the luminosity and predicts that the energy is spread by heat waves changing the cooling time. Applications in rapid variations in single white-dwarf oscillators and quasi periodic luminosity pulses of neutron stars are suggested.

  18. The urban heat island dynamics during heat waves: a study of cities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Leiqiu

    2016-04-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) is a common phenomenon describing that metropolitan areas are usually warmer than their rural surroundings. This effect is compounded by extreme heat events, which are a leading cause of weather-related human mortality in many countries worldwide. However, the spatial and diurnal variability of temperature and humidity in urban and adjacent rural areas during extreme heat events is not well measured and therefore not well understood. The recently developed dataset of near-surface air and dew temperature from MODIS atmospheric profiles and the new method for the UHI quantification--urban heat island curve are used to quantify the urban climatic changes during heat waves in cities of the United States. The enhanced and weakened UHIs are observed in various cities. The causes of UHI changes during heat waves are discussed, including climate region, vegetation type and amount, city geolocation, etc.

  19. SAS wave experiment on board Magion 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Błęcki

    Full Text Available A short description of the SAS (subsatellite analyser of spectra wave experiment on board the Magion-4 subsatellite is given. We present first measurements of the magnetic-field fluctuations in the frequency range 32–2000 Hz obtained in the magnetotail during the disturbed period at the magnetopause and in the polar cusp.

  20. Mesoscale heat waves induced by orography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladich, I.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Mordacchini, Gp.; Palazzo, A.; Stel, F.

    2008-07-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of an unusual and sudden thermal fluctuation that interested portions of Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy) during the night of 27 July 1983. The whole 1983 summer was extremely warm in Europe and in particular on the Italian peninsula, from the Alps down to Sicily. Nevertheless, the day of 27 July 1983 in Friuli Venezia Giulia deserves special attention because the observed maximum temperatures did not occur during day-time but during night-time (from 23:00 up to 24:00 LT, 21:00-22:00 UTC). Peaks of 34.8°C and values of relative humidity of the order of 28% were registered by the official network of weather stations. This event interested mainly the central-eastern part of the plain of Friuli Venezia Giulia, a few kilometers far from the Slovenian border and relieves. The thermal anomalies lasted up to an hour, then temperatures decreased toward values more usual for the climate of the month. The study of this event is carried out with the aid of the AR-WRF numerical atmospheric model, initialized through the ECMWF analysis. The numerical simulations highlight the important role played by orography, jointly with the peculiar thermal structure of the atmosphere, for the enhancing of the internal wave pattern over that area. According to the sensitivity studies realized, the amplification of the internal wave pattern might represent a possible explanation for that meteorological enigma.

  1. Mesoscale heat waves induced by orography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Gladich

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the analysis of an unusual and sudden thermal fluctuation that interested portions of Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy during the night of 27 July 1983. The whole 1983 summer was extremely warm in Europe and in particular on the Italian peninsula, from the Alps down to Sicily. Nevertheless, the day of 27 July 1983 in Friuli Venezia Giulia deserves special attention because the observed maximum temperatures did not occur during day-time but during night-time (from 23:00 up to 24:00 LT, 21:00–22:00 UTC. Peaks of 34.8°C and values of relative humidity of the order of 28% were registered by the official network of weather stations. This event interested mainly the central-eastern part of the plain of Friuli Venezia Giulia, a few kilometers far from the Slovenian border and relieves. The thermal anomalies lasted up to an hour, then temperatures decreased toward values more usual for the climate of the month. The study of this event is carried out with the aid of the AR-WRF numerical atmospheric model, initialized through the ECMWF analysis. The numerical simulations highlight the important role played by orography, jointly with the peculiar thermal structure of the atmosphere, for the enhancing of the internal wave pattern over that area. According to the sensitivity studies realized, the amplification of the internal wave pattern might represent a possible explanation for that meteorological enigma.

  2. Full wave computation of electromagnetic wave excitation, propagation, and absorption at the ion cyclotron frequency in fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic waves at frequencies ranging from a few megahertz to a few hundred gigahertz serve many important functions in modern fusion experiments. Probably the most important application is plasma heating. Ignition of a fusion reactor will require a plasma to be heated until the average particle energy is {approximately}10 keV (temperature > 10{sup 8} K). This is routinely accomplished in existing large devices. Waves at the ion cyclotron frequency (typically f = 30 to 100 MHz) are very important for fusion devices because of low cost/unit power compared to other frequency regimes and because of their ability to directly heat fusile ions. These waves are also useful for modifying the velocity distribution for improved stability and to drive currents which affect plasma equilibrium. Study of this frequency range is, however, greatly complicated by long wavelengths compared to device size, nonsymmetric device geometry, and the tendency of the waves to linearly transform to shorter wavelength modes. Geometrical optics is generally inapplicable. Thus, codes have been developed to solve the vector wave equation in toroidal geometry for hot plasmas having anisotropic, spatially nonuniform, dispersive constitutive relations. In this paper we describe the code ORION developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and present illustrative applications to a range of fusion experiments. Specific applications of the code include detailed modeling of the antennas used to launch the waves, calculation of wave propagation throughout the plasma, and modeling of the absorption of the waves by the plasma. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Are heat waves susceptible to mitigate the expansion of a species progressing with global warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinet, Christelle; Rousselet, Jérôme; Pineau, Patrick; Miard, Florie; Roques, Alain

    2013-09-01

    A number of organisms, especially insects, are extending their range in response of the increasing trend of warmer temperatures. However, the effects of more frequent climatic anomalies on these species are not clearly known. The pine processionary moth, Thaumetopoea pityocampa, is a forest pest that is currently extending its geographical distribution in Europe in response to climate warming. However, its population density largely decreased in its northern expansion range (near Paris, France) the year following the 2003 heat wave. In this study, we tested whether the 2003 heat wave could have killed a large part of egg masses. First, the local heat wave intensity was determined. Then, an outdoor experiment was conducted to measure the deviation between the temperatures recorded by weather stations and those observed within sun-exposed egg masses. A second experiment was conducted under laboratory conditions to simulate heat wave conditions (with night/day temperatures of 20/32°C and 20/40°C compared to the control treatment 13/20°C) and measure the potential effects of this heat wave on egg masses. No effects were noticed on egg development. Then, larvae hatched from these egg masses were reared under mild conditions until the third instar and no delayed effects on the development of larvae were found. Instead of eggs, the 2003 heat wave had probably affected directly or indirectly the young larvae that were already hatched when it occurred. Our results suggest that the effects of extreme climatic anomalies occurring over narrow time windows are difficult to determine because they strongly depend on the life stage of the species exposed to these anomalies. However, these effects could potentially reduce or enhance the average warming effects. As extreme weather conditions are predicted to become more frequent in the future, it is necessary to disentangle the effects of the warming trend from the effects of climatic anomalies when predicting the response of a

  4. Nonlinear phenomena arising from radio wave heating of the lower ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, A. A.

    1981-08-01

    This document describes a theoretical and experimental study of the interaction of high power, high frequency radio waves with the lower ionosphere. The theoretical calculations presented here show that the electron temperature of the ionospheric plasma can be greatly enhanced when the plasma is irradiated by a powerful groundbased HF transmitter with an effective radiated power of the order of 100 MW. If this plasma heating is maintained for times exceeding a few seconds, the composition of the plasma can also be altered. These temperature and composition modifications cause significant changes in the plasma conductivity and wave absorption in the medium. Two experiments were conducted in order to test for the predicted absorption and conductivity modifications: a vertical incidence plus absorption experiment and a nonlinear demodulation experiment. Data from the absorption experiment clearly show a large (9 dB) increase in wave absorption at 2.4 MHz due to a high power (60 MW ERP) HF heating of the ionosphere. The nonlinear demodulation experiment generated strong VLF radiation when the ionosphere was irradiated by a powerful modulated HF wave. These VLF signals are believed to be due to HF heating induced conductivity modulation of the dynamo current system.

  5. Temperature and heat wave trends in northwest Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Austria, Polioptro F.; Bandala, Erick R.; Patiño-Gómez, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Increase in temperature extremes is one of the main expected impacts of climate change, as well as one of the first signs of its occurrence. Nevertheless, results emerging from General Circulation Models, while sufficient for large scales, are not enough for forecasting local trends and, hence, the IPCC has called for local studies based on on-site data. Indeed, it is expected that climate extremes will be detected much earlier than changes in climate averages. Heat waves are among the most important and least studied climate extremes, however its occurrence has been only barely studied and even its very definition remains controversial. This paper discusses the observed changes in temperature trends and heat waves in Northwestern Mexico, one of the most vulnerable regions of the country. The climate records in two locations of the region are analyzed, including one of the cities with extreme climate in Mexico, Mexicali City in the state of Baja California and the Yaqui River basin at Sonora State using three different methodologies. Results showed clear trends on temperature increase and occurrence of heat waves in both of the study zones using the three methodologies proposed. As result, some policy making suggestion are included in order to increase the adaptability of the studied regions to climate change, particularly related with heat wave occurrence.

  6. Impact of simulated heat waves on soybean physiology and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    With increases in mean global temperatures and associated climate change, extreme temperature events are predicted to increase in both intensity and frequency. Despite the clearly documented negative public health impacts of heat waves, the impact on physiology and yields of key agricultural species...

  7. Heat Waves, Droughts, and Preferences for Environmental Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Ann L.; Conover, Emily; Videras, Julio; Wu, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Using data from a new household survey on environmental attitudes, behaviors, and policy preferences, we find that current weather conditions affect preferences for environmental regulation. Individuals who have recently experienced extreme weather (heat waves or droughts) are more likely to support laws to protect the environment. We find…

  8. The impact of heat waves on children's health: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Sheffield, Perry E.; Su, Hong; Wang, Xiaoyu; Bi, Yan; Tong, Shilu

    2014-03-01

    Young children are thought to be particularly sensitive to heat waves, but relatively less research attention has been paid to this field to date. A systematic review was conducted to elucidate the relationship between heat waves and children's health. Literature published up to August 2012 were identified using the following MeSH terms and keywords: "heatwave", "heat wave", "child health", "morbidity", "hospital admission", "emergency department visit", "family practice", "primary health care", "death" and "mortality". Of the 628 publications identified, 12 met the selection criteria. The existing literature does not consistently suggest that mortality among children increases significantly during heat waves, even though infants were associated with more heat-related deaths. Exposure to heat waves in the perinatal period may pose a threat to children's health. Pediatric diseases or conditions associated with heat waves include renal disease, respiratory disease, electrolyte imbalance and fever. Future research should focus on how to develop a consistent definition of a heat wave from a children's health perspective, identifying the best measure of children's exposure to heat waves, exploring sensitive outcome measures to quantify the impact of heat waves on children, evaluating the possible impacts of heat waves on children's birth outcomes, and understanding the differences in vulnerability to heat waves among children of different ages and from different income countries. Projection of the children's disease burden caused by heat waves under climate change scenarios, and development of effective heat wave mitigation and adaptation strategies that incorporate other child protective health measures, are also strongly recommended.

  9. On the construction of heat wave in symmetric case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, A. L.; Lempert, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    A nonlinear second-order parabolic equation with two variables is considered. Under additional conditions, this equation can be interpreted as the porous medium equation in case of dependence of the unknown function on two variables: time and distance from the origin. The equation has a wide variety of applications in continuum mechanics, for example, it is applicable for mathematical modeling of filtration of ideal polytropic gas in porous media or heat conduction. The authors deal with a special solutions which are usually called heat waves. A special feature of such solution is that it consists of two continuously joined solutions. The first of them is trivial and the second one is nonnegative. The heat wave solution can have discontinuous derivatives on the line of joint which is called the front of heat wave, i.e. smoothness of the solution, generally speaking, is broken. The most natural problem which has such solutions is the so-called “the Sakharov problem of the initiation of a heat wave”. New solutions of the problem in the form of multiple power series for physical variables are constructed. The coefficients of the series are obtained from tridiagonal systems of linear algebraic equations. Herewith, the elements of matrices of this systems depend on the matrix order and the condition of the diagonal dominance is not fulfilled. The recurrent formulas for the coefficients are suggested.

  10. Monitoring and forecasting heat and cold waves in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaysse, Christophe; Vogt, Jürgen; van der Schrier, Gerard

    2017-04-01

    Extreme temperature anomalies such as heat and cold waves may have a strong impacts on the human activities and health. The heat waves in Western Europe in 2003 and in Russia in 2010, or the cold wave in South-Eastern Europe in 2012 have generated a considerable amounts of lost and in total several hundreds of people died. Providing an operational system to monitor and forecast extreme temperature anomalies in Europe is thus a primordial importance to help decision makers, users and emergency services to trigger different type of emergencies depending the intensity of a current event or the uncertainties of a forecasts. In this study, the development and the validation of a complete tool of monitoring and forecasting extreme temperature anomalies are presented and allow providing seamless information with the uncertainties associated. In the first part of the study, the methodology applied, dealing with persistent quantiles of Tmin and Tmax above 0.85, will be presented. The climatology of the extreme events from 1995 to now will be then exposed, highlighting the spatial and temporal variabilities of the hazard. The uncertainties of the observation will be also discussed by comparing three different sets of observations. In the second part of the study, the assessment of the predictability of heat and cold waves will be presented. Thanks to a relative good reliability of the forecasted temperature, there is a benefit of using the forecasts to predict heat and cold waves. With some (temporal and spatial) uncertainties, the model is able to predict extreme waves up to 15-day lead time. Nevertheless, the prediction of the onset with a daily accuracy is a big challenge. So far, there is no significant signal after 6-day lead time.

  11. Probability of US Heat Waves Affected by a Subseasonal Planetary Wave Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Haiyan; Branstator, Grant; Wang, Hailan; Meehl, Gerald A.; Washington, Warren M.

    2013-01-01

    Heat waves are thought to result from subseasonal atmospheric variability. Atmospheric phenomena driven by tropical convection, such as the Asian monsoon, have been considered potential sources of predictability on subseasonal timescales. Mid-latitude atmospheric dynamics have been considered too chaotic to allow significant prediction skill of lead times beyond the typical 10-day range of weather forecasts. Here we use a 12,000-year integration of an atmospheric general circulation model to identify a pattern of subseasonal atmospheric variability that can help improve forecast skill for heat waves in the United States. We find that heat waves tend to be preceded by 15-20 days by a pattern of anomalous atmospheric planetary waves with a wavenumber of 5. This circulation pattern can arise as a result of internal atmospheric dynamics and is not necessarily linked to tropical heating.We conclude that some mid-latitude circulation anomalies that increase the probability of heat waves are predictable beyond the typical weather forecast range.

  12. Alfven Wave Solar Model: Part 1, Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, Bart; Meng, Xing; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas I

    2013-01-01

    We present the new Alfven Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), a global model from the upper chromosphere to the corona and the heliosphere. The coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are addressed with low-frequency Alfven wave turbulence. The injection of Alfven wave energy at the inner boundary is such that the Poynting flux is proportional to the magnetic field strength. The three-dimensional magnetic field topology is simulated using data from photospheric magnetic field measurements. This model does not impose open-closed magnetic field boundaries; those develop self-consistently. The physics includes: (1) The model employs three different temperatures, namely the isotropic electron temperature and the parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures. The firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities due to the developing ion temperature anisotropy are accounted for. (2) The Alfven waves are partially reflected by the Alfven speed gradient and the vorticity along the field lines. The resulting counter-propagat...

  13. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  14. Simulated heat waves affected alpine grassland only in combination with drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Hans J.; Bassin, Seraina; Verlinden, Maya; Zeiter, Michaela; Hiltbrunner, Erika

    2016-04-01

    The Alpine region is warming fast, leading to an increase in the frequency and intensity of climate extremes. Currently, it is unclear whether alpine ecosystems are sensitive or resistant to such extremes. In an experiment carried out in the Swiss Alps, we subjected Swiss alpine grassland communities to heat waves with varying intensity (5-10 °C warming) by transplanting monoliths to four different elevations (2440-660 m a.s.l.) for 17 days. Half of the monoliths were regularly irrigated while the other half were deprived of irrigation to additionally induce a drought at each site. We found that heat waves had no significant short-term impacts on fluorescence (Fv/Fm, a stress indicator), senescence and aboveground productivity if irrigation was provided. However, when heat waves coincided with drought, plants showed clear signs of stress, resulting in vegetation browning and reduced phytomass production. This likely resulted from direct drought effects, but also, as measurements of stomatal conductance and canopy temperatures suggest, from increased high-temperature stress as water scarcity decreased heat mitigation through transpiration. The immediate responses to heat waves (with or without droughts) recorded in these alpine grasslands were similar to those observed in the more extensively studied grasslands from temperate climates. Climate extreme impacts may differ in the longer run, however, because the short growing season in alpine environments likely constrains recovery.

  15. Supersonic Propagation of Heat Waves in Low Density Heavy Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Shaoen; Zhang Wenhai; Yi Rongqing; Cui Yanli; Chen Jiusen; Xu Yan; Ding Yongkun; Lai Dongxian; Zheng Zhijian; Huang Yikiang; Li Jinghong; Sun Kexu; Hu Xin

    2005-01-01

    The propagation of a supersonic heat-wave through copper-doped foam with a density of 50 mg/cm3 was experimentally investigated. The wave is driven by 140 eV Holhraum radiations generated in a cylindrical gold cavity heated by a 2 k J, 1ns laser pulse (0.35 μm). The delayed breakout time of the radiation waves from the rear side of the foam is measured by a threechromatic streaked x-ray spectrometer (TCS) consisting of a set of three-imaging pinholes and an array of three transmission gratings coupled with an x-ray streak camera (XSC). With one shot,simultaneous measurements of the delays of the drive source and the radiation with two different energies (210 eV, 840 eV) through the foam have been made for the first time. The experimental results indicate that the time delays vary with photon energies. The radiation with an energy of 210 eV propagates at a lower velocity. The radiating heat wave propagates with a velocity that is larger than the sound speed. Using TGS, the transmitting spectrum was measured, and then lower limit of the optical depth which is more than 1, was obtained. The experimental data were in agreement with numerical simulations.

  16. The urban heat island and its impact on heat waves and human health in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jianguo; Zheng, Youfei; Tang, Xu; Guo, Changyi; Li, Liping; Song, Guixiang; Zhen, Xinrong; Yuan, Dong; Kalkstein, Adam J; Li, Furong

    2010-01-01

    With global warming forecast to continue into the foreseeable future, heat waves are very likely to increase in both frequency and intensity. In urban regions, these future heat waves will be exacerbated by the urban heat island effect, and will have the potential to negatively influence the health and welfare of urban residents. In order to investigate the health effects of the urban heat island (UHI) in Shanghai, China, 30 years of meteorological records (1975-2004) were examined for 11 first- and second-order weather stations in and around Shanghai. Additionally, automatic weather observation data recorded in recent years as well as daily all-cause summer mortality counts in 11 urban, suburban, and exurban regions (1998-2004) in Shanghai have been used. The results show that different sites (city center or surroundings) have experienced different degrees of warming as a result of increasing urbanization. In turn, this has resulted in a more extensive urban heat island effect, causing additional hot days and heat waves in urban regions compared to rural locales. An examination of summer mortality rates in and around Shanghai yields heightened heat-related mortality in urban regions, and we conclude that the UHI is directly responsible, acting to worsen the adverse health effects from exposure to extreme thermal conditions.

  17. Eddy heat fluxes and stability of planetary waves. I, II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    The stability of baroclinic Rossby waves in a zonal shear flow was analyzed by a linear, quasigeostrophic, two-level, adiabatic, and frictionless midlatitude beta-plane model. The ratio of the basic wave scale and the radius of deformation together with two nondimensional parameters which describe the amplitudes of the barotropic and baroclinic components of the basic wave constitute the three parameters of the stability problem. The parameter space is partitioned according to the dominant energy source for instability; the Lorenz and Kim conditions are characterized by significant horizontal and vertical shears of the basic wave, while the Phillips regime has a strong zonal flow. The stability analysis is then applied to the atmosphere, with the primary motivation being to examine the midlatitude planetary scale (zonal wavenumbers 1, 2, 3) transient waves that transport heat. It is found that the most unstable mode consists of a spectrum of waves, with a maximum amplitude at wavenumber 3; the response is thus maximum at a zonal scale intermediate between the basic wave scale and the radius of deformation.

  18. Can the Tibetan Plateau snow cover influence the interannual variations of Eurasian heat wave frequency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Hua; Li, Yun

    2016-06-01

    The Eurasian continent has experienced significant year-to-year variations of summer heat waves during the past decades. Several possible factors, such as ocean temperature, soil moisture, and changes in land use and greenhouse gases, have been identified in previous studies, but the mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, it is found that the Tibetan Plateau snow cover (TPSC) is closely linked to the interannual variations of summer heat waves over Eurasia. The TPSC variability explains more than 30 % of the total variances of heat wave variability in the southern Europe and northeastern Asia (SENA) region. A set of numerical experiments reveal that the reduced TPSC may induce a distinct teleconnection pattern across the Eurasian continent, with two anomalous high pressure centers in the upper troposphere over the SENA region, which may lead to a reduction of the cloud formation near the surface. The less cloud cover tends to increase the net shortwave radiation and favor a stronger surface sensible heat flux in the dry surface condition over the SENA region, resulting in a deeper, warmer and drier atmospheric boundary layer that would further inhibit the local cloud formation. Such a positive land-atmosphere feedback may dry the surface even further, heat the near-surface atmosphere and thereby intensify the local heat waves. The above dynamical processes also operate on interdecadal time scales. Given the reduction of the TPSC could become more pronounced with increasing levels of greenhouse gases in a warming climate, we infer that the TPSC may play an increasingly important role in shaping the summer heat waves over the SENA region in next decades.

  19. The Impact of the Urban Heat Island during an Intense Heat Wave in Oklahoma City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B. Basara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During late July and early August 2008, an intense heat wave occurred in Oklahoma City. To quantify the impact of the urban heat island (UHI in Oklahoma City on observed and apparent temperature conditions during the heat wave event, this study used observations from 46 locations in and around Oklahoma City. The methodology utilized composite values of atmospheric conditions for three primary categories defined by population and general land use: rural, suburban, and urban. The results of the analyses demonstrated that a consistent UHI existed during the study period whereby the composite temperature values within the urban core were approximately 0.5∘C warmer during the day than the rural areas and over 2∘C warmer at night. Further, when the warmer temperatures were combined with ambient humidity conditions, the composite values consistently revealed even warmer heat-related variables within the urban environment as compared with the rural zone.

  20. Heat waves imposed during early pod development in soybean (Glycine max) cause significant yield loss despite a rapid recovery from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebers, Matthew H; Yendrek, Craig R; Drag, David; Locke, Anna M; Rios Acosta, Lorena; Leakey, Andrew D B; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2015-08-01

    Heat waves already have a large impact on crops and are predicted to become more intense and more frequent in the future. In this study, heat waves were imposed on soybean using infrared heating technology in a fully open-air field experiment. Five separate heat waves were applied to field-grown soybean (Glycine max) in central Illinois, three in 2010 and two in 2011. Thirty years of historical weather data from Illinois were analyzed to determine the length and intensity of a regionally realistic heat wave resulting in experimental heat wave treatments during which day and night canopy temperatures were elevated 6 °C above ambient for 3 days. Heat waves were applied during early or late reproductive stages to determine whether and when heat waves had an impact on carbon metabolism and seed yield. By the third day of each heat wave, net photosynthesis (A), specific leaf weight (SLW), and leaf total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration (TNC) were decreased, while leaf oxidative stress was increased. However, A, SLW, TNC, and measures of oxidative stress were no different than the control ca. 12 h after the heat waves ended, indicating rapid physiological recovery from the high-temperature stress. That end of season seed yield was reduced (~10%) only when heat waves were applied during early pod developmental stages indicates the yield loss had more to do with direct impacts of the heat waves on reproductive process than on photosynthesis. Soybean was unable to mitigate yield loss after heat waves given during late reproductive stages. This study shows that short high-temperature stress events that reduce photosynthesis and increase oxidative stress resulted in significant losses to soybean production in the Midwest, U.S. The study also suggests that to mitigate heat wave-induced yield loss, soybean needs improved reproductive and photosynthetic tolerance to high but increasingly common temperatures. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is

  1. Individual and Public-Program Adaptation: Coping with Heat Waves in Five Cities in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Alhassan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat Alert and Response Systems (HARS are currently undergoing testing and implementation in Canada. These programs seek to reduce the adverse health effects of heat waves on human health by issuing weather forecasts and warnings, informing individuals about possible protections from excessive heat, and providing such protections to vulnerable subpopulations and individuals at risk. For these programs to be designed effectively, it is important to know how individuals perceive the heat, what their experience with heat-related illness is, how they protect themselves from excessive heat, and how they acquire information about such protections. In September 2010, we conducted a survey of households in 5 cities in Canada to study these issues. At the time of the survey, these cities had not implemented heat outreach and response systems. The study results indicate that individuals’ recollections of recent heat wave events were generally accurate. About 21% of the sample reported feeling unwell during the most recent heat spell, but these illnesses were generally minor. Only in 25 cases out of 243, these illnesses were confirmed or diagnosed by a health care professional. The rate at which our respondents reported heat-related illnesses was higher among those with cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses, was higher among younger respondents and bore no relationship with the availability of air conditioning at home. Most of the respondents indicated that they would not dismiss themselves as “not at risk” and that they would cope with excessive heat by staying in air conditioned environments and keeping well hydrated. Despite the absence of heat outreach and education programs in their city, our respondents at least a rough idea of how to take care of themselves. The presence of air conditioning and knowledge of cooling centers is location-specific, which provides opportunities for targeting HARS interventions.

  2. The 2010 Russian heat wave was largely predictable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-05-01

    From June to August 2010, a stable high-pressure air mass hung in the sky over western Russia. This episode of “atmospheric blocking” drove up temperatures, causing thousands of deaths and breaking temperature records across the country. Strong heat waves like the one in Russia increase their potential to do damage the longer they persist, putting added stress on populations susceptible to dehydration, reduced air quality, and other heat-related illnesses. Long durations of consistently high temperatures also increase the likelihood of drought-driven crop loss and wildfires, both of which devastated the Russian countryside and economy. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL046557, 2011)

  3. Wave Driven Exothermic Heating in the Mesopause Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Michael P.

    1997-01-01

    A full-wave propagation model was developed that describes the propagation of gravity waves from the Earth's surface to the upper boundary, which can be placed anywhere between 150 and 500 km altitude. The model includes a realistic background atmosphere, and includes the effects of mean horizontal winds and their vertical shears, mean vertical temperature gradients, the eddy and molecular diffusion of heat and momentum, and the effects of ion-drag. This model solves five coupled second-order differential equations (continuity, momentum, and energy) in the vertical coordinate to derive the perturbation variables u', v', w' (horizontal and vertical velocity components), T' (temperature) and p' (pressure). The upper boundary can be automatically selected based on tests using the radiation condition at the upper boundary, wherein the height is increased until the wave is experiencing severe dissipation at the upper boundary, ensuring that substantial absorption occurs for any waves reflected from the upper boundary. The determination of wave amplitude is a key requirement of wave energetics. Therefore, the fullwave model has been applied to airglow observations in order to determine wave amplitudes as a function of altitude. This was accomplished by using the full-wave model output to drive a chemistry perturbation module that describes minor species perturbations and the resulting airglow perturbations. The full-wave output was multiplied by an altitude-independent factor such that the modeled and observed relative airglow intensity perturbations were equal. The effects of mean winds were included in these studies, and found to be the most important model input affecting the calculations (being more important than the choice of eddy diffusion profiles and chemical kinetic coefficients). In one study (Hickey et al., 1997a) these winds could not be well estimated from the measurements, whereas in the second study (Hickey et al.,1997b) the mean were well defined with a

  4. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  5. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  6. Heat wave fast ignition in inertial confinement energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shalom; Eliezer; Shirly; Vinikman; Pinhasi

    2013-01-01

    An accelerated micro-foil is used to ignite a pre-compressed cylindrical shell containing deuterium–tritium fuel.The well-known shock wave ignition criterion and a novel criterion based on heat wave ignition are developed in this work.It is shown that for heat ignition very high impact velocities are required.It is suggested that a multi-petawatt laser can accelerate a micro-foil to relativistic velocities in a very short time duration(picosecond)of the laser pulse.The cylindrical geometry suggested here for the fast ignition approach has the advantage of geometrically separating the nanosecond lasers that compress the target from the picosecond laser that accelerates the foil.The present model suggests that nuclear fusion by micro-foil impact ignition could be attained with currently existing technology.

  7. Multivariate Statistical Modelling of Drought and Heat Wave Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Colin; Widmann, Martin; Vrac, Mathieu; Maraun, Douglas; Bevaqua, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Multivariate Statistical Modelling of Drought and Heat Wave Events C. Manning1,2, M. Widmann1, M. Vrac2, D. Maraun3, E. Bevaqua2,3 1. School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK 2. Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, (LSCE-IPSL), Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France 3. Wegener Center for Climate and Global Change, University of Graz, Brandhofgasse 5, 8010 Graz, Austria Compound extreme events are a combination of two or more contributing events which in themselves may not be extreme but through their joint occurrence produce an extreme impact. Compound events are noted in the latest IPCC report as an important type of extreme event that have been given little attention so far. As part of the CE:LLO project (Compound Events: muLtivariate statisticaL mOdelling) we are developing a multivariate statistical model to gain an understanding of the dependence structure of certain compound events. One focus of this project is on the interaction between drought and heat wave events. Soil moisture has both a local and non-local effect on the occurrence of heat waves where it strongly controls the latent heat flux affecting the transfer of sensible heat to the atmosphere. These processes can create a feedback whereby a heat wave maybe amplified or suppressed by the soil moisture preconditioning, and vice versa, the heat wave may in turn have an effect on soil conditions. An aim of this project is to capture this dependence in order to correctly describe the joint probabilities of these conditions and the resulting probability of their compound impact. We will show an application of Pair Copula Constructions (PCCs) to study the aforementioned compound event. PCCs allow in theory for the formulation of multivariate dependence structures in any dimension where the PCC is a decomposition of a multivariate distribution into a product of bivariate components modelled using copulas. A

  8. The 2011 marine heat wave in Cockburn Sound, southwest Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Rose

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Over 2000 km of Western Australian coastline experienced a significant marine heat wave in February and March 2011. Seawater temperature anomalies of +2–4 °C were recorded at a number of locations, and satellite-derived SSTs (sea surface temperatures were the highest on record. Here, we present seawater temperatures from southwestern Australia and describe, in detail, the marine climatology of Cockburn Sound, a large, multiple-use coastal embayment. We compared temperature and dissolved oxygen levels in 2011 with data from routine monitoring conducted from 2002–2010. A significant warming event, 2–4 °C in magnitude, persisted for > 8 weeks, and seawater temperatures at 10 to 20 m depth were significantly higher than those recorded in the previous 9 yr. Dissolved oxygen levels were depressed at most monitoring sites, being ~ 2 mg l−1 lower than usual in early March 2011. Ecological responses to short-term extreme events are poorly understood, but evidence from elsewhere along the Western Australian coastline suggests that the heat wave was associated with high rates of coral bleaching; fish, invertebrate and macroalgae mortalities; and algal blooms. However, there is a paucity of historical information on ecologically-sensitive habitats and taxa in Cockburn Sound, so that formal examinations of biological responses to the heat wave were not possible. The 2011 heat wave provided insights into conditions that may become more prevalent in Cockburn Sound, and elsewhere, if the intensity and frequency of short-term extreme events increases as predicted.

  9. Solving Heat and Wave-Like Equations Using He's Polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Tauseef Mohyud-Din

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We use He's polynomials which are calculated form homotopy perturbation method (HPM for solving heat and wave-like equations. The proposed iterative scheme finds the solution without any discretization, linearization, or restrictive assumptions. Several examples are given to verify the reliability and efficiency of the method. The fact that suggested technique solves nonlinear problems without using Adomian's polynomials is a clear advantage of this algorithm over the decomposition method.

  10. On the Variability and Increasing Trends of Heat Waves over India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohini, P; Rajeevan, M; Srivastava, A K

    2016-05-19

    Over India, heat waves occur during the summer months of April to June. A gridded daily temperature data set for the period, 1961-2013 has been analyzed to examine the variability and trends in heat waves over India. For identifying heat waves, the Excess Heat Factor (EHF) and 90(th) percentile of maximum temperatures were used. Over central and northwestern parts of the country, frequency, total duration and maximum duration of heat waves are increasing. Anomalous persistent high with anti-cyclonic flow, supplemented with clear skies and depleted soil moisture are primarily responsible for the occurrence of heat waves over India. Variability of heat waves over India is influenced by both the tropical Indian Ocean and central Pacific SST anomalies. The warming of the tropical Indian Ocean and more frequent El Nino events in future may further lead to more frequent and longer lasting heat waves over India.

  11. Projection of temperature and heat waves for Africa with an ensemble of CORDEX Regional Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosio, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    The most severe effects of global warning will be related to the frequency and severity of extreme events. We provide an analysis of projections of temperature and related extreme events for Africa based on a large ensemble of Regional Climate Models from the COordinated Regional climate Downscaling EXperiment (CORDEX). Results are presented not only by means of widely used indices but also with a recently developed Heat Wave Magnitude Index-daily (HWMId), which takes into account both heat wave duration and intensity. Results show that under RCP8.5, warming of more than 3.5 °C is projected in JFM over most of the continent, whereas in JAS temperatures over large part of Northern Africa, the Sahara and the Arabian peninsula are projected to increase up to 6 °C. Large increase in in the number of warm days (Tx90p) is found over sub equatorial Africa, with values up to more than 90 % in JAS, and more than 80 % in JFM over e.g., the gulf of Guinea, Central African Republic, South Sudan and Ethiopia. Changes in Tn90p (warm nights) are usually larger, with some models projecting Tn90p reaching 95 % starting from around 2060 even under RCP4.5 over the Gulf of Guinea and the Sahel. Results also show that the total length of heat spells projected to occur normally (i.e. once every 2 years) under RCP8.5 may be longer than those occurring once every 30 years under the lower emission scenario. By employing the recently developed HWMId index, it is possible to investigate the relationship between heat wave length ad intensity; in particular it is shown that very intense heat waves such as that occurring over the Horn of Africa may have values of HWMId larger than that of longer, but relatively weak, heat waves over West Africa.

  12. Projection of temperature and heat waves for Africa with an ensemble of CORDEX Regional Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosio, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The most severe effects of global warning will be related to the frequency and severity of extreme events. We provide an analysis of projections of temperature and related extreme events for Africa based on a large ensemble of Regional Climate Models from the COordinated Regional climate Downscaling EXperiment (CORDEX). Results are presented not only by means of widely used indices but also with a recently developed Heat Wave Magnitude Index-daily (HWMId), which takes into account both heat wave duration and intensity. Results show that under RCP8.5, warming of more than 3.5 °C is projected in JFM over most of the continent, whereas in JAS temperatures over large part of Northern Africa, the Sahara and the Arabian peninsula are projected to increase up to 6 °C. Large increase in in the number of warm days (Tx90p) is found over sub equatorial Africa, with values up to more than 90 % in JAS, and more than 80 % in JFM over e.g., the gulf of Guinea, Central African Republic, South Sudan and Ethiopia. Changes in Tn90p (warm nights) are usually larger, with some models projecting Tn90p reaching 95 % starting from around 2060 even under RCP4.5 over the Gulf of Guinea and the Sahel. Results also show that the total length of heat spells projected to occur normally (i.e. once every 2 years) under RCP8.5 may be longer than those occurring once every 30 years under the lower emission scenario. By employing the recently developed HWMId index, it is possible to investigate the relationship between heat wave length ad intensity; in particular it is shown that very intense heat waves such as that occurring over the Horn of Africa may have values of HWMId larger than that of longer, but relatively weak, heat waves over West Africa.

  13. Rayleigh wave inversion using heat-bath simulated annealing algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongxu; Peng, Suping; Du, Wenfeng; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Ma, Zhenyuan; Lin, Peng

    2016-11-01

    The dispersion of Rayleigh waves can be used to obtain near-surface shear (S)-wave velocity profiles. This is performed mainly by inversion of the phase velocity dispersion curves, which has been proven to be a highly nonlinear and multimodal problem, and it is unsuitable to use local search methods (LSMs) as the inversion algorithm. In this study, a new strategy is proposed based on a variant of simulated annealing (SA) algorithm. SA, which simulates the annealing procedure of crystalline solids in nature, is one of the global search methods (GSMs). There are many variants of SA, most of which contain two steps: the perturbation of model and the Metropolis-criterion-based acceptance of the new model. In this paper we propose a one-step SA variant known as heat-bath SA. To test the performance of the heat-bath SA, two models are created. Both noise-free and noisy synthetic data are generated. Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm and a variant of SA, known as the fast simulated annealing (FSA) algorithm, are also adopted for comparison. The inverted results of the synthetic data show that the heat-bath SA algorithm is a reasonable choice for Rayleigh wave dispersion curve inversion. Finally, a real-world inversion example from a coal mine in northwestern China is shown, which proves that the scheme we propose is applicable.

  14. Closed-Field Coronal Heating Driven by Wave Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Downs, Cooper; Mikić, Zoran; Linker, Jon A; Velli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    To simulate the energy balance of coronal plasmas on macroscopic scales, we often require the specification of the coronal heating mechanism in some functional form. To go beyond empirical formulations and to build a more physically motivated heating function, we investigate the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) phenomenology for the heating of closed coronal loops. Our implementation is designed to capture the large-scale propagation, reflection, and dissipation of wave turbulence along a loop. The parameter space of this model is explored by solving the coupled WTD and hydrodynamic evolution in 1D for an idealized loop. The relevance to a range of solar conditions is also established by computing solutions for over one hundred loops extracted from a realistic 3D coronal field. Due to the implicit dependence of the WTD heating model on loop geometry and plasma properties along the loop and at the footpoints, we find that this model can significantly reduce the number of free parameters when compared to traditiona...

  15. Electron-cyclotron heating in the Constance 2 mirror experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauel, Michael E.

    1982-09-01

    Electron cyclotron heating of a highly-ionized plasma in mirror geometry is investigated. The experimental diagnosis of the electron energy distribution and the comparison of the results of this diagnosis with a two dimensional, time-dependent Fokker-Planck simulation are accomplished in four steps. (1) First, the power balance of the heated and unheated Constance 2 plasma is analyzed experimentally. It is concluded that the heated electrons escape the mirror at a rate dominated by a combination of the influx of cool electrons from outside the mirror and the increased loss rate of the ions. (2) The microwave parameters at the resonance zones are then calculated by cold-plasma ray tracing. High N/sub parallel/ waves are launched and for these waves, strong first-pass absorption is predicted. The absorption strength is qualitatively checked in the experiment by surrounding the plasma with non-reflecting liners. (3) A simplified quasilinear theory including the effect of N/sub parallel/ is developed to model the electrons. An analytic expression is derived for the RF-induced pump-out of the magnetically-confined warm electrons. Results of the Fokker-Planck simulations show the development of the electron energy distribution for several plasma conditions and verify the scaling of the analytic expression for RF-induced diffusion into the loss cone. (4) Sample x-ray and endloss data are presented, and the overall comparison between the simulation and experiment is discussed. The x-ray signals indicate that, for greater RF power, the hot electrondensity increases more rapidly than its temperature. The time history of the endloss data, illustrating RF-enhancement, suggests the predicted scaling for warm-electron pump-out. Finally, a comparison between the measured and predicted energy distribution shows that the bulk, warm and hot components of the heated Constance 2 electrons are indeed reproduced by the simulation.

  16. High Harmonic Fast Wave heating and current drive for NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. A.; Majeski, R.; Hosea, J.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J.; Batchelor, D. B.; Carter, M. D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P.; Swain, D.; Mau, T. K.; Chiu, S. C.; Smithe, D.

    1997-11-01

    Heating and noninductive current drive in NSTX will initially use 6 MW of rf power in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime. We present numerical modelling of HHFW heating and current drive in NSTX using the PICES, CURRAY, FISIC, and METS95 codes. High electron β during the discharge flattop in NSTX is predicted to result in off-axis power deposition and current drive. However, reductions in the trapped electron fraction (due also to high β effects) are predicted to result in adequate current drive efficiency, with ~ 400 - 500 kA of noninductive current driven. Sufficient per-pass absorption (>10%) to ensure effective electron heating is also expected for the startup plasma. Present plans call for a single twelve strap antenna driven by six FMIT transmitters operating at 30 MHz. The design for the antenna and matching system will also be discussed.

  17. Plasma heating via electron Bernstein wave heating using ordinary and extraodinary mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parvazian

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically confined plasma can be heated with high power microwave sources. In spherical torus the electron plasma frequency exeeds the electron cyclotron frequency (EC and, as a consequence, electromagnetic waves at fundamental and low harmonic EC cannot propagate within the plasma. In contrast, electron Bernstein waves (EBWs readily propagate in spherical torus plasma and are absorbed strongly at the electron cyclotron resonances. In order to proagate EBWs beyond the upper hybrid resonance (UHR, that surrounds the plasma, the EBWs must convert via one of two processes to either ordinary (O-mode or extraordinary (X-mode electromagnetic waves. O-mode and X-mode electromagnetic waves lunched at the plasma edge can convert to the electron Bernstein waves (EBWs which can propagate without and cut-off into the core of the plasma and damp on electrons. Since the electron Bernstein wave (EBW has no cut-off limits, it is well suited to heat an over-dense plasma by resonant absorption. An important problem is to calculate mode conversion coefficient that is very sensitive to density. Mode conversion coefficient depends on Budden parameter ( ñ and density scale length (Ln in upper hybrid resonance (UHR. In Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST, the optimized conversion efficiency approached 72.5% when Ln was 4.94 cm and the magnetic field was 0.475 Tesla in the core of the plasma.

  18. Rogue waves in a wave tank: experiments and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lechuga

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In past decades theoretical studies have been carried out with the double aim of improving the knowledge of rogue wave main characteristics and of attempting to predict its sudden appearance. As an effort on this topic we tried the generation of rogue waves in a water wave tank using a symmetric spectrum (Akhmediev et al., 2011a as input on the wave maker. To go on further the next step has been to apply a theoretical model to the envelope of these waves. After some considerations the best model has been an analogue of the Ginzburg–Landau equation.

  19. Future changes of temperature and heat waves in Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Huang, Guohe; Huang, Wendy; Lin, Qianguo; Liao, Renfei; Fan, Yurui

    2017-05-01

    Apparent changes in the temperature patterns in recent years brought many challenges to the province of Ontario, Canada. As the need for adapting to climate change challenges increases, the development of reliable climate projections becomes a crucial task. In this study, a regional climate modeling system, Providing Regional Climates for Impacts Studies (PRECIS), is used to simulate the temperature patterns in Ontario. Three PRECIS runs with a resolution of 25 km × 25 km are carried out to simulate the present (1961-1990) temperature variations. There is a good match between the simulated and observed data, which validates the performance of PRECIS in reproducing temperature changes in Ontario. Future changes of daily maximum, mean, and minimum temperatures during the period 2071-2100 are then projected under the IPCC SRES A2 and B2 emission scenarios using PRECIS. Spatial variations of annual mean temperature, mean diurnal range, and temperature seasonality are generated. Furthermore, heat waves defined based on the exceedance of local climatology and their temporal and spatial characteristics are analyzed. The results indicate that the highest temperature and the most intensive heat waves are most likely to occur at the Toronto-Windsor corridor in Southern Ontario. The Northern Ontario, in spite of the relatively low projected temperature, would be under the risk of long-lasting heat waves, and thus needs effective measures to enhance its climate resilience in the future. This study can assist the decision makers in better understanding the future temperature changes in Ontario and provide decision support for mitigating heat-related loss.

  20. Alfv\\'enic Wave Heating of the Upper Chromosphere in Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Reep, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a numerical model of flare heating due to the dissipation of Alfv\\'enic waves propagating from the corona to the chromosphere. With this model, we present an investigation of the key parameters of these waves on the energy transport, heating, and subsequent dynamics. For sufficiently high frequencies and perpendicular wave numbers, the waves dissipate significantly in the upper chromosphere, strongly heating it to flare temperatures. This heating can then drive strong chromospheric evaporation, bringing hot and dense plasma to the corona. We therefore find three important conclusions: (1) Alfv\\'enic waves, propagating from the corona to the chromosphere, are capable of heating the upper chromosphere and the corona, (2) the atmospheric response to heating due to the dissipation of Alfv\\'enic waves can be strikingly similar to heating by an electron beam, and (3) this heating can produce explosive evaporation.

  1. ALFVÉNIC WAVE HEATING OF THE UPPER CHROMOSPHERE IN FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reep, J. W. [National Research Council Post-Doc Program, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Russell, A. J. B., E-mail: jeffrey.reep.ctr@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: arussell@maths.dundee.ac.uk [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Nethergate, Dundee, DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-10

    We have developed a numerical model of flare heating due to the dissipation of Alfvénic waves propagating from the corona to the chromosphere. With this model, we present an investigation of the key parameters of these waves on the energy transport, heating, and subsequent dynamics. For sufficiently high frequencies and perpendicular wave numbers, the waves dissipate significantly in the upper chromosphere, strongly heating it to flare temperatures. This heating can then drive strong chromospheric evaporation, bringing hot and dense plasma to the corona. We therefore find three important conclusions: (1) Alfvénic waves, propagating from the corona to the chromosphere, are capable of heating the upper chromosphere and the corona, (2) the atmospheric response to heating due to the dissipation of Alfvénic waves can be strikingly similar to heating by an electron beam, and (3) this heating can produce explosive evaporation.

  2. An approach to quantify the heat wave strength and price a heat derivative for risk hedging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Samuel S. P.; Kramps, Benedikt; Sun, Shirley X.; Bailey, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Mitigating the heat stress via a derivative policy is a vital financial option for agricultural producers and other business sectors to strategically adapt to the climate change scenario. This study has provided an approach to identifying heat stress events and pricing the heat stress weather derivative due to persistent days of high surface air temperature (SAT). Cooling degree days (CDD) are used as the weather index for trade. In this study, a call-option model was used as an example for calculating the price of the index. Two heat stress indices were developed to describe the severity and physical impact of heat waves. The daily Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN-D) SAT data from 1901 to 2007 from the southern California, USA, were used. A major California heat wave that occurred 20-25 October 1965 was studied. The derivative price was calculated based on the call-option model for both long-term station data and the interpolated grid point data at a regular 0.1°×0.1° latitude-longitude grid. The resulting comparison indicates that (a) the interpolated data can be used as reliable proxy to price the CDD and (b) a normal distribution model cannot always be used to reliably calculate the CDD price. In conclusion, the data, models, and procedures described in this study have potential application in hedging agricultural and other risks.

  3. An Approach to Quantify the Heat Wave Strength and Price a Heat Derivative for Risk Hedging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel S. P. SHEN; Benedikt KRAMPS; Shirley X. SUN; Barbara BAILEY

    2012-01-01

    Mitigating the heat stress via a derivative policy is a vital financial option for agricultural producers and other business sectors to strategically adapt to the climate change scenario.This study has provided an approach to identifying heat stress events and pricing the heat stress weather derivative due to persistent days of high surface air temperature (SAT).Cooling degree days (CDD) are used as the weather index for trade.In this study,a call-option model was used as an example for calculating the price of the index.Two heat stress indices were developed to describe the severity and physical impact of heat waves.The daily Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN-D) SAT data from 1901 to 2007 from the southern California,USA,were used.A major California heat wave that occurred 20-25 October 1965 was studied.The derivative price was calculated based on the call-option model for both long-term station data and the interpolated grid point data at a regular 0.1°×0.1° latitude-longitude grid.The resulting comparison indicates that (a) the interpolated data can be used as reliable proxy to price the CDD and (b) a normal distribution model cannot always be used to reliably calculate the CDD price.In conclusion,the data,models,and procedures described in this study have potential application in hedging agricultural and other risks.

  4. Assessing wave energy effects on biodiversity: the wave hub experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, M J; Sheehan, E V; Bearhop, S; Broderick, A C; Conley, D C; Cotterell, S P; Crow, E; Grecian, W J; Halsband, C; Hodgson, D J; Hosegood, P; Inger, R; Miller, P I; Sims, D W; Thompson, R C; Vanstaen, K; Votier, S C; Attrill, M J; Godley, B J

    2012-01-28

    Marine renewable energy installations harnessing energy from wind, wave and tidal resources are likely to become a large part of the future energy mix worldwide. The potential to gather energy from waves has recently seen increasing interest, with pilot developments in several nations. Although technology to harness wave energy lags behind that of wind and tidal generation, it has the potential to contribute significantly to energy production. As wave energy technology matures and becomes more widespread, it is likely to result in further transformation of our coastal seas. Such changes are accompanied by uncertainty regarding their impacts on biodiversity. To date, impacts have not been assessed, as wave energy converters have yet to be fully developed. Therefore, there is a pressing need to build a framework of understanding regarding the potential impacts of these technologies, underpinned by methodologies that are transferable and scalable across sites to facilitate formal meta-analysis. We first review the potential positive and negative effects of wave energy generation, and then, with specific reference to our work at the Wave Hub (a wave energy test site in southwest England, UK), we set out the methodological approaches needed to assess possible effects of wave energy on biodiversity. We highlight the need for national and international research clusters to accelerate the implementation of wave energy, within a coherent understanding of potential effects-both positive and negative.

  5. Mortality in Spain during the heat waves of summer 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, F; Lopez-Abente, G; Ballester, E; Martínez, F

    2005-07-01

    The effect of the elevated temperatures on mortality experienced in Europe during the summer of 2003 was observed in several countries. This study, carried out in Spain, describes mortality between 1 June and 31 August and evaluates the effect of the heat wave on mortality. Observed deaths were obtained from official death registers from 50 provincial capitals. Observed deaths were compared with the expected number, estimated by applying a Poisson regression model to historical mortality series and adjusting for the upward trend and seasonality observed. Meteorological information was provided by the Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia (National Institute of Meteorology). Spain experienced three heat waves in 2003. The total associated excess deaths were 8% (43 212 observed deaths compared with 40 046 expected deaths). Excess deaths were only observed in those aged 75 years and over (15% more deaths than expected for the age group 75 to 84 and 29% for those aged 85 or over). This phenomenon (heat-associated excess mortality) is an emerging public health problem because of its increasing attributable risk, the aging of the Spanish population and its forecasted increasing frequency due to global warming. The implementation of alert and response systems based on monitoring of climate-related risks, emergency room activity and mortality, and strengthening the response capacity of the social and health services should be considered.

  6. Electron heating via mode converted ion Bernstein waves in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonoli, P. T.

    1996-11-01

    Highly localized electron heating (FWHM ≈ 0.5) has also been observed in D-(^3He) plasmas at 7.9 T. In this case the ^3He cyclotron resonance is on-axis and the fundamental D resonance and mode conversion layer are on the high field side of the tokamak. The concentration of ^3He in these experiments was in the range n_^3He / ne ~= (0.2 - 0.3) and the location of the mode conversion layer was controlled by changing the ^3He concentration or the toroidal magnetic field. The rf heating profiles were deduced using an rf power modulation technique in which the local electron heating rate was obtained from a ``break in slope'' analysis of the measured electron temperature versus time. Detailed comparisons with 1-D and toroidal full-wave ICRF models (FELICE and FISIC codes) have been carried out. The 1-D predictions for the fractional electron power absorption and damping location are found to be in qualitative agreement with the experiment. However discrepancies have been found between the full-wave toroidal code predictions and experiment. This disagreement is thought to be due to a lack of radial and poloidal resolution in the solution of the mode converted ion Bernstein wave in toroidal geometry and will be discussed. A fast wave current drive package has been modified to study the current generated via the mode converted IBW. Based on these numerical results and the experimental results for power absorption, off-axis current of up to 200 kA is predicted for C-Mod with unidirectional wave spectrum, which should be sufficient for studying reversed shear advanced tokamak plasmas. Work supported by USDOE Contract No. DE-AC02-78ET51013. Ôn behalf of the Alcator Group

  7. Could aerosol emissions be used for regional heat wave mitigation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Bernstein

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Geoengineering applications by injection of sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere are under consideration as a measure of last resort to counter global warming. Here a potential regional-scale application to offset the impacts of heat waves is critically examined. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with fully coupled chemistry (WRF-Chem, the effect of regional-scale sulfate aerosol emission over California in each of two days of the July 2006 heat wave is used to quantify potential reductions in surface temperature as a function of emission rates in a layer at 12 km altitude. Local meteorological factors yield geographical differences in surface air temperature sensitivity. For emission rates of approximately 30 μg m−2 s−1 of sulfate aerosols (with standard WRF-Chem size distribution over the region, temperature decreases of around 7 °C result during the middle part of the day over the Central Valley, one of the areas hardest hit by the heat wave. Regions more ventilated with oceanic air such as Los Angeles have slightly smaller reductions. The length of the hottest part of the day is also reduced. Advection effects on the aerosol cloud must be more carefully forecast for smaller injection regions. Verification of the impacts could be done via measurements of differences in reflected and surface downward shortwave. Such regional geoengineering applications with specific near-term target effects but smaller cost and side effects could potentially provide a means of testing larger scale applications. However, design considerations for regional applications, such as a preference for injection at a level of relatively low wind speed, differ from those for global applications. The size of the required injections and the necessity of injection close to the target region raise substantial concerns. The evaluation of this regional-scale application is thus consistent with global model evaluations, emphasizing that mitigation via

  8. Impacts of urban growth and heat waves events on the urban heat island in Bucharest city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, Maria A.; Savastru, Roxana S.; Savastru, Dan M.; Dida, Adrian I.

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the influences of urban growth and heat waves events on Urban Heat Island in relationship with several biophysical variables in Bucharest metropolitan area of Romania through satellite and in-situ monitoring data. Remote sensing data from Landsat TM/ETM+ and time series MODIS Terra/Aqua sensors have been used to assess urban land cover- temperature interactions over period between 2000 and 2016 years. Vegetation abundances and percent impervious surfaces were derived by means of linear spectral mixture model, and a method for effectively enhancing impervious surface has been developed to accurately examine the urban growth. The land surface temperature (Ts), a key parameter for urban thermal characteristics analysis, was also analyzed in relation with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) at city level. Based on these parameters, the urban growth, urban heat island effect (UHI) and the relationships of Ts to other biophysical parameters (surface albedo, precipitations, wind intensity and direction) have been analyzed. Results show that in the metropolitan area ratio of impervious surface in Bucharest increased significantly during investigated period, the intensity of urban heat island and heat wave events being most significant. The correlation analyses revealed that, at the pixel-scale, Ts possessed a strong positive correlation with percent impervious surfaces and negative correlation with vegetation abundances at the regional scale, respectively. This analysis provided an integrated research scheme and the findings can be very useful for urban ecosystem modeling.

  9. Gas dynamics of heat-release-induced waves in supercritical fluids: revisiting the Piston Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorino, Mario Tindaro; Scalo, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a gasdynamic approach to the modeling of heat-release-induced compression waves in supercritical fluids. We rely on highly resolved one-dimensional fully compressible Navier-Stokes simulations of CO2 at pseudo-boiling conditions in a closed duct inspired by the experiments of Miura et al.. Near-critical fluids exhibit anomalous variations of thermodynamic variables taken into account by adopting the Peng-Robinson equation of state and Chung's Method. An idealized heat source is applied, away from the boundaries, resulting in the generation of compression waves followed by contact discontinuities bounding a region of hot expanding fluid. For higher heat-release rates such compressions are coalescent with distinct shock-like features (i.e. non-isentropicity and propagation Mach numbers measurably greater than unity) and a non-uniform post-shock state, not present in ideal gas simulations, caused by the highly nonlinear equation of state. Thermoacoustic effects are limited to: (1) a one-way/one-time thermal-to-acoustic energy conversion, and (2) cumulative non-isentropic bulk heating due to the resonating compression waves, resulting in what is commonly referred to as the Piston Effect.

  10. Experiments on the WavePiston, Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelelli, E.; Zanuttigh, B.; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the performance of a new Wave Energy Converter (WEC) of the Oscillating Water Column type (OWC), named WavePiston. This near-shore floating device is composed of plates (i.e. energy collectors) sliding around a cylinder, that is placed perpendicular to the shore. Tests...

  11. Research Spotlight: Improved model reproduces the 2003 European heat wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-04-01

    In August 2003, record-breaking temperatures raged across much of Europe. In France, maximum temperatures of 37°C (99°F) persisted for 9 days straight, the longest such stretch since 1873. About 40,000 deaths (14,000 in France alone) were attributed to the extreme heat and low humidity. Various climate conditions must come into alignment to produce extreme weather like the 2003 heat wave, and despite a concerted effort, forecasting models have so far been unable to accurately reproduce the event—including the modern European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ensemble modeling system for seasonal forecasts, which went into operation in 2007. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL046455, 2011)

  12. Wave chaotic experiments and models for complicated wave scattering systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jen-Hao

    Wave scattering in a complicated environment is a common challenge in many engineering fields because the complexity makes exact solutions impractical to find, and the sensitivity to detail in the short-wavelength limit makes a numerical solution relevant only to a specific realization. On the other hand, wave chaos offers a statistical approach to understand the properties of complicated wave systems through the use of random matrix theory (RMT). A bridge between the theory and practical applications is the random coupling model (RCM) which connects the universal features predicted by RMT and the specific details of a real wave scattering system. The RCM gives a complete model for many wave properties and is beneficial for many physical and engineering fields that involve complicated wave scattering systems. One major contribution of this dissertation is that I have utilized three microwave systems to thoroughly test the RCM in complicated wave systems with varied loss, including a cryogenic system with a superconducting microwave cavity for testing the extremely-low-loss case. I have also experimentally tested an extension of the RCM that includes short-orbit corrections. Another novel result is development of a complete model based on the RCM for the fading phenomenon extensively studied in the wireless communication fields. This fading model encompasses the traditional fading models as its high-loss limit case and further predicts the fading statistics in the low-loss limit. This model provides the first physical explanation for the fitting parameters used in fading models. I have also applied the RCM to additional experimental wave properties of a complicated wave system, such as the impedance matrix, the scattering matrix, the variance ratio, and the thermopower. These predictions are significant for nuclear scattering, atomic physics, quantum transport in condensed matter systems, electromagnetics, acoustics, geophysics, etc.

  13. Sources and sinks separating domains of left- and right-traveling waves Experiment versus amplitude equations

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, R; Van Saarloos, W; Alvarez, Roberto; Hecke, Martin van; Saarloos, Wim van

    1996-01-01

    In many pattern forming systems that exhibit traveling waves, sources and sinks occur which separate patches of oppositely traveling waves. We show that simple qualitative features of their dynamics can be compared to predictions from coupled amplitude equations. In heated wire convection experiments, we find a discrepancy between the observed multiplicity of sources and theoretical predictions. The expression for the observed motion of sinks is incompatible with any amplitude equation description.

  14. Sources and sinks separating domains of left- and right-traveling waves: experiment versus amplitude equations

    OpenAIRE

    Saarloos, van, W.; Alvarez, R.; Hecke, van, M

    1997-01-01

    In many pattern forming systems that exhibit traveling waves, sources and sinks occur which separate patches of oppositely traveling waves. We show that simple qualitative features of their dynamics can be compared to predictions from coupled amplitude equations. In heated wire convection experiments, we find a discrepancy between the observed multiplicity of sources and theoretical predictions. The expression for the observed motion of sinks is incompatible with any amplitude equation descri...

  15. Quantifying impacts of heat waves on power grid operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Xinda; Wu, Di; Rice, Jennie S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Lu, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is projected to cause an increase in the severity and frequency of extreme weather events such as heat waves and droughts. Such changes present planning and operating challenges and risks to many economic sectors. In the electricity sector, statistics of extreme events in the past have been used to help plan for future peak loads, determine associated infrastructure requirements, and evaluate operational risks, but industry-standard planning tools have yet to be coupled with or informed by temperature models to explore the impacts of the "new normal" on planning studies. For example, high ambient temperatures during heat waves reduce the output capacity and efficiency of gas fired combustion turbines just when they are needed most to meet peak demands. This paper describes the development and application of a production cost and unit commitment model coupled to high resolution, hourly temperature data and a temperature dependent load model. The coupled system has the ability to represent the impacts of hourly temperatures on load conditions and available capacity and efficiency of combustion turbines, and therefore capture the potential impacts on system reliability and production cost. Ongoing work expands this capability to address the impacts of water availability and temperature on power grid operation.

  16. Wave behaviour and noncomplementary particle behaviour in the same experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangwala, Sadiq (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay 400 005 (India)); Roy, S.M. (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay 400 005 (India))

    1994-07-11

    Grangier, Roger and Aspect have recently performed beautiful experiments, which show that the same single photon source shows wave behaviour or particle behaviour depending on the experimental arrangement. We propose experiments in which quantum mechanics predicts wave behaviour and noncomplementary particle behaviour in the same experiment. ((orig.))

  17. Wave behaviour and noncomplementary particle behaviour in the same experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangwala, Sadiq; Roy, S. M.

    1994-07-01

    Grangier, Roger and Aspect have recently performed beautiful experiments, which show that the same single photon source shows wave behaviour or particle behaviour depending on the experimental arrangement. We propose experiments in which quantum mechanics predicts wave behaviour and noncomplementary particle behaviour in the same experiment.

  18. The impact of heat waves on surface urban heat island and local economy in Cluj-Napoca city, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Ioana; Croitoru, Adina-Eliza; Rus, Adina Viorica; Roşca, Cristina Florina; Harpa, Gabriela Victoria; Ciupertea, Antoniu-Flavius; Rus, Ionuţ

    2017-07-01

    The association between heat waves and the urban heat island effect can increase the impact on environment and society inducing biophysical hazards. Heat stress and their associated public health problems are among the most frequent. This paper explores the heat waves impact on surface urban heat island and on the local economy loss during three heat periods in Cluj-Napoca city in the summer of 2015. The heat wave events were identified based on daily maximum temperature, and they were divided into three classes considering the intensity threshold: moderate heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 90th percentile), severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature over the 95th percentile), and extremely severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 98th percentile). The minimum length of an event was of minimum three consecutive days. The surface urban heat island was detected based on land surface temperature derived from Landsat 8 thermal infrared data, while the economic impact was estimated based on data on work force structure and work productivity in Cluj-Napoca derived from the data released by Eurostat, National Bank of Romania, and National Institute of Statistics. The results indicate that the intensity and spatial extension of surface urban heat island could be governed by the magnitude of the heat wave event, but due to the low number of satellite images available, we should consider this information only as preliminary results. Thermal infrared remote sensing has proven to be a very efficient method to study surface urban heat island, due to the fact that the synoptic conditions associated with heat wave events usually favor cloud free image. The resolution of the OLI_TIRS sensor provided good results for a mid-extension city, but the low revisiting time is still a drawback. The potential economic loss was calculated for the working days during heat waves and the estimated loss reached more than 2.5 mil. EUR for each heat wave day

  19. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  20. Time-series Analysis of Heat Waves and Emergency Department Visits in Atlanta, 1993 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-31

    Heat waves are extreme weather events that have been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, there is limited knowledge of heat waves' impact on population morbidity, such as emergency department (ED) visits. We investigated associations between heat waves and ED visits for 17 outcomes in Atlanta over a 20-year period, 1993-2012. Associations were estimated using Poisson log-linear models controlling for continuous air temperature, dew-point temperature, day of week, holidays, and time trends. We defined heat waves as periods of consecutive days with temperatures beyond the 98th percentile of the temperature distribution over the period from 1945-2012. We considered six heat wave definitions using maximum, minimum, and average air temperatures and apparent temperatures. Associations by heat wave characteristics were examined. Among all outcome-heat wave combinations, associations were strongest between ED visits for acute renal failure and heat waves defined by maximum apparent temperature at lag 0 [relative risk (RR) = 1.15; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.29], ED visits for ischemic stroke and heat waves defined by minimum temperature at lag 0 (RR = 1.09; 95% CI: 1.02-1.17), and ED visits for intestinal infection and heat waves defined by average temperature at lag 1 (RR = 1.10; 95% CI: 1.00-1.21). ED visits for all internal causes were associated with heat waves defined by maximum temperature at lag 1 (RR = 1.02; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.04). Heat waves can confer additional risks of ED visits beyond those of daily air temperature, even in a region with high air-conditioning prevalence. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP44.

  1. Toward a Quantitative Estimate of Future Heat Wave Mortality under Global Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Roger D.; Tebaldi, Claudia; McDaniel, Larry; Bobb, Jennifer; Dominici, Francesca; Bell, Michelle D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Climate change is anticipated to affect human health by changing the distribution of known risk factors. Heat waves have had debilitating effects on human mortality, and global climate models predict an increase in the frequency and severity of heat waves. The extent to which climate change will harm human health through changes in the distribution of heat waves and the sources of uncertainty in estimating these effects have not been studied extensively. Objectives: We estimated t...

  2. A propagating heat wave model of skin electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliquett, Uwe; Gusbeth, Ch; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2008-03-21

    The main barrier to transdermal drug delivery in human skin is the stratum corneum. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) of sufficient amplitude can create new aqueous pathways across this barrier and enhance drug delivery through the skin. Here, we describe a model of pore formation between adjacent corneocytes that predicts the following sequence of events: (1) the PEF rapidly charges the stratum corneum near the electrode until the transepidermal potential difference is large enough to drive water into a small region of the stratum corneum, creating new aqueous pathways. (2) PEFs then drive a high current density through this newly created electropore to generate Joule heating that warms the pore perimeter. (3) This temperature rise at the perimeter increases the probability of further electroporation there as the local sphingolipids reach their phase transition temperature. (4) This heat-generated wave of further electroporation propagates outward until the surface area of the pore becomes so large that the reduced current density no longer generates sufficient heat to reach the phase transition temperature of the sphingolipids. (5) Cooling and partial recovery occurs after the field pulse. This process yields large, high permeability regions in the stratum corneum at which molecules can more readily cross this skin barrier. We present a model for this process that predicts that the initial radius of the first aqueous pathway is approximately 5nm for a transdermal voltage of 60V at room temperature.

  3. Higher Order Mode Coupler Heating in Continuous Wave Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyak, N.; Awida, M.; Hocker, A.; Khabibobulline, T.; Lunin, A.

    Electromagnetic heating due to higher order modes (HOM) propagation is particularly a concern for continuous wave (CW) particle accelerator machines. Power on the order of several watts could flow out of the cavity's HOM ports in CW operations. The upgrade of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS-II) at SLAC requires a major modification of the design of the higher order mode (HOM) antenna and feed through of the conventional ILC elliptical 9-cell cavity in order to utilize it for LCLS-II. The HOM antenna is required to bear higher RF losses, while relatively maintaining the coupling level of the higher order modes. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the heating expected in the HOM coupler with a thorough thermal quench study in comparison with the conventional ILC design. We discuss also how the heat will be removed from the cavity through RF cables with specially designed cooling straps. Finally, we report on the latest experimental results of cavity testing in vertical and horizontal cryostats.

  4. On some experiments of heat transfer On some experiments of heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Murgai

    1954-04-01

    Full Text Available This note describes the results of some experiments on the heat transfer, in an earthenware vessel, used for storing and cooling water in the summer season, and depending for its cooling effect on the evaporative loss. This vessel makes a good approach to a human body; all covered with sweat, and lends itself to an alternative method of measurement of the parameters, in the basic equation of the heat balance of the human body. The results obtained are comparable to those of Brunt, got by observations on human beings.

  5. Heat analysis of biological tissue exposed to microwave by using thermal wave model of bio-heat transfer (TWMBT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Sükrü; Helhel, Selçuk; Cerezci, Osman

    2008-02-01

    Thermal analyses of biological tissues exposed to microwaves were studied by using thermal wave model of bio-heat transfer (TWMBT). As a model, skin stratified as three layers with various thermal physical properties were simulated and thermal wave model of bio-heat transfer equations were solved by using finite difference method. Finally, the thermal variations were simulated in the cross section of the model. Comparative studies on the traditional Pennes' equations and thermal wave model of bio-heat transfer were performed and evaluated. Furthermore, temperature variations in the skin exposed to microwave were predicted depending on blood perfusion rate, thermal conductivity, frequency and power density of microwave, and exposure time. Thermal wave model of bio-heat transfer gives lower heat rise predictions than that of Pennes' equation, initially. When it approaches to steady state, it overlaps with the Pennes' equation.

  6. Study on Optical Filter Heating in Background Limited Detector Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, J.; de Visser, P. J.; Doyle, S.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2014-09-01

    Cryogenic test setups with controlled stray light environments capable of reaching ultra-low radiative background levels are required to test far infrared (FIR) and submillimeter (sub-mm) wave radiation detectors for future space based observatories. In recent experiments (Nature Commun 5:3130, 2014), in which 1.54 THz radiation was coupled onto an antenna-coupled kinetic inductance detector (KID), we found a higher than expected optical loading. We show that this can be explained by assuming heating of the metal mesh IR filters and re-radiation onto the KID. Note that the total power from the cryogenic black body source used in the experiments (at T = - K) is much larger than the power inside the - THz band we use to calibrate our detector. The out-of-band radiation can have up to 5 orders of magnitude more power than inside the - THz band of interest. A strategy to mitigate the filter heating problem is presented, and when it is implemented, the validated upper limit for stray light at the detector level is down to few aW.

  7. Climate change scenarios of heat waves in Central Europe and their uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotka, Ondřej; Kyselý, Jan; Farda, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    The study examines climate change scenarios of Central European heat waves with a focus on related uncertainties in a large ensemble of regional climate model (RCM) simulations from the EURO-CORDEX and ENSEMBLES projects. Historical runs (1970-1999) driven by global climate models (GCMs) are evaluated against the E-OBS gridded data set in the first step. Although the RCMs are found to reproduce the frequency of heat waves quite well, those RCMs with the coarser grid (25 and 50 km) considerably overestimate the frequency of severe heat waves. This deficiency is improved in higher-resolution (12.5 km) EURO-CORDEX RCMs. In the near future (2020-2049), heat waves are projected to be nearly twice as frequent in comparison to the modelled historical period, and the increase is even larger for severe heat waves. Uncertainty originates mainly from the selection of RCMs and GCMs because the increase is similar for all concentration scenarios. For the late twenty-first century (2070-2099), a substantial increase in heat wave frequencies is projected, the magnitude of which depends mainly upon concentration scenario. Three to four heat waves per summer are projected in this period (compared to less than one in the recent climate), and severe heat waves are likely to become a regular phenomenon. This increment is primarily driven by a positive shift of temperature distribution, but changes in its scale and enhanced temporal autocorrelation of temperature also contribute to the projected increase in heat wave frequencies.

  8. The impact of heat waves on mortality in 9 European cities: results from the EuroHEAT project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisanti Luigi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study aimed at developing a standardized heat wave definition to estimate and compare the impact on mortality by gender, age and death causes in Europe during summers 1990-2004 and 2003, separately, accounting for heat wave duration and intensity. Methods Heat waves were defined considering both maximum apparent temperature and minimum temperature and classified by intensity, duration and timing during summer. The effect was estimated as percent increase in daily mortality during heat wave days compared to non heat wave days in people over 65 years. City specific and pooled estimates by gender, age and cause of death were calculated. Results The effect of heat waves showed great geographical heterogeneity among cities. Considering all years, except 2003, the increase in mortality during heat wave days ranged from + 7.6% in Munich to + 33.6% in Milan. The increase was up to 3-times greater during episodes of long duration and high intensity. Pooled results showed a greater impact in Mediterranean (+ 21.8% for total mortality than in North Continental (+ 12.4% cities. The highest effect was observed for respiratory diseases and among women aged 75-84 years. In 2003 the highest impact was observed in cities where heat wave episode was characterized by unusual meteorological conditions. Conclusions Climate change scenarios indicate that extreme events are expected to increase in the future even in regions where heat waves are not frequent. Considering our results prevention programs should specifically target the elderly, women and those suffering from chronic respiratory disorders, thus reducing the impact on mortality.

  9. Plasma Shock Wave Modification Experiments in a Temperature Compensated Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, Frances J.; Mankowski, John J.; Saeks, Richard E.; Chow, Alan S.

    2003-01-01

    A number of researchers have observed that the intensity of a shock wave is reduced when it passes through a weakly ionized plasma. While there is little doubt that the intensity of a shock is reduced when it propagates through a weakly ionized plasma, the major question associated with the research is whether the reduction in shock wave intensity is due to the plasma or the concomitant heating of the flow by the plasma generator. The goal of this paper is to describe a temperature compensated experiment in a "large" diameter shock tube with an external heating source, used to control the temperature in the shock tube independently of the plasma density.

  10. Heat waves and morbidity: current knowledge and further direction-a comprehensive literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Gu, Shaohua; Bi, Peng; Yang, Jun; Liu, Qiyong

    2015-05-18

    In the past few decades, several devastating heat wave events have significantly challenged public health. As these events are projected to increase in both severity and frequency in the future, it is important to assess the relationship between heat waves and the health indicators that can be used in the early warning systems to guide the public health response. Yet there is a knowledge gap in the impact of heat waves on morbidity. In this study, a comprehensive review was conducted to assess the relationship between heat waves and different morbidity indicators, and to identify the vulnerable populations. The PubMed and ScienceDirect database were used to retrieve published literature in English from 1985 to 2014 on the relationship between heat waves and morbidity, and the following MeSH terms and keywords were used: heat wave, heat wave, morbidity, hospital admission, hospitalization, emergency call, emergency medical services, and outpatient visit. Thirty-three studies were included in the final analysis. Most studies found a short-term negative health impact of heat waves on morbidity. The elderly, children, and males were more vulnerable during heat waves, and the medical care demand increased for those with existing chronic diseases. Some social factors, such as lower socioeconomic status, can contribute to heat-susceptibility. In terms of study methods and heat wave definitions, there remain inconsistencies and uncertainties. Relevant policies and guidelines need to be developed to protect vulnerable populations. Morbidity indicators should be adopted in heat wave early warning systems in order to guide the effective implementation of public health actions.

  11. Effectiveness of an indoor preparation program to increase thermal resilience in elderly for heat waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Herweijer, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Elderly indoors can be subject to considerable heat strain during heat waves. We investigated if a short indoor acclimation (HA) program leads to improved resilience to heat. Although full HA takes about ten days, the main changes occur in the first days, leading to reduced heat strain with similar

  12. Numerical Simulation and Experiment for Underwater Shock Wave in Newly Designed Pressure Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shibuta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern eating habits depend in large part on the development of food processing technology. Thermal treatments are often performed in the conventional food processing, but it can cause discoloration and loss of nutrients of the food by thermal processing or treatment. On the other hand, food processing using an underwater shock wave has little influence of heat and its processing time is very short, preventing the loss of nutrients. In this research optical observation experiment and the numerical simulation were performed, in order to understand and control the behavior of the underwater shock wave in the development of the processing container using an underwater shock wave for the factory and home. In this experiment a rectangular container was used to observe the behavior of the underwater shock wave. In the experiment, the shock wave was generated by using explosive on the shock wave generation side. The shock wave, which passed through the phosphor bronze and propagated from the aluminum sidewall, was observed on the processing container side. Numerical simulation of an analogous experimental model was investigated, where LS-DYNA software was used for the numerical simulation. The comparative study of the experiment and the numerical simulation was investigated. The behavior of a precursor shock wave from the device wall was able to be clarified. This result is used for development of the device in numerical simulation.

  13. Variation in Population Vulnerability to Heat Wave in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianguo; Spicer, Tony; Jian, Le; Yun, Grace Yajuan; Shao, Changying; Nairn, John; Fawcett, Robert J B; Robertson, Andrew; Weeramanthri, Tarun Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Heat waves (HWs) have killed more people in Australia than all other natural hazards combined. Climate change is expected to increase the frequency, duration, and intensity of HWs and leads to a doubling of heat-related deaths over the next 40 years. Despite being a significant public health issue, HWs do not attract the same level of attention from researchers, policy makers, and emergency management agencies compared to other natural hazards. The purpose of the study was to identify risk factors that might lead to population vulnerability to HW in Western Australia (WA). HW vulnerability and resilience among the population of the state of WA were investigated by using time series analysis. The health impacts of HWs were assessed by comparing the associations between hospital emergency department (ED) presentations, hospital admissions and mortality data, and intensities of HW. Risk factors including age, gender, socioeconomic status (SES), remoteness, and geographical locations were examined to determine whether certain population groups were more at risk of adverse health impacts due to extreme heat. We found that hospital admissions due to heat-related conditions and kidney diseases, and overall ED attendances, were sensitive indicators of HW. Children aged 14 years or less and those aged 60 years or over were identified as the most vulnerable populations to HWs as shown in ED attendance data. Females had more ED attendances and hospital admissions due to kidney diseases; while males had more heat-related hospital admissions than females. There were significant dose-response relationships between HW intensity and SES, remoteness, and health service usage. The more disadvantaged and remotely located the population, the higher the health service usage during HWs. Our study also found that some population groups and locations were resilient to extreme heat. We produced a mapping tool, which indicated geographic areas throughout WA with various vulnerability

  14. Alfven Wave Collisions, The Fundamental Building Block of Plasma Turbulence IV: Laboratory Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, D J; Howes, G G; Kletzing, C A; Skiff, F; Carter, T A; Auerbach, D W

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is a phenomenon found throughout space and astrophysical plasmas. It plays an important role in solar coronal heating, acceleration of the solar wind, and heating of the interstellar medium. Turbulence in these regimes is dominated by Alfven waves. Most turbulence theories have been established using ideal plasma models, such as incompressible MHD. However, there has been no experimental evidence to support the use of such models for weakly to moderately collisional plasmas which are relevant to various space and astrophysical plasma environments. We present the first experiment to measure the nonlinear interaction between two counterpropagating Alfven waves, which is the building block for astrophysical turbulence theories. We present here four distinct tests that demonstrate conclusively that we have indeed measured the daughter Alfven wave generated nonlinearly by a collision between counterpropagating Alfven waves.

  15. Severe summer heat waves over Georgia: trends, patterns and driving forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Keggenhoff

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last 50 years Georgia experienced a rising number of severe summer heat waves causing increasing heat-health impacts. In this study, the 10 most severe heat waves between 1961 and 2010 and recent changes in heat wave characteristics have been detected from 22 homogenized temperature minimum and maximum series using the Excess Heat Factor (EHF. A composite and Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA have been performed to study summer heat wave patterns and their relationships to the selected predictors: mean Sea Level Pressure (SLP, Geopotential Height at 500 mb (Z500, Sea Surface Temperature (SST, Zonal (u-wind500 and Meridional Wind at 500 mb (v-wind500, Vertical Velocity at 500 mb (O500, Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR, Relative Humidity (RH500, Precipitation (RR and Soil Moisture (SM. Most severe heat events during the last 50 years are identified in 2007, 2006 and 1998. Largest significant trend magnitudes for the number, intensity and duration of low and high-impact heat waves have been found during the last 30 years. Significant changes in the heat wave predictors reveal that all relevant surface and atmospheric patterns contributing to heat waves have been intensified between 1961 and 2010. Composite anomalies and CCA patterns provide evidence of a large anticyclonic blocking pattern over the southern Ural Mountains, which attracts warm air masses from the Southwest, enhances subsidence and surface heating, shifts the African Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ northwards, and causes a northward shift of the subtropical jet. Moreover, pronounced precipitation and soil moisture deficiency throughout Georgia contribute to the heat wave formation and persistence over Georgia. Due to different large- to mesoscale circulation patterns and the local terrain, heat wave effects over Eastern Georgia are dominated by subsidence and surface heating, while convective rainfall and cooling are observed in the West.

  16. Forest response to heat waves at the dry timberline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakir, D.; Rotenberg, E.; Tatrinov, F.; Ogee, J.; Maseyk, K.

    2012-04-01

    Predictions of climate change consistently indicate continuous warming and drying for the entire Mediterranean basin and other regions during the next century. Investigating forest functioning at the current dry and hot "timberline" has therefore implications for predicting future forest distribution. In such investigations we should consider the forest adjustments to extreme conditions both at the long-term average climate basis, as at the time-scale of episodic extreme events, such as heat waves and droughts. Investigating both aspects in a 45-yr old semi-arid pine forest at the dry timberline (MuSICA) was used to test our understandings of underlying processes, and our ability to account for such differential responses.

  17. Tissue Erosion Using Shock Wave Heating and Millisecond Boiling in HIFU Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canney, Michael S.; Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Ha Hwang, Joo; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2010-03-01

    A wide variety of treatment protocols have been employed in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments, and the resulting bioeffects observed include both mechanical as well as thermal effects. In recent studies, there has been significant interest in generating purely mechanical damage using protocols with short, microsecond pulses. Tissue erosion effects have been attained by operating HIFU sources using short pulses of 10-20 cycles, low duty cycles (<1%), and pulse average intensities of greater than 20 kW/cm2. The goal of this work was to use a modified pulsing protocol, consisting of longer, millisecond-long pulses of ultrasound and to demonstrate that heating and rapid millisecond boiling from shock wave formation can be harnessed to induce controlled mechanical destruction of soft tissue. Experiments were performed in excised bovine liver and heart tissue using a 2-MHz transducer. Boiling activity was monitored during exposures using a high voltage probe in parallel with the HIFU source. In situ acoustic fields and heating rates were determined for exposures using a novel derating approach for nonlinear HIFU fields. Several different exposure protocols were used and included varying the duty cycle, pulse length, and power to the source. After exposures, the tissue was sectioned, and the gross lesion morphology was observed. Different types of lesions were induced in experiments that ranged from purely thermal to purely mechanical depending on the pulsing protocol used. Therefore, shock wave heating and millisecond boiling may be an effective method for reliably generating significant tissue erosion effects.

  18. Wave-current interaction near the Gulf Stream during the surface wave dynamics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David W.; Liu, Antony K.; Peng, Chih Y.; Meindl, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on the wave-current interaction near the local curvature of a Gulf Stream meander. The wave data were obtained from in situ measurements by a pitch-roll discus buoy during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) conducted off Wallops Island, Virginia, from October 1990 to March 1991. Owing to the advection of the Gulf Stream by the semidiurnal tide, the discus buoy was alternately located outside and inside the Gulf Stream. The directional wave measurements from the buoy show the changes in wave direction, wave energy, and directional spreading when waves encountered the current in the Gulf Stream meanders. A wave refraction model, using the ray-tracing method with an estimated Gulf Stream velocity field and meandering condition, was used to simulate wave refraction patterns and to estimate wave parameters at relative locations corresponding to buoy measurements. The numerical simulation shows that a focusing zone of wave rays was formed near the boundary and behind the crest of a simulated Gulf Stream meander. The focusing of wave rays causes changes in wave direction, increases in wave energy, and decreases in wave directional spreading, which are in good agreement with the results from the buoy measurements.

  19. Chromospheric heating by acoustic waves compared to radiative cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Sobotka, M; Švanda, M; Jurčák, J; del Moro, D; Berrilli, F

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves are among the possible candidate mechanisms that heat the upper layers of solar atmosphere. A weak chromospheric plage near a large solar pore NOAA 11005 was observed on October 15, 2008 in the lines Fe I 617.3 nm and Ca II 853.2 nm with the Interferometric Bidimemsional Spectrometer (IBIS) attached to the Dunn Solar Telescope. Analyzing the Ca II observations with spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.4" and 52 s, the energy deposited by acoustic waves is compared with that released by radiative losses. The deposited acoustic flux is estimated from power spectra of Doppler oscillations measured in the Ca II line core. The radiative losses are calculated using a grid of seven 1D hydrostatic semi-empirical model atmospheres. The comparison shows that the spatial correlation of maps of radiative losses and acoustic flux is 72 %. In quiet chromosphere, the contribution of acoustic energy flux to radiative losses is small, only of about 15 %. In active areas with photospheric ma...

  20. Contrasting responses of urban and rural surface energy budgets to heat waves explain synergies between urban heat islands and heat waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Sun, Ting; Liu, Maofeng; Yang, Long; Wang, Linlin; Gao, Zhiqiu

    2015-05-01

    Heat waves (HWs) are projected to become more frequent and last longer over most land areas in the late 21st century, which raises serious public health concerns. Urban residents face higher health risks due to synergies between HWs and urban heat islands (UHIs) (i.e., UHIs are higher under HW conditions). However, the responses of urban and rural surface energy budgets to HWs are still largely unknown. This study analyzes observations from two flux towers in Beijing, China and reveals significant differences between the responses of urban and rural (cropland) ecosystems to HWs. It is found that UHIs increase significantly during HWs, especially during the nighttime, implying synergies between HWs and UHIs. Results indicate that the urban site receives more incoming shortwave radiation and longwave radiation due to HWs as compared to the rural site, resulting in a larger radiative energy input into the urban surface energy budget. Changes in turbulent heat fluxes also diverge strongly for the urban site and the rural site: latent heat fluxes increase more significantly at the rural site due to abundant available water, while sensible heat fluxes and possibly heat storage increase more at the urban site. These comparisons suggest that the contrasting responses of urban and rural surface energy budgets to HWs are responsible for the synergies between HWs and UHIs. As a result, urban mitigation and adaption strategies such as the use of green roofs and white roofs are needed in order to mitigate the impact of these synergies.

  1. Drift waves in the corona: heating and acceleration of ions at frequencies far below the gyro frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Vranjes, J

    2010-01-01

    In the solar corona, several mechanisms of the drift wave instability can make the mode growing up to amplitudes at which particle acceleration and stochastic heating by the drift wave take place. The stochastic heating, well known from laboratory plasma physics where it has been confirmed in numerous experiments, has been completely ignored in past studies of coronal heating. However, in the present study and in our very recent works it has been shown that the inhomogeneous coronal plasma is, in fact, a perfect environment for fast growing drift waves. As a matter of fact, the large growth rates are typically of the same order as the plasma frequency. The consequent heating rates may exceed the required values for a sustained coronal heating by several orders of magnitude. Some aspects of these phenomena are investigated here. In particular the analysis of the particle dynamics within the growing wave is compared with the corresponding fluid analysis. While both of them predict the stochastic heating, the th...

  2. Recent severe heat waves: how to view them in a 'global warming' perspective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kysely, J.

    2010-03-01

    The area of western and central Europe has recently been affected by several long-lasting and severe heat waves, particularly in July-August 2003, June-July 2006, and July 2007. The heat waves influenced various sectors of human activities, with enormous socio-economic impacts. With an estimated death toll exceeding 50000 over Europe, the August 2003 heat wave was the worst natural disaster in Europe during the last 50 years, yielding an example of how seriously may also high-income countries be affected by climate change. The aims of the study are to assess whether recent occurrences of severe heat waves in central Europe were exceptional in the context of past fluctuations, and to estimate their recurrence probabilities under future climate change scenarios. We focus on analogs of the 2006 heat wave which lasted 33 consecutive days in Prague and was the longest and most severe heat wave since the beginning of air temperature measurements in 1775. Probabilities of long and severe heat waves are estimated from daily temperature series generated by a first-order autoregressive model with a deterministic component, incorporating the seasonal cycle and the long-term trend. The model is validated with respect to the simulation of heat waves in present climate (1961-2006) and subsequently run under several assumptions reflecting various rates of summer warming over the 21st century, based on climate model projections. The return period of a heat wave reaching or exceeding the length of the 2006 heat wave is estimated to be around 120 years in 2006. Due to an increase in mean summer temperatures, probabilities of very long heat waves have already risen by an order of magnitude over the recent 25 years, and they are likely to increase by another order of magnitude by around 2040 under the summer warming rate assumed by the mid-scenario. Even the lower-bound scenario yields a considerable decline of return periods associated with intense heat waves. Although positive socio

  3. Similarity solution for the flow behind a shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux in magnetogasdynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of a spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux, in the presence of a spacially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field, driven out by a moving piston is investigated. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow-field behind the shock and the effects of variation of the heat transfer parameters, the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas, both, decreases the compressibility of the gas and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that with an increase in the parameters of radiative and conductive heat transfer the tendency of formation of maxima in the distributions of heat flux, density and isothermal speed of sound decreases. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is form at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, chemical detonation, rupture of a pressurized vessels, in the analysis of data from exploding wire experiments, and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or reentry vehicles, etc. The findings of the present works provided a clear picture of whether and how the non-idealness parameter, conductive and radiative heat transfer parameters and the magnetic field affect the flow behind the shock

  4. How to use near real-time health indicators to support decision-making during a heat wave: the example of the French heat wave warning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Mathilde; Laaidi, Karine; Wagner, Vérène; Ung, Aymeric Bun; Smaili, Sabira; Fouillet, Anne; Caserio-Schönemann, Céline; Beaudeau, Pascal

    2012-07-16

    Introduction The French warning system for heat waves is based on meteorological forecasts. Near real-time health indicators are used to support decision-making, e.g. to extend the warning period, or to choose the most appropriate preventive measures. They must be analysed rapidly to provide decision-makers useful and in-time information. The objective of the study was to evaluate such health indicators. Methods A literature review identified a range of possible mortality and morbidity indicators. A reduced number were selected, based on several criteria including sensitivity to heat, reactivity, representativity and data quality. Two methods were proposed to identify indicator-based statistical alarms: historical limits or control charts, depending on data availability. The use of the indicators was examined using the 2006 and 2009 heat waves. Results Out of 25 possible indicators, 5 were selected: total mortality, total emergency calls, total emergency visits, emergency visits for people aged 75 and over and emergency visits for causes linked to heat. In 2006 and 2009, no clear increases were observed during the heat waves. The analyses of real-time health indicators showed there was no need to modify warning proposals based on meteorological parameters. Discussion These findings suggest that forecasted temperatures can be used to anticipate heat waves and promote preventive actions. Health indicators may not be needed to issue a heat wave alert, but daily surveillance of health indicators may be useful for decision-makers to adapt prevention measures.

  5. Boundary-reflected waves and ultrasonic coda waves in rock physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bo-Ye; Fu, Li-Yun; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yan

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasonic coda waves are widely used to study high-frequency scattering. However, ultrasonic coda waves are strongly affected by interference from by boundary-reflected waves. To understand the effect of boundary-reflected waves, we performed ultrasonic experiments using aluminum and shale samples, and the rotating staggered-mesh finite-difference method to simulate the wavefield. We analyzed the wavefield characteristics at the different receiving points and the interference characteristics of the boundary-reflected waves with the ultrasonic coda wave, and the effect of sample geometry on the ultrasonic coda waves. The increase in the aspect ratio of the samples delays the interference effect of the laterally reflected waves and reduces the effect on the ultrasonic coda waves. The main waves interfering with the ultrasonic coda waves are laterally reflected PP-, PS-, PPP-, and PPS-waves. The scattering and attenuation of the high-frequency energy in actual rocks can weaken the interference of laterally reflected waves with the ultrasonic coda waves.

  6. Enzyme Activity Dynamics in Response to Climate Change: 2011 Drought-Heat Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extreme weather events such as severe droughts and heat waves may have permanent consequences on soil quality and functioning in agroecosystems. The Southern High Plains (SHP) region of Texas, U.S., a large cotton producing area, experienced a historically extreme drought and heat wave during 2011,...

  7. Heat waves measured with MODIS land surface temperature data predict changes in avian community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff

    2011-01-01

    Heat waves are expected to become more frequent and severe as climate changes, with unknown consequences for biodiversity. We sought to identify ecologically-relevant broad-scale indicators of heat waves based on MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and interpolated air temperature data and assess their associations with avian community structure. Specifically, we...

  8. Heat wave hazard classification and risk assessment using artificial intelligence fuzzy logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramitsoglou, Iphigenia; Kiranoudis, Chris T; Maiheu, Bino; De Ridder, Koen; Daglis, Ioannis A; Manunta, Paolo; Paganini, Marc

    2013-10-01

    The average summer temperatures as well as the frequency and intensity of hot days and heat waves are expected to increase due to climate change. Motivated by this consequence, we propose a methodology to evaluate the monthly heat wave hazard and risk and its spatial distribution within large cities. A simple urban climate model with assimilated satellite-derived land surface temperature images was used to generate a historic database of urban air temperature fields. Heat wave hazard was then estimated from the analysis of these hourly air temperatures distributed at a 1-km grid over Athens, Greece, by identifying the areas that are more likely to suffer higher temperatures in the case of a heat wave event. Innovation lies in the artificial intelligence fuzzy logic model that was used to classify the heat waves from mild to extreme by taking into consideration their duration, intensity and time of occurrence. The monthly hazard was subsequently estimated as the cumulative effect from the individual heat waves that occurred at each grid cell during a month. Finally, monthly heat wave risk maps were produced integrating geospatial information on the population vulnerability to heat waves calculated from socio-economic variables.

  9. New Generation of ELF/VLF Wave Injection Experiments for HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Reddy, A.; Watkins, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    We present a ray tracing study to investigate the feasibility of a new generation of wave injection experiments from HAARP transmitter (L 4.9). Highly successful whistler mode wave injection experiments from SIPLE station, Antarctica, have established the importance of such experiments to study magnetospheric wave-particle interactions, and for cold and hot plasma diagnostics [Helliwell and Katsufrakis, 1974; Carpenter and Miller, 1976; Sonwalkar et al., 1997]. Modulated heating experiments from HAARP have shown that it is possible to launch ELF/VLF waves into the magnetosphere that can be observed on the ground after one-, two-, and multi-hop ducted propagation [Inan et al., 2004]. Recent research has also shown that ionospheric heating experiments using HAARP can lead to the formation of magnetospheric ducts [e.g. Milikh et al., 2010; Fallen et al., 2011]. Collectively, these results indicate that the HAARP (or similar) transmitter can be used first to form ducts on nearby L shells, and then to inject and trap transmitter generated ELF/VLF waves in those ducts. Ray tracing studies using a model magnetosphere shows that ELF/VLF waves in a few kilohertz range can be trapped in ducts with L shells near the HAARP transmitter. For example, 1.5 kHz waves injected from L shell = 4.9 and altitude = 200 km can be trapped in ducts located within 0.3 L of the transmitter L-shell. The duct parameters needed for ray-trapping are typically duct width dL 0.1-0.3 and duct enhancement factor dNe/Ne 10-20% or more. The location of plasmapause with respect to transmitter plays a role in the nature of trapping. The duct locations and parameters required for trapping ELF/VLF waves inside the ducts are consistent with past observations of ducts generated by the HAARP transmitter. Ray tracing calculations provide trapped wave normal angles, time delays, resonant energetic electron energy, estimates of wave intensity inside the duct, on the ground, and on satellites such DEMETER, Van

  10. Rogue waves in a water tank: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Recently many rogue waves have been reported as the main cause of ship incidents on the sea. One of the main characteristics of rogue waves is its elusiveness: they present unexpectedly and disappear in the same wave. Some authors (Zakharov and al.2010) are attempting to find the probability of their appearances apart from studyingthe mechanism of the formation. As an effort on this topic we tried the generation of rogue waves in a water wave tank using a symmetric spectrum(Akhmediev et al. 2011) as input on the wave maker. The produced waves were clearly rogue waves with a rate (maximum wave height/ Significant wave height) of 2.33 and a kurtosis of 4.77 (Janssen 2003, Onorato 2006). These results were already presented (Lechuga 2012). Similar waves (in pattern aspect, but without being extreme waves) were described as crossing waves in a water tank(Shemer and Lichter1988). To go on further the next step has been to apply a theoretical model to the envelope of these waves. After some considerations the best model has been an analogue of the Ginzburg-Landau equation. This apparently amazing result is easily explained: We know that the Ginzburg-Landau model is related to some regular structures on the surface of a liquid and also in plasmas, electric and magnetic fields and other media. Another important characteristic of the model is that their solutions are invariants with respectto the translation group. The main aim of this presentation is to extract conclusions of the model and the comparison with the measured waves in the water tank.The nonlinear structure of waves and their regularity make suitable the use of the Ginzburg-Landau model to the envelope of generated waves in the tank,so giving us a powerful tool to cope with the results of our experiment.

  11. Temporal Changes in Extreme High Temerature, Heat Waves in Istanbul Between 1960-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yürük, C.; Ünal, Y. S.; Bilgen, S. I.; Menteş, Ş. S.; İncecik, S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change has crucial effects on cities and especially for informal settlements, urban poor and other vulnerable groups by influencing human health, assets and livelihoods. These impacts directly result from the variations in temperature and precipitation, and emergence of heat waves, droughts, floods and fires (IPCC, 2014). Summertime episodes with extremely high air temperatures which last for several days or longer are addressed to as heat waves and affect the weather and climate in the globe. The aim of this study is to analyze the occurrence of heat waves in terms of quantity, duration and frequency and also to evaluate the accuracy of the COSMO-CLM (CCLM) model in reproducing the characteristics of heat waves in Istanbul. The summer maximum temperatures of six Turkish State Meteorological Service (TSMS) stations are selected between 1960 and 2014 to estimate the characteristics of heat waves in Istanbul. We define the heat wave if the maximum temperatures exceed a threshold value for at least three consecutive days. The threshold value is determined as 30.5 from the 90th percentile of all six station's observations. Then it is used in the detection of the hot days, heat waves and their durations. The results show that not only the number of heat waves but also duration of heat waves increase towards the end of the study period. Especially, a significant increase in heat wave events is evident after 1990s. In 2012, the number of hot days reaches the maximum value in all stations and Kartal station located southern part of city, has the highest value of 60 hot days. Furthermore, Kartal as an urban area in the Asian side of the city, exhibits highest heat wave duration with 18 consecutive days in 1998. To estimate the relationship between urban heat island intensity and the heat waves, we examined data at 43 stations collected by Disaster Coordination Center and TSMS between 2007 and 2012. Urban heat island phenomenon is found to be related to higher

  12. Experiences with large heat pumps for space heating. Erfaringer med store varmepumper til rumopvarmning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willumsen, O.

    1984-01-01

    In Denmark, only a moderate number of large heat pumps has been installed. Large heat pumps are in this context defined as heat pumps with a heat output exceeding 50 kW. Heat sources for these heat pumps are - to some extent - the same as for smaller heat pumps, i.e. outdoor air, exhaust air, soil and ground water. The use of sewage water, water from lakes or seawater also is rather commen. Besides, more special heat sources based on industrial waste heat are being utilized. The report primarily deals with heat pumps using the most common heat sources. This means that industrial heat pumps are not included in this report. In a few cases it has been considered appropriate to include heat pumps with a heat output smaller than 50 kW, when the experiences from these installations are considered relevant for larger plants. Some of the main findings of the survey are: - When designing heat pump installations, greater attention should be paid towards a more precise evaluation of the annual energy demand of the heat load. - Consulting firms generally have inadequate knowledge of the practical attainable seasonal COP's. - The energy surveillance equipment is insufficient in many installations - or is missing completely. - Salt-based antifreeze solutions should normally be avoided. - Utilizing ground water as a heat source can be problematic due to fouling problems or corrosion damages.

  13. Excitation of ion-cyclotron harmonic waves in lower-hybrid heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, E.

    1981-06-01

    The parametric excitation of ion-cyclotron waves by a lower-hybrid pump field is studied in the assumption that the magnitude of the pump is constant. The spatial amplification factor is given as a function of the wavenumber mismatch as produced by the plasma density gradient, and of the linear damping rates of the excited ion-cyclotron and sideband waves. The analysis is applied to plasma edge parameters relevant to the JFT2 heating experiment. It is found that ion-cyclotron harmonic modes are excited depending on pump frequency and plasma density. These modes are shown to have finite damping rates. The parallel refractive indices n1z of the excited sideband fields are found to be always larger than that of the driven pump field. Transition to quasi-mode decay occurs either by decreasing the pump frequency or by increasing the applied RF-power.

  14. Generation of whistler-wave heated discharges with planar resonant RF networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guittienne, Ph; Howling, A A; Hollenstein, Ch

    2013-09-20

    Magnetized plasma discharges generated by a planar resonant rf network are investigated. A regime transition is observed above a magnetic field threshold, associated with rf waves propagating in the plasma and which present the characteristics of whistler waves. These wave heated regimes can be considered as analogous to conventional helicon discharges, but in planar geometry.

  15. Effects of Autumn and Spring Heat Waves on Seed Germination of High Mountain Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsenigo, Simone; Abeli, Thomas; Rossi, Graziano; Bonasoni, Paolo; Pasquaretta, Cristian; Gandini, Maurizia; Mondoni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Alpine plants are considered to be particularly vulnerable to climate change and related extreme episodes, such as heat waves. Despite growing interest in the impact of heat waves on alpine plants, knowledge about their effects on regeneration is still fragmentary. Recruitment from seeds will be crucial for the successful migration and survival of these species and will play a key role in their future adaptation to climate change. In this study, we assessed the impacts of heat waves on the seed germination of 53 high mountain plants from the Northern Apennines (Italy). The seeds were exposed to laboratory simulations of three seasonal temperature treatments, derived from real data recorded at a meteorological station near the species growing site, which included two heat wave episodes that occurred both in spring 2003 and in autumn 2011. Moreover, to consider the effect of increasing drought conditions related to heat waves, seed germination was also investigated under four different water potentials. In the absence of heat waves, seed germination mainly occurred in spring, after seeds had experienced autumn and winter seasons. However, heat waves resulted in a significant increase of spring germination in c. 30% of the species and elicited autumn germination in 50%. When heat waves were coupled with drought, seed germination decreased in all species, but did not stop completely. Our results suggest that in the future, heat waves will affect the germination phenology of alpine plants, especially conditionally dormant and strictly cold-adapted chorotypes, by shifting the emergence time from spring to autumn and by increasing the proportion of emerged seedlings. The detrimental effects of heat waves on recruitment success is less likely to be due to the inhibition of seed germination per se, but rather due to seedling survival in seasons, and temperature and water conditions that they are not used to experiencing. Changes in the proportion and timing of emergence

  16. Artificial plasma cusp generated by upper hybrid instabilities in HF heating experiments at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Spencer; Snyder, Arnold

    2013-05-01

    High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program digisonde was operated in a fast mode to record ionospheric modifications by the HF heating wave. With the O mode heater of 3.2 MHz turned on for 2 min, significant virtual height spread was observed in the heater off ionograms, acquired beginning the moment the heater turned off. Moreover, there is a noticeable bump in the virtual height spread of the ionogram trace that appears next to the plasma frequency (~ 2.88 MHz) of the upper hybrid resonance layer of the HF heating wave. The enhanced spread and the bump disappear in the subsequent heater off ionograms recorded 1 min later. The height distribution of the ionosphere in the spread situation indicates that both electron density and temperature increases exceed 10% over a large altitude region (> 30 km) from below to above the upper hybrid resonance layer. This "mini cusp" (bump) is similar to the cusp occurring in daytime ionograms at the F1-F2 layer transition, indicating that there is a small ledge in the density profile reminiscent of F1-F2 layer transitions. Two parametric processes exciting upper hybrid waves as the sidebands by the HF heating waves are studied. Field-aligned purely growing mode and lower hybrid wave are the respective decay modes. The excited upper hybrid and lower hybrid waves introduce the anomalous electron heating which results in the ionization enhancement and localized density ledge. The large-scale density irregularities formed in the heat flow, together with the density irregularities formed through the parametric instability, give rise to the enhanced virtual height spread. The results of upper hybrid instability analysis are also applied to explain the descending feature in the development of the artificial ionization layers observed in electron cyclotron harmonic resonance heating experiments.

  17. Theory and experiments on RF plasma heating, current drive and profile control in TORE SUPRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the main experimental and theoretical achievements related to the study of RF heating and non-inductive current drive and particularly phenomena related to the current density profile control and the potentiality of producing stationary enhanced performance regimes: description of the Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonant Frequency (ICRF) systems; long pulse coupling performance of the RF systems; observation of the transition to the so-called ``stationary LHEP regime`` in which the (flat) central current density and (peaked) electron temperature profiles are fully decoupled; experiments on ICRF sawtooth stabilization with the combined effect of LHCD modifying the current density profile; diffusion of fast electrons generated by LH waves; ramp-up experiments in which the LH power provided a significant part of the resistive poloidal flux and flux consumption scaling; theory of spectral wave diffusion and multipass absorption; fast wave current drive modelling with the Alcyon full wave code; a reflector LH antenna concept. 18 figs., 48 refs.

  18. The Effect of Heat Waves on Mental Health in a Temperate Australian City

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Alana; Bi, Peng; Nitschke, Monika; Ryan, Philip; Pisaniello, Dino; Tucker, Graeme

    2008-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to identify mental, behavioral, and cognitive disorders that may be triggered or exacerbated during heat waves, predisposing individuals to heat-related morbidity and mortality. Design Using health outcome data from Adelaide, South Australia, for 1993–2006, we estimated the effect of heat waves on hospital admissions and mortalities attributed to mental, behavioral, and cognitive disorders. We analyzed data using Poisson regression accounting for overdispe...

  19. Characterization of Heat Waves in the Sahel and associated mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oueslati, Boutheina; Pohl, Benjamin; Moron, Vincent; Rome, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    Large efforts are made to investigate the heat waves (HW) in developed countries because of their devastating impacts on society, economy and environment. This interest increased after the intense event over Europe during summer 2003. However, HWs are still understudied over developing countries. This is particularly true in West Africa, and especially in the Sahel, where temperatures recurrently reach critical values, such as during the 2010 HW event. Understanding the Sahelian HWs and associated health risks constitute the main objective of ACASIS, a 4-year project funded by the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche. Our work contributes to this project and aims at characterizing the Sahelian HWs and understanding the mechanisms associated with such extreme events. There is no universal definition of a HW event, since it is highly dependent on the sector (human health, agriculture, transport...) and region of interest. In our case, a HW is defined when the heat index of the day and of the night exceeds the 90th percentile for at least 3 consecutive days (Rome et al. 2016, in preparation). This index combines temperature and relative humidity in order to determine the human-perceived equivalent temperature (definition adapted from Steadman, 1979). Intrinsic properties of Sahelian HW are analyzed from the Global Summary of the Day (GSOD) synoptic observations and ERA-interim reanalyses over 1979-2014 during boreal spring seasons (April-May-June), the warmest period of the year in the Central Sahel. ERA-interim captures well the observed interannual variability and seasonal cycle at the regional scale, as well as the 1979-2014 increasing linear trend of springtime HW occurrences in the Sahel. Reanalyses, however, overestimate the duration, spatial extent of HW, and underestimate their intensity. For both GSOD and ERA-interim, we show that, over the last three decades, Sahelian HWs tend to become more frequent, last longer, cover larger areas and reach higher

  20. Health impacts of the July 2010 heat wave in Québec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bustinza Ray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the consequences of climate change is the increased frequency and intensity of heat waves which can cause serious health impacts. In Québec, July 2010 was marked by an unprecedented heat wave in recent history. The purpose of this study is to estimate certain health impacts of this heat wave. Methods The crude daily death and emergency department admission rates during the heat wave were analyzed in relation to comparison periods using 95% confidence intervals. Results During the heat wave, the crude daily rates showed a significant increase of 33% for deaths and 4% for emergency department admissions in relation to comparison periods. No displacement of mortality was observed over a 60-day horizon. Conclusions The all-cause death indicator seems to be sufficiently sensitive and specific for surveillance of exceedences of critical temperature thresholds, which makes it useful for a heat health-watch system. Many public health actions combined with the increased use of air conditioning in recent decades have contributed to a marked reduction in mortality during heat waves. However, an important residual risk remains, which needs to be more vigorously addressed by public health authorities in light of the expected increase in the frequency and severity of heat waves and the aging of the population.

  1. Magnitude and frequency of heat and cold waves in recent decades: the case of South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ceccherini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades there has been an increase in magnitude and occurrence of heat waves and a decrease of cold waves which are possibly related to the anthropogenic influence (Solomon et al., 2007. This study describes the extreme temperature regime of heat waves and cold waves across South America over recent years (1980–2014. Temperature records come from the Global Surface Summary of the Day (GSOD, a climatological dataset produced by the National Climatic Data Center that provides records of daily maximum and minimum temperatures acquired worldwide. The magnitude of heat waves and cold waves for each GSOD station are quantified on annual basis by means of the Heat Wave Magnitude Index (Russo et al., 2014 and the Cold Wave Magnitude Index (CWMI, Forzieri et al., 2015. Results indicate an increase in intensity and in frequency of heat waves, with up to 75 % more events occurring only in the last 10 years. Conversely, no significant changes are detected for cold waves. In addition, the trend of the annual temperature range (i.e., yearly mean of Tmax – yearly mean of Tmin is positive – up to 1 °C decade−1 – over the extra-tropics and negative – up to 0.5 °C decade−1 – over the tropic. This dichotomous behaviour indicates that the annual mean of Tmax is generally increasing more than the annual mean of Tmin in the extra-tropics and vice versa in the tropics.

  2. Impact of heat waves on nonaccidental deaths in Jinan, China, and associated risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Shouqin; Han, Jing; Zhou, Lin; Liu, Yueling; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Ying

    2016-09-01

    An ecological study and a case-crossover analysis were conducted to evaluate the impact of heat waves on nonaccidental deaths, and to identify contributing factors of population vulnerability to heat-related deaths in Jinan, China. Daily death data and meteorological data were collected for summer months (June to August) of 2012-2013. Excess mortality was calculated and multivariate linear regression models were used to assess the increased risk of heat waves on deaths. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were performed to estimate the odd ratios (ORs) of risk factors and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Overall, heat waves were related to 24.88 % excess deaths of total nonaccidental deaths and 31.33 % excess deaths of circulatory diseases, with an OR of 16.07 (95 % CI 8.80-23.33) for total nonaccidental deaths and 12.46 (95 % CI 7.39-17.53) for deaths of circulatory diseases. The case-crossover analysis indicated that older people were more likely to die during heat waves (OR = 1.233, 95 % CI 1.076-1.413) and more deaths occurred outside a hospital during heat waves (OR = 1.142, 95 % CI 1.006-1.296). In conclusion, heat waves have caused excess deaths and significantly increased the risk of circulatory deaths. The risk factors identified in our study have implications for public health interventions to reduce heat-related mortality during extreme heat events.

  3. ULF wave electromagnetic energy flux into the ionosphere: Joule heating implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartinger, M. D.; Moldwin, M. B.; Zou, S.; Bonnell, J. W.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-01-01

    Ultralow-frequency (ULF) waves—in particular, Alfvén waves-transfer energy into the Earth's ionosphere via Joule heating, but it is unclear how much they contribute to global and local heating rates relative to other energy sources. In this study we use Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellite data to investigate the spatial, frequency, and geomagnetic activity dependence of the ULF wave Poynting vector (electromagnetic energy flux) mapped to the ionosphere. We use these measurements to estimate Joule heating rates, covering latitudes at or below the nominal auroral oval and below the open/closed field line boundary. We find ULF wave Joule heating rates (integrated over 3-30 mHz frequency band) typically range from 0.001 to 1 mW/m2. We compare these rates to empirical models of Joule heating associated with large-scale, static (on ULF wave timescales) current systems, finding that ULF waves nominally contribute little to the global, integrated Joule heating rate. However, there are extreme cases with ULF wave Joule heating rates of ≥10 mW/m2—in these cases, which are more likely to occur when Kp ≥ 3, ULF waves make significant contributions to the global Joule heating rate. We also find ULF waves routinely make significant contributions to local Joule heating rates near the noon and midnight local time sectors, where static current systems nominally contribute less to Joule heating; the most important contributions come from lower frequency (<7 mHz) waves.

  4. Educing the emission mechanism of internal gravity waves in the differentially heat rotating annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Joran; Hien, Steffen; Achatz, Ulrich; Borchert, Sebastian; Fruman, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the lifecycle of gravity waves is fundamental to a good comprehension of the dynamics of the atmosphere. In this lifecycle, the emission mechanisms may be the most elusive. Indeed, while the emission of gravity waves by orography or convection is well understood, the so-called spontaneous emission is still a quite open topic of investigation [1]. This type of emission usually occur very near jet-front systems in the troposphere. In this abstract, we announce our numerical study of the question. Model systems of the atmosphere which can be easily simulated or built in a laboratory have always been an important part of the study of atmospheric dynamics, alongside global simulations, in situ measurements and theory. In the case of the study of the spontaneous emission of gravity waves near jet-front systems, the differentially heated rotating annulus set up has been proposed and extensively used. It comprises of an annular tank containing water: the inner cylinder is kept at a cold temperature while the outer cylinder is kept at a warm temperature. The whole system is rotating. Provided the values of the control parameters (temperature, rotation rate, gap between the cylinders, height of water) are well chosen, the resulting flow mimics the troposphere at midlatitudes: it has a jet stream, and a baroclinic lifecycle develops on top of it. A very reasonable ratio of Brunt-Väisälä frequency over rotation rate of the system can be obtained, so as to be as close to the atmosphere as possible. Recent experiments as well as earlier numerical simulations in our research group have shown that gravity waves are indeed emitted in this set up, in particular near the jet front system of the baroclinic wave [2]. After a first experimental stage of characterising the emitted wavepacket, we focused our work on testing hypotheses on the gravity wave emission mechanism: we have tested and validated the hypothesis of spontaneous imbalance generated by the flow in

  5. THEMIS Observations of the Magnetopause Electron Diffusion Region: Large Amplitude Waves and Heated Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Xiangwei; Dombeck, John; Dai, Lei; Wilson, Lynn B; Breneman, Aaron; Hupach, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We present the first observations of large amplitude waves in a well-defined electron diffusion region at the sub-solar magnetopause using data from one THEMIS satellite. These waves identified as whistler mode waves, electrostatic solitary waves, lower hybrid waves and electrostatic electron cyclotron waves, are observed in the same 12-sec waveform capture and in association with signatures of active magnetic reconnection. The large amplitude waves in the electron diffusion region are coincident with abrupt increases in electron parallel temperature suggesting strong wave heating. The whistler mode waves which are at the electron scale and enable us to probe electron dynamics in the diffusion region were analyzed in detail. The energetic electrons (~30 keV) within the electron diffusion region have anisotropic distributions with T_{e\\perp}/T_{e\\parallel}>1 that may provide the free energy for the whistler mode waves. The energetic anisotropic electrons may be produced during the reconnection process. The whi...

  6. Heating of X-Ray Hot Gas in Groups by Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Y

    2001-01-01

    In order to find the conditions which determine whether X-Ray hot gas in galaxy groups (intragroup gas; IGG) is heated externally or internally, we investigate the evolution of blast waves in galaxy groups growing on a hierarchical clustering scenario. We find that the blast waves driven by quasars are confined in groups and heat the IGG internally at z~ 1, they expel the IGG from groups; the expelled gas may fall back into the groups later as externally heated gas. Moreover, this may explain the observed low metal abundance of IGG. For blast waves driven by strong starbursts, the shift of the fate of blast waves occurs at z~ 3. On the other hand, although blast waves driven by weak starbursts do not expel IGG from groups, the heating efficiency decreases at z>~ 3 because of radiative cooling. It will be useful to compare these results with XMM-Newton observations.

  7. Diamond Heat-Spreader for Submillimeter-Wave Frequency Multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Robert H.; Schlecht, Erich T.; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.; Ward, John S.; Lee, Choonsup; Thomas, Bertrand C.; Maestrini, Alain

    2010-01-01

    The planar GaAs Shottky diode frequency multiplier is a critical technology for the local oscillator (LO) for submillimeter- wave heterodyne receivers due to low mass, tenability, long lifetime, and room-temperature operation. The use of a W-band (75-100 GHz) power amplifier followed by a frequency multiplier is the most common for submillimeter-wave sources. Its greatest challenge is to provide enough input power to the LO for instruments onboard future planetary missions. Recently, JPL produced 800 mW at 92.5 GHz by combining four MMICs in parallel in a balanced configuration. As more power at W-band is available to the multipliers, their power-handling capability be comes more important. High operating temperatures can lead to degradation of conversion efficiency or catastrophic failure. The goal of this innovation is to reduce the thermal resistance by attaching diamond film as a heat-spreader on the backside of multipliers to improve their power-handling capability. Polycrystalline diamond is deposited by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This diamond film acts as a heat-spreader to both the existing 250- and 300-GHz triplers, and has a high thermal conductivity (1,000-1,200 W/mK). It is approximately 2.5 times greater than copper (401 W/mK) and 20 times greater than GaAs (46 W/mK). It is an electrical insulator (resistivity approx. equals 10(exp 15) Ohms-cm), and has a low relative dielectric constant of 5.7. Diamond heat-spreaders reduce by at least 200 C at 250 mW of input power, compared to the tripler without diamond, according to thermal simulation. This superior thermal management provides a 100-percent increase in power-handling capability. For example, with this innovation, 40-mW output power has been achieved from a 250-GHz tripler at 350-mW input power, while the previous triplers, without diamond, suffered catastrophic failures. This breakthrough provides a stepping-stone for frequency multipliers-based LO up to 3 THz. The future work

  8. Detection of heat and cold waves in Montevergine time series (1884-2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Vincenzo; Budillon, Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, extreme events related to cooling and heating have taken high resonance, motivating the scientific community to carry out an intensive research activity, aimed to detect their variability and frequency. In this work, we have investigated about the frequency, the duration, the severity and the intensity of heat and cold waves in a Southern Italy high-altitude region, by analysing the climatological time series collected in Montevergine observatory. Following the guidelines provided by CLIVAR project (Climate and Ocean Variability, Predictability and Change), we have adopted indicators based on percentiles and duration to define a heat wave and cold event. Main results have highlighted a strong and significant positive trend in the last 40 years (1974-2015) in heat waves frequency, severity and intensity. On the contrary, in recent decades, cold wave events have exhibited a significant and positive trend only in intensity. Moreover, through the usage of two Wavelet Analysis tools, the Cross Wavelet Transform and the Wavelet Coherence, we have investigated about the connections between the extreme temperature events occurred in Montevergine and the large-scale atmospheric patterns. The heat wave events have exhibited relevant relationships with the Western European Zonal Circulation and the North Atlantic Oscillation, whereas the variability of cold wave events have shown linkages with the Eastern Mediterranean Pattern and the North Sea Caspian Pattern. In addition, the main features of synoptic patterns that have caused summer heat waves and winter cold waves in Montevergine site are presented.

  9. Evaluation of major heat waves' mechanisms in EURO-CORDEX RCMs over Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotka, Ondřej; Kyselý, Jan; Plavcová, Eva

    2017-09-01

    The main aim of the study is to evaluate the capability of EURO-CORDEX regional climate models (RCMs) to simulate major heat waves in Central Europe and their associated meteorological factors. Three reference major heat waves (1994, 2006, and 2015) were identified in the E-OBS gridded data set, based on their temperature characteristics, length and spatial extent. Atmospheric circulation, precipitation, net shortwave radiation, and evaporative fraction anomalies during these events were assessed using the ERA-Interim reanalysis. The analogous major heat waves and their links to the aforementioned factors were analysed in an ensemble of EURO-CORDEX RCMs driven by various global climate models in the 1970-2016 period. All three reference major heat waves were associated with favourable circulation conditions, precipitation deficit, reduced evaporative fraction and increased net shortwave radiation. This joint contribution of large-scale circulation and land-atmosphere interactions is simulated with difficulties in majority of the RCMs, which affects the magnitude of modelled major heat waves. In some cases, the seemingly good reproduction of major heat waves' magnitude is erroneously achieved through extremely favourable circulation conditions compensated by a substantial surplus of soil moisture or vice versa. These findings point to different driving mechanisms of major heat waves in some RCMs compared to observations, which should be taken into account when analysing and interpreting future projections of these events.

  10. Producing Acoustic 'Frozen Waves': Simulated experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Prego, Jose' L; Recami, Erasmo; Hernandez-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we show how appropriate superpositions of Bessel beams can be successfully used to obtain arbitrary longitudinal intensity patterns of nondiffracting ultrasonic wavefields with very high transverse localization. More precisely, the method here described allows generating longitudinal acoustic pressure fields, whose longitudinal intensity patterns can assume, in principle, any desired shape within a freely chosen interval 0wave propagates). Indeed, it is here demonstrated by computer evaluations that these very special beams of non-attenuated ultrasonic fields can be generated in water by means of annular transducers. Such fields "at rest" have been called by us Acoustic Frozen Waves(FW). The paper presents various cases of FWs in water, and investigates the characteristics of their aperture, such as minimum required size and ring dimensioning, as well as the influence...

  11. Wind Observations of Wave Heating and/or Particle Energization at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lynn Bruce, III; Szabo, Adam; Koval, Andriy; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Kellogg, Paul J.; Goetz, Keith; Breneman, Aaron; Kersten, Kris; Kasper, Justin C.; Pulupa, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We present the first observations at supercritical interplanetary shocks of large amplitude (> 100 mV/m pk-pk) solitary waves, approx.30 mV/m pk-pk waves exhibiting characteristics consistent with electron Bernstein waves, and > 20 nT pk-pk electromagnetic lower hybrid-like waves, with simultaneous evidence for wave heating and particle energization. The solitary waves and the Bernstein-like waves were likely due to instabilities driven by the free energy provided by reflected ions [Wilson III et al., 2010]. They were associated with strong particle heating in both the electrons and ions. We also show a case example of parallel electron energization and perpendicular ion heating due to a electromagnetic lower hybrid-like wave. Both studies provide the first experimental evidence of wave heating and/or particle energization at interplanetary shocks. Our experimental results, together with the results of recent Vlasov [Petkaki and Freeman, 2008] and PIC [Matsukyo and Scholer, 2006] simulations using realistic mass ratios provide new evidence to suggest that the importance of wave-particle dissipation at shocks may be greater than previously thought.

  12. Periodic Structure of Equatorial Envelope Rossby Wave Under Influence of Diabatic Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FUZun-Tao; CHENZhe; LIUShi-Da; LIUShi-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    A simple shallow-water model with influence of diabatic heating on a β-plane is applied to investigate the nonlinear equatorial Rossby waves in a shear flow. By the asymptotic method of multiple scales, the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS for short) equation with an external heating source is derived for large amplitude equatorial envelope Rossby wave in a shear flow. And then various periodic structures for these equatorial envelope Rossby waves are obtained with the help of Jacob/elliptic functions and elliptic equation. It is shown that phase-locked diabatic heating plays an important role in periodic structures of rational form.

  13. Periodic Structure of Equatorial Envelope Rossby Wave Under Influence of Diabatic Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zun-Tao; CHEN Zhe; LIU Shi-Da; LIU Shi-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    A simple shallow-water model with influence of diabatic heating on aβ-plane is applied to investigate the nonlinear equatorial Rossby waves in a shear flow. By the asymptotic method of multiple scales, the cubic nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS for short) equation with an external heating source is derived for large amplitude equatorial envelope Rossby wave in a shear flow. And then various periodic structures for these equatorial envelope Rossby waves are obtained with the help of Jacobi elliptic functions and elliptic equation. It is shown that phase-locked diabatic heating plays an important role in periodic structures of rational form.

  14. Stochastic Heating of Ions by Linear Polarized Alfvén Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV Xiang; LI Yi; WANG Shui

    2007-01-01

    The ion motion in the presence of linear polarized Alfvén waves is studied. For a linearly polarized wave,nonlinear resonances can occur when the amplitude of Alfvén wave is large enough. Under certain conditions, these resonances can overlap and thus make the ion motion chaotic. In this process, the plasma can be heated without the limitation of cyclotron resonant condition. Taking into account ofa spectrum of waves, the stochastic condition can decrease largely. In addition, the preferential heating can be found in the perpendicular direction.

  15. Numerical Anaysis on Heat Transfer Enhancement by Waves on Falling Liquid Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AkioMiyara

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been carried out for two dimensional wavy falling liquid films on a vertical wall.The algorithm of the simulation is based on MAC method and schemes for interfacial boundary conditions are modifed.Small artificial perturbations given at the inflow boundary grow rapidly and then the amplitude of the waves approaches to developed waves.Effects of the disturbance frequency on the wave development behavior and heat transfer characteristics are especially investigated.For low frequency,a disturbance wave develops to a solitary wave consisted of a large amplitude roll wave and small amplitude capillary waves,Increasing the frequency,the wave amplitude decreases and the capillary wave disappears.For further high frequency,the disturbance amplitude reduces along down stream.The heat transfer coefficient is enhanced by the surface wave and has a maximum at a certain frequency,The streamlines and the temperature comtoure contours are shown for various frequency waves and the heat transfer enhancement mechanism is clarified.

  16. Heat Transfer Experiments on a Pulse Detonation Driven Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    in this experiment was to determine the design for the heat exchanger. Utilizing heat transfer principals ( Incropera , et al. 2007) a spreadsheet...flow is attained from a source ( Incropera , et al. 2007). From these numbers, q is calculated:  , ,hg,in hg,outq T Thg in hg outp pm C C  Eq...convection and radiation calculations for PDC tube and heat exchanger The following formulas and methods ( Incropera , et al. 2007) were used in

  17. Heat loads on JET plasma facing components from ICRF and LH wave absorption in the SOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, P.; Colas, L.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Arnoux, G.; Bobkov, V.; Brix, M.; Coad, P.; Czarnecka, A.; Dodt, D.; Durodie, F.; Ekedahl, A.; Frigione, D.; Fursdon, M.; Gauthier, E.; Goniche, M.; Graham, M.; Joffrin, E.; Korotkov, A.; Lerche, E.; Mailloux, J.; Monakhov, I.; Noble, C.; Ongena, J.; Petrzilka, V.; Portafaix, C.; Rimini, F.; Sirinelli, A.; Riccardo, V.; Vizvary, Z.; Widdowson, A.; Zastrow, K.-D.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2011-10-01

    In JET, lower hybrid (LH) and ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) wave absorption in the scrape-off layer can lead to enhanced heat fluxes on some plasma facing components (PFCs). Experiments have been carried out to characterize these heat loads in order to: (i) prepare JET operation with the Be wall which has a reduced power handling capability as compared with the carbon wall and (ii) better understand the physics driving these wave absorption phenomena and propose solutions for next generation systems to reduce them. When using ICRF, hot spots are observed on the antenna structures and on limiters close to the powered antennas and are explained by acceleration of ions in RF-rectified sheath potentials. High temperatures up to 800 °C can be reached on locations where a deposit has built up on tile surfaces. Modelling which takes into account the fast thermal response of surface layers can reproduce well the surface temperature measurements via infrared (IR) imaging, and allow evaluation of the heat fluxes local to active ICRF antennas. The flux scales linearly with the density at the antenna radius and with the antenna voltage. Strap phasing corresponding to wave spectra with lower kpar values can lead to a significant increase in hot spot intensity in agreement with antenna modelling that predicts, in that case, an increase in RF sheath rectification. LH absorption in front of the antenna through electron Landau damping of the wave with high Npar components generates hot spots precisely located on PFCs magnetically connected to the launcher. Analysis of the LH hot spot surface temperature from IR measurements allows a quantification of the power flux along the field lines: in the worst case scenario it is in the range 15-30 MW m-2. The main driving parameter is the LH power density along the horizontal rows of the launcher, the heat fluxes scaling roughly with the square of the LH power density. The local electron density in front of the grill increases

  18. Heat conduction: hyperbolic self-similar shock-waves in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Barna, Imre Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    Analytic solutions for cylindrical thermal waves in solid medium is given based on the nonlinear hyperbolic system of heat flux relaxation and energy conservation equations. The Fourier-Cattaneo phenomenological law is generalized where the relaxation time and heat propagation coefficient have a general power law temperature dependence. From such laws one cannot form a second order parabolic or telegraph-type equation. We consider the original non-linear hyperbolic system itself with the self-similar Ansatz for the temperature distribution and for the heat flux. As results continuous and shock-wave solutions are presented. For physical establishment numerous materials with various temperature dependent heat conduction coefficients are mentioned.

  19. Wave Particle Duality and the Afshar Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drezet A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the experiment realized in 2003-2004 by S. Afshar et al. in order to refute the principle of complementarity. We discuss the general meaning of this principle and show that contrarily to the claim of the authors Bohr's complementarity is not in danger in this experiment.

  20. Wave Particle Duality and the Afshar Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drezet A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the experiment realized in 2003-2004 by S. Afshar et al. [1] in order to refute the principle of complementarity. We discuss the general meaning of this principle and show that contrarily to the claim of the authors Bohr’s complementarity is not in danger in this experiment.

  1. Experimental evidence of wave chaos from a double slit experiment with water surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunfei; Shen, Yifeng; Yang, Jiong; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian; Li, Baowen

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we report experimental evidence of wave chaos using the double slit water surface wave experiment. We demonstrate that classical dynamics of a domain manifests itself in the interference patterns after the diffraction behind the double slit. For a domain whose classical dynamics is integrable clear interference fringes can be observed behind the double slits; for a domain whose classical dynamics is chaotic, however, interference fringes can totally disappear. Our experimental results clearly demonstrate that the centuries-old double slit experiment can render an excellent tool to observe the manifestations of wave chaos.

  2. ALFVÉN WAVE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE: 1.5D MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arber, T. D.; Brady, C. S. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Shelyag, S. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, 3800 (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    Physical processes that may lead to solar chromospheric heating are analyzed using high-resolution 1.5D non-ideal MHD modeling. We demonstrate that it is possible to heat the chromospheric plasma by direct resistive dissipation of high-frequency Alfvén waves through Pedersen resistivity. However, this is unlikely to be sufficient to balance radiative and conductive losses unless unrealistic field strengths or photospheric velocities are used. The precise heating profile is determined by the input driving spectrum, since in 1.5D there is no possibility of Alfvén wave turbulence. The inclusion of the Hall term does not affect the heating rates. If plasma compressibility is taken into account, shocks are produced through the ponderomotive coupling of Alfvén waves to slow modes and shock heating dominates the resistive dissipation. In 1.5D shock coalescence amplifies the effects of shocks, and for compressible simulations with realistic driver spectra, the heating rate exceeds that required to match radiative and conductive losses. Thus, while the heating rates for these 1.5D simulations are an overestimate, they do show that ponderomotive coupling of Alfvén waves to sound waves is more important in chromospheric heating than Pedersen dissipation through ion–neutral collisions.

  3. Numerical Modelling of Solitary Wave Experiments on Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, H. G.; Arikawa, T.; Baykal, C.; Yalciner, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Performance of a rubble mound breakwater protecting Haydarpasa Port, Turkey, has been tested under tsunami attack by physical model tests conducted at Port and Airport Research Institute (Guler et al, 2015). It is aimed to understand dynamic force of the tsunami by conducting solitary wave tests (Arikawa, 2015). In this study, the main objective is to perform numerical modelling of solitary wave tests in order to verify accuracy of the CFD model IHFOAM, developed in OpenFOAM environment (Higuera et al, 2013), by comparing results of the numerical computations with the experimental results. IHFOAM is the numerical modelling tool which is based on VARANS equations with a k-ω SST turbulence model including realistic wave generation, and active wave absorption. Experiments are performed using a Froude scale of 1/30, measuring surface elevation and flow velocity at several locations in the wave channel, and wave pressure around the crown wall of the breakwater. Solitary wave tests with wave heights of H=7.5 cm and H=10 cm are selected which represent the results of the experiments. The first test (H=7.5 cm) is the case that resulted in no damage whereas the second case (H=10 cm) resulted in total damage due to the sliding of the crown wall. After comparison of the preliminary results of numerical simulations with experimental data for both cases, it is observed that solitary wave experiments could be accurately modeled using IHFOAM focusing water surface elevations, flow velocities, and wave pressures on the crown wall of the breakwater (Figure, result of sim. at t=29.6 sec). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSThe authors acknowledge developers of IHFOAM, further extend their acknowledgements for the partial supports from the research projects MarDiM, ASTARTE, RAPSODI, and TUBITAK 213M534. REFERENCESArikawa (2015) "Consideration of Characteristics of Pressure on Seawall by Solitary Waves Based on Hydraulic Experiments", Jour. of Japan. Soc. of Civ. Eng. Ser. B2 (Coast. Eng.), Vol 71, p I

  4. A protocol to assess insect resistance to heat waves, applied to bumblebees (Bombus Latreille, 1802).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, Baptiste; Lecocq, Thomas; Smet, Jérémy; Rasmont, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Insect decline results from numerous interacting factors including climate change. One of the major phenomena related to climate change is the increase of the frequency of extreme events such as heat waves. Since heat waves are suspected to dramatically increase insect mortality, there is an urgent need to assess their potential impact. Here, we determined and compared the resistance to heat waves of insects under hyperthermic stress through their time before heat stupor (THS) when they are exposed to an extreme temperature (40°C). For this, we used a new experimental standardised device available in the field or in locations close to the field collecting sites. We applied this approach on different Arctic, Boreo-Alpine and Widespread bumblebee species in order to predict consequences of heat waves. Our results show a heat resistance gradient: the heat stress resistance of species with a centred arctic distribution is weaker than the heat resistance of the Boreo-Alpine species with a larger distribution which is itself lower than the heat stress resistance of the ubiquitous species.

  5. Wave solutions of ion cyclotron heated plasmas with self-consistent velocity distributions in a tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungpyo; Wright, John; Bonoli, Paul; Harvey, Robert

    2015-11-01

    We describe a numerical model for the propagation and absorption of ion cyclotron waves in a tokamak with a non-Maxwellian velocity space distribution function. The non-Maxwellian distribution is calculated by solving Maxwell's equations and the Fokker-Plank equation self-consistently. This approach will be useful to interpret measurements of minority hydrogen tail formation during ICRF heating experiments in Alcator C-Mod. To couple the Maxwell equation solver with Fokker-Plank equation solver, the quasilinear diffusion coefficients for the fundamental ion cyclotron absorption and the first harmonic absorption are calculated. In a previous study, the all-orders spectral algorithm wave solver (AORSA) was coupled with the Fokker-Plank code (CQL3D) to find the self-consistent non-Maxwellian distribution. We derive the modified quasilinear diffusion coefficients for the finite Larmor radius (FLR) approximation using a significantly faster wave solver (TORIC) following the approach by Jaeger. The coupled TORIC-CQL3D model will be compared against results from AORSA-CQL3D in order to verify the accuracy of the reduced FLR physics in TORIC. Work supported by US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FC02-01ER54648.

  6. Heat illness--a review of military experience (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricknell, M C

    1995-10-01

    This paper is the first part of a two part review of the published literature reporting the military experience of heat illness. It summarises current concepts of the mechanisms for the development of heat illness. The reports of heat illness in the military medical literature from pre-World War 1 to the end of World War 2 are discussed. The second part will consider reports from the end of the Second World War to the present day. Epidemiological evidence for the factors causing heat illness will be summarised and finally the current areas of uncertainty will be identified with proposals for future research.

  7. Gravitational Wave Experiments - Proceedings of the First Edoardo Amaldi Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, E.; Pizzella, G.; Ronga, F.

    1995-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * Notes on Edoardo Amaldi's Life and Activity * PART I. INVITED LECTURES * Sources and Telescopes * Sources of Gravitational Radiation for Detectors of the 21st Century * Neutrino Telescopes * γ-Ray Bursts * Space Detectors * LISA — Laser Interferometer Space Antenna for Gravitational Wave Measurements * Search for Massive Coalescing Binaries with the Spacecraft ULYSSES * Interferometers * The LIGO Project: Progress and Prospects * The VIRGO Experiment: Status of the Art * GEO 600 — A 600-m Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Antenna * 300-m Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detector (TAMA300) in Japan * Resonant Detectors * Search for Continuous Gravitational Wave from Pulsars with Resonant Detector * Operation of the ALLEGRO Detector at LSU * Preliminary Results of the New Run of Measurements with the Resonant Antenna EXPLORER * Operation of the Perth Cryogenic Resonant-Bar Gravitational Wave Detector * The NAUTILUS Experiment * Status of the AURIGA Gravitational Wave Antenna and Perspectives for the Gravitational Waves Search with Ultracryogenic Resonant Detectors * Ultralow Temperature Resonant-Mass Gravitational Radiation Detectors: Current Status of the Stanford Program * Electromechanical Transducers and Bandwidth of Resonant-Mass Gravitational-Wave Detectors * Fully Numerical Data Analysis for Resonant Gravitational Wave Detectors: Optimal Filter and Available Information * PART II. CONTRIBUTED PAPERS * Sources and Telescopes * The Local Supernova Production * Periodic Gravitational Signals from Galactic Pulsars * On a Possibility of Scalar Gravitational Wave Detection from the Binary Pulsars PSR 1913+16 * Kazan Gravitational Wave Detector “Dulkyn”: General Concept and Prospects of Construction * Hierarchical Approach to the Theory of Detection of Periodic Gravitational Radiation * Application of Gravitational Antennae for Fundamental Geophysical Problems * On

  8. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: cluster observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; De Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, UPMC Université Paris 06, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Matteini, L. [Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Santolík, O. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics ASCR, 141 31 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-11-20

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ∼10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β {sub e∥} is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β {sub e∥} ≥ 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  9. VLF wave injection experiments from Siple Station, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    R.A., Helliwell

    1987-01-01

    The background of VLF wave-particle experiments from Siple Station, Antarctica, including wave-induced precipitation is briefly reviewed. Single frequency ducted signals that exceed a certain 'threshold' intensity are observed at the conjugate point (Roberval, Quebec) to be amplified 30-50dB, with temporal growth rates of 30-200dB/s. Following saturation, variable frequency emissions are triggered. When a second signal is added to the first, with a frequency spacing Df

  10. First experience with a modified Siemens Lithostar shock wave system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volmer, K D; Köhler, G; Folberth, W; Planz, K

    1991-01-01

    A Siemens Lithostar shock wave system was modified and investigated clinically. The modified system yields increased focal pressure and energy density. The first clinical experience in renal calculi shows a significant reduction in shock wave numbers per treatment. Higher energy output enables better treatment results for difficult stones such as staghorn and infections calculi. Despite the higher energy output more than 90% of treatments could be performed without anesthesia or analgesia. No significant side effects could be detected. The service life of the modified shock wave system increased by a factor of two.

  11. A Megawatt-level 28z GHz Heating System For The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Gary

    2014-04-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) will operate at axial toroidal fields of < 1 T and plasma currents, Ip < 2 MA. The development of non-inductive (NI) plasmas is a major long-term research goal for NSTX-U. Time dependent numerical simulations of 28 GHz electron cyclotron (EC) heating of low density NI start-up plasmas generated by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) in NSTX-U predict a significant and rapid increase of the central electron temperature (Te(0)) before the plasma becomes overdense. The increased Te(0) will significantly reduce the Ip decay rate of CHI plasmas, allowing the coupling of fast wave heating and neutral beam injection. A megawatt-level, 28 GHz electron heating system is planned for heating NI start-up plasmas in NSTX-U. In addition to EC heating of CHI start-up discharges, this system will be used for electron Bernstein wave (EBW) plasma start-up, and eventually for EBW heating and current drive during the Ip flattop.

  12. Three-wave interaction during electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Hansen, Søren Kjer

    2016-01-01

    Non-linear wave-wave interactions in fusion plasmas, such as the parametric decay instability (PDI) of gyrotron radiation, can potentially hamper the use of microwave diagnostics. Here we report on anomalous scattering in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak during electron cyclotron resonance heating...

  13. Theories and heat pulse experiments of non-Fourier heat conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ván Péter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The experimental basis and theoretical background of non-Fourier heat conduction is shortly reviewed from the point of view of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The performance of different theories is compared in case of heat pulse experiments.

  14. Heat-Related Mortality in India: Excess All-Cause Mortality Associated with the 2010 Ahmedabad Heat Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Mavalankar, Dileep; Nori-Sarma, Amruta; Rajiva, Ajit; Dutta, Priya; Jaiswal, Anjali; Sheffield, Perry; Knowlton, Kim; Hess, Jeremy J.; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Deol, Bhaskar; Bhaskar, Priya Shekhar; Hess, Jeremy; Jaiswal, Anjali; Khosla, Radhika; Knowlton, Kim; Mavalankar, Mavalankar; Rajiva, Ajit; Sarma, Amruta; Sheffield, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the recent past, spells of extreme heat associated with appreciable mortality have been documented in developed countries, including North America and Europe. However, far fewer research reports are available from developing countries or specific cities in South Asia. In May 2010, Ahmedabad, India, faced a heat wave where the temperatures reached a high of 46.8°C with an apparent increase in mortality. The purpose of this study is to characterize the heat wave impact and assess the associated excess mortality. Methods We conducted an analysis of all-cause mortality associated with a May 2010 heat wave in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India, to determine whether extreme heat leads to excess mortality. Counts of all-cause deaths from May 1–31, 2010 were compared with the mean of counts from temporally matched periods in May 2009 and 2011 to calculate excess mortality. Other analyses included a 7-day moving average, mortality rate ratio analysis, and relationship between daily maximum temperature and daily all-cause death counts over the entire year of 2010, using month-wise correlations. Results The May 2010 heat wave was associated with significant excess all-cause mortality. 4,462 all-cause deaths occurred, comprising an excess of 1,344 all-cause deaths, an estimated 43.1% increase when compared to the reference period (3,118 deaths). In monthly pair-wise comparisons for 2010, we found high correlations between mortality and daily maximum temperature during the locally hottest “summer” months of April (r = 0.69, pheat (May 19–25, 2010), mortality rate ratios were 1.76 [95% CI 1.67–1.83, pheat wave in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India had a substantial effect on all-cause excess mortality, even in this city where hot temperatures prevail through much of April-June. PMID:24633076

  15. Propagation of waves in a gravitating and rotating anisotropic heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    by the drift velocity since wave normal is transverse to the direction of flow. Keywords: Waves ... plasma turbulence in accretion disks and is believed to be responsible for angular momentum ... even on Mars, may simulate this situation. Thus ...... Higher moment equations and the distribution function of the solar wind plasma ...

  16. Asymmetric Wave Transmission During Electron-Cyclotron Resonant Heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, A.G.; Smits, F. M. A.; Giruzzi, G.; Oomens, A. A. M.; Westerhof, E.

    1995-01-01

    In low density plasmas in the RTP tokamak the single-pass absorption of O-mode waves at the fundamental electron cyclotron resonance is observed to be toroidally asymmetric. The absorption is highest for waves travelling in the direction opposite to the toroidal plasma current. Fokker-Planck

  17. Fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, F. T.; Abramson, H. N.; Angrist, S. W.; Catton, I.; Churchill, S. W.; Mannheimer, R. J.; Otrach, S.; Schwartz, S. H.; Sengers, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    An overstudy committee was formed to study and recommend fundamental experiments in fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer for experimentation in orbit, using the space shuttle system and a space laboratory. The space environment, particularly the low-gravity condition, is an indispensable requirement for all the recommended experiments. The experiments fell broadly into five groups: critical-point thermophysical phenomena, fluid surface dynamics and capillarity, convection at reduced gravity, non-heated multiphase mixtures, and multiphase heat transfer. The Committee attempted to assess the effects of g-jitter and other perturbations of the gravitational field on the conduct of the experiments. A series of ground-based experiments are recommended to define some of the phenomena and to develop reliable instrumentation.

  18. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  19. Wave-flume experiments of soft-rock cliff erosion under monochromatic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regard, Vincent; Astruc, Dominique; Caplain, Bastien

    2017-04-01

    We investigate how cliffs erode under wave attack. Rocky coast erosion works through cycles, each one corresponding to three successive phases: (i) notch creation at cliff toe by mechanical action of waves, (ii) cliff fracturation leading to collapse, and (iii) evacuation of scree aprons by waves and currents. We performed experiments in a 5m x 14cm x 25cm wave flume (15 cm water depth) to investigate how waves are eroding a rocky coast. The cliff is made of wet sand and models a relatively soft rock. We used 3 different grain size (D50 = 0.28-0.41-0.48 mm), changing the cliff rheology. Waves are monochromatic; their height and period differ for the various experiments. Actual wave parameters are estimated by capacitive probes located offshore. The experiments are monitored by two video cameras both on the side and above the flume. Pictures are taken at a rate of 1Hz during the first 4h and then the rate is decreased to 0.1Hz till the end of experiment (about 1 day). The monitoring ensure a confident characterization of experiments in terms of waves (surf similarity parameter ξ and the incident wave energy flux F) and in terms of sediment (Dean number Ω and Shields number θb at breakers). Experiments begin by an initial phase of quick cliff retreat. Then the system evolves with slower cliff retreat. We focus on bottom morphology which we characterize in function of wave forcing (ξ, F). We show that the bottom morphology mainly depends on ξ. For our reference sediment (Dm = 0.41 mm), we observed: (i) surging breakers on a steep terrace (type T1) for ξ > 0.65; (ii)collapsing breakers on a bared profile attached to the inner platform (type T2) for 0.55< ξ <0.6; (iii) spilling breakers on gentle terrace (type T3) for F < 1.3 W/m and 0.55< ξ <0.6. Another bottom morphology, type T4, displays two sub-systems, an outer system with a double-bar profile where breaking waves are plunging, and an inner system with a T1, T2 or T3 profile. Some of these bottom

  20. 76 FR 62777 - Forum-Trends and Causes of Observed Changes in Heat Waves, Cold Waves, Floods and Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Forum--Trends and Causes of Observed Changes in Heat Waves...: Notice of open public forum. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the schedule and topics of an upcoming forum... the forum, and are required to RSVP to Brooke.Stewart@noaa.gov by 5 p.m. EDT, Tuesday, October 25...

  1. Characterization of heat waves affecting mortality rates of broilers between 29 days and market age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Vale

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate may affect broiler production, especially where there are heat waves, which may cause high mortality rates due to the heat stress. Heat wave prediction and characterization may allow early mitigation actions to be taken. Data Mining is one of the tools used for such a characterization, particularly when a large number of variables is involved. The objective of this study was to classify heat waves that promote broiler chicken mortality in poultry houses equipped with minimal environmental control. A single day of heat, a heat-shock day, is capable of producing high broiler mortality. In poultry houses equipped with fans and evaporative cooling, the characterization of heat waves affecting broiler mortality between 29 days of age and market age presented 89.34% Model Accuracy and 0.73 Class Precision for high mortality. There was no influence on high mortality (HM of birds between 29 and 31 days of age. Maximum temperature humidity index (THI above 30.6 ºC was the main characteristic of days when there was a heat wave, causing high mortality in broilers older than 31 days. The high mortality of broilers between 31 and 40 days of age occurred when maximum THI was above 30.6 ºC and maximum temperature of the day was above 34.4 ºC. There were two main causes of high mortality of broilers older than 40 days: 1 maximum THI above 30.6 ºC and minimum THI equal or lower than 15.5 ºC; 2 maximum THI above 30.6 ºC, minimum THI lower than 15.5 ºC, and the time of maximum temperature later than 15:00h. The heat wave influence on broiler mortality lasted an average of 2.7 days.

  2. Nonlinear heat-transport equation beyond Fourier law: application to heat-wave propagation in isotropic thin layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellitto, A.; Tibullo, V.; Dong, Y.

    2017-03-01

    By means of a nonlinear generalization of the Maxwell-Cattaneo-Vernotte equation, on theoretical grounds we investigate how nonlinear effects may influence the propagation of heat waves in isotropic thin layers which are not laterally isolated from the external environment. A comparison with the approach of the Thermomass Theory is made as well.

  3. Transition from avalanche dominated transport to drift-wave dominated transport in a basic laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Compernolle, Bart; Morales, George; Maggs, James; Sydora, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Results of a basic heat transport experiment involving an off-axis heat source are presented. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. A ring-shaped electron beam source injects low energy electrons (below ionization energy) along a strong magnetic field into a preexisting, large and cold plasma. The injected electrons are thermalized by Coulomb collisions within a short distance and provide an off-axis heat source that results in a long, hollow, cylindrical region of elevated plasma pressure embedded in a colder plasma, and far from the machine walls. The off-axis source is active for a period long compared to the density decay time, i.e. as time progresses the power per particle increases. Two distinct regimes are observed to take place, an initial regime dominated by avalanches, identified as sudden intermittent rearrangements of the pressure profile, and a second regime dominated by sustained drift-Alfvén wave activity. The transition between the two regimes is sudden, affects the full radial profile and is preceded by the growth of drift Alfvén waves. Langmuir probe data will be shown on the evolution of the density, temperature and flow profiles during the transition. The character of the sustained drift wave activity will also be presented. Work supported by NSF/DOE Grant 1619505, and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, sponsored jointly by DOE and NSF.

  4. Gamma heated subassembly for sodium boiling experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artus, S.C.

    1975-01-01

    The design of a system to boil sodium in an LMFBR is examined. This design should be regarded as a first step in a series of boiling experiments. The reactor chosen for the design of the boiling apparatus is the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), located at the National Reactor Testing Station in Idaho. Criteria broadly classified as design objectives and design requirements are discussed.

  5. Syndromic surveillance and heat wave morbidity: a pilot study based on emergency departments in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josseran, Loïc; Caillère, Nadège; Brun-Ney, Dominique; Rottner, Jean; Filleul, Laurent; Brucker, Gilles; Astagneau, Pascal

    2009-02-20

    The health impacts of heat waves are serious and have prompted the development of heat wave response plans. Even when they are efficient, these plans are developed to limit the health effects of heat waves. This study was designed to determine relevant indicators related to health effects of heat waves and to evaluate the ability of a syndromic surveillance system to monitor variations in the activity of emergency departments over time. The study uses data collected during the summer 2006 when a new heat wave occurred in France. Data recorded from 49 emergency departments since July 2004, were transmitted daily via the Internet to the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance. Items collected on patients included diagnosis (ICD10 codes), outcome, and age. Statistical t-tests were used to compare, for several health conditions, the daily averages of patients within different age groups and periods (whether 'on alert' or 'off alert'). A limited number of adverse health conditions occurred more frequently during hot period: dehydration, hyperthermia, malaise, hyponatremia, renal colic, and renal failure. Over all health conditions, the total number of patients per day remained equal between the 'on alert' and 'off alert' periods (4,557.7/day vs. 4,511.2/day), but the number of elderly patients increased significantly during the 'on alert' period relative to the 'off alert' period (476.7/day vs. 446.2/day p waves.

  6. Freak waves in negative-ion plasmas: an experiment revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourakis, Ioannis; Elkamash, Ibrahem; Reville, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Extreme events in the form of rogue waves (freak waves) occur widely in the open sea. These are space- and time-localised excitations, which appear unexpectedly and are characterised by a significant amplitude. Beyond ocean dynamics, the mechanisms underlying rogue wave formation are now being investigated in various physical contexts, including materials science, nonlinear optics and plasma physics, to mention but a few. We have undertaken an investigation, from first principles, of the occurrence of rogue waves associated with the propagation of electrostatic wavepackets in plasmas. Motivated by recent experimental considerations involving freak waves in negative-ion plasmas (NIP), we have addresed the occurrence of freak waves in NIP from first principles. An extended range of plasma parameter values was identified, where freak wave formation is possible, in terms of relevant plasma parameters. Our results extend -and partly contradict- the underlying assumptions in the interpretation of the aforementioned experiment, where a critical plasma configuration was considered and a Gardner equation approach was adopted. This work was supported from CPP/QUB funding. One of us (I. Elkamash) acknowledges financial support by an Egyptian Government fellowship.

  7. Coupling heat and chemical tracer experiments for estimating heat transfer parameters in shallow alluvial aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemeersch, S; Jamin, P; Orban, P; Hermans, T; Klepikova, M; Nguyen, F; Brouyère, S; Dassargues, A

    2014-11-15

    Geothermal energy systems, closed or open, are increasingly considered for heating and/or cooling buildings. The efficiency of such systems depends on the thermal properties of the subsurface. Therefore, feasibility and impact studies performed prior to their installation should include a field characterization of thermal properties and a heat transfer model using parameter values measured in situ. However, there is a lack of in situ experiments and methodology for performing such a field characterization, especially for open systems. This study presents an in situ experiment designed for estimating heat transfer parameters in shallow alluvial aquifers with focus on the specific heat capacity. This experiment consists in simultaneously injecting hot water and a chemical tracer into the aquifer and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and concentration in the recovery well (and possibly in other piezometers located down gradient). Temperature and concentrations are then used for estimating the specific heat capacity. The first method for estimating this parameter is based on a modeling in series of the chemical tracer and temperature breakthrough curves at the recovery well. The second method is based on an energy balance. The values of specific heat capacity estimated for both methods (2.30 and 2.54MJ/m(3)/K) for the experimental site in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River (Belgium) are almost identical and consistent with values found in the literature. Temperature breakthrough curves in other piezometers are not required for estimating the specific heat capacity. However, they highlight that heat transfer in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River is complex and contrasted with different dominant process depending on the depth leading to significant vertical heat exchange between upper and lower part of the aquifer. Furthermore, these temperature breakthrough curves could be included in the calibration of a complex heat transfer model for

  8. Resonant Heating of Ions by Parallel Propagating Alfvén Waves in Solar Coronal Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Xi Zhang; Jing-Xiu Wang; Chi-Jie Xiao

    2005-01-01

    Resonant heating of H, O+5, and Mg+9 by parallel propagating ioncyclotron Alfven waves in solar coronal holes at a heliocentric distance is studied using the heating rate derived from the quasilinear theory. It is shown that the particle-Alfven-wave interaction is a significant microscopic process. The temperatures of the ions are rapidly increased up to the observed order in only microseconds, which implies that simply inserting the quasilinear heating rate into the fluid/MHD energy equation to calculate the radial dependence of ion temperatures may cause errors as the time scales do not match. Different species ions are heated by Alfven waves with a power law spectrum in approximately a mass order.To heat O+5 over Mg+9 as measured by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) in the solar coronal hole at a region≥ 1.9R⊙, the energy density of Alfven waves with a frequency close to the O+5-cyclotron frequency must be at least double of that at the Mg+9-cyclotron frequency. With an appropriate wave-energy spectrum, the heating of H, O+5 and Mg+9 can be consistent with the UVCS measurements in solar coronal holes at a heliocentric distance.

  9. On the dissipation and dispersion of entropy waves in heat transferring channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, A.; Hosseinalipour, S. M.; Karimi, N.

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the hydrodynamic and heat transfer effects on the dissipation and dispersion of entropy waves in non-reactive flows. These waves, as advected density inhomogeneities downstream of unsteady flames, may decay partially or totally before reaching the exit nozzle, where they are converted into sound. Attenuation of entropy waves dominates the significance of the subsequent acoustic noise generation. Yet, the extent of this decay process is currently a matter of contention and the pertinent mechanisms are still largely unexplored. To resolve this issue, a numerical study is carried out by compressible large eddy simulation of the wave advection in a channel subject to convective and adiabatic thermal boundary conditions. The dispersion, dissipation, and spatial correlation of the wave are evaluated by post-processing of the numerical results. This includes application of the classical coherence function as well as development of nonlinear quantitative measures of wave dissipation and dispersion. The analyses reveal that the high frequency components of the entropy wave are always strongly damped. The survival of the low frequency components heavily depends on the turbulence intensity and thermal boundary conditions of the channel. In general, high turbulence intensities and particularly heat transfer intensify the decay and destruction of the spatial coherence of entropy waves. In some cases, they can even result in the complete annihilation of the wave. The current work can therefore resolve the controversies arising over the previous studies of entropy waves with different thermal boundary conditions.

  10. Vertical heat and salt fluxes induced by inertia-gravity internal waves on sea shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepyshev, A. A.; Vorotnikov, D. I.

    2017-07-01

    Free inertia-gravity internal waves are considered in a two-dimensional vertically nonuniform flow in the Boussinesq approximation. The equation for vertical velocity amplitude includes complex factors caused by the gradient of the flow velocity component transverse to the wave-propagation direction; therefore, the eigenfunction and wave frequency are complex. It is shown that the decrement of damping (imaginary correction to the frequency) of 15-min internal waves is two orders of magnitude smaller than the wave frequency; i.e., the waves weakly damp. Vertical wave fluxes of heat and salt are nonzero due to the phase shift between fluctuations of the vertical velocity and temperature (salinity) different from π 2. The vertical component of the Stokes drift speed is also nonzero and contributed into the vertical transport.

  11. Wave-mean flow interaction and its relationship with the atmospheric energy cycle with diabatic heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Anmin; WU Guoxiong

    2005-01-01

    Based on the traditional theory of wave mean flow interaction, an improved quasi-geostrophic Eliassen-Palm flux with diabatic heating included is deduced. It is shown that there exists an intrinsic relation between the atmospheric energy cycle derived by Lorenz and the wave energy transfer derived by Eliassen and Palm. From this relation it becomes clear that the energy propagation process of large-scale stationary wave is indeed a part of Lorenz energy cycle, and the energy transform from mean flow to wave equals the global mass integral of the divergence of local wave energy flux or the global integral of local wave energy. The diagnostic results by using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data suggest that the classical adiabatic Eliassen-Palm flux relation can present only the wintertime wave energy transformation. For other seasons, however, the diabatic effect must be taken into account.

  12. How hard they hit? Perception, adaptation and public health implications of heat waves in urban and peri-urban Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Sara; Bakhsh, Khuda; Abbas, Azhar; Hassan, Sarfraz; Ali, Asghar; Kächele, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Heat waves threaten human health given the fast changing climatic scenarios in the recent past. Adaptation to heat waves would take place when people perceive their impacts based on their knowledge. The present study examines perception level and its determinants resulting in adaptation to heat waves in Pakistan. The study used cross-sectional data from urban and peri-urban respondents of Faisalabad District. The study employs a health belief model to assess risk perception among the respondents. Logistic model is used to determine factors affecting level of knowledge, perception and adaptation to heat waves. Around 30% of peri-urban respondents have a low level of knowledge about the fatal impacts of heat waves. Risk perception of heat waves is very low among urban (57%) and peri-urban (66%) respondents. Households' knowledge on heat waves is significantly related to age, gender, education, wealth and access to health services. Determinants of perception include knowledge of heat waves, age and joint effect of marital status and knowledge while income level, family size, urban/peri-urban background, perceived barriers, perceived benefits and cues to action significantly affect adaptation to heat waves. To reduce deadly health impacts, mass awareness campaigns are needed to build perception and improve adaptation to heat waves.

  13. Wave-particle duality: suggestion for an experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, R N

    2012-01-01

    Feynman contended that the double-slit experiment contained the `only mystery' in quantum mechanics. The mystery was that electrons traverse the interferometer as waves, but are detected as particles. This note was motivated by the question whether single electrons can be detected as waves. It suggests a double-slit interferometry experiment with atoms of noble gases in which it may be possible to detect an individual atom as a probability wave, using a detector which can execute two different types of simple harmonic motion: as a simple pendulum, and as a torsion pendulum. In the experiment, a torsional oscillation will never be induced by the impact of a probability wave, but will always be induced by the impact of a particle. Detection as a wave is contingent on the atom interacting much more strongly with the macroscopic detector as a whole than with its microscopic constituents. This requirement may be more difficult to meet with electrons, protons, neutrons or photons than with atoms.

  14. Long term climatology and trends of heat and cold waves over southern Bihar, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sheraz Mahdi; B S Dhekale

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the trends and variability in extreme temperature indices. We examined climatological distribution of heat and cold waves of two important agro-climatic zones (South Bihar Alluvial Zone-IIIA and B), which is part of the middle Indo-Gangetic Basin and comprising 17 densely populated (1108 persons/km²) districts of Bihar state. We used series of daily maximum and minimum temperature data from 1969 to 2013 of seven stations to calculate temperature indices, from which the trend, occurrence, duration and severity of heat and cold waves were estimated. Results revealed that, in a period of 45 years, zone-IIIA and B has experienced 251/182 and 337/140 average number of heat and cold events, respectively. Although the zone-IIIA on average is experiencing ≥8 heat and cold wave days per season, both these high frequency temperature extremes are decreasing at the rate 0.15 and 0.17 per year, respectively, with significance at 95% confidence level. Zone-IIIB on average is experiencing ≤5 heat and cold days per season, but heat waves have been found increasing at the rate 0.11 per year, whereas, a non-significant decreasing rate of 0.04/year was observed in cold waves. The study also inferred that heat waves of the month of May in zone-IIIA and of June in zone-IIIB are more frequent, hotter and longer than other months of hot weather period under study, whereas, the cold waves of month January are more frequent and longer, in both zones.

  15. Changes in heat waves indices in Romania over the period 1961-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Adina-Eliza; Piticar, Adrian; Ciupertea, Antoniu-Flavius; Roşca, Cristina Florina

    2016-11-01

    In the last two decades many climate change studies have focused on extreme temperatures as they have a significant impact on environment and society. Among the weather events generated by extreme temperatures, heat waves are some of the most harmful. The main objective of this study was to detect and analyze changes in heat waves in Romania based on daily observation data (maximum and minimum temperature) over the extended summer period (May-Sept) using a set of 10 indices and to explore the spatial patterns of changes. Heat wave data series were derived from daily maximum and minimum temperature data sets recorded in 29 weather stations across Romania over a 55-year period (1961-2015). In this study, the threshold chosen was the 90th percentile calculated based on a 15-day window centered on each calendar day, and for three baseline periods (1961-1990, 1971-2000, and 1981-2010). Two heat wave definitions were considered: at least three consecutive days when maximum temperature exceeds 90th percentile, and at least three consecutive days when minimum temperature exceeds 90th percentile. For each of them, five variables were calculated: amplitude, magnitude, number of events, duration, and frequency. Finally, 10 indices resulted for further analysis. The main results are: most of the indices have statistically significant increasing trends; only one index for one weather station indicated statistically significant decreasing trend; the changes are more intense in case of heat waves detected based on maximum temperature compared to those obtained for heat waves identified based on minimum temperature; western and central regions of Romania are the most exposed to increasing heat waves.

  16. Long term climatology and trends of heat and cold waves over southern Bihar, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, S. Sheraz; Dhekale, B. S.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the trends and variability in extreme temperature indices. We examined climatological distribution of heat and cold waves of two important agro-climatic zones (South Bihar Alluvial Zone-IIIA and B), which is part of the middle Indo-Gangetic Basin and comprising 17 densely populated (1108 persons/km 2) districts of Bihar state. We used series of daily maximum and minimum temperature data from 1969 to 2013 of seven stations to calculate temperature indices, from which the trend, occurrence, duration and severity of heat and cold waves were estimated. Results revealed that, in a period of 45 years, zone-IIIA and B has experienced 251/182 and 337/140 average number of heat and cold events, respectively. Although the zone-IIIA on average is experiencing ≥8 heat and cold wave days per season, both these high frequency temperature extremes are decreasing at the rate 0.15 and 0.17 per year, respectively, with significance at 95% confidence level. Zone-IIIB on average is experiencing ≤5 heat and cold days per season, but heat waves have been found increasing at the rate 0.11 per year, whereas, a non-significant decreasing rate of 0.04/year was observed in cold waves. The study also inferred that heat waves of the month of May in zone-IIIA and of June in zone-IIIB are more frequent, hotter and longer than other months of hot weather period under study, whereas, the cold waves of month January are more frequent and longer, in both zones.

  17. Impact of Heat Wave in 2005 on Mortality in Guangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun; LIU Hua Zhang; OU Chun Quan; LIN Guo Zhen; DING Yan; ZHOU Qin; SHEN Ji Chuan; CHEN Ping Yan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of the heat wave in 2005 on mortality among the residents in Guangzhou and to identify susceptible subpopulations in Guangzhou, China. Methods The data of daily number of deaths and meteorological measures from 2003 to 2006 in Guangzhou were used in this study. Heat wave was defined as≥7 consecutive days with daily maximum temperature above 35.0 °C and daily mean temperature above the 97th percentile during the study period. The excess deaths and rate ratio (RR) of mortality in the case period compared with the reference period in the same summer were calculated. Results During the study period, only one heat wave in 2005 was identified and the total number of excess deaths was 145 with an average of 12 deaths per day. The effect of the heat wave on non-accidental mortality (RR=1.23, 95%CI:1.11-1.37) was found with statistically significant difference. Also, greater effects were observed for cardiovascular mortality (RR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.13-1.59) and respiratory mortality (RR=1.31, 95% CI: 1.02-1.69). Females, the elderly and people with lower socioeconomic status were at significantly higher risk of heat wave-associated mortality. Conclusion The 2005 heat wave had a substantial impact on mortality among the residents in Guangzhou, particularly among some susceptible subpopulations. The findings from the present study may provide scientific evidences to develop relevant public health policies and prevention measures aimed at reduction of preventable mortality from heat waves.

  18. Proton Heating in Solar Wind Compressible Turbulence with Collisions between Counter-propagating Waves

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jiansen; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H K; Wang, Linghua; Pei, Zhongtian; Zhang, Lei; Salem, Chadi S; Bale, Stuart D

    2015-01-01

    Magnetohydronamic turbulence is believed to play a crucial role in heating the laboratorial, space, and astrophysical plasmas. However, the precise connection between the turbulent fluctuations and the particle kinetics has not yet been established. Here we present clear evidence of plasma turbulence heating based on diagnosed wave features and proton velocity distributions from solar wind measurements by the Wind spacecraft. For the first time, we can report the simultaneous observation of counter-propagating magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar wind turbulence. Different from the traditional paradigm with counter-propagating Alfv\\'en waves, anti-sunward Alfv\\'en waves (AWs) are encountered by sunward slow magnetosonic waves (SMWs) in this new type of solar wind compressible turbulence. The counter-propagating AWs and SWs correspond respectively to the dominant and sub-dominant populations of the imbalanced Els\\"asser variables. Nonlinear interactions between the AWs and SMWs are inferred from the non-orth...

  19. Anisotropic ion heating and BBELF waves within the low-altitude ion upflow region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y.; Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; James, H. G.; Miles, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that low-energy (region using data from the Suprathermal Electron imager (SEI), the Fluxgate Magnetometer (MGF), and the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) onboard the e-POP satellite. Initial results demonstrate that perpendicular-to-B ion temperatures can reach up to 4.3 eV in approximately 1 km wide spatial region near 410 km altitude inside an active auroral surge. Intense small-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) as well as strong BBELF wave emissions, comprising electromagnetic waves below 80 Hz and electrostatic waves above, accompany these ion heating events. The minimum altitude of potential WPI reported here is lower than as previously suggested as 520 km by Frederick-Frost et al. 2007. We measure polarization and power spectral density for specific wave modes to explore the nature of ion heating within the BBELF waves. Acknowledgement: This research is supported by an Eyes High Doctoral Recruitment Scholarship at University of Calgary.

  20. The socio economic impact of heat waves in labor productivity in the agricultural sector in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, F.; Wehner, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Scientific evidence points to an increase in the frequency and magnitude of extreme events related to climate change. Heat waves is one such event and it impacts both the urban and rural areas of high and low income countries. Heat waves have an important impact on agricultural labor which takes place mostly outdoors. In this study we use weather data from the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) and the California Department of Agriculture to analyze the impact of heat waves on labor productivity in the agricultural sector in California. In particular, we analyze 12 counties from the Central and Imperial Valleys and the 10 most important crops (value wise) in each county. Using temperature and relative humidity we develop a Heat Index (HI), a measure of relative human discomfort to heat. We use the HI as a variable in a production function analysis to determine how heat extremes impact agricultural productivity via the labor factor of production. By including crop labor requirements we are able to identify impacts of the HI to specific crops. This analysis allows for a design and implementation of adaptive measures to the future impact of heat waves in the agricultural sector in California and, with modifications, elsewhere.

  1. Operational experience with room temperature continuous wave accelerator structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimov, A. S.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Piskarev, I. M.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Tiunov, A. V.

    1993-05-01

    The paper reports the results of the computer simulation of parameters of the on-axis coupled accelerator structure for the continuous wave racetrack microtron. The operational experience with the accelerating sections on the basis of the on-axis coupled structure is described.

  2. Solar assisted heat pumps: a possible wave of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetana, F.O.

    1976-12-01

    With the higher costs of electric power and the widespread interest to use solar energy to reduce the national dependence on fossil fuels, heat pumps are examined to determine their suitability for use with solar energy systems.

  3. Solar assisted heat pumps: A possible wave of the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, F. O.

    1976-01-01

    With the higher costs of electric power and the widespread interest to use solar energy to reduce the national dependence on fossil fuels, heat pumps are examined to determine their suitability for use with solar energy systems.

  4. Heat-related mortality in India: excess all-cause mortality associated with the 2010 Ahmedabad heat wave.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulrez Shah Azhar

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the recent past, spells of extreme heat associated with appreciable mortality have been documented in developed countries, including North America and Europe. However, far fewer research reports are available from developing countries or specific cities in South Asia. In May 2010, Ahmedabad, India, faced a heat wave where the temperatures reached a high of 46.8 °C with an apparent increase in mortality. The purpose of this study is to characterize the heat wave impact and assess the associated excess mortality. METHODS: We conducted an analysis of all-cause mortality associated with a May 2010 heat wave in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India, to determine whether extreme heat leads to excess mortality. Counts of all-cause deaths from May 1-31, 2010 were compared with the mean of counts from temporally matched periods in May 2009 and 2011 to calculate excess mortality. Other analyses included a 7-day moving average, mortality rate ratio analysis, and relationship between daily maximum temperature and daily all-cause death counts over the entire year of 2010, using month-wise correlations. RESULTS: The May 2010 heat wave was associated with significant excess all-cause mortality. 4,462 all-cause deaths occurred, comprising an excess of 1,344 all-cause deaths, an estimated 43.1% increase when compared to the reference period (3,118 deaths. In monthly pair-wise comparisons for 2010, we found high correlations between mortality and daily maximum temperature during the locally hottest "summer" months of April (r = 0.69, p<0.001, May (r = 0.77, p<0.001, and June (r = 0.39, p<0.05. During a period of more intense heat (May 19-25, 2010, mortality rate ratios were 1.76 [95% CI 1.67-1.83, p<0.001] and 2.12 [95% CI 2.03-2.21] applying reference periods (May 12-18, 2010 from various years. CONCLUSION: The May 2010 heat wave in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India had a substantial effect on all-cause excess mortality, even in this city where hot temperatures

  5. Global Alfven Waves in Solar Physics: Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo, C. A.; de Assis, A. S.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se ha demostrado que Ia onda discreta de Alfven puede generar por lo memos un 20% de la energia coronal requerida con densidad de flujo de lO- erg 5 . Las ondas discretas de Alfven son una nueva clase `de ondas de Alfven las cuales pueden describirse por el modelo con que incluye un i6n finito, con frecuencia ciclotr6nica ( /uci # 0) y los efectos del equilibrio de plasma mostrados por Appert, Vaclavik and Villar 1984. ABSTRACT. It has been shown that the Discrete Alfven wave can power at least 20% of the required coronal energy flux density iO- Discrete Alfven waves are a new class of Alfven waves wich can be described by the model with the inclusion of finite ion cyclotron frequency (w/wci 0) and the equilibrium plasma current effects as shown by Appert, Vaclavik and Villar 1984. o,t :, HYDROMAGNETICS - SUN-CORONA

  6. Detection of quasiresonant amplification of planetary waves and their connection to northern hemisphere summer heat extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhuber, Kai; Coumou, Dim; Petri, Stefan; Petoukhov, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Several recent northern hemisphere (NH) summer heat extremes have been linked to anomalous patterns of mid-latitudinal planetary waves , e.g. the European heat wave in 2003, the Russian Heat wave and Pakistani floods in 2010 and the US heat wave in 2011(Lau and Kim 2012, Black et al 2004, Petoukhov et al 2013). The NH large-scale circulation patterns in those years were characterized by persistent longitudinal planetary-scale high-amplitude waves of relative high wavenumber (6-8). A common mechanism that could lead to the observed high-amplitude planetary waves was proposed by Petukhov et al. (Petukhov et al 2013). Under certain conditions, free synoptic waves can be 'trapped' in a midlatitudinal waveguide while their amplitudes are amplified by a quasiresonant response to thermal and orographic forcing. We have searched the available reanalysis data for the emergence of waveguides for particular planetary waves and will present preliminary results of this analysis. Using spectral analysis, we quantify the planetary wave field in terms of wavenumber, amplitude, phase and eastward phase-propagation. We will present statistics of these wave quantities for periods with and without waveguides. With those conditions explicitly implemented in code we should be able to detect and point out the periods in time the requirements for amplification were met. By doing so the connection of actual summer month heat extremes to quasiresonance events can be assessed statistically. Black E., Blackburn M., Hoskins B. and Methven J.; 2004: Factors contributing to the summer 2003 European heatwave 217-23 Lau W. K. M. and Kim K.-M.; 2012: The 2010 Pakistan Flood and Russian Heat Wave: Teleconnection of Hydrometeorological Extremes J. Hydrometeorol. 13 392-403 Online: http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/JHM-D-11-016.1 Petoukhov V., Rahmstorf S., Petri S. and Schellnhuber H .J.;2013: Quasi-resonant amplification of atmospheric planetary waves as a mechanism for recent Northern

  7. Assessment of the impact of the 2003 and 2006 heat waves on cattle mortality in France.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Morignat

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: While several studies have highlighted and quantified human mortality during the major heat waves that struck Western Europe in 2003 and 2006, the impact on farm animals has been overlooked. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of these two events on cattle mortality in France, one of the most severely impacted countries. METHODS: Poisson regressions were used to model the national baseline for cattle mortality between 2004 and 2005 and predict the weekly number of expected deaths in 2003 and 2006 for the whole cattle population and by subpopulation based on age and type of production. Observed and estimated values were compared to identify and quantify excess mortality. The same approach was used at a departmental scale (a French department being an administrative and territorial division to assess the spatio-temporal evolution of the mortality pattern. RESULTS: Overall, the models estimated relative excess mortality of 24% [95% confidence interval: 22-25%] for the two-week heat wave of 2003, and 12% [11-14%] for the three-week heat wave of 2006. In 2003, most cattle subpopulations were impacted during the heat wave and some in the following weeks too. In 2006, cattle subpopulations were impacted for a limited time only, with no excess mortality at the beginning or after the heat wave. No marked differences in cattle mortality were found among the different subpopulations by age and type of production. The implications of these results for risk prevention are discussed.

  8. Spatial and Temp oral Variations of Heat Waves in China from 1961 to 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Dian-Xiu; YIN Ji-Fu; CHEN Zheng-Hong; ZHENG You-Fei; WU Rong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Daily maximum temperatures from 753 stations across China and the heat wave indicators are used to study the temporal and spatial characteristics of heat wave intensity, frequency and heat wave days in China over the period of 1961-2010. The results show that high frequency, long duration and strong intensity of heat waves occurred in the Jianghuai area, Jiangnan area, and eastern Sichuan Basin. The highest frequency and the longest duration are located in northern Jiangxi and northern Zhejiang provinces, and the highest intensity in northern Zhejiang province is even more prominent. The frequency, heat wave days and intensity showed a general increasing trend in the past 50 years, while decadal characteristics are also observed with a decreasing trend from the 1960s to the early 1980s and increasing trend from the end of the 1980s to 2010. The regional variations demonstrate a significant increasing trend in the northern and western parts of North China, central-northern part of Northwest China, the central part of South China, the Yangtze River Delta and the southern Sichuan Basin, with an obvious decreasing trend in the southern Huanghuai area, northern Jianghuai area and Hanjiang River Basin.

  9. O+ heating associated with strong wave activity in the high altitude cusp and mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stenberg

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We use the Cluster spacecraft to study three events with intense waves and energetic oxygen ions (O+ in the high altitude cusp and mantle. The ion energies considered are of the order 1000 eV and higher, observed above an altitude of 8 earth radii together with high wave power at the O+ gyrofrequency. We show that heating by waves can explain the observed high perpendicular energy of O+ ions, using a simple gyroresonance model and 25–45% of the observed wave spectral density at the gyrofrequency. This is in contrast to a recently published study where the wave intensity was too low to explain the observed high altitude ion energies. Long lasting cases (>10 min of high perpendicular-to-parallel temperature ratios are sometimes associated with low wave activity, suggesting that high perpendicular-to-parallel temperature ratio is not a good indicator of local heating. Using multiple spacecraft, we show that the regions of enhanced wave activity are at least one order of magnitude larger than the gyroradius of the heated ions.

  10. E × B shear pattern formation by radial propagation of heat flux waves

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuga, Y; Diamond, PH; Dif-Pradalier, G; Gürcan, OD

    2014-01-01

    A novel theory to describe the formation of E×B flow patterns by radially propagating heat flux waves is presented. A model for heat avalanche dynamics is extended to include a finite delay time between the instantaneous heat flux and the mean flux, based on an analogy between heat avalanche dynamics and traffic flow dynamics. The response time introduced here is an analogue of the drivers' response time in traffic dynamics. The microscopic foundation for the time delay is the time for mixing...

  11. Fast wave heating in a mirror during plasma build-up

    OpenAIRE

    Moiseenko, Vladimir; Dreval, N.; Ågren, Olov; Stepanov, K.; A. Burdakov; Kalinin, P.; Tereshin, V.

    2010-01-01

    A heating method for partially ionized plasma has been described in reference [V.E. Moiseenko, Sov. J. Plasma Phys. 12, 427 (1986)]. It exploits the collisional damping of fast waves that is large owing to the high rate of charge exchange collisions. Since the time of heating is limited by the duration of neutral gas ionization, the heating needs to be strong enough to achieve a high final ion temperature. This heating method has been studied numerically in the framework of MHD-like (magneto-...

  12. On the spatial scales of wave heating in the solar chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave energy has been proposed as a viable heating mechanism in the solar chromospheric plasma. Here, we use a simplified one-dimensional model of the chromosphere to theoretically investigate the physical processes and the spatial scales that are required for the efficient dissipation of Alfv\\'en waves and slow magnetoacoustic waves. We consider the governing equations for a partially ionized hydrogen-helium plasma in the single-fluid MHD approximation and include realistic wave damping mechanisms that may operate in the chromosphere, namely Ohmic and ambipolar magnetic diffusion, viscosity, thermal conduction, and radiative losses. We perform an analytic local study in the limit of small amplitudes to approximately derive the lengthscales for critical damping and efficient dissipation of MHD wave energy. We find that the critical dissipation lengthscale for Alfv\\'en waves depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and ranges from 10~m to 1~km for realistic field ...

  13. Variable conductance heat pipe technology. [research project resulting in heat pipe experiment on OAO-3 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. T.; Edwards, D. K.; Eninger, J. E.; Marcus, B. D.

    1974-01-01

    A research and development program in variable conductance heat pipe technology is reported. The project involved: (1) theoretical and/or experimental studies in hydrostatics, (2) hydrodynamics, (3) heat transfer into and out of the pipe, (4) fluid selection, and (5) materials compatibility. The development, fabrication, and test of the space hardware resulted in a successful flight of the heat pipe experiment on the OAO-3 satellite. A summary of the program is provided and a guide to the location of publications on the project is included.

  14. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertelli, N., E-mail: nbertell@pppl.gov; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering Inc., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Lau, C.; Blazevski, D.; Green, D. L.; Berry, L.; Ryan, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Qin, C. M. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); and others

    2015-12-10

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to “conventional” tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  15. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertelli, Nicola [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering Inc., Oak Ridge; Lau, Cornwall H [ORNL; Blazevski, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Green, David L [ORNL; Berry, Lee Alan [XCEL Engineering Inc., Oak Ridge; Bonoli, P. T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Gerhardt, S.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hosea, J. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); LeBlanc, B. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Perkins, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Phillips, Cynthia [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Pinsker, R. I. [General Atomics, San Diego; Prater, R. [General Atomics; Qin, C M [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Institute of Plasma Physics, Hefei; Ryan, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Taylor, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Valeo, E. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Wilson, Randy [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Wright, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Zhang, X J [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Institute of Plasma Physics, Hefei

    2015-01-01

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to "conventional" tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  16. Second law analysis of a plate heat exchanger with an axial dispersive wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Das, Sarit; Roetzel, Wilfried

    A second law analysis is presented for thermally dispersive flow through a plate heat exchanger. It is well known that in plate or plate fin type heat exchangers the backmixing and other deviations from plug flow contribute significantly to the inefficiency of the heat exchanger, which is of importance to heat exchangers working in the cryogenic regime. The conventional axial heat dispersion model which is used so far is found to be better than `plug flow' model but still unsatisfactory where the timescale related to heat transfer is comparable with the thermal relaxation time for the propagation of dispersion. The present work therefore considers dispersion as a wave phenomenon propagating with a finite velocity. The study discusses the nature of variation of different contributions to total exergy loss in the heat exchanger with respect to dispersion parameters of the Peclet number and propagation velocity of the dispersive wave. The practical example of the single-pass plate heat exchanger demonstrates how a second law optimization can be carried out for heat transfer equipment under such conditions.

  17. Future heat waves due to climate change threaten the survival of Posidonia oceanica seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Meseguer, Laura; Marín, Arnaldo; Sanz-Lázaro, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    Extreme weather events are major drivers of ecological change, and their occurrence is likely to increase due to climate change. The transient increases in atmospheric temperatures are leading to a greater occurrence of heat waves, extreme events that can produce a substantial warming of water, especially in enclosed basins such as the Mediterranean Sea. Here, we tested the effects of current and predicted heat waves on the early stages of development of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica. Temperatures above 27 °C limited the growth of the plant by inhibiting its photosynthetic system. It suffered a reduction in leaf growth and faster leaf senescence, and in some cases mortality. This study demonstrates that the greater frequency of heat waves, along with anticipated temperature rises in coming decades, are expected to negatively affect the germination of P. oceanica seedlings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. On The Role of MHD Waves in Heating Localised Magnetic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdélyi, R.; Nelson, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    Satellite and ground-based observations from e.g. SOHO, TRACE, STEREO, Hinode, SDO and IRIS to DST/ROSA, IBIS, CoMP, STT/CRISP have provided a wealth of evidence of waves and oscillations present in a wide range of spatial scales of the magnetised solar atmosphere. Our understanding about localised solar structures has been considerably changed in light of these high spatial and time resolution observations. However, MHD waves not only enable us to perform sub-resolution magneto-seismology of magnetic waveguides but are also potential candidates to carry and damp the necessary non-thermal energy in these localised waveguides. First, we will briefly outline the basic recent developments in MHD wave theory focussing on linear waves. Next, we discuss the role of the most frequently studied wave classes, including the Alfven, and magneto-acoustic kink and sausage waves. The current theoretical (and often difficult) interpretations of the detected solar atmospheric wave and oscillatory phenomena within the framework of MHD will be shown. Last, the latest reported observational findings of potential MHD wave flux, in terms of localised plasma heating, in the solar atmosphere is discussed, bringing us closer to solve the coronal heating problem.

  19. Potential impact of vegetation feedback on European heat waves in a 2 x CO 2 climate: Vegetation impact on European heat waves

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Su-Jong; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Kim, Kwang-Yul; Kim, Jinwon; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Park, Tae-Won

    2010-01-01

    Inclusion of the effects of vegetation feedback in a global climate change simulation suggests that the vegetation–climate feedback works to alleviate partially the summer surface warming and the associated heat waves over Europe induced by the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The projected warming of 4°C over most of Europe with static vegetation has been reduced by 1°C as the dynamic vegetation feedback effects are included.. Examination of the simulated surface energy fluxes sug...

  20. ELF wave generation in the ionosphere using pulse modulated HF heating: initial tests of a technique for increasing ELF wave generation efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Barr

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results of a preliminary study to determine the effective heating and cooling time constants of ionospheric currents in a simulated modulated HF heating, `beam painting' configuration. It has been found that even and odd harmonics of the fundamental ELF wave used to amplitude modulate the HF heater are sourced from different regions of the ionosphere which support significantly different heating and cooling time constants. The fundamental frequency and its odd harmonics are sourced in a region of the ionosphere where the heating and cooling time constants are about equal. The even harmonics on the other hand are sourced from regions of the ionosphere characterised by ratios of cooling to heating time constant greater than ten. It is thought that the even harmonics are sourced in the lower ionosphere (around 65 km where the currents are much smaller than at the higher altitudes around 78 km where the currents at the fundamental frequency and odd harmonics maximise.

    Key words. Electromagnetics (antennae · Ionosphere (active experiments · Radio science (non linear phenomena

  1. Increasing heat waves and warm spells in India, observed from a multiaspect framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Dileep Kumar; AghaKouchak, Amir; Ambast, Sunil Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Recent heat waves have been a matter of serious concern for India because of potential impacts on agriculture, food security, and socioeconomic progress. This study examines the trends and variability in frequency, duration, and intensity of hot episodes during three time periods (1951-2013, 1981-2013 and 1998-2013) by defining heat waves based on the percentile of maximum, minimum, and mean temperatures. The study also explores heat waves and their relationships with hydroclimatic variables, such as rainfall, terrestrial water storage, Palmer drought severity index, and sea surface temperature. Results reveal that the number, frequency, and duration of daytime heat waves increased considerably during the post-1980 dry and hot phase over a large area. The densely populated and agriculturally dominated northern half of India stands out as a key region where the nighttime heat wave metrics reflected the most pronounced amplifications. Despite the recent warming hiatus in India and other parts of the world, we find that both daytime and nighttime extreme measures have undergone substantial changes during or in the year following a dry year since 2002, with the probability distribution functions manifesting a hotter-than-normal climate during 1998-2013. This study shows that a few months preceding the 2010 record-breaking heat wave in Russia, India experienced the largest hot episode in the country's history. Interestingly, both these mega events are comparable in terms of their evolution and amplification. These findings emphasize the importance of planning for strategies in the context of the rising cooccurrence of dry and hot events.

  2. Syndromic surveillance and heat wave morbidity: a pilot study based on emergency departments in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filleul Laurent

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health impacts of heat waves are serious and have prompted the development of heat wave response plans. Even when they are efficient, these plans are developed to limit the health effects of heat waves. This study was designed to determine relevant indicators related to health effects of heat waves and to evaluate the ability of a syndromic surveillance system to monitor variations in the activity of emergency departments over time. The study uses data collected during the summer 2006 when a new heat wave occurred in France. Methods Data recorded from 49 emergency departments since July 2004, were transmitted daily via the Internet to the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance. Items collected on patients included diagnosis (ICD10 codes, outcome, and age. Statistical t-tests were used to compare, for several health conditions, the daily averages of patients within different age groups and periods (whether 'on alert' or 'off alert'. Results A limited number of adverse health conditions occurred more frequently during hot period: dehydration, hyperthermia, malaise, hyponatremia, renal colic, and renal failure. Over all health conditions, the total number of patients per day remained equal between the 'on alert' and 'off alert' periods (4,557.7/day vs. 4,511.2/day, but the number of elderly patients increased significantly during the 'on alert' period relative to the 'off alert' period (476.7/day vs. 446.2/day p Conclusion Our results show the interest to monitor specific indicators during hot periods and to focus surveillance efforts on the elderly. Syndromic surveillance allowed the collection of data in real time and the subsequent optimization of the response by public health agencies. This method of surveillance should therefore be considered as an essential part of efforts to prevent the health effects of heat waves.

  3. Alfv\\'en Wave Driven High Frequency Waves in the Solar Atmosphere: Implications for Ion Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh

    2014-01-01

    This work is an extension of Kaghashvili [1999] where ion-cyclotron wave dissipation channel for Alfv\\'en waves was discussed. While our earlier study dealt with the mode coupling in the commonly discussed sense, here we study changes in the initial waveform due to interaction of the initial driver Alfv\\'en wave and the plasma inhomogeneity, which are implicitly present in the equations, but were not elaborated in Kaghashvili [1999]. Using a cold plasma approximation, we show how high frequency waves (higher than the initial driver Alfv\\'en wave frequency) are generated in the inhomogeneous solar plasma flow. The generation of the high frequency forward and backward propagating modified fast magnetosonic/whistler waves as well as the generation of the driven Alfv\\'en waves is discussed in the solar atmosphere. The generated high frequency waves have a shorter dissipation timescale, and they can also resonant interact with particles using both the normal cyclotron and anomalous cyclotron interaction channels. ...

  4. The effects of latent heat release on the waves with Ekman pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of the effects of the latent heat release on the waves with both upper and lower boundary frictional effects is investigated. The influence of the vertical shear of the basic wind in these models will be investigated. These investigations will shed some light on the method of solution to the problem of including the effect of Ekman pumping on the moist baroclinic waves in the model of Tang and Fichtl.

  5. Versatile Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) on Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minerick, Adrienne R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines a new Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) engineered for a chemical engineering junior-level Heat Transfer course. This new DEMo learning tool is versatile, fairly inexpensive, and portable such that it can be positioned on student desks throughout a classroom. The DEMo system can illustrate conduction of various materials,…

  6. A data acquisition system for water heating and cooling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea Martins, J. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a simple analogue waterproof temperature probe design and its electronic interfacing with a computer to compose a data acquisition system for water temperature measurement. It also demonstrates the system usage through an experiment to verify the water heating period with an electric heater and another to verify the Newton’s law of cooling

  7. Heat Loss Experiments: Teach Energy Savings with Cardboard "House"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Using two cardboard boxes, a light bulb socket, light bulbs of varying wattage, a thermometer, and some insulation, students can learn some interesting lessons about how heat loss occurs in homes. This article describes practical experiments that work well on units related to energy, sustainable energy, renewables, engineering, and construction.…

  8. Convectively Forced Gravity Waves and their Sensitivity to Heating Profile and Atmospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Oliver; Parker, Douglas; Griffiths, Stephen; Vosper, Simon; Stirling, Alison

    2016-04-01

    It has been known for some time that convective heating is communicated to its environment by gravity waves. Despite this, the radiation of gravity waves in macro-scale models, which are typically forced at the grid-scale by meso-scale parameterization schemes, is not well understood. We present here theoretical work directed toward improving our fundamental understanding of convectively forced gravity wave effects at the meso-scale, in order to begin to address this problem. Starting with the hydrostatic, non-rotating, 2D, Boussinesq equations in a slab geometry, we find a radiating, analytical solution to prescribed sensible heat forcing for both the vertical velocity and potential temperature response. Both Steady and pulsed heating with adjustable horizontal structure is considered. From these solutions we construct a simple model capable of interrogating the spatial and temporal sensitivity to chosen heating functions of the remote forced response in particular. By varying the assumed buoyancy frequency, the influence of the model stratosphere on the upward radiation of gravity waves, and in turn, on the tropospheric response can be understood. Further, we find that the macro-scale response to convection is highly dependent on the radiation characteristics of gravity waves, which are in turn dependent upon the temporal and spatial structure of the source, and upper boundary condition of the domain.

  9. COLD AND HEAT WAVES IN THE BARLAD PLATEAU BETWEEN 1961-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. HUSTIU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the meteorological phenomena with severe impact upon individual humans, upon society and the environment one distinguishes cold and heat waves. The geographic location of the Bârlad Plateau – east of the mountainous barrier of the Eastern Carpathians and in a region where main pressure centers travel along the year – facilitates the occurrence of cold and heat waves. Such events were analysed, for the interval 1961-2013, both as the frequency of massive warming and cooling situations, and their duration – taking as a reference intervals of at least 5 consecutive days when in any month thermal anomalies are recorded, either positive or negative.

  10. Dust heating by Alfvén waves using non-Maxwellian distribution function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubia, K. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A. [Department of Physics, Forman Christian College, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Quasilinear theory is employed in order to evaluate the resonant heating rate by Alfvén waves, of multiple species dust particles in a hot, collisionless, and magnetized plasma, with the underlying assumption that the dust velocity distribution function can be modeled by a generalized (r, q) distribution function. The kinetic linear dispersion relation for the electromagnetic dust cyclotron Alfvén waves is derived, and the dependence of the heating rate on the magnetic field, mass, and density of the dust species is subsequently investigated. The heating rate and its dependence on the spectral indices r and q of the distribution function are also investigated. It is found that the heating is sensitive to negative value of spectral index r.

  11. Heat-flow equation motivated by the ideal-gas shock wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel

    2010-08-01

    We present an equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, in order to model shockwave propagation in gases. Our approach is motivated by the observation of a disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the temperature component in the direction of a planar shock wave, versus those in the transverse directions. This difference is most prominent near the shock front. We test our heat-flow equation for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which has been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes solutions. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of hard spheres under strong shockwave conditions.

  12. Tailored ramp wave generation in gas gun experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotton Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas guns are traditionally used as platforms to introduce a planar shock wave to a material using plate impact methods, generating states on the Hugoniot. The ability to deliver a ramp wave to a target during a gas gun experiment enables access to different regions of the equation-of-state surface, making it a valuable technique for characterising material behaviour. Previous techniques have relied on the use of multi-material impactors to generate a density gradient, which can be complex to manufacture. In this paper we describe the use of an additively manufactured steel component consisting of an array of tapered spikes which can deliver a ramp wave over ∼ 2 μs. The ability to tailor the input wave by varying the component design is discussed, an approach which makes use of the design freedom offered by additive manufacturing techniques to rapidly iterate the spike profile. Results from gas gun experiments are presented to evaluate the technique, and compared with 3D hydrodynamic simulations.

  13. Do asteroids evaporate near pulsars? Induction heating by pulsar waves revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Kotera, Kumiko; Voisin, Guillaume; Heyvaerts, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evaporation of close-by pulsar companions, such as planets, asteroids, and white dwarfs, by induction heating. Assuming that the outflow energy is dominated by a Poynting flux (or pulsar wave) at the location of the companions, we calculate their evaporation timescales, by applying the Mie theory. Depending on the size of the companion compared to the incident electromagnetic wavelength, the heating regime varies and can lead to a total evaporation of the companion. In particular, we find that inductive heating is mostly inefficient for small pulsar companions, although it is generally considered the dominant process. Small objects like asteroids can survive induction heating for $10^4\\,$years at distances as small as $1\\,R_\\odot$ from the neutron star. For degenerate companions, induction heating cannot lead to evaporation and another source of heating (likely by kinetic energy of the pulsar wind) has to be considered. It was recently proposed that bodies orbiting pulsars are the cause of ...

  14. Land surface and atmospheric conditions associated with heat waves in the South Central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eungul; Bieda, Rahama; Shanmugasundaram, Jothiganesh; Richter, Heather

    2017-04-01

    Exposure to extreme heat was reconstructed based on regional land-atmosphere processes from 1979 to 2010 in the South Central U.S. The study region surrounds the Chickasaw Nation (CN), a predominantly Native American population with a highly prevalent burden of climate-sensitive chronic diseases. Land surface and atmospheric conditions for summer heat waves were analyzed during spring (March-April-May, MAM) and summer (June-July-August, JJA) based on the Climate and Ocean: Variability, Predictability, and Change maximum temperature definition for heat wave frequency (HWF). The spatial-temporal pattern of HWF was determined using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis and the corresponding principle component time series of the first EOF of HWF. Statistically significant analyses of observed conditions indicated that sensible heat increased and latent heat fluxes decreased with high HWF in the South Central U.S. The largest positive correlations of sensible heat flux to HWF and the largest negative correlations of latent heat flux to HWF were specifically observed over the CN. This is a significantly different energy transfer regime due to less available soil moisture during the antecedent MAM and JJA. The higher sensible heat from dry soil could cause significant warming from the near surface (> 2.0°C) to the lower troposphere (> 1.5°C), and accumulated boundary layer heat could induce the significant patterns of higher geopotential height and enhance anticyclonic circulations (negative vorticity anomaly) at the midtroposphere. Results suggested a positive land-atmosphere feedback associated with heat waves and called attention to the need for region-specific climate adaptation planning.

  15. Pre-supernova outbursts via wave heating in massive stars - I. Red supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jim

    2017-09-01

    Early observations of supernovae (SNe) indicate that enhanced mass-loss and pre-SN outbursts may occur in progenitors of many types of SNe. We investigate the role of energy transport via waves driven by vigorous convection during late-stage nuclear burning of otherwise typical 15 M⊙ red supergiant SN progenitors. Using mesa stellar evolution models including 1D hydrodynamics, we find that waves carry ∼107 L⊙ of power from the core to the envelope during core neon/oxygen burning in the final years before core collapse. The waves damp via shocks and radiative diffusion at the base of the hydrogen envelope, which heats up fast enough to launch a pressure wave into the overlying envelope that steepens into a weak shock near the stellar surface, causing a mild stellar outburst and ejecting a small (≲1 M⊙) amount of mass at low speed (≲50 km s-1) roughly one year before the SN. The wave heating inflates the stellar envelope but does not completely unbind it, producing a non-hydrostatic pre-SN envelope density structure different from prior expectations. In our models, wave heating is unlikely to lead to luminous Type IIn SNe, but it may contribute to flash-ionized SNe and some of the diversity seen in II-P/II-L SNe.

  16. The role of Alfv\\'en wave heating in solar prominences

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, Roberto; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Observations have shown that magnetohydrodynamic waves over a large frequency range are ubiquitous in solar prominences. The waves are probably driven by photospheric motions and may transport energy up to prominences suspended in the corona. Dissipation of wave energy can lead to heating of the cool prominence plasma, so contributing to the local energy balance within the prominence. Here we discuss the role of Alfv\\'en wave dissipation as a heating mechanism for the prominence plasma. We consider a slab-like quiescent prominence model with a transverse magnetic field embedded in the solar corona. The prominence medium is modelled as a partially ionized plasma composed of a charged ion-electron single fluid and two separate neutral fluids corresponding to neutral hydrogen and neutral helium. Friction between the three fluids acts as a dissipative mechanism for the waves. The heating caused by externally-driven Alfv\\'en waves incident on the prominence slab is analytically explored. We find that the dense pro...

  17. Experimental investigation of effect of surface gravity waves and spray on heat and momentum flux at strong wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The most important characteristics that determine the interaction between atmosphere and ocean are fluxes of momentum, heat and moisture. For their parameterization the dimensionless exchange coefficients (the surface drag coefficient CD and the heat transfer coefficient or the Stanton number CT) are used. Numerous field and laboratory experiments show that CD increases with increasing wind speed at moderate and strong wind, and as it was shows recently CD decreases at hurricane wind speed. Waves are known to increase the sea surface resistance due to enhanced form drag, the sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the 'drag reduction' at hurricane conditions. The dependence of heat transfer coefficient CD on the wind speed is not so certain and the role of the mechanism associated with the wave disturbances in the mass transfer is not completely understood. Observations and laboratory data show that this dependence is weaker than for the CD, and there are differences in the character of the dependence in different data sets. The purpose of this paper is investigation of the effect of surface waves on the turbulent exchange of momentum and heat within the laboratory experiment, when wind and wave parameters are maintained and controlled. The effect of spray on turbulent exchange at strong winds is also estimated. A series of experiments to study the processes of turbulent exchange of momentum and heat in a stably stratified temperature turbulent boundary layer air flow over waved water surface were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS, the peculiarity of this experiment was the option to change the surface wave parameters regardless of the speed of the wind flow in the channel. For this purpose a polyethylene net with the variable depth (0.25 mm thick and a cell of 1.6 mm × 1.6mm) has been stretched along the channel. The waves were absent when the net was located at the level of the undisturbed water surface, and had maximum

  18. Heat Conduction: Hyperbolic Self-similar Shock-waves in Solid Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Barna, IF; Kersner, R.

    2016-01-01

    Analytic solutions for cylindrical thermal waves in solid medium are given based on the nonlinear hyperbolic system of heat flux relaxation and energy conservation equations. The Fourier-Cattaneo phenomenological law is generalized where the relaxation time and heat propagation coefficient have a general power law temperature dependence. From such laws one cannot form a second order parabolic or telegraph-type equation.We consider the original non-linear hyperbolic system itself w...

  19. Heat conduction: hyperbolic self-similar shock-waves in solids

    OpenAIRE

    Barna, Imre Ferenc; Kersner, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Analytic solutions for cylindrical thermal waves in solid medium is given based on the nonlinear hyperbolic system of heat flux relaxation and energy conservation equations. The Fourier-Cattaneo phenomenological law is generalized where the relaxation time and heat propagation coefficient have a general power law temperature dependence. From such laws one cannot form a second order parabolic or telegraph-type equation. We consider the original non-linear hyperbolic system itself with the self...

  20. A new approach to the theory of heat conduction with finite wave speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Antonio Cimmelli

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available Relations between the physical models describing the heat conduction in solids and a phenomenological model leading to quasi-linear hyperbolic equations and systems of conservation laws are presented. A new semi-empirical temperature scale is introduced in terms of which a modified Fourier law is formulated. The hyperbolicity of the heat conduction equation is discussed together with some wave propagation problems.

  1. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  2. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

    2008-08-04

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  3. Nanohertz gravitational wave searches with interferometric pulsar timing experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Massimo

    2011-05-13

    We estimate the sensitivity to nano-Hertz gravitational waves of pulsar timing experiments in which two highly stable millisecond pulsars are tracked simultaneously with two neighboring radio telescopes that are referenced to the same timekeeping subsystem (i.e., "the clock"). By taking the difference of the two time-of-arrival residual data streams we can exactly cancel the clock noise in the combined data set, thereby enhancing the sensitivity to gravitational waves. We estimate that, in the band (10(-9)-10(-8))  Hz, this "interferometric" pulsar timing technique can potentially improve the sensitivity to gravitational radiation by almost 2 orders of magnitude over that of single-telescopes. Interferometric pulsar timing experiments could be performed with neighboring pairs of antennas of the NASA's Deep Space Network and the forthcoming large arraying projects.

  4. Alfv\\'en Wave Heating of the Solar Chromosphere: 1.5D models

    CERN Document Server

    Arber, T D; Shelyag, S

    2015-01-01

    Physical processes which may lead to solar chromospheric heating are analyzed using high-resolution 1.5D non-ideal MHD modelling. We demonstrate that it is possible to heat the chromospheric plasma by direct resistive dissipation of high-frequency Alfv\\'en waves through Pedersen resistivity. However this is unlikely to be sufficient to balance radiative and conductive losses unless unrealistic field strengths or photospheric velocities are used. The precise heating profile is determined by the input driving spectrum since in 1.5D there is no possibility of Alfv\\'en wave turbulence. The inclusion of the Hall term does not affect the heating rates. If plasma compressibility is taken into account, shocks are produced through the ponderomotive coupling of Alfv\\'en waves to slow modes and shock heating dominates the resistive dissipation. In 1.5D shock coalescence amplifies the effects of shocks and for compressible simulations with realistic driver spectra the heating rate exceeds that required to match radiative...

  5. Explicit analytical wave solutions of unsteady 1D ideal gas flow with friction and heat transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Several families of algebraically explicit analytical wavesolutions are derived for the unsteady 1D ideal gas flow with friction and heat-transfer, which include one family of travelling wave solutions, three families of standing wave solutions and one standing wave solution. \\{Among\\} them, the former four solution families contain arbitrary functions, so actually there are infinite analytical wave solutions having been derived. Besides their very important theoretical meaning, such analytical wave solutions can guide the development of some new equipment, and can be the benchmark solutions to promote the development of computational fluid dynamics. For example, we can use them to check the accuracy, convergence and effectiveness of various numerical computational methods and to improve the numerical computation skills such as differential schemes, grid generation ways and so on.

  6. The Foggy EUV Corona and Coronal Heating by MHD Waves From Explosive Reconnection Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Falconer, D. A.

    2008-05-01

    In 0.5 arcsec/pixel TRACE coronal EUV images, the corona rooted in active regions that are at the limb and are not flaring is seen to consist of (1) a complex array of discrete loops and plumes embedded in (2) a diffuse ambient component that shows no fine structure and gradually fades with height. For each of two not-flaring active regions, Cirtain et al (2006, Sol. Phys., 239, 295) found that the diffuse component is (1) approximately isothermal and hydrostatic and (2) emits well over half of the total EUV luminosity of the active-region corona. Here, from a TRACE Fe XII coronal image of another not-flaring active region, the large sunspot active region AR 10652 when it was at the west limb on 30 July 2004, we separate the diffuse component from the discrete-loop component by spatial filtering, and find that the diffuse component has about 60% of the total luminosity. If under much higher spatial resolution than that of TRACE (e.g., the 0.1 arcsec/pixel resolution of the Hi-C sounding- rocket experiment proposed by J. W. Cirtain et al), most of the diffuse component remains diffuse rather being resolved into very narrow loops and plumes, this will raise the possibility that the EUV corona in active regions consists of two basically different but comparably luminous components: one being the set of discrete bright loops and plumes and the other being a truly diffuse component filling the space between the discrete loops and plumes. This dichotomy would imply that there are two different but comparably powerful coronal heating mechanisms operating in active regions, one for the distinct loops and plumes and another for the diffuse component. We present a scenario in which (1) each discrete bright loop or plume is a flux tube that was recently reconnected in a burst of reconnection, and (2) the diffuse component is heated by MHD waves that are generated by these reconnection events and by other fine-scale explosive reconnection events, most of which occur in and

  7. The Foggy EUV Corona and Coronal Heating by MHD Waves from Explosive Reconnection Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ron L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Falconer, David A.

    2008-01-01

    In 0.5 arcsec/pixel TRACE coronal EUV images, the corona rooted in active regions that are at the limb and are not flaring is seen to consist of (1) a complex array of discrete loops and plumes embedded in (2) a diffuse ambient component that shows no fine structure and gradually fades with height. For each of two not-flaring active regions, found that the diffuse component is (1) approximately isothermal and hydrostatic and (2) emits well over half of the total EUV luminosity of the active-region corona. Here, from a TRACE Fe XII coronal image of another not-flaring active region, the large sunspot active region AR 10652 when it was at the west limb on 30 July 2004, we separate the diffuse component from the discrete loop component by spatial filtering, and find that the diffuse component has about 60% of the total luminosity. If under much higher spatial resolution than that of TRACE (e. g., the 0.1 arcsec/pixel resolution of the Hi-C sounding-rocket experiment proposed by J. W. Cirtain et al), most of the diffuse component remains diffuse rather being resolved into very narrow loops and plumes, this will raise the possibility that the EUV corona in active regions consists of two basically different but comparably luminous components: one being the set of discrete bright loops and plumes and the other being a truly diffuse component filling the space between the discrete loops and plumes. This dichotomy would imply that there are two different but comparably powerful coronal heating mechanisms operating in active regions, one for the distinct loops and plumes and another for the diffuse component. We present a scenario in which (1) each discrete bright loop or plume is a flux tube that was recently reconnected in a burst of reconnection, and (2) the diffuse component is heated by MHD waves that are generated by these reconnection events and by other fine-scale explosive reconnection events, most of which occur in and below the base of the corona where they are

  8. Generation of whistler waves by continuous HF heating of the upper ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.; Eliasson, B.; Najmi, A. C.; Parrot, M.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-07-01

    Broadband VLF waves in the frequency range 7-10 kkHz and 15-19 kHz, generated by F region CW HF ionospheric heating in the absence of electrojet currents, were detected by the DEMETER satellite overflying the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) transmitter during HAARP/BRIOCHE campaigns. The VLF waves are in a frequency range corresponding to the F region lower lybrid (LH) frequency and its harmonic. This paper aims to show that the VLF observations are whistler waves generated by mode conversion of LH waves that were parametrically excited by HF-pump-plasma interaction at the upper hybrid layer. The paper discusses the basic physics and presents a model that conjectures (1) the VLF waves observed at the LH frequency are due to the interaction of the LH waves with meter-scale field-aligned striations—generating whistler waves near the LH frequency; and (2) the VLF waves at twice the LH frequency are due to the interaction of two counterpropagating LH waves—generating whistler waves near the LH frequency harmonic. The model is supported by numerical simulations that show good agreement with the observations. The (Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions results and model discussions are complemented by the Kodiak radar, ionograms, and stimulated electromagnetic emission observations.

  9. Ion acceleration and heating by kinetic Alfvén waves associated with magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ji; Lin, Yu; Johnson, Jay R.; Wang, Zheng-Xiong; Wang, Xueyi

    2017-10-01

    Our previous study on the generation and signatures of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) associated with magnetic reconnection in a current sheet revealed that KAWs are a common feature during reconnection [Liang et al. J. Geophys. Res.: Space Phys. 121, 6526 (2016)]. In this paper, ion acceleration and heating by the KAWs generated during magnetic reconnection are investigated with a three-dimensional (3-D) hybrid model. It is found that in the outflow region, a fraction of inflow ions are accelerated by the KAWs generated in the leading bulge region of reconnection, and their parallel velocities gradually increase up to slightly super-Alfvénic. As a result of wave-particle interactions, an accelerated ion beam forms in the direction of the anti-parallel magnetic field, in addition to the core ion population, leading to the development of non-Maxwellian velocity distributions, which include a trapped population with parallel velocities consistent with the wave speed. The ions are heated in both parallel and perpendicular directions. In the parallel direction, the heating results from nonlinear Landau resonance of trapped ions. In the perpendicular direction, however, evidence of stochastic heating by the KAWs is found during the acceleration stage, with an increase of magnetic moment μ. The coherence in the perpendicular ion temperature T⊥ and the perpendicular electric and magnetic fields of KAWs also provides evidence for perpendicular heating by KAWs. The parallel and perpendicular heating of the accelerated beam occur simultaneously, leading to the development of temperature anisotropy with T⊥>T∥ . The heating rate agrees with the damping rate of the KAWs, and the heating is dominated by the accelerated ion beam. In the later stage, with the increase of the fraction of the accelerated ions, interaction between the accelerated beam and the core population also contributes to the ion heating, ultimately leading to overlap of the beams and an overall

  10. Projection of Heat Waves over China under Different Global Warming Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaojun; Luo, Yong; Huang, Jianbin; Zhao, Zongci

    2015-04-01

    Global warming targets, which are determined in terms of global mean temperature increases relative to pre-industrial temperature levels, have been one of the heated issues recently. And the climate change (especially climate extremes) and its impacts under different targets have been paid extensive concerns. In this study, evaluation and projection of heat waves in China were carried out by five CMIP5 global climate models (GCMs) with a 0.5°×0.5° horizontal resolution which were derived from EU WATCH project. A new daily observed gridded dataset CN05.1 (0.5°×0.5°) was also used to evaluate the GCMs. And four indices (heat waves frequency, longest heat waves duration, heat waves days and high temperature days) were adopted to analyze the heat waves. Compared with the observations, the five GCMs and its Multi-Model Ensemble (MME) have a remarkable capacity of reproducing the spatial and temporal characteristic of heat waves. The time correlation coefficients between MME and the observation results can all reach 0.05 significant levels. Based on the projection data of five GCMs, both the median year of crossing 1.5°C, 2°C, 2.5°, 3°C, 3.5°C, 4°C, 4.5°C and 5°C global warming targets and the corresponding climate change over China were analyzed under RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios, respectively. The results show that when the global mean surface air temperature rise to different targets with respect to the pre-industrial times (1861-1880), the frequency and intensity of heat waves will increase dramatically. To take the high emission scenario RCP8.5 as an example, under the RCP8.5 scenario, the warming rate over China is stronger than that over the globe, the temperature rise(median year) over China projected by MME are 1.77°C(2025), 2.63°C(2039), 3.39°C(2050), 3.97°C(2060), 4.82°C(2070), 5.47°C(2079) and 6.2°C(2089) under 1.5°C, 2°C, 2.5°C, 3°C, 3.5°C, 4°C and 4.5°C global warming targets, respectively. With the increase of the global

  11. Observation of extremely strong shock waves in solids launched by petawatt laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, K. L.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Pasley, J.; Hakel, P.; Ma, T.; Highbarger, K.; Beg, F. N.; Chen, S. N.; Daskalova, R. L.; Freeman, R. R.; Green, J. S.; Habara, H.; Jaanimagi, P.; Key, M. H.; King, J.; Kodama, R.; Krushelnick, K.; Nakamura, H.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; MacKinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Stephens, R. B.; Van Woerkom, L.; Norreys, P. A.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding hydrodynamic phenomena driven by fast electron heating is important for a range of applications including fast electron collimation schemes for fast ignition and the production and study of hot, dense matter. In this work, detailed numerical simulations modelling the heating, hydrodynamic evolution, and extreme ultra-violet (XUV) emission in combination with experimental XUV images indicate shock waves of exceptional strength (200 Mbar) launched due to rapid heating of materials via a petawatt laser. We discuss in detail the production of synthetic XUV images and how they assist us in interpreting experimental XUV images captured at 256 eV using a multi-layer spherical mirror.

  12. Solitary heat waves in nonlinear lattices with squared on-site potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rovinita Perseus; M M Latha

    2013-06-01

    A model Hamiltonian is proposed for heat conduction in a nonlinear lattice with squared on-site potential using the second quantized operators and averaging the same using a suitable wave function, equations are derived in discrete form for the field amplitude and the properties of heat transfer are examined theoretically. Numerical analysis shows that the propagation of heat is in the form of solitons. Furthermore, a systemized version of tanh method is carried out to extract solutions for the resulting nonlinear equations in the continuum case and the effect of inhomogeneity is studied for different temperatures.

  13. Alfvén wave solar model (AWSoM): Coronal heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Holst, B.; Sokolov, I. V.; Meng, X.; Jin, M.; Manchester, W. B. IV; Tóth, G.; Gombosi, T. I. [Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    We present a new version of the Alfvén wave solar model, a global model from the upper chromosphere to the corona and the heliosphere. The coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are addressed with low-frequency Alfvén wave turbulence. The injection of Alfvén wave energy at the inner boundary is such that the Poynting flux is proportional to the magnetic field strength. The three-dimensional magnetic field topology is simulated using data from photospheric magnetic field measurements. This model does not impose open-closed magnetic field boundaries; those develop self-consistently. The physics include the following. (1) The model employs three different temperatures, namely the isotropic electron temperature and the parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures. The firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities due to the developing ion temperature anisotropy are accounted for. (2) The Alfvén waves are partially reflected by the Alfvén speed gradient and the vorticity along the field lines. The resulting counter-propagating waves are responsible for the nonlinear turbulent cascade. The balanced turbulence due to uncorrelated waves near the apex of the closed field lines and the resulting elevated temperatures are addressed. (3) To apportion the wave dissipation to the three temperatures, we employ the results of the theories of linear wave damping and nonlinear stochastic heating. (4) We have incorporated the collisional and collisionless electron heat conduction. We compare the simulated multi-wavelength extreme ultraviolet images of CR2107 with the observations from STEREO/EUVI and the Solar Dynamics Observatory/AIA instruments. We demonstrate that the reflection due to strong magnetic fields in the proximity of active regions sufficiently intensifies the dissipation and observable emission.

  14. Observation of nonlinear wave decay processes in the solar wind by the AMPTE IRM plasma wave experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koons, H. C.; Roeder, J. L.; Bauer, O. H.; Haerendel, G.; Treumann, R.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear wave decay processes have been detected in the solar wind by the plasma wave experiment aboard the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) IRM spacecraft. The main process is the generation of ultralow-frequency ion acoustic waves from the decay of Langmuir waves near the electron plasma frequency. Frequently, this is accompanied by an enhancement of emissions near twice the plasma frequency. This enhancement is most likely due to the generation of electromagnetic waves from the coalescence of two Langmuir waves. These processes occur within the electron foreshock in front of the earth's bow shock.

  15. Characterization of High Frequency Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes during Heating Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Wayne; Mahmoudian, Alireza

    It has been experimentally observed for some time now that the Polar Mesospheric Summer Echo PMSE strength can be artificially modified by using a ground-based ionospheric heating facility to perturb the electron irregularity source region that is believed to produce PMSE. It is evident that significant diagnostic information may be available to characterize the charged sub-visible dust layer from the temporal behavior of the electron irregularities during the heating process which ultimately modifies the mesospheric electron temperature. Particularly impor-tant time periods of the irregularity temporal behavior are during the turn-on and turn-off of the radio wave heating in which interesting and important behavior has been predicted and observed. Most past experiments have been performed using radar measurements in the VHF frequency range, i.e. consideration of VHF PMSE. Recently measurements have begun to be made using HF radars for investigation of heating of HF PMSE. The objective of this presen-tation is to discuss the physical processes that control the evolution of electron irregularities associated with mesospheric dust layers during radio wave heating for these new HF radar measurements. First, the two dominant processes that control electron irregularity evolution during ionospheric heating, dust charging and ambipolar diffusion will be discussed. It will be shown that a fundamental parameter that controls the temporal behavior is the ratio of the dust charging to ambipolar diffusion time during the turn-on and turn-off period. Computational and analytical models will be introduced that may be used to directly investigate the electron irregularity temporal evolution with particular emphasis placed on modeling the electron ir-regularity temporal evolution during the time periods when the radio wave heating is turned on and off. These models will be used to investigate the evolution predicted for measurements with HF radars. Guided by the results, possible

  16. Investigation of water wave breaking phenomena: experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chybicki, W.; Staroszczyk, R.

    2009-09-01

    The phenomenon of water wave breaking and the link between the wave breaking and the velocities of water particles on the free surface are investigated. Results of experiments carried out in a laboratory flume are presented, and then compared with predictions of a theoretical model that has also been outlined in the paper. The experiments have been conducted in a 64 m long water channel at the Institute of Hydro-Engineering of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Gdansk, Poland. The experiments have been focused on measurements of Lagrangian velocities of fluid particles on the free surface of water. The motion of the fluid was induced by a piston-type wave maker that generated short trains of mono- and bi-chromatic waves propagating in water of a mean-level depth of 40 cm, in which an underwater inclined ramp, of a slope of 10 per cent and a height of 30 cm, was mounted. The height of a generated wave was adjusted in such a way that the wave breaking occurred in a chosen location over the ramp. The wave breaking was of a spilling type. The fluid particle velocities were measured by putting floating markers (small plastic beads of densities very close to that of water) on the free surface of water, and then by recording their movements by means of a camera during the process of wave breaking. The displacements of the markers in time were determined from the analysis of their positions in successive frames of the film. In the paper also a theoretical model describing the propagation of waves over an uneven bottom is presented. The model is formulated in the Lagrangian variables. A key simplification on which the proposed theory is based is that the vertical displacements of fluid particles are related to an assumed variation of the horizontal displacements, the continuity equation, and the boundary condition at the bottom. The momentum equation, derived by applying a variational principle and making use of the latter assumptions, is equivalent to the Boussinesq

  17. On the strongly damped wave equation and the heat equation with mixed boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloisio F. Neves

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We study two one-dimensional equations: the strongly damped wave equation and the heat equation, both with mixed boundary conditions. We prove the existence of global strong solutions and the existence of compact global attractors for these equations in two different spaces.

  18. Combined effects of heat waves and droughts on avian communities across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Brian D. Wardlow; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff

    2010-01-01

    Increasing surface temperatures and climatic variability associated with global climate change are expected to produce more frequent and intense heat waves and droughts in many parts of the world. Our goal was to elucidate the fundamental, but poorly understood, effects of these extreme weather events on avian communities across the conterminous United States....

  19. The Bermuda Triangle mysteries: an explanation based on the diffraction of heat waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Njau, E.C. [Dar es Salaam Univ. (Tanzania, United Republic of). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    Studies based on actual meteorological records [E.C. Njau, Nuovo Cimento 15C, 17-23 (1992)] as well as analytical methods [E.C. Njau, Proc. Ind. Natn. Sci. Acad., 61A (4) (1995); Renewable Energy 4, 261-263 (1994)] have established the continuous existence of a series of large-scale, Eastward-moving heat waves along the Earth`s surface, whose individual crests and troughs are stretched approximately along the geographical North-South direction. In moving across the American continent, these waves encounter a line of physical barriers formed by the lofty Rocky and Andes ranges of mountains, which is continuous except for a significant gap or opening between Colombia and Mexico. This line of physical barriers consistently maintains a maximum height of 3000-4000 m between latitudes 40{sup o}S and 55{sup o}N except for a significant opening or slit located between Mexico and Colombia where the maximum height hardly exceeds 600 m. The Eastward-moving heat waves are thus incident obliquely on an approximately single-slit barrier when crossing the American continent and those parts of the waves which filter through this single slit essentially form some kind of single-slit diffraction (heat) patterns in, around and past the Bermuda Triangle. These diffraction heat patterns give rise to corresponding weather and ocean patterns which, to a large extent, account for the mysteries already noted in the Bermuda region. (Author)

  20. Burgulence and Alfv\\'en waves heating mechanism of solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Mishonov, T M

    2006-01-01

    Heating of magnetized turbulent plasma is calculated in the framework of Burgers turbulence [A.M. Polyakov, Phys. Rev. E. 52, 6183, (1995)]. There is calculated the energy flux of Alfv\\'en waves along the magnetic field. The Alfven waves are considered as intermediary between the turbulent energy and the heat. The derived results are related to wave channel of the heating of solar corona. After incorporating dissipation of convective plasma waves instabilities [G.D. Chagelishvili, R.G. Chanishvili, T.S. Hristov, and J.G. Lominadze, Phys. Rev. E 47, 366 (1993)] and [A.D. Rogava, S.M. Mahajan, G. Bodo, and S. Marsaglia, Astronomy & Astrophysics, 399, 421-431 (2003)] the suggested model of heating can be applied to analysis of the missing viscosity of accretion discs and to reveal why the quasars are the most powerful sources of light in the universe. We suppose that applied Langevin-Burgers approach to turbulence can be helpful for other systems where we have intensive interaction between a stochastic turbu...

  1. Observed changes in seasonal heat waves and warm temperature extremes in the Romanian Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micu, Dana; Birsan, Marius-Victor; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Cheval, Sorin

    2015-04-01

    Extreme high temperature have a large impact on environment and human activities, especially in high elevation areas particularly sensitive to the recent climate warming. The climate of the Romanian Carpathians became warmer particularly in winter, spring and summer, exibiting a significant increasing frequency of warm extremes. The paper investigates the seasonal changes in the frequency, duration and intensity of heat waves in relation to the shifts in the daily distribution of maximum temperatures over a 50-year period of meteorological observations (1961-2010). The paper uses the heat wave definition recommended by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) and exploits the gridded daily dataset of maximum temperature at 0.1° resolution (~10 km) developed in the framework of the CarpatClim project (www.carpatclim.eu). The seasonal changes in heat waves behavior were identified using the Mann-Kendall non-parametric trend test. The results suggest an increase in heat wave frequency and a lengthening of intervals affected by warm temperature extremes all over the study region, which are explained by the shifts in the upper (extreme) tail of the daily maximum temperature distribution in most seasons. The trends are consistent across the region and are well correlated to the positive phases of the East Atlantic Oscillation. Our results are in good agreement with the previous temperature-related studies concerning the Carpathian region. This study was realized within the framework of the project GENCLIM, financed by UEFISCDI, code PN-II 151/2014.

  2. The Impact of Heat Waves on Occurrence and Severity of Construction Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameez Rameezdeen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of heat stress on human health has been extensively studied. Similarly, researchers have investigated the impact of heat stress on workers’ health and safety. However, very little work has been done on the impact of heat stress on occupational accidents and their severity, particularly in South Australian construction. Construction workers are at high risk of injury due to heat stress as they often work outdoors, undertake hard manual work, and are often project based and sub-contracted. Little is known on how heat waves could impact on construction accidents and their severity. In order to provide more evidence for the currently limited number of empirical investigations on the impact of heat stress on accidents, this study analysed 29,438 compensation claims reported during 2002–2013 within the construction industry of South Australia. Claims reported during 29 heat waves in Adelaide were compared with control periods to elicit differences in the number of accidents reported and their severity. The results revealed that worker characteristics, type of work, work environment, and agency of accident mainly govern the severity. It is recommended that the implementation of adequate preventative measures in small-sized companies and civil engineering sites, targeting mainly old age workers could be a priority for Work, Health and Safety (WHS policies.

  3. The Impact of Heat Waves on Occurrence and Severity of Construction Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameezdeen, Rameez; Elmualim, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    The impact of heat stress on human health has been extensively studied. Similarly, researchers have investigated the impact of heat stress on workers’ health and safety. However, very little work has been done on the impact of heat stress on occupational accidents and their severity, particularly in South Australian construction. Construction workers are at high risk of injury due to heat stress as they often work outdoors, undertake hard manual work, and are often project based and sub-contracted. Little is known on how heat waves could impact on construction accidents and their severity. In order to provide more evidence for the currently limited number of empirical investigations on the impact of heat stress on accidents, this study analysed 29,438 compensation claims reported during 2002–2013 within the construction industry of South Australia. Claims reported during 29 heat waves in Adelaide were compared with control periods to elicit differences in the number of accidents reported and their severity. The results revealed that worker characteristics, type of work, work environment, and agency of accident mainly govern the severity. It is recommended that the implementation of adequate preventative measures in small-sized companies and civil engineering sites, targeting mainly old age workers could be a priority for Work, Health and Safety (WHS) policies. PMID:28085067

  4. Neonates in Ahmedabad, India, during the 2010 heat wave: a climate change adaptation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkad, Khyati; Barzaga, Michelle L; Wallenstein, Sylvan; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Sheffield, Perry E

    2014-01-01

    Health effects from climate change are an international concern with urban areas at particular risk due to urban heat island effects. The burden of disease on vulnerable populations in non-climate-controlled settings has not been well studied. This study compared neonatal morbidity in a non-air-conditioned hospital during the 2010 heat wave in Ahmedabad to morbidity in the prior and subsequent years. The outcome of interest was neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions for heat. During the months of April, May, and June of 2010, 24 NICU admissions were for heat versus 8 and 4 in 2009 and 2011, respectively. Both the effect of moving the maternity ward and the effect of high temperatures were statistically significant, controlling for each other. Above 42 degrees Celsius, each daily maximum temperature increase of a degree was associated with 43% increase in heat-related admissions (95% CI 9.2-88%). Lower floor location of the maternity ward within hospital which occurred after the 2010 heat wave showed a protective effect. These findings demonstrate the importance of simple surveillance measures in motivating a hospital policy change for climate change adaptation-here relocating one ward-and the potential increasing health burden of heat in non-climate-controlled institutions on vulnerable populations.

  5. Neonates in Ahmedabad, India, during the 2010 Heat Wave: A Climate Change Adaptation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khyati Kakkad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Health effects from climate change are an international concern with urban areas at particular risk due to urban heat island effects. The burden of disease on vulnerable populations in non-climate-controlled settings has not been well studied. This study compared neonatal morbidity in a non-air-conditioned hospital during the 2010 heat wave in Ahmedabad to morbidity in the prior and subsequent years. The outcome of interest was neonatal intensive care unit (NICU admissions for heat. During the months of April, May, and June of 2010, 24 NICU admissions were for heat versus 8 and 4 in 2009 and 2011, respectively. Both the effect of moving the maternity ward and the effect of high temperatures were statistically significant, controlling for each other. Above 42 degrees Celsius, each daily maximum temperature increase of a degree was associated with 43% increase in heat-related admissions (95% CI 9.2–88%. Lower floor location of the maternity ward within hospital which occurred after the 2010 heat wave showed a protective effect. These findings demonstrate the importance of simple surveillance measures in motivating a hospital policy change for climate change adaptation—here relocating one ward—and the potential increasing health burden of heat in non-climate-controlled institutions on vulnerable populations.

  6. The Impact of Heat Waves on Occurrence and Severity of Construction Accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameezdeen, Rameez; Elmualim, Abbas

    2017-01-11

    The impact of heat stress on human health has been extensively studied. Similarly, researchers have investigated the impact of heat stress on workers' health and safety. However, very little work has been done on the impact of heat stress on occupational accidents and their severity, particularly in South Australian construction. Construction workers are at high risk of injury due to heat stress as they often work outdoors, undertake hard manual work, and are often project based and sub-contracted. Little is known on how heat waves could impact on construction accidents and their severity. In order to provide more evidence for the currently limited number of empirical investigations on the impact of heat stress on accidents, this study analysed 29,438 compensation claims reported during 2002-2013 within the construction industry of South Australia. Claims reported during 29 heat waves in Adelaide were compared with control periods to elicit differences in the number of accidents reported and their severity. The results revealed that worker characteristics, type of work, work environment, and agency of accident mainly govern the severity. It is recommended that the implementation of adequate preventative measures in small-sized companies and civil engineering sites, targeting mainly old age workers could be a priority for Work, Health and Safety (WHS) policies.

  7. The 2010 Pakistan Flood and Russian Heat Wave: Teleconnection of Hydrometeorological Extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, preliminary results are presented showing that the two record-setting extreme events during 2010 summer (i.e., the Russian heat wave-wildfires and Pakistan flood) were physically connected. It is found that the Russian heat wave was associated with the development of an extraordinarily strong and prolonged extratropical atmospheric blocking event in association with the excitation of a large-scale atmospheric Rossby wave train spanning western Russia, Kazakhstan, and the northwestern China-Tibetan Plateau region. The southward penetration of upper-level vorticity perturbations in the leading trough of the Rossby wave was instrumental in triggering anomalously heavy rain events over northern Pakistan and vicinity in mid- to late July. Also shown are evidences that the Russian heat wave was amplified by a positive feedback through changes in surface energy fluxes between the atmospheric blocking pattern and an underlying extensive land region with below-normal soil moisture. The Pakistan heavy rain events were amplified and sustained by strong anomalous southeasterly flow along the Himalayan foothills and abundant moisture transport from the Bay of Bengal in connection with the northward propagation of the monsoonal intraseasonal oscillation.

  8. PROTON HEATING IN SOLAR WIND COMPRESSIBLE TURBULENCE WITH COLLISIONS BETWEEN COUNTER-PROPAGATING WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Pei, Zhongtian [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); Marsch, Eckart [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Chen, Christopher H. K. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Zhang, Lei [Sate Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Salem, Chadi S.; Bale, Stuart D., E-mail: jshept@gmail.com [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Magnetohydronamic turbulence is believed to play a crucial role in heating laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasmas. However, the precise connection between the turbulent fluctuations and the particle kinetics has not yet been established. Here we present clear evidence of plasma turbulence heating based on diagnosed wave features and proton velocity distributions from solar wind measurements by the Wind spacecraft. For the first time, we can report the simultaneous observation of counter-propagating magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar wind turbulence. As opposed to the traditional paradigm with counter-propagating Alfvén waves (AWs), anti-sunward AWs are encountered by sunward slow magnetosonic waves (SMWs) in this new type of solar wind compressible turbulence. The counter-propagating AWs and SWs correspond, respectively, to the dominant and sub-dominant populations of the imbalanced Elsässer variables. Nonlinear interactions between the AWs and SMWs are inferred from the non-orthogonality between the possible oscillation direction of one wave and the possible propagation direction of the other. The associated protons are revealed to exhibit bi-directional asymmetric beams in their velocity distributions: sunward beams appear in short, narrow patterns and anti-sunward in broad extended tails. It is suggested that multiple types of wave–particle interactions, i.e., cyclotron and Landau resonances with AWs and SMWs at kinetic scales, are taking place to jointly heat the protons perpendicular and in parallel.

  9. Heat wave over India during summer 2015: an assessment of real time extended range forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, D. R.; Mohapatra, M.; Srivastava, A. K.; Kumar, Arun

    2017-08-01

    Hot winds are the marked feature of summer season in India during late spring preceding the climatological onset of the monsoon season in June. Some years the conditions becomes very vulnerable with the maximum temperature ( T max) exceeding 45 °C for many days over parts of north-western, eastern coastal states of India and Indo-Gangetic plain. During summer of 2015 (late May to early June) eastern coastal states, central and northwestern parts of India experienced severe heat wave conditions leading to loss of thousands of human life in extreme high temperature conditions. It is not only the loss of human life but also the animals and birds were very vulnerable to this extreme heat wave conditions. In this study, an attempt is made to assess the performance of real time extended range forecast (forecast up to 3 weeks) of this scorching T max based on the NCEP's Climate Forecast System (CFS) latest version coupled model (CFSv2). The heat wave condition was very severe during the week from 22 to 28 May with subsequent week from 29 May to 4 June also witnessed high T max over many parts of central India including eastern coastal states of India. The 8 ensemble members of operational CFSv2 model are used once in a week to prepare the weekly bias corrected deterministic (ensemble mean) T max forecast for 3 weeks valid from Friday to Thursday coinciding with the heat wave periods of 2015. Using the 8 ensemble members separately and the CFSv2 corresponding hindcast climatology the probability of above and below normal T max is also prepared for the same 3 weeks. The real time deterministic and probabilistic forecasts did indicate impending heat wave over many parts of India during late May and early June of 2015 associated with strong northwesterly wind over main land mass of India, delaying the sea breeze, leading to heat waves over eastern coastal regions of India. Thus, the capability of coupled model in providing early warning of such killer heat wave can be very

  10. E × B shear pattern formation by radial propagation of heat flux waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); IAS and RIAM, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); CASS and CMTFO, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Dif-Pradalier, G. [CEA, IRFM, Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gürcan, Ö. D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

    2014-05-15

    A novel theory to describe the formation of E×B flow patterns by radially propagating heat flux waves is presented. A model for heat avalanche dynamics is extended to include a finite delay time between the instantaneous heat flux and the mean flux, based on an analogy between heat avalanche dynamics and traffic flow dynamics. The response time introduced here is an analogue of the drivers' response time in traffic dynamics. The microscopic foundation for the time delay is the time for mixing of the phase space density. The inclusion of the finite response time changes the model equation for avalanche dynamics from Burgers equation to a nonlinear telegraph equation. Based on the telegraph equation, the formation of heat flux jams is predicted. The growth rate and typical interval of jams are calculated. The connection of the jam interval to the typical step size of the E×B staircase is discussed.

  11. Heating of the Solar Corona by Alfven Waves: Self-Induced Opacity

    CERN Document Server

    Zahariev, N I

    2011-01-01

    There have been derived equations describing the static distributions of temperature and wind velocity at the transition region within the framework of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of fully ionized hydrogen plasma . We have also calculated the width of the transition between the chromosphere and corona as a self-induced opacity of the high-frequency Alfven waves (AWs). The domain wall is a direct consequence of the self-consistent MHD treatment of AWs propagation. We predict considerable spectral density of the high-frequency AWs in the photosphere. The idea that Alfven waves might heat the solar corona belong to Alfven - we simply derived the corresponding MHD equations. The comparison of the solutions to those equations with the observational/measured data will be crucial for revealing the heating mechanism. The analysis of those solutions will explain how Alfven waves brick unto the corona and dissipate their energy there.

  12. Propagation of combustion waves in the shell-core energetic materials with external heat losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubernov, V V; Kudryumov, V N; Kolobov, A V; Polezhaev, A A

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the properties and stability of combustion waves propagating in the composite solid energetic material of the shell-core type are numerically investigated within the one-dimensional diffusive-thermal model with heat losses to the surroundings. The flame speed is calculated as a function of the parameters of the model. The boundaries of stability are determined in the space of parameters by solving the linear stability problem and direct integration of the governing non-stationary equations. The results are compared with the characteristics of the combustion waves in pure solid fuel. It is demonstrated that a stable travelling combustion wave solution can exist for the parameters of the model for which the flame front propagation is unstable in pure solid fuel and it can propagate several times faster even in the presence of significant heat losses.

  13. Cryogenic heat loads analysis from SST-1 plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairagi, N.; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic heat load analysis is an important aspect for stable operation of Tokamaks employing large scale superconducting magnets. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) at IPR is equipped with superconducting magnets system (SCMS) comprising sixteen numbers of modified ‘D’ shaped toroidal field (TF) and nine poloidal field (PF) superconducting coils which are wound using NbTi/Cu based cable-in conduit conductor (CICC). SST-1 magnets operation has flexibility to cool either in two-phase with sub-cooling, two-phase without sub-cooling or single phase (supercritical) helium using a dedicated 1.3 kW helium refrigerator cum liquefier (HRL). Here, we report gross heat losses for integrated TF superconducting magnets of SST-1 during the plasma campaign using cryogenic helium supply/return thermodynamic data from cryoplant. Heat loads mainly comprising of steady state as well as transient loads are smoothly absorbed by SST-1 cryogenic helium plant during plasma experiments. The corresponding heat produced in the coils is totally released to the helium flowing through the TF coils, which in turn is dumped into liquid helium stored in main control Dewar. These results are very useful reference for heat loss analysis for TF as well as PF coils and provides database for future operation of SST-1 machine.

  14. Test of a new heat-flow equation for dense-fluid shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel; Ravelo, Ramon

    2010-09-21

    Using a recently proposed equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, we model shockwave propagation in the dense Lennard-Jones fluid. Disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the kinetic temperature in the direction of a planar shock wave and those in the transverse directions, particularly in the region near the shock front, gives rise to a new transport (equilibration) mechanism not seen in usual one-dimensional heat-flow situations. The modification of the heat-flow equation was tested earlier for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which had been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes-Fourier solutions. Now, the Lennard-Jones fluid, whose equation of state and transport properties have been determined from independent calculations, allows us to study the case where potential, as well as kinetic contributions are important. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations under strong shock wave conditions, compared to Navier-Stokes.

  15. ELF/VLF wave generation from the beating of two HF ionospheric heating sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Moore, R. C.; Golkowski, M.; Lehtinen, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established that Extremely Low Frequency (ELF, 0.3-3 kHz) and Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio waves can be generated via modulated High Frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) heating of the lower ionosphere (60-100 km). The ionospheric absorption of HF power modifies the conductivity of the lower ionosphere, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, creates an `antenna in the sky.' We utilize a theoretical model of the HF to ELF/VLF conversion and the ELF/VLF propagation, and calculate the amplitudes of the generated ELF/VLF waves when two HF heating waves, separated by the ELF/VLF frequency, are transmitted from two adjacent locations. The resulting ELF/VLF radiation pattern exhibits a strong directional dependence (as much as 15 dB) that depends on the physical spacing of the two HF sources. This beat wave source can produce signals 10-20 dB stronger than those generated using amplitude modulation, particularly for frequencies greater than 5-10 kHz. We evaluate recent suggestions that beating two HF waves generates ELF/VLF waves in the F-region (>150 km), and conclude that those experimental results may have misinterpreted, and can be explained strictly by the much more well established D region mechanism.

  16. Major results of the electron cyclotron heating experiment in the PDX tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsuan, H.; Bol, K.; Bowen, N.; Boyd, D.; Cavallo, A.; Dimits, A.; Doane, J.; Elder, G.; Goldman, M.; Grek, B.

    1984-07-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) experiments on PDX have been carried out with two 60 GHz pulsed gyrotrons each yielding up to approximately 100 kW. The ECH system used two waveguide runs each about 30 meters long. One run included 5 bends and the other, 7 bends. Predetermined waveguide modes were transmitted. The electron cyclotron waves were launched in narrow beams from both the high field and the low field sides of the plasma torus. The major new physics results are: (1) efficient central electron heating for both ohmic and neutral beam heated target plasmas; (2) alteration of MHD behavior using ECH; (3) identification of the trapped electron population with ECH; and (4) signature of velocity-space time evolution during ECH. In the best heating results obtained, Thomson scattering data indicated a central temperature increase from less than or equal to 1.5 keV to greater than or equal to 2.5 keV. This occurred with an average density of about 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ and approximately 80 kW outside-launch ordinary-mode heating.

  17. Predictability and Spatial Characteristics of New-York-City-Area Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, C.; Horton, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The origins, characteristics, and predictability of extreme heat waves in the Northeast U.S. are simultaneously examined at multiple scales, using hourly observational data from 1948-2014 and focusing in particular on the region surrounding New York City. A novel definition of heat waves - incorporating both temperature and moisture at hourly resolution - is used to identify 3-to-5-day heat waves whose dynamics are then analyzed from 3 weeks prior to 3 weeks subsequent to the event. Inter-event differences in dynamics such as the strength and position of geopotential-height anomalies; the strength, persistence, and orientation of sea breezes; and the dominant 850-hPa wind azimuth, all of which are filtered via local terrain and land-use to create differences in conditions between events at specific locations. In particular, using composite maps and back trajectories, they are found to play an important role in creating mesoscale differences in low-level moisture content, from one side of the metropolitan area to the other. Evidence is presented supporting the influence of coastline orientation in explaining the differences in the relationships between wind azimuth and temperature & moisture advection between New York City proper and northern New Jersey. Self-organizing maps are employed to classify heat waves based on the small-scale differences in temperature and moisture between events, and the results of this classification are then used in correlations with synoptic- and hemispheric-scale geopotential-height anomalies. Considerable predictability of event type on the small-scale (as well as occurrence of a heat wave of any kind) is found, originating primarily from central Pacific and western Atlantic SSTs.

  18. Modelling surface ozone during the 2003 heat-wave in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieno, M.; Dore, A. J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Doherty, R.; Heal, M. R.; Reis, S.; Hallsworth, S.; Tarrason, L.; Wind, P.; Fowler, D.; Simpson, D.; Sutton, M. A.

    2010-08-01

    The EMEP4UK modelling system is a high resolution (5×5 km2) application of the EMEP chemistry-transport model, designed for scientific and policy studies in the UK. We demonstrate the use and performance of the EMEP4UK system through the study of ground-level ozone (O3) during the extreme August 2003 heat-wave. Meteorology is generated by the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model, nudged every six hours with reanalysis data. We focus on SE England, where hourly average O3 reached up to 140 ppb during the heat-wave. EMEP4UK accurately reproduces elevated O3 and much of its day-to-day variability during the heat-wave. Key O3 precursors, nitrogen dioxide and isoprene, are less well simulated, but show generally accurate diurnal cycles and concentrations to within a factor of ~2-3 of observations. The modelled surface O3 distribution has an intricate spatio-temporal structure, governed by a combination of meteorology, emissions and photochemistry. A series of sensitivity runs with the model are used to explore the factors that influenced O3 levels during the heat-wave. Various factors appear to be important on different days and at different sites. Ozone imported from outside the model domain, especially the south, is very important on several days during the heat-wave, contributing up to 85 ppb. The effect of dry deposition is also important on several days. Modelled isoprene concentrations are generally best simulated if isoprene emissions are changed from the base emissions: typically doubled, but elevated by up to a factor of five on one hot day. We found that accurate modelling of the exact positions of nitrogen oxide and volatile organic compound plumes is crucial for the successful simulation of O3 at a particular time and location. Variations in temperature of ±5 K were found to have impacts on O3 of typically less than ±10 ppb.

  19. The heat wave of August 2012 in the Czech Republic: Evaluation using the Weather Extremity Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtanová, Eva; Valeriánová, Anna; Crhová, Lenka

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the summer heat wave of August 2012 in the Czech Republic. We use and compare results of two different approaches to heat wave evaluation. The Weather Extremity Index evaluates the extremity and spatial extent of the meteorological extreme event of interest. The second method is based on the duration of daily maximum air temperature above specific thresholds. In August 2012, the high air temperature in the Czech Republic lasted from 18/8 to 24/8. It was connected with the inflow of hot air from northern Africa between the low pressure trough over the eastern Atlantic and the region of high pressure in central Europe. The heat wave culminated on 20/8 when the maximum air temperature was higher than 30°C in the whole area of the Czech Republic and the highest daily maximum air temperature on record in the Czech Republic with value of 40.4°C was observed at Dobřichovice station. Our results demonstrate that the studied heat wave was quite extraordinary, occurring so late in the summer with a relatively large areal extent and extremity of detected maximum air temperature. Furthermore, the Weather Extremity Index was found useful for identification of really extreme high air temperature events and facilitated inter-comparison in terms of extremity and spatial extent. However, it cannot be used for detection of all heat waves that could have severe impacts on both human activities and natural ecosystems. The work has been supported by the grant P209/11/1990 funded by the Czech Science Foundation.

  20. Magnetogasdynamic Cylindrical Shock Waves in a Rotating Nonideal Gas with Radiation Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, J. P.; Patel, Nanhey

    2015-03-01

    A similarity solution is presented for a cylindrical magnetogasdynamic shock wave in a rotating nonideal gas in the presence of a variable axial magnetic field in the case where the radiation heat flux is of importance. The initial angular velocity of the medium is assumed to vary as some power of the distance from the symmetry axis. The radiation heat flux is evaluated from the equation of motion without explicit use of the radiation transfer equations. It is shown that the gas nonidealness increases the shock strength but decreases the shock velocity. On the other hand, the presence of a magnetic field decreases the shock strength but increases the shock velocity. Moreover, the shock velocity increases with the ratio of specific heats. The total energy of the shock wave increases with time.

  1. Protoplanetary Disk Heating and Evolution Driven by the Spiral Density Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Rafikov, Roman R

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution imaging of some protoplanetary disks in scattered light reveals presence of the global spiral arms of significant amplitude, likely excited by massive planets or stellar companions. Assuming that these arms are density waves, evolving into spiral shocks, we assess their effect on the thermodynamics, accretion, and global evolution of the disk. We derive analytical expressions for the direct (irreversible) heating, angular momentum transport, and mass accretion rate induced by the disk shocks of arbitrary strength. We find these processes to be very sensitive to the shock amplitude. Focusing on the waves of moderate strength (density jump at the shock $\\Delta\\Sigma/\\Sigma\\sim 1$) we show the associated disk heating to be negligible (contributing at $\\sim 1\\%$ level to the energy budget) in passive, irradiated protoplanetary disks on $\\sim 100$ AU scales, but becoming important within several AU from the star. At the same time, shock heating can be a significant (or even dominant) energy source ...

  2. Mode conversion and heating in a UCLA-high schools collaborative experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Miana; Buckley-Bonnano, Samuel; Pribyl, Patrick; Gekelman, Walter; Wise, Joe; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken

    2016-10-01

    A small plasma device is in operation for use by undergraduates and high school students at UCLA. Magnetic field up to 100 G, with density 108 meters long. The plasma is generated by an ICP source at one end operating at about 500 kHz. For this experiment, a small plate located near the edge of the plasma column is used as an electrostatic launcher. High frequency waves ωce distance away axially measures plasma heating along a field line that passes several cm in front of the launcher, localized in radius with δr 1cm Absorption and strong electron heating are observed at the plasma resonant layer. We explore the ``double resonance condition at which ωpe = 2ωce . Here strong interaction with electron Bernstein waves is expected. The Bernstein waves are also launched at low power and their dispersion relation verified. Work done at the BaPSF at UCLA which is supported by the DOE/NSF.

  3. Consistent pattern of local adaptation during an experimental heat wave in a pipefish-trematode host-parasite system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne H Landis

    Full Text Available Extreme climate events such as heat waves are expected to increase in frequency under global change. As one indirect effect, they can alter magnitude and direction of species interactions, for example those between hosts and parasites. We simulated a summer heat wave to investigate how a changing environment affects the interaction between the broad-nosed pipefish (Syngnathus typhle as a host and its digenean trematode parasite (Cryptocotyle lingua. In a fully reciprocal laboratory infection experiment, pipefish from three different coastal locations were exposed to sympatric and allopatric trematode cercariae. In order to examine whether an extreme climatic event disrupts patterns of locally adapted host-parasite combinations we measured the parasite's transmission success as well as the host's adaptive and innate immune defence under control and heat wave conditions. Independent of temperature, sympatric cercariae were always more successful than allopatric ones, indicating that parasites are locally adapted to their hosts. Hosts suffered from heat stress as suggested by fewer cells of the adaptive immune system (lymphocytes compared to the same groups that were kept at 18°C. However, the proportion of the innate immune cells (monocytes was higher in the 18°C water. Contrary to our expectations, no interaction between host immune defence, parasite infectivity and temperature stress were found, nor did the pattern of local adaptation change due to increased water temperature. Thus, in this host-parasite interaction, the sympatric parasite keeps ahead of the coevolutionary dynamics across sites, even under increasing temperatures as expected under marine global warming.

  4. In-space experiment on thermoacoustic convection heat transfer phenomenon-experiment definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, M.; Crocker, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    The definition phase of an in-space experiment in thermoacoustic convection (TAC) heat transfer phenomenon is completed and the results are presented and discussed in some detail. Background information, application and potential importance of TAC in heat transfer processes are discussed with particular focus on application in cryogenic fluid handling and storage in microgravity space environment. Also included are the discussion on TAC space experiment objectives, results of ground support experiments, hardware information, and technical specifications and drawings. The future plans and a schedule for the development of experiment hardware (Phase 1) and flight tests and post-flight analysis (Phase 3/4) are also presented. The specific experimental objectives are rapid heating of a compressible fluid and the measurement of the fluid temperature and pressure and the recording and analysis of the experimental data for the establishment of the importance of TAC heat transfer process. The ground experiments that were completed in support of the experiment definition included fluid temperature measurement by a modified shadowgraph method, surface temperature measurements by thermocouples, and fluid pressure measurements by strain-gage pressure transducers. These experiments verified the feasibility of the TAC in-space experiment, established the relevance and accuracy of the experimental results, and specified the nature of the analysis which will be carried out in the post-flight phase of the report.

  5. Numerical experiment for nonlinear full-wave tomography. 3; Hisenkei full wave tomography no suchi jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, T. [Dia Consultants Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Nonlinear full-wave tomography (FWT) is under investigation to improve the estimation accuracy of Vp/Vs distributions. Full-wave tomography is one of the underground structure exploration methods mainly using Tarantola`s nonlinear local optimization method (LOM). Numerical experiment for FWT was carried out assuming relatively weak nonlinear underground structure. In the case of inversion by local optimization method, adequate preconditioning is important. Utilization of geological information is also effective in estimating low-frequency components of a model. As far as data are obtained under proper observation arrangement, even in actual field, precise estimation of Vp/Vs distributions is possible by FWT using explosion in a hole as wave source. In full-wave tomography, selection of observation arrangement is essential for both Vp and Vs. However, the proper arrangement is different between Vp and Vs. Approach to different analyses for Vp and Vs is also necessary by using only proper data for Vp and Vs among obtained data sets. 4 figs.

  6. Boiling Experiment Facility for Heat Transfer Studies in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delombard, Richard; McQuillen, John; Chao, David

    2008-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. By conducting tests in microgravity, it is possible to assess the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and assess the relative magnitude of effects with regards to other "forces" and phenomena such as Marangoni forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The Boiling eXperiment Facility is now being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox that will use normal perfluorohexane as a test fluid to extend the range of test conditions to include longer test durations and less liquid subcooling. Two experiments, the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment and the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment will use the Boiling eXperiment Facility. The objectives of these studies are to determine the differences in local boiling heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity and normal gravity from nucleate boiling, through critical heat flux and into the transition boiling regime and to examine the bubble nucleation, growth, departure and coalescence processes. Custom-designed heaters will be utilized to achieve these objectives.

  7. Fokker-Planck Simulation of Fast Wave Current Drive and Heating in the Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchimoto, E.; Shiina, S.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Forest, C. B.; Prager, S. C.; Wright, J. C.

    1999-11-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) has been shown theoretically to be a good candidate for improving plasma confinement characteristics of a high-beta, reactor-grade RFP via current profile control.footnote S. Shiina, Y. Kondoh, H. Ishii, Nuclear Fusion 34, 1473 (1994); T. Nagai et al., Proc. ICPP (Nagoya, 1996), p. 1042; K. Kusano et al., 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conf. (Yokohama, 1998), paper THP1/12. To assess the effects of toroidicity and quasilinear modifications to the electron distribution function on FWCD, we are using the RFP version of ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck codes (GENRAY and CQL3D). Although lower hybrid slow waves are ideally suited for poloidal current drive in large RFPs presently in operation, possible use of fast waves is being considered for core current drive and heating in these devices. For MST parameters, our calculations focus on intermediate to high harmonic fast waves for which geometric optics is valid.

  8. Relative contributions of external SST forcing and internal atmospheric variability to July-August heat waves over the Yangtze River valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Zhou, Tianjun

    2017-08-01

    The Yangtze River valley (YRV), located in central-eastern China, has witnessed increased numbers of heat waves in the summer since 1951. Knowing what factors control and affect the interannual variability of heat waves, especially distinguishing the contributions of anomalous sea surface temperature (SST) forcings and those of internal modes of variability, is important to improving heat wave prediction. After evaluating 70 members of the atmospheric model intercomparison project (AMIP) experiments from the 25 models that participated in the coupled model intercomparison project phase 5 (CMIP5), 13 high-skill members (HSMs) are selected to estimate the SST-forced variability. The results show that approximately 2/3 of the total variability of the July-August heat waves in the YRV during 1979-2008 can be attributed to anomalous SST forcings, whereas the other 1/3 are due to internal variability. Within the SST-forced component, one-half of the influence is from the impact of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the other half is from non-ENSO related SST forcings, specifically, the SST anomalies in the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. Both the decaying El Niño and developing La Niña accompanied by a warm Indian Ocean and cold central Pacific, respectively, are favorable to hotter summers in the YRV because these patterns strengthen and extend the western North Pacific Subtropical High (WNPSH) westwards, for which the decaying ENSO plays a dominant role. The internal variability shows a circumglobal teleconnection in which Rossby waves propagate southeastwards over the Eurasian Continent and strengthen the WNPSH. Atmospheric model sensitivity experiments confirm that non-ENSO SST forcings can modulate the WNPSH and heat wave variability by projecting their influences onto the internal mode.

  9. Heating and Acceleration of the Fast Solar Wind by Alfvén Wave Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Asgari-Targhi, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present numerical simulations of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) turbulence in a magnetic flux tube at the center of a polar coronal hole. The model for the background atmosphere is a solution of the momentum equation and includes the effects of wave pressure on the solar wind outflow. Alfvén waves are launched at the coronal base and reflect at various heights owing to variations in Alfvén speed and outflow velocity. The turbulence is driven by nonlinear interactions between the counterpropagating Alfvén waves. Results are presented for two models of the background atmosphere. In the first model the plasma density and Alfvén speed vary smoothly with height, resulting in minimal wave reflections and low-energy dissipation rates. We find that the dissipation rate is insufficient to maintain the temperature of the background atmosphere. The standard phenomenological formula for the dissipation rate significantly overestimates the rate derived from our RMHD simulations, and a revised formula is proposed. In the second model we introduce additional density variations along the flux tube with a correlation length of 0.04 R⊙ and with relative amplitude of 10%. These density variations simulate the effects of compressive MHD waves on the Alfvén waves. We find that such variations significantly enhance the wave reflection and thereby the turbulent dissipation rates, producing enough heat to maintain the background atmosphere. We conclude that interactions between Alfvén and compressive waves may play an important role in the turbulent heating of the fast solar wind.

  10. A simple indicator to rapidly assess the short-term impact of heat waves on mortality within the French heat warning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antics, Annamaria; Pascal, Mathilde; Laaidi, Karine; Wagner, Vérène; Corso, Magali; Declercq, Christophe; Beaudeau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple method to provide a rapid and robust estimate of the short-term impacts of heat waves on mortality, to be used for communication within a heat warning system. The excess mortality during a heat wave is defined as the difference between the observed mortality over the period and the observed mortality over the same period during the N preceding years. This method was tested on 19 French cities between 1973 and 2007. In six cities, we compared the excess mortality to that obtained using a modelling of the temperature-mortality relationship. There was a good agreement between the excess mortalities estimated by the simple indicator and by the models. Major differences were observed during the most extreme heat waves, in 1983 and 2003, and after the implementation of the heat prevention plan in 2006. Excluding these events, the mean difference between the estimates obtained by the two methods was of 13 deaths [1:45]. A comparison of mortality with the previous years provides a simple estimate of the mortality impact of heat waves. It can be used to provide early and reliable information to stakeholders of the heat prevention plan, and to select heat waves that should be further investigated.

  11. Temporal evolution of radar echoes associated with mesospheric dust clouds after turn-on of radio wave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Scales, W. A.

    2012-03-01

    The initial perturbation of polar mesospheric summer echoes PMSEs during radio wave heating provides significant diagnostic information about the charged dust layer associated with the irregularity source region. Comparison between the results of computational models and the observation data can be used as a tool to estimate charged dust layer parameters. An analytical model is developed and compared to a more accurate computational model as a reference to investigate the possibilities for diagnostic information as well as insight into the physical processes after heater turn-on. During radio wave heating of the mesosphere, which modifies the background electron temperature, various temporal evolution characteristics of irregularity amplitude may be observed which depend on the background plasma parameters and the characteristics of the dust layer. Turn-on overshoot due to the dominant electron charging process and turn-on undershoot resulting from the dominant ambipolar diffusion process, that can occur simultaneously at different radar frequencies, have been studied. The maximum and minimum of the electron density irregularity amplitude and the time at which this amplitude has been achieved as well as the decay time of irregularity amplitude after the maximum amplitude are unique observables that can shed light on the physical processes after the turn-on of the pump heating and to diagnose the charged dust layer. The agreement between the computational and analytical results are good and indicate the simplified analytical model may be used to provide considerable insight into the heating process and serve as the basis for a diagnostic model after heater turn-on. Moreover, the work proposes that conducting PMSE active experiments in the HF and VHF band simultaneously may allow estimation of the dust density altitude profile, dust charge state variation during pump heating, and ratio of electron temperature enhancement in the irregularity source region.

  12. Modelling and Experiments of a Standing Wave Piezomotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, B.; Helbo, Jan; Blanke, Mogens

    The paper presents a new contact model for standing wave piezomotors. The contact model is based on the Hertz theory for normal contact deformations and elastic contact theory for tangential loads. The contact theory is simplified into a model with discrete springs for normal and tangential loads...... which allows the calculation of slip/stick transitions. Simulations show that tip trajectories in general cannot be prescribed. The paper presents the principle of a bending resonator. Experiments indicate that the bending vibrations are too small to generate rotor rotations. However, due to unintended...

  13. Modelling and Experiments of a Standing Wave Piezomotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, B.; Helbo, Jan; Blanke, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a new contact model for standing wave piezomotors. The contact model is based on the Hertz theory for normal contact deformations and elastic contact theory for tangential loads. The contact theory is simplified into a model with discrete springs for normal and tangential loads...... which allows the calculation of slip/stick transitions. Simulations show that tip trajectories in general cannot be prescribed. The paper presents the principle of a bending resonator. Experiments indicate that the bending vibrations are too small to generate rotor rotations. However, due to unintended...

  14. Steep wave loads from irregular waves on an offshore wind turbine foundation: Computation and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Bo Terp; Bingham, Harry B.; Bredmose, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    harmonic forcing. The test case is representative for monopile foundations at intermediate water depths. The potential flow computations are carried out in a two-dimensional vertical plane and the inline force on the cylinder is evaluated by the Morison equation. The Navier-Stokes/VOF computations......Two-dimensional irregular waves on a sloping bed and their impact on a bottom mounted circular cylinder is modeled by three different numerical methods and the results are validated against laboratory experiments. We here consider the performance of a linear-, a fully nonlinear potential flow...... solver and a fully nonlinear Navier-Stokes/VOF solver. The validation is carried out in terms of both the free surface elevation and the inline force. Special attention is paid to the ultimate load in case of a single wave event and the general ability of the numerical models to capture the higher...

  15. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  16. Deadly 2010 Russian heat wave not a consequence of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-05-01

    Although some people may try to ascribe specific extreme weather events to climate change, global warming cannot be held responsible for recent weather events such as the 2010 Russian heat wave. Using climate simulations and a comparison against historical conditions, Dole et al. assess the influence of greenhouse gases, aerosols, anomalous sea surface temperatures, and other potential climate forcings on the likelihood and magnitude of the 2010 Russian heat wave. The authors suggest that the heat wave—which lasted from late June to mid­August and was responsible for thousands of deaths, widespread wildfires, and devastating crop loss—fell well within the bounds of natural climate variability. The authors find that none of the tested climate factors showed appreciable ability to predict the extreme temperatures seen throughout the heat wave. Additionally, the researchers' historical analysis revealed that July temperatures, as well as the temperature variability, for the affected region of western Russia showed no significant trend over the past 130 years. They note that the top 10 hottest July days for the region were distributed randomly across the historical period, although global averages do show clustering in the past 2 decades. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL046582, 2011)

  17. Development and Testing of a Refractory Millimeter-Wave Absorbent Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambot, Thomas; Myrabo, Leik; Murakami, David; Parkin, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Central to the Millimeter-Wave Thermal Launch System (MTLS) is the millimeter-wave absorbent heat exchanger. We have developed metallic and ceramic variants, with the key challenge being the millimeter-wave absorbent coatings for each. The ceramic heat exchanger came to fruition first, demonstrating for the first time 1800 K peak surface temperatures under illumination by a 110 GHz Gaussian beam. Absorption efficiencies of up to 80 are calculated for mullite heat exchanger tubes and up to 50 are calculated for alumina tubes. These are compared with estimates based on stratified layer and finite element analyses. The problem of how to connect the 1800 K end of the ceramic tubes to a graphite outlet manifold and nozzle is solved by press fitting, or by threading the ends of the ceramic tubes and screwing them into place. The problem of how to connect the ceramic tubes to a metallic or nylon inlet pipe is solved by using soft compliant PTFE and PVC tubes that accommodate thermal deformations of the ceramic tubes during startup and operation. We show the resulting heat exchangers in static tests using argon and helium as propellants.

  18. Effect of quantum correction on nonlinear thermal wave of electrons driven by laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafari, F.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2016-08-01

    In thermal interaction of laser pulse with a deuterium-tritium (DT) plane, the thermal waves of electrons are generated instantly. Since the thermal conductivity of electron is a nonlinear function of temperature, a nonlinear heat conduction equation is used to investigate the propagation of waves in solid DT. This paper presents a self-similar analytic solution for the nonlinear heat conduction equation in a planar geometry. The thickness of the target material is finite in numerical computation, and it is assumed that the laser energy is deposited at a finite initial thickness at the initial time which results in a finite temperature for electrons at initial time. Since the required temperature range for solid DT ignition is higher than the critical temperature which equals 35.9 eV, the effects of quantum correction in thermal conductivity should be considered. This letter investigates the effects of quantum correction on characteristic features of nonlinear thermal wave, including temperature, penetration depth, velocity, heat flux, and heating and cooling domains. Although this effect increases electron temperature and thermal flux, penetration depth and propagation velocity are smaller. This effect is also applied to re-evaluate the side-on laser ignition of uncompressed DT.

  19. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  20. Alpha Heating and TN Burn in NIF Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Merrill, Frank; Cerjan, Charlie; Batha, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Sustainable TN burn requires alpha-particle energy deposition in the hot fuel. Recently, we developed an analytic model to estimate the neutron yield generated by the alpha-particle energy deposited in the hot spot, in terms of the measured total neutron yield, the adiabat of the cold fuel and the peak implosion kinetic energy of the pusher. Our alpha heating model has been applied to a number of inertial confinement fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our model predictions are consistent with the post-shot calibrated code simulations and experimental data. We have also studied the uncertainty and sensitivities of alpha heating on various physics parameters, such as the adiabat of cold fuel, total neutron yield and peak implosion velocity. Our analysis demonstrates that the alpha particle heating was appreciable in only high-foot experiments. Based on our work, we will discuss paths and parameters to reach ignition at NIF (LA-UR-15-25507). This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  1. Interdecadal variations and trends of the Urban Heat Island in Athens (Greece) and its response to heat waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Founda, D.; Pierros, F.; Petrakis, M.; Zerefos, C.

    2015-07-01

    The study explores the interdecadal and seasonal variability of the urban heat island (UHI) intensity in the city of Athens. Daily air temperature data from a set of urban and surrounding non urban stations over the period 1970-2004 were used. Nighttime and daytime heat island revealed different characteristics as regards the mean amplitude, seasonal variability and temporal variation and trends. The difference of the annual mean air temperature between urban and rural stations exhibited a progressive statistically significant increase over the studied period, with rates equal to + 0.2 °C/decade. A gradual and constant increase of the daytime UHI intensity was detected, in contrast to the nighttime UHI intensity which increases only in summer, after the mid 1980s. UHI phenomenon was found to be related to higher increasing rates of hot days frequency at the urban stations. It was found that the interaction between heat waves and heat island in Athens, results to pronounced amplification of nocturnal UHI intensity under exceptionally hot weather.

  2. Similarity solution for a cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, J. P.; Nath, G.

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of shock waves in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux, which has a variable azimuthally fluid velocity together with a variable axial fluid velocity, is investigated. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-condition is maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston (or inner expanding surface). The fluid velocities in the ambient medium are assume to be vary and obey power laws. The density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant, the heat conduction is express in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. In order to obtain the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assume to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameter and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. The effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are also investigated.

  3. The Nonlinear Interaction Process in the Wave Assimilation Model and Its Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永增; 纪永刚; 袁业立

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a composite interaction formula based on the discrete-interactionoperator of wave-wave nonlinear interaction for deriving its adjoint source function in the wave assimilation model. Assimilation experiments were performed using the significant wave heights observed by the TOPES/POSEIDON satellite, and the gradient distribution in the physical space wasalso analyzed preliminarily.

  4. A low-frequency wave motion mechanism enables efficient energy transport in carbon nanotubes at high heat fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-07-11

    The great majority of investigations of thermal transport in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the open literature focus on low heat fluxes, that is, in the regime of validity of the Fourier heat conduction law. In this paper, by performing nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we investigated thermal transport in a single-walled CNT bridging two Si slabs under constant high heat flux. An anomalous wave-like kinetic energy profile was observed, and a previously unexplored, wave-dominated energy transport mechanism is identified for high heat fluxes in CNTs, originated from excited low frequency transverse acoustic waves. The transported energy, in terms of a one-dimensional low frequency mechanical wave, is quantified as a function of the total heat flux applied and is compared to the energy transported by traditional Fourier heat conduction. The results show that the low frequency wave actually overtakes traditional Fourier heat conduction and efficiently transports the energy at high heat flux. Our findings reveal an important new mechanism for high heat flux energy transport in low-dimensional nanostructures, such as one-dimensional (1-D) nanotubes and nanowires, which could be very relevant to high heat flux dissipation such as in micro/nanoelectronics applications.

  5. Air pollution during the 2003 European heat wave as seen by MOZAIC airliners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tressol

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an analysis of both MOZAIC profiles above Frankfurt and Lagrangian dispersion model simulations for the 2003 European heat wave. The comparison of MOZAIC measurements in summer 2003 with the 11-year MOZAIC climatology reflects strong temperature anomalies (exceeding 4°C throughout the lower troposphere. Higher positive anomalies of temperature and negative anomalies of both wind speed and relative humidity are found for the period defined here as the heat wave (2–14 August 2003, compared to the periods before (16–31 July 2003 and after (16–31 August 2003 the heat wave. In addition, Lagrangian model simulations in backward mode indicate the suppressed long-range transport in the mid- to lower troposphere and the enhanced southern origin of air masses for all tropospheric levels during the heat wave. Ozone and carbon monoxide also present strong anomalies (both ~+40 ppbv during the heat wave, with a maximum vertical extension reaching 6 km altitude around 11 August 2003. Pollution in the planetary boundary layer (PBL is enhanced during the day, with ozone mixing ratios two times higher than climatological values. This is due to a combination of factors, such as high temperature and radiation, stagnation of air masses and weak dry deposition, which favour the accumulation of ozone precursors and the build-up of ozone. A negligible role of a stratospheric-origin ozone tracer has been found for the lower troposphere in this study. From 29 July to 15 August 2003 forest fires burnt around 0.3×106 ha in Portugal and added to atmospheric pollution in Europe. Layers with enhanced CO and NOy mixing ratios, advected from Portugal, were crossed by the MOZAIC aircraft in the free troposphere over Frankfurt. A series of forward and backward Lagrangian model simulations have been performed to investigate the origin of anomalies during the whole heat wave. European anthropogenic emissions present the strongest

  6. Vortex Contribution to Specific Heat of Dirty $d$-Wave Superconductors: Breakdown of Scaling

    OpenAIRE

    Kuebert, C.; Hirschfeld, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the problem of the vortex contribution to thermal properties of dirty d-wave superconductors. In the clean limit, the main contribution to the density of states in a d-wave superconductor arises from extended quasiparticle states which may be treated semiclassically, giving rise to a specific heat contribution \\delta C(H)\\sim H^{1/2}. We show that the extended states continue to dominate the dirty limit, but lead to a H \\log H behavior at the lowest fields, H_{c1}\\ltsim H\\ll H_{c2...

  7. Evaluation of approaches for modeling temperature wave propagation in district heating pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielaitiene, I.; Bøhm, Benny; Sunden, B.

    2008-01-01

    The limitations of a pseudo-transient approach for modeling temperature wave propagation in district heating pipes were investigated by comparing numerical predictions with experimental data. The performance of two approaches, namely a pseudo-transient approach implemented in the finite element...... code ANSYS and a node method, was examined for a low turbulent Reynolds number regime and small velocity fluctuations. Both approaches are found to have limitations in predicting the temperature response time and predicting the peak values of the temperature wave, which is further hampered by the fact...... to be given to the detailed modeling of the turbulent flow characteristics....

  8. HTGR nuclear heat source component design and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peinado, C.O.; Wunderlich, R.G.; Simon, W.A.

    1982-05-01

    The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) nuclear heat source components have been under design and development since the mid-1950's. Two power plants have been designed, constructed, and operated: the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station and the Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. Recently, development has focused on the primary system components for a 2240-MW(t) steam cycle HTGR capable of generating about 900 MW(e) electric power or alternately producing high-grade steam and cogenerating electric power. These components include the steam generators, core auxiliary heat exchangers, primary and auxiliary circulators, reactor internals, and thermal barrier system. A discussion of the design and operating experience of these components is included.

  9. Using NASA Earth Science Datasets for National Climate Assessment Indicators: Urban Impacts of Heat Waves Associated with Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoff, N.; Weber, S.; Zell, E. R.; de Sherbinin, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate-induced heat waves have been increasing globally in the past 5-10 years and are projected to continue increasing throughout the 21st century. In urban areas, heat waves are exacerbated by the non-climate stressor of urban heat islands (UHIs). The vulnerability of a city's population to heat waves reflects exposure to extreme heat events, sensitivity of the population to impacts, such as adverse health effects, and adaptive capacity to prepare for and respond to heat waves. Socially and economically vulnerable populations are especially at risk to the impacts of heat waves, due to increasing energy costs, air pollution, and heat-related illness and mortality. NASA earth science datasets, combined with socioeconomic data, can be used to create indicators that characterize vulnerability to urban heat events and address the effectiveness of adaptation measures designed to reduce local temperatures. The indicator development process should include engagement from local stakeholders and end users from the onset to ensure local relevance and, ultimately, indicator uptake and sustainability. This presentation will explore the process of working with urban stakeholders in Philadelphia to develop a set of policy-relevant, interdisciplinary vulnerability indicators focused on extreme heat events in urban areas. Ambient and land surface temperature, land cover classifications, NDVI, and US Census data are used to create a basket of indicators that reflect urban heat wave duration and intensity, UHI exposure, socioeconomic vulnerability, and adaptation effectiveness. These indicators can be assessed at the city level and also comparatively among different parts of a city to help quantify and track heat wave impacts on vulnerable populations and the effectiveness of adaptation measures.

  10. Possibilities of Diagnosing Mesospheric Dust Layers During Ionospheric Heating Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Wayne; Mahmoudian, Alireza

    2012-07-01

    Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in understanding physical processes associated with heating mesospheric dust layers with high power radiowaves. The principal signature associated with this heating, which increases the electron temperature, is the modulation of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes PMSEs which are strong radar echoes from electron irregularities due to the presence of the charged dust layer. Particularly important is the modulation of PMSE strength during the periods after the turn-on and turn-off of the radiowave heating. Such periods have been proposed to provide significant diagnostic information about the dust layer and have lead to this being a vigorous field of investigation. At this time, several computational models have been developed that can reproduce important aspects of the temporal behavior during the experiments, however, a key objective to furthering experimental progress is to continue to develop strategies to obtain critical diagnostic information on the dust layer. The focus of this talk is to present simplified analytical models that 1) elucidate the fundamental dusty plasma physics of the processes during the turn-on and turn-off of radiowave heating and 2) are much more amenable to directly providing diagnostic information on the dust layer than the complicated computational models of the past. During the first part of the presentation, the formulation and application of the simplified models are discussed. It is then shown that using a multi-frequency experimental measurement is expected to provide enough observables to determine critical diagnostic information on the dust layer such as the dust density altitude profile, average charge state, and electron temperature in the heated volume.

  11. Changes in the Intensity and Frequency of Atmospheric Blocking and Associated Heat Waves During Northern Summer Over Eurasia in the CMIP5 Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lau, K. M.; Wu, H. T.; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Cho, Chunho

    2012-01-01

    The Russia heat wave and wild fires of the summer of 2010 was the most extreme weather event in the history of the country. Studies show that the root cause of the 2010 Russia heat wave/wild fires was an atmospheric blocking event which started to develop at the end of June and peaked around late July and early August. Atmospheric blocking in the summer of 2010 was anomalous in terms of the size, duration, and the location, which shifted to the east from the normal location. This and other similar continental scale severe summertime heat waves and blocking events in recent years have raised the question of whether such events are occurring more frequently and with higher intensity in a warmer climate induced by greenhouse gases. We studied the spatial and temporal distributions of the occurrence and intensity of atmospheric blocking and associated heat waves for northern summer over Eurasia based on CMIPS model simulations. To examine the global warming induced change of atmospheric blocking and heat waves, experiments for a high emissions scenario (RCP8.S) and a medium mitigation scenario (RCP4.S) are compared to the 20th century simulations (historical). Most models simulate the mean distributions of blockings reasonably well, including major blocking centers over Eurasia, northern Pacific, and northern Atlantic. However, the models tend to underestimate the number of blockings compared to MERRA and NCEPIDOE reanalysis, especially in western Siberia. Models also reproduced associated heat waves in terms of the shifting in the probability distribution function of near surface temperature. Seven out of eight models used in this study show that the frequency of atmospheric blocking over the Europe will likely decrease in a warmer climate, but slightly increase over the western Siberia. This spatial pattern resembles the blocking in the summer of 2010, indicating the possibility of more frequent occurrences of heat waves in western Siberia. In this talk, we will also

  12. Excitation of Alfvén waves by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere, with application to FAST observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kolesnikova

    Full Text Available During the operation of the EISCAT high power facility (heater at Tromsø, Norway, on 8 October 1998, the FAST spacecraft made electric field and particle observations in the inner magnetosphere at 0.39 Earth radii above the heated ionospheric region. Measurements of the direct current electric field clearly exhibit oscillations with a frequency close to the modulated frequency of heater ( ~ 3 Hz and an amplitude of ~ 2 - 5 mV m-1. Thermal electron data from the electrostatic analyser show the modulation at the same frequency of the downward electron fluxes. During this period the EISCAT UHF incoherent scatter radar, sited also at Tromsø, measured a significant enhancement of the electron density in E-layer up to 2 · 1012 m-3. These observations have prompted us to make quantitative estimates of the expected pulsations in the inner magnetosphere caused by the modulated HF heating of lower ionosphere. Under the conditions of the strong electron precipitation in the ionosphere, which took place during the FAST observations, the primary current caused by the perturbation of the conductivity in the heated region is closed entirely by the parallel current which leaks into the magnetosphere. In such circumstances the conditions at the ionosphere-magnetosphere boundary are most favourable for the launching of an Alfvén wave: it is launched from the node in the gradient of the scalar potential which is proportional to the parallel current. The parallel electric field of the Alfvén wave is significant in the region where the electron inertial length is of order of the transverse wavelength of the Alfvén wave or larger and may effectively accelerate superthermal electrons downward into the ionosphere.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; ionosphere – magnetosphere interactions; particle acceleration

  13. Microwave pre-heating of natural rubber using a rectangular wave guide (MODE: TE10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo-ngam, N.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of microwave radiation for pre-heating of natural rubbercompounding with various sulphur contents. The natural rubber-compounding was pre-heated by microwave radiation using a rectangular wave guide system (MODE: TE10 operating at frequency of 2.45 GHz in which the power can vary from 0 to 1500 W. In the present work, the influence of power input, sample thickness, and sulphur content were examined after applying microwave radiation to the rubber samples. Results are discussed regarding the thermal properties, 3-D network, dielectric properties and chemical structures. From the result, firstly, it was found that microwave radiation can be applied to pre-heating natural rubber-compounding before the vulcanization process. Secondly, microwave radiation was very useful for pre-heating natural rubber-compounding that has a thickness greater than 5mm. Thirdly, crosslinking in natural rubber-compounding may occurs after pre-heating by microwave radiation though Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy(FTIR. Finally, there a little effect of sulphur content on temperature profiles after applying microwave radiation to the natural rubber-compounding. Moreover, natural rubber-compounding without carbon black showed a lower heat absorption compared with natural rubbercompounding filled carbon black. This is due to the difference in dielectric loss factor. This preliminary result will be useful information in terms of microwave radiation for pre-heating natural rubber-compounding and rubber processing in industry.

  14. Lava-substrate heat transfer: Laboratory experiments and thermodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C. W.; Wright, R.; Crawford, I.

    2012-12-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to investigate the heat transfer from a lava flow into various substrate materials, focusing on the effects of the differing thermophysical properties of substrate materials. Initial motivation for this project developed from the desire to understand the loss of solar wind volatiles embedded in lunar regolith deposits that were subsequently covered by a lava flow. The Moon lacks a significant atmosphere and magnetosphere, leaving the surface regolith exposed to bombardment by solar flare and solar wind particles, and by the cosmogenic products of galactic cosmic rays. Preservation of particle-rich regolith deposits may have occurred by the emplacement of an active lava flow on top of the regolith layer, provided the embedded particles survive heating by the lava. During future expeditions to the lunar surface, ancient regolith deposits could be sampled through surface drilling to extract the extra-lunar particles, revealing a history of the solar activity and galactic events not available on the Earth. This project also has important implications for terrestrial lava flows, particularly in the prediction of lava flow hazards. Lava erupted on Earth may be emplaced on various substrates, including solid lava rock, volcanic tephra, sands, soils, etc. The composition, grain size, consolidation, moisture content, etc. of these materials will vary greatly and have different effects on the cooling of the flow. Accounting for specific properties of the substrate could be an important improvement in lava flow models We have performed laboratory experiments in collaboration with the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in which ~5-6 kg of basalt, collected at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is melted to ~1200 °C. The lava is poured into a device constructed of calcium silicate sheeting that has been filled with a solid or particulate substrate material and embedded with thermocouples

  15. Shock-Wave Heating Model for Chondrule Formation: Prevention of Isotopic Fractionation

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, H; Miura, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2006-01-01

    Chondrules are considered to have much information on dust particles and processes in the solar nebula. It is naturally expected that protoplanetary disks observed in present star forming regions have similar dust particles and processes, so study of chondrule formation may provide us great information on the formation of the planetary systems. Evaporation during chondrule melting may have resulted in depletion of volatile elements in chondrules. However, no evidence for a large degree of heavy-isotope enrichment has been reported in chondrules. In order to meet this observed constraint, the rapid heating rate at temperatures below the silicate solidus is required to suppress the isotopic fractionation. We have developed a new shock-wave heating model taking into account the radiative transfer of the dust thermal continuum emission and the line emission of gas molecules and calculated the thermal history of chondrules. We have found that optically-thin shock waves for the thermal continuum emission from dust ...

  16. Genome-wide evolutionary response to a heat wave in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Trelles, Francisco; Tarrío, Rosa; Santos, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Extreme climatic events can substantially affect organismal performance and Darwinian fitness. In April 2011, a strong heat wave struck extensive geographical areas of the world, including Western Europe. At that time, we happened to resume and extend a long-term time series of seasonal genetic data in the widespread fly Drosophila subobscura, which provided a unique opportunity to quantify the intensity of the genetic perturbation caused by the heat wave. We show that the spring 2011 genetic constitution of the populations transiently shifted to summer-like frequencies, and that the magnitude of the genetic anomaly quantitatively matched the temperature anomaly. The results provide compelling evidence that direct effects of rising temperature are driving adaptive evolutionary shifts, and also suggest a strong genetic resilience in this species. PMID:23740296

  17. The role of Ekman flow and planetary waves in the oceanic cross-equatorial heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical model is used to mechanistically simulate the oceans' seasonal cross-equatorial heat transport. The basic process of Ekman pumping and drift is able to account for a large amount of the cross-equatorial flux. Increased easterly wind stress in the winter hemisphere causes Ekman surface drift poleward, while decreased easterly stress allows a reduction in the poleward drift in the summer hemisphere. The addition of planetary and gravity waves to this model does not alter the net cross-equatorial flow, although the planetary waves are clearly seen. On comparison with Oort and Vonder Haar (1976), this adiabatic advective redistribution of heat is seen to be plausible up to 10-20 deg N, beyond which other dynamics and thermodynamics are indicated.

  18. Generation of Non-Inductive H-Mode Plasmas with 30 MHz Fast Wave Heating in NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Hosea, J. C.; Mueller, D.; Perkins, R. J.; Poli, F. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Raman, R.

    2016-10-01

    A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility based on a spherical tokamak must generate the plasma current (Ip) with little or no central solenoid field. The NSTX-U non-inductive (NI) plasma research program is addressing this goal by developing NI start-up, ramp-up and sustainment scenarios separately. 4 MW of 30 MHz fast wave power is predicted to ramp Ip to 400 kA, a level sufficient to avoid significant shine-through of 90 keV ions from neutral beam injection. In 2010, experiments in NSTX demonstrated that 1.4 MW of 30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power could generate an Ip = 300 kA H-mode discharge with a NI Ip fraction, fNI, around 0.7 at the maximum axial toroidal field (BT(0)) in NSTX of 0.55 T. NSTX-U is a major upgrade of NSTX that will eventually allow the generation of plasmas with BT(0) up to 1 T. Full wave simulations of 30 MHz HHFW heating in NSTX-U predict reduced FW power loss in the plasma edge as BT(0) is increased. HHFW experiments this year aim to couple 3 - 4 MW of 30 MHz HHFW power into an Ip = 250 - 350 kA plasma with BT(0) up to 0.75 T to generate a fNI = 1 H-mode plasma. These experiments should benefit from the improved fast wave coupling predicted at higher BT(0) in NSTX-U. Work supported by USDOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  19. An experiment in heat conduction using hollow cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortuno, M; Marquez, A; Gallego, S; Neipp, C; Belendez, A, E-mail: a.belendez@ua.es [Departamento de Fisica, IngenierIa de Sistemas y TeorIa de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    An experimental apparatus was designed and built to allow students to carry out heat conduction experiments in hollow cylinders made of different materials, as well as to determine the thermal conductivity of these materials. The evolution of the temperature difference between the inner and outer walls of the cylinder as a function of time is analysed, and when the process reaches the steady state regime the thermal conductivity can be easily calculated. Several materials such as wood, plastic and metals are considered and the values of their thermal conductivities, obtained experimentally, are compared with those given in the reference list.

  20. Computational exploration of wave propagation and heating from transcranial focused ultrasound for neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jerel K.; Ai, Leo; Bansal, Priya; Legon, Wynn

    2016-10-01

    Objective. While ultrasound is largely established for use in diagnostic imaging, its application for neuromodulation is relatively new and crudely understood. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of tissue properties and geometry on the wave propagation and heating in the context of transcranial neuromodulation. Approach. A computational model of transcranial-focused ultrasound was constructed and validated against empirical data. The models were then incrementally extended to investigate a number of issues related to the use of ultrasound for neuromodulation, including the effect on wave propagation of variations in geometry of skull and gyral anatomy as well as the effect of multiple tissue and media layers, including scalp, skull, CSF, and gray/white matter. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was run to characterize the influence of acoustic properties of intracranial tissues. Finally, the heating associated with ultrasonic stimulation waveforms designed for neuromodulation was modeled. Main results. The wave propagation of a transcranially focused ultrasound beam is significantly influenced by the cranial domain. The half maximum acoustic beam intensity profiles are insensitive overall to small changes in material properties, though the inclusion of sulci in models results in greater peak intensity values compared to a model without sulci (1%-30% greater). Finally, heating using currently employed stimulation parameters in humans is highest in bone (0.16 °C) and is negligible in brain (4.27 × 10-3 °C) for a 0.5 s exposure. Significance. Ultrasound for noninvasive neuromodulation holds great promise and appeal for its non-invasiveness, high spatial resolution and deep focal lengths. Here we show gross brain anatomy and biological material properties to have limited effect on ultrasound wave propagation and to result in safe heating levels in the skull and brain.

  1. The spatial distribution of health vulnerability to heat waves in Guangdong Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: International literature has illustrated that the health impacts of heat waves vary according to differences in the spatial variability of high temperatures and the social and economic characteristics of populations and communities. However, to date there have been few studies that quantitatively assess the health vulnerability to heat waves in China. Objectives: To assess the spatial distribution of health vulnerability to heat waves in Guangdong Province, China. Methods: A vulnerability framework including dimensions of exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity was employed. The last two dimensions were called social vulnerability. An indicator pool was proposed with reference to relevant literatures, local context provided by relevant local stakeholder experts, and data availability. An analytic hierarchy process (AHP and a principal component analysis were used to determine the weight of indicators. A multiplicative vulnerability index (VI was constructed for each district/county of Guangdong province, China. Results: A total of 13 items (two for exposure, six for sensitivity, and five for adaptive capacity were proposed to assess vulnerability. The results of an AHP revealed that the average VI in Guangdong Province was 0.26 with the highest in the Lianzhou and Liannan counties of Qingyuan (VI=0.50 and the lowest in the Yantian district of Shenzhen (VI=0.08. Vulnerability was gradiently distributed with higher levels in northern inland regions and lower levels in southern coastal regions. In the principal component analysis, three components were isolated from the 11 social vulnerability indicators. The estimated vulnerability had a similar distribution pattern with that estimated by AHP (Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC=0.98, p<0.01. Conclusions: Health vulnerability to heat waves in Guangdong Province had a distinct spatial distribution, with higher levels in northern inland regions than that in the southern coastal

  2. Orion EFT-1 Cavity Heating Tile Experiments and Environment Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Oliver, Brandon; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Developing aerothermodynamic environments for deep cavities, such as those produced by micrometeoroids and orbital debris impacts, poses a great challenge for engineers. In order to assess existing cavity heating models, two one-inch diameter cavities were flown on the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). These cavities were manufactured with depths of 1.0 in and 1.4 in, and they were both instrumented. Instrumentation included surface thermocouples upstream, downstream and within the cavities, and additional thermocouples at the TPS-structure interface. This paper will present the data obtained, and comparisons with computational predictions will be shown. Additionally, the development of a 3D material thermal model will be described, which will be used to account for the three-dimensionality of the problem when interpreting the data. Furthermore, using a multi-dimensional inverse heat conduction approach, a reconstruction of a time- and space-dependent flight heating distribution during EFT1 will be presented. Additional discussions will focus on instrumentation challenges and calibration techniques specific to these experiments. The analysis shown will highlight the accuracies and/or deficiencies of current computational techniques to model cavity flows during hypersonic re-entry.

  3. Russia Browning: The 2010 Heat Wave Was Not an Isolated Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. K.; de Beurs, K. M.; Henebry, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    Record-high temperatures and wildfires eliminated nearly a third of Russia's 2010 wheat crop. Similar crop losses in Ukraine and Kazakhstan, combined with a Russian export ban, roiled international grain markets. Here we show that the 2010 crop failures were not isolated events, but rather the continuation of a decade-long browning trend across much of the Eurasian "breadbasket". Over the period 2001-2010, we find that nearly 40% of the Eurasian wheat belt (EWB) exhibited significant negative trends in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The height of the Russian heat wave was caused by severe atmospheric blocking during July and August of 2010. However, we find highly negative NDVI anomalies during the early growing season preceding the onset of atmospheric blocking; suggesting that land surface feedbacks linked to early season drying amplified the blocking event's severity and duration. The unusually warm and dry early growing season preceding the heat wave was consistent with the highly negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) which emerged in 2009/2010. We also find an empirical link between the NAO's recent downward trend and browning of the EWB. Recent evidence that receding Arctic sea ice is forcing a downward trend in the NAO suggests the possibility that global climate change played a role in the Russian heat wave. Food security models predicting that the EWB will contribute an increasing share of global wheat production due to climate-change effects including longer growing seasons and warmer winters may be unrealistic given observed trends.

  4. Gravity Wave and Turbulence Transport of Heat and Na in the Mesopause Region over the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yafang; Liu, Alan Z.

    2016-07-01

    The vertical heat and Na fluxes induced by gravity waves and turbulence are derived based on over 600 hours of observations from the Na wind/temperature lidar located at Andes lidar Observatory (ALO), Cerro Pachón, Chile. In the 85-100 km region, the annual mean vertical fluxes by gravity waves show downward heat transport with a maximum of 0.78K m/s at 90 km, and downward Na transport with a maximum of 210 m/s/cm3 at 94km. The maximum cooing rate reaches -24 K/d at 94km. The vertical fluxes have strong seasonal variations, with large differences in magnitudes and altitudes of maximum fluxes between winter and summer. The vertical fluxes due to turbulence eddies are also derived with a novel method that relates turbulence fluctuations of temperature and vertical wind with photon count fluctuations at very high resolution (25 m, 6 s). The results show that the vertical transports are comparable to those by gravity waves and they both play significant roles in the atmospheric thermal structure and constituent distribution. This direct measure of turbulence transport also enables estimate of the eddy diffusivity for heat and constituent in the mesopause region.

  5. Climate extremes and climate change: The Russian heat wave and other climate extremes of 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Fasullo, John T.

    2012-09-01

    A global perspective is developed on a number of high impact climate extremes in 2010 through diagnostic studies of the anomalies, diabatic heating, and global energy and water cycles that demonstrate relationships among variables and across events. Natural variability, especially ENSO, and global warming from human influences together resulted in very high sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in several places that played a vital role in subsequent developments. Record high SSTs in the Northern Indian Ocean in May 2010, the Gulf of Mexico in August 2010, the Caribbean in September 2010, and north of Australia in December 2010 provided a source of unusually abundant atmospheric moisture for nearby monsoon rains and flooding in Pakistan, Colombia, and Queensland. The resulting anomalous diabatic heating in the northern Indian and tropical Atlantic Oceans altered the atmospheric circulation by forcing quasi-stationary Rossby waves and altering monsoons. The anomalous monsoonal circulations had direct links to higher latitudes: from Southeast Asia to southern Russia, and from Colombia to Brazil. Strong convection in the tropical Atlantic in northern summer 2010 was associated with a Rossby wave train that extended into Europe creating anomalous cyclonic conditions over the Mediterranean area while normal anticyclonic conditions shifted downstream where they likely interacted with an anomalously strong monsoon circulation, helping to support the persistent atmospheric anticyclonic regime over Russia. This set the stage for the "blocking" anticyclone and associated Russian heat wave and wild fires. Attribution is limited by shortcomings in models in replicating monsoons, teleconnections and blocking.

  6. Effect of heat waves on VOC emissions from vegetation and urban air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churkina, G.; Kuik, F.; Lauer, A.; Bonn, B.; Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Programs to plant millions of trees in cities around the world aim at the reduction of summer temperatures, increase carbon storage, storm water control, provision of space for recreation, as well as poverty alleviation. Although these multiple benefits speak positively for urban greening programs, the programs do not take into account how close human and natural systems are coupled in urban areas. Elevated temperatures together with anthropogenic emissions of air and water pollutants distinguish the urban system. Urban and sub-urban vegetation responds to ambient changes and reacts with pollutants. Neglecting this coupling may lead to unforeseen drawbacks of urban greening programs. The potential for emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vegetation combined with anthropogenic emissions to produce ozone has long been recognized. This potential increases under rising temperatures. Here we investigate how heat waves affect emissions of VOC from urban vegetation and corresponding ground-level ozone. In this study we use Weather Research and Forecasting Model with coupled atmospheric chemistry (WRF-CHEM) to quantify these feedbacks in Berlin, Germany during the 2006 heat wave. VOC emissions from vegetation are simulated with MEGAN 2.0 coupled with WRF-CHEM. Our preliminary results indicate that contribution of VOCs from vegetation to ozone formation may increase by more than twofold during the heat wave period. We highlight the importance of the vegetation for urban areas under changing climate and discuss associated tradeoffs.

  7. HEATING OF THE PARTIALLY IONIZED SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE BY WAVES IN MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelyag, S.; Przybylski, D. [Department of Mathematics and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Khomenko, E.; Vicente, A. de, E-mail: shelyag@gmail.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205, C/Vía Láctea, s/n, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we show a “proof of concept” of the heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere due to wave dissipation caused by the effects of partial ionization. Numerical modeling of non-linear wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube, embedded in the solar atmosphere, is performed by solving a system of single-fluid quasi-MHD equations, which take into account the ambipolar term from the generalized Ohm’s law. It is shown that perturbations caused by magnetic waves can be effectively dissipated due to ambipolar diffusion. The energy input by this mechanism is continuous and shown to be more efficient than dissipation of static currents, ultimately leading to chromospheric temperature increase in magnetic structures.

  8. Heating of the partially ionized solar chromosphere by waves in magnetic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Shelyag, S; de Vicente, A; Przybylski, D

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show a "proof of concept" of the heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere due to wave dissipation caused by the effects of partial ionization. Numerical modeling of non-linear wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube, embedded in the solar atmosphere, is performed by solving a system of single-fluid quasi-MHD equations, which take into account the ambipolar term from the generalized Ohm's law. It is shown that perturbations caused by magnetic waves can be effectively dissipated due to ambipolar diffusion. The energy input by this mechanism is continuous and shown to be more efficient than dissipation of static currents, ultimately leading to chromospheric temperature increase in magnetic structures.

  9. The operation of stochastic heating mechanisms in an electromagnetic standing wave configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, Y.; Nakach, R.

    1991-10-01

    The possibility of the operation of stochastic heating mechanisms of charged particles in a configuration consisting of a left-handed circularly polarized standing electromagnetic wave and a uniform magnetic field, has been studied numerically and theoretically. It is found that such a configuration induces stochasticity, the threshold of which is dependent on two independent parameters, determined by the frequency and the amplitude of the wave and the strength of the magnetic field. From the theoretical analysis, it emerges that the origin of onset of large scale stochasticity is the destabilization of fixed points associated with an equation describing the motion of the particles in an electrostatic-type potential having standing wave characteristics. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with the numerical results is found to be quite satisfactory. Possible applications to realistic plasmas have been discussed.

  10. Axisymmetry Breaking to Travelling Waves in the Cylinder with Partially Heated Sidewall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Dong-Jun; SUN De-Jun; YIN Xie-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    The transition from an axisymmetric stationary now to three-dimensional time-dependent Hows is carefully studied in a vertical cylinder partially heated from the side, with the aspect ratio A = 2 and Prandtl number Pr = 0.021. The now develops from the steady toroidal pattern beyond the first instability threshold, breaks the axisymmetric state at a Rayleigh number near 2000, and transits to standing or travelling azirnuthal waves. A new result is observed that a slightly unstable now pattern of standing waves exists and will transit to stable travelling waves after a long time evolution. The onset of oscillations is associated with a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in a system with O(2) symmetry.

  11. Step density waves on growing vicinal crystal surfaces - Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranguelov, Bogdan; Müller, Pierre; Metois, Jean-Jacques; Stoyanov, Stoyan

    2017-01-01

    The Burton, Cabrera and Frank (BCF) theory plays a key conceptual role in understanding and modeling the crystal growth of vicinal surfaces. In BCF theory the adatom concentration on a vicinal surface obeys to a diffusion equation, generally solved within quasi-static approximation where the adatom concentration at a given distance x from a step has a steady state value n (x) . Recently, we show that going beyond this approximation (Ranguelov and Stoyanov, 2007) [6], for fast surface diffusion and slow attachment/detachment kinetics of adatoms at the steps, a train of fast-moving steps is unstable against the formation of steps density waves. More precisely, the step density waves are generated if the step velocity exceeds a critical value related to the strength of the step-step repulsion. This theoretical treatment corresponds to the case when the time to reach a steady state concentration of adatoms on a given terrace is comparable to the time for a non-negligible change of the step configuration leading to a terrace adatom concentration n (x , t) that depends not only on the terrace width, but also on its "past width". This formation of step density waves originates from the high velocity of step motion and has nothing to do with usual kinetic instabilities of step bunching induced by Ehrlich-Schwoebel effect, surface electromigration and/or the impact of impurities on the step rate. The so-predicted formation of step density waves is illustrated by numerical integration of the equations for step motion. In order to complete our previous theoretical treatment of the non-stationary BCF problem, we perform an in-situ reflection electron microscopy experiment at specific temperature interval and direction of the heating current, in which, for the first time, the step density waves instability is evidenced on Si(111) surface during highest possible Si adatoms deposition rates.

  12. The impact of temperature on mortality in a subtropical city: effects of cold, heat, and heat waves in São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ji-Young; Gouveia, Nelson; Bravo, Mercedes A.; de Freitas, Clarice Umbelino; Bell, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how weather impacts health is critical, especially under a changing climate; however, relatively few studies have investigated subtropical regions. We examined how mortality in São Paulo, Brazil, is affected by cold, heat, and heat waves over 14.5 years (1996-2010). We used over-dispersed generalized linear modeling to estimate heat- and cold-related mortality, and Bayesian hierarchical modeling to estimate overall effects and modification by heat wave characteristics (intensity, duration, and timing in season). Stratified analyses were performed by cause of death and individual characteristics (sex, age, education, marital status, and place of death). Cold effects on mortality appeared higher than heat effects in this subtropical city with moderate climatic conditions. Heat was associated with respiratory mortality and cold with cardiovascular mortality. Risk of total mortality was 6.1 % (95 % confidence interval 4.7, 7.6 %) higher at the 99th percentile of temperature than the 90th percentile (heat effect) and 8.6 % (6.2, 11.1 %) higher at the 1st compared to the 10th percentile (cold effect). Risks were higher for females and those with no education for heat effect, and males for cold effect. Older persons, widows, and non-hospital deaths had higher mortality risks for heat and cold. Mortality during heat waves was higher than on non-heat wave days for total, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality. Our findings indicate that mortality in São Paulo is associated with both cold and heat and that some subpopulations are more vulnerable.

  13. Propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a rotating dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, J. P.; Nath, G.

    2010-04-01

    A self-similar solution for the propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux, which is rotating about the axis of symmetry, is investigated. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a piston (an inner expanding surface) and the dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles. The density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and radiation is considered to be of diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. Similarity solutions are obtained, and the effects of variation of the parameter of non-idealness of the gas in the mixture, the mass concentration of solid particles and the ratio of density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas are investigated.

  14. Fast- and slow-wave heating of ion cyclotron range of frequencies in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutoh, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T. [and others

    2000-11-01

    Wave-heating at the fundamental ion-cyclotron frequency was applied to a hydrogen plasma in the Large Helical Device (LHD) over a range of plasma densities from 0.2-8x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}. Substantial heating was observed for all densities. In the low-density plasma (less than 0.4x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) ion-cyclotron-wave (shear Alfven wave) heating was effective. For high-density plasmas, a fast-wave should be excited, and in this case also, effective heating was observed with the presence of the NBI beam component. The wave damping mechanism may be attributed to the finite gyro-radius effect on beam ions by the right-handed polarized wave. The experimental results were compared with an analysis using the full-wave code. The heating performance was a little worse than that of the usual two-ion hybrid-heating mode. (author)

  15. An experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces for thermal radiation in cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-07-01

    In cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors, one of the most important issues is the fast cooling of their mirrors and keeping them cool during operation to reduce thermal noise. For this purpose, the correct estimation of thermal-radiation heat transfer through the pipe-shaped radiation shield is vital to reduce the heat load on the mirrors. However, the amount of radiation heat transfer strongly depends on whether the surfaces reflect radiation rays diffusely or specularly. Here, we propose an original experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces. This experiment has clearly shown that the examined diamond-like carbon-coated surface is specular. This result emphasizes the importance of suppressing the specular reflection of radiation in the pipe-shaped shield.

  16. Heat transfer and wall temperature effects in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, M.; Asproulias, I.; Larsson, J.; Pirozzoli, S.; Grasso, F.

    2016-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of the wall temperature on the behavior of oblique shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions at free-stream Mach number 2.28 and shock angle of the wedge generator φ =8∘ . Five values of the wall-to-recovery-temperature ratio (Tw/Tr ) are considered, corresponding to cold, adiabatic, and hot wall thermal conditions. We show that the main effect of cooling is to decrease the characteristic scales of the interaction in terms of upstream influence and extent of the separation bubble. The opposite behavior is observed in the case of heating, which produces a marked dilatation of the interaction region. The distribution of the Stanton number shows that a strong amplification of the heat transfer occurs across the interaction, with the maximum thermal and dynamic loads found for the case of the cold wall. The analysis reveals that the fluctuating heat flux exhibits a strong intermittent behavior, characterized by scattered spots with extremely high values compared to the mean. Furthermore, the analogy between momentum and heat transfer, typical of compressible, wall-bounded, equilibrium turbulent flows, does not apply for most of the interaction domain. The premultiplied spectra of the wall heat flux do not show any evidence of the influence of the low-frequency shock motion, and the primary mechanism for the generation of peak heating is found to be linked with the turbulence amplification in the interaction region.

  17. X-ray analysis of electron Bernstein wave heating in MST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzman, A. H.; Anderson, J. K.; DuBois, A. M.; Almagri, A.; Forest, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    A pulse height analyzing x-ray tomography system has been developed to detect x-rays from electron Bernstein wave heated electrons in the Madison symmetric torus reversed field pinch (RFP). Cadmium zinc telluride detectors are arranged in a parallel beam array with two orthogonal multi-chord detectors that may be used for tomography. In addition a repositionable 16 channel fan beam camera with a 55° field of view is used to augment data collected with the Hard X-ray array. The chord integrated signals identify target emission from RF heated electrons striking a limiter located 12° toroidally away from the RF injection port. This provides information on heated electron spectrum, transport, and diffusion. RF induced x-ray emission from absorption on harmonic electron cyclotron resonances in low current (<250 kA) RFP discharges has been observed.

  18. X-ray analysis of electron Bernstein wave heating in MST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seltzman, A. H., E-mail: seltzman@wisc.edu; Anderson, J. K.; DuBois, A. M.; Almagri, A.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A pulse height analyzing x-ray tomography system has been developed to detect x-rays from electron Bernstein wave heated electrons in the Madison symmetric torus reversed field pinch (RFP). Cadmium zinc telluride detectors are arranged in a parallel beam array with two orthogonal multi-chord detectors that may be used for tomography. In addition a repositionable 16 channel fan beam camera with a 55° field of view is used to augment data collected with the Hard X-ray array. The chord integrated signals identify target emission from RF heated electrons striking a limiter located 12° toroidally away from the RF injection port. This provides information on heated electron spectrum, transport, and diffusion. RF induced x-ray emission from absorption on harmonic electron cyclotron resonances in low current (<250 kA) RFP discharges has been observed.

  19. Strong-Coupling Properties of a p-Wave Interacting Fermi Gas on the Viewpoint of Specific Heat at Constant Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inotani, Daisuke; van Wyk, Pieter; Ohashi, Yoji

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically investigate the specific heat CV at constant volume in the normal state of a p-wave interacting Fermi gas. Including fluctuations in the p-wave Cooper channel within the framework of the strong-coupling theory developed by Nozières and Schmitt-Rink, we clarify how CV as a function of temperature varies, as one moves from the weak-coupling regime to the strong-coupling limit. In the weak-coupling regime, CV is shown to be enhanced by p-wave pairing fluctuations, near the superfluid phase transition temperature Tc. Similar enhancement of CV(T ≃ Tc) is also obtained in the strong-coupling regime, which, however, reflects that system is close an ideal Bose gas of p-wave two-body bound molecules. Using these results, we classify the normal state into (1) the normal Fermi gas regime, (2) the p-wave molecular Bose gas regime, and (3) the region between the two, where p-wave pairing fluctuations are dominant. Since the current experiments can only access the normal phase of a p-wave interacting Fermi gas, our results would be useful for experiments to understand strong-coupling properties of this Fermi system above Tc.

  20. Comparative Calculation of Heat Exchange with the Ground in Residential Building Including Periodes of Heat Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staszczuk Anna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides verification of 3D transient ground-coupled model to calculation of heat exchange between ground and typical one-storey, passive residential building. The model was performed with computer software WUFI®plus and carried out to estimate the indoor air temperatures during extending hot weather periods. For verifying the results of calculations performed by the WUFI®plus software, the most recent version of EnergyPlus software version was used. Comparison analysis of calculation results obtained with the two above mentioned calculation method was made for two scenarios of slab on ground constructions: without thermal insulation and with thermal insulation under the whole slab area. Comprehensive statistical analysis was done including time series analysis and descriptive statistics parameters.

  1. Global assessment of heat wave magnitudes from 1901 to 2010 and implications for the river discharge of the Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Matteo; Russo, Simone; di Sabatino, Silvana; Michetti, Melania; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Gualdi, Silvio

    2016-11-15

    Heat waves represent one of the most significant climatic stressors for ecosystems, economies and societies. A main topic of debate is whether they have increased or not in intensity and/or their duration due to the observed climate change. Firstly, this is because of the lack of reliable long-term daily temperature data at the global scale; secondly, because of the intermittent nature of such phenomena. Long datasets are required to produce a reliable and meaningful assessment. In this study, we provide a global estimate of heat wave magnitudes based on the three most appropriate datasets currently available, derived from models and observations (i.e. the 20th Century Reanalyses from NOAA and ECMWF), spanning the last century and before. The magnitude of the heat waves is calculated by means of the Heat Wave Magnitude Index daily (HWMId), taking into account both duration and amplitude. We compare the magnitude of the most severe heat waves occurred across different regions of the world and we discuss the decadal variability of the larger events since the 1850s. We concentrate our analysis from 1901 onwards, where all datasets overlap. Our results agree with other studies focusing on heat waves that have occurred in the recent decades, but using different data. In addition, we found that the percentage of global area covered by heat wave exceeding a given magnitude has increased almost three times, in the last decades, with respect to that measured in the early 20th century. Finally, we discuss the specific implications of the heat waves on the river runoff generated in the Alps, for which comparatively long datasets exist, affecting the water quality and availability in a significant portion of the European region in summer.

  2. Observation of strongly non-Gaussian statistics for random sea surface gravity waves in wave flume experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M; Osborne, A R; Serio, M; Cavaleri, L; Brandini, C; Stansberg, C T

    2004-12-01

    We study random surface gravity wave fields and address the formation of large-amplitude waves in a laboratory environment. Experiments are performed in one of the largest wave tank facilities in the world. We present experimental evidence that the tail of the probability density function for wave height strongly depends on the Benjamin-Feir index (BFI)-i.e., the ratio between wave steepness and spectral bandwidth. While for a small BFI the probability density functions obtained experimentally are consistent with the Rayleigh distribution, for a large BFI the Rayleigh distribution clearly underestimates the probability of large events. These results confirm experimentally the fact that large-amplitude waves in random spectra may result from the modulational instability.

  3. Urban enhancement of the heat waves in Madrid and its metropolitan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, F.; Rasilla, D.

    2009-04-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) is a worldwide phenomenon that causes an increase of the temperatures in the centre of the cities. The process of urbanization has developed an intense urban heat island in Madrid, with temperature differences up to 10°C higher than the surrounding rural environment. Such differences may potentially increase the magnitude and duration of heat waves within cities, exacerbating their most negative effects over human health, particularly by night, as it deprives urban residents of the cool relief found in rural areas. In this contribution we study the long term trends on warm extreme temperature episodes in the Madrid metropolitan area, and their impact at local scale, on the onw city of Madrid. For the first task, we have compared maximum and minimum temperatures from rural (Barajas and Torrejón) and urban (El Retiro, Cuatro Vientos, Getafe) stations from 1961-2008; for the second one a local network of automated meteorological stations inside the city provided hourly data from the 2002-2004 years. Finally, the 2003 heat wave is used as an example of the spatial and temporal patterns of temperature and ozone concentrations during those extreme episodes. Our results show a regional increase in the frequency and duration of those extreme warm episodes since the end of the 80´s, although their absolute magnitude remains unchanged. The urban environment exacerbates the heat load due to the persistence of the high temperatures during the night-time hours, as it is shown by the above average number of tropical nights (> 20°C) inside the urban spaces, simultaneous to the increasing trend of maximum temperatures. Besides, the diversity of urban morphologies introduces a spatial variability on the strength of this nocturnal heat load, aggravating it in the densely urbanized areas and mitigating it in the vicinities of the green areas. The regional meteorological conditions associated to these warm episodes, characterized also by low wind speed

  4. Heat wave beats green wave: the effect of a climate extreme on alpine grassland phenology as seen by phenocams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonese, Edoardo; Filippa, Gianluca; Migliavacca, Mirco; Siniscalco, Consolata; Oddi, Ludovica; Galvagno, Marta

    2016-04-01

    The year 2015 has been one of the warmest on record for many regions of the world. The record-breaking temperatures did not spare the European Alps, where the summer anomaly reached +4°C. This heat wave caused important impacts on the seasonal development and structural properties of alpine grasslands that deserve investigations. Phenocams are useful tools to describe canopy greenness seasonal dynamics and many recent studies demonstrated that the major phenological events (e.g. budbrust, senescence, …) can be extracted from greenness trajectories. In contrast, little is know about their capabilities to describe the impact of extreme climate events on a fully developed canopy. Moreover the relation between quantitative structural and functional vegetation properties (e.g. biomass, LAI, …) and phenocam data remains poorly investigated. In this study we examine the impact of the 2015 summer heat wave on a subalpine grassland by jointly analyzing phenocam greenness trajectories, proximal sensing and flux data together with field measures of vegetation structural properties. The effect of different environmental drivers on greenness seasonal development was further evaluated by a modeling approach (GSI model). Phenocam tracked the impact of heatwave 2015 that caused a lower canopy development and an anticipation of yellowing by more than 2 months. The same pattern was observed for CO2 fluxes, NDVI and field measures. GSI model results show that during the heatwave, a combination of moisture and high temperature limitation was responsible for the observed reduction of the canopy development. Moreover, spatially explicit analysis of digital images allowed to highlight the differential response of specific plant functional types to the extreme event.

  5. Communicating Wave Energy: An Active Learning Experience for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trongnghia; Hou, Gene; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted an education project to communicate the wave energy concept to high school students. A virtual reality system that combines both hardware and software is developed in this project to simulate the buoy-wave interaction. This first-of-its-kind wave energy unit is portable and physics-based, allowing students to conduct a number of…

  6. 2D divertor heat flux distribution using a 3D heat conduction solver in National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, K F; Ahn, J-W; Park, J-W; Maingi, R; McLean, A G; Gray, T K; Gong, X; Zhang, X D

    2013-02-01

    The divertor heat flux footprint in tokamaks is often observed to be non-axisymmetric due to intrinsic error fields, applied 3D magnetic fields or during transients such as edge localized modes. Typically, only 1D radial heat flux profiles are analyzed; however, analysis of the full 2D divertor measurements provides opportunities to study the asymmetric nature of the deposited heat flux. To accomplish this an improved 3D Fourier analysis method has been successfully applied in a heat conduction solver (TACO) to determine the 2D heat flux distribution at the lower divertor surface in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) tokamak. This advance enables study of helical heat deposition onto the divertor. In order to account for heat transmission through poorly adhered surface layers on the divertor plate, a heat transmission coefficient, defined as the surface layer thermal conductivity divided by the thickness of the layer, was introduced to the solution of heat conduction equation. This coefficient is denoted as α and a range of values were tested in the model to ensure a reliable heat flux calculation until a specific value of α led to the constant total deposited energy in the numerical solution after the end of discharge. A comparison between 1D heat flux profiles from TACO and from a 2D heat flux calculation code, THEODOR, shows good agreement. Advantages of 2D heat flux distribution over the conventional 1D heat flux profile are also discussed, and examples of 2D data analysis in the study of striated heat deposition pattern as well as the toroidal degree of asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width are demonstrated.

  7. Surveillance of Summer Mortality and Preparedness to Reduce the Health Impact of Heat Waves in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelozzi, Paola; de’ Donato, Francesca K.; Bargagli, Anna Maria; D’Ippoliti, Daniela; De Sario, Manuela; Marino, Claudia; Schifano, Patrizia; Cappai, Giovanna; Leone, Michela; Kirchmayer, Ursula; Ventura, Martina; di Gennaro, Marta; Leonardi, Marco; Oleari, Fabrizio; De Martino, Annamaria; Perucci, Carlo A.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2004, the Italian Department for Civil Protection and the Ministry of Health have implemented a national program for the prevention of heat-health effects during summer, which to-date includes 34 major cities and 93% of the residents aged 65 years and over. The Italian program represents an important example of an integrated approach to prevent the impact of heat on health, comprising Heat Health Watch Warning Systems, a mortality surveillance system and prevention activities targeted to susceptible subgroups. City-specific warning systems are based on the relationship between temperature and mortality and serve as basis for the modulation of prevention measures. Local prevention activities, based on the guidelines defined by the Ministry of Health, are constructed around the infrastructures and services available. A key component of the prevention program is the identification of susceptible individuals and the active surveillance by General Practitioners, medical personnel and social workers. The mortality surveillance system enables the timely estimation of the impact of heat, and heat waves, on mortality during summer as well as to the evaluation of warning systems and prevention programs. Considering future predictions of climate change, the implementation of effective prevention programs, targeted to high risk subjects, become a priority in the public health agenda. PMID:20623023

  8. Surface-wave capillary plasmas in helium: modeling and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M.; Alves, L. L.; Noel, C.; Belmonte, T.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we use both simulations and experiments to study helium discharges (99.999% purity) sustained by surface-waves (2.45 GHz frequency), in capillary tubes (3 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. Simulations use a self-consistent homogeneous and stationary collisional-radiative model that solves the rate balance equations for the different species present in the plasma (electrons, the He^+ and He2^+ ions, the He(nexcimers) and the gas thermal balance equation, coupled to the two-term electron Boltzmann equation (including direct and stepwise collisions as well as electron-electron collisions). Experiments use optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to measure the electron density (Hβ Stark broadening), the gas temperature (ro-vibrational transitions of OH, present at trace concentrations), and the populations of different excited states. Model predictions at 1.7x10^13 cm-3 electron density (within the range estimated experimentally) are in good agreement with measurements (deviations < 10%) of (i) the excitation spectrum and the excitation temperatures (2795 ± 115 K, obtained from the Boltzmann-plot of the excited state populations, with energies lying between 22.7 and 24.2 eV), (ii) the power coupled to the plasma (˜ 180 ± 10 W), and (iii) the gas temperature (˜ 1700 ± 100 K). We discuss the extreme dependence of model results (particularly the gas temperature) on the power coupled to the plasma.

  9. Microwave thermal imaging of scanned focused ultrasound heating: animal experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Meaney, Paul M.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Geimer, Shireen D.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2011-03-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) uses focused ultrasound beams to ablate localized tumors noninvasively. Multiple clinical trials using HIFU treatment of liver, kidney, breast, pancreas and brain tumors have been conducted, while monitoring the temperature distribution with various imaging modalities such as MRI, CT and ultrasound. HIFU has achieved only minimal acceptance partially due to insufficient guidance from the limited temperature monitoring capability and availability. MR proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift thermometry is currently the most effective monitoring method; however, it is insensitive in temperature changes in fat, susceptible to motion artifacts, and is high cost. Exploiting the relationship between dielectric properties (i.e. permittivity and conductivity) and tissue temperature, in vivo dielectric property distributions of tissue during heating were reconstructed with our microwave tomographic imaging technology. Previous phantom studies have demonstrated sub-Celsius temperature accuracy and sub-centimeter spatial resolution in microwave thermal imaging. In this paper, initial animal experiments have been conducted to further investigate its potential. In vivo conductivity changes inside the piglet's liver due to focused ultrasound heating were observed in the microwave images with good correlation between conductivity changes and temperature.

  10. The impact of the summer 2003 heat waves on mortality in four Italian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelozzi, P; de Donato, F; Bisanti, L; Russo, A; Cadum, E; DeMaria, M; D'Ovidio, M; Costa, G; Perucci, C A

    2005-07-01

    This study evaluates the impact of the 2003 heat wave on cause-specific mortality and the role of demographic characteristics and socioeconomic conditions that may have increased the risk of mortality in four Italian cities: Bologna, Milan, Rome and Turin. Daily mortality counts, for the resident population by age, sex and cause of death were considered. Daily excess mortality was calculated as the difference between the number of deaths observed and the smoothed average. The impact of heat on health is measured in terms of maximum apparent temperature. The greatest excess in mortality was observed in the north west of Italy (Turin, +23% and Milan, +23%). The old (75-84 years) and the very old (85+ years) were the age groups most affected, and when stratifying by sex, the increase in mortality seemed to be greater among females. The greatest excess in mortality was registered in those with low socioeconomic status in Rome (+17.8%) and in those with lower education levels in Turin (+43%). The analysis of cause-specific mortality not only confirms results from previous studies of an increase in heat-related mortality by respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, but also shows a significant excess in mortality for diseases of the central nervous system and for metabolic/endocrine disorders. Results from 2003 highlight the necessity of targeting future prevention programmes at the susceptible sub-groups identified. The introduction of warning systems alongside efficient preventive plans and the monitoring of mortality during heat waves may represent a valid tool for the reduction of heat-related deaths.

  11. Modeling the relative roles of the foehn wind and urban expansion in the 2002 Beijing heat wave and possible mitigation by high reflective roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongyun; Shao, Haiyan; Song, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Rapid urbanization has intensified summer heat waves in recent decades in Beijing, China. In this study, effectiveness of applying high-reflectance roofs on mitigating the warming effects caused by urban expansion and foehn wind was simulated for a record-breaking heat wave occurred in Beijing during July 13-15, 2002. Simulation experiments were performed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF version 3.0) model coupled with an urban canopy model. The modeled diurnal air temperatures were compared well with station observations in the city and the wind convergence caused by urban heat island (UHI) effect could be simulated clearly. By increasing urban roof albedo, the simulated UHI effect was reduced due to decreased net radiation, and the simulated wind convergence in the urban area was weakened. Using WRF3.0 model, the warming effects caused by urban expansion and foehn wind were quantified separately, and were compared with the cooling effect due to the increased roof albedo. Results illustrated that the foehn warming effect under the northwesterly wind contributed greatly to this heat wave event in Beijing, while contribution from urban expansion accompanied by anthropogenic heating was secondary, and was mostly evident at night. Increasing roof albedo could reduce air temperature both in the day and at night, and could more than offset the urban expansion effect. The combined warming caused by the urban expansion and the foehn wind could be potentially offset with high-reflectance roofs by 58.8 % or cooled by 1.4 °C in the early afternoon on July 14, 2002, the hottest day during the heat wave.

  12. Heat Waves Assessment in Urban Areas Through Remote Sensing Image-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, Maria

    Climate change and extreme climate events are the great environmental concerns facing mankind in the twenty first century. Surface temperatures are expected to continue to increase globally and major changes are likely to occur in the global hydrological and energy cycles.Extreme climate events like heat waves are a key manifestation of complex systems, in both the natu-ral and human world.It was estimated that during last years regional surface warming caused the frequency, intensity and duration of heat waves to increase over Europe. During last pe-riod global warming was intensified because the global mean surface temperature has increased since the late 19th century.As urbanization has become an important contributor for global warming, Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, will be sure to influence the regional climate, envi-ronment, and socio-economic development.Much more, extreme climatic events as heat waves will amplify the UHI effect with severe urban ecosystem health consequences. Remote sensing is a key to mesoscale modeling through specification of land cover distributions and creating spatial products of moisture, reflectance, and surface temperatures. Because the knowledge of urban surface energy budgets and urban heat islands is significant to assess urban climatology, global environmental change, and human-environment interactions important for planning and management practices, is very important to study land surface temperatures and urban energy budget characteristics using the technology of satellite remote sensing imagery. In this study MODIS and IKONOS satellite remote sensing images for 1989 to 2008 period have been se-lected to retrieve the urban biogeophysical parameters and brightness temperatures in relation with changes of land use/cover types over Bucharest metropolitan area, Romania. The spatial distribution of heat islands has been changed from a mixed pattern, where bare land, semi-bare land and land under development were warmer than

  13. Linear and Nonlinear Modeling of a Traveling-Wave Thermoacoustic Heat Engine

    CERN Document Server

    Scalo, Carlo; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out three-dimensional Navier-Stokes simulations, from quiescent conditions to the limit cycle, of a traveling-wave thermoacoustic heat engine (TAE) composed of a long variable-area resonator shrouding a smaller annular tube, which encloses the hot (HHX) and ambient (AHX) heat-exchangers, and the regenerator (REG). Simulations are wall-resolved, with no-slip and adiabatic conditions enforced at all boundaries, while the heat transfer and drag due to the REG and HXs are modeled. HHX temperatures have been investigated in the range 440K - 500K with AHX temperature fixed at 300K. The initial exponential growth of acoustic energy is due to a network of traveling waves amplified by looping around the REG/HX unit in the direction of the imposed temperature gradient. A simple analytical model demonstrates that such thermoacoustic instability is a Lagrangian thermodynamic process resembling a Stirling cycle. A system-wide linear stability model based on Rott's theory is able to accurately predict the f...

  14. Definition of temperature thresholds: the example of the French heat wave warning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Mathilde; Wagner, Vérène; Le Tertre, Alain; Laaidi, Karine; Honoré, Cyrille; Bénichou, Françoise; Beaudeau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Heat-related deaths should be somewhat preventable. In France, some prevention measures are activated when minimum and maximum temperatures averaged over three days reach city-specific thresholds. The current thresholds were computed based on a descriptive analysis of past heat waves and on local expert judgement. We tested whether a different method would confirm these thresholds. The study was set in the six cities of Paris, Lyon, Marseille, Nantes, Strasbourg and Limoges between 1973 and 2003. For each city, we estimated the excess in mortality associated with different temperature thresholds, using a generalised additive model, controlling for long-time trends, seasons and days of the week. These models were used to compute the mortality predicted by different percentiles of temperatures. The thresholds were chosen as the percentiles associated with a significant excess mortality. In all cities, there was a good correlation between current thresholds and the thresholds derived from the models, with 0°C to 3°C differences for averaged maximum temperatures. Both set of thresholds were able to anticipate the main periods of excess mortality during the summers of 1973 to 2003. A simple method relying on descriptive analysis and expert judgement is sufficient to define protective temperature thresholds and to prevent heat wave mortality. As temperatures are increasing along with the climate change and adaptation is ongoing, more research is required to understand if and when thresholds should be modified.

  15. Drought and Heat Waves: The Role of SST and Land Surface Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Siegfried

    2011-01-01

    Drought occurs on a wide range of time scales, and within a variety of different types of regional climates. At the shortest time scales it is often associated with heat waves that last only several weeks to a few months but nevertheless can have profound detrimental impacts on society (e.g., heat-related impacts on human health, desiccation of croplands, increased fire hazard), while at the longest time scales it can extend over decades and can lead to long term structural changes in many aspects of society (e.g., agriculture, water resources, wetlands, tourism, population shifts). There is now considerable evidence that sea surface temperatures (SSTs) play a leading role in the development of drought world-wide, especially at seasonal and longer time scales, though land-atmosphere feedbacks can also play an important role. At shorter (subseasonal) time scales, SSTs are less important, but land feedbacks can play a critical role in maintaining and amplifying the atmospheric conditions associated with heat waves and short-term droughts. This talk reviews our current understanding of the physical mechanisms that drive precipitation and temperature variations on subseasonal to centennial time scales. This includes an assessment of predictability, prediction skill, and user needs at all time scales.

  16. Large Scale Experiments on the Interaction of a Caisson Breakwater with Breaking Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stagonas, Dimitris; Marzeddu, Andrea; Buccino, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Tests looking at the interaction of a caisson breakwater with steep, breaking waves are outlined here. 4 different wave generation methodologies were employed allowing for experiments with regular, irregular, focused and tailored made waves. The emphasis, however, is given in tests with focused w...

  17. Loop heating by D.C. electric current and electromagnetic wave emissions simulated by 3-D EM particle zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, J. I.; Zhao, J.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that a current-carrying plasma loop can be heated by magnetic pinch driven by the pressure imbalance between inside and outside the loop, using a 3-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) particle code. Both electrons and ions in the loop can be heated in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, therefore the perpendicular temperature can be increased about 10 times compared with the parallel temperature. This temperature anisotropy produced by the magnetic pinch heating can induce a plasma instability, by which high-frequency electromagnetic waves can be excited. The plasma current which is enhanced by the magnetic pinch can also excite a kinetic kink instability, which can heat ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. The heating mechanism of ions as well as the electromagnetic emission could be important for an understanding of the coronal loop heating and the electromagnetic wave emissions from active coronal regions.

  18. Large Scale Experiments on the Interaction of a Caisson Breakwater with Breaking Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stagonas, Dimitris; Marzeddu, Andrea; Buccino, Mariano;

    2014-01-01

    Tests looking at the interaction of a caisson breakwater with steep, breaking waves are outlined here. 4 different wave generation methodologies were employed allowing for experiments with regular, irregular, focused and tailored made waves. The emphasis, however, is given in tests with focused...... waves, which resulted in impulsive conditions at the face of the caisson. Amongst our objectives was to look at the mechanisms occurring when a wave breaks at the structure and to investigate the validity of tactile pressure sensors. As such, for all experiments, pressure, force and surface elevation...

  19. Meso-scale analysis of deformation wave heating in metalized solid explosive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonthier K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deformation induced heating of reactive solids is a physically complex process. As such, the effects of meso-structure, component thermomechanical properties, component mass fractions, and porosity on their impact response is not well-understood. In this study, an explicit, 2-D, Lagrangian finite and discrete element technique is used to examine thermomechanical fields in metal-explosive (aluminum-HMX particle mixtures due to piston supported uniaxial deformation waves. The meso-scale description uses a plane strain, thermoelastic-viscoplastic and friction constitutive theory to describe the motion and deformation of individual particles, and an energy consistent, penalty based method to describe inter-particle contact. The deformation response of material having an initial solid volume fraction of ΦS0 = 0.835 is characterized for different metal mass fractions and wave strengths. Predictions indicate that the response can be classified into strength dominated and pressure dominated regions depending on wave strength. Average thermomechanical fields that define the macro-scale wave structure are found to differ both qualitatively and quantitatively between the two regions.

  20. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES AND CORONAL HEATING: UNIFYING EMPIRICAL AND MHD TURBULENCE MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Van der Holst, Bart; Oran, Rona; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B. IV; Gombosi, Tamas I. [Department of AOSS, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Downs, Cooper [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Roussev, Ilia I. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Evans, Rebekah M., E-mail: igorsok@umich.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Space Weather Lab, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    We present a new global model of the solar corona, including the low corona, the transition region, and the top of the chromosphere. The realistic three-dimensional magnetic field is simulated using the data from the photospheric magnetic field measurements. The distinctive feature of the new model is incorporating MHD Alfven wave turbulence. We assume this turbulence and its nonlinear dissipation to be the only momentum and energy source for heating the coronal plasma and driving the solar wind. The difference between the turbulence dissipation efficiency in coronal holes and that in closed field regions is because the nonlinear cascade rate degrades in strongly anisotropic (imbalanced) turbulence in coronal holes (no inward propagating wave), thus resulting in colder coronal holes, from which the fast solar wind originates. The detailed presentation of the theoretical model is illustrated with the synthetic images for multi-wavelength EUV emission compared with the observations from SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI instruments for the Carrington rotation 2107.

  1. Resonance between heat-carrying electrons and Langmuir waves in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozmus, W. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Chapman, T.; Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Brantov, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 Russia and Center for Fundamental and Applied Research, VNIIA, ROSATOM, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); Winjum, B. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Brunner, S. [Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Tableman, A.; Tzoufras, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Glenzer, S. [LCLS, Stanford, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In ignition scale hot plasmas, temperature gradients and thermal transport modify electron distributions in a velocity range resonant with Langmuir waves typical of those produced by stimulated Raman scattering. We examine the resultant changes to the Landau damping experienced by these Langmuir waves and the levels of thermal plasma fluctuations. The form factor and Thomson scattering cross-section in such plasmas display unique characteristics of the background conditions. A theoretical model and high-order Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations are used in our analysis. An experiment to measure changes in thermal plasma fluctuation levels due to a thermal gradient is proposed.

  2. The 2010 Pakistan Flood and the Russia Heat Wave: Teleconnection of Extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K.; Kim, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    The Pakistan flood and the Russia heat wave/Vvild fires of the summer of2010 were two of the most extreme, and catastrophic events in the histories of the two countries occurring at about the same time. To a casual observer, the timing may just be a random coincidence of nature, because the two events were separated by long distances, and represented opposite forces of nature, i.e., flood vs. drought, and water vs. fire. In this paper, using NASA satellite and NOAA reanalysis data, we presented observation evidences that that the two events were indeed physically connected.

  3. Heat induction in copper-bearing IUD'S during short-wave diathermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, N C; Hansen, R; Larsen, T

    1979-01-01

    This brief communication describes a means of measuring heat induction in utero in an attempt to discover any temperature alterations resulting when electrocoagulation procedures are performed on women with copper or metal IUDs in situ. The model described entails placing a patient between 2 condenser plates at a distance of 30 cm and administering, for 20 minutes, 150 watts at a frequency of 27.12 Mhz. Calculations showed a maximum increase in temperature appreciably lower than 1.6 degrees celsius at the frequencies and duration of treatment used in short wave diathermy of women with pelvic inflammation. Detailed calculations are available upon request to the authors.

  4. A unified model for informetrics based on the wave and heat equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Fred Y

    2010-01-01

    The function g(r,t) = p(r+q)^(-{\\beta}). e^(kt) is introduced as a basic informetric function describing the classical informetric laws (through its Mandelbrot part) and a time evolution. It is shown that this function is a solution of a wave-type and of a heat-type partial differential equation. It is suggested that our approach may lead to a description of informetrics in a partial differential equation setting, formally similar to that for well-known physical laws.

  5. Summer heat waves over Eastern China: dynamical processes and trend attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freychet, Nicolas; Tett, Simon; Wang, Jun; Hegerl, Gabriele

    2017-02-01

    Recent trends in summer heat waves (HW) over Central-Eastern China and their atmospheric drivers are investigated using the ERA Interim re-analysis. A composite analysis shows that these events are preceded by an increase in 500 hPa geopotential height. Consequently, a subsidence anomaly develops over the region and surface solar radiation increases. An increase in the northward moisture transport from the tropical region is also found to increase specific humidity, leading to warmer night-time temperatures. Feedback effects are also important: decrease of precipitation and enhanced evaporation also increases the specific humidity and North-Westerlies due to the low pressure lead to more heat convergence. HW occurrence increases, especially during the last decade, and is largely due to an increase in the mean temperature rather than to a change in dynamics, suggesting a human influence.

  6. The meridional variation of the eddy heat fluxes by baroclinic waves and their parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    The meridional and vertical eddy fluxes of sensible heat produced by small-amplitude growing baroclinic waves are calculated using solutions to the two-level model with horizontal shear in the mean flow. The results show that the fluxes are primarily dependent on the local baroclinicity, i.e., the local value of the isentropic slopes in the mean state. Where the slope exceeds the critical value, the transports are poleward and upward; where the slope is less than the critical value, the transports are equatorward and downward. These results are used to improve an earlier parameterization of the tropospheric eddy fluxes of sensible heat based on Eady's model. Comparisons with observations show that the improved parameterization reproduces the observed magnitude and sign of the eddy fluxes and their vertical variations and seasonal changes, but the maximum in the poleward flux is too near the equator.

  7. Turbulent boundary layers under irregular waves and currents: Experiments and the equivalent-wave concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A full-scale experimental study of turbulent boundary layer flows under irregular waves and currents is conducted with the primary objective to investigate the equivalent-wave concept by Madsen (1994). Irregular oscillatory flows following the bottom-velocity spectrum under realistic surface irregular waves are produced over two fixed rough bottoms in an oscillatory water tunnel, and flow velocities are measured using a Particle Image Velocimetry. The root-mean-square (RMS) value and representative phase lead of wave velocities have vertical variations very similar to those of the first-harmonic velocity of periodic wave boundary layers, e.g., the RMS wave velocity follows a logarithmic distribution controlled by the physical bottom roughness in the very near-bottom region. The RMS wave bottom shear stress and the associated representative phase lead can be accurately predicted using the equivalent-wave approach. The spectra of wave bottom shear stress and boundary layer velocity are found to be proportional to the spectrum of free-stream velocity. Currents in the presence of irregular waves exhibit the classic two-log-profile structure with the lower log-profile controlled by the physical bottom roughness and the upper log-profile controlled by a much larger apparent roughness. Replacing the irregular waves by their equivalent sinusoidal waves virtually makes no difference for the coexisting currents. These observations, together with the excellent agreement between measurements and model predictions, suggest that the equivalent-wave representation adequately characterizes the basic wave-current interaction under irregular waves.

  8. Investigating Vaporization of Silica through Laser Driven Shock Wave Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, R. G.; Swift, D. C.; Stewart, S. T.; Smith, R.; Bolme, C. A.; Spaulding, D. K.; Hicks, D.; Eggert, J.; Collins, G.

    2010-12-01

    Giant impacts melt and vaporize a significant amount of the bolide and target body. However, our ability to determine how much melt or vapor a given impact creates depends strongly on our understanding of the liquid-vapor phase boundary of geologic materials. Our current knowledge of the liquid-vapor equilibrium for one of the most important minerals, SiO2, is rather limited due to the difficulty of performing experiments in this area of phase space. In this study, we investigate the liquid-vapor coexistence region by shocking quartz into a supercritical fluid state and allowing it to adiabatically expand to a state on the liquid-vapor phase boundary. Although shock compression and release has been used to study the liquid-vapor equilibrium of metals [1], few attempts have been made at studying geologic materials by this method [2]. Shock waves were produced by direct ablation of the quartz sample using the Jupiter Laser Facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Steady shock pressures of 120-360 GPa were produced in the quartz samples: high enough to force the quartz into a supercritical fluid state. As the shock wave propagates through the sample, we measure the shock velocity using a line imaging velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) and shock temperature using a streaked optical pyrometer (SOP). When the shock wave reaches the free surface of the sample, the material adiabatically expands. Upon breakout of the shock at the free surface, the SOP records a distinct drop in radiance due to the lower temperature of the expanded material. For a subset of experiments, a LiF window is positioned downrange of the expanding silica. When the expanding silica impacts the LiF window, the velocity at the interface between the expanding silica and LiF window is measured using the VISAR. From the shock velocity measurements, we accurately determine the shocked state in the quartz. The post-shock radiance measurements are used to constrain the

  9. Effects of N on Plant Response to Heat-wave: A Field Study with Prairie Vegetation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Wang; Scott A. Heckathorn; Kumar Mainali; E. William Hamilton

    2008-01-01

    More intense, more frequent, and longer heat-waves are expected in the future due to global warming, which could have dramatic ecological impacts. Increasing nitrogen (N) availability and its dynamics will likely impact plant responses to heat stress and carbon (C) sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems. This field study examined the effects of N availability on plant response to heat-stress (HS) treatment in naturally-occurring vegetation. HS (5 d at ambient or 40.5 ℃) and N treatments (±N) were applied to 16 1 m2 plots in restored prairie vegetation dominated by Andropogon gerardii (warm-season C4 grass) and Solidago canadensis (warm-season C3 forb). Before, during, and after HS, air, canopy, and soil temperature were monitored; net CO2 assimilation (Pn), quantum yield of photosystem Ⅱ (φPsⅡ), stomatal conductance (gs), and leaf water potential (Ψw) of the dominant species and soil respiration (Rsolf) of each plot were measured daily during HS. One week after HS, plots were harvested, and C% and N% were determined for rhizosphere and bulk soil, and above-ground tissue (green/senescent leaf, stem, and flower). Photosynthetic N-use efficiency (PNUE) and N resorption rate (NRR) were calculated. HS decreased Pn, gs, Ψw, and PNUE for both species, and +N treatment generally increased these variables (±HS), but often slowed their poat-HS recovery. Aboveground biomass tended to decrease with HS in both species (and for green leaf mass in S. canadensis), but decrease with +N for ,4. gerardii and increase with +N for S. canadensis. For A. gerardii, HS tended to decrease N% in green tissues with +N, whereas in S. canadensis, HS increased N% in green leaves.Added N decreased NRR for A. gerardii and HS increased NRR for S. canadensis. These results suggest that heat waves,though transient, could have significant effects on plants, communities, and ecosystem N cycling, and N can influence the effect of heat waves.

  10. A Self-similar Flow Behind a Shock Wave in a Gravitating or Non-gravitating Gas with Heat Conduction and Radiation Heat-flux

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. P. Vishwakarma; Arvind K. Singh

    2009-03-01

    The propagation of a spherical shock wave in an ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux, and with or without self-gravitational effects, is investigated. The initial density of the gas is assumed to obey a power law. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier’s law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density, and the total energy of the wave to vary with time. Similarity solutions are obtained and the effects of variation of the heat transfer parameters, the variation of initial density and the presence of self-gravitational field are investigated.

  11. Observation of Electron Bernstein Wave Heating in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzman, Andrew; Anderson, Jay; Dubois, Ami; Almagri, Abdulgader; Nonn, Paul; McCollam, Karsten; Chapman, Brett; Goetz, John; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    We report the first observation of electron Bernstein wave heating in the MST RFP. Similar to a high density stellarator, the RFP is inaccessible to electromagnetic ECRH. The plasma current and |B|operating range of MST allows a 5.5 GHz RF source (100kW, 4ms pulse) to heat on the fundamental and up to 4th harmonic EC resonances. With an x-ray diagnostic most sensitive to edge electrons located +12 degrees toroidally from the antenna, the measured emission is a strong function of predicted heating inside versus outside the Bt =0 reversal layer of the RFP. Measured during a scan of plasma current, distinct edges in a plot of emissivity versus predicted deposition layer align with the deposition layers crossing of this reversal layer and confirm EBW heating on the fundamental through 4th EC harmonic. Additional confirmation of the absorption location has been demonstrated by using auxiliary poloidal current drive to reduce electron diffusion rates and sweep the location of the Bt =0 surface across a static RF absorption location in RFP discharges. In these discharges EBW enhancement of the 15-40keV x-ray energies has been observed. Work supported by USDOE.

  12. Temperature, comfort and pollution levels during heat waves and the role of sea breeze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Dimitris K; Melas, Dimitris; Bartzanas, Thomas; Kittas, Constantinos

    2010-05-01

    During the summer of 2007 several Greek regions suffered periods of extreme heat, with midday temperatures of over 40 degrees C on several consecutive days. High temperatures were also recorded on the east coast of central Greece, where a complex sea breeze circulation system frequently develops. The more intense events occurred at the end of June and July. The highest temperatures were observed on 26 June and 25 July, while the sea breeze developed only on 25 July. Meteorological data collected at two sites-a coastal urban location and an inland suburban site that is not reached by the sea breeze flow-as well as pollution data collected at the urban site, were analysed in order to investigate the relationship between sea breeze development and the prevailing environmental conditions during these two heat wave events. The analysis revealed that sea breeze development affects temperature and pollution levels at the shoreline significantly, causing a decrease of approximately 4 degrees C from the maximum temperature value and an increase of approximately 30% in peak PM10 levels. Additionally, several stress indices were calculated in order to assess heat comfort conditions at the two sites. It was found that nocturnal comfort levels are determined mainly by the urban heat island effect, the intensity of which reaches up to 8 degrees C, while the applied indices do not demonstrate any significant daytime thermal stress relief due to sea breeze development.

  13. The relationship between housing and heat wave resilience in older people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughnan, Margaret; Carroll, Matthew; Tapper, Nigel J.

    2015-09-01

    Older people have justifiably been highlighted as a high-risk group with respect to heat wave mortality and morbidity. However, there are older people living within the community who have developed adaptive and resilient environments around their home that provide some protection during periods of extreme heat. This study investigated the housing stock and self-reported thermal comfort of a group of older people living in a regional town in Australia during the summer of 2012. The results indicated that daily maximum living room temperature was not significantly correlated with outdoor temperature, and daily minimum living room temperature was very weakly correlated with outdoor temperature. Residents reported feeling comfortable when indoor temperature approximated 26 °C. As living room temperature increased, indoor thermal comfort decreased. Significant differences between indoor temperatures were noted for homes that were related to house characteristics such as the age of the house, the number of air-conditioning units, the pitch of the roof, home insulation and the number of heat-mitigation modifications made to the home. Brick veneer homes showed smaller diurnal changes in temperature than other building materials. With population ageing and the increasing focus on older people living in the community, the quality of the housing stock available to them will influence their risk of heat exposure during extreme weather.

  14. Simulations of Alfven wave driving of the solar chromosphere - efficient heating and spicule launching

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, C S

    2016-01-01

    Two of the central problems in our understanding of the solar chromosphere are how the upper chromosphere is heated and what drives spicules. Estmates of the required chromospheric heating, based on radiative and conductive losses suggest a rate of $\\sim 0.1 \\mathrm{\\:erg\\:cm^{-3}\\:s^{-1}}$ in the lower chromosphere dropping to $\\sim 10^{-3} \\mathrm{\\:erg\\:cm^{-3}\\:s^{-1}}$ in the upper chromosphere (\\citet{Avrett1981}). The chromosphere is also permeated by spicules, higher density plasma from the lower atmosphere propelled upwards at speeds of $\\sim 10-20 \\mathrm{\\:km\\:s^{-1}}$, for so called Type-I spicules (\\citet{Pereira2012,Zhang2012}, reaching heights of $\\sim 3000-5000 \\mathrm{\\:km}$ above the photosphere. A clearer understanding of chromospheric dynamics, its heating and the formation of spicules, is thus of central importance to solar atmospheric science. For over thirty years it has been proposed that photospheric driving of MHD waves may be responsible for both heating and spicule formation. This ...

  15. Experiments with Point Absorber Type Wave Energy Converters in a Large-Scale Wave Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stratigaki, Vasiliki; Troch, Peter; Stallard, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Wave Energy Converters (WECs) extract energy from ocean waves and have the potential to produce a significant contribution of electricity from renewable sources. However, large "WEC farms" or "WEC arrays" are expected to have "WEC array effects", expressed as the impact of the WECs on the wave...... of geometric layout configurations and wave conditions. WEC response, wave induced forces on the WECs and wave field modifications have been measured. Each WEC consists of a buoy with diameter of 0.315 m. Power take-off is modeled by realizing friction based energy dissipation through damping of the WECs...... array effects and for validation and extension of numerical models. This model validation will enable optimization of the geometrical layout of WEC arrays for real applications and reduction of the cost of energy from wave energy systems....

  16. Climate change induced heat wave hazard in eastern Africa: Dar Es Salaam (Tanzania) and Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Paolo; Sellerino, Mariangela; Di Ruocco, Angela; Kombe, Wilbard; Yeshitela, Kumelachew

    2013-04-01

    Last decades, new records were set in the world for tornadoes, drought, wind, floods, wildfires and hot temperatures, testifying unusual weather and climate patterns with increasing frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. Extreme heat events are natural hazards affecting many regions in the world, nevertheless limited work has been done on the analysis and effects of extreme heat events in Africa, that is considered a continent particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. In fact, the increase of temperature expected in the African continent during the 21st century is larger than the global mean warming, being about 3° to 4° C, about 1.5 times the global temperature increase (Christensen et al., 2007; Gualdi et al., 2012), with the subtropical regions projected to warm more than the tropical regions. Observations and downscaled model simulations (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 IPCC scenarios) are analyzed to describe heat wave characteristics in Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) and Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), spanning the last five decades as well as that projected for the 21st century. Observed data are daily maximum and minimum temperature collected in the period 1961-2011; downscaled model simulations span up to 2050. Heat waves are defined following a peak over threshold approach by statistical comparison to historical meteorological baselines (site dependent), using a fixed absolute threshold. Projected future warming in the Dar es Salaam and Addis Ababa shows a further increase in the heat waves parameters. Heat wave duration and hot days number are strictly correlated showing that the temperature rise could generate not only an increase of heat waves number but mainly a longer average duration, that can strongly affect the resilience capacity of the population, particularly the elder people. In fact, the impacts of heat waves on the society are determined also by temporal duration (Stephenson, 2008), in addition to their frequency, in fact the capacity of

  17. Chromospheric Heating and the Excitation of Magnetic Tube Waves Through p-Mode Buffeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bradley W.

    1997-05-01

    The dissipation of magnetic tube waves may be the primary source of energy in the thermal balance of the solar chromosphere and corona. In this paper, I compute an upper limit on the energy flux of tube waves that can be driven into the chromosphere if the waves are excited by buffeting of magnetic flux tubes by p--modes. In addition, I estimate the p--mode line widths which result from this transfer of energy from the modes to the flux tube waves. To obtain the upper limit, I assume that the solar magnetic field has a fibril structure consisting of a large set of well--separated, identical tubes. Each tube is axisymmetric, vertical and slender. I approximate the solar atmosphere with a truncated isentropic polytrope, chosen such that it's upper surface matches the tau_ {5000}=1 layer of the photospheric model of Maltby (1986). The response of the fibrils is described using the thin flux tube approximation, ignoring multiple scattering between the tubes, and assuming that the p--modes force the tubes incoherently. The effects of the region above the surface of the polytrope, where a flaring flux tube is poorly represented by the thin flux equations, are simulated through a boundary condition applied at the polytrope's surface. By varying this boundary condition the influence of any upper atmosphere can be reproduced. To compute an upper limit, I chose the boundary condition which optimizes the upward flux of waves. I find that the largest flux of tube waves that can be sent into chromosphere is 29 ergs cm(-2) s(-1) for a fibril field with a 1% filling factor. This flux is miniscule when compared to the energy flux necessary to heat the chromosphere or corona. Therefore, tube waves generated by the buffeting of magnetic fibrils by acoustic waves are inconsequential in the energy balance of the upper atmosphere. Furthermore, using the same boundary conditions, I find that the line width of a p--mode due to the absorption of that mode by the fibrils can be a

  18. Research on the Propagation Acting of the Equatorial Planetary Waves on the Western Equatorial Pacific Warm Pool Heat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Qiang; Xu Jianping; Zhu Bokang

    2003-01-01

    Based on the long-term buoy data from the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean ( TAO ) array during the TOGA ( Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere) Program (1980-1996), the propagation acting of the Equatorial planetary waves on the Western Equatorial Pacific warm pool heat is analyzed. Results show that the zonal heat transmission in the Western Equatorial Pacific takes palace mainly in the subsurface water and spreads eastwards along the thermocline; while the seasonal westward-spreading heat change structure occurs in the mixed layers in the middle and western Pacific. The standing-form transmission in the western Pacific appears in the thermocline layer, while in the eastern pacific, it exists in the mixed layer as well as in the thermocline layer. The standing-form and eastward-spreading sign of zonal heat transmitting in the upper water is predominant and strong, and the westward sign is weak.The component force of Kelvin Equatorial wave pressure runs through the western and eastern Equatorial pacific, and transmits heat energy eastwards. And the heat transmitted by zonal current component occurs mostly in the western Pacific; The heat transmitted by the component force of Rossby wave pressure mainly appears in the eastern and middle areas of the Pacific, while the zonal current component transmitting occurs mainly in the western Pacific; Mixed-Rossby gravity wave's action on the zonal current is stronger than that of the thermocline layer. In the mean state, the standing wave model of Equatorial Pacific up layer ocean temperature confines the transport of western Pacific warm pool heat to the eastern Pacific. Under abnormal conditions, the standing wave model of Equatorial Pacific up layer ocean temperature weakens, the eastwardly transmitting model enhances, and subsequently the El Ni n o event occurs.

  19. A Laboratory Experiment on EM Backscatter from Farley-Buneman and Gradient Drift Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alport, M. J.; D'Angelo, N.; Pécseli, Hans

    1981-01-01

    Results are reported of a laboratory experiment on Bragg backscatter of 3-cm microwaves by turbulent waves driven by the Farley-Buneman and gradient drift instabilities. The present work is the third in a series of laboratory experiments performed to test, under controlled conditions, prevalent...... ideas on EM scattering by equatorial and high-latitude ionospheric waves and irregularities....

  20. Compound Effect of Alfv\\'en Waves and Ion-cyclotron Waves on Heating/Acceleration of Minor Ions via the Pickup Process

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, C B; Lee, L C

    2014-01-01

    A scenario is proposed to explain the preferential heating of minor ions and differential streaming velocity between minor ions and protons observed in the solar corona and in the solar wind. It is demonstrated by test particle simulations that minor ions can be nearly fully picked up by intrinsic Alfv\\'en-cyclotron waves observed in the solar wind based on the observed wave energy density. Both high frequency ion-cyclotron waves and low frequency Alfv\\'en waves play crucial roles in the pickup process. A minor ion can first gain a high magnetic moment through the resonant wave-particle interaction with ion-cyclotron waves, and then this ion with a large magnetic moment can be trapped by magnetic mirror-like field structures in the presence of the lower-frequency Alfv\\'en waves. As a result, the ion is picked up by these Alfv\\'en-cyclotron waves. However, minor ions can only be partially picked up in the corona due to low wave energy density and low plasma beta. During the pickup process, minor ions are stoch...

  1. Comparison of the effects of millimeter wave irradiation, general bath heating, and localized heating on neuronal activity in the leech ganglion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Sergii; Siegel, Peter H.; Wagenaar, Daniel A.; Pikov, Victor

    2013-02-01

    The use of electrically-induced neuromodulation has grown in importance in the treatment of multiple neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, epilepsy, chronic pain, cluster headaches and others. While electrical current can be applied locally, it requires placing stimulation electrodes in direct contact with the neural tissue. Our goal is to develop a method for localized application of electromagnetic energy to the brain without direct tissue contact. Toward this goal, we are experimenting with the wireless transmission of millimeter wave (MMW) energy in the 10-100 GHz frequency range, where penetration and focusing can be traded off to provide non-contact irradiation of the cerebral cortex. Initial experiments have been conducted on freshly-isolated leech ganglia to evaluate the real-time changes in the activity of individual neurons upon exposure to the MMW radiation. The initial results indicate that low-intensity MMWs can partially suppress the neuronal activity. This is in contrast to general bath heating, which had an excitatory effect on the neuronal activity. Further studies are underway to determine the changes in the state of the membrane channels that might be responsible for the observed neuromodulatory effects.

  2. Comparison between off-resonance and electron Bernstein waves heating regime in a microwave discharge ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, G.; Di Giugno, R.; Miracoli, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Mascali, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. P. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Lanaia, D.; Ciavola, G. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serafino, T. [CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Di Bartolo, F. [Universita di Messina, Ctr. da Papardo-Sperone, 98100 Messina (Italy); Gambino, N. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); IET-Institute of Energy Technology, LEC-Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-02-15

    A microwave discharge ion source (MDIS) operating at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of INFN, Catania has been used to compare the traditional electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating with an innovative mechanisms of plasma ignition based on the electrostatic Bernstein waves (EBW). EBW are obtained via the inner plasma electromagnetic-to-electrostatic wave conversion and they are absorbed by the plasma at cyclotron resonance harmonics. The heating of plasma by means of EBW at particular frequencies enabled us to reach densities much larger than the cutoff ones. Evidences of EBW generation and absorption together with X-ray emissions due to high energy electrons will be shown. A characterization of the discharge heating process in MDISs as a generalization of the ECR heating mechanism by means of ray tracing will be shown in order to highlight the fundamental physical differences between ECR and EBW heating.

  3. The GRA Beam-Splitter Experiment and Wave-Particle Duality of Light

    CERN Document Server

    Kaloyerou, P N

    2005-01-01

    Grangier, Roger and Aspect (GRA) performed a beam-splitter experiment to demonstrate particle behaviour of light and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer experiment to demonstrate wave behaviour of light. The distinguishing feature of these experiments is the use of a gating system to produce near ideal single photon states. With the demonstration of both wave and particle behaviour (in the two mutually exclusive experiments) they claim to have demonstrated the dual wave-particle behaviour of light, and hence, to have confirmed Bohr's Principle of complementarity. The demonstration of the wave behaviour of light is not in dispute. But, we want to demonstrate, contrary to the claims of GRA, that their beam-splitter experiment does not conclusively confirm the particle behaviour of light, and hence does not confirm particle-wave duality, nor, more generally, is complementarity confirmed. Our demonstration consists of providing a detailed model based on the Causal Interpretation of Quantum Fields (CIEM), which does not...

  4. High-frequency torsional Alfvén waves as an energy source for coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar; Shetye, Juie; Murawski, Krzysztof; Doyle, John Gerard; Stangalini, Marco; Scullion, Eamon; Ray, Tom; Wójcik, Dariusz Patryk; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2017-03-01

    The existence of the Sun’s hot atmosphere and the solar wind acceleration continues to be an outstanding problem in solar-astrophysics. Although magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and dissipation of magnetic energy contribute to heating and the mass cycle of the solar atmosphere, yet direct evidence of such processes often generates debate. Ground-based 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope (SST)/CRISP, Hα 6562.8 Å observations reveal, for the first time, the ubiquitous presence of high frequency (~12–42 mHz) torsional motions in thin spicular-type structures in the chromosphere. We detect numerous oscillating flux tubes on 10 June 2014 between 07:17 UT to 08:08 UT in a quiet-Sun field-of-view of 60” × 60” (1” = 725 km). Stringent numerical model shows that these observations resemble torsional Alfvén waves associated with high frequency drivers which contain a huge amount of energy (~105 W m‑2) in the chromosphere. Even after partial reflection from the transition region, a significant amount of energy (~103 W m‑2) is transferred onto the overlying corona. We find that oscillating tubes serve as substantial sources of Alfvén wave generation that provide sufficient Poynting flux not only to heat the corona but also to originate the supersonic solar wind.

  5. High-frequency torsional Alfvén waves as an energy source for coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar; Shetye, Juie; Murawski, Krzysztof; Doyle, John Gerard; Stangalini, Marco; Scullion, Eamon; Ray, Tom; Wójcik, Dariusz Patryk; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2017-01-01

    The existence of the Sun’s hot atmosphere and the solar wind acceleration continues to be an outstanding problem in solar-astrophysics. Although magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and dissipation of magnetic energy contribute to heating and the mass cycle of the solar atmosphere, yet direct evidence of such processes often generates debate. Ground-based 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope (SST)/CRISP, Hα 6562.8 Å observations reveal, for the first time, the ubiquitous presence of high frequency (~12–42 mHz) torsional motions in thin spicular-type structures in the chromosphere. We detect numerous oscillating flux tubes on 10 June 2014 between 07:17 UT to 08:08 UT in a quiet-Sun field-of-view of 60” × 60” (1” = 725 km). Stringent numerical model shows that these observations resemble torsional Alfvén waves associated with high frequency drivers which contain a huge amount of energy (~105 W m−2) in the chromosphere. Even after partial reflection from the transition region, a significant amount of energy (~103 W m−2) is transferred onto the overlying corona. We find that oscillating tubes serve as substantial sources of Alfvén wave generation that provide sufficient Poynting flux not only to heat the corona but also to originate the supersonic solar wind. PMID:28256538

  6. Canopy and physiological controls of GPP during drought and heat wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Xiao, Xiangming; Zhou, Sha; Ciais, Philippe; McCarthy, Heather; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation indices (VIs) derived from satellite reflectance measurements are often used as proxies of canopy activity to evaluate the impacts of drought and heat wave on gross primary production (GPP) through production efficiency models. However, GPP is also regulated by physiological processes that cannot be directly detected using reflectance measurements. This study analyzes the co-limitation of canopy and plant physiology (represented by VIs and climate anomalies, respectively) on GPP during the 2003 European summer drought and heat wave for 15 Euroflux sites. During the entire drought period, spatial pattern of GPP anomalies can be quantified by relative changes in VIs. We also find that GPP sensitivity to relative canopy changes is higher for nonforest ecosystems (1.81 ± 0.32%GPP/%enhanced vegetation index), while GPP sensitivity to physiological changes is higher for forest ecosystems (-0.18 ± 0.05 g C m-2 d-1/hPa). A conceptual model is further built to better illustrate the canopy and physiological controls on GPP during drought periods.

  7. Plants adapted to warmer climate do not outperform regional plants during a natural heat wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharova, Anna; Durka, Walter; Hermann, Julia-Maria; Hölzel, Norbert; Michalski, Stefan; Kollmann, Johannes; Bossdorf, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    With ongoing climate change, many plant species may not be able to adapt rapidly enough, and some conservation experts are therefore considering to translocate warm-adapted ecotypes to mitigate effects of climate warming. Although this strategy, called assisted migration, is intuitively plausible, most of the support comes from models, whereas experimental evidence is so far scarce. Here we present data on multiple ecotypes of six grassland species, which we grew in four common gardens in Germany during a natural heat wave, with temperatures 1.4-2.0°C higher than the long-term means. In each garden we compared the performance of regional ecotypes with plants from a locality with long-term summer temperatures similar to what the plants experienced during the summer heat wave. We found no difference in performance between regional and warm-adapted plants in four of the six species. In two species, regional ecotypes even outperformed warm-adapted plants, despite elevated temperatures, which suggests that translocating warm-adapted ecotypes may not only lack the desired effect of increased performance but may even have negative consequences. Even if adaptation to climate plays a role, other factors involved in local adaptation, such as biotic interactions, may override it. Based on our results, we cannot advocate assisted migration as a universal tool to enhance the performance of local plant populations and communities during climate change.

  8. The short-term effect of heat waves on mortality and its modifiers in China: an analysis from 66 communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenjun; Zeng, Weilin; Zhou, Maigeng; Wang, Lijun; Rutherford, Shannon; Lin, Hualiang; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yonghui; Xiao, Jianpeng; Zhang, Yewu; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gu, Xin; Chu, Cordia

    2015-02-01

    Many studies have reported increased mortality risk associated with heat waves. However, few have assessed the health impacts at a nation scale in a developing country. This study examines the mortality effects of heat waves in China and explores whether the effects are modified by individual-level and community-level characteristics. Daily mortality and meteorological variables from 66 Chinese communities were collected for the period 2006-2011. Heat waves were defined as ≥2 consecutive days with mean temperature ≥95th percentile of the year-round community-specific distribution. The community-specific mortality effects of heat waves were first estimated using a Distributed Lag Non-linear Model (DLNM), adjusting for potential confounders. To investigate effect modification by individual characteristics (age, gender, cause of death, education level or place of death), separate DLNM models were further fitted. Potential effect modification by community characteristics was examined using a meta-regression analysis. A total of 5.0% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 2.9%-7.2%) excess deaths were associated with heat waves in 66 Chinese communities, with the highest excess deaths in north China (6.0%, 95% CI: 1%-11.3%), followed by east China (5.2%, 95% CI: 0.4%-10.2%) and south China (4.5%, 95% CI: 1.4%-7.6%). Our results indicate that individual characteristics significantly modified heat waves effects in China, with greater effects on cardiovascular mortality, cerebrovascular mortality, respiratory mortality, the elderly, females, the population dying outside of a hospital and those with a higher education attainment. Heat wave mortality effects were also more pronounced for those living in urban cities or densely populated communities. Heat waves significantly increased mortality risk in China with apparent spatial heterogeneity, which was modified by some individual-level and community-level factors. Our findings suggest adaptation plans that target vulnerable

  9. Summer heat waves over western Europe 1880-2003, their relationship to large-scale forcings and predictability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della-Marta, P.M. [University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Climatology and Meteorology Research Group, Bern (Switzerland); Federal Office for Meteorology and Climatology MeteoSwiss, Zurich (Switzerland); National Climate Center, Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne (Australia); Luterbacher, J.; Xoplaki, E.; Wanner, H. [University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Climatology and Meteorology Research Group, Bern (Switzerland); NCCR Climate, Bern (Switzerland); Weissenfluh, H. von [University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Climatology and Meteorology Research Group, Bern (Switzerland); Brunet, M. [University Rovira i Virgili, Climate Change Research Group, Tarragona (Spain)

    2007-08-15

    We investigate the large-scale forcing and teleconnections between atmospheric circulation (sea level pressure, SLP), sea surface temperatures (SSTs), precipitation and heat wave events over western Europe using a new dataset of 54 daily maximum temperature time series. Forty four of these time series have been homogenised at the daily timescale to ensure that the presence of inhomogeneities has been minimised. The daily data have been used to create a seasonal index of the number of heat waves. Using canonical correlation analysis (CCA), heat waves over western Europe are shown to be related to anomalous high pressure over Scandinavia and central western Europe. Other forcing factors such as Atlantic SSTs and European precipitation, the later as a proxy for soil moisture, a known factor in strengthening land-atmosphere feedback processes, are also important. The strength of the relationship between summer SLP anomalies and heat waves is improved (from 35%) to account for around 46% of its variability when summer Atlantic and Mediterranean SSTs and summer European precipitation anomalies are included as predictors. This indicates that these predictors are not completely collinear rather that they each have some contribution to accounting for summer heat wave variability. However, the simplicity and scale of the statistical analysis masks this complex interaction between variables. There is some useful predictive skill of summer heat waves using multiple lagged predictors. A CCA using preceding winter North Atlantic SSTs and preceding January to May Mediterranean total precipitation results in significant hindcast (1972-2003) Spearman rank correlation skill scores up to 0.55 with an average skill score over the domain equal to 0.28 {+-} 0.28. In agreement with previous studies focused on mean summer temperature, there appears to be some predictability of heat wave events on the decadal scale from the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), although the long

  10. Past analogs of recent climate anomalies and impacts in Portugal. Droughts, storms and heat waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoforado, M. J.; Nunes, M. F.

    2009-09-01

    An indexed reconstruction of precipitation variability, based on documentary and instrumental data, has been done for southern Portugal starting in 1675. The descriptions of the extreme events in the documentary sources have also supplied information about their impacts. We will compare past and recent extreme weather events in Portugal, their causes and their impacts on society. We have selected periods of winter droughts, of storms that triggered great floods and of heat waves. There are a number of documentary sources dating from 1693-94 indicating that that there was no rainfall from December 1693 to at least November 1694 with the exception of light showers in June. Several pro-pluvia rogations ceremonies took place all over the country, even in the Northwest that is generally rainy. There are numerous descriptions of the impact of droughts on agriculture, of shortage of cereals, of escalating prices and the subsequent generalised famine. An analogy will be made for the 20th century using the 1980-81 winter drought that lasted roughly the same time and which also had severe social and economic impacts. The decrease in production of hydroelectric energy (50% below average) between January and July 1981 is also pointed out. In both cases, the lack of rainfall was partly due to a ridge that stayed over the Eastern Atlantic and kept Iberia in aerologic shelter. Apart from urban flash floods there are two types of floods in Portugal: (i) floods from the big river basins (Tagus, Mondego and Douro) that are due to the frequent passage of westerly frontal depressions during days or weeks; and (ii) floods of the small river basins due to convective depressions that affect small areas. The December 1739 flood, caused by the overflow of the great rivers, will be compared with the ones that occurred in February 1978. Both were caused by intensive precipitation all over the country at a time when the soil was already saturated with water from previous rainfall. The damages

  11. Risk factors for deaths during the 2009 heat wave in Adelaide, Australia: a matched case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Nitschke, Monika; Krackowizer, Antoinette; Dear, Keith; Pisaniello, Dino; Weinstein, Philip; Tucker, Graeme; Shakib, Sepehr; Bi, Peng

    2017-01-01

    The extreme heat wave in Australia in 2009 resulted in significantly increased number of daily deaths. The circumstances that lead to deaths during extreme heat have not been explored before in Australia. This study aims to identify the individual and community risk factors for deaths during this extreme heat wave in Adelaide. A matched case-control study was conducted. Cases were those who died in the Adelaide metropolitan area during the heat wave period. For each case, two community controls were randomly selected, matched by age and gender. Face-to-face or telephone interviews were conducted to collect data of demographic information, living environment, social support, health status and behavioural changes during the heat wave. Descriptive analysis, as well as simple and multiple conditional logistic regressions were performed. In total, 82 deaths and 164 matched community controls were included in the analysis, with a median age of 77.5 (range 26.6-100.7). The multiple logistic regression model indicated that, compared with controls, the risk of death during the heat wave was significantly increased for people living alone (AOR = 42.31, 95 % CI 2.3, 792.8) or having existing chronic heart disease (AOR = 22.4, 95 % CI 1.7, 303.0). In addition, having air conditioning in bedrooms (AOR = 0.004, 95 % CI 0.00006, 0.28) and participating in social activities more than once a week (AOR = 0.011, 95 % CI 0.0004, 0.29) indicated significant protective effects. We have identified factors that could significantly impact on the likelihood of deaths during heat waves. Our findings could assist in the development of future intervention programs and policies to reduce mortality associated with a warmer climate.

  12. Risk factors for deaths during the 2009 heat wave in Adelaide, Australia: a matched case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Nitschke, Monika; Krackowizer, Antoinette; Dear, Keith; Pisaniello, Dino; Weinstein, Philip; Tucker, Graeme; Shakib, Sepehr; Bi, Peng

    2016-05-01

    The extreme heat wave in Australia in 2009 resulted in significantly increased number of daily deaths. The circumstances that lead to deaths during extreme heat have not been explored before in Australia. This study aims to identify the individual and community risk factors for deaths during this extreme heat wave in Adelaide. A matched case-control study was conducted. Cases were those who died in the Adelaide metropolitan area during the heat wave period. For each case, two community controls were randomly selected, matched by age and gender. Face-to-face or telephone interviews were conducted to collect data of demographic information, living environment, social support, health status and behavioural changes during the heat wave. Descriptive analysis, as well as simple and multiple conditional logistic regressions were performed. In total, 82 deaths and 164 matched community controls were included in the analysis, with a median age of 77.5 (range 26.6-100.7). The multiple logistic regression model indicated that, compared with controls, the risk of death during the heat wave was significantly increased for people living alone (AOR = 42.31, 95 % CI 2.3, 792.8) or having existing chronic heart disease (AOR = 22.4, 95 % CI 1.7, 303.0). In addition, having air conditioning in bedrooms (AOR = 0.004, 95 % CI 0.00006, 0.28) and participating in social activities more than once a week (AOR = 0.011, 95 % CI 0.0004, 0.29) indicated significant protective effects. We have identified factors that could significantly impact on the likelihood of deaths during heat waves. Our findings could assist in the development of future intervention programs and policies to reduce mortality associated with a warmer climate.

  13. Marine Heat Waves Hazard 3D Maps and the Risk for Low Motility Organisms in a Warming Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Galli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Frequency and severity of heat waves is expected to increase as a consequence of climate change with important impacts on human and ecosystems health. However, while many studies explored the projected occurrence of hot extremes on terrestrial systems, few studies dealt with marine systems, so that both the expected change in marine heat waves occurrence and the effects on marine organisms and ecosystems remain less understood and surprisingly poorly quantified. Here we: (i assess how much more frequent, severe, and depth-penetrating marine heat waves will be in the Mediterranean area in the next decades by post-processing the output of an ocean general circulation model; and (ii show that heat waves increase will impact on many species that live in shallow waters and have reduced motility, and related economic activities. This information is made available also as a dataset of temperature threshold exceedance indexes that can be used in combination with biological information to produce risk assessment maps for target species or biomes across the whole Mediterranean Sea. As case studies we compared projected heat waves occurrence with thermotolerance thresholds of low motility organisms. Results suggest a deepening of the survival horizon for red coral (Corallium rubrum, a commercially exploited benthic species already subjected to heat-related mass mortality events and coralligenous reefs as well as a reduction of suitable farming sites for the mussel Mythilus galloprovincialis. In recent years Mediterranean circalittoral ecosystems (coralligenous have been severely and repeatedly impacted by marine heat waves. Our results support that equally deleterious events are expected in the near future also for other ecologically important habitats (e.g., seagrass meadows and aquaculture activities (bivalvae, and point at the need for mitigation strategies.

  14. Attributing human mortality during extreme heat waves to anthropogenic climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Daniel; Heaviside, Clare; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Huntingford, Chris; Masato, Giacomo; Guillod, Benoit P.; Frumhoff, Peter; Bowery, Andy; Wallom, David; Allen, Myles

    2016-07-01

    It has been argued that climate change is the biggest global health threat of the 21st century. The extreme high temperatures of the summer of 2003 were associated with up to seventy thousand excess deaths across Europe. Previous studies have attributed the meteorological event to the human influence on climate, or examined the role of heat waves on human health. Here, for the first time, we explicitly quantify the role of human activity on climate and heat-related mortality in an event attribution framework, analysing both the Europe-wide temperature response in 2003, and localised responses over London and Paris. Using publicly-donated computing, we perform many thousands of climate simulations of a high-resolution regional climate model. This allows generation of a comprehensive statistical description of the 2003 event and the role of human influence within it, using the results as input to a health impact assessment model of human mortality. We find large-scale dynamical modes of atmospheric variability remain largely unchanged under anthropogenic climate change, and hence the direct thermodynamical response is mainly responsible for the increased mortality. In summer 2003, anthropogenic climate change increased the risk of heat-related mortality in Central Paris by ∼70% and by ∼20% in London, which experienced lower extreme heat. Out of the estimated ∼315 and ∼735 summer deaths attributed to the heatwave event in Greater London and Central Paris, respectively, 64 (±3) deaths were attributable to anthropogenic climate change in London, and 506 (±51) in Paris. Such an ability to robustly attribute specific damages to anthropogenic drivers of increased extreme heat can inform societal responses to, and responsibilities for, climate change.

  15. The role played by thermal feedback in heated Farley-Buneman waves at high latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. St.-Maurice

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that electron thermal effects have to be taken into account when dealing with the theory of ionospheric instabilities in the high-latitude ionosphere. Unfortunately, the mathematical complexity often hides the physical processes at work. We follow the limiting cases of a complex but systematic generalized fluid approach to get to the heart of the thermal processes that affect the stability of E region waves during electron heating events. We try to show as simply as possible under what conditions thermal effects contribute to the destabilization of strongly field-aligned (zero aspect angle Farley-Buneman modes. We show that destabilization can arise from a combination of (1 a reduction in pressure gradients associated with temperature fluctuations that are out of phase with density fluctuations, and (2 thermal diffusion, which takes the electrons from regions of enhanced temperatures to regions of negative temperature fluctuations, and therefore enhanced densities. However, we also show that, contrary to what has been suggested in the past, for modes excited along the E0×B direction thermal feedback decreases the growth rate and raises the threshold speed of the Farley-Buneman instability. The increase in threshold speed appears to be important enough to explain the generation of `Type IV' waves in the high-latitude ionosphere.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; iono- spheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities

  16. Simulations of Alfvén and Kink Wave Driving of the Solar Chromosphere: Efficient Heating and Spicule Launching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, C. S.; Arber, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    Two of the central problems in our understanding of the solar chromosphere are how the upper chromosphere is heated and what drives spicules. Estimates of the required chromospheric heating, based on radiative and conductive losses, suggest a rate of ˜0.1 erg cm-3 s-1 in the lower chromosphere and drops to ˜10-3 erg cm-3 s-1 in the upper chromosphere. The chromosphere is also permeated by spicules, higher density plasma from the lower atmosphere propelled upwards at speeds of ˜10-20 km s-1, for so-called Type I spicules, which reach heights of ˜3000-5000 km above the photosphere. A clearer understanding of chromospheric dynamics, its heating, and the formation of spicules is thus of central importance to solar atmospheric science. For over 30 years it has been proposed that photospheric driving of MHD waves may be responsible for both heating and spicule formation. This paper presents results from a high-resolution MHD treatment of photospheric driven Alfvén and kink waves propagating upwards into an expanding flux tube embedded in a model chromospheric atmosphere. We show that the ponderomotive coupling from Alfvén and kink waves into slow modes generates shocks, which both heat the upper chromosphere and drive spicules. These simulations show that wave driving of the solar chromosphere can give a local heating rate that matches observations and drive spicules consistent with Type I observations all within a single coherent model.

  17. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  18. Spatial Approach of Climate Risk Assessment and Uncertainty: A Case Study of Heat Wave Risk in Seoul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S.; Lee, D. K.; Jeong, W.

    2016-12-01

    As climate change continuously reaches new climaxes, it is aggravating many climate extremes. Urban heat island effect (UHI) is one of them. It occurs in cities with sealed surfaces and building canyons, which make changes in storage, radiative and turbulent heat flux that make cities warmer than surrounding areas. However, applying adequate policies at the right place can attenuate the impacts of UHI. Therefore, heat wave risk assessment is important in the sense that it helps decision makers set priority in targets of application. Seoul is highly urbanized capital of South Korea. It is suffering from increasing heat wave days and tropical nights every year. More than 10 million residents are exposed to heat extremes and measures should be taken. Therefore, heat wave risk assessment of Seoul should be done in advance. While, risk assessment contains uncertainty; from variables to assessment procedure. However, there is no standardized assessment methodology. A fuzzy logic, introduced by Zadeh in 1965, is applied in quantifying these uncertainties. We fuzzified indices for assessing heat wave risk with threshold values. And indices were aggregated step by step with fuzzy operators, which make up "vulnerability" and "climate exposure". Vulnerability and climate exposure are further combined with fuzzy operator to derive complete heat wave risk assessment map. As a result, we expressed spatial distribution of UHI risk. Districts lying in the central area of the city showed higher risk than in marginal areas. In addition, hierarchic structured approach of assessing risk in this study makes it easy to track key variables of risk, therefore, giving decision makers insights to help their application of adaptation policies.

  19. Awareness of and Attitudes towards Heat Waves within the Context of Climate Change among a Cohort of Residents in Adelaide, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain A. Walker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat waves are a public health concern in Australia and unprecedented heat waves have been recorded in Adelaide over recent years. The aim of this study was to examine the perception and attitudes towards heat waves in the context of climate change among a group of residents in Adelaide, an Australian city with a temperate climate. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the summer of 2012 among a sample of 267 residents. The results of the survey found that television (89.9%, radio (71.2%, newspapers (45.3% were the main sources from which respondents received information about heat waves. The majority of the respondents (73.0% followed news about heat waves very or somewhat closely. About 26.6% of the respondents were extremely or very concerned about the effects of heat waves on them personally. The main issues that were of personal concern for respondents during a heat wave were their personal comfort (60.7%, their garden (48.7%, and sleeping well (47.6%. Overall, respondents were more concerned about the impacts of heat waves to the society than on themselves. There was a significant association between gender (χ² = 21.2, df = 3, p = 0.000, gross annual household income (p = 0.03 and concern for the societal effects of heat waves. Less than half (43.2% of the respondents believed that heat waves will extremely or very likely increase in Adelaide according to climate projections. Nearly half (49.3% believed that the effects of heat waves were already being felt in Adelaide. These findings may inform the reframing and communication strategies for heat waves in Adelaide in the context of climate change.

  20. Awareness of and Attitudes towards Heat Waves within the Context of Climate Change among a Cohort of Residents in Adelaide, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akompab, Derick A.; Bi, Peng; Williams, Susan; Grant, Janet; Walker, Iain A.; Augoustinos, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Heat waves are a public health concern in Australia and unprecedented heat waves have been recorded in Adelaide over recent years. The aim of this study was to examine the perception and attitudes towards heat waves in the context of climate change among a group of residents in Adelaide, an Australian city with a temperate climate. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the summer of 2012 among a sample of 267 residents. The results of the survey found that television (89.9%), radio (71.2%), newspapers (45.3%) were the main sources from which respondents received information about heat waves. The majority of the respondents (73.0%) followed news about heat waves very or somewhat closely. About 26.6% of the respondents were extremely or very concerned about the effects of heat waves on them personally. The main issues that were of personal concern for respondents during a heat wave were their personal comfort (60.7%), their garden (48.7%), and sleeping well (47.6%). Overall, respondents were more concerned about the impacts of heat waves to the society than on themselves. There was a significant association between gender (χ² = 21.2, df = 3, p = 0.000), gross annual household income (p = 0.03) and concern for the societal effects of heat waves. Less than half (43.2%) of the respondents believed that heat waves will extremely or very likely increase in Adelaide according to climate projections. Nearly half (49.3%) believed that the effects of heat waves were already being felt in Adelaide. These findings may inform the reframing and communication strategies for heat waves in Adelaide in the context of climate change. PMID:23343978

  1. A Simple Calorimetric Experiment that Highlights Aspects of Global Heat Retention and Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Joel D.; Johnston, Harold S.

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, general chemistry students measure the heating curves for three different systems: (i) 500 g of room-temperature water heated by a small desk lamp, (ii) 500 g of an ice-water mixture warmed by conduction with room-temperature surroundings, and (iii) 500 g of an ice-water mixture heated by a small desk lamp and by…

  2. Reduction of the heat leak in superconducting system at half-wave-rectified current mode by peltier current lead

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaguchi, T; Nakamura, K; Yamaguchi, S; Hasegawa, Y

    2002-01-01

    Experiments of Peltier current lead (PCL) were performed by the way of half-wave-rectified current (HWRC) for an evaluation of the PCL system in the drive with the large-rippled current. The current ripple of the HWRC is large, and we discussed the cooling capability of the current ripple. The experimental results revealed that the temperature difference of the thermoelectric-element (TE) increased with the magnitude of the current in the PCL system, despite the large current ripple. Calorimetric measurements revealed that the PCL reduced the heat leak of 60% for the peak current 90A. We compared the PCL systems of the direct current (dc) mode and the HWRC mode. The results showed that the current dependence of the temperature difference in the HWRC mode did not match that of the dc mode, but those of the heat leak matched well. The performance of the Peltier cooling in the HWRC mode is reduced to be 2/pi time of the Seebeck coefficient for the dc mode by using the time-average method. (author)

  3. Reduction of the heat leak in superconducting system at half-wave-rectified current mode by peltier current lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Ohtaki, Naohiro; Nakamura, Keiji; Yamaguchi, Satarou [Chubu Univ., Kasugai, Aichi (Japan); Hasegawa, Yasuhiro [Saitama Univ., Saitama (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Experiments of Peltier current lead (PCL) were performed by the way of half-wave-rectified current (HWRC) for an evaluation of the PCL system in the drive with the large-rippled current. The current ripple of the HWRC is large, and we discussed the cooling capability of the current ripple. The experimental results revealed that the temperature difference of the thermoelectric-element (TE) increased with the magnitude of the current in the PCL system, despite the large current ripple. Calorimetric measurements revealed that the PCL reduced the heat leak of 60% for the peak current 90A. We compared the PCL systems of the direct current (dc) mode and the HWRC mode. The results showed that the current dependence of the temperature difference in the HWRC mode did not match that of the dc mode, but those of the heat leak matched well. The performance of the Peltier cooling in the HWRC mode is reduced to be 2/{pi} time of the Seebeck coefficient for the dc mode by using the time-average method. (author)

  4. Heat transfer and wall temperature effects in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, Matteo; Pirozzoli, Sergio; Grasso, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of the wall temperature on the behavior of oblique shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions at freestream Mach number $2.28$ and shock angle of the wedge generator $\\varphi = 8^{\\circ}$. Five values of the wall-to-recovery-temperature ratio ($T_w/T_r$) are considered, corresponding to cold, adiabatic and hot wall thermal conditions. We show that the main effect of cooling is to decrease the characteristic scales of the interaction in terms of upstream influence and extent of the separation bubble. The opposite behavior is observed in the case of heating, that produces a marked dilatation of the interaction region. The distribution of the Stanton number shows that a strong amplification of the heat transfer occurs across the interaction, and the maximum values of thermal and dynamic loads are found in the case of cold wall. The analysis reveals that the fluctuating heat flux exhibits a strong intermittent behavior, characterized by ...

  5. Surface thermal analysis of North Brabant cities and neighbourhoods during heat waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyre Echevarria Icaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island effect is often associated with large metropolises. However, in the Netherlands even small cities will be affected by the phenomenon in the future (Hove et al., 2011, due to the dispersed or mosaic urbanisation patterns in particularly the southern part of the country: the province of North Brabant. This study analyses the average night time land surface temperature (LST of 21 North-Brabant urban areas through 22 satellite images retrieved by Modis 11A1 during the 2006 heat wave and uses Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper to map albedo and normalized difference temperature index (NDVI values. Albedo, NDVI and imperviousness are found to play the most relevant role in the increase of night-time LST. The surface cover cluster analysis of these three parameters reveals that the 12 “urban living environment” categories used in the region of North Brabant can actually be reduced to 7 categories, which simplifies the design guidelines to improve the surface thermal behaviour of the different neighbourhoods thus reducing the Urban Heat Island (UHI effect in existing medium size cities and future developments adjacent to those cities.

  6. Wave-current interaction, experiments with controlled uniform shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bruno; Touboul, Julien; Rey, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Vertically varying currents have a non negligible impact on the propagation of waves. Even though the analytical aspect of the interaction between wave and sheared current is being an active subject of research, experimental data remain rare. Here, the effects of a uniformly shear were investigated in the 10 m long by 0.3 m wide wave flume of the Université de Toulon, France. The main difficulty of the study was to produce several conditions of current with constant shear (du/dz = cst) that would persist along the channel. This was achieved by using curved wire screens upstream the channel (Dunn and Tavoularis, 2007). The geometry and properties of the screens were adjusted to deflect the streamline towards the channel bed or the free surface in order to change the velocity profile. The study focused on regular wave propagating against the current for several wave frequencies and amplitudes. Properties of the free surface and flow velocity are discussed for current with positive and negative shear in order to quantify the influence of the current on the waves. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The DGA (Direction Générale de l'Armement, France) is acknowledged for its financial support through the ANR grant N° ANR-13-ASTR-0007.

  7. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Heating, Refrigeration, & Air Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John

    This Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning course is comprised of eleven individualized units: (1) Refrigeration Tools, Materials, and Refrigerant; (2) Basic Heating and Air Conditioning; (3) Sealed System Repairs; (4) Basic Refrigeration Systems; (5) Compression Systems and Compressors; (6) Refrigeration Controls; (7) Electric Circuit…

  8. Infragravity wave generation and dynamics over a mild slope beach : Experiments and numerical computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cienfuegos, R.; Duarte, L.; Hernandez, E.

    2008-12-01

    Charasteristic frequencies of gravity waves generated by wind and propagating towards the coast are usually comprised between 0.05Hz and 1Hz. Nevertheless, lower frequecy waves, in the range of 0.001Hz and 0.05Hz, have been observed in the nearshore zone. Those long waves, termed as infragravity waves, are generated by complex nonlinear mechanisms affecting the propagation of irregular waves up to the coast. The groupiness of an incident random wave field may be responsible for producing a slow modulation of the mean water surface thus generating bound long waves travelling at the group speed. Similarly, a quasi- periodic oscillation of the break-point location, will be accompained by a slow modulation of set-up/set-down in the surf zone and generation and release of long waves. If the primary structure of the carrying incident gravity waves is destroyed (e.g. by breaking), forced long waves can be freely released and even reflected at the coast. Infragravity waves can affect port operation through resonating conditions, or strongly affect sediment transport and beach morphodynamics. In the present study we investigate infragravity wave generation mechanisms both, from experiments and numerical computations. Measurements were conducted at the 70-meter long wave tank, located at the Instituto Nacional de Hidraulica (Chile), prepared with a beach of very mild slope of 1/80 in order to produce large surf zone extensions. A random JONSWAP type wave field (h0=0.52m, fp=0.25Hz, Hmo=0.17m) was generated by a piston wave-maker and measurements of the free surface displacements were performed all over its length at high spatial resolution (0.2m to 1m). Velocity profiles were also measured at four verticals inside the surf zone using an ADV. Correlation maps of wave group envelopes and infragravity waves are computed in order to identify long wave generation and dynamics in the experimental set-up. It appears that both mechanisms (groupiness and break-point oscillation) are

  9. Vapor Compression and Thermoelectric Heat Pump Heat Exchangers for a Condensate Distillation System: Design and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lisa R.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing the reuse of wastewater while minimizing the use of consumables is critical in long duration space exploration. One of the more promising methods of reclaiming urine is the distillation/condensation process used in the cascade distillation system (CDS). This system accepts a mixture of urine and toxic stabilizing agents, heats it to vaporize the water and condenses and cools the resulting water vapor. The CDS wastewater flow requires heating and its condensate flow requires cooling. Performing the heating and cooling processes separately requires two separate units, each of which would require large amounts of electrical power. By heating the wastewater and cooling the condensate in a single heat pump unit, mass, volume, and power efficiencies can be obtained. The present work describes and compares two competing heat pump methodologies that meet the needs of the CDS: 1) a series of mini compressor vapor compression cycles and 2) a thermoelectric heat exchanger. In the paper, the system level requirements are outlined, the designs of the two heat pumps are described in detail, and the results of heat pump performance tests are provided. A summary is provided of the heat pump mass, volume and power trades and a selection recommendation is made.

  10. Mortality in Portugal associated with the heat wave of August 2003: early estimation of effect, using a rapid method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, P J; Falcão, J M; Contreiras, M T; Paixão, E; Brandão, João; Batista, I

    2005-07-01

    During the first two weeks of August 2003, Portugal was affected by a severe heat wave. Following the identification in Portugal of the influence of heat waves on mortality in 1981 and 1991 (estimated excess of about 1900 and 1000 deaths respectively), the Observatorio Nacional de Saude (ONSA) - Instituto Nacional de Saude Dr. Ricardo Jorge, together with the Vigilancia Previsao e Informacao - Instituto de Meteorologia, created a surveillance system called iCARO, which has been in operation since 1999. iCARO identifies heat waves with potential influence on mortality [1]. Before the end of the 2003 heat wave, ONSA had produced a preliminary estimate of its effect on mortality. The results based on daily number of deaths from 1 June to 12 August 2003 were presented within 4 working days. Data was gathered from 31 National Civil registrars, covering the district capitals of all 18 districts of mainland Portugal, and representing approximately 40% of the mainland's mortality. The number of deaths registered in the period 30 July to 12 August was compared with the ones registered during 3 comparison periods: (in July): 1-14 July, 1-28 July, and 15-28 July). 15-28 July, the period best resembling the heat wave in time and characteristics, produced an estimation of 37.7% higher mortality rate then the value expected under normal temperature conditions. From this value, an estimate of 1316 death excess was obtained for mainland Portugal. The main purpose of this article is to present the method used to identify and assess the occurrence of an effect (excess mortality) during the heat wave of summer 2003.

  11. Stage-specific heat effects: timing and duration of heat waves alter demographic rates of a global insect pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Rudolf, Volker H W; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2015-12-01

    The frequency and duration of periods with high temperatures are expected to increase under global warming. Thus, even short-lived organisms are increasingly likely to experience periods of hot temperatures at some point of their life-cycle. Despite recent progress, it remains unclear how various temperature experiences during the life-cycle of organisms affect demographic traits. We simulated hot days (daily mean temperature of 30 °C) increasingly experienced under field conditions and investigated how the timing and duration of such hot days during the life cycle of Plutella xylostella affects adult traits. We show that hot days experienced during some life stages (but not all) altered adult lifespan, fecundity, and oviposition patterns. Importantly, the effects of hot days were contingent on which stage was affected, and these stage-specific effects were not always additive. Thus, adults that experience different temporal patterns of hot periods (i.e., changes in timing and duration) during their life-cycle often had different demographic rates and reproductive patterns. These results indicate that we cannot predict the effects of current and future climate on natural populations by simply focusing on changes in the mean temperature. Instead, we need to incorporate the temporal patterns of heat events relative to the life-cycle of organisms to describe population dynamics and how they will respond to future climate change.

  12. Changes in heat waves characteristics over Extremadura (SW Spain): duration, intensity and frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Javier; Parey, Sylvie; Fernández-Fernández, María Isabel; Carrasco, Víctor Manuel; Agustín García, José

    2016-04-01

    Heat waves (HW) are increasing and its consequences are important not only for the effects over the population but also for the agriculture and biodiversity. That's why trends in heat wave events over Extremadura, a Region located in the southwest of Spain and characterized by irrigated land with crops like corn or tomatoes growing in summers, has been studied. Heat waves are defined as days occurring above the 95th percentile of the summer (June-August) maximum temperature time series. Another event named as Warm Event (WE) has been studied and defined as exceedance over the 75th percentile. For this purpose, a set of 13 regularly distributed daily maximum temperature time series was selected from a larger database for the Region of Extremadura for the common period 1965-2014. A stochastic seasonal functional heteroscedastic auto-regressive model developed to simulate daily (minimum, maximum, or mean) temperature time series coherent with observed time series (Parey et al., 2014, Dacunha-Castelle et al., 2015) has been used. This stochastic temperature generator is used to reproduce 1000 time series equivalent to the observed ones in order to investigate the significance of the changes in HW characteristics: duration, intensity and frequency; using different sub-periods length for the observed period. The results show that the changes in HW frequencies of the last 10-year sub-period comparing to the first are significant for 7 of the 13 observatories but the changes in HW durations and intensities are not significant. But when considering the lower threshold (75th percentile) to study changes in WE characteristics, frequency shows significant changes in 8 observatories, duration for 4 observatories and intensity for 2. Then, the parameters of the WE are increasing higher than the corresponding to the HW events. References: Parey, S., T. T. H. Hoang, and D. Dacunha-Castelle (2014), Validation of a stochastic temperature generator focusing on extremes, and an

  13. Simulation of heat waves in climate models using large deviation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragone, Francesco; Bouchet, Freddy; Wouters, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    One of the goals of climate science is to characterize the statistics of extreme, potentially dangerous events (e.g. exceptionally intense precipitations, wind gusts, heat waves) in the present and future climate. The study of extremes is however hindered by both a lack of past observational data for events with a return time larger than decades or centuries, and by the large computational cost required to perform a proper sampling of extreme statistics with state of the art climate models. The study of the dynamics leading to extreme events is especially difficult as it requires hundreds or thousands of realizations of the dynamical paths leading to similar extremes. We will discuss here a new numerical algorithm, based on large deviation theory, that allows to efficiently sample very rare events in complex climate models. A large ensemble of realizations are run in parallel, and selection and cloning procedures are applied in order to oversample the trajectories leading to the extremes of interest. The statistics and characteristic dynamics of the extremes can then be computed on a much larger sample of events. This kind of importance sampling method belongs to a class of genetic algorithms that have been successfully applied in other scientific fields (statistical mechanics, complex biomolecular dynamics), allowing to decrease by orders of magnitude the numerical cost required to sample extremes with respect to standard direct numerical sampling. We study the applicability of this method to the computation of the statistics of European surface temperatures with the Planet Simulator (Plasim), an intermediate complexity general circulation model of the atmosphere. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method by comparing its performances against standard approaches. Dynamical paths leading to heat waves are studied, enlightening the relation of Plasim heat waves with blocking events, and the dynamics leading to these events. We then discuss the feasibility of this

  14. Model experiment and analysis of pressure waves emitted from portals of a tunnel with a branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, T.; Fukuda, T.; Saito, S.

    2014-11-01

    A model experiment was performed to investigate pressure waves generated by a train passing by a branch and pulse waves radiated from portals of a main tunnel and the branch. For the experiment, the train speed was set as 400-500 km/h. The cross-sectional area ratio of the branch to the main tunnel was 0-0.5. The cross-sectional area ratio of the branch to the main tunnel was identified as a dominant factor in determining the magnitude of the pressure waves in the tunnel and the pulse waves radiated from the portals. Closed form expressions for the magnitude of the pressure changes generated by a train passing by a branch were derived using low Mach number approximation. Correlation between the pressure waves in the tunnel and the pulse waves radiated from the portals was clarified using simple acoustic theory. The overall tendency of the experimental results is explainable based on analytical results.

  15. Solutions of Heat-Like and Wave-Like Equations with Variable Coefficients by Means of the Homotopy Analysis Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K.Alomari; M.S.M.Noorani; R.Nazar

    2008-01-01

    We employ the homotopy analysis method(HAM)to obtain approximate analytical solutions to the heat-like and wave-like equations.The HAM contains the auxiliary parameter h,which provides a convenient way of controlling the convergence region of series solutions.The analysisis accompanied by several linear and nonlinear heat-like and wave-like equations with initial boundary value problems.The results obtained prove that HAM is very effectiw and simple with less error than the Adomian decomposition method and the variational iteration method.

  16. The Spanish tourist sector facing extreme climate events: a case study of domestic tourism in the heat wave of 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Martín, M. Belén; Armesto-López, Xosé A.; Martínez-Ibarra, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    This research explores, by means of a questionnaire-based survey, public knowledge and perception as well as the behaviour of young Spanish tourists before, during and after the summer holiday period affected by an episode of extreme heat in 2003. The survey was administered between November and December 2004. The extraordinary heat wave of the summer of 2003 can be seen as an example of a normal episode in terms of the predicted intensity and duration of European summers towards the end of the twenty-first century. It can therefore be used as the laboratory setting for this study. In this context, the use of the climate analogue approach allows us to obtain novel perspectives regarding the future impact that this type of event could have on tourist demand, based on a real experience. Likewise, such an approach allows the strategies of adaptation implemented by the different elements in the tourist system in order to cope with the atmospheric episode to be evaluated. Such strategies could prove useful in reducing vulnerability when faced with similar episodes in the future. The main results indicate that Spanish tourists (young segment market) are flexible in adapting to episodes of extremely high temperatures. Their personal perception of the phenomenon, their behaviour and the adaptation measures implemented to a greater or lesser extent before that time, reduce the vulnerability of the sector when faced with this type of event, at least from the point of view of this young segment of the internal national market. In Spain, the episode of extreme heat of 2003 has led to the implementation or improvement of some adaptive measures after the event, especially in the fields of management, policy and education.

  17. The Spanish tourist sector facing extreme climate events: a case study of domestic tourism in the heat wave of 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Martín, M Belén; Armesto-López, Xosé A; Martínez-Ibarra, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    This research explores, by means of a questionnaire-based survey, public knowledge and perception as well as the behaviour of young Spanish tourists before, during and after the summer holiday period affected by an episode of extreme heat in 2003. The survey was administered between November and December 2004. The extraordinary heat wave of the summer of 2003 can be seen as an example of a normal episode in terms of the predicted intensity and duration of European summers towards the end of the twenty-first century. It can therefore be used as the laboratory setting for this study. In this context, the use of the climate analogue approach allows us to obtain novel perspectives regarding the future impact that this type of event could have on tourist demand, based on a real experience. Likewise, such an approach allows the strategies of adaptation implemented by the different elements in the tourist system in order to cope with the atmospheric episode to be evaluated. Such strategies could prove useful in reducing vulnerability when faced with similar episodes in the future. The main results indicate that Spanish tourists (young segment market) are flexible in adapting to episodes of extremely high temperatures. Their personal perception of the phenomenon, their behaviour and the adaptation measures implemented to a greater or lesser extent before that time, reduce the vulnerability of the sector when faced with this type of event, at least from the point of view of this young segment of the internal national market. In Spain, the episode of extreme heat of 2003 has led to the implementation or improvement of some adaptive measures after the event, especially in the fields of management, policy and education.

  18. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – 33rd scale experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

    2013-07-29

    Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Power’s Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speed statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.

  19. Land surface and atmospheric conditions associated with heat waves over the Chickasaw Nation in the South Central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eungul; Bieda, Rahama; Shanmugasundaram, Jothiganesh; Basara Richter, Heather

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to extreme heat was reconstructed based on regional land-atmosphere processes from 1979 to 2010 in the South Central U.S. The study region surrounds the Chickasaw Nation (CN), a predominantly Native American population with a highly prevalent burden of climate-sensitive chronic diseases. Land surface and atmospheric conditions for summer heat waves were analyzed during spring (March-April-May, MAM) and summer (June-July-August, JJA) based on the Climate and Ocean: Variability, Predictability, and Change maximum temperature definition for heat wave frequency (HWF). The spatial-temporal pattern of HWF was determined using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis and the corresponding principle component time series of the first EOF of HWF. Statistically significant analyses of observed conditions indicated that sensible heat increased and latent heat fluxes decreased with high HWF in the South Central U.S. The largest positive correlations of sensible heat flux to HWF and the largest negative correlations of latent heat flux to HWF were specifically observed over the CN. This is a significantly different energy transfer regime due to less available soil moisture during the antecedent MAM and JJA. The higher sensible heat from dry soil could cause significant warming from the near surface (>2.0°C) to the lower troposphere (>1.5°C), and accumulated boundary layer heat could induce the significant patterns of higher geopotential height and enhance anticyclonic circulations (negative vorticity anomaly) at the midtroposphere. Results suggested a positive land-atmosphere feedback associated with heat waves and called attention to the need for region-specific climate adaptation planning.

  20. First Experience from the World Largest fully commercial Solar Heating Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Alfred; Furbo, Simon

    1997-01-01

    The first experience from the largest solar heating plant in the world is given. The plant is situated in Marstal and is has a total area of 8000 square m.......The first experience from the largest solar heating plant in the world is given. The plant is situated in Marstal and is has a total area of 8000 square m....

  1. Observation of Magnetocoriolis Waves in a Liquid Metal Taylor-Couette Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nornberg, M. D.; Ji, H.; Schartman, E.; Roach, A.; Goodman, J.

    2009-09-14

    The first observation of fast and slow magnetocoriolis (MC) waves in a laboratory experiment is reported. Rotating nonaxisymmetric modes arising from a magnetized turbulent Taylor-Couette flow of liquid metal are identified as the fast and slow MC waves by the dependence of the rotation frequency on the applied field strength. The observed slow MC wave is marginally damped but will become destabilized by the magnetorotational instability with a modest increase in rotation rate.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Gravitational Waves, Volume 1: Theory and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Eric

    2008-10-01

    A superficial introduction to gravitational waves can be found in most textbooks on general relativity, but typically, the treatment hardly does justice to a field that has grown tremendously, both in its theoretical and experimental aspects, in the course of the last twenty years. Other than the technical literature, few other sources have been available to the interested reader; exceptions include edited volumes such as [1] and [2], Weber's little book [3] which happily is still in print, and Peter Saulson's text [4] which appears, unfortunately, to be out of print. In addition to these technical references, the story of gravitational waves was famously told by a sociologist of scientific knowledge [5] (focusing mostly on the experimental aspects) and a historian of science [6] (focusing mostly on the theoretical aspects). The book Gravitational Waves, Volume 1, by Michele Maggiore, is a welcome point of departure. This is, as far as I know, the first comprehensive textbook on gravitational waves. It describes the theoretical foundations of the subject, the known (and anticipated) sources, and the principles of detection by resonant masses and laser interferometers. This book is a major accomplishment, and with the promised volume 2 on astrophysical and cosmological aspects of gravitational waves, the community of all scientists interested in this topic will be well served. Part I of the book is devoted to the theoretical aspects of gravitational waves. In chapter 1 the waves are introduced in usual relativist's fashion, in the context of an approximation to general relativity in which they are treated as a small perturbation of the Minkowski metric of flat spacetime. This is an adequate foundation to study how the waves propagate, and how they interact with freely moving masses making up a detector. The waves are presented in the usual traceless-transverse gauge, but the detection aspects are also worked out in the detector's proper rest frame; this dual

  3. A Standing-Wave Experiment with a Guitar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Fred W.

    2006-10-01

    When teaching standing waves, one often uses as examples musical instruments with strings, e.g., pianos, violins, and guitars. In today's popular music culture, young people may be more familiar with guitars than any other string instrument. I was helping my 15-year-old granddaughter make some repairs and adjustments to her electric guitar, and the subject of the spacing between the frets on the fingerboard was raised. I told her that the physics of standing waves and the equal tempered musical scale dictate the location of the frets. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that students might be introduced to the physics of standing waves using a guitar and to the formula for the fret locations. By measuring the positions of the frets, this formula can be tested.

  4. Exact Theory to a Gravitational Wave Detector. New Experiments Proposed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We deduce exact solutions to the deviation equation in the cases of both free and spring-connected particles. The solutions show that gravitational waves may displace particles in a two-particle system only if they are in motion with respect to each other or the local space (there is no effect if they are at rest. We therefore propose a new experim