WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave forms

  1. Parametric form of QCD travelling waves

    OpenAIRE

    Peschanski, R.

    2005-01-01

    We derive parametric travelling-wave solutions of non-linear QCD equations. They describe the evolution towards saturation in the geometric scaling region. The method, based on an expansion in the inverse of the wave velocity, leads to a solvable hierarchy of differential equations. A universal parametric form of travelling waves emerges from the first two orders of the expansion.

  2. Parametric form of QCD travelling waves

    OpenAIRE

    Peschanski, R.

    2005-01-01

    We derive parametric travelling-wave solutions of non-linear QCD equations. They describe the evolution towards saturation in the geometric scaling region. The method, based on an expansion in the inverse of the wave velocity, leads to a solvable hierarchy of differential equations. A universal parametric form of travelling waves emerges from the first two orders of the expansion.

  3. Wave forming mechanisms in explosive welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental results of wavy metal interfaces obtained by explosive welding are presented and used to determine which wave forming mechanism occurred. It was found that for small collision angles (smaller than about 20°) the Von Karman or jet indentation mechanism occurs, while for large collision

  4. Critical Wave Forms in Dry Type Transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kenneth; Holbøll, Joachim; Henriksen, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    This paper concerns critical wave forms in dry type transformers under transient voltage application. A very general approach has been applied, meaning that many of the results will be applicable to various types of power transformers. The results can be very useful if they are combined with know......This paper concerns critical wave forms in dry type transformers under transient voltage application. A very general approach has been applied, meaning that many of the results will be applicable to various types of power transformers. The results can be very useful if they are combined...... with knowledge of the ageing effects of the insulation. Especially fast transients are likely to become a major issue due to fast breakers and power electronics. In order to perform relevant research in transformer insulation with respect to this subject, fundamental knowledge about the transmission...

  5. Early Cambrian wave-formed shoreline deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Glad, Aslaug Clemmensen; Pedersen, Gunver Krarup

    2017-01-01

    -preserved subaqueous dunes and wave ripples indicates deposition in a wave-dominated upper shoreface (littoral zone) environment, and the presence of interference ripples indicates that the littoral zone environment experienced water level fluctuations due to tides and/or changing meteorological conditions. Discoidal...

  6. Pulsar average wave forms and hollow-cone beam models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulsar wave forms have been analyzed from observations conducted over a wide radio-frequency range to assess the wave-form morphologies and to measure wave-form widths. The results of the analysis compare favorably with the predictions of a model with a hollow-cone beam of fixed dimensions and with random orientation of both the observer and the cone axis with respect to the pulsar spin axis. A class of three-component wave forms is included in the model by adding a central pencil beam to the hollow-cone hypothesis. The consequences of a number of discrepancies between observations and quantitative predictions of the model are discussed.

  7. Source Estimation by Full Wave Form Inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjögreen, Björn [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing; Petersson, N. Anders [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing

    2013-08-07

    Given time-dependent ground motion recordings at a number of receiver stations, we solve the inverse problem for estimating the parameters of the seismic source. The source is modeled as a point moment tensor source, characterized by its location, moment tensor components, the start time, and frequency parameter (rise time) of its source time function. In total, there are 11 unknown parameters. We use a non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm to minimize the full waveform misfit between observed and computed ground motions at the receiver stations. An important underlying assumption of the minimization problem is that the wave propagation is accurately described by the elastic wave equation in a heterogeneous isotropic material. We use a fourth order accurate finite difference method, developed in [12], to evolve the waves forwards in time. The adjoint wave equation corresponding to the discretized elastic wave equation is used to compute the gradient of the misfit, which is needed by the non-linear conjugated minimization algorithm. A new source point moment source discretization is derived that guarantees that the Hessian of the misfit is a continuous function of the source location. An efficient approach for calculating the Hessian is also presented. We show how the Hessian can be used to scale the problem to improve the convergence of the non-linear conjugated gradient algorithm. Numerical experiments are presented for estimating the source parameters from synthetic data in a layer over half-space problem (LOH.1), illustrating rapid convergence of the proposed approach.

  8. Rational Form Solitary Wave Solutions and Doubly Periodic Wave Solutions to(1+1)-Dimensional Dispersive Long Wave Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qi; CHEN Yong; ZHANG Hong-Qing

    2005-01-01

    In this work we devise an algebraic method to uniformly construct rational form solitary wave solutions and Jacobi and Weierstrass doubly periodic wave solutions of physical interest for nonlinear evolution equations. With the aid of symbolic computation, we apply the proposed method to solving the (1+1)-dimensional dispersive long wave equation and explicitly construct a series of exact solutions which include the rational form solitary wave solutions and elliptic doubly periodic wave solutions as special cases.

  9. Period functions for Maass wave forms and cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Bruggeman, R; Zagier, D; Bruggeman, R W; Zagier, D

    2015-01-01

    The authors construct explicit isomorphisms between spaces of Maass wave forms and cohomology groups for discrete cofinite groups \\Gamma\\subset\\mathrm{PSL}_2({\\mathbb{R}}). In the case that \\Gamma is the modular group \\mathrm{PSL}_2({\\mathbb{Z}}) this gives a cohomological framework for the results in Period functions for Maass wave forms. I, of J. Lewis and D. Zagier in Ann. Math. 153 (2001), 191-258, where a bijection was given between cuspidal Maass forms and period functions. The authors introduce the concepts of mixed parabolic cohomology group and semi-analytic vectors in principal serie

  10. Differential Forms and Wave Equations for General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, S R

    1996-01-01

    Recently, Choquet-Bruhat and York and Abrahams, Anderson, Choquet-Bruhat, and York (AACY) have cast the 3+1 evolution equations of general relativity in gauge-covariant and causal ``first-order symmetric hyperbolic form,'' thereby cleanly separating physical from gauge degrees of freedom in the Cauchy problem for general relativity. A key ingredient in their construction is a certain wave equation which governs the light-speed propagation of the extrinsic curvature tensor. Along a similar line, we construct a related wave equation which, as the key equation in a system, describes vacuum general relativity. Whereas the approach of AACY is based on tensor-index methods, the present formulation is written solely in the language of differential forms. Our approach starts with Sparling's tetrad-dependent differential forms, and our wave equation governs the propagation of Sparling's 2-form, which in the ``time-gauge'' is built linearly from the ``extrinsic curvature 1-form.'' The tensor-index version of our wave e...

  11. Accelerated electron populations formed by Langmuir wave-caviton interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sircombe, N J; Dendy, R O

    2004-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of electron dynamics in externally driven electrostatic waves have been carried out using a relativistic two-fluid one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson code. When the driver wave has sufficiently large amplitude, ion density holes (cavitons) form. The interaction between these cavitons and other incoming Langmuir waves gives rise to substantial local acceleration of groups of electrons, and fine jet-like structures arise in electron phase space. We show that these jets are caused by wave-breaking when finite amplitude Langmuir waves experience the ion density gradient at the leading edge of the holes, and are not caused by caviton burn-out. An analytical two-fluid model gives the critical density gradient and caviton depth for which this process can occur. In particular, the density gradient critically affects the rate at which a Langmuir wave, moving into the caviton, undergoes Landau damping. This treatment also enables us to derive analytical estimates for the maximum energy of accel...

  12. Technical Submission Form: Technical Specification of a Wave Energy Farm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Kim Nielsen; Ben Kennedy; Bull, Diana L; Costello, Ronan Patrick; Jochem Weber

    2017-04-01

    The Wave - SPARC project developed the Technology Performance Level (TPL) assessment procedure based on a rigorous Systems Engineering exercise. The TPL assessment allows a whole system evaluation of Wave Energy Conversion Technology by measuring it against the requirements determined through the Systems Engineering exercise. The TPL assessment is intended to be useful in technology evaluation; in technology innovation; in allocation of public or priva te investment, and; in making equipment purchasing decisions. This Technical Submission Form (TSF) serves the purpose of collecting relevant and complete information, in a technology agnostic way, to allow TPL assessment s to be made by third party assessor s. The intended usage of this document is that the organization or people that are performing the role of developers or promoters of a particular technology will use this form to provide the information necessary for the organization or people who are perf orming the assessor role to use the TPL assessment.

  13. Electromagnetic form factors of the Δ with D-waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramalho, Gilberto T.F. [CFTP, Institute Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Pena, Maria Teresa [CFTP, Institute Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Gross, Franz L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The electromagnetic form factors of the Δ baryon are evaluated within the framework of a covariant spectator quark model, where S and D-states are included in the Δ wave function. We predict all the four Δ multipole form factors: the electric charge GE0, the magnetic dipole GM1, the electric quadrupole GE2 and the magnetic octupole GM3. We compare our predictions with other theoretical calculations. Our results are compatible with the available experimental data and recent lattice QCD data.

  14. Electromagnetic form factors of the Delta with D-waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalho, G; Gross, Franz

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factors of the Delta baryon are evaluated within the framework of a covariant spectator quark model, where S and D-states are included in the $\\Delta$ wave function. We predict all the four Delta multipole form factors: the electric charge GE0, the magnetic dipole GM1, the electric quadrupole GE2 and the magnetic octupole GM3. We compare our predictions with other theoretical calculations. Our results are compatible with the available experimental data and recent lattice QCD data.

  15. New Forms of Deuteron Equations and Wave Function Representations

    CERN Document Server

    Fachruddin, I; Glöckle, W; Elster, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    A recently developed helicity basis for nucleon-nucleon (NN) scattering is applied to th e deuteron bound state. Here the total spin of the deuteron is treated in such a helicity representation. For the bound state, two sets of two coupled eigenvalue equations are developed, where the amplitudes depend on two and one variable, respectively. Numerical illustrations based on the realistic Bonn-B NN potential are given. In addition, an `operator form' of the deuteron wave function is presented, and several momentum dependent spin densities are derived and shown, in which the angular dependence is given analytically.

  16. Evolution of bed form height and length during a discharge wave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warmink, J.J.; Schielen, R.M.J.; Dohmen-Janssen, C.M.; Lancker, van V.; Garlan, T.

    2013-01-01

    This research focusses on modeling the evolution of bed form during a discharge wave for application in operational flood forecasting. The objective of this research was to analyze and predict the bed form evolution during a discharge wave in a flume experiment. We analyzed the data of a flume exper

  17. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES IN BLACK HOLE FORMING CORE COLLAPSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; DeBrye, Nicolas; Aloy, Miguel A.; Font, José A.; Obergaulinger, Martin, E-mail: pablo.cerda@uv.es [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, c/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100-Burjassot (Spain)

    2013-12-20

    We present general relativistic numerical simulations of collapsing stellar cores. Our initial model consists of a low metallicity rapidly-rotating progenitor which is evolved in axisymmetry with the latest version of our general relativistic code CoCoNuT, which allows for black hole formation and includes the effects of a microphysical equation of state (LS220) and a neutrino leakage scheme to account for radiative losses. The motivation of our study is to analyze in detail the emission of gravitational waves in the collapsar scenario of long gamma-ray bursts. Our simulations show that the phase during which the proto-neutron star (PNS) survives before ultimately collapsing to a black hole is particularly optimal for gravitational wave emission. The high-amplitude waves last for several seconds and show a remarkable quasi-periodicity associated with the violent PNS dynamics, namely during the episodes of convection and the subsequent nonlinear development of the standing-accretion shock instability (SASI). By analyzing the spectrogram of our simulations we are able to identify the frequencies associated with the presence of g-modes and with the SASI motions at the PNS surface. We note that the gravitational waves emitted reach large enough amplitudes to be detected with third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope within a Virgo Cluster volume at rates ≲ 0.1 yr{sup –1}.

  18. Gravitational wave signatures in black-hole forming core collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Aloy, Miguel A; Font, José A; Obergaulinger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We present numerical simulations in general relativity of collapsing stellar cores. Our initial model consists of a low metallicity rapidly-rotating progenitor which is evolved in axisymmetry with the latest version of our general relativistic code CoCoNuT, which allows for black hole formation and includes the effects of a microphysical equation of state (LS220) and a neutrino leakage scheme to account for radiative losses. The motivation of our study is to analyze in detail the emission of gravitational waves in the collapsar scenario of long gamma-ray bursts. Our simulations show that the phase during which the proto-neutron star (PNS) survives before ultimately collapsing to a black hole is particularly optimal for gravitational wave emission. The high-amplitude waves last for several seconds and show a remarkable quasi-periodicity associated with the violent PNS dynamics, namely during the episodes of convection and the subsequent nonlinear development of the standing-accretion shock instability (SASI). ...

  19. [Selective Heating of Membrane-forming Holes in Teflon Film Exposed to Decimeter Waves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, S I; Fesenko, E E; Fesenko, E E

    2015-01-01

    Calculations of heating of membrane-forming holes in Teflon film exposed to decimeter waves were performed. The dependence of the temperature increment in holes on the geometry of holes, electrolyte concentration, and decimeter wave frequency was studied. The kinetics of heating depending on the hole diameter was also obtained. It was concluded that the observed in the experiment effects of the decimeter wave on bilayer lipid membranes resulted from the elevated concentration of decimeter electromagnetic waves in membrane-forming hole that led to selective heating of electrolyte in hole and bilayer lipid membranes.

  20. Spatial rogue waves in a photorefractive pattern-forming system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsal, N; Caullet, V; Wolfersberger, D; Sciamanna, M

    2014-06-15

    We have experimentally analyzed pattern formation in an optical system composed of a bulk photorefractive crystal subjected to a single optical feedback. In a highly nonlinear regime far above the modulational instability threshold, we are reporting on turbulent spatiotemporal dynamics that leads to rare, intense localized optical peaks. We have proven that the statistics and features of those peaks correspond to the signatures of two-dimensional spatial rogue events. These optical rogue waves occur erratically in space and time and live typically the same amount of time as the response time of the photorefractive material.

  1. Exact travelling wave solutions for four forms of nonlinear Klein-Gordon equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirendaoreji [College of Mathematical Science, Inner Mongolia Normal University, Huhhot 010022, Inner Mongolia (China)]. E-mail: siren@imnu.edu.cn

    2007-04-09

    A variable separated equation and its solutions are used to construct the exact travelling wave solutions for four forms of nonlinear Klein-Gordon equations. The solutions previously obtained by the tanh and sech method are recovered. New and more exact travelling wave solutions including solitons, kink and anti-kink, bell and anti-bell solitary wave solutions, periodic solutions, singular solutions and exponential solutions are found.

  2. Wave energy dissipation due to mudbanks formed off southwest coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiksha, S. V.; Vethamony, P.; Rogers, W. Erick; Pednekar, P. S.; Babu, M. T.; Dineshkumar, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    Mudbanks (MBs) are a unique natural phenomenon, and form along the southwest coast of India during the southwest monsoon. They are characterized by a calm-water region, bordered by a rough sea. In order to quantify the wave energy dissipation, wave data were collected at two water depths (15 m and 7 m) before and during the period of formation of MBs off Alappuzha, Kerala. The observations indicate that MBs exist even in deeper water beyond 15 m water depth, contrary to earlier findings that they only form in depths of 0-5 m. The analysis showed 65-70% wave height attenuation. As spectral density evolves with shoaling, energy dissipation was examined using the concept of wave energy flux. The combination of high frequency dissipation and nonlinear energy transfer from higher-frequency to low-frequency waves resulted in a reduction of energy across a wide frequency range. The WAVEWATCH III® (WW3) model with wave-mud interaction physics was used to capture the signature of wave energy dissipation due to MBs. The accuracy of prediction of significant wave heights (Hs) of the WW3 model was verified using Hs of measured waves and ERA- Interim (ECMWF Reanalysis Interim data). The model accurately reproduced both the wave heights in the MB region and their general characteristics. The measurements and model results complement each other in explaining changes associated with an apparent shift of the MBs.

  3. Globally singularity-free semi-classical wave functions in closed form

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, C; Seligman, T H

    2000-01-01

    We use a factorization technique and representation of canonical transformations to construct globally valid closed form expressions without singularities of semi-classical wave functions for arbitrary smooth potentials over a one-dimensional position space.

  4. TRAVELING WAVE FRONTS OF A DEGENERATE PARABOLIC EQUATION WITH NON-DIVERGENCE FORM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春朋; 尹景学

    2003-01-01

    We study the traveling wave solutions of a nonlinear degenerate parabolic equation with non-divergence form. Under some conditions on the source, we establish the existence, and then discuss the regularity of such solutions.

  5. The plain truth about forming a plane wave of neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Apoorva G., E-mail: nintsspd@barc.gov.i [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Abbas, Sohrab [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Treimer, Wolfgang [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    We have attained the first sub-arcsecond collimation of a monochromatic neutron beam by diffracting neutrons from a Bragg prism, viz. a single crystal prism operating in the vicinity of Bragg incidence. Analytical as well numerical computations based on the dynamical diffraction theory, led to the optimised collimator configuration of a silicon {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} Bragg prism for 5.26 A neutrons. We fabricated a Bragg prism to these specifications, tested and operated it at the double diffractometer setup in Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin to produce a 0.58 arcsec wide monochromatic neutron beam. With a similarly optimised Bragg prism analyser of opposite asymmetry, we recorded a 0.62 arcsec wide virgin rocking curve for this ultra-parallel beam. With this nearly plane-wave neutron beam, we have recorded the first ever USANS spectrum in Q{approx}10{sup -6} A{sup -1} range with a hydroxyapatite casein protein sample and demonstrated the instrument capability to characterise agglomerates up to 150 {mu}m in size. The super-collimated monochromatic beam has also enabled us to record the first neutron diffraction pattern from a macroscopic grating of 200 {mu}m period. The transverse coherence length of 175 {mu}m (FWHM) of the ultra-parallel beam derived from the analysis of this pattern, is the greatest achieved to date for A wavelength neutrons.

  6. An analytical model for the amplitude of lee waves forming on the boundary layer inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachsperger, Johannes; Serafin, Stefano; Stiperski, Ivana; Grubišić, Vanda

    2016-04-01

    Lee waves are horizontally propagating gravity waves with a typical wavelength of 5-15 km that may be generated when stratified flow is lifted over a mountain. A frequently observed type of such waves is that of interfacial lee waves. Those develop, similar to surface waves on a free water surface, when the upstream flow features a density discontinuity. Such conditions are often present for example at the capping inversion in boundary layer flow. The dynamics of interfacial lee waves can be described concisely with linear interfacial gravity wave theory. However, while this theoretical framework accurately describes the wavelength, it fails to properly predict the amplitude of lee waves. It is well known that large amplitude lee waves may lead to low-level turbulence, which poses a potential hazard for aviation. Therefore, this property of interfacial lee waves deserves further attention. In this study, we develop a simple analytical model for the amplitude of lee waves forming on the boundary layer inversion. This model is based on the energetics of two-layer flow. We obtain an expression for the wave amplitude by equating the energy loss across an internal jump with the energy radiation through lee waves. The verification of the result with water tank experiments of density-stratified two-layer flow over two-dimensional topography from the HYDRALAB campaign shows good agreement between theory and observations. This new analytical model may be useful in determining potential hazards of interfacial lee waves with negligible computational cost as compared to numerical weather prediction models.

  7. Magneto-optical trap formed by elliptically polarised light waves for Mg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a magneto-optical trap (MOT) formed by elliptically polarised waves for 24Mg atoms on a closed optical 3P2 → 3D3 (λ = 383.8 nm) transition in the ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration of the field. Compared with a known MOT formed by circularly polarised waves (σ+ - σ- configuration), the suggested configuration of the trap formed by fields of ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration allows deeper sub-Doppler cooling of trapped 24Mg atoms, which cannot be implemented in a conventional trap formed by fields of σ+ - σ- configuration.

  8. Beam forming networks for mm-wave satellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Technology features of a beam forming network (BFN) employing ferrite devices to provide multiple beam antenna pattern control for satellites used in telecommunications are described. The BFN produces the phase and amplitude distribution for each horn in an antenna array, with the number of horns in the array being equal to the number of outputs in the BFN. One configuration involves microwave switches and permits illumination of a single feed horn at a time using ferrite latching circulators that function by reversing the circulation direction. A more flexible version, yielding a variable amplitude distribution across the feed horn array to accommodate changing traffic patterns or serving a TDMA system, includes the capability of forming nulls in the system with a variable phase shifter in the input ports. The antenna scan angles in phased arrays can be limited to 8 deg from center. Acceptable insertion losses have been demonstrated in BFN with hundreds of ports and switching rates as high as 10 kHz.

  9. Beam forming networks for mm-wave satellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, T. E.

    1983-08-01

    Technology features of a beam forming network (BFN) employing ferrite devices to provide multiple beam antenna pattern control for satellites used in telecommunications are described. The BFN produces the phase and amplitude distribution for each horn in an antenna array, with the number of horns in the array being equal to the number of outputs in the BFN. One configuration involves microwave switches and permits illumination of a single feed horn at a time using ferrite latching circulators that function by reversing the circulation direction. A more flexible version, yielding a variable amplitude distribution across the feed horn array to accommodate changing traffic patterns or serving a TDMA system, includes the capability of forming nulls in the system with a variable phase shifter in the input ports. The antenna scan angles in phased arrays can be limited to 8 deg from center. Acceptable insertion losses have been demonstrated in BFN with hundreds of ports and switching rates as high as 10 kHz.

  10. Bed forms created by simulated waves and currents in a large flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jessica R.; Rubin, David M.; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Mokudai, Kuniyasu; Hanes, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    The morphology and evolution of bed forms created by combinations of waves and currents were investigated using an oscillating plate in a 4-m-wide flume. Current speed ranged from 0 to 30 cm/s, maximum oscillatory velocity ranged from 20 to 48 cm/s, oscillation period was 8 s (except for one run with 12 s period), and the median grain size was 0.27 mm. The angle between oscillations and current was 90°, 60°, or 45°. At the end of each run the sand bed was photographed and ripple dimensions were measured. Ripple wavelength was also determined from sonar images collected throughout the runs. Increasing the ratio of current to wave (i.e., oscillatory) velocity decreased ripple height and wavelength, in part because of the increased fluid excursion during the wave period. Increasing the ratio of current to waves, or decreasing the angle between current and waves, increased the three-dimensionality of bed forms. During the runs, ripple wavelength increased by a factor of about 2. The average number of wave periods for evolution of ripple wavelength to 90% of its final value was 184 for two-dimensional ripples starting from a flat bed. Bed form orientations at the end of each run were compared to four potential controlling factors: the directions of waves, current, maximum instantaneous bed shear stress, and maximum gross bed form normal transport (MGBNT). The directions of waves and of MGBNT were equally good predictors of bed form orientations, and were significantly better than the other two factors.

  11. Variability in form and growth of sediment waves on turbidite channel levees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normark, W.R.; Piper, D.J.W.; Posamentier, H.; Pirmez, C.; Migeon, S.

    2002-01-01

    Fine-grained sediment waves have been observed in many modern turbidite systems, generally restricted to the overbank depositional element. Sediment waves developed on six submarine fan systems are compared using high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, sediment core samples (including ODP drilling), multibeam bathymetry, 3D seismic-reflection imaging (including examples of burried features), and direct measurements of turbidity currents that overflow their channels. These submarine fan examples extend over more than three orders of magnitude in physical scale. The presence or absence of sediment waves is not simply a matter of either the size of the turbidite channel-levee systems or the dominant initiation process for the turbidity currents that overflow the channels to form the wave fields. Both sediment-core data and seismic-reflection profiles document the upslope migration of the wave forms, with thicker and coarser beds deposited on the up-current flank of the waves. Some wave fields are orthogonal to channel trend and were initiated by large flows whose direction was controlled by upflow morphology, whereas fields subparallel to channel levees resulted from local spillover. In highly meandering systems, sediment waves may mimic meander planform. Larger sediment waves form on channel-levee systems with thicker overflow of turbidity currents, but available data indicate that sediment waves can be maintaned during conditions of relatively thin overflow. Coarser-grained units in sediment waves are typically laminated and thin-bedded sand as much as several centimetres thick, but sand beds as thick as several tens of centimetres have been documented from both modern and buried systems. Current production of hydrocarbons from sediment-wave deposits suggests that it is important to develop criteria for recognising this overbank element in outcrop exposures and borehole data, where the wavelength of typical waves (several kilometres) generally exceeds outcrop

  12. The measurement of capillary waves on a weldpool formed by a Nd:YAG laser

    CERN Document Server

    Deam, R T; Harris, J

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were performed using an on-line pyrometer to measure the capillary waves on a weldpool formed by a Nd: YAG laser. The surface temperature measurements taken from the weldpool revealed strong temporal fluctuations. Fourier transform of the pyrometer data revealed distinct peaks, consistent with calculated resonant frequencies for capillary surface waves on the weldpool formed by the laser. The possibility of using on-line measurement of surface temperature fluctuations to control weldpool depth in laser welds is discussed. The work forms part of an on-going programme to develop closed loop control for laser processing at Swinburne University

  13. Extreme Response Predictions for Jack-up Units in Second Order Stochastic Waves by FORM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Capul, Julien

    2006-01-01

    An efficient procedure for derivation of mean outcrossing rates for non-linear wave-induced responses in stationary sea states is presented and applied to an analysis of the horizontal deck sway of a jack-up unit. The procedure is based on the theory of random vibrations and uses the first order...... reliability method (FORM) to estimate the most probable set of wave components in the ocean wave system that will lead to exceedance of a specific response level together with the associated mean outcrossing rate. The procedure bears some resemblance to the Constrained NewWave methodology, but is conceptually......-tic waves, not previously included in the analysis of jack-up units in stochastic seaways....

  14. Multiple Scattering of Waves in 3D Crystals (Natural or Photonic) Formed by Anisotropically Scattering Centers

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshevsky, V G

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the refraction and diffraction of waves in three-dimensional crystals formed by anisotropically scattering centers. The partial wave expansion method is used to consider the effect of multiple rescattering of waves by centers composing a crystal. The expression for the refractive index of a crystal is derived. It is shown that instead of the diagonal elements of the scattering matrix $\\mathbf{T}$, appearing in the expression for the refractive index of a chaotic medium, the derived expression includes the diagonal elements of the reaction matrix $\\mathbf{K}$. This fact is taken into account in writing the equations describing the dynamical diffraction of waves in a crystal. The results can be of interest for research into, e.g., diffraction of cold neutrons and photons in crystals, nanocrystalline materials, as well as for the description of parametric and diffraction radiation in electromagnetic crystals formed by anisotropically scattering centers.

  15. Lommel pulses: an analytic form for localized waves of the focus wave mode type with bandlimited spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Colin J R; Saari, Peeter

    2008-01-07

    A criticism of the focus wave mode (FWM) solution for localized pulses is that it contains backward propagating components that are difficult to generate in many practical situations. We describe a form of FWM where the strength of the backward propagating components is identically zero and derive special cases where the field can be written in an analytic form. In particular, a free-space version of "backward light" pulse is considered, which moves in the opposite direction with respect to all its spectral constituents.

  16. Parametrically Excited Surface Waves Two-Frequency Forcing, Normal Form Symmetries, and Pattern Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Silber, M; Silber, Mary; Skeldon, Anne C.

    1999-01-01

    Motivated by experimental observations of exotic standing wave patterns in the two-frequency Faraday experiment, we investigate the role of normal form symmetries in the pattern selection problem. With forcing frequency components in ratio m/n, where m and n are co-prime integers, there is the possibility that both harmonic and subharmonic waves may lose stability simultaneously, each with a different wavenumber. We focus on this situation and compare the case where the harmonic waves have a longer wavelength than the subharmonic waves with the case where the harmonic waves have a shorter wavelength. We show that in the former case a normal form transformation can be used to remove all quadratic terms from the amplitude equations governing the relevant resonant triad interactions. Thus the role of resonant triads in the pattern selection problem is greatly diminished in this situation. We verify our general results within the example of one-dimensional surface wave solutions of the Zhang-Vinals model of the t...

  17. Viscous Shear Layers Formed by Non-Bifurcating Shock Waves in Shock-Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Kevin; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Shock-tubes are test apparatuses that are used extensively for chemical kinetic measurements. Under ideal conditions, shock-tubes provide a quiescent region behind a reflected shock wave where combustion may take place without complications arising from gas-dynamic effects. However, due to the reflected shock wave encountering a boundary layer, significant inhomogeneity may be introduced into the test region. The bifurcation of the reflected shock-wave is well-known to occur under certain conditions; however, a viscous shear layer may form behind a non-bifurcating reflected shock wave as well and may affect chemical kinetics and ignition of certain fuels. The focus of this talk is on the development of the viscous shear layer and the coupling to the ignition in the regime corresponding to the negative temperature conditions.

  18. Alternative Form of the Hydrogenic Wave Functions for an Extended, Uniformly Charged Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley-Koo, E.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presented are forms of harmonic oscillator attraction and Coulomb wave functions which can be explicitly constructed and which lead to numerical results for the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the atomic system. The Schrodinger equation and its solution and specific cases of muonic atoms illustrating numerical calculations are included.…

  19. Wave-free floating body forms for a shallow sea area; Senkaiiki no naminashi futai keijo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyozuka, Y.; Nariai, Y. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    In column footing or semi-submergible type marine structures, a vertical wave force vanishes at a specific period of waves. This phenomenon is called wave-free characteristics. This wave-free characteristics make it possible to design marine structures superior in oscillation performance in waves. Since Bessho`s wave-free theory is useful only for an infinite water depth, this paper studied the wave-free theory for a shallow sea area. On a wave-free singularity and required floating body form, 2-D and 3-D axisymmetric floating body forms were determined, and vertical wave force characteristics of the obtained body forms were calculated and verified experimentally. Since the source term of the wave-free singularity was weaker in a shallow sea area than an infinite deep water area, resulting in the narrow width of the obtained wave-free body forms in a shallow sea area. The wave-free theory for a shallow sea area was verified by both numerical calculation based on a singularity distribution method and model experiment for these floating body forms. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Early Cambrian wave-formed shoreline deposits: the Hardeberga Formation, Bornholm, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Glad, Aslaug C.; Pedersen, Gunver K.

    2017-09-01

    During the early Cambrian, the Danish island Bornholm was situated on the northern edge of the continent Baltica with palaeolatitudes of about 35°S. An early Cambrian (Terreneuvian) transgression inundated large areas of Baltica including Bornholm creating shallow marine and coastline environments. During this period, wave-formed shoreline sediments (the Vik Member, Hardeberga Formation) were deposited on Bornholm and are presently exposed at Strøby quarry. The sediments consist of fine- and medium-grained quartz-cemented arenites in association with a few silt-rich mudstones. The presence of well-preserved subaqueous dunes and wave ripples indicates deposition in a wave-dominated upper shoreface (littoral zone) environment, and the presence of interference ripples indicates that the littoral zone environment experienced water level fluctuations due to tides and/or changing meteorological conditions. Discoidal structures (medusoids) are present in the quarry, but due to the relative poor preservation of their fine-scale structures it is difficult to determine if the discoids represent true medusae imprints or inorganic structures. The preservation of the shallow-water bedforms as well as the possible medusae imprints is related to either the formation of thin mud layers, formed during a period of calm water when winds blew offshore for a longer period, or to the growth of bacterial mats. The orientation of the wave-formed bedforms indicates a local palaeoshoreline trending NE-SW and facing a large ocean to the north.

  1. Early Cambrian wave-formed shoreline deposits: the Hardeberga Formation, Bornholm, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Glad, Aslaug C.; Pedersen, Gunver K.

    2016-09-01

    During the early Cambrian, the Danish island Bornholm was situated on the northern edge of the continent Baltica with palaeolatitudes of about 35°S. An early Cambrian (Terreneuvian) transgression inundated large areas of Baltica including Bornholm creating shallow marine and coastline environments. During this period, wave-formed shoreline sediments (the Vik Member, Hardeberga Formation) were deposited on Bornholm and are presently exposed at Strøby quarry. The sediments consist of fine- and medium-grained quartz-cemented arenites in association with a few silt-rich mudstones. The presence of well-preserved subaqueous dunes and wave ripples indicates deposition in a wave-dominated upper shoreface (littoral zone) environment, and the presence of interference ripples indicates that the littoral zone environment experienced water level fluctuations due to tides and/or changing meteorological conditions. Discoidal structures (medusoids) are present in the quarry, but due to the relative poor preservation of their fine-scale structures it is difficult to determine if the discoids represent true medusae imprints or inorganic structures. The preservation of the shallow-water bedforms as well as the possible medusae imprints is related to either the formation of thin mud layers, formed during a period of calm water when winds blew offshore for a longer period, or to the growth of bacterial mats. The orientation of the wave-formed bedforms indicates a local palaeoshoreline trending NE-SW and facing a large ocean to the north.

  2. Extreme value predictions and critical wave episodes for marine structures by FORM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to advocate for a very effective stochastic procedure, based on the First Order Reliability Method (FORM), for extreme value predictions related to wave induced loads. Three different applications will be illustrated. The first deals with a jack-up rig where second...... order stochastic waves are included in the analysis. The second application is parametric roll motions of ships. Finally, the motion of a TLP floating foundation for an offshore wind turbine is analysed taking into account large motions....

  3. Extreme value predictions and critical wave episodes for marine structures by FORM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to advocate for a very effective stochastic procedure, based on the First Order Reliability Method (FORM), for extreme value predictions related to wave induced loads. Three different applications will be illustrated. The first deals with a jack-up rig where second...... order stochastic waves are included in the analysis. The second application is parametric roll motions of ships. Finally, the motion of a TLP floating foundation for an offshore wind turbine is analysed taking into account large motions....

  4. Superconductivity of Cu/CuOx interface formed by shock-wave pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhray, D. V.; Avdonin, V. V.; Palnichenko, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    A mixture of powdered Cu and CuO has been subjected to shock-wave pressure of 350 kbar with following quenching of the vacuum-encapsulated product to 77 K. The ac magnetic susceptibility measurements of the samples have revealed metastable superconductivity with Tc ≈ 19 K, characterized by glassy dynamics of the shielding currents below Tc . Comparison of the ac susceptibility and the DC magnetization measurements infers that the superconductivity arises within the granular interfacial layer formed between metallic Cu and its oxides due to the shock-wave treatment.

  5. Form Factors and Wave Functions of Vector Mesons in Holographic QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovhannes R. Grigoryan; Anatoly V. Radyushkin

    2007-07-01

    Within the framework of a holographic dual model of QCD, we develop a formalism for calculating form factors of vector mesons. We show that the holographic bound states can be described not only in terms of eigenfunctions of the equation of motion, but also in terms of conjugate wave functions that are close analogues of quantum-mechanical bound state wave functions. We derive a generalized VMD representation for form factors, and find a very specific VMD pattern, in which form factors are essentially given by contributions due to the first two bound states in the Q^2-channel. We calculate electric radius of the \\rho-meson, finding the value < r_\\rho^2>_C = 0.53 fm^2.

  6. New Families of Rational Form Solitary Wave Solutions to (2+1)-Dimensional Broer-Kaup-Kupershmidt System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qi; CHEN Yong; LI Biao; ZHANG Hong-Qing

    2005-01-01

    Taking the (2+1)-dimensional Broer-Kaup-Kupershmidt system as a simple example, some families of rational form solitary wave solutions, triangular periodic wave solutions, and rational wave solutions are constructed by using the Riccati equation rational expansion method presented by us. The method can also be applied to solve more nonlinear partial differential equation or equations.

  7. Indirect (source-free) integration method. I. Wave-forms from geodesic generic orbits of EMRIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Patxi; Aoudia, Sofiane; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.; Cordier, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    The Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli (RWZ) wave-equation describes Schwarzschild-Droste black hole perturbations. The source term contains a Dirac distribution and its derivative. We have previously designed a method of integration in time domain. It consists of a finite difference scheme where analytic expressions, dealing with the wave-function discontinuity through the jump conditions, replace the direct integration of the source and the potential. Herein, we successfully apply the same method to the geodesic generic orbits of EMRI (Extreme Mass Ratio Inspiral) sources, at second order. An EMRI is a Compact Star (CS) captured by a Super-Massive Black Hole (SMBH). These are considered the best probes for testing gravitation in strong regime. The gravitational wave-forms, the radiated energy and angular momentum at infinity are computed and extensively compared with other methods, for different orbits (circular, elliptic, parabolic, including zoom-whirl).

  8. Indirect (source-free) integration method. I. Wave-forms from geodesic generic orbits of EMRIs

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, P; Spallicci, A; Cordier, S

    2015-01-01

    The Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli (RWZ) wave-equation describes Schwarzschild-Droste black hole perturbations. The source term contains a Dirac distribution and its derivative. We have previously designed a method of integration in time domain. It consists of a finite difference scheme where analytic expressions, dealing with the wave-function discontinuity through the jump conditions, replace the direct integration of the source and the potential. Herein, we successfully apply the same method to the geodesic generic orbits of EMRI (Extreme Mass Ratio Inspiral) sources, at second order. An EMRI is a Compact Star (CS) captured by a Super Massive Black Hole (SMBH). These are considered the best probes for testing gravitation in strong regime. The gravitational wave-forms, the radiated energy and angular momentum at infinity are computed and extensively compared with other methods, for different orbits (circular, elliptic, parabolic, including zoom-whirl).

  9. A special form of electrodynamical response to a gravitational wave: outgoing and imploding photon fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳昱; 苏荀; 龙炳蔚; 唐孟希

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of an electromagnetic (EM) wave with a standing gravitational wave (GW)in an external static magnetic field, and obtained concrete forms of first-order perturbative EM energy fluxes. Unlikethe propagating properties of the "left-circular" and "right-circular" waves of the tangential perturbative energy fluxesaround the symmetricalaxis, the radial perturbative energy fluxes are expressed as the outgoing and imploding wavesto the symmetrical axis.We also examine several physical examples and show that this effect can produce very smallbut nonvanishing radial perturbative photon fluxes. This may be useful for EM detection of the high-frequency relicGWs of the GHz region in quintessential inflationary models.

  10. Precisely proportioned: intertidal barnacles alter penis form to suit coastal wave action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Christopher J; Palmer, A Richard

    2008-05-07

    For their size, barnacles possess the longest penis of any animal (up to eight times their body length). However, as one of few sessile animals to copulate, they face a trade-off between reaching more mates and controlling ever-longer penises in turbulent flow. We observed that penises of an intertidal barnacle (Balanus glandula) from wave-exposed shores were shorter than, stouter than, and more than twice as massive for their length as, those from nearby protected bays. In addition, penis shape variation was tightly correlated with maximum velocity of breaking waves, and, on all shores, larger barnacles had disproportionately stouter penises. Finally, field experiments confirmed that most of this variation was due to phenotypic plasticity: barnacles transplanted to a wave-exposed outer coast produced dramatically shorter and wider penises than counterparts moved to a protected harbour. Owing to the probable trade-off between penis length and ability to function in flow, and owing to the ever-changing wave conditions on rocky shores, intertidal barnacles appear to have acquired the capacity to change the size and shape of their penises to suit local hydrodynamic conditions. This dramatic plasticity in genital form is a valuable reminder that factors other than the usual drivers of genital diversification--female choice, sexual conflict and male-male competition--can influence genital form.

  11. Solitary Wave Solutions of the Boussinesq Equation and Its Improved Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Abazari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the general case study of previous works on generalized Boussinesq equations, (Abazari, 2011 and (Kılıcman and Abazari, 2012, that focuses on the application of G′/G-expansion method with the aid of Maple to construct more general exact solutions for the coupled Boussinesq equations. In this work, the mentioned method is applied to construct more general exact solutions of Boussinesq equation and improved Boussinesq equation, which the French scientist Joseph Valentin Boussinesq (1842–1929 described in the 1870s model equations for the propagation of long waves on the surface of water with small amplitude. Our work is motivated by the fact that the G′/G-expansion method provides not only more general forms of solutions but also periodic, solitary waves and rational solutions. The method appears to be easier and faster by means of a symbolic computation.

  12. The dynamic properties of shock-waves formed during laser ablation at sub-atmospheric pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitan, D.; Coutts, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    The Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann (STN) theory has been shown to accurately describe the dynamic properties of shock-waves generated during pulsed-laser ablation of solid aluminium targets at visible wavelengths (510/578 nm) with 40 ns pulses with energies up to 3.5 mJ. A ballistic pendulum is used to measure the integrated recoil pressure in various inert atmospheres (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, CO2, SF6) with pressures of 10-2 - 103 mbar. This recoil momentum is found to scale linearly with the background gas pressure P1 and with the square root of the molecular weight M1. More interestingly, the scaling with the ratio of heat capacities γ is verified to be a monotonically increasing function dependent on the form factor of the shock-wave. The validity of a modified STN theory which accounts for the piston mass is assessed.

  13. Electromagnetic form factors of the Delta in a S-wave approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalho, G

    2008-01-01

    Without any further adjusting of parameters, a relativistic constituent quark model, successful in the description of the data for the nucleon elastic form factors and the dominant contribution to the nucleon to $\\Delta$ electromagnetic transition, is used here to predict the dominant electromagnetic form factors of the $\\Delta$ baryon. The model considered is based on a simple $\\Delta$ wave function corresponding to a quark-diquark system in an S-state. The results for E0 and M1 are consistent both with experimental results and lattice calculations. The remaining form factors M1 and E2 are negligible for small $Q^2$, as expected, given the symmetric structure considered for the $\\Delta$.

  14. Blast Wave Dynamics at the Cornea as a Function of Eye Protection Form and Fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Steven T; Harding, Thomas H; Statz, J Keegan; Martin, John S

    2017-03-01

    A shock tube and anthropomorphic headforms were used to investigate eye protection form and fit using eyewear on the Authorized Protective Eyewear List in primary ocular blast trauma experiments. Time pressure recordings were obtained from highly linear pressure sensors mounted at the cornea of instrumented headforms of different sizes. A custom shock tube produced highly reliable shock waves and pressure recordings were collected as a function of shock wave orientation and protective eyewear. Eyewear protection coefficients were calculated as a function of a new metric of eyewear fit. In general, better protection was correlated with smaller gaps between the eyewear and face. For oblique angles, most spectacles actually potentiated the blast wave by creating higher peak pressures at the cornea. Installing foam around the perimeter of the spectacle lens to close the gap between the lens and face resulted in significantly lower pressure at the cornea. In conclusion, current eye protection, which was designed to reduce secondary and tertiary blast injuries, provides insufficient protection against primary blast injury. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. Wave-formed sediment ripples: Transient analysis of ripple spectral development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joseph P.; Walker, David J.; Townsend, Murray; Young, Ian R.

    2004-07-01

    A new method has been developed that models the changes a wave-formed rippled sediment bed undergoes as it is actively evolving between two given equilibrium states due to a change in surface wave conditions. The transient analysis of rippled beds has received very little attention within the literature. Dynamic changes within ripple parameters have implications for the estimation of flow dissipation and sediment transport by changing the bottom roughness height. The method uses the spectral density function of the rippled bed and is based on a series of ripple growth and ripple transition experimental tests. The ripple evolution model was developed from the well-known Logistic Growth Law. Fitting the general solution of the logistic nonlinear differential equation to the experimental data enabled the evolution rate of the bed to be determined for each experimental test. It was concluded that there was no difference between the evolution rate determined from the ripple growth tests and the ripple transition tests. This indicated that the two types of growth are special cases of the same evolution processes, which is adequately modeled by the logistic growth equation. A functional dependence was established between the ripple evolution rate and the Shields parameter. This allows the evolution rate to be estimated from flow and sediment properties. The estimation of the rate at which rippled sediment beds evolve under a variable sea state has the potential to lead to significant improvements to the way ripple transition and hence bottom roughness is approximated in coastal wave models.

  16. Terahertz wave generation from spontaneously formed nanostructures in silver nanoparticle ink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kosaku; Takano, Keisuke; Tadokoro, Yuzuru; Nakajima, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate terahertz pulse generation from silver nanoparticle ink, originally developed for printed electronics, under irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Using metal nanoparticle ink, metallic nanostructures can be easily made in a large area without lithographic techniques. Terahertz pulses were emitted from the baked ink, having spontaneously formed nanostructures of ∼100  nm. From the results of the baking temperature dependence and the polarization measurement, the terahertz generation is attributed to the nonlinear polarization induced by the enhanced local fields around these nanostructures. This study paves the way for the future development of terahertz emitters which have resonances in both the near-infrared light and the terahertz wave, by combining micrometer-scale structures drawn by an inkjet printer and nanometer-scale structures formed during the baking process.

  17. Solitary wave and periodic wave solutions for Burgers, Fisher, Huxley and combined forms of these equations by the (′/)-expansion method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jalil Manafian; Mehrdad Lakestani

    2015-07-01

    An application of the (′/)-expansion method to search for exact solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations is analysed. This method is used for Burgers, Fisher, Huxley equations and combined forms of these equations. The (′/)-expansion method was used to construct periodic wave and solitary wave solutions of nonlinear evolution equations. This method is developed for searching exact travelling wave solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations. It is shown that the (′/)-expansion method, with the help of symbolic computation, provides a straightforward and powerful mathematical tool for solving nonlinear partial differential equations.

  18. Fine structure of the electromagnetic fields formed by backward surface waves in an azimuthally symmetric surface wave-excited plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Ono, Kouichi [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    The electromagnetic fields and plasma parameters have been studied in an azimuthally symmetric surface wave-excited plasma (SWP) source, by using a two-dimensional numerical analysis based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approximation to Maxwell's equations self-consistently coupled with a fluid model for plasma evolution. The FDTD/fluid hybrid simulation was performed for different gas pressures in Ar and different microwave powers at 2.45 GHz, showing that the surface waves (SWs) occur along the plasma-dielectric interfaces to sustain overdense plasmas. The numerical results indicated that the electromagnetic SWs consist of two different waves, Wave-1 and Wave-2, having relatively shorter and longer wavelengths. The Wave-1 was seen to fade away with increasing pressure and increasing power, while the Wave-2 remained relatively unchanged over the range of pressure and power investigated. The numerical results revealed that the Wave-1 propagates as backward SWs whose phase velocity and group velocity point in the opposite directions. In contrast, the Wave-2 appeared to form standing waves, being ascribed to a superposition of forward SWs whose phase and group velocities point in the same direction. The fadeaway of the Wave-1 or backward SWs at increased pressures and increased powers was seen with the damping rate increasing in the axial direction, being related to the increased plasma electron densities. A comparison with the conventional FDTD simulation indicated that such fine structure of the electromagnetic fields of SWs is not observed in the FDTD simulation with spatially uniform and time-independent plasma distributions; thus, the FDTD/fluid hybrid model should be employed in simulating the electromagnetic fields and plasma parameters in SWPs with high accuracy.

  19. A new technique for assessing arterial pressure wave forms and central pressure with tissue Doppler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluska, Brian A; Jeffriess, Leanne; Mottram, Phillip M; Carlier, Stephane G; Marwick, Thomas H

    2007-01-01

    Background Non-invasive assessment of arterial pressure wave forms using applanation tonometry of the radial or carotid arteries can be technically challenging and has not found wide clinical application. 2D imaging of the common carotid arteries is routinely used and we sought to determine whether arterial waveform measurements could be derived from tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) of the carotid artery. Methods We studied 91 subjects (52 men, age 52 ± 14 years) with and without cardiovascular disease. Tonometry was performed on the carotid artery simultaneously with pulsed wave Doppler of the LVOT and acquired digitally. Longitudinal 2D images of the common carotid artery with and without TDI were also acquired digitally and both TDI and tonometry were calibrated using mean and diastolic cuff pressure and analysed off line. Results Correlation between central pressure by TDI and tonometry was excellent for maximum pressure (r = 0.97, p < 0.0001). The mean differences between central pressures derived by TDI and tonometry were minimal (systolic 5.36 ± 5.5 mmHg; diastolic 1.2 ± 1.2 mmHg). Conclusion Imaging of the common carotid artery motion with tissue Doppler may permit acquisition of a waveform analogous to that from tonometry. This method may simplify estimation of central arterial pressure and calculation of total arterial compliance. PMID:17266772

  20. Maxwell equations in Duffin - Kemmer tetrad form, spherical waves in Riemann space S_3

    CERN Document Server

    Bogush, A A; Red'kov, V M

    2009-01-01

    The Duffin-Kemmer form of massless vector field (Maxwell field) is extended to the case of arbitrary pseudo-Riemannian space-time in accordance with the tetrad recipe of Tetrode-Weyl-Fock-Ivanenko. In this approach, the Maxwell equations are solved exactly on the background of simplest static cosmological model, space of constant curvature of Riemann parameterized by spherical coordinates. Separation of variables is realized in the basis of Schr\\"odinger- Pauli type, description of angular dependence in electromagnetic filed functions is given in terms of Wigner D-functions. A discrete frequency spectrum for electromagnetic modes depending on the curvature radius of space and three discrete parameters is found. 4-potentials for spherical electro- magnetic waves of magnetic and electric type have been constructed.

  1. Extreme Value Predictions for Wave- and Wind-induced Loads on Floating Offshore Wind Turbines using FORM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Sunvard; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Mansour, Alaa E.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to advocate for a very effective stochastic procedure, based on the First Order Reliability Method (FORM), for extreme value predic-tions related to wave induced loads. Due to the efficient optimisation procedures implemented in standard FORM codes and the short du...

  2. Nouvelles méthodes d'identification des fractures par diagraphie acoustique en full wave form New Methods of Identifying Fractures by Full Wave Form Acoustic Logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les outils acoustiques de dernière génération permettent maintenant d'enregistrer l'ensemble des ondes générées par une source acoustique à l'intérieur d'une géométrie cylindrique telle qu'un puits de sondage. Le train d'onde qu'il est alors possible d'analyser se compose successivement de trois composantes majeures (l'onde de compression, de cisaillement et de Stoneley dont nous avons une représentation pour chaque position de la sonde à l'intérieur du puits. Nous présentons, dans ce texte, trois méthodes originales et rapides (calculs possibles sur le site même pour identifier, à partir du traitement de l'onde de Stoneley, les fractures ouvertes recoupées par un forage. Nous donnons, dans un premier temps, nos motivations pour le choix unique du traitement de l'onde de Stoneley pour, dans un deuxième temps, exposer les trois méthodes développées et montrer pour chacune d'entre elles une application pratique. Interest in recognizing and identifying fractures in a coherent formation for the petroleum, geothermal and storage (oil and gas, wastes sectors has led to the development of indirect prospection methods inside boreholes such as acoustic logging. The latest acoustic tools are capable of recording all waves generated by an acoustic logging tool inside a cyclindrical geometry such as a borehole. The wavetrain that can then be analyzed is successively made up of three major components (the P compression wave, the S shear wave and the Stoneley wave for which we have a representation for each position of the logging tool in the borehole. An example of a recording is shown in Fig. 1. Because of its specific features (high amplitudes, low frequency, high signal-to-noise ratio, the Stoneley wave is recognized to be a good indicator of open fractures. Therefore, we use simple digital processing to quantify the influence of fracturing on the propagation of the Stoneley wave. Three methods stemming from the digital processing of

  3. TUNING IN TO FISH SWIMMING WAVES - BODY FORM, SWIMMING MODE AND MUSCLE FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WARDLE, CS; VIDELER, JJ; ALTRINGHAM, JD

    1995-01-01

    Most fish species swim with lateral body undulations running from head to tail, These waves run more slowly than the waves of muscle activation causing them, reflecting the effect of the interaction between the fish's body and the reactive forces from the water, The coupling between both waves depen

  4. TUNING IN TO FISH SWIMMING WAVES - BODY FORM, SWIMMING MODE AND MUSCLE FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WARDLE, CS; VIDELER, JJ; ALTRINGHAM, JD

    1995-01-01

    Most fish species swim with lateral body undulations running from head to tail, These waves run more slowly than the waves of muscle activation causing them, reflecting the effect of the interaction between the fish's body and the reactive forces from the water, The coupling between both waves depen

  5. TUNING IN TO FISH SWIMMING WAVES - BODY FORM, SWIMMING MODE AND MUSCLE FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WARDLE, CS; VIDELER, JJ; ALTRINGHAM, JD

    Most fish species swim with lateral body undulations running from head to tail, These waves run more slowly than the waves of muscle activation causing them, reflecting the effect of the interaction between the fish's body and the reactive forces from the water, The coupling between both waves

  6. Global upper-mantle tomography with the automated multimode inversion of surface and S-wave forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebedev, S.; Hilst, R.D. van der

    2008-01-01

    We apply the Automated Multimode Inversion of surface and S-wave forms to a large global data set, verify the accuracy of the method and assumptions behind it, and compute an Sv-velocity model of the upper mantle (crust–660 km). The model is constrained with ~51 000 seismograms recorded at 368

  7. THE OPTIMIZATION OF THE HULL FORM WITH THE MINIMUM WAVE MAKING RESISTANCE BASED ON RANKINE SOURCE METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bao-ji; MA Kun; JI Zhuo-shang

    2009-01-01

    The hull form optimization concerns one of the most important applications of wave making resistance theories. In order to obtain a hull form with the minimum wave making resistance, an optimization design method based on the CFD is proposed, which combines the Rankine source method with the nonlinear programming (NLP). The bow-body shape is optimized with the minimum wave making resistance as the objective function. A hull form modification function is introduced to represent an improved hull surface, which can be used to generate a new smooth hull surface by multiplying it by the offset data of the original hull surface. The parameters of the hull form modification function are taken as the design variables. Other constraint conditions can also be considered, for example, in optimizing the lines of the bow, appropriate displacements can be taken as the basic constraints. S60 hull form is selected as the original hull. Three improved hulls are obtained by optimal design. Rankine source method proves to be an effective method in ship form optimization based on analysis of the resistance performance and lines of the improved hull.

  8. Profiles of optical surface waves formed at the metal - photorefractive crystal interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmedzhanov, I M [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-31

    Photorefractive surface waves propagating in a stationary regime along the surface of the metal - photorefractive crystal (SBN-75) interface are considered. The transverse structure of the optical field distribution is calculated in the near- and far-field zones, depending on the angle of incidence of the exciting wave. The calculation results are in good agreement with the published experimental results. It is shown that the photorefractive effect leads to a splitting of the spectrum of a surface plasmon polariton excited at the metal - photorefractive crystal interface. (surface waves)

  9. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM MASSIVE MAGNETARS FORMED IN BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Osso, Simone [Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Tübingen, auf der Morgenstelle 10 D-72076 (Germany); Giacomazzo, Bruno [Physics Department, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Perna, Rosalba [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Stella, Luigi, E-mail: simone.dallosso@uni-tuebingen.de [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are among the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs), as well as candidate progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Depending on the total initial mass of the system and the NS equation of state (EOS), the post-merger phase can be characterized by a prompt collapse to a black hole or by the formation of a supramassive NS, or even a stable NS. In the latter cases of post-merger NS (PMNS) formation, magnetic field amplification during the merger will produce a magnetar and induce a mass quadrupole moment in the newly formed NS. If the timescale for orthogonalization of the magnetic symmetry axis with the spin axis is smaller than the spindown time, the NS will radiate its spin down energy primarily via GWs. Here we study this scenario for the various outcomes of NS formation: we generalize the set of equilibrium states for a twisted torus magnetic configuration to include solutions that, for the same external dipolar field, carry a larger magnetic energy reservoir; we hence compute the magnetic ellipticity for such configurations, and the corresponding strength of the expected GW signal as a function of the relative magnitude of the dipolar and toroidal field components. The relative number of GW detections from PMNSs and from binary NSs is a very strong function of the NS EOS, being higher (∼1%) for the stiffest EOSs and negligibly small for the softest ones. For intermediate-stiffness EOSs, such as the n = 4/7 polytrope recently used by Giacomazzo and Perna or the GM1 used by Lasky et al., the relative fraction is ∼0.3%; correspondingly, we estimate a GW detection rate from stable PMNSs of ∼0.1-1 yr{sup –1} with advanced detectors, and of ∼100-1000 yr{sup –1} with detectors of third generation such as the Einstein Telescope. Measurement of such GW signals would provide constraints on the NS EOS and, in connection with an SGRB, on the nature of the binary progenitors giving rise to these events.

  10. Development of Traveling Wave Actuators Using Waveguides of Different Geometrical Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramutis Bansevicius

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper covers the research and development of piezoelectric traveling wave actuators using different types of the waveguides. The introduced piezoelectric actuators can be characterized by specific areas of application, different resolution, and torque. All presented actuators are ultrasonic resonant devices and they were developed to increase amplitudes of the traveling wave oscillations of the contact surface. Three different waveguides are introduced, that is, symmetrical, asymmetrical, and cone type waveguide. A piezoelectric ring with the sectioned electrodes is used to excite traveling wave oscillations for all actuators. Operating principle, electrode pattern, and excitation regimes of piezoelectric actuators are described. A numerical modelling of the actuators was performed to validate the operating principle and to calculate trajectories of the contact points motion. Prototype actuators were made and experimental study was performed. The results of numerical and experimental analysis are discussed.

  11. The Weibull functional form for the energetic particle spectrum at interplanetary shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenza, M.; Consolini, G.; Storini, M.; Pallocchia, G.; Damiani, A.

    2016-11-01

    Transient interplanetary shock waves are often associated with high energy particle enhancements, which are called energetic storm particle (ESP) events. Here we present a case study of an ESP event, recorded by the SEPT, LET and HET instruments onboard the STEREO B spacecraft, on 3 October 2011, in a wide energy range from 0.1 MeV to ∼ 30 MeV. The obtained particle spectrum is found to be reproduced by a Weibull like shape. Moreover, we show that the Weibull spectrum can be theoretically derived as the asymptotic steady state solution of the diffusion loss equation by assuming anomalous diffusion for particle velocity. The evaluation of Weibull's parameters obtained from particle observations and the power spectral density of the turbulent fluctations in the shock region, support this scenario and suggest that stochastic acceleration can contribute significantly to the acceleration of high energetic particles at collisioness shock waves.

  12. Planar undulator motion excited by a fixed traveling wave: Quasiperiodic Averaging, normal forms and the FEL Pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, James A; Vogt, Mathias; Gooden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    We present a mathematical analysis of planar motion of energetic electrons moving through a planar dipole undulator, excited by a fixed planar polarized plane wave Maxwell field in the X-Ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) regime. Our starting point is the 6D Lorentz system, which allows planar motions, and we examine this dynamical system as the wavelength of the traveling wave varies. By scalings and transformations the 6D system is reduced, without approximation, to a 2D system in a form for a rigorous asymptotic analysis using the Method of Averaging (MoA), a long time perturbation theory. The two dependent variables are a scaled energy deviation and a generalization of the so-called ponderomotive phase. As the wavelength varies the system passes through resonant and nonresonant (NR) zones and we develop NR and near-to-resonant (NtoR) normal form approximations. For a special initial condition and on resonance, the NtoR normal form reduces to the well-known FEL pendulum system. We then state and prove NR and Nt...

  13. Planar undulator motion excited by a fixed traveling wave. Quasiperiodic averaging normal forms and the FEL pendulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, James A.; Heinemann, Klaus [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics; Vogt, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gooden, Matthew [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2013-03-15

    We present a mathematical analysis of planar motion of energetic electrons moving through a planar dipole undulator, excited by a fixed planar polarized plane wave Maxwell field in the X-Ray FEL regime. Our starting point is the 6D Lorentz system, which allows planar motions, and we examine this dynamical system as the wave length {lambda} of the traveling wave varies. By scalings and transformations the 6D system is reduced, without approximation, to a 2D system in a form for a rigorous asymptotic analysis using the Method of Averaging (MoA), a long time perturbation theory. The two dependent variables are a scaled energy deviation and a generalization of the so- called ponderomotive phase. As {lambda} varies the system passes through resonant and nonresonant (NR) zones and we develop NR and near-to-resonant (NtoR) MoA normal form approximations. The NtoR normal forms contain a parameter which measures the distance from a resonance. For a special initial condition, for the planar motion and on resonance, the NtoR normal form reduces to the well known FEL pendulum system. We then state and prove NR and NtoR first-order averaging theorems which give explicit error bounds for the normal form approximations. We prove the theorems in great detail, giving the interested reader a tutorial on mathematically rigorous perturbation theory in a context where the proofs are easily understood. The proofs are novel in that they do not use a near identity transformation and they use a system of differential inequalities. The NR case is an example of quasiperiodic averaging where the small divisor problem enters in the simplest possible way. To our knowledge the planar prob- lem has not been analyzed with the generality we aspire to here nor has the standard FEL pendulum system been derived with associated error bounds as we do here. We briefly discuss the low gain theory in light of our NtoR normal form. Our mathematical treatment of the noncollective FEL beam dynamics problem in

  14. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  15. Origin of the split quantum oscillation wave form in α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, N.; Biskup, N.; Brooks, J. S.; Balicas, L.; Tokumoto, M.

    2001-05-01

    We report the results of a detailed study of the field orientation dependence of the de Haas-van Alphen wave form in α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 over a wide range of angles and fields. By considering the field orientation dependence of the sign and phase of the fundamental α frequency, at fields both well above and below the kink transition field, it is found that the product of the effective mass with the electron g factor is approximately constant. This implies that spin splitting cannot occur within the low-magnetic-field phase until the angle between the magnetic field and the normal to the conducting planes is ~42°. This finding contrasts greatly with that recently published by Sasaki and Fukase. The results of the present study imply that the electron-electron interactions are largely field independent in this material, while a field dependence of the electron-phonon interactions is still tenable. The manner in which the amplitude of the wave form of the oscillations is damped within the low-magnetic-field phase is suggestive of a nonharmonically indexed reduction of the amplitude, thereby eliminating explanations in terms of magnetic breakdown or impurity scattering. Meanwhile, the presence of a large amplitude second harmonic within the low-magnetic-field phase that has a negative sign over a broad range of angles can be explained only by the frequency doubling effect.

  16. Trigonometric Function Periodic Wave Solutions and Their Limit Forms for the KdV-Like and the PC-Like Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhengrong

    2011-01-01

    study the periodic wave solutions and their limit forms for the KdV-like equation ut+a(1+buuux+uxxx=0, and PC-like equation vtt - vttxx - (a1v+a2v2+a3v3xx=0, respectively. Via some special phase orbits, we obtain some new explicit periodic wave solutions which are called trigonometric function periodic wave solutions because they are expressed in terms of trigonometric functions. We also show that the trigonometric function periodic wave solutions can be obtained from the limits of elliptic function periodic wave solutions. It is very interesting that the two equations have similar periodic wave solutions. Our work extend previous some results.

  17. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, P K; McDonnell, A G; Prabhakar, R; Yeo, L Y; Friend, J, E-mail: james.friend@monash.edu.au [MicroNanophysics Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia); Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity ({approx}<10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities-water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  18. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, P. K.; McDonnell, A. G.; Prabhakar, R.; Yeo, L. Y.; Friend, J.

    2011-02-01

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity (lsim10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities—water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  19. Propagation of sound waves through a linear shear layer - A closed form solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Closed form solutions are presented for sound propagation from a line source in or near a shear layer. The analysis is exact for all frequencies and is developed assuming a linear velocity profile in the shear layer. This assumption allows the solution to be expressed in terms of parabolic cylinder functions. The solution is presented for a line monopole source first embedded in the uniform flow and then in the shear layer. Solutions are also discussed for certain types of dipole and quadrupole sources. Asymptotic expansions of the exact solutions for small and large values of Strouhal number give expressions which correspond to solutions previously obtained for these limiting cases.

  20. Propagation of sound waves through a linear shear layer: A closed form solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Closed form solutions are presented for sound propagation from a line source in or near a shear layer. The analysis was exact for all frequencies and was developed assuming a linear velocity profile in the shear layer. This assumption allowed the solution to be expressed in terms of parabolic cyclinder functions. The solution is presented for a line monopole source first embedded in the uniform flow and then in the shear layer. Solutions are also discussed for certain types of dipole and quadrupole sources. Asymptotic expansions of the exact solutions for small and large values of Strouhal number gave expressions which correspond to solutions previously obtained for these limiting cases.

  1. New Families of Rational Form Variable Separation Solutions to (2+1)-Dimensional Dispersive Long Wave Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Xiao-Yong

    2009-01-01

    With the aid of symbolic computation system Maple, some families of new rational variable separation solutions of the (2+1)-dimensional dispersive long wave equations are constructed by means of a function transformation, improved mapping approach, and variable separation approach, among which there are rational solitary wave solutions, periodic wave solutions and rational wave solutions.

  2. Physical enviroment of 2-D animal cell aggregates formed in a short pathlength ultrasound standing wave trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazou, Despina; Kuznetsova, Larisa A; Coakley, W Terence

    2005-03-01

    2-D mammalian cell aggregates can be formed and levitated in a 1.5 MHz single half wavelength ultrasound standing wave trap. The physical environment of cells in such a trap has been examined. Attention was paid to parameters such as temperature, acoustic streaming, cavitation and intercellular forces. The extent to which these factors might be intrusive to a neural cell aggregate levitated in the trap was evaluated. Neural cells were exposed to ultrasound at a pressure amplitude of 0.54 MPa for 30 s; a small aggregate had been formed at the center of the trap. The pressure amplitude was then decreased to 0.27 MPa for 2 min, at which level the aggregation process continued at a slower rate. The pressure amplitude was then decreased to 0.06 MPa for 1 h. Temperature measurements that were conducted in situ with a 200 microm thermocouple over a 30 min period showed that the maximum temperature rise was less than 0.5 K. Acoustic streaming was measured by the particle image velocimetry method (PIV). It was shown that the hydrodynamic stress imposed on cells by acoustic streaming is less than that imposed by gentle preparative centrifugation procedures. Acoustic spectrum analysis showed that cavitation activity does not occur in the cell suspensions sonicated at the above pressures. White noise was detected only at a pressure amplitude of 1.96 MPa. Finally, it was shown that the attractive acoustic force between ultrasonically agglomerated cells is small compared with the normal attractive van der Waals force that operates at close cell surface separations. It is concluded that the standing wave trap operates only to concentrate cells locally, as in tissue, and does not modify the in vitro expression of surface receptor interactions.

  3. Lagrange form of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for low-vorticity waves in deep water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrashkin, Anatoly; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2017-06-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation describing the propagation of weakly rotational wave packets in an infinitely deep fluid in Lagrangian coordinates has been derived. The vorticity is assumed to be an arbitrary function of Lagrangian coordinates and quadratic in the small parameter proportional to the wave steepness. The vorticity effects manifest themselves in a shift of the wave number in the carrier wave and in variation in the coefficient multiplying the nonlinear term. In the case of vorticity dependence on the vertical Lagrangian coordinate only (Gouyon waves), the shift of the wave number and the respective coefficient are constant. When the vorticity is dependent on both Lagrangian coordinates, the shift of the wave number is horizontally inhomogeneous. There are special cases (e.g., Gerstner waves) in which the vorticity is proportional to the squared wave amplitude and nonlinearity disappears, thus making the equations for wave packet dynamics linear. It is shown that the NLS solution for weakly rotational waves in the Eulerian variables may be obtained from the Lagrangian solution by simply changing the horizontal coordinates.

  4. The applicability range of different forms of the radiation friction force in the ultrarelativistic electron interaction with electromagnetic wave (exact solutions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esirkepov, T. Zh; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2013-02-01

    When the effects of radiation reaction dominate the interaction of electrons with intense laser pulses, the electron dynamics changes qualitatively. The adequate theoretical description of this regime becomes crucially important with the use of the radiation friction force either in the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac form, which possess unphysical runaway solutions, or in the Landau-Lifshitz form, which is a perturbation valid for relatively low electromagnetic wave amplitude. The goal of the present paper is to find the limits of the Landau-Lifshitz radiation force applicability in terms of the electromagnetic wave amplitude and frequency.

  5. Asymptotic Representation of the Filtration-Wave Field in the Layer of an Inhomogeneous Medium in the Form of a Plane Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, A. I.; Akhmetova, O. V.; Koval‧skii, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The filtration-wave process in the central layer of a three-layer anisotropic medium is described as an equivalent plane wave with a modified asymptotic method accurate in the mean. The initial problem is parametrized and broken down into simpler problems for the coefficients of expansion in an asymptotic parameter. The zero expansion coefficient describes the sought plane wave, whereas the first coefficient ensures refinement of the wave-front geometry. The exact solution of the parametrized problem is obtained on the basis of the Fourier sine transformation. The correctness of the developed method is confirmed by comparing the obtained asymptotic solutions and the coefficients of Maclaurin-series expansion of the exact solution of the parametrized problem in a formal parameter.

  6. Determination of the antibiotic drug pefloxacin in bulk form, tablets and human serum using square wave cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltagi, A M

    2003-04-10

    A simple, rapid, reliable and fully validated square wave cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetric procedure has been developed for the determination of the antibiotic pefloxacin drug in bulk form, tablets and human serum, based on its electrochemical reduction at a hanging mercury drop electrode. The Britton-Robinson buffer of pH 7.0 was found to be reasonable as a supporting electrolyte for assay of the drug. Pefloxacin drug, at the optimized conditions, showed a single 2-electron well-defined peak at -1.07 V (versus Ag/AgCl/KCl(s)) using an accumulation potential of -0.40 V. This peak may be attributed to the reduction of the C=O group. A mean recovery of 99.54%+/-0.23 and a detection limit of 1.65 x 10(-10) M pefloxacin were achieved. After being validated, the proposed procedure was successfully applied for the determination of the drug in tablets and human serum with mean recoveries of 99.57+/-0.48 and 98.55+/-0.78%, respectively. A detection limit of 4.50 x 10(-10) M was achieved for the determination of the drug in human serum. Results of the proposed procedure were comparable with those obtained by reported methods.

  7. Spectroscopy of a plasma formed in the vicinity of implosion of the shock wave generated by underwater electrical explosion of spherical wire array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, O.; Efimov, S.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Bernshtam, V. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2015-05-15

    The results of visible spectroscopy of the plasma formed inside a copper capillary placed at the equatorial plane of an underwater electrically exploded spherical wire array (30 mm in diameter; 40 wires, each of 100 μm in diameter) are reported. In the experiments, a pulsed power generator with current amplitude of ∼300 kA and rise time of ∼1.1 μs was used to produce wire array explosion accompanied by the formation of a converging strong shock wave. The data obtained support the assumption of uniformity of the shock wave along the main path of its convergence. The spectroscopic measurements show that this rather simple method of formation of a converging strong shock wave can be used successfully for studying the shock wave's interaction with matter and the evaporation processes of atoms from a target.

  8. Extreme Value Predictions for Wave- and Wind-induced Loads on Floating Offshore Wind Turbines using FORM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Sunvard; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Mansour, Alaa E.

    2007-01-01

    probable wave episodes leading to given re-sponses. As an example the motions of floating foundations for offshore wind turbines are analysed taking into consid-eration both the wave and wind induced loads and con-sidering different mooring systems. The possible large horizontal motions make it important...

  9. Results of the four-wave kinetic integral computation for spectra of special forms. The case of Zakharov spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Polnikov, Vlad

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to show explicitly the non stationarity of the Zakharov spectra, obtained analytically as the stationary solution of the four-wave kinetic equation for stochastic nonlinear surface gravity waves[1,2], we have calculated directly the proper kinetic integral by means of two independent algorithms[3,4] both for an isotropic and anisotropic angular distribution of spectra given on the restricted frequency band.

  10. Sedimentary structures formed under water surface waves: examples from a sediment-laden flash flood observed by remote camer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froude, Melanie; Alexander, Jan; Cole, Paul; Barclay, Jenni

    2014-05-01

    On 13-14 October 2012, Tropical Storm Rafael triggered sediment-laden flash floods in the Belham Valley on Montserrat, West Indies. Rainfall was continuous for ~38 hours and intensity peaked at 48 mm/hr. Flow was strongly unsteady, turbulent with sediment concentrations varying up to hyperconcentrated. Time-lapse images captured at >1 frame per second by remote camera overlooking a surveyed valley section show the development of trains of water surface waves at multiple channel locations during different flow stages. Waves grew and diminished in height and remained stationary or migrated upstream. Trains of waves persisted for <5 minutes, until a single wave broke, sometimes initiating the breaking of adjacent waves within the train. Channel-wide surges (bores) propagating downstream with distinct turbulent flow fronts, were observed at irregular intervals during and up to 7 hours after peak stage. These bores are mechanically similar to breaking front tidal bores and arid flood bores, and resulted in a sudden increase in flow depth and velocity. When a bore front came into close proximity (within ~10 m) upstream of a train of water surface waves, the waves appeared to break simultaneously generating a localised surge of water upstream, that was covered by the bore travelling downstream. Those trains in which waves did not break during the passage of a bore temporarily reduced in height. In both cases, water surface waves reformed immediately after the surge in the same location. Deposits from the event, were examined in <4 m deep trenches ~0.5 km downstream of the remote camera. These contained laterally extensive lenticular and sheet-like units comprised of varying admixtures of sand and gravel that are attributed to antidunes, and associated transitions from upper-stage-plane-beds. Some of the structures are organised within concave upward sequences which contain downflow shifts between foreset and backset laminae; interpreted as trough fills from chute

  11. The longitudinal and transverse distributions of the pion wave function from the present experimental data on the pion-photon transition form factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Tao; Wu, Xing-Gang; Huang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    The low-energy and high-energy behavior of the pion-photon transition form factor F_{π γ }(Q^2) are sensitive to the transverse and longitudinal distributions of the pion wave function, respectively. A careful study of F_{π γ }(Q^2) shall thus provide helpful constraints on the properties of the pion wave function. In this paper, we present a combined analysis of the data on F_{π γ }(Q^2) reported by the CELLO, the CLEO, the BABAR, and the BELLE Collaborations. It is performed by using the method of least squares. By using the combined measurements of the BELLE and CLEO Collaborations, the pion wave function longitudinal and transverse behavior can be fixed to a certain degree, i.e. we obtain β in [0.691,0.757] GeV and B in [0.00,0.235] for P_{χ ^2} ≥ 90 %, where β and B are two parameters of a convenient pion wave function model. It is noted that the distribution amplitude of such a pion wave function can mimic various longitudinal behaviors, as suggested in the literature under a proper choice of parameters. We observe that the CELLO, CLEO, and BELLE data are consistent with each other, all of which prefer the asymptotic-like distribution amplitude; while the BABAR data prefers a more broad distribution amplitude, such as the CZ-like one.

  12. Effects of heat and mass transfer on peristaltic flow of a Bingham fluid in the presence of inclined magnetic field and channel with different wave forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Safia, E-mail: safia_akram@yahoo.com [Department of Basic Sciences, MCS, National University of Sciences and Technology, Rawalpindi 46000 (Pakistan); Nadeem, S.; Hussain, Anwar [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2014-08-01

    In the present analysis we discussed the influence of heat and mass transfer on the peristaltic flow of a Bingham in an inclined magnetic field and channel with different wave forms. The governing two dimensional equations of momentum, heat and mass transfer are simplified under the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation. The exact solutions of momentum, heat and mass transfer are calculated. Finally, graphical behaviors of various physical parameters are also discussed through the graphical behavior of pressure rise, pressure gradient, temperature concentration and stream functions. - Highlights: • Combine effects of heat and mass transfer on peristaltic flow problem is discussed. • Effects of inclined magnetic field and channel on new fluid model are discussed. • Effects of different wave forms are also discussed in the present flow problem.

  13. Forming of space charge wave with broad frequency spectrum in helical relativistic two-stream electron beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysenko, Alexander V.; Volk, Iurii I.; Serozhko, A.

    2017-01-01

    We elaborate a quadratic nonlinear theory of plural interactions of growing space charge wave (SCW) harmonics during the development of the two-stream instability in helical relativistic electron beams. It is found that in helical two-stream electron beams the growth rate of the two-stream instab...

  14. Numerical evaluation of longitudinal motions of Wigley hulls advancing in waves by using Bessho form translating-pulsating source Green'S function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenbin; Dong, Wencai

    2016-06-01

    In the framework of 3D potential flow theory, Bessho form translating-pulsating source Green's function in frequency domain is chosen as the integral kernel in this study and hybrid source-and-dipole distribution model of the boundary element method is applied to directly solve the velocity potential for advancing ship in regular waves. Numerical characteristics of the Green function show that the contribution of local-flow components to velocity potential is concentrated at the nearby source point area and the wave component dominates the magnitude of velocity potential in the far field. Two kinds of mathematical models, with or without local-flow components taken into account, are adopted to numerically calculate the longitudinal motions of Wigley hulls, which demonstrates the applicability of translating-pulsating source Green's function method for various ship forms. In addition, the mesh analysis of discrete surface is carried out from the perspective of ship-form characteristics. The study shows that the longitudinal motion results by the simplified model are somewhat greater than the experimental data in the resonant zone, and the model can be used as an effective tool to predict ship seakeeping properties. However, translating-pulsating source Green function method is only appropriate for the qualitative analysis of motion response in waves if the ship geometrical shape fails to satisfy the slender-body assumption.

  15. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  16. Spring-spawning herring ( Clupea harengus L.) in the southwestern Baltic Sea: do they form genetically distinct spawning waves?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, H.B.H.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Loeschcke, V.

    2005-01-01

    Temporal sampling within the spring-spawning season has revealed differentiation in length-at-age in herring at Rugen and differentiation in, e.g., Anisakis infestation rate, otolith microstructure, and gillraker counts in Gdansk Bay, leading to the expectation that spawning waves consist of dist...... genetically distinct but sympatric spawning populations may be found at Rugen. (c) 2005 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  17. Analysis of Vibrating String Standing Wave Formed by Origin%利用Origin分析弦振动形成驻波的规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李生仁; 白琼燕; 杨军; 李春望

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, analyzing the movement of the tiny sport on string section through wave equation in theory, deriving the relationship among the wavelength, the string tension, frequency and the density of strings when standing wave forms. Meanwhile, with evenly string vibration tester XZDY-type B, obtaining a lot of experimental data. And processing the data under the environment of Origin fitting processing system, making the data relationship chart to enable experimental data vis-ualization and informationization, the law that formed standing wave audio-visual and easier to understand.%本文通过波动方程和对弦上某一微小段的运动理论分析,推导出弦振动形成驻波时波长、弦中张力、频率和弦线密度之间的关系。同时借助XZDY-B型均匀弦振动仪,获得大量的实验数据,并在Origin环境下对数据进行系统的拟合处理,做出了数据间的关系图,使实验数据可视化和信息化,使弦振动形成驻波的规律更为直观,更容易理解。

  18. Josephson effects in the junction formed by DIII-class topological and s-wave superconductors with an embedded quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Shan, Wan-Fei; Wu, Hai-Na; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the Josephson effects in the junction formed by the indirect coupling between DIII-class topological and s-wave superconductors via an embedded quantum dot. Due to the presence of two kinds of superconductors, three dot-superconductor coupling manners are considered, respectively. As a result, the Josephson current is found to oscillate in period 2π. More importantly, the presence of Majorana doublet in the DIII-class superconductor renders the current finite at the case of zero phase difference, with its sign determined by the fermion parity of such a junction. In addition, the dot-superconductor coupling plays a nontrivial role in adjusting the Josephson current. When the s-wave superconductor couples to the dot in the weak limit, the current direction will have an opportunity to reverse. It is believed that these results will be helpful for understanding the transport properties of the DIII-class superconductor. PMID:27324426

  19. The Analytical Form of the Dispersion Equation of Elastic Waves in Periodically Inhomogeneous Medium of Different Classes of Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurlybek A. Ispulov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of thermoelastic wave propagation in elastic media is bound to have much influence in the fields of material science, geophysics, seismology, and so on. The heat conduction equations and bound equations of motions differ by the difficulty level and presence of many physical and mechanical parameters in them. Therefore thermoelasticity is being extensively studied and developed. In this paper by using analytical matrizant method set of equation of motions in elastic media are reduced to equivalent set of first-order differential equations. Moreover, for given set of equations, the structure of fundamental solutions for the general case has been derived and also dispersion relations are obtained.

  20. Study of u and d quark form factors in light front wave function with N{sup 2}LO approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reza Shojaei, Mohammad [Shahrood University of Technology, Department of Physics, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In this paper, we have calculated the Dirac and Pauli form factors for u and d quark with light front quark model in N{sup 2}LO approximation for MSTW2008 quark function distributions. By using this approximation we found the parameters of Dirac and Pauli form factors, and then we calculated the form factors function as Q{sup 2}. By comparing with experimental data we concluded that F{sub 1}(Q{sup 2}) and F{sub 2}(Q{sup 2}) are in good agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  1. Exploring long-wave infrared transmitting materials with AxBy form: First-principles gene-like studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jia-Ren; Chen, Nian-Ke; Li, Xian-Bin; Xie, Sheng-Yi; Tian, Wei Quan; Wang, Xian-Yin; Tu, Hai-Ling; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-02-01

    Long-wave infrared (8-12 μm) transmitting materials play critical roles in space science and electronic science. However, the paradox between their mechanical strength and infrared transmitting performance seriously prohibits their applications in harsh external environment. From the experimental view, searching a good window material compatible with both properties is a vast trail-and-error engineering project, which is not readily achieved efficiently. In this work, we propose a very simple and efficient method to explore potential infrared window materials with suitable mechanical property by first-principles gene-like searching. Two hundred and fifty-three potential materials are evaluated to find their bulk modulus (for mechanical performance) and phonon vibrational frequency (for optical performance). Seven new potential candidates are selected, namely TiSe, TiS, MgS, CdF2, HgF2, CdO, and SrO. Especially, the performances of TiS and CdF2 can be comparable to that of the most popular commercial ZnS at high temperature. Finally, we propose possible ranges of infrared transmission for halogen, chalcogen and nitrogen compounds respectively to guide further exploration. The present strategy to explore IR window materials can significantly speed up the new development progress. The same idea can be used for other material rapid searching towards special functions and applications.

  2. The Swift/UVOT catalogue of NGC4321 star forming sources: A case against density wave theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreras, Ignacio; Kawata, Daisuke; Page, Mat; Hoversten, Erik A

    2012-01-01

    We study the star forming regions in the spiral galaxy NGC4321, taking advantage of the spatial resolution (2.5 arcsec FWHM) of the Swift/UVOT camera and the availability of three UV passbands in the region 1600-3000 A, in combination with optical and IR imaging from SDSS, KPNO/Ha and Spitzer/IRAC, to obtain a catalogue of 787 star forming regions out to three disc scale lengths. We determine the properties of the young stellar component and its relationship with the spiral arms. The Ha luminosities of the sources have a strong decreasing radial trend, suggesting more massive star forming regions in the central part of the galaxy. When segregated with respect to NUV-optical colour, blue sources have a significant excess of flux in the IR at 8 micron, revealing the contribution from PAHs, although the overall reddening of these sources stays below E(B-V)=0.2 mag. The distribution of distances to the spiral arms is compared for subsamples selected according to Ha luminosity, NUV-optical colour, or ages derived ...

  3. Calculations of near-field emissions in frequency-domain into time-dependent data with arbitrary wave form transient perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted on the application of the computational method for calculating the transient electromagnetic (EM near-field (NF radiated by electronic structures from the frequency-dependent data for the arbitrary wave form perturbations i(t. The method proposed is based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT. The different steps illustrating the principle of the method is described. It is composed of three successive steps: the synchronization of the input excitation spectrum I(f and the given frequency data H0(f, the convolution of the two inputs data and then, the determination of the time-domain emissions H(t. The feasibility of the method is verified with standard EM 3D simulations. In addition to this method, an extraction technique of the time-dependent z-transversal EM NF component Xz(t from the frequency-dependent x- and y- longitudinal components Hx(f and Hy(f is also presented. This technique is based on the conjugation of the plane wave spectrum (PWS transform and FFT. The feasibility of the method is verified with a set of dipole radiations. The method introduced in this paper is particularly useful for the investigation of time-domain emissions for EMC applications by considering transient EM interferences (EMIs.

  4. Sediment wave-forms and modes of construction on Mariana (and other) intra-oceanic arc volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embley, R. W.; Stern, R. J.; Chadwick, B.; Tamura, Y.; Merle, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Most intra-oceanic arc volcanoes are composite edifices constructed primarily in the submarine environment, built up by volcaniclastic sediments derived from hydroclastic and pyroclastic processes at/near the summits, punctuated by occasional lava flows and intrusions. Of particular interest in the mode of construction are extensive fields of large sediment waveforms (SWFs), up to >2 km wavelength and >100 m amplitude, on the submarine flanks of many islands and seamounts within the Mariana and other intra-oceanic subduction zones. These SWFs are composed of coarse-grained volcaniclastic sediments derived from the (approximate) point source summits of the island and submarine volcanoes. SWFs around some seamounts and islands, particularly those with large calderas, define quasi-concentric ring-like ridges, suggesting formation by density currents generated during submarine and island eruptions, and preserved for 10s of thousands of years. Some types of SWFs appear to have formed by progressive slumping of oversteepened slopes without fluidization. General conclusions about the origin of SWFs are hampered by the dearth of samples and high resolution seismic reflection profiles. However, large coherent slumps and debris avalanches documented for some ocean islands (e.g., Hawaiian Islands) are (mostly) are not as evident on the composite arc volcanoes. Submarine Mariana arc (and other intra-oceanic arc) volcanism probably spread volcaniclastic material primarily during submarine "Neptunian" eruptions and by progressive slides and other sediment flow rather than by catastrophic flank collapse. These processes could mitigate the Hawaiian-style of tsumami hazard, but Krakatoa-type tsunami hazards exist.

  5. 探析土家族摆手舞的舞蹈形态及风格特征%Analysis on Dance Forms and Style Features of Tujia Waving Dance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪茜

    2015-01-01

    Taking the fact that the name, form and content of Tujia Waving Dance were originated from religion, war and labor pro-ductivity as the breakthrough point, the author analyzes such two performance forms of Tujia Waving Dance as big-range waving and small-range waving, and then elaborates the style character-istics of Tujia Waving Dance, namely, originality, warfare, sacri-fice and aesthetics, and finally specifies the dance forms of Tujia Waving Dance, including bending knees, vibration, same side, vertical jump and waving, circular jump and waving. The aim of this paper is to promote the popularization of Tujia Waving Dance among more and more people.%笔者以土家族摆手舞的起名、形式、内容分别产生于宗教信仰、战争及劳动生产为切入点,解析了土家族摆手舞的大摆、小摆两种表演形式,进而对土家族摆手舞的原生性、战争性、祭祀性、审美性的风格特征进行了阐述,最后对土家族摆手舞的屈膝、颤动、顺拐、同边、直立跳摆及绕圈跳摆的舞蹈形态特征进行了剖析。以期推动土家族摆手舞被越来越多的人所认识。

  6. Ocular-motor profile and effects of memantine in a familial form of adult cerebellar ataxia with slow saccades and square wave saccadic intrusions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Rosini

    Full Text Available Fixation instability due to saccadic intrusions is a feature of autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxias, and includes square wave intrusions (SWI and macrosaccadic oscillations (MSO. A recent report suggested that the non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors, memantine, could decrease MSO and improve fixation in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia with saccadic intrusions (SCASI. We similarly tested two sisters, respectively of 58 and 60 years, with an unrecognized form of recessive, adult-onset cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy and slow saccades, who showed prominent SWI and also complained with difficulty in reading. We tested horizontal visually guided saccades (10°-18° and three minutes of steady fixation in each patient and in thirty healthy controls. Both patients showed a significant reduction of peak and mean velocity compared with control subjects. Large SWI interrupting steady fixation were prominent during steady fixation and especially following visually guided saccades. Eye movements were recorded before and during the treatment with memantine, 20 mg/daily for 6 months. The treatment with memantine reduced both the magnitude and frequency of SWI (the former significantly, but did not modified neurological conditions or saccade parameters. Thus, our report suggests that memantine may have some general suppressive effect on saccadic intrusions, including both SWI and MSO, thereby restoring the capacity of reading and visual attention in these and in other recessive forms of ataxia, including Friedreich's, in which saccadic intrusions are prominent.

  7. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Angélil, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics, rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches, we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic...

  8. Studies on seismic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海明; 陈晓非

    2003-01-01

    The development of seismic wave study in China in the past four years is reviewed. The discussion is divided into several aspects, including seismic wave propagation in laterally homogeneous media, laterally heterogeneous media, anisotropic and porous media, surface wave and seismic wave inversion, and seismic wave study in prospecting and logging problems. Important projects in the current studies on seismic wave is suggested as the development of high efficient numerical methods, and applying them to the studies of excitation and propagation of seismic waves in complex media and strong ground motion, which will form a foundation for refined earthquake hazard analysis and prediction.

  9. Wave Data Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alikhani, Amir; Frigaard, Peter; Burcharth, Hans F.

    1998-01-01

    The data collected over the course of the experiment must be analysed and converted into a form suitable for its intended use. Type of analyses range from simple to sophisticated. Depending on the particular experiment and the needs of the researcher. In this study three main part of irregular wave...... data analyses are presented e.g. Time Domain (Statistical) Analyses, Frequency Domain (Spectral) Analyses and Wave Reflection Analyses. Random wave profile and definitions of representative waves, distributions of individual wave height and wave periods and spectra of sea waves are presented....

  10. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...... means that form serves both as the connective value and as the concept for reflection. In other words, form is observed as form, not anything else. The didactical challenge of teaching form as form is accentuated by students’ everyday-based pre-orientation towards function at the expense of form....... In general, students enter design education as far more skilled observers with regards to function than form. They are, in other words, predisposed to observe objects asking ‘what is?’, rather than ‘how is?’. This habit has not only cognitive implications. It is closely intertwined with a rudimentary...

  11. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...... means that form serves both as the connective value and as the concept for reflection. In other words, form is observed as form, not anything else. The didactical challenge of teaching form as form is accentuated by students’ everyday-based pre-orientation towards function at the expense of form...... vocabulary of form. Even in cases in which teaching uses terms and phrases from everyday life (for instance, ‘intersection’), the meaning of the word cannot necessarily be transmitted directly from an ordinary vocabulary into a design context. And it is clearly a common issue for the contributions...

  12. Island-trapped Waves, Internal Waves, and Island Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Island-trapped waves , internal waves , and island circulation T. M. Shaun Johnston Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California...topography. As strong flows encounter small islands, points, and submarine ridges, it is expected that wakes, eddies, and arrested internal lee waves ...form drag, lee waves , eddy generation) over small-scale topographic features and (ii) fundamentally nonlinear processes (turbulent island wakes

  13. Fracture channel waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Kurt T.; Yi, Weidong; Myer, Larry R.; Cook, Neville G. W.; Schoenberg, Michael

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A0 mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected.

  14. Broadband optical parametric amplifier formed by two pairs of adjacent four-wave mixing sidebands in a tellurite microstructured optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Tuan, Tong-Hoang; Kawamura, Harutaka; Nagasaka, Kenshiro; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2016-05-01

    A broadband fibre-optical parametric amplifier (FOPA) operating at a novel wavelength region that is far from the pump wavelength has been demonstrated by exploiting two pairs of adjacent four-wave mixing (FWM) sidebands generated simultaneously in a tellurite microstructured optical fibre (TMOF). Owing to the large nonlinearity of the TMOF and the high pump peak power provided by a picosecond laser, a maximal average gain of 65.1 dB has been obtained. When the FOPA is operated in a saturated state, a flat-gain amplification from 1424 nm to 1459 nm can be achieved. This broadband and high-gain FOPA operating at new wavelength regions far from the pump offers the prospect of all-optical signal processing.

  15. Modelling Bending Wave Transmission across Coupled Plate Systems Comprising Periodic Ribbed Plates in the Low-, Mid-, and High-Frequency Ranges Using Forms of Statistical Energy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfei Yin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of bending wave transmission across systems of coupled plates which incorporate periodic ribbed plates is considered using Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA in the low- and mid-frequency ranges and Advanced SEA (ASEA in the high-frequency range. This paper investigates the crossover from prediction with SEA to ASEA through comparison with Finite Element Methods. Results from L-junctions confirm that this crossover occurs near the frequency band containing the fundamental bending mode of the individual bays on the ribbed plate when ribs are parallel to the junction line. Below this frequency band, SEA models treating each periodic ribbed plate as a single subsystem were shown to be appropriate. Above this frequency band, large reductions occur in the vibration level when propagation takes place across successive bays on ribbed plates when the ribs are parallel to the junction. This is due to spatial filtering; hence it is necessary to use ASEA which can incorporate indirect coupling associated with this transmission mechanism. A system of three coupled plates was also modelled which introduced flanking transmission. The results show that a wide frequency range can be covered by using both SEA and ASEA for systems of coupled plates where some or all of the plates are periodic ribbed plates.

  16. Study of Damage Stability of Trimaran Hull Form in Following Waves%三体船随浪中的破舱稳性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李磊; 宗智

    2012-01-01

    以一三体船型为例,研究了三体船型在波浪中的破舱稳性.对不同的破舱位置和侧体位置的多种方案进行了计算,结果表明:侧体位置不同时,最危险的破舱位置亦不同,并且破舱位置对稳性损失的影响随着侧体横向位置的增大而减小;侧体位置位于船舯时破舱稳性较好,侧体横向距离越大破舱稳性越好.%A typical trimaran as an example, the damage stability in waves is studied. Several solutions of stabilities for trimaran with different damage tank and side hull positions are calculated. The result shows that the most dangerous damage tank location depends on different side hull location. Further more, the influence of the damage tank location on damage stability decreases as the horizontal position of the side hulls increases. The study also shows that when the side hull longitudinal position is neur to the midship, the larger the horizontal distance of the side hull is, the better the damage stability is.

  17. Dichromatic Langmuir waves in degenerate quantum plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinov, A. E.; Kitayev, I. N.

    2015-06-01

    Langmuir waves in fully degenerate quantum plasma are considered. It is shown that, in the linear approximation, Langmuir waves are always dichromatic. The low-frequency component of the waves corresponds to classical Langmuir waves, while the high-frequency component, to free-electron quantum oscillations. The nonlinear problem on the profile of dichromatic Langmuir waves is solved. Solutions in the form of a superposition of waves and in the form of beatings of its components are obtained.

  18. SCALAR WAVES AND WIRELESS POWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It is established that in the classical electrodynamics with Lorenz gauge there are solutions in the form of waves of scalar and vector potential at zero magnetic and electric field. It is shown that wave scalar and vector potential can interact with the substance, causing ionization of the atoms and molecules. The analogue of scalar waves in electrodynamics and sound waves in gas dynamics is discussed. Proposed technical application of the waves of scalar and vector potential similar to acoustic waves. Discusses Tesla invented electrical device capable of generating and receiving scalar waves

  19. Mass spectrometric study on inactivation mechanism of spore-forming bacteria by low-pressure surface-wave excited oxygen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2011-05-01

    In this letter, the etching phenomena of the spore-forming bacteria by oxygen plasma were investigated by using quadrupole mass spectrometry. The etching by-products of H2O and CO2 were obviously detected during the oxygen plasma irradiation by the multiple ion detection measurement. Inactivation of roughly 106 spores population was achieved under almost the same reduced spore shapes for three different incident microwave powers. It is considered from the present results that the oxygen radical etching could cause damage to the germinant receptors located in the inner membrane inevitable for germination of spores, without any damage of the DNA in the cores.

  20. Collaborative form(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy

    Gunn asks us to consider beauty as collaborative forms of action generated by moving between design by means of anthropology and anthropology by means of design. Specifically, she gives focus to play-like reflexions on practices of designing energy products, systems and infrastructure. Design...

  1. Comparison with structure performance to different forms of ship hull under wave loads%不同船体构造形式在波浪载荷下的结构性能比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    边文凤; 白光辉; 吴忠友; 张崇杰

    2011-01-01

    船体结构形式不同,直接影响船体的结构性能和运动性能.文章针对五种船体构造形式,即:单板横向加筋、单板纵向加筋、单板双向加筋、硬壳式和夹层式这五种不同结构的船体在外载相同、质量相等的条件下进行应力与变形分析,以比较各种结构的响应和性能,为结构选型提供数值分析依据.分析考虑了静载与波浪载荷的叠加,并进行了准静态处理.通过计算和综合性能比较,挑选出既符合结构性能,又能满足使用要求的结构形式.%Ship hull in different forms has an impact on ship's structure performance and movement performance. In this paper, to five different ship structuring forms as longitudinal framing, transverse framing, combined system, hardshell form and laminated form, the stress and displacement on the condition of same loads and the equvience mass are analysed to compare the response and performance to different structures and to provide reference for structure election. The analysis considers superpositon of static loads and wave loads and deals with quasi-static. With computation and synthesis performance comparison, one structure form should be selected not only contents structure performance, but also satisfies using desire.

  2. Electromagnetic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is dedicated to various aspects of electromagnetic wave theory and its applications in science and technology. The covered topics include the fundamental physics of electromagnetic waves, theory of electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering, methods of computational analysis...

  3. MHD waves in sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Sych, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The review addresses the spatial frequency morphology of sources of sunspot oscillations and waves, including their localization, size, oscillation periods, height localization with the mechanism of cut-off frequency that forms the observed emission variability. Dynamic of sunspot wave processes, provides the information about the structure of wave fronts and their time variations, investigates the oscillation frequency transformation depending on the wave energy is shown. The initializing solar flares caused by trigger agents like magnetoacoustic waves, accelerated particle beams, and shocks are discussed. Special attention is paid to the relation between the flare reconnection periodic initialization and the dynamics of sunspot slow magnetoacoustic waves. A short review of theoretical models of sunspot oscillations is provided.

  4. Five Waves of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Claus Møller; Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss; Gertsen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Building on previous well-argued work by Jon Sundbo (1995a), on how innovation has evolved in three phases or waves since 1880, this paper’s contribution is extending the historical line, by offering arguments and explanations for two additional waves of innovation that explain the most recent...... developments. The paper also adds new interpretations of the previous work by Sundbo (1995a) in suggesting that the waves are triggered by societal and economic crisis. The result is a new theoretical and historical framework, proposing five waves of innovation triggered by societal and economic crises....... The innovation within each wave is constituted by different drivers of innovation: Cost-driven, development-driven, market-driven, user-driven, and remains of these waves are accumulated to form the complex character of today’s network-driven innovation....

  5. An Extented Wave Action Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左其华

    2003-01-01

    Based on the Navier-Stokes equation, an average wave energy equation and a generalized wave action conservation equation are presented in this paper. The turbulence effects on water particle velocity ui and wave surface elavation ξ as well as energy dissipation are included. Some simplified forms are also given.

  6. Extreme waves that appear from nowhere: On the nature of rogue waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmediev, N. [Optical Sciences Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Soto-Crespo, J.M. [Instituto de Optica, C.S.I.C., Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: iodsc09@io.cfmac.csic.es; Ankiewicz, A. [Optical Sciences Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2009-06-01

    We have numerically calculated chaotic waves of the focusing nonlinear Schrrodinger equation (NLSE), starting with a plane wave modulated by relatively weak random waves. We show that the peaks with highest amplitude of the resulting wave composition (rogue waves) can be described in terms of exact solutions of the NLSE in the form of the collision of Akhmediev breathers.

  7. A numerical study of the breaking of modulated waves generated at a wave maker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andonowati,; Kusumawinahyu, W.M; Groesen, van E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with breaking criteria for generated waves. An input in the form of a time signal is prescribed to a wave maker located at one end of a wave tank as used in hydrodynamic laboratories. The motion of this wave maker produces waves propagating into initially still water in the t

  8. Exact Solitary-wave Solutions and Periodic Wave Solutions for Generalized Modified Boussinesq Equation and the Effect of Wave Velocity on Wave Shape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-guo Zhang; Shao-wei Li; Wei-zhong Tian; Lu Zhang

    2008-01-01

    By means of the undetermined assumption method, we obtain some new exact solitary-wave solutions with hyperbolic secant function fractional form and periodic wave solutions with cosine function form for the generalized modified Bonssinesq equation. We also discuss the boundedness of these solutions. More over,we study the correlative characteristic of the solitary-wave solutions and the periodic wave solutions along with the travelling wave velocity's variation.

  9. Maslov shear-waveforms in highly anisotropic shales and implications for shear-wave splitting analyses; Formes d`onde transversales de Maslov dans les argiles fortement anisotropes et implications dans les analyses de birefringence des ondes transversales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caddick, J. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Kendall, J.M.; Raymer, D.G. [Western Geophysical, Middlesex (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1998-09-01

    Shales are the most common sedimentary rocks in hydrocarbon environments often forming the source rock and trapping rock for a reservoir. Due to the platy nature of the constituent grains, shales are commonly anisotropic. In this paper we calculate seismic waveforms for highly anisotropic shales using Maslow asymptotic theory (MAT). This theory is an extension of classical ray theory which provides valid waveforms in regions of caustics (wavefront folding) where ray theory amplitudes are unstable. Asymptotic ray theory (ART) is based on the Fermat or geometrical ray which connects the source and receiver. In contrast, the Maslov solution integrates the contributions from neighbouring non-Fermat rays. Ray-paths, travel-times, amplitudes and synthetic seismograms are presented for three highly anisotropic shales using a very simple 1D model comprised of an anisotropic shale overlying an isotropic shale. The ART waveforms fail to account for complex waveform effects due to triplications. In comparison, the MAT waveforms predict nonsingular amplitudes at wavefront cusps and it predicts the diffracted signals from these cusps. A Maslov solution which integrates ray contributions over a single slowness component will break down when rays focus in 3D (at a point rather than along a line). One of the tested shales shows such a point caustic and integration over 2 slowness components is required to remove the amplitude singularity. Finally, we examine the effects of wavefront triplications on Alford rotations which are used to estimate shear-wave splitting. In such cases, the rotation successfully finds the fast shear-wave polarization, but it can be unreliable in its estimate of the time separation. (authors) 21 refs.

  10. Reflection and Refraction of Acoustic Waves by a Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillouin, J.

    1957-01-01

    The presence of sound waves in one or the other of the fluid regions on either side of a shock wave is made apparent, in the region under superpressure, by acoustic waves (reflected or refracted according to whether the incident waves lie in the region of superpressure or of subpressure) and by thermal waves. The characteristics of these waves are calculated for a plane, progressive, and uniform incident wave. In the case of refraction, the refracted acoustic wave can, according to the incidence, be plane, progressive, and uniform or take the form of an 'accompanying wave' which remains attached to the front of the shock while sliding parallel to it. In all cases, geometrical constructions permit determination of the kinematic characteristics of the reflected or refractive acoustic waves. The dynamic relationships show that the amplitude of the reflected wave is always less than that of the incident wave. The amplitude of the refracted wave, whatever its type, may in certain cases be greater than that of the incident wave.

  11. Heisenberg's wave packet reconsidered

    OpenAIRE

    Grabbe, J. Orlin

    2005-01-01

    This note shows that Heisenberg's choice for a wave function in his original paper on the uncertainty principle is simply a renormalized characteristic function of a stable distribution with certain restrictions on the parameters. Relaxing Heisenberg's restrictions leads to a more general formulation of the uncertainty principle. This reformulation shows quantum uncertainty can exist at a macroscopic level. These modifications also give rise to a new form of Schrodinger's wave equation as the...

  12. Spin wave confinement

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    This book presents recent scientific achievements in the investigation of magnetization dynamics in confined magnetic systems. Introduced by Bloch as plane waves of magnetization in unconfined ferromagnets, spin waves currently play an important role in the description of very small magnetic systems ranging from microelements, which form the basis of magnetic sensors, to magnetic nano-contacts. The spin wave confinement effect was experimentally discovered in the 1990s in permalloy microstripes. The diversity of systems where this effect is observed has been steadily growing since then, and

  13. Waves in the seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    or change. If ini- tially, only a thin layer of air close to the water surface matters in the mo- mentum transfer from wind to water, afterwards with strong winds, a layer of air upto say 15 to 30 metres comes Small sand waves formed on a seashore due... it breaks with a heading wind or on a beach). Consider an open sea of say 1000 square kilometres wherein billions of 'pushes' and 'pulls' happen over tens of hours, causing uncountable number of waves and wave groups of various types moving in different...

  14. Mathieu Progressive Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrei B. Utkin

    2011-01-01

    A new family of exact solutions to the wave equation representing relatively undistorted progressive waves is constructed using separation of variables in the elliptic cylindrical coordinates and one of the Bateman transforms. The general form of this Bateman transform in an orthogonal eurvilinear cylindrical coordinate system is discussed and a specific problem of physical feasibility of the obtained solutions, connected with their dependence on the cyclic coordinate, is addressed. The limiting case of zero eccentricity, in which the elliptic cylindrical coordinates turn into their circular cylindrical counterparts, is shown to correspond to the focused wave modes of the Bessel-Gauss type.

  15. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and ... having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - Slow down. Avoid strenuous ...

  16. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  17. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter; Sørensen, H. C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper concerns with the development of the wave energy converter (WEC) Wave Dragon. This WEC is based on the overtopping principle. An overview of the performed research done concerning the Wave Dragon over the past years is given, and the results of one of the more comprehensive studies......, concerning a hydraulic evaluation and optimisation of the geometry of the Wave Dragon, is presented. Furthermore, the plans for the future development projects are sketched....

  18. Electromagnetic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is dedicated to various aspects of electromagnetic wave theory and its applications in science and technology. The covered topics include the fundamental physics of electromagnetic waves, theory of electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering, methods of computational analysis......, material characterization, electromagnetic properties of plasma, analysis and applications of periodic structures and waveguide components, etc....

  19. Wave phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Towne, Dudley H

    1988-01-01

    This excellent undergraduate-level text emphasizes optics and acoustics, covering inductive derivation of the equation for transverse waves on a string, acoustic plane waves, boundary-value problems, polarization, three-dimensional waves and more. With numerous problems (solutions for about half). ""The material is superbly chosen and brilliantly written"" - Physics Today. Problems. Appendices.

  20. Controllable parabolic-cylinder optical rogue wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Chen, Lang; Belić, Milivoj; Petrović, Nikola

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate controllable parabolic-cylinder optical rogue waves in certain inhomogeneous media. An analytical rogue wave solution of the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation with spatially modulated coefficients and an external potential in the form of modulated quadratic potential is obtained by the similarity transformation. Numerical simulations are performed for comparison with the analytical solutions and to confirm the stability of the rogue wave solution obtained. These optical rogue waves are built by the products of parabolic-cylinder functions and the basic rogue wave solution of the standard nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Such rogue waves may appear in different forms, as the hump and paw profiles.

  1. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  2. From the Somigliana waves to the evanescent waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Caloi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Rayleigh equation has real coefficients; therefore, also the case of complex conjugated roots may be explained physically. The Author proves that the Somigliana waves may be formed for Poisson ratio values until 0.30543; for gradually less rigid media, they are missing altogether and degenerate into evanescent waves.

  3. Reduced-order prediction of rogue waves in two-dimensional deep-water waves

    CERN Document Server

    Farazmand, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of large wave prediction in two-dimensional water waves. Such waves form due to the synergistic effect of dispersive mixing of smaller wave groups and the action of localized nonlinear wave interactions that leads to focusing. Instead of a direct simulation approach, we rely on the decomposition of the wave field into a discrete set of localized wave groups with optimal length scales and amplitudes. Due to the short-term character of the prediction, these wave groups do not interact and therefore their dynamics can be characterized individually. Using direct numerical simulations of the governing envelope equations we precompute the expected maximum elevation for each of those wave groups. The combination of the wave field decomposition algorithm, which provides information about the statistics of the system, and the precomputed map for the expected wave group elevation, which encodes dynamical information, allows (i) for understanding of how the probability of occurrence of rogue wave...

  4. Making waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Traveling waves propagating along surfaces play an important role for intracellular organization. Such waves can appear spontaneously in reaction-diffusion systems, but only few general criteria for their existence are known. Analyzing the dynamics of the Min proteins in Escherichia coli, Levine and Kessler (2016 New J. Phys. 18 122001) now identified a new mechanism for the emergence of traveling waves that relies on conservation laws. From their analysis one can expect traveling waves to be a generic feature of systems made of proteins that have a cytoplasmic and a membrane-bound state.

  5. Janus Waves

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We show the existence of a family of waves that share a common interesting property affecting the way they propagate and focus. These waves are a superposition of twin waves, which are conjugate to each other under inversion of the propagation direction. In analogy to holography, these twin "real" and "virtual" waves are related respectively to the converging and the diverging part of the beam and can be clearly visualized in real space at two distinct foci under the action of a focusing lens...

  6. Stress wave focusing transducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S.R., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Conversion of laser radiation to mechanical energy is the fundamental process behind many medical laser procedures, particularly those involving tissue destruction and removal. Stress waves can be generated with laser radiation in several ways: creation of a plasma and subsequent launch of a shock wave, thermoelastic expansion of the target tissue, vapor bubble collapse, and ablation recoil. Thermoelastic generation of stress waves generally requires short laser pulse durations and high energy density. Thermoelastic stress waves can be formed when the laser pulse duration is shorter than the acoustic transit time of the material: {tau}{sub c} = d/c{sub s} where d = absorption depth or spot diameter, whichever is smaller, and c{sub s} = sound speed in the material. The stress wave due to thermoelastic expansion travels at the sound speed (approximately 1500 m/s in tissue) and leaves the site of irradiation well before subsequent thermal events can be initiated. These stress waves, often evolving into shock waves, can be used to disrupt tissue. Shock waves are used in ophthalmology to perform intraocular microsurgery and photodisruptive procedures as well as in lithotripsy to fragment stones. We have explored a variety of transducers that can efficiently convert optical to mechanical energy. One such class of transducers allows a shock wave to be focused within a material such that the stress magnitude can be greatly increased compared to conventional geometries. Some transducer tips could be made to operate regardless of the absorption properties of the ambient media. The size and nature of the devices enable easy delivery, potentially minimally-invasive procedures, and precise tissue- targeting while limiting thermal loading. The transducer tips may have applications in lithotripsy, ophthalmology, drug delivery, and cardiology.

  7. A sand wave simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, A.A.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Damme, van R.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sand waves form a prominent regular pattern in the offshore seabeds of sandy shallow seas. A two dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological numerical model describing the behaviour of these sand waves has been developed. The model contains the 2DV shallow water equations, with a free water su

  8. Regeneration of dredged sand waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Knaapen, Michiel; Scholl, Olaf; Scholl, O.; Trenteseaux., A.; Garlan, T.

    2000-01-01

    Sand waves form a wavy pattern in the offshore sandy seabed. Since their crests reduce the navigability, it is important to know their evolution. A simple model is presented to estimate the recovery of sand wave amplitudes. This model is partially based on the similarity with sea ripples and

  9. Opdriftsbaserede modeller for Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten

    Formålet med dette skrift er at få en forhåndsvurdering af mulige effektforøgelser for Wave Star ved anvendelse af aktiv akkumulatordrift. Disse vurderinger baseres på simuleringsmodeller for driften af Wave Star i uregelmæssige bølger. Modellen er udarbejdet i programmeringssproget Delphi og er en...

  10. Wave Dissipation and Balance - NOPP Wave Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    interactions between them, and it is not clear how to transform each type of measurement into a clear constraint for the functional form and magnitude of...white with a uniform current U = 0.15 m/s towards the trigonometric angle 99 degrees. The white dashed line marks approximately the separation between...A. Roland, A. van der Westhuysen, P. Queffeulou, J.-M. Lefevre, L. Aouf, and F. Collard. Semi-empirical dissipation source functions for wind-wave

  11. Third wave development expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Byskov, Morten

    2017-01-01

    In this paper I offer a normative account of development expertise. Although extending expertise beyond the traditional development experts to include local stakeholders, this normative account aims to delimit legitimate forms of expertise. I label this normative view third wave development expertis

  12. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Since March 2003 a prototype of Wave Dragon has been tested in an inland sea in Denmark. This has been a great success with all subsystems tested and improved through working in an offshore environment. The project has proved the Wave Dragon device and has enabled the next stage, a production sized...

  13. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik;

    2008-01-01

    Since March 2003 a prototype of Wave Dragon has been tested in an inland sea in Denmark. This has been a great success with all subsystems tested and improved through working in an offshore environment. The project has proved the Wave Dragon device and has enabled the next stage, a production sized...

  14. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  15. Wave Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Christov, Ivan C

    2012-01-01

    In classical continuum physics, a wave is a mechanical disturbance. Whether the disturbance is stationary or traveling and whether it is caused by the motion of atoms and molecules or the vibration of a lattice structure, a wave can be understood as a specific type of solution of an appropriate mathematical equation modeling the underlying physics. Typical models consist of partial differential equations that exhibit certain general properties, e.g., hyperbolicity. This, in turn, leads to the possibility of wave solutions. Various analytical techniques (integral transforms, complex variables, reduction to ordinary differential equations, etc.) are available to find wave solutions of linear partial differential equations. Furthermore, linear hyperbolic equations with higher-order derivatives provide the mathematical underpinning of the phenomenon of dispersion, i.e., the dependence of a wave's phase speed on its wavenumber. For systems of nonlinear first-order hyperbolic equations, there also exists a general ...

  16. On conformally related -waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varsha Daftardar-Gejji

    2001-05-01

    Brinkmann [1] has shown that conformally related distinct Ricci flat solutions are -waves. Brinkmann's result has been generalized to include the conformally invariant source terms. It has been shown that [4] if $g_{ik}$ and $\\overline{g}_{ik}$ ($=^{-2}g_{ik}$, : a scalar function), are distinct metrics having the same Einstein tensor, $G_{ik}=\\overline{G}_{ik}$, then both represent (generalized) $pp$-waves and $_{i}$ is a null convariantly constant vector of $g_{ik}$. Thus $pp$-waves are the only candidates which yield conformally related nontrivial solutions of $G_{ik}=T_{ik}=\\overline{G}_{ik}$, with $T_{ik}$ being conformally invariant source. In this paper the functional form of the conformal factor for the conformally related $pp$-waves/generalized $pp$-waves has been obtained. It has been shown that the most general $pp$-wave, conformally related to ${\\rm d}s^{2}=-2{\\rm d}u[{\\rm d}v-m{\\rm d}y+H{\\rm d}u]+P^{-2}[{\\rm d}y^{2}+{\\rm d}z^{2}]$, turns out to the $(au+b)^{-2}{\\rm d}s^{2}$, where , are constants. Only in the special case when $m=0$, $H=1$, and $P=P(y,z)$, the conformal factor is $(au+b)^{-2}$ or $(a(u+v)+b)^{-2}$.

  17. Wave Grouping of a Drifting Spiral Wave in the Presence of an External Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hu-Jiang; YANG Jun-Zhong; HU Gang

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenon of wave grouping, in which the dense waves and the sparse waves can form groups in front of the spiral tip when the spiral wave is meandering, has been reported in a chemical reaction system recently. We present a method to realize the phenomenon of wave grouping by applying an external field to the system. The numerical simulations are carried out on the basis of the FitzHugh-Nagumo equations.

  18. A method for generating highly nonlinear periodic waves in physical wave basins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Haiwen; Schäffer, Hemming A.; Bingham, Harry B.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract describes a new method for generating nonlinear waves of constant form in physical wave basins. The idea is to combine fully dispersive linear wavemaker theory with nonlinear shallow water wave generation theory; and use an exact nonlinear theory as the target. We refer to the metho...... as an ad-hoc unified wave generation theory, since there is no rigorous analysis behind the idea which is simply justified by the improved results obtained for the practical generation of steady nonlinear waves....

  19. Waves, damped wave and observation

    CERN Document Server

    Phung, Kim Dang

    2009-01-01

    We consider the wave equation in a bounded domain (eventually convex). Two kinds of inequality are described when occurs trapped ray. Applications to control theory are given. First, we link such kind of estimate with the damped wave equation and its decay rate. Next, we describe the design of an approximate control function by an iterative time reversal method.

  20. Gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, David

    1987-02-01

    Gravity waves contributed to the establishment of the thermal structure, small scale (80 to 100 km) fluctuations in velocity (50 to 80 m/sec) and density (20 to 30%, 0 to peak). Dominant gravity wave spectrum in the middle atmosphere: x-scale, less than 100 km; z-scale, greater than 10 km; t-scale, less than 2 hr. Theorists are beginning to understand middle atmosphere motions. There are two classes: Planetary waves and equatorial motions, gravity waves and tidal motions. The former give rise to variability at large scales, which may alter apparent mean structure. Effects include density and velocity fluctuations, induced mean motions, and stratospheric warmings which lead to the breakup of the polar vortex and cooling of the mesosphere. On this scale are also equatorial quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations. Gravity wave and tidal motions produce large rms fluctuations in density and velocity. The magnitude of the density fluctuations compared to the mean density is of the order of the vertical wavelength, which grows with height. Relative density fluctuations are less than, or of the order of 30% below the mesopause. Such motions may cause significant and variable convection, and wind shear. There is a strong seasonal variation in gravity wave amplitude. Additional observations are needed to address and quantify mean and fluctuation statistics of both density and mean velocity, variability of the mean and fluctuations, and to identify dominant gravity wave scales and sources as well as causes of variability, both temporal and geographic.

  1. Considerations on Gravitational Wave in Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Ovidiu Racorean

    2002-01-01

    A proposal for a dynamical potential of population displacements (named gravitational potential) between economic regions will be given. For a particular ideal chosen case,the gravitational potential is acting as a wave. An equation of the wave form will be given for gravitational potential-gravitational wave in economics.

  2. Leapfrogging Kelvin waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hietala, N; Salman, H; Barenghi, C F

    2016-01-01

    Two vortex rings can form a localized configuration whereby they continually pass through one another in an alternating fashion. This phenomenon is called leapfrogging. Using parameters suitable for superfluid helium-4, we describe a recurrence phenomenon that is similar to leapfrogging which occurs for two coaxial straight vortex filaments with the same Kelvin wave mode. For small amplitude Kelvin waves we demonstrate that our full Biot-Savart simulations closely follow predictions obtained from a simpified model that provides an analytical approximation developed for nearly parallel vortices. Our results are also relevant to thin-cored helical vortices in classical fluids.

  3. Leapfrogging Kelvin waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietala, N.; Hänninen, R.; Salman, H.; Barenghi, C. F.

    2016-12-01

    Two vortex rings can form a localized configuration whereby they continually pass through one another in an alternating fashion. This phenomenon is called leapfrogging. Using parameters suitable for superfluid helium-4, we describe a recurrence phenomenon that is similar to leapfrogging, which occurs for two coaxial straight vortex filaments with the same Kelvin wave mode. For small-amplitude Kelvin waves we demonstrate that our full Biot-Savart simulations closely follow predictions obtained from a simplified model that provides an analytical approximation developed for nearly parallel vortices. Our results are also relevant to thin-cored helical vortices in classical fluids.

  4. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Knapp, W.

    2006-01-01

    Wave Dragon is a floating wave energy converter working by extracting energy principally by means of overtopping of waves into a reservoir. A 1:4.5 scale prototype has been sea tested for 20 months. This paper presents results from testing, experiences gained and developments made during...... this extended period. The prototype is highly instrumented. The overtopping characteristic and the power produced are presented here. This has enabled comparison between the prototype and earlier results from both laboratory model and computer simulation. This gives the optimal operating point and the expected...

  5. Janus Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Papazoglou, Dimitris G; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2016-01-01

    We show the existence of a family of waves that share a common interesting property affecting the way they propagate and focus. These waves are a superposition of twin waves, which are conjugate to each other under inversion of the propagation direction. In analogy to holography, these twin "real" and "virtual" waves are related respectively to the converging and the diverging part of the beam and can be clearly visualized in real space at two distinct foci under the action of a focusing lens. Analytic formulas for the intensity distribution after focusing are derived, while numerical and experimental demonstrations are given for some of the most interesting members of this family, the accelerating Airy and ring-Airy beams.

  6. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  7. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  8. Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Needham, Charles E

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this text is to document many of the lessons that have been learned during the author’s more than forty years in the field of blast and shock. The writing therefore takes on an historical perspective, in some sense, because it follows the author’s experience. The book deals with blast waves propagating in fluids or materials that can be treated as fluids. It begins by distinguishing between blast waves and the more general category of shock waves. It then examines several ways of generating blast waves, considering the propagation of blast waves in one, two and three dimensions as well as through the real atmosphere. One section treats the propagation of shocks in layered gases in a more detailed manner. The book also details the interaction of shock waves with structures in particular reflections, progressing from simple to complex geometries, including planar structures, two-dimensional structures such as ramps or wedges, reflections from heights of burst, and three-dimensional st...

  9. Piezoelectric wave motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  10. Quantum wave packet revivals

    CERN Document Server

    Robinett, R W

    2004-01-01

    The numerical prediction, theoretical analysis, and experimental verification of the phenomenon of wave packet revivals in quantum systems has flourished over the last decade and a half. Quantum revivals are characterized by initially localized quantum states which have a short-term, quasi-classical time evolution, which then can spread significantly over several orbits, only to reform later in the form of a quantum revival in which the spreading reverses itself, the wave packet relocalizes, and the semi-classical periodicity is once again evident. Relocalization of the initial wave packet into a number of smaller copies of the initial packet (`minipackets' or `clones') is also possible, giving rise to fractional revivals. Systems exhibiting such behavior are a fundamental realization of time-dependent interference phenomena for bound states with quantized energies in quantum mechanics and are therefore of wide interest in the physics and chemistry communities. We review the theoretical machinery of quantum w...

  11. Communication at millimeter waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, A. K.; Christopher, P. F.

    The advantage and disadvantages of millimeter waves for terrestrial and satellite communications are enumerated. Atmospheric attenuation is discussed in detail, with brief attention given to signal loss in particulates, sandstorms, snow, hail, and fog. Short closed forms are then found for gaseous attenuation on ground-satellite paths. An exponential rain loss probability density function is used in generating atmospheric loss at arbitrary required availability. It is pointed out that this loss (as a function of frequency) can be used to pick optimum carrier frequencies as a function of location, required availability, elevation angle, and system cost. An estimate is made of the rate-of-change of millimeter wave device availability. Special attention is given to GaAs FETs, not only because they will be useful, but because one phase of their millimeter wave performance is predictable: their noise performance as a function of frequency can be estimated with the aid of a Fukui equation.

  12. Tropical Cyclogenesis in a Tropical Wave Critical Layer: Easterly Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkerton, T. J.; Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, is identified herein as the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The recirculating Kelvin cat's eye within the critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis at the center of the cat's eye, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally the associated Lagrangian motions, one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. In this co-moving frame, streamlines are approximately equivalent to particle trajectories. The closed circulation is quasi-stationary, and a dividing streamline separates air within the cat's eye from air outside.

  13. Fronts of Stress Wave in Anisotropic Piezoelectric Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘颖; 刘凯欣; 高凌天

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic of wave fronts in anisotropic piezoelectric media is analysed by adopting the generalized characteristic theory. Analytical expressions for wave velocities and wave fronts are formulated. Apart from the ordinary characteristics, a new phenomenon, energy velocity funnel, is formed on the wave fronts of quasitransverse waves in anisotropic piezoelectric materials. A three-dimensional representation of wave fronts in anisotropic piezoelectric materials is given for a better understanding of the new phenomena.

  14. From solitary wave to traveling surge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋礼庭

    1995-01-01

    The solution of kinetic Alfven wave under action of anomalous resistance has two branches: the slow wave, VPwave VP>VA cosθ will be in a wave-broken state. Such traveling surge structure is a typical self-organization phenomenon and its wave form is determined by parameter β which represents the magnitude of resistance. High β leads to shock-like structure and low β to the appearance of some solitary waves in front of the shock. According to the study on solitary wave, shock wave and traveling surge in conjunction with self-organization of nonlinear dynamics, a general definition of wave can be given.

  15. Narrative form

    CERN Document Server

    Keen, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    This revised and expanded handbook concisely introduces narrative form to advanced students of fiction and creative writing, with refreshed references and new discussions of cognitive approaches to narrative, nonfiction, and narrative emotions.

  16. Wave Generation Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Høgedal, Michael; Christensen, Morten

    The intention of this manual is to provide some formulas and techniques which can be used for generating waves in hydraulic laboratories. Both long crested waves (2-D waves) and short crested waves (3-D waves) are considered....

  17. Wave Generation Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Frigaard, Peter; Høgedal, Michael; Christensen, Morten

    1993-01-01

    The intention of this manual is to provide some formulas and techniques which can be used for generating waves in hydraulic laboratories. Both long crested waves (2-D waves) and short crested waves (3-D waves) are considered.

  18. Nonlinear wave-wave interactions and wedge waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ray Q.Lin; Will Perrie

    2005-01-01

    A tetrad mechanism for exciting long waves,for example edge waves,is described based on nonlinear resonant wave-wave interactions.In this mechanism,resonant interactions pass energy to an edge wave,from the three participating gravity waves.The estimated action flux into the edge wave can be orders of magnitude greater than the transfer fluxes derived from other competing mechanisms,such as triad interactions.Moreover,the numerical results show that the actual transfer rates into the edge wave from the three participating gravity waves are two-to three- orders of magnitude greater than bottom friction.

  19. Segregation of helicity in inertial wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, A.

    2017-03-01

    Inertial waves are known to exist in the Earth's rapidly rotating outer core and could be important for the dynamo generation. It is well known that a monochromatic inertial plane wave traveling parallel to the rotation axis (along positive z ) has negative helicity while the wave traveling antiparallel (negative z ) has positive helicity. Such a helicity segregation, north and south of the equator, is necessary for the α2-dynamo model based on inertial waves [Davidson, Geophys. J. Int. 198, 1832 (2014), 10.1093/gji/ggu220] to work. The core is likely to contain a myriad of inertial waves of different wave numbers and frequencies. In this study, we investigate whether this characteristic of helicity segregation also holds for an inertial wave packet comprising waves with the same sign of Cg ,z, the z component of group velocity. We first derive the polarization relations for inertial waves and subsequently derive the resultant helicity in wave packets forming as a result of superposition of two or more waves. We find that the helicity segregation does hold for an inertial wave packet unless the wave numbers of the constituent waves are widely separated. In the latter case, regions of opposite color helicity do appear, but the mean helicity retains the expected sign. An illustration of this observation is provided by (a) calculating the resultant helicity for a wave packet formed by superposition of four upward-propagating inertial waves with different wave vectors and (b) conducting the direct numerical simulation of a Gaussian eddy under rapid rotation. Last, the possible effects of other forces such as the viscous dissipation, the Lorentz force, buoyancy stratification, and nonlinearity on helicity are investigated and discussed. The helical structure of the wave packet is likely to remain unaffected by dissipation or the magnetic field, but can be modified by the presence of linearly stable stratification and nonlinearity.

  20. Wave climate analysis of the South China Sea and North Indian Ocean form 1957 to 2002%1957~2002年南海—北印度洋海浪场波候特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑崇伟; 李训强; 潘静

    2012-01-01

    The third-generation wave model WAVEWATCH-M was used to simulate the wave field from September 1957 to August 2002 with inputs of ERA40 10 m surface wind data in the South China Sea and North Indian Ocean. Results show that; ( 1 ) the wind field and wave field were significantly affected by the monsoon in the South China Sea and North Indian Ocean. (2) Sea surface wind speed in most areas of North Indian Ocean has an obvious increasing tendency, about 0. 01 ~0. 02 m/( s o a) , the linear trend in the South China Sea is not obvious. The significant wave height shows an obvious annually linear increasing trend mainly located in low latitude of mid-east Indian Ocean (about 0.003 ~0. 006 m/a) , waters around Somalia (about 0. 002 ~0. 005 m/a) , and most areas in the South China Sea ( about 0. 002 ~0. 004 m/a) , the area with decreasing tendency mainly located in waters of Bengal Bay (about -0.002 m/a). (3) There is a close relationship between the nino3 index and wave field (wind field) in the South China Sea and North Indian Ocean. (4) The wind speed and significant wave height in the South China Sea and North Indian Ocean have the same period of 5.2 years, the wind speed and sig- nificant wave height in the South China Sea have the same period of 2.0 years, the wind speed and significant wave height in the North Indian Ocean have the same period of 26. 0 years.%利用ERA-40海表10 m风场驱动第三代海浪数值模式WAVEWATCH-Ⅲ,得到南海—北印度洋1957年9月至2002年8月的海浪场,并分析其波候(风候)特征.研究发现如下主要特征:(1)该海域的波高波向、风速风向受季风影响显著;(2)北印度洋大部分海域的海表风速呈显著性逐年线性递增趋势,大约0.01~0.02 m/(s·a),南海线性递增的区域则较少,有效波高呈显著性逐年线性递增的区域主要集中在低纬度中东印度洋(约0.003 ~0.006 m/a)、索马里附近海域(大约0.002~0.005 m/a)、南海大部分海域(约0.002 ~ 0

  1. Fri form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Dette Kompendiun er lavet i forbindelse med en workshop i møbeldesign. En række af form-Z's værktøjer til konstruktion af dobbeltkrumme flader gennemgås. Kompendiet kan bruges til selvstudie.......Dette Kompendiun er lavet i forbindelse med en workshop i møbeldesign. En række af form-Z's værktøjer til konstruktion af dobbeltkrumme flader gennemgås. Kompendiet kan bruges til selvstudie....

  2. Automorphic Forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Flemming Brændgaard

    systems. For automorphic forms wrt. Hecke triangle groups and Fuchsian groups with no elliptic elements and genus 0, we show that some logarithms of multiplier systems can be interpreted as a linking number. Finally we show a "twisted" version of the prime geodesics theorem, and logarithms of multiplier...

  3. Cosmic Forms

    CERN Document Server

    Kleman, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    The continuous 1D defects of an isotropic homogeneous material in an Euclidean 3D space are classified by a construction method, the Volterra process (VP). We employ the same method to classify the continuous 2D defects (which we call \\textit{cosmic forms}) of a vacuum in a 4D maximally symmetric spacetime. These defects fall into three different classes: i)- $m$-forms, akin to 3D space disclinations, related to ordinary rotations and analogous to Kibble's global cosmic strings (except that being continuous any deficit angle is allowed); ii)- $t$-forms, related to Lorentz boosts (hyperbolic rotations); iii)- $r$-forms, never been considered so far, related to null rotations. A detailed account of their metrics is presented. Their inner structure in many cases appears as a non-singular \\textit{core} separated from the outer part by a timelike hypersurface with distributional curvature and/or torsion, yielding new types of geometrical interactions with cosmic dislocations and other cosmic disclinations. Whereas...

  4. KINETIC THEORY OF PLASMA WAVES: Part II: Homogeneous Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  5. Kinetic theory of plasma waves: Part II homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  6. Kinetic theory of plasma waves - Part II: Homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves axe discussed in the limit of the cold

  7. Kinetic theory of plasma waves: Part II homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  8. KINETIC THEORY OF PLASMA WAVES: Part II: Homogeneous Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  9. Kinetic theory of plasma waves - Part II: Homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves axe discussed in the limit of the cold

  10. Study of detonation wave contours in EFP warhead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-dong Zu

    2016-04-01

    The results show that the planar detonation wave do better than the conical detonation and the spherical detonation wave in increasing the length–diameter ratio of explosively-formed projectiles (EFP and keep the nose of EFP integrated. The detonation wave can increase the length–diameter ratio of EFP when the wave shaper has the suitable thickness.

  11. Aircraft measurements of wave cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Cui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, aircraft measurements are presented of liquid phase (ice-free wave clouds made at temperatures greater than −5 °C that formed over Scotland, UK. The horizontal variations of the vertical velocity across wave clouds display a distinct pattern. The maximum updraughts occur at the upshear flanks of the clouds and the strong downdraughts at the downshear flanks. The cloud droplet concentrations were a couple of hundreds per cubic centimetres, and the drops generally had a mean diameter between 15–45 μm. A small proportion of the drops were drizzle. A new definition of a mountain-wave cloud is given, based on the measurements presented here and previous studies. The results in this paper provide a case for future numerical simulation of wave cloud and the interaction between wave and clouds.

  12. Inherently Unstable Internal Gravity Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that there exist internal gravity waves that are inherently unstable, that is, they cannot exist in nature for a long time. The instability mechanism is a one-way (irreversible) harmonic-generation resonance that permanently transfers the energy of an internal wave to its higher harmonics. We show that, in fact, there are countably infinite number of such unstable waves. For the harmonic-generation resonance to take place, nonlinear terms in the free surface boundary condition play a pivotal role, and the instability does not obtain if a simplified boundary condition such as rigid lid or linear form is employed. Harmonic-generation resonance presented here also provides a mechanism for the transfer of the energy of the internal waves to the higher-frequency part of the spectrum where internal waves are more prone to breaking, hence losing energy to turbulence and heat and contributing to oceanic mixing.

  13. Reduced-order prediction of rogue waves in two-dimensional deep-water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farazmand, Mohammad; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.

    2017-07-01

    We consider the problem of large wave prediction in two-dimensional water waves. Such waves form due to the synergistic effect of dispersive mixing of smaller wave groups and the action of localized nonlinear wave interactions that leads to focusing. Instead of a direct simulation approach, we rely on the decomposition of the wave field into a discrete set of localized wave groups with optimal length scales and amplitudes. Due to the short-term character of the prediction, these wave groups do not interact and therefore their dynamics can be characterized individually. Using direct numerical simulations of the governing envelope equations we precompute the expected maximum elevation for each of those wave groups. The combination of the wave field decomposition algorithm, which provides information about the statistics of the system, and the precomputed map for the expected wave group elevation, which encodes dynamical information, allows (i) for understanding of how the probability of occurrence of rogue waves changes as the spectrum parameters vary, (ii) the computation of a critical length scale characterizing wave groups with high probability of evolving to rogue waves, and (iii) the formulation of a robust and parsimonious reduced-order prediction scheme for large waves. We assess the validity of this scheme in several cases of ocean wave spectra.

  14. Broadband cloaking for flexural waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zareei, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The governing equation for elastic waves in flexural plates is not form invariant, and hence designing a cloak for such waves faces a major challenge. Here, we present the design of a perfect broadband cloak for flexural waves through the use of a nonlinear transformation, and by matching term-by-term the original and transformed equations. For a readily achievable flexural cloak in a physical setting, we further present an approximate adoption of our perfect cloak under more restrictive physical constraints. Through direct simulation of the governing equations, we show that this cloak, as well, maintains a consistently high cloaking efficiency over a broad range of frequencies. The methodology developed here may be used for steering waves and designing cloaks in other physical systems with non form-invariant governing equations.

  15. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hereman, Willy

    2013-01-01

    Encyclopedic article covering shallow water wave models used in oceanography and atmospheric science. Sections: Definition of the Subject; Introduction and Historical Perspective; Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations; Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics; Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions; Numerical Methods; Water Wave Experiments and Observations; Future Directions, and Bibliography.

  16. GEODYNAMIC WAVES AND GRAVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vikulin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available  Gravity phenomena related to the Earth movements in the Solar System and through the Galaxy are reviewed. Such movements are manifested by geological processes on the Earth and correlate with geophysical fields of the Earth. It is concluded that geodynamic processes and the gravity phenomena (including those of cosmic nature are related.  The state of the geomedium composed of blocks is determined by stresses with force moment and by slow rotational waves that are considered as a new type of movements [Vikulin, 2008, 2010]. It is shown that the geomedium has typical rheid properties [Carey, 1954], specifically an ability to flow while being in the solid state [Leonov, 2008]. Within the framework of the rotational model with a symmetric stress tensor, which is developed by the authors [Vikulin, Ivanchin, 1998; Vikulin et al., 2012a, 2013], such movement of the geomedium may explain the energy-saturated state of the geomedium and a possibility of its movements in the form of vortex geological structures [Lee, 1928]. The article discusses the gravity wave detection method based on the concept of interactions between gravity waves and crustal blocks [Braginsky et al., 1985]. It is concluded that gravity waves can be recorded by the proposed technique that detects slow rotational waves. It is shown that geo-gravitational movements can be described by both the concept of potential with account of gravitational energy of bodies [Kondratyev, 2003] and the nonlinear physical acoustics [Gurbatov et al., 2008]. Based on the combined description of geophysical and gravitational wave movements, the authors suggest a hypothesis about the nature of spin, i.e. own moment as a demonstration of the space-time ‘vortex’ properties.  

  17. Waves & vibrations

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    Engineering school; This course is designed for students of Polytech Marseille, engineering school. It covers first the physics of vibration of the harmonic oscillator with damping and forcing, coupled oscillators. After a presentation of the wave equation, the vibration of strings, beams and membranes are studied.

  18. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    På foranledning af Löwenmark F.R.I, er der udført numeriske beregninger af Wave Dragons (herefter WD) armes effektivitet for forskellige geometriske udformninger. 5 geometriske modeller, hvor WD's arme er forkortet/forlænget er undersøgt for 3 forskellige drejninger af armene. I alt er 15...

  19. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    På foranledning af Löwenmark F.R.I, er der udført numeriske beregninger af Wave Dragons (herefter WD) armes effektivitet for forskellige geometriske udformninger. 5 geometriske modeller, hvor WD's arme er forkortet/forlænget er undersøgt for 3 forskellige drejninger af armene. I alt er 15...

  20. Waves and aggregation patterns in myxobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg A.; Welch, Roy; Kaiser, Dale; Oster, George

    2004-03-01

    Under starvation conditions, a population of myxobacteria aggregates to build a fruiting body whose shape is species-specific and within which the cells sporulate. Early in this process, cells often pass through a "ripple phase" characterized by traveling linear, concentric, and spiral waves. These waves are different from the waves observed during slime mold aggregation that depend on diffusible morphogens, because myxobacteria communicate by direct contact. The difference is most dramatic when waves collide: rather than annihilating one another, myxobacterial waves appear to pass through one another unchanged. Under certain conditions, the spacing and location of the nascent fruiting bodies is determined by the wavelength and pattern of the waves. Later in fruiting body development, waves are replaced by streams of cells that circulate around small initial aggregates enlarging and rounding them. Still later, pairs of motile aggregates coalesce to form larger aggregates that develop into fruiting bodies. Here we present a mathematical model that quantitatively explains these wave and aggregation phenomena.

  1. A reappraisal of ocean wave studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yeli; Huang, Norden E.

    2012-11-01

    A reappraisal of wave theory from the beginning to the present day is made here. On the surface, the great progress in both theory and applications seems to be so successful that there would be no great challenge in wave studies anymore. On deeper examination, we found problems in many aspects of wave studies starting from the definition of frequency, the governing equations, the various source functions of wave models, the directional development of wind wavefield, the wave spectral form and finally the role of waves as they affect coastal and global ocean dynamics. This is a call for action for the wave research community. For future research, we have to consider these problems seriously and also to examine the basic physics of wave motion to determine their effects on other ocean dynamic processes quantitatively, rather than relying on parameterization in oceanic and geophysical applications.

  2. Short term wave forecasting, using digital filters, for improved control of Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Frigaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    experimentally. Results are shown form measurements taken on the Wave Dragon prototype device, a floating overtopping device situated in Northern Denmark. In this case the method is able to accurately predict the surface elevation at the device 11.2 seconds before the measurement is made. This is sufficient......This paper presents a Digital Filter method for real time prediction of waves incident upon a Wave Energy device. The method transforms waves measured at a point ahead of the device, to expected waves incident on the device. The relationship between these incident waves and power capture is derived...

  3. Wave Physics Oscillations - Solitons - Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Nettel, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    This textbook is intended for those second year undergraduates in science and engineering who will later need an understanding of electromagnetic theory and quantum mechanics. The classical physics of oscillations and waves is developed at a more advanced level than has been customary for the second year, providing a basis for the quantum mechanics that follows. In this new edition the Green's function is explained, reinforcing the integration of quantum mechanics with classical physics. The text may also form the basis of an "introduction to theoretical physics" for physics majors. The concluding chapters give special attention to topics in current wave physics: nonlinear waves, solitons, and chaotic behavior.

  4. Solar Magnetic Waves and Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi von Fay-Siebenburgen, R.

    2006-11-01

    Recent solar and space satellite missions (e.g. SOHO, Trace) and high- resolution ground-based observations (e.g. Swedish Solar Telescope, Dutch Open Telescope) have opened new avenues for 21st century plasma physics. With unprecedented details a very rich and abundant structure of the solar atmosphere is unveiled. Revolutionary observations clearly confirmed the existence of MHD waves and oscillations in a wide range of solar atmospheric magnetic structures, commonly described in the form of solar flux tubes. The objectives of this review are to give an up-to-date account of the theory of MHD waves and oscillations in solar and astrophysical magnetic wave-guides. Since magnetic structuring acts as excellent wave guides, plasma waves and oscillations are able to propagate from sub-surface solar regions through the solar atmosphere deep into the interplanetary space. Observations and theoretical modeling of waves can provide excellent diagnostic tools about the state of solar plasma. Key examples of the various types of MHD waves and oscillations will be discussed both from observational and theoretical perspectives and the concept of atmospheric (coronal) and magneto-seismology will be introduced. The lecture will also contain a few short exercises in order to highlight the important points of the applications of solar MHD wave theory.

  5. Wave-current interaction near the Gulf Stream during the surface wave dynamics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David W.; Liu, Antony K.; Peng, Chih Y.; Meindl, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on the wave-current interaction near the local curvature of a Gulf Stream meander. The wave data were obtained from in situ measurements by a pitch-roll discus buoy during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) conducted off Wallops Island, Virginia, from October 1990 to March 1991. Owing to the advection of the Gulf Stream by the semidiurnal tide, the discus buoy was alternately located outside and inside the Gulf Stream. The directional wave measurements from the buoy show the changes in wave direction, wave energy, and directional spreading when waves encountered the current in the Gulf Stream meanders. A wave refraction model, using the ray-tracing method with an estimated Gulf Stream velocity field and meandering condition, was used to simulate wave refraction patterns and to estimate wave parameters at relative locations corresponding to buoy measurements. The numerical simulation shows that a focusing zone of wave rays was formed near the boundary and behind the crest of a simulated Gulf Stream meander. The focusing of wave rays causes changes in wave direction, increases in wave energy, and decreases in wave directional spreading, which are in good agreement with the results from the buoy measurements.

  6. Fission waves can oscillate

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Under the right conditions, self sustaining fission waves can form in fertile nuclear materials. These waves result from the transport and absorption of neutrons and the resulting production of fissile isotopes. When these fission, additional neutrons are produced and the chain reaction propagates until it is poisoned by the buildup of fission products. It is typically assumed that fission waves are soliton-like and self stabilizing. However, we show that in uranium, coupling of the neutron field to the 239U->239Np->239Pu decay chain can lead to a Hopf bifurcation. The fission reaction then ramps up and down, along with the wave velocity. The critical driver for the instability is a delay, caused by the half-life of 239U, between the time evolution of the neutron field and the production of 239Pu. This allows the 239Pu to accumulate and burn out in a self limiting oscillation that is characteristic of a Hopf bifurcation. Time dependent results are obtained using a numerical implementation of a reduced order r...

  7. Impact of Wave Dragon on Wave Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Tedd, James; Kramer, Morten

    This report is an advisory paper for use in determining the wave dragon effects on hydrography, by considering the effect on the wave climate in the region of a wave dragon. This is to be used in the impact assessment for the Wave Dragon pre-commercial demonstrator.......This report is an advisory paper for use in determining the wave dragon effects on hydrography, by considering the effect on the wave climate in the region of a wave dragon. This is to be used in the impact assessment for the Wave Dragon pre-commercial demonstrator....

  8. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Maksimchuk, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-02-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses that diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we study theoretically and numerically relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking.

  9. Gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, I; Moschella, U; Fre, P

    2001-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are a hot topic and promise to play a central role in astrophysics, cosmology, and theoretical physics. Technological developments have led us to the brink of their direct observation, which could become a reality in the coming years. The direct observation of GWs will open an entirely new field: GW astronomy. This is expected to bring a revolution in our knowledge of the universe by allowing the observation of previously unseen phenomena, such as the coalescence of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes), the fall of stars into supermassive black holes, stellar core collapses, big-bang relics, and the new and unexpected.With a wide range of contributions by leading scientists in the field, Gravitational Waves covers topics such as the basics of GWs, various advanced topics, GW detectors, astrophysics of GW sources, numerical applications, and several recent theoretical developments. The material is written at a level suitable for postgraduate students entering the field.

  10. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter; Brorsen, Michael

    Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004.......Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004....

  11. Wave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrarese, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Lectures: A. Jeffrey: Lectures on nonlinear wave propagation.- Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Ondes asymptotiques.- G. Boillat: Urti.- Seminars: D. Graffi: Sulla teoria dell'ottica non-lineare.- G. Grioli: Sulla propagazione del calore nei mezzi continui.- T. Manacorda: Onde nei solidi con vincoli interni.- T. Ruggeri: "Entropy principle" and main field for a non linear covariant system.- B. Straughan: Singular surfaces in dipolar materials and possible consequences for continuum mechanics

  12. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  13. When Shock Waves Collide

    CERN Document Server

    Hartigan, P; Frank, A; Hansen, E; Yirak, K; Liao, A S; Graham, P; Wilde, B; Blue, B; Martinez, D; Rosen, P; Farley, D; Paguio, R

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than an oblique one does. In this paper we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and ...

  14. Quantum wave packet revivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinett, R.W

    2004-03-01

    The numerical prediction, theoretical analysis, and experimental verification of the phenomenon of wave packet revivals in quantum systems has flourished over the last decade and a half. Quantum revivals are characterized by initially localized quantum states which have a short-term, quasi-classical time evolution, which then can spread significantly over several orbits, only to reform later in the form of a quantum revival in which the spreading reverses itself, the wave packet relocalizes, and the semi-classical periodicity is once again evident. Relocalization of the initial wave packet into a number of smaller copies of the initial packet ('minipackets' or 'clones') is also possible, giving rise to fractional revivals. Systems exhibiting such behavior are a fundamental realization of time-dependent interference phenomena for bound states with quantized energies in quantum mechanics and are therefore of wide interest in the physics and chemistry communities. We review the theoretical machinery of quantum wave packet construction leading to the existence of revivals and fractional revivals, in systems with one (or more) quantum number(s), as well as discussing how information on the classical period and revival time is encoded in the energy eigenvalue spectrum. We discuss a number of one-dimensional model systems which exhibit revival behavior, including the infinite well, the quantum bouncer, and others, as well as several two-dimensional integrable quantum billiard systems. Finally, we briefly review the experimental evidence for wave packet revivals in atomic, molecular, and other systems, and related revival phenomena in condensed matter and optical systems.

  15. Quantum wave packet revivals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinett, R. W.

    2004-03-01

    The numerical prediction, theoretical analysis, and experimental verification of the phenomenon of wave packet revivals in quantum systems has flourished over the last decade and a half. Quantum revivals are characterized by initially localized quantum states which have a short-term, quasi-classical time evolution, which then can spread significantly over several orbits, only to reform later in the form of a quantum revival in which the spreading reverses itself, the wave packet relocalizes, and the semi-classical periodicity is once again evident. Relocalization of the initial wave packet into a number of smaller copies of the initial packet (‘minipackets’ or ‘clones’) is also possible, giving rise to fractional revivals. Systems exhibiting such behavior are a fundamental realization of time-dependent interference phenomena for bound states with quantized energies in quantum mechanics and are therefore of wide interest in the physics and chemistry communities. We review the theoretical machinery of quantum wave packet construction leading to the existence of revivals and fractional revivals, in systems with one (or more) quantum number(s), as well as discussing how information on the classical period and revival time is encoded in the energy eigenvalue spectrum. We discuss a number of one-dimensional model systems which exhibit revival behavior, including the infinite well, the quantum bouncer, and others, as well as several two-dimensional integrable quantum billiard systems. Finally, we briefly review the experimental evidence for wave packet revivals in atomic, molecular, and other systems, and related revival phenomena in condensed matter and optical systems.

  16. Wave propagation in chiral media: composite Fresnel equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Ruey-Lin

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the author studies the features of wave propagation in chiral media. A general form of wave equations in biisotropic media is employed to derive concise formulas for the reflection and transmission coefficients. These coefficients are represented as a composite form of Fresnel equations for ordinary dielectrics, which reveal the circularly polarized nature of chiral media. The important features of negative refraction and a backward wave associated with left-handed waves are analyzed.

  17. Model testing of Wave Dragon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Previous to this project a scale model 1:50 of the wave energy converter (WEC) Wave Dragon was built by the Danish Maritime Institute and tested in a wave tank at Aalborg University (AAU). The test programs investigated the movements of the floating structure, mooring forces and forces in the reflectors. The first test was followed by test establishing the efficiency in different sea states. The scale model has also been extensively tested in the EU Joule Craft project JOR-CT98-7027 (Low-Pressure Turbine and Control Equipment for Wave Energy Converters /Wave Dragon) at University College Cork, Hydraulics and Maritime Research Centre, Ireland. The results of the previous model tests have formed the basis for a redesign of the WEC. In this project a reconstruction of the scale 1:50 model and sequential tests of changes to the model geometry and mass distribution parameters will be performed. AAU will make the modifications to the model based on the revised Loewenmark design and perform the tests in their wave tank. Grid connection requirements have been established. A hydro turbine with no movable parts besides the rotor has been developed and a scale model 1:3.5 tested, with a high efficiency over the whole head range. The turbine itself has possibilities for being used in river systems with low head and variable flow, an area of interest for many countries around the world. Finally, a regulation strategy for the turbines has been developed, which is essential for the future deployment of Wave Dragon.The video includes the following: 1. Title, 2. Introduction of the Wave Dragon, 3. Model test series H, Hs = 3 m, Rc = 3 m, 4. Model test series H, Hs = 5 m, Rc = 4 m, 5. Model test series I, Hs = 7 m, Rc = 1.25 m, 6. Model test series I, Hs = 7 m, Rc = 4 m, 7. Rolling title. On this VCD additional versions of the video can be found in the directory 'addvideo' for playing the video on PC's. These versions are: Model testing of Wave Dragon, DVD version

  18. A suppressor to prevent direct wave-induced cavitation in shock wave therapy devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matula, Thomas J.; Hilmo, Paul R.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2005-07-01

    Cavitation plays a varied but important role in lithotripsy. Cavitation facilitates stone comminution, but can also form an acoustic barrier that may shield stones from subsequent shock waves. In addition, cavitation damages tissue. Spark-gap lithotripters generate cavitation with both a direct and a focused wave. The direct wave propagates as a spherically diverging wave, arriving at the focus ahead of the focused shock wave. It can be modeled with the same waveform (but lower amplitude) as the focused wave. We show with both simulations and experiments that bubbles are forced to grow in response to the direct wave, and that these bubbles can still be large when the focused shock wave arrives. A baffle or ``suppressor'' that blocks the propagation of the direct wave is shown to significantly reduce the direct wave pressure amplitude, as well as direct wave-induced bubble growth. These results are applicable to spark-gap lithotripters and extracorporeal shock wave therapy devices, where cavitation from the direct wave may interfere with treatment. A simple direct-wave suppressor might therefore be used to improve the therapeutic efficacy of these devices.

  19. Excitation of parasitic waves near cutoff in forward-wave amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sinitsyn, Oleksandr V.; Antonsen, Thomas M., Jr.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, excitation of parasitic waves near cutoff in forward-wave amplifiers is studied in a rather general form. This problem is important for developing high-power sources of coherent, phase controlled short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation because just the waves which can be excited near cutoff have low group velocities. Since the wave coupling to an electron beam is inversely proportional to the group velocity, these waves are the most dangerous parasitic waves preventing stable amplification of desired signal waves. Two effects are analyzed in the paper. The first one is the effect of signal wave parameters on the self-excitation conditions of such parasitic waves. The second effect is the role of the beam geometry on excitation of these parasitic waves in forward-wave amplifiers with spatially extended interaction space, such as sheet-beam devices. It is shown that a large-amplitude signal wave can greatly influence the self-excitation conditions of the parasitic waves which define stability of operation. Therefore the effect described is important for accurate designing of high-power amplifiers of electromagnetic waves.

  20. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  1. Tidal Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla Pittaluga, M.; Seminara, G.; Tambroni, N.

    2003-04-01

    We give an overview of some recent investigations on the mechanics of the processes whereby forms develop in tidal environments. The viewpoint taken here is mechanistic. Some of the questions which deserve an answer may be summarised as follows: i) do tidal channels tend to some altimetric long term equilibrium? ii) why are they typically convergent and weakly meandering? iii) how is such equilibrium affected by the hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of tidal inlets? iv) what is the hydrodynamic and morphodynamic role played by tidal flats adjacent to the channels? Some of the above questions have received a considerable attention in the last few years. Schuttelaars and de Swart (1996), Lanzoni and Seminara (2002) and, more recently, Bolla Pittaluga (2003) have investigated the first problem. In particular, the latter two contributions have shown that a straight tidal channel connected to a tidal sea at one end and closed at the other end tends to reach a long term equilibrium profile, which is slightly concave seaward and convex landward where a beach forms. The equilibrium profile is strongly sensitive to the harmonic content of the tidal forcing as well as to the value of sediment concentration established by the coastal hydrodynamics in the far field of the inlet region. Less important are the effect of channel convergence and the role of settling lag in the transport of suspended load. Insufficient attention has been devoted to the understanding of what mechanisms control channel convergence and meandering, though some similarities and differences between tidal and fluvial channels have emerged from some recent works. In particular, free bars form in tidal channels due to an instability mechanism essentially similar to that occurring under steady conditions though the oscillatory character of the flow field makes the bar pattern non migrating (Seminara and Tubino, 2001). Similarly, forced bars in curved tidal channels are driven by the development of

  2. Tropical cyclogenesis in a tropical wave critical layer: easterly waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Dunkerton

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, is identified herein as the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The recirculating Kelvin cat's eye within the critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis at the center of the cat's eye, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally the associated Lagrangian motions, one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. In this co-moving frame, streamlines are approximately equivalent to particle trajectories. The closed circulation is quasi-stationary, and a dividing streamline separates air within the cat's eye from air outside. The critical layer equatorward of the easterly jet axis is important to tropical cyclogenesis because its cat's eye provides (i a region of

  3. Coordinate transformations and matter waves cloaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, G.R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zanjan, Zanjan 45371-38791 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghaddam, A.G. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadkhani, R., E-mail: rmkhani@znu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zanjan, Zanjan 45371-38791 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-06

    Transformation method provides an efficient tool to control wave propagation inside the materials. Using the coordinate transformation approach, we study invisibility cloaks with sphere, cylinder and ellipsoid structures for electronic waves propagation. The underlying physics behind this investigation is the fact that Schrödinger equation with position dependent mass tensor and potentials has a covariant form which follows the coordinate transformation. Using this technique we obtain the exact spatial form of the mass tensor and potentials for a variety of cloaks with different shapes. - Highlights: • Invisibility cloaks for matter waves with three different geometries. • Exact analytical form of the effective mass tensor and potential. • Analogy between cloaking for quantum mechanical waves with classical electromagnetic waves. • Possible experimental realization in engineered semiconducting structures.

  4. Experimental study of ultrasonic beam sectors for energy conversion into Lamb waves and Rayleigh waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, Nico Felicien

    2014-02-01

    When a bounded beam is incident on an immersed plate Lamb waves or Rayleigh waves can be generated. Because the amplitude of a bounded beam is not constant along its wave front, a specific beam profile is formed that influences the local efficiency of energy conversion of incident sound into Lamb waves or Rayleigh waves. Understanding this phenomenon is important for ultrasonic immersion experiments of objects because the quality of such experiments highly depends on the amount of energy transmitted into the object. This paper shows by means of experiments based on monochromatic Schlieren photography that the area within the bounded beam responsible for Lamb wave generation differs from that responsible for Rayleigh wave generation. Furthermore it provides experimental verification of an earlier numerical study concerning Rayleigh wave generation.

  5. CMS-Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-27

    2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CMS -Wave 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Program CMS -Wave CMS -Wave is a two-dimensional spectral wind-wave generation and transformation model that employs a forward-marching, finite...difference method to solve the wave action conservation equation. Capabilities of CMS -Wave include wave shoaling, refraction, diffraction, reflection

  6. Tropical cyclogenesis in a tropical wave critical layer: easterly waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Dunkerton

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, resembles the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development within the critical layer is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally this "marsupial paradigm" one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. This translation requires an appropriate "gauge" that renders translating streamlines and isopleths of translating stream function approximately equivalent to flow trajectories. In the translating frame, the closed circulation is stationary, and a dividing streamline effectively separates air within the critical layer from air outside. The critical layer equatorward of the easterly jet axis is important to tropical cyclogenesis because it

  7. Models of wave memory

    CERN Document Server

    Kashchenko, Serguey

    2015-01-01

    This monograph examines in detail models of neural systems described by delay-differential equations. Each element of the medium (neuron) is an oscillator that generates, in standalone mode, short impulses also known as spikes. The book discusses models of synaptic interaction between neurons, which lead to complex oscillatory modes in the system. In addition, it presents a solution to the problem of choosing the parameters of interaction in order to obtain attractors with predetermined structure. These attractors are represented as images encoded in the form of autowaves (wave memory). The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but it will also be beneficial for graduate students.

  8. Breaking the Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul Rind; Kirketerp, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The paper shortly reveals the history of a small school - the KaosPilots - dedicated to educate young people to carriers as entrepreneurs. In this contribution we want to explore how the KaosPilots managed to break the waves of institutionalised concepts and practices of teaching entrepreneurship....... Following the so-called 'Dogma' concept developed by Danish filmmakers, this contribution aim to explore the key elements making up the recipes guiding the entrepreneurship training program exercised by the school. Key factors forming a community of learning practice are outlined as well as the critical...... pedagogical elements on which the education in entrepreneurship rests....

  9. Plastic-Flow Waves ("Slow-Waves") and Seismic Activity in Central-Eastern Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shengzu; Zhang Zongchun

    2005-01-01

    The results inferred from experiments with analogue models carried out previously have shown that two types of plastic-flow waves, "fast-waves" and "slow-waves", are induced in the lower lithosphere (including the lower crust and lithospheric mantle ) under driving at plate boundaries and both of them are viscous gravity waves formed by the superposition of major and subsidiary waves. The major waves are similar to solitary waves and the subsidiary waves are traveling waves. The plastic-flow waves in the lower lithosphere control seismic activities in the overlying seismogenic layer and result in the distribution of earthquakes along the wavecrest belts. "Fast-waves" propagated with velocities of orders of magnitude of 100 ~ 102km/a have been verified by wave-controlled earthquake migration, showing the "decade waves" and "century waves" with the average periods of 10.8 and 93.4 a, respectively, which originate from the Himalayan driving boundary. According to the recognition of the patterns of the beltlike distribution of strong earthquakes with Ms ≥ 7.0, it is indicated further in this paper that the "slow-waves" with velocities of orders of magnitude of 100 ~ 101 m/a also originated under compression from the Himalayan driving boundary. Strong earthquakes with Ms ≥ 7.0 are controlled mainly by subsidiary waves, because the major waves with a duration of up to 106 a for each disturbance cannot result in the accmnulation of enough energy for strong earthquakes due to the relaxation of the upper crust. The subsidiary waves propagate with an average wave length of 445 km, velocities of 0.81~2.80 m/a and periods of 0.16 ~ 0.55 Ma. The wavegenerating time at the Himalayan driving boundary is about 1.34 ~ 4.59 Ma before present for the "slow-waves", corresponding to the stage from the Mid Pliocene to the Mid EarlyPleistocene and being identical with one of the major tectonic episodes of the Himalayan tectonic movement. It is shown from the recognition of

  10. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MIYATA, Hideaki; ORIHARA, Hideo; SATO, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    .... Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design...

  11. Numerical simulation of converging shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Seokjune; Abe, Kanji

    We can achieve the high pressure and high temperature state of gas if the shock wave converges stably. In order to check the stability of the converging shock wave, we introduce two kinds of perturbed initial conditions. The Euler equations of conservation form are integrated by using explicit Non-Muscl TVD finite difference scheme.

  12. Contributors Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2016-06-01

    to produce preprints or reprints and translate into languages other than English for sale or free distribution; and 4 the right to republish the work in a collection of articles in any other mechanical or electronic format. We give the rights to the corresponding author to make necessary changes as per the request of the journal, do the rest of the correspondence on our behalf and he/she will act as the guarantor for the manuscript on our behalf. All persons who have made substantial contributions to the work reported in the manuscript, but who are not contributors, are named in the Acknowledgment and have given me/us their written permission to be named. If I/we do not include an Acknowledgment that means I/we have not received substantial contributions from non-contributors and no contributor has been omitted.S NoAuthors' NamesContribution (IJCME Guidelines{1 substantial contributions to conception and design, acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; 2 drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content; and 3 final approval of the version to be published. Authors should meet conditions 1, 2, and 3}.SignatureDate                              Note: All the authors are required to sign independently in this form in the sequence given above. In case an author has left the institution/country and whose whereabouts are not known, the senior author may sign on his/her behalf taking the responsibility.No addition/deletion/ or any change in the sequence of the authorship will be permissible at a later stage, without valid reasons and permission of the Editor.If the authorship is contested at any stage, the article will be either returned or will not be processed for publication till the issue is solved.Maximum up to 4 authors for short communication and up to 6 authors for original article.

  13. An Internal Wave as a Frequency Filter for Surface Gravity Waves on Water

    CERN Document Server

    Lossow, K

    2010-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional model of the interaction between surface and the internal gravity water waves. The internal wave is modeled by its basic form: a non-dispersive field with a horizontal current that is uniform over all depth, insignificantly affected by the surface waves, while ignoring surface tension and wind growth/decay effects. The depth is infinite. Approximation for the height of the surface wave on the flow by the "elementary quasi stationary" solutions was found. It was shown that the flow acts as a frequency filter for gravitational waves on water.

  14. Probing density waves in fluidized granular media with diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Philip; Reinhold, Steffen; Sperl, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Density waves are characteristic for fluidized beds and affect measurements on liquidlike dynamics in fluidized granular media. Here the intensity autocorrelation function as obtainable with diffusing-wave spectroscopy is derived in the presence of density waves. The predictions by the derived form of the intensity autocorrelation function match experimental observations from a gas-fluidized bed. The model suggests separability of the contribution from density waves from the contribution by microscopic scatterer displacement to the decay of correlation and thus paves the way for characterizing microscopic particle motions using diffusing-wave spectroscopy as well as heterogeneities in fluidized granular media.

  15. Efficient Wave Energy Amplification with Wave Reflectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten Mejlhede; Frigaard, Peter Bak

    2002-01-01

    Wave Energy Converters (WEC's) extract wave energy from a limited area, often a single point or line even though the wave energy is generally spread out along the wave crest. By the use of wave reflectors (reflecting walls) the wave energy is effectively focused and increased to approximately 130......-140%. In the paper a procedure for calculating the efficiency and optimizing the geometry of wave reflectors are described, this by use of a 3D boundary element method. The calculations are verified by laboratory experiments and a very good agreement is found. The paper gives estimates of possible power benifit...... for different geometries of the wave reflectors and optimal geometrical design parameters are specified. On this basis inventors of WEC's can evaluate whether a specific WEC possible could benefit from wave reflectors....

  16. Cosmological Acceleration from Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Marochnik, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the classical gravitational waves of super-horizon wavelengths are able to form the de Sitter accelerated expansion of the empty (with no matter fields) Universe. The contemporary Universe is about 70% empty and asymptotically is going to become completely empty, so the effect caused by emptiness should be already very noticeable. It could manifest itself as the dark energy.

  17. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Rogue Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    We propose an early warning system for approaching rogue waves using the remote sensing of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) - progressive sound waves that propagate at the speed of sound in the ocean. It is believed that AGWs are generated during the formation of rogue waves, carrying information on the rogue waves at near the speed of sound, i.e. much faster than the rogue wave. The capability of identifying those special sound waves would enable detecting rogue waves most efficiently. A lot of promising work has been reported on AGWs in the last few years, part of which in the context of remote sensing as an early detection of tsunami. However, to our knowledge none of the work addresses the problem of rogue waves directly. Although there remains some uncertainty as to the proper definition of a rogue wave, there is little doubt that they exist and no one can dispute the potential destructive power of rogue waves. An early warning system for such extreme waves would become a demanding safety technology. A closed form expression was developed for the pressure induced by an impulsive source at the free surface (the Green's function) from which the solution for more general sources can be developed. In particular, we used the model of the Draupner Wave of January 1st, 1995 as a source and calculated the induced AGW signature. In particular we studied the AGW signature associated with a special feature of this wave, and characteristic of rogue waves, of the absence of any local set-down beneath the main crest and the presence of a large local set-up.

  18. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, George V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is very well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis of modern

  19. Z-Spec: A broadband spectrometer for millimeter-wave astrophysics---Instrument development and results of a molecular line survey of nearby star-forming galaxy NGC 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Lieko

    We have built Z-Spec, a broadband spectrometer for millimeter-wave astrophysics. The instrument's instantaneous bandwidth of 185-305 GHz covers the entire 1 millimeter atmospheric transmission window with a moderate resolving power ( R = n/Dn) of 250-350. The spectrometer employs a novel architecture called WaFIRS (Waveguide Far-Infrared Spectrometer) which confines the light propagation for a curved diffraction grating within a parallel-plate waveguide, resulting in a minimum mechanical envelope. An array of 160 silicon- nitride micromesh bolometers is cooled to 60 mK via an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) backed by a closed-cycle 3 He- 4 He sorption pump refrigerator. Z-Spec's compact design serves as a concept demonstration for a future far-infrared spectrometer aboard a cold telescope in space. Routine observations with Z-Spec from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea have been conducted since April 2006, and the instrument currently achieves good sensitivities that are within a factor of two of the photon background limit set by the atmosphere and telescope. Z-Spec's primary science objectives are to determine the redshifts of faint submillimeter galaxies using the 12 CO rotational ladder, and to conduct systematic line surveys of local galaxies. The millimeter waveband hosts low- to mid- J rotational transitions for several molecular species which trace the dense interstellar gas associated with active star formation. Z-Spec's bandwidth offers a unique advantage over the traditional single-dish heterodyne approach: the spectral lines and the corresponding continua are all observed simultaneously, greatly reducing relative uncertainties in flux calibration and line-to-continuum ratios. The starburst galaxy NGC 253 was observed with Z-Spec in November 2006, for a total integration of 3.49 hours over two nights. NGC 253 is one of the brightest neighbors outside the Local Group of galaxies and its compact nuclear region is a site of

  20. Long Wave Dynamics along a Convex Bottom

    CERN Document Server

    Didenkulova, Ira; Soomere, Tarmo

    2008-01-01

    Long linear wave transformation in the basin of varying depth is studied for a case of a convex bottom profile in the framework of one-dimensional shallow water equation. The existence of travelling wave solutions in this geometry and the uniqueness of this wave class is established through construction of a 1:1 transformation of the general 1D wave equation to the analogous wave equation with constant coefficients. The general solution of the Cauchy problem consists of two travelling waves propagating in opposite directions. It is found that generally a zone of a weak current is formed between these two waves. Waves are reflected from the coastline so that their profile is inverted with respect to the calm water surface. Long wave runup on a beach with this profile is studied for sine pulse, KdV soliton and N-wave. Shown is that in certain cases the runup height along the convex profile is considerably larger than for beaches with a linear slope. The analysis of wave reflection from the bottom containing a s...

  1. Slow wave propagation in soft adhesive interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-11-16

    Stick-slip in sliding of soft adhesive surfaces has long been associated with the propagation of Schallamach waves, a type of slow surface wave. Recently it was demonstrated using in situ experiments that two other kinds of slow waves-separation pulses and slip pulses-also mediate stick-slip (Viswanathan et al., Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 5265-5275). While separation pulses, like Schallamach waves, involve local interface detachment, slip pulses are moving stress fronts with no detachment. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the propagation of these three waves in a linear elastodynamics framework. Different boundary conditions apply depending on whether or not local interface detachment occurs. It is shown that the interface dynamics accompanying slow waves is governed by a system of integral equations. Closed-form analytical expressions are obtained for the interfacial pressure, shear stress, displacements and velocities. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves emerge naturally as wave solutions of the integral equations, with oppositely oriented directions of propagation. Wave propagation is found to be stable in the stress regime where linearized elasticity is a physically valid approximation. Interestingly, the analysis reveals that slow traveling wave solutions are not possible in a Coulomb friction framework for slip pulses. The theory provides a unified picture of stick-slip dynamics and slow wave propagation in adhesive contacts, consistent with experimental observations.

  2. Wave Heating of the Solar Chromosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wolfgang Kalkofen

    2008-03-01

    The nonmagnetic interior of supergranulation cells has been thought since the 1940s to be heated by the dissipation of acoustic waves. But all attempts to measure the acoustic flux have failed to show sufficient energy for chromospheric heating. Recent space observations with TRACE, for example, have found 10% or less of the necessary flux. To explain the missing energy it has been speculated that the nonmagnetic chromosphere is heated mainly by waves related to the magnetic field. If that were correct, the whole chromosphere, magnetic as well as nonmagnetic, would be heated mainly by waves related to the magnetic field. But contrary to expectation, the radiation emerging from the nonmagnetic chromosphere shows none of the signatures of magnetic waves, only those of acoustic waves. Nearly all the heating of the nonmagnetic chromosphere must therefore be due to acoustic waves. In the magnetic network on the boundary of supergranulation cells, on the other hand, the small filling factor of the magnetic field in the photosphere implies that only a small fraction of the wave flux that travels upward to heat the chromosphere can be channeled by the magnetic field. Hence, while some of the energy that is dissipated in the magnetic network is in the form of magnetic waves, most of it must be in the form of acoustic waves. Thus, the quiet solar chromosphere, instead of being heated mainly by magneticwaves throughout, must be heated mainly by acoustic waves throughout. The full wave flux heating the quiet chromosphere must travel through the photosphere. In the nonmagnetic medium, this flux is essentially all in the form of acoustic waves; TRACE registers at most 10% of it, perhaps because of limited spatial resolution.

  3. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razin, S.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.; Skalyga, V.

    2014-02-01

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80-100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2-1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI.

  4. Surface waves on metal-dielectric metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee;

    2016-01-01

    of surface waves and, therefore, can serve as a platform allowing many applications for surface photonics. Most of these surface waves are directional and their propagation direction is sensitive to permittivities of the media forming the interface. Hence, their propagation can be effectively controlled...... by changing a wavelength or material parameters. We discover that two new types of surface waves with complex dispersion exist for a uniaxial medium with both negative ordinary and extraordinary permittivities. Such new surface wave solutions originate from the anisotropic permittivities of the uniaxial media......, resulting in unique hyperbolic–like wavevector dependencies....

  5. Predictability of Wave Energy and Electricity Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chozas, Julia Fernandez

    2012-01-01

    The articlw addresses an important challenge ahead the integration of the electricity generated by wave energy conversion technologies into the electric grid. Particularly, it looks into the role of wave energy within the day-ahead electricity market. For that the predictability of the theoretical...... power outputs of three wave energy technologies in the Danish North Sea are examined. The simultaneous and co-located forecast and buoy-measured wave parameters at Hanstholm, Denmark, during a non-consecutive autumn and winter 3-month period form the basis of the investigation. The objective...

  6. Line geometry and electromagnetism II: wave motion

    CERN Document Server

    Delphenich, D H

    2013-01-01

    The fundamental role of line geometry in the study of wave motion is first introduced in the general context by way of the tangent planes to the instantaneous wave surfaces, in which it is first observed that the possible frequency-wave number 1-forms are typically constrained by a dispersion law that is derived from a constitutive law by way of the field equations. After a general review of the basic concepts that relate to quadratic line complexes, these geometric notions are applied to the study of electromagnetic waves, in particular.

  7. Canonical Formulation of pp-waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balasin, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    We construct a Hamiltonian formulation for the class of plane-fronted gravitational waves with parallel rays (pp-waves). Because of the existence of a light-like Killing vector, the dynamics is effectively reduced to a 2+1 evolution with "time" chosen to be light-like. In spite of the vanishing action this allows us to geometrically identify a symplectic form as well as dynamical Hamiltonian, thus casting the system into canonical form.

  8. Smooth sandwich gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Podolsky, J

    1999-01-01

    Gravitational waves which are smooth and contain two asymptotically flat regions are constructed from the homogeneous pp-waves vacuum solution. Motion of free test particles is calculated explicitly and the limit to an impulsive wave is also considered.

  9. The physics of waves

    CERN Document Server

    Georgi, Howard

    1993-01-01

    The first complete introduction to waves and wave phenomena by a renowned theorist. Covers damping, forced oscillations and resonance; normal modes; symmetries; traveling waves; signals and Fourier analysis; polarization; diffraction.

  10. Waves near interplanetary shocks observed by STEREO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Krauss-Varban, D.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the properties of interplanetary shocks that form ahead of virtually all fast propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Understanding the characteristics of these shocks and their surrounding regions is of great interest as they play a major role in the acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs). In this work we study low frequency waves upstream and downstream of interplanetary shocks (IP) observed by the twin spacecraft mission STEREO. In the upstream region waves can be generated by ion beams reflected or otherwise energized at the shock. Downstream the wave spectrum may be formed by both, waves generated locally and waves transmitted through the shock.The efficiency of wave generation and wave convection to the shock depends on the shock Mach number, and the angle between the IMF and the shock normal. Waves can disturb the shock and participate in ion acceleration processes. Multi-point STEREO measurements will allow us to study wave characteristics in different regions near IP shocks and determine the effects that these fluctuations have on particle energization.

  11. Propagation and linear mode conversion of magnetosonic and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Richard B.; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2016-10-01

    Magnetosonic waves and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are important for electron acceleration and loss from the radiation belts. It is generally understood that these waves are generated by unstable ion distributions that form during geomagnetically disturbed times. Here we show that magnetosonic waves could be a source of EMIC waves as a result of propagation and a process of linear mode conversion. The converse is also possible. We present ray tracing to show how magnetosonic (EMIC) waves launched with large (small) wave normal angles can reach a location where the wave normal angle is zero and the wave frequency equals the so-called crossover frequency whereupon energy can be converted from one mode to another without attenuation. While EMIC waves could be a source of magnetosonic waves below the crossover frequency, magnetosonic waves could be a source of hydrogen band waves but not helium band waves.

  12. Vertical variations of wave-induced radiation stress tensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jinhai; Yan Yixin

    2001-01-01

    The distributions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor over depth are studied by using the linear wave theory, which are divided into three regions, i.e., above the mean water level, below the wave trough level, and between these two levels. The computational expressions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor at the arbitrary wave angle are established by means of the Eulerian coordinate transformation, and the asymptotic forms for deep and shallow water are also presented. The vertical variations of a 30° incident wave-induced radiation stress tensor in deep water, intermediate water and shallow water are calculated respectively. The following conclusions are obtained from computations.The wave-induced radiation stress tensor below the wave trough level is induced by the water wave particle velocities only, whereas both the water wave particle velocities and the wave pressure contribute to the tensor above the wave trough level. The vertical variations of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor are influenced substantially by the velocity component in the direction of wave propagation. The distributions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor over depth are nonuniform and the proportion of the tensor below the wave trough level becomes considerable in the shallow water. From the water surface to the seabed, the reversed variations occur for the predominant tensor components.

  13. Grammaticalization waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård-Sørensen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Artiklens formål er påvise at samtidige og konsekutive grammatikaliseringer i et og samme sprog ikke er adskilte processer, men ofte vil være tæt forbundne. Denne teori illustreres med en "bølge" af grammatikaliseringer i russisk. Udgangspunktet er konjunktiven, der i oldrussisk var en perifrasti...

  14. Efficient modelling of sand wave behaviour [Powerpoint Presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Joris; Damme, van Ruud

    2004-01-01

    Sand waves form a pattern of more or less parallel ridges. The wave length is about 300 meters and the height up to 10 meters, which is a considerable amount of the total water depth. Sand waves migrate with speeds of about 10 meters per year. Information on their behaviour is valuable: the larger p

  15. Noncommutative Field Theory on Homogeneous Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Halliday, S; Halliday, Sam; Szabo, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    We describe an algebraic approach to the time-dependent noncommutative geometry of a six-dimensional Cahen-Wallach pp-wave string background supported by a constant Neveu-Schwarz flux, and develop a general formalism to construct and analyse quantum field theories defined thereon. Various star-products are derived in closed explicit form and the Hopf algebra of twisted isometries of the plane wave is constructed. Scalar field theories are defined using explicit forms of derivative operators, traces and noncommutative frame fields for the geometry, and various physical features are described. Noncommutative worldvolume field theories of D-branes in the pp-wave background are also constructed.

  16. New exact travelling wave solutions of bidirectional wave equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jonu Lee; Rathinasamy Sakthivel

    2011-06-01

    The surface water waves in a water tunnel can be described by systems of the form [Bona and Chen, Physica D116, 191 (1998)] \\begin{equation*} \\begin{cases} v_t + u_x + (uv)_x + au_{x x x} − bv_{x x t} = 0,\\\\ u_t + v_x + u u_x + cv_{x x x} − d u_{x x t} = 0, \\end{cases} \\tag{1} \\end{equation*} where , , and d are real constants. In general, the exact travelling wave solutions will be helpful in the theoretical and numerical study of the nonlinear evolution systems. In this paper, we obtain exact travelling wave solutions of system (1) using the modified tanh–coth function method with computerized symbolic computation.

  17. Noether symmetries of vacuum classes of pp-waves and the wave equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Sameerah; Shabbir, Ghulam

    2016-06-01

    The Noether symmetry algebras admitted by wave equations on plane-fronted gravitational waves with parallel rays are determined. We apply the classification of different metric functions to determine generators for the wave equation, and also adopt Noether's theorem to derive conserved forms. For the possible cases considered, there exist symmetry groups with dimensions two, three, five, six and eight. These symmetry groups contain the homothetic symmetries of the spacetime.

  18. TURBULENT COHERENT STRUCTURES IN CHANNELS WITH SAND WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sand wave bed is one of the typical shape of complicated boundaries in hydraulics and river dynamics, and sand wave motion is the main form of the bed load motion in-rivers, thence the study of turbulent structures over sand waves is of importance both in theory and practice. In this paper turbulent coherent structures over single-and multi-sand waves were studied experimentally, the formulae for the separation length and vortex shedding period of the turbulent flow over single-sand wave were suggested, and the characteristics of turbulent coherent structures over multi-sand waves were also given.

  19. Densified waste form and method for forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    2015-08-25

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate the temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.

  20. Wave propagation in complex coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, S A R; Philbin, T G

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the analytic continuation of wave equations into the complex position plane. For the particular case of electromagnetic waves we provide a physical meaning for such an analytic continuation in terms of a family of closely related inhomogeneous media. For bounded permittivity profiles we find the phenomenon of reflection can be related to branch cuts in the wave that originate from poles of the permittivity at complex positions. Demanding that these branch cuts disappear, we derive a large family of inhomogeneous media that are reflectionless for a single angle of incidence. Extending this property to all angles of incidence leads us to a generalized form of the Poschl Teller potentials. We conclude by analyzing our findings within the phase integral (WKB) method.

  1. Spallation and fracture resulting from reflected and intersecting stress waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinslow, R.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of stress waves produced in solid by explosions or high-velocity impacts. These waves rebound from free surfaces in the form of tensile waves that are capable of causing internal fractures or spallation of the material. The high-speed framing camera is shown to be an important tool for observing the stress waves and fracture in transparent targets, and its photographs provide valuable information on the mechanics of fracture.

  2. Shear wave speed and dispersion measurements using crawling wave chirps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Zaegyoo; Partin, Alexander; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-10-01

    This article demonstrates the measurement of shear wave speed and shear speed dispersion of biomaterials using a chirp signal that launches waves over a range of frequencies. A biomaterial is vibrated by two vibration sources that generate shear waves inside the medium, which is scanned by an ultrasound imaging system. Doppler processing of the acquired signal produces an image of the square of vibration amplitude that shows repetitive constructive and destructive interference patterns called "crawling waves." With a chirp vibration signal, successive Doppler frames are generated from different source frequencies. Collected frames generate a distinctive pattern which is used to calculate the shear speed and shear speed dispersion. A special reciprocal chirp is designed such that the equi-phase lines of a motion slice image are straight lines. Detailed analysis is provided to generate a closed-form solution for calculating the shear wave speed and the dispersion. Also several phantoms and an ex vivo human liver sample are scanned and the estimation results are presented.

  3. WaveNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    generates wave and wind roses and histograms of directional wave data required to define the wave climate for Corps projects. Five published technical...on the CIRP wiki: http://cirpwiki.info/wiki/Main_Page Application of Products Projected Benefits Documentation Points of Contact CIRP Website Figure 2. Display of time series of wave height ( blue ) and wind speed (red)

  4. Waves in inhomogeneous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we study wave propagation in inhomogeneous media. Examples of the classical (massless) waves we consider are acoustic waves (sound) and electromagnetic waves (light, for example). Interaction with inhomogeneities embedded in a reference medium alter the propagation direction, velocity

  5. A Simple Wave Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  6. Waves in inhomogeneous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we study wave propagation in inhomogeneous media. Examples of the classical (massless) waves we consider are acoustic waves (sound) and electromagnetic waves (light, for example). Interaction with inhomogeneities embedded in a reference medium alter the propagation direction, velocity

  7. Linear Rogue waves

    CERN Document Server

    Yuce, C

    2015-01-01

    We predict the existence of linear discrete rogue waves. We discuss that Josephson effect is the underlying reason for the formation of such waves. We study linear rogue waves in continuous system and present an exact analytical rogue wave solution of the Schrodinger-like equation.

  8. Finsler p p -waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Andrea; Pabst, Cornelia

    2016-11-01

    In this work we present Finsler gravitational waves. These are a Finslerian version of the well-known p p -waves, generalizing the very special relativity line element. Our Finsler p p -waves are an exact solution of Finslerian Einstein's equations in vacuum and describe gravitational waves propagating in an anisotropic background.

  9. A Comparison of Nature Waves and Model Waves with Special Reference to Wave Grouping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    This paper represents a comparative analyses of the occurrence of wave grouping in field storm waves and laboratory waves with similar power spectra and wave height distribution.......This paper represents a comparative analyses of the occurrence of wave grouping in field storm waves and laboratory waves with similar power spectra and wave height distribution....

  10. Star-Forming Complexes in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, B G

    2004-01-01

    Star complexes are the largest globular regions of star formation in galaxies. If there is a spiral density wave, nuclear ring, tidal arm, or other well-defined stellar structure, then gravitational instabilities in the gaseous component produce giant cloud complexes with a spacing of about three times the width. These gas complexes form star complexes, giving the familiar beads on a string of star formation along spiral arms, or nuclear hotspots in the case of a ring. Turbulence compression, supernovae, and self-gravitational contraction inside the giant clouds produce a nearly scale-free structure, including giant molecular clouds that form OB associations and molecular cloud cores that form clusters. Without stellar density waves or similar structures, random gravitational instabilities form flocculent spirals and these fragment into star complexes, OB associations and star clusters in the same way. The largest coherent star-forming regions are the flocculent arms themselves. At the core of the hierarchy a...

  11. Inherently Unstable Internal Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Reza

    2016-11-01

    Here we show that there exist internal gravity waves that are inherently unstable, that is, they cannot exist in nature for a long time. The instability mechanism is a one-way (irreversible) harmonic-generation resonance that permanently transfers the energy of an internal wave to its higher harmonics. We show that, in fact, there are countably infinite number of such unstable waves. For the harmonic-generation resonance to take place, nonlinear terms in the free surface boundary condition play a pivotal role, and the instability does not obtain for a linearly-stratified fluid if a simplified boundary condition such as rigid lid or linear form is employed. Harmonic-generation resonance discussed here also provides a mechanism for the transfer of the energy of the internal waves to the higher-frequency part of the spectrum where internal waves are more prone to breaking, hence losing energy to turbulence and heat and contributing to oceanic mixing. Yong Liang (yong.liang@berkeley.edu).

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic waves within the medium separated by the plane shock wave or rotational discontinuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lubchich

    2005-07-01

    expressions determining the polarisation of the MHD waves are derived in the reference frame connected with the discontinuity surface. This form of presentation is much more convenient in investigating the interaction of small perturbations with MHD discontinuities. It is shown that the perturbations of the velocity and magnetic field associated with the surface magnetoacoustic wave have the elliptic polarisation. Usually the planes of polarisation for the perturbations of the velocity and magnetic field are not coincident with each other.

    Keywords. Space plasma physics (Discontinuities; Shock waves – Interplanetary physics (Discontinuities; Interplanetary shocks – Magnetospheric physics (Solar windmagnetosphere interactions

  13. Stochastic wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Sobczyk, K

    1985-01-01

    This is a concise, unified exposition of the existing methods of analysis of linear stochastic waves with particular reference to the most recent results. Both scalar and vector waves are considered. Principal attention is concentrated on wave propagation in stochastic media and wave scattering at stochastic surfaces. However, discussion extends also to various mathematical aspects of stochastic wave equations and problems of modelling stochastic media.

  14. Sources of localized waves

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzipetros, Argyrios Alexandros

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of two types of Localized Wave (L W) pulses is considered; these are the 'Focus Wave Model (FWM) pulse and the X Wave pulse. First, we introduce the modified bidirectional representation where one can select new basis functions resulting in different representations for a solution to the scalar wave equation. Through this new representation, we find a new class of focused X Waves which can be extremely localized. The modified bidirectional decomposition is applied...

  15. Waves at Navigation Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-27

    ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 2 19a. NAME...upgrades the Coastal Modeling System’s ( CMS ) wave model CMS -Wave, a phase-averaged spectral wave model, and BOUSS-2D, a Boussinesq-type nonlinear wave...provided by this work unit address these critical needs of the Corps’ navigation mission. Description Issue Addressed CMS -Wave application at Braddock

  16. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Schroeder, C B; Zhidkov, A G; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2011-01-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses as they diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we report on theoretical study of relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking. These waves may be suitable as particle injectors or as flying mirrors that both reflect and focus radiation, enabling unique X-ray sources and nonlinear QED phenomena.

  17. Wave-Ice interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈奚海莉

    2001-01-01

    The growth and movement of sea ice cover are influenced by the presence of wave field. Inturn, the wave field is influenced by the presence of ice cover. Their interaction is not fully understood.In this paper, we discuss some current understanding on wave attenuation when it propagates through frag-mented ice cover, ice drift due to the wave motion, and the growth characteristics of ice cover in wave field.

  18. When Shock Waves Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  19. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, P.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the 'effective' forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  20. Wave energy input into the Ekman layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the wave energy input into the Ekman layer, based on 3 observational facts that surface waves could significantly affect the profile of the Ekman layer. Under the assumption of constant vertical diffusivity, the analytical form of wave energy input into the Ekman layer is derived. Analysis of the energy balance shows that the energy input to the Ekman layer through the wind stress and the interaction of the Stokes-drift with planetary vorticity can be divided into two kinds. One is the wind energy input, and the other is the wave energy input which is dependent on wind speed, wave characteristics and the wind direction relative to the wave direction. Estimates of wave energy input show that wave energy input can be up to 10% in high-latitude and high-wind speed areas and higher than 20% in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, compared with the wind energy input into the classical Ekman layer. Results of this paper are of significance to the study of wave-induced large scale effects.

  1. Freak waves in counterpropagating wave systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støle-Hentschel, Susanne; Rye, Lisa; Raustøl, Anne; Trulsen, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    The kurtosis of unimodal and counterpropagating bimodal wave systems is compared by means of laboratory experiments and simulations. Both give strong evidence that a bimodal wave system with waves travelling in opposite directions has reduced kurtosis compared to the corresponding unidirectional case. We thus anticipate reduced probability of freak waves in counterpropagating waves. The laboratory tests were performed with a JONSWAP wavefield in a long and narrow flume. The unimodal case was run with a damping beach in one end, while the bimodality was created by inserting a reflecting wall. The simulations were carried out with a numerical wave tank based on a Higher order spectral method employing partially or non-reflecting boundary conditions.

  2. Long Waves Associated with Bichromatic Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Guohai(董国海); YE Wenya(叶文亚); Nicholas Dodd

    2001-01-01

    A numerical model of low frequency waves is presented. The model is based on that of Roelvink (1993), but the numerical techniques used in the solution are based on the so-called Weighted-Average Flux (WAF) method withTime-Operator-Splitting (TOS) used for the treatment of the source terms. This method allows a small number ofcomputational points to be used, and is particularly efficient in modeling wave setup. The short wave (or primary wave)energy equation is solved with a traditional Lax-Wendroff technique. A nonlinear wave theory is introduced. The modeldescribed in this paper is found to be satisfactory in modeling low frequency waves associated with incident bichromaticwaves.

  3. Nonlocal theory of longitudinal waves in thermoelastic bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esin Inan

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available The longitudinal waves in thermoelastic bars are investigated in the context of nonlocal theory. Using integral forms of constitutive equations, balance of momenta and energy, field equations are obtained. Then the frequency equation is found in generalized form. To obtain tangible results, an approximate procedure is applied and numerical results are given for short waves.

  4. Elliptic Equation and New Solutions to Nonlinear Wave Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zun-Tao; LIU Shi-Kuo; LIU Shi-Da

    2004-01-01

    The new solutions to elliptic equation are shown, and then the elliptic equation is taken as a transformationand is applied to solve nonlinear wave equations. It is shown that more kinds of solutions are derived, such as periodicsolutions of rational form, solitary wave solutions of rational form, and so on.

  5. Extreme wave and wind response predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Olsen, Anders S.; Mansour, Alaa E.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to advocate effective stochastic procedures, based on the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) and Monte Carlo simulations (MCS), for extreme value predictions related to wave and wind-induced loads.Due to the efficient optimization procedures implemented in standard FORM...

  6. The New Wave of Regional Economic Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Since the 1990s, various regional economic integration organizations have been mushrooming in the world, forming an unprecedentedly forceful and extensive new wave. The broad-ranged contents, flexible regimes, diverse forms and bright prospects of cooperation are all unparalleled in history.

  7. Robust Wave Resource Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavelle, John; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of the wave energy resource at the location of the Danish Wave Energy test Centre (DanWEC) is presented in this paper. The Wave Energy Converter (WEC) test centre is located at Hanstholm in the of North West Denmark. Information about the long term wave statistics of the resource...... is necessary for WEC developers, both to optimise the WEC for the site, and to estimate its average yearly power production using a power matrix. The wave height and wave period sea states parameters are commonly characterized with a bivariate histogram. This paper presents bivariate histograms and kernel...... density estimates of the PDF as a function both of Hm0 and Tp, and Hm0 and T0;2, together with the mean wave power per unit crest length, Pw, as a function of Hm0 and T0;2. The wave elevation parameters, from which the wave parameters are calculated, are filtered to correct or remove spurious data...

  8. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Poole, Brian R.

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  9. A scalable method for computing quadruplet wave-wave interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vledder, Gerbrant

    2017-04-01

    Non-linear four-wave interactions are a key physical process in the evolution of wind generated ocean waves. The present generation operational wave models use the Discrete Interaction Approximation (DIA), but it accuracy is poor. It is now generally acknowledged that the DIA should be replaced with a more accurate method to improve predicted spectral shapes and derived parameters. The search for such a method is challenging as one should find a balance between accuracy and computational requirements. Such a method is presented here in the form of a scalable and adaptive method that can mimic both the time consuming exact Snl4 approach and the fast but inaccurate DIA, and everything in between. The method provides an elegant approach to improve the DIA, not by including more arbitrarily shaped wave number configurations, but by a mathematically consistent reduction of an exact method, viz. the WRT method. The adaptiveness is to adapt the abscissa of the locus integrand in relation to the magnitude of the known terms. The adaptiveness is extended to the highest level of the WRT method to select interacting wavenumber configurations in a hierarchical way in relation to their importance. This adaptiveness results in a speed-up of one to three orders of magnitude depending on the measure of accuracy. This definition of accuracy should not be expressed in terms of the quality of the transfer integral for academic spectra but rather in terms of wave model performance in a dynamic run. This has consequences for the balance between the required accuracy and the computational workload for evaluating these interactions. The performance of the scalable method on different scales is illustrated with results from academic spectra, simple growth curves to more complicated field cases using a 3G-wave model.

  10. Dispersion of Own Frequency of Ion-Dipole by Supersonic Transverse Wave in Solid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minasyan V.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available First, we predict an existence of transverse electromagnetic field formed by supersonic transverse wave in solid. This electromagnetic wave acquires frequency and speed of sound, and it propagates along of direction propagation of supersonic wave. We also show that own frequency of ion-dipole depends on frequency of supersonic transverse wave.

  11. Wave-based liquid-interface metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Fontana, P W; Shats, M

    2017-01-01

    The control of matter motion at liquid–gas interfaces opens an opportunity to create two-dimensional materials with remotely tunable properties. In analogy with optical lattices used in ultra-cold atom physics, such materials can be created by a wave field capable of dynamically guiding matter into periodic spatial structures. Here we show experimentally that such structures can be realized at the macroscopic scale on a liquid surface by using rotating waves. The wave angular momentum is transferred to floating micro-particles, guiding them along closed trajectories. These orbits form stable spatially periodic patterns, the unit cells of a two-dimensional wave-based material. Such dynamic patterns, a mirror image of the concept of metamaterials, are scalable and biocompatible. They can be used in assembly applications, conversion of wave energy into mean two-dimensional flows and for organising motion of active swimmers. PMID:28181490

  12. Focusing of high-wave-vector magnons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, J. J.; Camley, R. E.

    2017-06-01

    The focusing of spin waves in magnetic materials has a number of important advantages for directing energy and thus information. In contrast to earlier works, we theoretically calculate the focusing of short-wavelength spin waves. We show that strong focusing of large wave-vector spin waves naturally occurs about halfway out in the Brillouin zone with no need for a magnetocrystalline anisotropy, dipolar effects, or an external magnetic field. The fact that the wavelength is on the order of the lattice constant leads to a form of lattice-induced anisotropy in the wave propagation. We also explore the tunability that is achieved by the application of both an external field and a uniaxial anisotropy. In this case there is a rotation of the focusing pattern. The rotation angle can be changed by varying the field strength, demonstrating tunability.

  13. Nonlinear Dispersion Relation in Wave Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞杰; 严以新; 曹宏生

    2003-01-01

    A nonlinear dispersion relation is presented to model the nonlinear dispersion of waves over the whole range of possible water depths. It reduces the phase speed over-prediction of both Hedges′ modified relation and Kirby and Dalrymple′s modified relation in the region of 1<kh<1.5 for small wave steepness and maintains the monotonicity in phase speed variation for large wave steepness. And it has a simple form. By use of the new nonlinear dispersion relation along with the mild slope equation taking into account weak nonlinearity, a mathematical model of wave transformation is developed and applied to laboratory data. The results show that the model with the new dispersion relation can predict wave transformation over complicated bathymetry satisfactorily.

  14. Wave-Particle Duality in Classical Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, Alexander Y

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, wave-particle duality has been thought of as quantum principle without a counterpart in classical physics. This belief was challenged after surprising discovery of "walkers" - droplets that bounce on a vertically vibrating bath of the same fluid and can form wave-particle symbiotic structures with the surface waves they generate. Macroscopic walkers were shown experimentally to exhibit particle and wave properties simultaneously. This paper exposes a new family of objects that can display both particle and wave features all together while strictly obeying laws of the Newtonian mechanics. In contrast to walkers, no constant inflow of energy is required for their existence. These objects behave deterministically provided that all their degrees of freedom are known to an observer. If, however, some degrees of freedom are unknown, observer can describe such objects only probabilistically and they manifest weird features similar to that of quantum particles. We show that such quantum phenomena as p...

  15. NEW WIND WAVE GROWTH RELATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shu-ping; HOU Yi-jun; YIN Bao-shu

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper combining the relationship between wave steepness and wave age with the significant wave energy balance equation for wind wave,a new wind wave growth relation is presented.Comparisons with the other existing wind wave growth relations show that the results in present paper accord better with the wind wave growth process.

  16. Potential role of kinetic Alfvén waves and whistler waves in solar wind plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandal, P.; Yadav, N.; Sharma, R. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft observations indicate the signatures of highly oblique kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) and whistler waves in the solar wind plasma. In the present work, we explore the possible role of KAWs and whistler waves in the observed solar wind magnetic turbulent spectrum. The nonlinear spatial evolution of KAW is studied including the effects of the ponderomotive force which results in intense localized structures due to the background density modification. Weak quasi-transverse whistler wave propagating through these localized structures also gets localized in the form of small-scale localized structures. We present numerically calculated magnetic power spectra for both KAW as well as for whistler wave. Our obtained results demonstrate the important role that KAWs and whistler waves play in the energy cascading from larger to smaller scales. The relevance of these results to recent spacecraft observations is also pointed out.

  17. Short term wave forecasting, using digital filters, for improved control of Wave Energy Converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedd, J.; Frigaard, P. [Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University, Aalborg (Denmark)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a Digital Filter method for real time prediction of waves incident upon a Wave Energy device. The method transforms waves measured at a point ahead of the device, to expected waves incident on the device. The relationship between these incident waves and power capture is derived experimentally. Results are shown form measurements taken on the Wave Dragon prototype device, a floating overtopping device situated in Northern Denmark. In this case the method is able to accurately predict the surface elevation at the device 11.2 seconds before the measurement is made. This is sufficient to allow advanced control systems to be developed using this knowledge to significantly improve power capture.

  18. An Approximate Method for Analysis of Solitary Waves in Nonlinear Elastic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushchitsky, J. J.; Yurchuk, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Two types of solitary elastic waves are considered: a longitudinal plane displacement wave (longitudinal displacements along the abscissa axis of a Cartesian coordinate system) and a radial cylindrical displacement wave (displacements in the radial direction of a cylindrical coordinate system). The basic innovation is the use of nonlinear wave equations similar in form to describe these waves and the use of the same approximate method to analyze these equations. The distortion of the wave profile described by Whittaker (plane wave) or Macdonald (cylindrical wave) functions is described theoretically

  19. From a breather homoclinic wave to a rogue wave solution for the coupled Schrödinger-Boussinesq equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanjian; Dai, Zhengde; Liu, Changfu

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, two types of multi-parameter breather homoclinic wave solutions—including breather homoclinic wave and rational homoclinic wave solutions—are obtained by using the Hirota technique and ansätz with complexity of parameter for the coupled Schrödinger-Boussinesq equation. Rogue waves in the form of the rational homoclinic solution are derived when the periods of breather homoclinic wave go to infinite. Some novel features of homoclinic wave solutions are discussed and presented. In contrast to the normal bright rogue wave structure, a structure like a four-petaled flower in temporal-spatial distribution is exhibited. Further with the change of the wave number of the plane wave, the bright and dark rogue wave structures may change into each other. The bright rogue wave structure results from the full merger of two nearby peaks, and the dark rogue wave structure results from the full merger of two nearby holes. The dark rogue wave for the uncoupled Boussinesq equation is finally obtained. Its structural properties show that it never takes on bright rogue wave features with the change of parameter. It is hoped that these results might provide us with useful information on the dynamics of the relevant fields in physics.

  20. Oblique wave-free potentials for water waves in constant finite depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Rajdeep; Basu, Uma; Mandal, B. N.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method to construct oblique wave-free potentials in the linearised theory of water waves for water with uniform finite depth is presented in a systematic manner. The water has either a free surface or an ice-cover modelled as a thin elastic plate. For the case of free surface, the effect of surface tension may be neglected or taken into account. Here, the wave-free potentials are singular solutions of the modified Helmholtz equation, having singularity at a point in the fluid region and they satisfy the conditions at the upper surface and the bottom of water region and decay rapidly away from the point of singularity. These are useful in obtaining solutions to oblique water wave problems involving bodies with circular cross-sections such as long horizontal cylinders submerged or half-immersed in water of uniform finite depth with a free surface or an ice-cover modelled as a floating elastic plate. Finally, the forms of the upper surface related to the wave-free potentials constructed here are depicted graphically in a number of figures to visualize the wave motion. The results for non-oblique wave-free potentials and the upper surface wave-free potentials are obtained. The wave-free potentials constructed here will be useful in the mathematical study of water wave problems involving infinitely long horizontal cylinders, either half-immersed or completely immersed in water.

  1. Characteristics of Spherical Shock Wave and Circular Pulse Jet Generated by Discharge of Propagating Shock Wave at Open End of Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsukasa Irie; Tsuyoshi Yasunobu; Hideo Kashimura; Toshiaki Setoguchi; Kazuyasu Matsuo

    2003-01-01

    When the shock wave propagating in the straight circular tube reaches at the open end, the impulsive wave is generated by the emission of a shock wave from an open end, and unsteady pulse jet is formed near the open end behind the impulsive wave under the specific condition. The pulse jet transits to spherical shock wave with the increase in the strength of shock wave. The strength is dependent on the Mach number of shock wave, which attenuates by propagation distance from the open end. In this study, the mechanism of generating the unsteady pulse jet, the characteristics of the pressure distribution in the flow field and the emission of shock wave from straight circular tube which has the infinite flange at open end are analyzed numerically by the TVD method. Strength of spherical shock wave, relation of shock wave Mach number, distance decay of spherical shock wave and directional characteristics are clarified.

  2. $pp$-waves in modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Baykal, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    The family of metrics corresponding to the plane-fronted gravitational waves with parallel propagation, commonly referred to as the family of pp-wave metrics, is studied in the context of various modified gravitational models in a self-contained and coherent manner by using a variant of the null coframe formulation of Newman and Penrose and the exterior algebra of differential forms on pseudo-Riemannian manifolds.

  3. Wave propelled ratchets and drifting rafts

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Several droplets, bouncing on a vertically vibrated liquid bath, can form various types of bound states, their interaction being due to the waves emitted by their bouncing. Though they associate droplets which are individually motionless, we show that these bound states are self- propelled when the droplets are of uneven size. The driving force is linked to the assymetry of the emitted surface waves. The direction of this ratchet-like displacement can be reversed, by varying the amplitude of ...

  4. Dynamical Space-Time and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    van Holten, J W

    2016-01-01

    According to General Relativity gravity is the result of the interaction between matter and space-time geometry. In this interaction space-time geometry itself is dynamical: it can store and transport energy and momentum in the form of gravitational waves. We give an introductory account of this phenomenon and discuss how the observation of gravitational waves may open up a fundamentally new window on the universe.

  5. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  6. Forming Spirals From Shadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    What causes the large-scale spiral structures found in some protoplanetary disks? Most models assume theyre created by newly-forming planets, but a new study suggests that planets might have nothing to do with it.Perturbations from Planets?In some transition disks protoplanetary disks with gaps in their inner regions weve directly imaged large-scale spiral arms. Many theories currently attribute the formation of these structures to young planets: either the direct perturbations of a planet embedded in the disk cause the spirals, or theyre indirectly caused by the orbit of a planetary body outside of the arms.Another example of spiral arms detected in a protoplanetary disk, MWC 758. [NASA/ESA/ESO/M. Benisty et al.]But what if you could get spirals without any planets? A team of scientists led by Matas Montesinos (University of Chile) have recently published a study in which they examine what happens to a shadowed protoplanetary disk.Casting Shadows with WarpsIn the teams setup, they envision a protoplanetary disk that is warped: the inner region is slightly tilted relative to the outer region. As the central star casts light out over its protoplanetary disk, this disk warping would cause some regions of the disk to be shaded in a way that isnt axially symmetric with potentially interesting implications.Montesinos and collaborators ran 2D hydrodynamics simulations to determine what happens to the motion of particles within the disk when they pass in and out of the shadowed regions. Since the shadowed regions are significantly colder than the illuminated disk, the pressure in these regions is much lower. Particles are therefore accelerated and decelerated as they pass through these regions, and the lack of axial symmetry causes spiral density waves to form in the disk as a result.Initial profile for the stellar heating rate per unit area for one of the authors simulations. The regions shadowed as a result of the disk warp subtend 0.5 radians each (shown on the left

  7. Multi-directional random wave interaction with an array of cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Xinran; Liu, Shuxue; Bingham, Harry B.;

    2015-01-01

    . The biggest transverse force is found to occur on the rear cylinder rather than the front one. This is quite different from the results in unidirectional waves and should be paid much more attention in the design of offshore structures. At last, the possibility of the near-trapping under the multi......Based on the linear theory of wave interaction with an array of circular bottom-mounted vertical cylinders, systematic calculations are made to investigate the effects of the wave directionality on wave loads in short-crested seas. The multi-directional waves are specified using a discrete form...... of the Mitsuyasu-type spreading function. The time series of multi-directional wave loads, including both the wave run-up and wave force, can be simulated. The effect of wave directionality on the wave run-up and wave loading on the cylinders is investigated. For multi-directional waves, as the distribution...

  8. Control methods for localization of nonlinear waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porubov, Alexey; Andrievsky, Boris

    2017-03-01

    A general form of a distributed feedback control algorithm based on the speed-gradient method is developed. The goal of the control is to achieve nonlinear wave localization. It is shown by example of the sine-Gordon equation that the generation and further stable propagation of a localized wave solution of a single nonlinear partial differential equation may be obtained independently of the initial conditions. The developed algorithm is extended to coupled nonlinear partial differential equations to obtain consistent localized wave solutions at rather arbitrary initial conditions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'.

  9. Transmission of light waves through normal shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, S I; Johnson, D K

    1995-11-20

    We seek to characterize light waves transmitted through normal shock waves. The investigation is motivated by the need for a theory to support a shadowgraph experiment for flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle. In this experiment light beams are passed through the nozzle transverse to the direction of the flow in which a shock has formed in the vicinity of the throat. We present a formulation and an approximation that yield calculations of the intensity of transmitted waves. We also present experimental results to support the theory. The patterns predicted by the theory compare well with the patterns observed in experiments.

  10. On the freak waves in mesospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Shewy, E. K.; El-Bedwehy, N. A.; El-Razek, H. N. Abd; El-Rahman, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear properties of dusty ionic freak waves have been studied in homogeneous, unmagnetized dusty plasma system containing ions, isothermal electrons, negative and positive grains. By using the derivative expansion method and assuming strongly dispersive medium, the basic model equations are reduced to a nonlinear form of Schrodinger equation (NLSE). One of the solutions of the NLSE in the unstable region is the rational one which is responsible for the creation of the freak profiles. The reliance of freak waves profile on dusty grains charge and carrier wave number are discussed.

  11. Love Wave Propagation in Poro elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.V. Rama Rao

    1978-10-01

    Full Text Available It is observed that on similar reasons as in classical theory of elasticity, SH wave propagation in a semi infinite poroelastic body is not possible and is possible when there is a layer of another poro elastic medium over it i.e., Love waves. Two particular cases are considered in one of which phase velocity can be determined for a given wave length. In the same case, equation for phase velocity is of the same form as that of the classical theory of Elasticity.

  12. Wave-wave interactions and deep ocean acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Guralnik, Zachary; Bourdelais, John; Zabalgogeazcoa, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Deep ocean acoustics, in the absence of shipping and wildlife, is driven by surface processes. Best understood is the signal generated by non-linear surface wave interactions, the Longuet-Higgins mechanism, which dominates from 0.1 to 10 Hz, and may be significant for another octave. For this source, the spectral matrix of pressure and vector velocity is derived for points near the bottom of a deep ocean resting on an elastic half-space. In the absence of a bottom, the ratios of matrix elements are universal constants. Bottom effects vitiate the usual "standing wave approximation," but a weaker form of the approximation is shown to hold, and this is used for numerical calculations. In the weak standing wave approximation, the ratios of matrix elements are independent of the surface wave spectrum, but depend on frequency and the propagation environment. Data from the Hawaii-2 Observatory are in excellent accord with the theory for frequencies between 0.1 and 1 Hz, less so at higher frequencies. Insensitivity o...

  13. Electromagnetic Transition form Factor of Nucleon Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toru

    2016-10-01

    A dynamical coupled channel model for electron and neutrino induced meson production reactions is developed. The model is an extension of our previous reaction model to describe reactions at finite Q^2. The electromagnetic transition form factors of the first (3/2^+,3/2) and (3/2^-,1/2) resonances extracted from partial wave amplitude are discussed.

  14. Wave Meteorology and Soaring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews some mountain wave turbulence and operational hazards while soaring. Maps, photographs, and satellite images of the meteorological phenomena are included. Additionally, photographs of aircraft that sustained mountain wave damage are provided.

  15. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  16. Electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Songling; Li, Weibin; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamental theory of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves, together with its applications. It includes the dispersion characteristics and matching theory of guided waves; the mechanism of production and theoretical model of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves; the effect mechanism between guided waves and defects; the simulation method for the entire process of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave propagation; electromagnetic ultrasonic thickness measurement; pipeline axial guided wave defect detection; and electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave detection of gas pipeline cracks. This theory and findings on applications draw on the author’s intensive research over the past eight years. The book can be used for nondestructive testing technology and as an engineering reference work. The specific implementation of the electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave system presented here will also be of value for other nondestructive test developers.

  17. Viscothermal wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, Marten Jozef Johannes

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the accuracy, efficiency and range of applicability of various (approximate) models for viscothermal wave propagation are investigated. Models for viscothermal wave propagation describe thewave behavior of fluids including viscous and thermal effects. Cases where viscothermal effects a

  18. Detonation Wave Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  19. Gravitational Waves and Light Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Depies, Matthew R

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational wave signatures from cosmic strings are analyzed numerically. Cosmic string networks form during phase transistions in the early universe and these networks of long cosmic strings break into loops that radiate energy in the form of gravitational waves until they decay. The gravitational waves come in the form of harmonic modes from individual string loops, a "confusion noise" from galactic loops, and a stochastic background of gravitational waves from a network of loops. In this study string loops of larger size $\\alpha$ and lower string tensions $G\\mu$ (where $\\mu$ is the mass per unit length of the string) are investigated than in previous studies. Several detectors are currently searching for gravitational waves and a space based satellite, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), is in the final stages of pre-flight. The results for large loop sizes ($\\alpha=0.1$) put an upper limit of about $G\\mu<10^{-9}$ and indicate that gravitational waves from string loops down to $G\\mu \\approx...

  20. Controlling spiral wave with target wave in oscillatory systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fu-Cheng; Wang Xiao-Fei; Li Xue-Chen; Dong Li-Fang

    2007-01-01

    Spiral waves have been controlled by generating target waves with a localized inhomogeneity in the oscillatory medium. The competition between the spiral waves and target waves is discussed. The effect of the localized inhomogeneity size has also been studied.

  1. High-energy-rate magnetohydraulic metal forming system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    In the magnetohydraulic metal forming system, a sonic shock wave is generated in a liquid medium by a coil energized by an electrical discharge. These waves transfer energy from a metal diaphragm, actuated by a pulsed magnetic field, to a metal workpiece. In the development a study was made of the pressure pulse phenomenon in a liquid medium.

  2. Explosive Line Wave Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    curvature produced by each line wave generator. Piezoelectric pins were used for an additional assessment of the explosive lens design...to a visual assessment of the wave curvature from the high speed camera images, the explosive lens design was also evaluated using piezoelectric pins...High Explosive Firing Complex (HEFC). The various explosive line wave generators were taped vertically on a supporting board and the detonation wave

  3. Careers (A Course of Study). Unit V: Forms, Forms, Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Kay

    Designed to enable special needs students to understand and complete various job-related forms, this set of activities devoted to forms encountered before and after one obtains a job is the fifth in a nine-unit secondary level careers course intended to provide handicapped students with the knowledge and tools necessary to succeed in the world of…

  4. Plane-wave impulse approximation extraction of the neutron magnetic form factor from Quasi-Elastic {sup 3}{rvec H}e({rvec e},e{prime}) at Q{sup 2} = 0.3 to 0.6 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Xu; B. Anderson; L. Auberbach; T. Averett; W. Bertozzi; T. Black; J. Calarco; L. Cardman; G.D. Cates; Z.W. Chai; J.P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; S. Churchwell; G.S. Corrado; C. Crawford; D. Dale; A. Deur; P. Djawotho; T.W. Donnelly; D. Dutta; J.M. Finn; H. Gao; R. Gilman; A.V. Glamazdin; C. Glashausser; Walter Gloeckle; J. Golak; J. Gomez; V.G. Gorbenko; J.O. Hansen; F.W. Hersman; D.W. Higinbotham; R. Holmes; C.R. Howell; E. Hughes; B. Humensky; S. Incerti; C.W. de Jager; J.S. Jensen; X. Jiang; C.E. Jones; M. Jones; R. Kahl; H. Kamada; A. Kievsky; I. Kominis; W. Korsch; K. Kramer; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; E. Lakuriqi; M. Liang; N. Liyanage; J. LeRose; S. Malov; D.J. Margaziotis; J.W. Martin; K. McCormick; R. D. McKeown; K. McIlhany; Z.E. Meziani; R. Michaels; G.W. Miller; J. Mitchell; S. Nanda; E. Pace; T. Pavlin; G.G. Petratos; R.I. Pomatsalyuk; D. Pripstein; D. Prout; R.D. Ransome; Y. Roblin; M. Rvachev; A. Saha; G. Salme; M. Schnee; T. Shin; K. Slifer; P.A. Souder; S. Strauch; R. Suleiman; M. Sutter; B. Tipton; L. Todor; M. Viviani; B. Vlahovic; J. Watson; C.F. Williamson; H. Witala; B. Wojtsekhowski; F. Xiong; J. Yeh; P. Zolnierczuk

    2003-02-01

    A high precision measurement of the transverse spin-dependent asymmetry A{sub T} in {sup 3}{rvec H}e({rvec e},e{prime}) quasielastic scattering was performed in Hall A at Jefferson Lab at values of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}, between 0.1 and 0.6 (GeV/c){sup 2}. A{sub T} is sensitive to the neutron magnetic form factor, G{sub M}{sup n}. Values of G{sub M}{sup n} at Q{sup 2} = 0.1 and 0.2 (GeV/c){sup 2}, extracted using Faddeev calculations, were reported previously. Here, we report the extraction of G{sub M}{sup n} for the remaining Q{sup 2}-values in the range from 0.3 to 0.6 (GeV/c){sup 2} using a Plane-Wave Impulse Approximation calculation. The results are in good agreement with recent precision data from experiments using a deuterium target.

  5. Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Finnveden, Svante; Barbagallo, Mathias; Arteaga, Ines Lopez

    2014-05-01

    Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core, which is modeled by Biot's theory, is investigated using the waveguide finite element method. A waveguide poroelastic element is developed based on a displacement-pressure weak form. The dispersion curves of the sandwich panel are first identified as propagating or evanescent waves by varying the damping in the panel, and wave characteristics are analyzed by examining their motions. The energy distributions are calculated to identify the dominant motions. Simplified analytical models are also devised to show the main physics of the corresponding waves. This wave propagation analysis provides insight into the vibro-acoustic behavior of sandwich panels lined with elastic porous materials.

  6. Faraday pilot-wave dynamics: modelling and computation

    OpenAIRE

    Milewski, Paul A.; Galeano-Rios, Carlos A.; Nachbin, André; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-01-01

    A millimetric droplet bouncing on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath can self-propel by virtue of a resonant interaction with its own wave field. This system represents the first known example of a pilot-wave system of the form envisaged by Louis de Broglie in his double-solution pilot-wave theory. We here develop a fluid model of pilot-wave hydrodynamics by coupling recent models of the droplet’s bouncing dynamics with a more realistic model of weakly viscous quasi-potential wave generati...

  7. Wave Dragon MW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter

    Wave Dragon is a wave energy converter of the overtopping type. The device has been thoroughly tested on a 1:51.8 scale model in wave laboratories and a 1:4.5 scale model deployed in Nissum Bredning, a large inland waterway in Denmark. Based on the experience gained a full scale, multi MW prototype...

  8. Wave Dragon MW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter

    Wave Dragon is a wave energy converter of the overtopping type. The device has been thoroughly tested on a 1:51.8 scale model in wave laboratories and a 1:4.5 scale model deployed in Nissum Bredning, a large inland waterway in Denmark. Based on the experience gained a full scale, multi MW prototype...

  9. The Wave Energy Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This Handbook for Ocean Wave Energy aims at providing a guide into the field of ocean wave energy utilization. The handbook offers a concise yet comprehensive overview of the main aspects and disciplines involved in the development of wave energy converters (WECs). The idea for the book has been ...

  10. Characteristics of the breathers, rogue waves and solitary waves in a generalized (2+1)-dimensional Boussinesq equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Bin; Tian, Shou-Fu; Qin, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Tian-Tian

    2016-07-01

    Under investigation in this work is a generalized (2+1)-dimensional Boussinesq equation, which can be used to describe the propagation of small-amplitude, long wave in shallow water. By virtue of Bell's polynomials, an effective way is presented to succinctly construct its bilinear form. Furthermore, based on the bilinear formalism and the extended homoclinic test method, the breather wave solution, rogue-wave solution and solitary-wave solution of the equation are well constructed. Our results can be used to enrich the dynamical behavior of the generalized (2+1)-dimensional nonlinear wave fields.

  11. Crossing seas and occurrence of rogue waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitner-Gregersen, Elzbieta; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    The study is addressing crossing wave systems which may lead to formation of rogue waves. Onorato et al. (2006, 2010) have shown using the Nonlinear Schr?dringer (NLS) equations that the modulational instability and rogue waves can be triggered by a peculiar form of directional sea state, where two identical, crossing, narrow-banded random wave systems interact with each other. Such results have been underpinned by numerical simulations of the Euler equations solved with a Higher Order Spectral Method (HOSM) and experimental observations (Toffoli et al., 2011). They substantiate a dependence of the angle between the mean directions of propagation of the two crossing wave systems, with a maximum rogue wave probability for angles of approximately 40 degrees. Such an unusual sea state of two almost identical wave systems (approximately the same significant wave height and mean frequency) with high steepness and different directions was observed during the accident to the cruise ship Louis Majesty (Cavaleri et al. 2012). Occurrence of wind sea and swell having almost the same spectral period and significant wave height and crossing at the angle 40o region. These sea states have been observed in the North Atlantic as well as in the North and Norwegian Seas but only in low and intermediate wave conditions. They have not been found in a location off coast of Australia and Nigeria. There are some indications that in the future climate we may expect an increase number of occurrence of rogue-prone crossing sea states in some ocean regions An adopted partitioning procedure of a wave spectrum will impact the results. References Bitner-Gregersen, E.M. and Toffoli, A., 2014. Probability of occurrence of rogue sea states and consequences for design of marine structures. Special Issue of Ocean Dynamics, ISSN 1616-7341, 64(10), DOI 10.1007/s10236-014-0753-2. Cavaleri, L., Bertotti, L., Torrisi, L. Bitner-Gregersen, E., Serio, M. and Onorato, M., 2012. Rogue Waves in Crossing Seas

  12. Wave turbulence in annular wave tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, Miguel; Stramignoni, Ettore

    2014-05-01

    We perform experiments in an annular wind wave tank at the Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Torino. The external diameter of the tank is 5 meters while the internal one is 1 meter. The tank is equipped by two air fans which can lead to a wind of maximum 5 m/s. The present set up is capable of studying the generation of waves and the development of wind wave spectra for large duration. We have performed different tests including different wind speeds. For large wind speed we observe the formation of spectra consistent with Kolmogorv-Zakharov predictions.

  13. On good ETOL forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Sven

    1978-01-01

    This paper continues the study of ETOL forms and good EOL forms done by Maurer, Salomaa and Wood. It is proven that binary very complete ETOL forms exist, good synchronized ETOL forms exist and that no propagating or synchronized ETOL form can be very complete.......This paper continues the study of ETOL forms and good EOL forms done by Maurer, Salomaa and Wood. It is proven that binary very complete ETOL forms exist, good synchronized ETOL forms exist and that no propagating or synchronized ETOL form can be very complete....

  14. Physics of waves

    CERN Document Server

    Elmore, William C

    1985-01-01

    Because of the increasing demands and complexity of undergraduate physics courses (atomic, quantum, solid state, nuclear, etc.), it is often impossible to devote separate courses to the classic wave phenomena of optics, acoustics, and electromagnetic radiation. This brief comprehensive text helps alleviate the problem with a unique overview of classical wave theory in one volume.By examining a sequence of concrete and specific examples (emphasizing the physics of wave motion), the authors unify the study of waves, developing abstract and general features common to all wave motion. The fundam

  15. The Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H. C.; Hansen, R.; Friis-Madsen, E.

    2000-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is an offshore wave energy converter of the overtopping type, utilizing a patented wave reflector design to focus the waves towards a ramp, and the overtopping is used for electricity production through a set of Kaplan/propeller hydro turbines. During the last 2 years, excessive...... design an testing has been performed on a scale 1:50 model of the Wave Dragon, and on a scale 1:3:5 model turbine. Thus survivability, overtopping, hydraulic response, turbine performance and feasibility have been verified....

  16. Questions about elastic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbrecht, Jüri

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the modelling of mechanical waves by asking the right questions about them and trying to find suitable answers. The questions follow the analytical sequence from elementary understandings to complicated cases, following a step-by-step path towards increased knowledge. The focus is on waves in elastic solids, although some examples also concern non-conservative cases for the sake of completeness. Special attention is paid to the understanding of the influence of microstructure, nonlinearity and internal variables in continua. With the help of many mathematical models for describing waves, physical phenomena concerning wave dispersion, nonlinear effects, emergence of solitary waves, scales and hierarchies of waves as well as the governing physical parameters are analysed. Also, the energy balance in waves and non-conservative models with energy influx are discussed. Finally, all answers are interwoven into the canvas of complexity.

  17. Asymptotics of Heavy-Meson Form Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Grozin, A.G.; Grozin, Andrey G.; Neubert, Matthias

    1997-01-01

    Using methods developed for hard exclusive QCD processes, we calculate the asymptotic behaviour of heavy-meson form factors at large recoil. It is determined by the leading- and subleading-twist meson wave functions. For $1\\ll |v\\cdot v'|\\ll m_Q/\\Lambda$, the form factors are dominated by the Isgur--Wise function, which is determined by the interference between the wave functions of leading and subleading twist. At $|v\\cdot v'|\\gg m_Q/\\Lambda$, they are dominated by two functions arising at order $1/m_Q$ in the heavy-quark expansion, which are determined by the leading-twist wave function alone. The sum of these contributions describes the form factors in the whole region $|v\\cdot v'|\\gg 1$. As a consequence, there is an exact zero in the form factor for the scattering of longitudinally polarized $B^*$ mesons at some value $v\\cdot v'\\sim m_b/\\Lambda$, and an approximate zero in the form factor of $B$ mesons in the timelike region ($v\\cdot v'\\sim -m_b/\\Lambda$). We obtain the evolution equations and sum rules ...

  18. Coordinate transformations and matter waves cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, G. R.; Moghaddam, A. G.; Mohammadkhani, R.

    2016-03-01

    Transformation method provides an efficient tool to control wave propagation inside the materials. Using the coordinate transformation approach, we study invisibility cloaks with sphere, cylinder and ellipsoid structures for electronic waves propagation. The underlying physics behind this investigation is the fact that Schrödinger equation with position dependent mass tensor and potentials has a covariant form which follows the coordinate transformation. Using this technique we obtain the exact spatial form of the mass tensor and potentials for a variety of cloaks with different shapes.

  19. 4-wave dynamics in kinetic wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chibbaro, Sergio; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2016-01-01

    A general Hamiltonian wave system with quartic resonances is considered, in the standard kinetic limit of a continuum of weakly interacting dispersive waves with random phases. The evolution equation for the multimode characteristic function $Z$ is obtained within an "interaction representation" and a perturbation expansion in the small nonlinearity parameter. A frequency renormalization is performed to remove linear terms that do not appear in the 3-wave case. Feynman-Wyld diagrams are used to average over phases, leading to a first order differential evolution equation for $Z$. A hierarchy of equations, analogous to the Boltzmann hierarchy for low density gases is derived, which preserves in time the property of random phases and amplitudes. This amounts to a general formalism for both the $N$-mode and the 1-mode PDF equations for 4-wave turbulent systems, suitable for numerical simulations and for investigating intermittency.

  20. Traveling waves in a spring-block chain sliding down a slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, J. E.; James, G.; Tonnelier, A.

    2017-07-01

    Traveling waves are studied in a spring slider-block model. We explicitly construct front waves (kinks) for a piecewise-linear spinodal friction force. Pulse waves are obtained as the matching of two traveling fronts with identical speeds. Explicit formulas are obtained for the wavespeed and the wave form in the anticontinuum limit. The link with localized waves in a Burridge-Knopoff model of an earthquake fault is briefly discussed.

  1. Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

    2013-04-23

    Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

  2. Gravitational waves and multimessenger astronomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricci Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely expected that in the coming quinquennium the first gravitational wave signal will be directly detected. The ground-based advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors are being upgraded to a sensitivity level such that we expect to be measure a significant binary merger rate. Gravitational waves events are likely to be accompanied by electromagnetic counterparts and neutrino emission carrying complementary information to those associated to the gravitational signals. If it becomes possible to measure all these forms of radiation in concert, we will end up an impressive increase in the comprehension of the whole phenomenon. In the following we summarize the scientific outcome of the interferometric detectors in the past configuration. Then we focus on some of the potentialities of the advanced detectors once used in the new context of the multimessenger astronomy.

  3. Gravitational waves and multimessenger astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Fulvio

    2016-07-01

    It is widely expected that in the coming quinquennium the first gravitational wave signal will be directly detected. The ground-based advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors are being upgraded to a sensitivity level such that we expect to be measure a significant binary merger rate. Gravitational waves events are likely to be accompanied by electromagnetic counterparts and neutrino emission carrying complementary information to those associated to the gravitational signals. If it becomes possible to measure all these forms of radiation in concert, we will end up an impressive increase in the comprehension of the whole phenomenon. In the following we summarize the scientific outcome of the interferometric detectors in the past configuration. Then we focus on some of the potentialities of the advanced detectors once used in the new context of the multimessenger astronomy.

  4. Wave Overtopping Characteristics of the Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    Simulation work has been used extensively with the Wave dragon and other overtopping devices to analyse the power production performance of them and to optimise the structural design and the control strategy. A time domain approach to this is well documented in Jakobsen & Frigaard 1999. Using...... measurements taken from the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning prototype, some of the previous assumptions have been slightly modified and improved upon, so that the simulation method better represents the reality of what is occurring....

  5. Wave Overtopping Characteristics of the Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    Simulation work has been used extensively with the Wave dragon and other overtopping devices to analyse the power production performance of them and to optimise the structural design and the control strategy. A time domain approach to this is well documented in Jakobsen & Frigaard 1999. Using...... measurements taken from the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning prototype, some of the previous assumptions have been slightly modified and improved upon, so that the simulation method better represents the reality of what is occurring....

  6. Modulational instability, solitons and periodic waves in a model of quantum degenerate boson-fermion mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmonte-Beitia, Juan [Departamento de Matematicas, E. T. S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha 13071, Ciudad Real (Spain); Perez-Garcia, Victor M. [Departamento de Matematicas, E. T. S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha 13071, Ciudad Real (Spain); Vekslerchik, Vadym [Departamento de Matematicas, E. T. S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha 13071, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    In this paper, we study a system of coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations modelling a quantum degenerate mixture of bosons and fermions. We analyze the stability of plane waves, give precise conditions for the existence of solitons and write explicit solutions in the form of periodic waves. We also check that the solitons observed previously in numerical simulations of the model correspond exactly to our explicit solutions and see how plane waves destabilize to form periodic waves.

  7. Two Dimensional Acoustic Propagation Through Oceanic Internal Solitary Waves: Weak Scattering Theory and Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    sech2 wave form is used because the amplitude and horizontal displacement are solutions of the Korteweg de Vries ( KdV ) non linear wave equation which...a solution to the KDV wave equation . After making the frozen field approximation, the soliton can be represented by the following mathematical...scattering. 3. The Gaussian Soliton As discussed, the sech2 form of a soliton is chosen because it is an exact solution to the KDV wave equation . For

  8. Elastic waves along a fracture intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Bradley Charles

    Fractures and fracture networks play a significant role in the subsurface hydraulic connectivity within the Earth. While a significant amount of research has been performed on the seismic response of single fractures and sets of fractures, few studies have examined the effect of fracture intersections on elastic wave propagation. Intersections play a key role in the connectivity of a fracture network that ultimately affects the hydraulic integrity of a rock mass. In this dissertation two new types of coupled waves are examined that propagate along intersections. 1) A coupled wedge wave that propagates along a surface fracture with particle motion highly localized to the intersection of a fracture with a free surface, and 2) fracture intersection waves that propagate along the intersection between two orthogonal fractures. Theoretical formulations were derived to determine the particle motion and velocity of intersection waves. Vibrational modes calculated from the theoretical formulation match those predicted by group theory based on the symmetry of the problem. For the coupled wedge wave, two vibrational modes exist that range in velocity between the wedge wave and Rayleigh wave velocity and exhibit either wagging or breathing motion depending on the Poisson's ratio. For the intersection waves, the observed modes depend on the properties of the fractures forming the intersection. If both fractures have equal stiffness four modes exist, two with wagging and two with breathing motion. If the fractures have unequal stiffness, four modes also exist, but the motion depends on the Poisson's ratio. The velocity of intersection waves depends on the coupling or stiffness of the intersection and frequency of the signal. In general, the different modes travel with speeds between the wedge wave and bulk shear wave velocity. Laboratory experiments were performed on isotropic and anisotropic samples to verify the existence of these waves. For both waves, the observed signals

  9. A new gravitational wave background from the Big Bang

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The reheating of the universe after hybrid inflation proceeds through the nucleation and subsequent collision of large concentrations of energy density in the form of bubble-like structures moving at relativistic speeds. This generates a significant fraction of energy in the form of a stochastic background of gravitational waves, whose time evolution is determined by the successive stages of reheating: First, tachyonic preheating makes the amplitude of gravity waves grow exponentially fast. Second, bubble collisions add a new burst of gravitational radiation. Third, turbulent motions finally sets the end of gravitational waves production. From then on, these waves propagate unimpeded to us. We find that the fraction of energy density today in these primordial gravitational waves could be significant for GUT scale models of inflation, although well beyond the frequency range sensitivity of gravitational wave observatories like LIGO, LISA or BBO. However, low-scale models could still produce a detectable signal...

  10. A Continuum Model of Actin Waves in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamviwath, Varunyu; Hu, Jifeng; Othmer, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    Actin waves are complex dynamical patterns of the dendritic network of filamentous actin in eukaryotes. We developed a model of actin waves in PTEN-deficient Dictyostelium discoideum by deriving an approximation of the dynamics of discrete actin filaments and combining it with a signaling pathway that controls filament branching. This signaling pathway, together with the actin network, contains a positive feedback loop that drives the actin waves. Our model predicts the structure, composition, and dynamics of waves that are consistent with existing experimental evidence, as well as the biochemical dependence on various protein partners. Simulation suggests that actin waves are initiated when local actin network activity, caused by an independent process, exceeds a certain threshold. Moreover, diffusion of proteins that form a positive feedback loop with the actin network alone is sufficient for propagation of actin waves at the observed speed of . Decay of the wave back can be caused by scarcity of network components, and the shape of actin waves is highly dependent on the filament disassembly rate. The model allows retraction of actin waves and captures formation of new wave fronts in broken waves. Our results demonstrate that a delicate balance between a positive feedback, filament disassembly, and local availability of network components is essential for the complex dynamics of actin waves. PMID:23741312

  11. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will

  12. Modular Forms and Weierstrass Mock Modular Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Clemm

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Alfes, Griffin, Ono, and Rolen have shown that the harmonic Maass forms arising from Weierstrass ζ-functions associated to modular elliptic curves “encode” the vanishing and nonvanishing for central values and derivatives of twisted Hasse-Weil L-functions for elliptic curves. Previously, Martin and Ono proved that there are exactly five weight 2 newforms with complex multiplication that are eta-quotients. In this paper, we construct a canonical harmonic Maass form for these five curves with complex multiplication. The holomorphic part of this harmonic Maass form arises from the Weierstrass ζ-function and is referred to as the Weierstrass mock modular form. We prove that the Weierstrass mock modular form for these five curves is itself an eta-quotient or a twist of one. Using this construction, we also obtain p-adic formulas for the corresponding weight 2 newform using Atkin’s U-operator.

  13. A maximum entropy distribution for wave heights of non-linear sea waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the maximum entropy principle, a probability density function (PDF) for the zero-crossing wave height (H)of random waves is derived as the simple form fn (H) = αHγe-βHn ( n is a selectable positive integer) through solving a variational problem subject to some quite general constraints. This PDF maximizes the information entropy of H, and its parameters α, γ and β are expressed ear sea waves with large uncertainty, and its parameters can be simply determined from available data. Comparisons between the PDF with n = 3 and n = 4 and the observed distributions of H from wave records measured in the East China Sea and in a wind-wave tunnel show fairly satisfying agreements.

  14. Pressure vessel made by free forming using underwater explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Iyama

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Explosive forming is one particular forming technique, in which, mostcommonly, water is used as the pressure transmission medium. In recentyears, we have done the development of the method which obtains anecessary form of the metal by the control of underwater shock wave actson the metal plate, without a metal die. On the other hand, the pressurevessel is required in various fields, but we think that the free forming usingthe underwater shock wave is advantageous in the production of pressurevessel of a simple spherical, ellipse, parabola shape. In this paper, we willintroduce an experiment and several numerical simulations that we carriedout for this technical development.

  15. Internal waves and temperature fronts on slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Thorpe

    Full Text Available Time series measurements from an array of temperature miniloggers in a line at constant depth along the sloping boundary of a lake are used to describe the `internal surf zone' where internal waves interact with the sloping boundary. More small positive temperature time derivatives are recorded than negative, but there are more large negative values than positive, giving the overall distribution of temperature time derivatives a small negative skewness. This is consistent with the internal wave dynamics; fronts form during the up-slope phase of the motion, bringing cold water up the slope, and the return flow may become unstable, leading to small advecting billows and weak warm fronts. The data are analysed to detect `events', periods in which the temperature derivatives exceed a set threshold. The speed and distance travelled by `events' are described. The motion along the slope may be a consequence of (a instabilities advected by the flow (b internal waves propagating along-slope or (c internal waves approaching the slope from oblique directions. The propagation of several of the observed 'events' can only be explained by (c, evidence that the internal surf zone has some, but possibly not all, the characteristics of the conventional 'surface wave' surf zone, with waves steepening as they approach the slope at oblique angles.

    Key words. Oceanography: general (benthic boundary layers; limnology, Oceanography: physical (internal and inertial waves

  16. Tympanal travelling waves in migratory locusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windmill, James F C; Göpfert, Martin C; Robert, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Hearing animals, including many vertebrates and insects, have the capacity to analyse the frequency composition of sound. In mammals, frequency analysis relies on the mechanical response of the basilar membrane in the cochlear duct. These vibrations take the form of a slow vibrational wave propagating along the basilar membrane from base to apex. Known as von Békésy's travelling wave, this wave displays amplitude maxima at frequency-specific locations along the basilar membrane, providing a spatial map of the frequency of sound--a tonotopy. In their structure, insect auditory systems may not be as sophisticated at those of mammals, yet some are known to perform sound frequency analysis. In the desert locust, this analysis arises from the mechanical properties of the tympanal membrane. In effect, the spatial decomposition of incident sound into discrete frequency components involves a tympanal travelling wave that funnels mechanical energy to specific tympanal locations, where distinct groups of mechanoreceptor neurones project. Notably, observed tympanal deflections differ from those predicted by drum theory. Although phenomenologically equivalent, von Békésy's and the locust's waves differ in their physical implementation. von Békésy's wave is born from interactions between the anisotropic basilar membrane and the surrounding incompressible fluids, whereas the locust's wave rides on an anisotropic membrane suspended in air. The locust's ear thus combines in one structure the functions of sound reception and frequency decomposition.

  17. Solitary Wave Propagation Influenced by Submerged Breakwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锦; 左其华; 王登婷

    2013-01-01

    The form of Boussinesq equation derived by Nwogu (1993) using velocity at an arbitrary distance and surface elevation as variables is used to simulate wave surface elevation changes. In the numerical experiment, water depth was divided into five layers with six layer interfaces to simulate velocity at each layer interface. Besides, a physical experiment was carried out to validate numerical model and study solitary wave propagation.“Water column collapsing”method (WCCM) was used to generate solitary wave. A series of wave gauges around an impervious breakwater were set-up in the flume to measure the solitary wave shoaling, run-up, and breaking processes. The results show that the measured data and simulated data are in good agreement. Moreover, simulated and measured surface elevations were analyzed by the wavelet transform method. It shows that different wave frequencies stratified in the wavelet amplitude spectrum. Finally, horizontal and vertical velocities of each layer interface were analyzed in the process of solitary wave propagation through submerged breakwater.

  18. Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converters Used as Coastal Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with wave energy converters used to reduce the wave height along shorelines. For this study the Wave Dragon wave energy converter is chosen. The wave height reduction from a single device has been evaluated from physical model tests in scale 1:51.8 of the 260 x 150 m, 24 kW/m model...... Spain, to evaluate the potential for reducing wave heights close the shore by means of Wave Dragons....

  19. Maslov Shear-Waveforms in Highly Anisotropic Shales and Implications for Shear-Wave Splitting Analyses Formes d'onde transversales de Maslov dans les argiles fortement anisotropes et implications dans les analyses de biréfringence des ondes transversales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caddick J.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Shales are the most common sedimentary rocks in hydrocarbon environments often forming the source rock and trapping rock for a reservoir. Due to the platey nature of the constituent grains, shales are commonly anisotropic. In this paper we calculate seismic waveforms for highly anisotropic shales using Maslov asymptotic theory (MAT. This theory is an extension of classical ray theory which provides valid waveforms in regions of caustics (wavefront folding where ray theory amplitudes are unstable. Asymptotic ray theory (ART is based on the Fermat or geometrical ray which connects the source and receiver. In contrast, the Maslov solution integrates the contributions from neighbouring non-Fermat rays. Raypaths, travel-times, amplitudes and synthetic seismograms are presented for three highly anisotropic shales using a very simple 1D model comprised of an anisotropic shale overlying an isotropic shale. The ART waveforms fail to account for complex waveform effects due to triplications. In comparison, the MAT waveforms predict nonsingular amplitudes at wavefront cusps and it predicts the diffracted signals from these cusps. A Maslov solution which integrates ray contributions over a single slowness component will break down when rays focus in 3D (at a point rather than along a line. One of the tested shales shows such a point caustic and integration over 2 slowness components is required to remove the amplitude singularity. Finally, we examine the effects of wavefront triplications on Alford rotations which are used to estimate shear-wave splitting. In such cases, the rotation successfully finds the fast shear-wave polarization, but it can be unreliable in its estimate of the time separation. Les argiles sont les roches sédimentaires les plus répandues dans l'environnement des hydrocarbures, et forment souvent la roche mère et la roche des pièges pétrolifères. En raison de la structure en plaques des grains, les argiles sont g

  20. Isentropic compressive wave generator and method of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L.M.

    An isentropic compressive wave generator and method of making same are disclosed. The wave generator comprises a disk or flat pillow member having component materials of different shock impedances formed in a configuration resulting in a smooth shock impedance gradient over the thickness thereof for interpositioning between an impactor member and a target specimen for producing a shock wave of a smooth predictable rise time. The method of making the pillow member comprises the reduction of the component materials to a powder form and forming the pillow member by sedimentation and compressive techniques.

  1. Dynamics of Bose-Einstein Condensates: Exact Representation and Topological Classification of Coherent Matter Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the bifurcation theory of dynamical systems, we present the exact representation and topological classification of coherent matter waves in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs, such as solitary waves and modulate amplitude waves (MAWs. The existence and multiplicity of such waves are determined by the parameter regions selected. The results show that the characteristic of coherent matter waves can be determined by the “angular momentum” in attractive BECs while for repulsive BECs; the waves of the coherent form are all MAWs. All exact explicit parametric representations of the above waves are exhibited and numerical simulations support the result.

  2. Clustering of cycloidal wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Stefan G.

    2016-03-29

    A wave energy conversion system uses a pair of wave energy converters (WECs) on respective active mountings on a floating platform, so that the separation of the WECs from each other or from a central WEC can be actively adjusted according to the wavelength of incident waves. The adjustable separation facilitates operation of the system to cancel reactive forces, which may be generated during wave energy conversion. Modules on which such pairs of WECs are mounted can be assembled with one or more central WECs to form large clusters in which reactive forces and torques can be made to cancel. WECs of different sizes can be employed to facilitate cancelation of reactive forces and torques.

  3. The physics of orographic gravity wave drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A C Teixeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The drag and momentum fluxes produced by gravity waves generated in flow over orography are reviewed, focusing on adiabatic conditions without phase transitions or radiation effects, and steady mean incoming flow. The orographic gravity wave drag is first introduced in its simplest possible form, for inviscid, linearized, non-rotating flow with the Boussinesq and hydrostatic approximations, and constant wind and static stability. Subsequently, the contributions made by previous authors (primarily using theory and numerical simulations to elucidate how the drag is affected by additional physical processes are surveyed. These include the effect of orography anisotropy, vertical wind shear, total and partial critical levels, vertical wave reflection and resonance, non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves, rotation and nonlinearity. Frictional and boundary layer effects are also briefly mentioned. A better understanding of all of these aspects is important for guiding the improvement of drag parametrization schemes.

  4. Wave-Particle Duality and the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Sivashinsky, Gregory I

    2009-01-01

    The Hamilton-Jacobi equation of relativistic quantum mechanics is revisited. The equation is shown to permit solutions in the form of breathers (oscillating/spinning solitons), displaying simultaneous particle-like and wave-like behavior. The de Broglie wave thus acquires a clear deterministic meaning of a wave-like excitation of the classical action function. The problem of quantization in terms of the breathing action function and the double-slit experiment are discussed.

  5. On the accuracy of wave equations for inhomogeneous media

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, Zhihai

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous media is a very ideal assumption to establishing wave equations. Compared to the interested wave length, most materials in reality are inhomogeneous. To investigate the accuracy of electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic wave equations for inhomogeneous media, this paper checks their form-invariance in global Cartesian coordinate system by transforming them from arbitrary spatial geometries, in which they must be form-invariant according to the definition of tensor. In this way, it shows that form-invariant or not is an intrinsic property of wave equations, which is independent with the relation between field variables before and after coordinate transformation. With this approach, one can prove that Maxwell equations and acoustic equations are locally accurate to describe the wave propagation in inhomogeneous media, but Navier equations are not. In addition, new elastodynamic equations can be naturally obtained as the local versions of Willis equations, which are verified by some numerical simulati...

  6. New Wave in the Perception of New Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ristivojević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents an analysis of contemporary ideas about new wave music formed by generations born after 1980, in the "post-new wave" period. The ever more evident tendency to revitalize and re-actualize the new wave phenomenon at the local level, as well as the identities which stem from it, is indicative not only of the importance of this musical concept but its interdependence with the local community. The echoes of different contemporary narratives about this phenomenon influence the forming of a set of notions about, on the one hand, new wave itself, and on the other – notions about Belgrade of that time period, among generations which form their opinions and perceptions of it indirectly, and after the fact. The aim of the paper is to answer the question of the extent to which young people today are familiar with new wave and what the concept represents for them.

  7. Analysis of Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    The present book describes the most important aspects of wave analysis techniques applied to physical model tests. Moreover, the book serves as technical documentation for the wave analysis software WaveLab 3, cf. Aalborg University (2012). In that respect it should be mentioned that supplementary...... to the present technical documentation exists also the online help document describing the WaveLab software in detail including all the inputs and output fields. In addition to the two main authors also Tue Hald, Jacob Helm-Petersen and Morten Møller Jakobsen have contributed to the note. Their input is highly...... acknowledged. The outline of the book is as follows: • Chapter 2 and 3 describes analysis of waves in time and frequency domain. • Chapter 4 and 5 describes the separation of incident and reflected waves for the two-dimensional case. • Chapter 6 describes the estimation of the directional spectra which also...

  8. Waves and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ockendon, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this book continues to give readers a broad mathematical basis for modelling and understanding the wide range of wave phenomena encountered in modern applications.  New and expanded material includes topics such as elastoplastic waves and waves in plasmas, as well as new exercises.  Comprehensive collections of models are used to illustrate the underpinning mathematical methodologies, which include the basic ideas of the relevant partial differential equations, characteristics, ray theory, asymptotic analysis, dispersion, shock waves, and weak solutions. Although the main focus is on compressible fluid flow, the authors show how intimately gasdynamic waves are related to wave phenomena in many other areas of physical science.   Special emphasis is placed on the development of physical intuition to supplement and reinforce analytical thinking. Each chapter includes a complete set of carefully prepared exercises, making this a suitable textbook for students in applied mathematics, ...

  9. The Wave Energy Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Tedd, James William

    2006-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is a 4 to 11 MW offshore wave energy converter of the overtopping type. It basically consists of two wave reflectors focusing the waves towards a ramp, a reservoir for collecting the overtopping water and a number of hydro turbines for converting the pressure head into power......'s first offshore wave energy converter. During this period an extensive measuring program has established the background for optimal design of the structure and regulation of the power take off system. Planning for full scale deployment of a 7 MW unit within the next 2 years is in progress. The prototype....... In the period from 1998 to 2001 extensive testing on a scale 1:50 model was carried at Aalborg University. During the last two years, testing has started on a prototype of the Wave Dragon in Nissum Bredning, Denmark (scale 1:4.5 of the North Sea). The prototype was grid connected in May 2003 as the world...

  10. Shock wave reflection phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-dor, Gabi

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive state-of-the-knowledge description of the shock wave reflection phenomena from a phenomenological point of view. The first part is a thorough introduction to oblique shock wave reflections, presenting the two major well-known reflection wave configurations, namely, regular (RR) and Mach (MR) reflections, the corresponding two- and three-shock theories, their analytical and graphical solution and the proposed transition boundaries between these two reflection-wave configurations. The second, third and fourth parts describe the reflection phenomena in steady, pseudo-steady and unsteady flows, respectively. Here, the possible specific types of reflection wave configurations are described, criteria for their formation and termination are presented and their governing equations are solved analytically and graphically and compared with experimental results. The resolution of the well-known von Neumann paradox and a detailed description of two new reflection-wave configurations - t...

  11. Gravitational wave astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    In the past year, the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration announced the first secure detection of gravitational waves. This discovery heralds the beginning of gravitational wave astronomy: the use of gravitational waves as a tool for studying the dense and dynamical universe. In this talk, I will describe the full spectrum of gravitational waves, from Hubble-scale modes, through waves with periods of years, hours and milliseconds. I will describe the different techniques one uses to measure the waves in these bands, current and planned facilities for implementing these techniques, and the broad range of sources which produce the radiation. I will discuss what we might expect to learn as more events and sources are measured, and as this field matures into a standard part of the astronomical milieu.

  12. Near Shore Wave Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    the alongshore current, and a full non linear bottom shear stress. Contributions from the alongshore wind stress are mostly evident offshore and over...fraction) profiles measured on a day with offshore wave height of 1.6m, and 10 ms-1 wind speed. The one hour mean void fraction profiles are measured in a...given the offshore wave conditions. OBJECTIVES We hypothesize that the wave-induced kinematic, sediment and morphologic processes are nonlinearly

  13. Dyakonov surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Crasovan, Lucian Cornel; Johansen, Steffen Kjær;

    2008-01-01

    The interface of two semi-infinite media, where at least one of them is a birefringent crystal, supports a special type of surface wave that was predicted theoretically by D'yakonov in 1988. Since then, the properties of such waves, which exist in transparent media only under very special......, the existence of these surface waves in specific material examples is analyzed, discussing the challenge posed by their experimental observation....

  14. Spheroidal wave functions

    CERN Document Server

    Flammer, Carson

    2005-01-01

    Intended to facilitate the use and calculation of spheroidal wave functions, this applications-oriented text features a detailed and unified account of the properties of these functions. Addressed to applied mathematicians, mathematical physicists, and mathematical engineers, it presents tables that provide a convenient means for handling wave problems in spheroidal coordinates.Topics include separation of the scalar wave equation in spheroidal coordinates, angle and radial functions, integral representations and relations, and expansions in spherical Bessel function products. Additional subje

  15. Making Wave Concept Tangible

    OpenAIRE

    Bülbül, Mustafa Şahin

    2012-01-01

    This study includes efficiency of some designed materials and activities for the students with special needs (blind students) about wave concept. In 9th grade Turkish High School Physics Curriculum, all the students have to learn wave concept because physics course is compulsory and wave concept was prepared as a unit. Generally, blind students only memorize some definitions about period, frequency and amplitude in that unit. This seems the easiest way for both teacher and students. Observing...

  16. Radial wave crystals: radially periodic structures from anisotropic metamaterials for engineering acoustic or electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2009-08-07

    We demonstrate that metamaterials with anisotropic properties can be used to develop a new class of periodic structures that has been named radial wave crystals. They can be sonic or photonic, and wave propagation along the radial directions is obtained through Bloch states like in usual sonic or photonic crystals. The band structure of the proposed structures can be tailored in a large amount to get exciting novel wave phenomena. For example, it is shown that acoustical cavities based on radial sonic crystals can be employed as passive devices for beam forming or dynamically orientated antennas for sound localization.

  17. Non-diffractive waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Figueroa, Hugo E; Recami, Erasmo

    2013-01-01

    This continuation and extension of the successful book ""Localized Waves"" by the same editors brings together leading researchers in non-diffractive waves to cover the most important results in their field and as such is the first to present the current state.The well-balanced presentation of theory and experiments guides readers through the background of different types of non-diffractive waves, their generation, propagation, and possible applications. The authors include a historical account of the development of the field, and cover different types of non-diffractive waves, including Airy

  18. Propagation of waves

    CERN Document Server

    David, P

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of Waves focuses on the wave propagation around the earth, which is influenced by its curvature, surface irregularities, and by passage through atmospheric layers that may be refracting, absorbing, or ionized. This book begins by outlining the behavior of waves in the various media and at their interfaces, which simplifies the basic phenomena, such as absorption, refraction, reflection, and interference. Applications to the case of the terrestrial sphere are also discussed as a natural generalization. Following the deliberation on the diffraction of the "ground? wave around the ear

  19. The Wave Energy Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This Handbook for Ocean Wave Energy aims at providing a guide into the field of ocean wave energy utilization. The handbook offers a concise yet comprehensive overview of the main aspects and disciplines involved in the development of wave energy converters (WECs). The idea for the book has been...... shaped by the development, research, and teaching that we have carried out at the Wave Energy Research Group at Aalborg University over the past decades. It is our belief and experience that it would be useful writing and compiling such a handbook in order to enhance the understanding of the sector...

  20. Wave Loads on Cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Frigaard, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Wave loads may be defined as time varying forces on a body resulting from the wave induced flow fields which surrounds the body in whole or in part. Such unsteady fluid forces are the net result of pressure and shear forces integrated over the instantaneous wetted area.......Wave loads may be defined as time varying forces on a body resulting from the wave induced flow fields which surrounds the body in whole or in part. Such unsteady fluid forces are the net result of pressure and shear forces integrated over the instantaneous wetted area....

  1. Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converters Used as Coastal Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with wave energy converters used to reduce the wave height along shorelines. For this study the Wave Dragon wave energy converter is chosen. The wave height reduction from a single device has been evaluated from physical model tests in scale 1:51.8 of the 260 x 150 m, 24 kW/m model...

  2. Wave groups in uni-directional surface-wave models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groesen, van E.

    1998-01-01

    Uni-directional wave models are used to study wave groups that appear in wave tanks of hydrodynamic laboratories; characteristic for waves in such tanks is that the wave length is rather small, comparable to the depth of the layer. In second-order theory, the resulting Nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) eq

  3. Exitation of Whistler Waves by a Helical Wave Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balmashnov, A. A.; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul

    1981-01-01

    The excitation of whistler waves in a radial inhomogeneous plasma is investigated experimentally, using a slow-wave structure consisting of a helix of variable length surrounding the plasma column. The excited waves were observed to have a wave-vector parallel to the external magnetic field....... The possibility of exciting the waves in different radial regions is demonstrated....

  4. Adaptive municipal electronic forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Pieter; Dijk, van Betsy; Bondarouk, Tanya; Ruël, Huub; Guiderdoni-Jourdain, Karine; Oiry, Ewan

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation of electronic forms (e-forms) seems to be a step forward to reduce the burden for people who fill in forms. Municipalities more and more offer e-forms online that can be used by citizens to request a municipal product or service or by municipal employees to place a request on behalf of a

  5. Simple waves in relativistic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2010-11-01

    We consider the Riemann problem for relativistic flows of polytropic fluids and find relations for the flow characteristics. Evolution of physical quantities takes especially simple form for the case of cold magnetized plasmas. We find exact explicit analytical solutions for one-dimensional expansion of magnetized plasma into vacuum, valid for arbitrary magnetization. We also consider expansion into cold unmagnetized external medium both for stationary initial conditions and for initially moving plasma, as well as reflection of rarefaction wave from a wall. We also find self-similar structure of three-dimensional magnetized outflows into vacuum, valid close to the plasma-vacuum interface.

  6. Blast Wave Experiments at Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    radiation flows upward, it passes though a 1.7-mm high, tapered, 25-μm thick gold wall cone that is filled 20 ± 3 mg/cm3 silica aerogel (SiO2). Above...this cone is a 20 ± 3 mg/cm3 silica aerogel filled, 1-mm high, 2.4-mm inner diameter, 25-μm thick gold wall cylinder. On the cylinder rests a 4-mm...diameter gold platform that supports a higher density (40-60 mg/cm3) silica aerogel . This aerogel is the region where the blast wave forms after

  7. FOUR-WAVE MIXING STUDIES OF IONS IN SOLIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, R.; Suchocki, A.; Durville, F.; Gilliland, G.; Behrens, E.; Quarles, G.; BOULON, G.

    1987-01-01

    The laser technique of four-wave mixing is useful in both optical device applications and for characterizing fundamental properties of optical materials. This paper gives an overview of the theory and experimental technique of four-wave mixing, and presents examples of using this technique as a spectroscopic tool and of forming optical devices.

  8. Linear waves in two-layer fluids over periodic bottoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, J.; Maas, L.R.M.

    2016-01-01

    A new, exact Floquet theory is presented for linear waves in two-layer fluidsover a periodic bottom of arbitrary shape and amplitude. A method of conformaltransformation is adapted. The solutions are given, in essentially analytical form, forthe dispersion relation between wave frequency and general

  9. Linear waves in two-layer fluids over periodic bottoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Jie; Maas, L.R.M.

    2016-01-01

    A new, exact Floquet theory is presented for linear waves in two-layer fluids over a periodic bottom of arbitrary shape and amplitude. A method of conformal transformation is adapted. The solutions are given, in essentially analytical form, for the dispersion relation between wave frequency and gene

  10. Re-radiation of acoustic waves from the A0 wave on a submerged elastic shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahyi, A C; Cao, Hui; Raju, P K; Uberall, Herbert

    2005-07-01

    We consider evacuated thin semi-infinite shells immersed in a fluid, which may be either of cylindrical shape with a hemispherical shell endcap, or formed two-dimensionally by semi-infinite parallel plates joined together by a semi-cylinder. The connected shell portions are joined in a manner to satisfy continuity but with a discontinuous radius of curvature. Acoustic waves are considered incident along the axis of symmetry (say the z axis) onto the curved portion of the shell, where they, at the critical angle of coincidence, generate Lamb and Stoneley-type waves in the shell. Computations were carried out using a code developed by Cao et al. [Chinese J. Acoust. 14, 317 (1995)] and was used in order to computationally visualize the waves in the fluid that have been re-radiated by the shell waves a the critical angle. The frequency range was below that of the lowest Lamb wave, and only the A0 wave (and partly the S0 wave) was observed to re-radiate into the fluid under our assumptions. The results will be compared to experimental results in which the re-radiated waves are optically visualized by the Schardin-Cranz schlieren method.

  11. Manufacturing processes 4 forming

    CERN Document Server

    Klocke, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    This book provides essential information on metal forming, utilizing a practical distinction between bulk and sheet metal forming. In the field of bulk forming, it examines processes of cold, warm and hot bulk forming, as well as rolling and a new addition, the process of thixoforming. As for the field of sheet metal working, on the one hand it deals with sheet metal forming processes (deep drawing, flange forming, stretch drawing, metal spinning and bending). In terms of special processes, the chapters on internal high-pressure forming and high rate forming have been revised and refined. On the other, the book elucidates and presents the state of the art in sheet metal separation processes (shearing and fineblanking). Furthermore, joining by forming has been added to the new edition as a new chapter describing mechanical methods for joining sheet metals. The new chapter “Basic Principles” addresses both sheet metal and bulk forming, in addition to metal physics, plastomechanics and computational basics; ...

  12. EEG, alpha waves and coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascolani, Gianluca

    This thesis addresses some theoretical issues generated by the results of recent analysis of EEG time series proving the brain dynamics are driven by abrupt changes making them depart from the ordinary Poisson condition. These changes are renewal, unpredictable and non-ergodic. We refer to them as crucial events. How is it possible that this form of randomness be compatible with the generation of waves, for instance alpha waves, whose observation seems to suggest the opposite view the brain is characterized by surprisingly extended coherence? To shed light into this apparently irretrievable contradiction we propose a model based on a generalized form of Langevin equation under the influence of a periodic stimulus. We assume that there exist two different forms of time, a subjective form compatible with Poisson statistical physical and an objective form that is accessible to experimental observation. The transition from the former to the latter form is determined by the brain dynamics interpreted as emerging from the cooperative interaction among many units that, in the absence of cooperation would generate Poisson fluctuations. We call natural time the brain internal time and we make the assumption that in the natural time representation the time evolution of the EEG variable y(t) is determined by a Langevin equation perturbed by a periodic process that in this time representation is hardly distinguishable from an erratic process. We show that the representation of this random process in the experimental time scale is characterized by a surprisingly extended coherence. We show that this model generates a sequence of damped oscillations with a time behavior that is remarkably similar to that derived from the analysis of real EEG's. The main result of this research work is that the existence of crucial events is not incompatible with the alpha wave coherence. In addition to this important result, we find another result that may help our group, or any other research

  13. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lamb, Bradford [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Prudell, Joseph [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Hammagren, Erik [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-08-22

    This Project aims to satisfy objectives of the DOE’s Water Power Program by completing a system detailed design (SDD) and other important activities in the first phase of a utility-scale grid-connected ocean wave energy demonstration. In early 2012, Columbia Power (CPwr) had determined that further cost and performance optimization was necessary in order to commercialize its StingRAY wave energy converter (WEC). CPwr’s progress toward commercialization, and the requisite technology development path, were focused on transitioning toward a commercial-scale demonstration. This path required significant investment to be successful, and the justification for this investment required improved annual energy production (AEP) and lower capital costs. Engineering solutions were developed to address these technical and cost challenges, incorporated into a proposal to the US Department of Energy (DOE), and then adapted to form the technical content and statement of project objectives of the resulting Project (DE-EE0005930). Through Project cost-sharing and technical collaboration between DOE and CPwr, and technical collaboration with Oregon State University (OSU), National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) and other Project partners, we have demonstrated experimentally that these conceptual improvements have merit and made significant progress towards a certified WEC system design at a selected and contracted deployment site at the Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) at the Marine Corps Base in Oahu, HI (MCBH).

  14. Reflectors to Focus Wave Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Wave Energy Converters (WEC’s) extract wave energy from a limited area, often a single point or line even though the wave energy is generally spread out along the wave crest. By the use of wave reflectors (reflecting walls) the wave energy is effectively focused and increased by approximately 30......-50%. Clearly longer wave reflectors will focus more wave energy than shorter wave reflectors. Thus the draw back is the increased wave forces for the longer wave reflectors. In the paper a procedure for calculating the energy efficiency and the wave forces on the reflectors are described, this by use of a 3D...... boundary element method. The calculations are verified by laboratory experiments and a very good agreement is found. The paper gives estimates of possible power benefit for different wave reflector geometries and optimal geometrical design parameters are specified. On this basis inventors of WEC’s can...

  15. Wave Equations in Bianchi Space-Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the wave equation in Bianchi type III space-time. We construct a Lagrangian of the model, calculate and classify the Noether symmetry generators, and construct corresponding conserved forms. A reduction of the underlying equations is performed to obtain invariant solutions.

  16. Multisymplectic Geometry for the Seismic Wave Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jing-Bo

    2004-01-01

    The multisymplectic geometry for the seismic wave equation is presented in this paper.The local energy conservation law,the local momentum evolution equations,and the multisymplectic form are derived directly from the variational principle.Based on the covariant Legendre transform,the multisymplectic Hamiltonian formulation is developed.Multisymplectic discretization and numerical experiments are also explored.

  17. Local Tensor Radiation Conditions For Elastic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2001-01-01

    A local boundary condition is formulated, representing radiation of elastic waves from an arbitrary point source. The boundary condition takes the form of a tensor relation between the stress at a point on an arbitrarily oriented section and the velocity and displacement vectors at the point. The...

  18. Wave Mechanics or Wave Statistical Mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    By comparison between equations of motion of geometrical optics and that of classical statistical mechanics, this paper finds that there should be an analogy between geometrical optics and classical statistical mechanics instead of geometrical mechanics and classical mechanics. Furthermore, by comparison between the classical limit of quantum mechanics and classical statistical mechanics, it finds that classical limit of quantum mechanics is classical statistical mechanics not classical mechanics, hence it demonstrates that quantum mechanics is a natural generalization of classical statistical mechanics instead of classical mechanics. Thence quantum mechanics in its true appearance is a wave statistical mechanics instead of a wave mechanics.

  19. Convective Wave Breaking in the KdV Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, Mats K

    2016-01-01

    The KdV equation is a model equation for waves at the surface of an inviscid incompressible fluid, and it is well known that the equation describes the evolution of unidirectional waves of small amplitude and long wavelength fairly accurately if the waves fall into the Boussinesq regime. The KdV equation allows a balance of nonlinear steepening effects and dispersive spreading which leads to the formation of steady wave profiles in the form of solitary waves and cnoidal waves. While these wave profiles are solutions of the KdV equation for any amplitude, it is shown here that there for both the solitary and the cnoidal waves, there are critical amplitudes for which the horizontal component of the particle velocity matches the phase velocity of the wave. Solitary or cnoidal solutions of the KdV equation which surpass these amplitudes feature incipient wave breaking as the particle velocity exceeds the phase velocity near the crest of the wave, and the model breaks down due to violation of the kinematic surface...

  20. Comparison between Full Wave and Ray-Tracing Calculations to Examine Scenarios for Electron Bernstein Wave Heating in LHD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    IGAMI, Hiroe; FUKUYAMA, Atsushi; IDEI, Hiroshi; NAGASAKI, Kazunobu; GOTO, Yuki; KUBO, Shin; SHIMOZUMA, Takashi; YOSHIMURA, Yasuo; TAKAHASHI, Hiromi; TSUJIMURA, Toru I; MAKINO, Ryohei

    2016-01-01

    With the use of the density scale length and the magnetic field strength around the O-X mode conversion region in the LHD for 77 GHz EC waves, the full wave calculations by the TASK/WF2D code have been per formed...

  1. EMS wave logger data processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Waves can be measured in several ways. One way of measuring waves is by measuring the wave pressure at a certain depth using a pressure sensor and calculate the wave information from the pressure record. The EMS wave logger uses a Honeywell MLH 050 PGP 06A pressure sensor. The information is stored

  2. Making waves: visualizing fluid flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweers, Wout; Zwart, Valerie; Bokhove, Onno

    2013-01-01

    We explore the visualization of violent wave dynamics and erosion by waves and jets in laser-cut reliefs, laser engravings, and three-dimensional printing. For this purpose we built table-top experiments to cast breaking waves, and also explored the creation of extreme or rogue waves in larger wave

  3. Theoretical Study of Wave Breaking for Nonlinear Water Waves Propagating on a Sloping Bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Hsu, H. C.; Li, M. S.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, a third-order asymptotic solution in a Lagrangian framework describing nonlinear water wave propagation on the surface of a uniform sloping bottom is presented. A two-parameter perturbation method is used to develop a new mathematical derivation. The particle trajectories, wave pressure and Lagrangian velocity potential are obtained as a function of the nonlinear wave steepness and the bottom slope perturbed to third order. This theoretical solution in Lagrangian form satisfies state of the normal pressure at the free surface. The condition of the conservation of mass flux is examined in detail for the first time. The two important properties in Lagrangian coordinates, Lagrangian wave frequency and Lagrangian mean level, are included in the third-order solution. The solution can also be used to estimate the mean return current for waves progressing over the sloping bottom. The Lagrangian solution untangle the description of the features of wave shoaling in the direction of wave propagation from deep to shallow water, as well as the process of successive deformation of a wave profile and water particle trajectories leading to wave breaking. A series of experiment was conducted to validate the obtained theoretical solution. The proposed solution will be used to determine the wave shoaling and breaking process and the comparisons between the experimental and theoretical results are excellent. For example, the variations of phase velocity on sloping bottom are obtained by 7 set of two close wave gauges and the theoretical result could accurately predict the measured phase velocity. The theoretical wave breaking index can be derived by use of the kinematic stability parameter (K.P.S). The comparisons between the theory, experiment (present study, Iwagali et al.(1974), Deo et al.(2003) and Tsai et al.(2005)) and empirical formula of Goda (2004) for the breaking index(u/C) versus the relative water depth(d/L) under two different bottom slopes shows that the

  4. Rogue wave variational modelling through the interaction of two solitary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidel, Floriane; Bokhove, Onno

    2016-04-01

    The extreme and unexpected characteristics of Rogue waves have made them legendary for centuries. It is only on the 1st of January 1995 that these mariners' tales started to raise scientist's curiosity, when such a wave was recorded in the North Sea; a sudden wall of water hit the Draupner offshore platform, more than twice higher than the other waves, providing evidence of the existence of rogue or freak waves. Since then, studies have shown that these surface gravity waves of high amplitude (at least twice the height of the other sea waves [Dyste et al., 2008]) appear in non-linear dispersive water motion [Drazin and Johnson, 1989], at any depth, and have caused a lot of damage in recent years [Nikolkina and Didenkulova, 2011 ]. So far, most of the studies have tried to determine their probability of occurrence, but no conclusion has been achieved yet, which means that we are currently unenable to predict or avoid these monster waves. An accurate mathematical and numerical water-wave model would enable simulation and observation of this external forcing on boats and offshore structures and hence reduce their threat. In this work, we aim to model rogue waves through a soliton splash generated by the interaction of two solitons coming from different channels at a specific angle. Kodama indeed showed that one way to produce extreme waves is through the intersection of two solitary waves, or one solitary wave and its oblique reflection on a vertical wall [Yeh, Li and Kodama, 2010 ]. While he modelled Mach reflection from Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) theory, we aim to model rogue waves from the three-dimensional potential flow equations and/or their asymptotic equivalent described by Benney and Luke [Benney and Luke, 1964]. These theories have the advantage to allow wave propagation in several directions, which is not the case with KP equations. The initial solitary waves are generated by removing a sluice gate in each channel. The equations are derived through a

  5. Maass Forms and Quantum Modular Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolen, Larry

    This thesis describes several new results in the theory of harmonic Maass forms and related objects. Maass forms have recently led to a flood of applications throughout number theory and combinatorics in recent years, especially following their development by the work of Bruinier and Funke the modern understanding Ramanujan's mock theta functions due to Zwegers. The first of three main theorems discussed in this thesis concerns the integrality properties of singular moduli. These are well-known to be algebraic integers, and they play a beautiful role in complex multiplication and explicit class field theory for imaginary quadratic fields. One can also study "singular moduli" for special non-holomorphic functions, which are algebraic but are not necessarily algebraic integers. Here we will explain the phenomenon of integrality properties and provide a sharp bound on denominators of symmetric functions in singular moduli. The second main theme of the thesis concerns Zagier's recent definition of a quantum modular form. Since their definition in 2010 by Zagier, quantum modular forms have been connected to numerous different topics such as strongly unimodal sequences, ranks, cranks, and asymptotics for mock theta functions. Motivated by Zagier's example of the quantum modularity of Kontsevich's "strange" function F(q), we revisit work of Andrews, Jimenez-Urroz, and Ono to construct a natural vector-valued quantum modular form whose components. The final chapter of this thesis is devoted to a study of asymptotics of mock theta functions near roots of unity. In his famous deathbed letter, Ramanujan introduced the notion of a mock theta function, and he offered some alleged examples. The theory of mock theta functions has been brought to fruition using the framework of harmonic Maass forms, thanks to Zwegers. Despite this understanding, little attention has been given to Ramanujan's original definition. Here we prove that Ramanujan's examples do indeed satisfy his

  6. Deriving nearshore wave climate along South African coast

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rossouw, M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study addressed aspects of the highly interrelated study area of coastal safety and vulnerability, climate change and setback lines for South African coast. A medium resolution numerical wave analysis was undertaken, in the form...

  7. Developing de Broglie Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Johansson J. X.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity v, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed c between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength Λd=vcΛ and phase velocity c2/v+v which resembles directly L. de Broglie’s hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transmitting the particle mass at the speed v and angular frequency Ωd= 2πv/Λd, with Λd and Ωd obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schrödinger equation of an identical system.

  8. Slow frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  9. [Shock waves in orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, G

    1997-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock waves have revolutionized urological stone treatment. Nowadays shock waves are widely used in orthopedics, too. This article reviews the applications of extracorporeal shock waves on bone and adjacent soft tissue. The osteoneogenetic effect of extracorporeal shock waves has been proven and can be used to treat pseudarthrosis with a success rate of around 75%. Shock waves have a positive effect in tennis and golfer's elbow, calcaneal spur, and the complex called "periarthritis humero-scapularis." The mechanism for this is not yet known, and results from large prospective and randomized studies are still lacking. However, the treatment has been performed many thousands of times. In patients in whom conservative treatment has failed surgery used to be the only choice, but its success rate barely exceeds that of shock wave therapy and surgery can still be done if shock wave therapy fails. Extracorporeal shock waves will have an impact on orthopedics comparable to its effect in urology. Scientific evaluations, professional certifications, quality assurance and reimbursement issues present great challenges.

  10. Wave Reflection Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Larsen, Brian Juul

    The investigation concerns the design of a new internal breakwater in the main port of Ibiza. The objective of the model tests was in the first hand to optimize the cross section to make the wave reflection low enough to ensure that unacceptable wave agitation will not occur in the port. Secondly...

  11. Ship bow waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NOBLESSE Francis; DELHOMMEAU Gerard; LIU Hua; WAN De-cheng; YANG Chi

    2013-01-01

    The bow wave generated by a ship hull that advances at constant speed in calm water is considered.The bow wave only depends on the shape of the ship bow (not on the hull geometry aft of the bow wave).This basic property makes it possible to determine the bow waves generated by a canonical family of ship bows defined in terms of relatively few parameters.Fast ships with fine bows generate overturning bow waves that consist of detached thin sheets of water,which are mostly steady until they hit the main free surface and undergo turbulent breaking up and diffusion.However,slow ships with blunt bows create highly unsteady and turbulent breaking bow waves.These two alternative flow regimes are due to a nonlinear constraint related to the Bernoulli relation at the free surface.Recent results about the overturning and breaking bow wave regimes,and the boundary that divides these two basic flow regimes,are reviewed.Questions and conjectures about the energy of breaking ship bow waves,and free-surface effects on flow circulation,are also noted.

  12. The Relativistic Wave Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2009-01-01

    The Lorentz transformation applies directly to the kinematics of moving particles viewed as geometric points. Wave propagation, on the other hand, involves moving planes which are extended objects defined by simultaneity. By treating a plane wave as a geometric object moving at the phase velocity, novel results are obtained that illustrate the…

  13. Dyakonov surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Crasovan, Lucian Cornel; Johansen, Steffen Kjær

    2008-01-01

    The interface of two semi-infinite media, where at least one of them is a birefringent crystal, supports a special type of surface wave that was predicted theoretically by D'yakonov in 1988. Since then, the properties of such waves, which exist in transparent media only under very special conditi...

  14. Gravitational waves from inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetti, M. C.; Bartolo, N.; Liguori, M.; Matarrese, S.

    2016-09-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between tensor-to-scalar ratio r and tensor spectral index nT. In light of the prospects for (directly/indirectly) detecting primordial gravitational waves, we give the expected present-day gravitational radiation spectral energy-density, highlighting the main characteristics imprinted by the cosmic thermal history, and we outline the signatures left by gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background and some imprints in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe. Finally, current bounds and prospects of detection for inflationary gravitational waves are summarized.

  15. Weak Turbulence in the Magnetosphere: Formation of Whistler Wave Cavity by Nonlinear Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Crabtree, C; Ganguli, G; Mithaiwala, M; Galinsky, V; Shevchenko, V

    2011-01-01

    We consider the weak turbulence of whistler waves in the in low-\\beta\\ inner magnetosphere of the Earth. Whistler waves with frequencies, originating in the ionosphere, propagate radially outward and can trigger nonlinear induced scattering by thermal electrons provided the wave energy density is large enough. Nonlinear scattering can substantially change the direction of the wave vector of whistler waves and hence the direction of energy flux with only a small change in the frequency. A portion of whistler waves return to the ionosphere with a smaller perpendicular wave vector resulting in diminished linear damping and enhanced ability to pitch-angle scatter trapped electrons. In addition, a portion of the scattered wave packets can be reflected near the ionosphere back into the magnetosphere. Through multiple nonlinear scatterings and ionospheric reflections a long-lived wave cavity containing turbulent whistler waves can be formed with the appropriate properties to efficiently pitch-angle scatter trapped e...

  16. Risk Analysis of Breakwater Caisson Under Wave Attack Using Load Surface Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Hyawn KIM

    2014-01-01

    A new load surface based approach to the reliability analysis of caisson-type breakwater is proposed. Uncertainties of the horizontal and vertical wave loads acting on breakwater are considered by using the so-called load surfaces, which can be estimated as functions of wave height, water level, and so on. Then, the first-order reliability method (FORM) can be applied to determine the probability of failure under the wave action. In this way, the reliability analysis of breakwaters with uncertainties both in wave height and in water level is possible. Moreover, the uncertainty in wave breaking can be taken into account by considering a random variable for wave height ratio which relates the significant wave height to the maximum wave height. The proposed approach is applied numerically to the reliability analysis of caisson breakwater under wave attack that may undergo partial or full wave breaking.

  17. Ion Acoustic Waves in the Presence of Electron Plasma Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave.......Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave....

  18. Project GlobWave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busswell, Geoff; Ash, Ellis; Piolle, Jean-Francois; Poulter, David J. S.; Snaith, Helen; Collard, Fabrice; Sheera, Harjit; Pinnock, Simon

    2010-12-01

    The ESA GlobWave project is a three year initiative, funded by ESA and CNES, to service the needs of satellite wave product users across the globe. Led by Logica UK, with support from CLS, IFREMER, SatOC and NOCS, the project will provide free access to satellite wave data and products in a common format, both historical and in near real time, from various European and American SAR and altimeter missions. Building on the successes of similar projects for Sea Surface Temperature and ocean colour, the project aims to stimulate increased use and analysis of satellite wave products. In addition to common-format satellite data the project will provide comparisons with in situ measurements, interactive data analysis tools and a pilot spatial wave forecast verification scheme for operational forecast production centres. The project will begin operations in January 2010, with direction from regular structured user consultation.

  19. Wave Reflection Coefficient Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞聿修; 邵利民; 柳淑学

    2003-01-01

    The wave reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and directional spectrum for concrete face slope breakwaters and rubble mound breakwaters are investigated through physical model tests in the present study. The reflection coefficients of oblique irregular waves are analyzed by the Modified Two-Point Method (MTPM) proposed by the authors. The results show that the wave reflection coefficient decreases with increasing wave frequency and incident angle or decreasing structure slope. The reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and its variation with Iribarren number are given in this paper. The paper also suggests an empirical 3-dimensional reflection coefficient spectrum, i.e. reflection coefficient directional spectrum, which can be used to illustrate quantitatively the variation of reflection coefficient with the incident angle and the Iribarren number for oblique irregular waves.

  20. Gravitational waves from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Guzzetti, Maria Chiara; Liguori, Michele; Matarrese, Sabino

    2016-01-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power-spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between t...

  1. Electromagnetic wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave energy is converted into electric power with an array of mutually insulated electromagnetic wave absorber elements each responsive to an electric field component of the wave as it impinges thereon. Each element includes a portion tapered in the direction of wave propagation to provide a relatively wideband response spectrum. Each element includes an output for deriving a voltage replica of the electric field variations intercepted by it. Adjacent elements are positioned relative to each other so that an electric field subsists between adjacent elements in response to the impinging wave. The electric field results in a voltage difference between adjacent elements that is fed to a rectifier to derive dc output power.

  2. Efficient counter-propagating wave acoustic micro-particle manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinenko, A.; Ong, C. K.; Courtney, C. R. P.; Wilcox, P. D.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2012-12-01

    A simple acoustic system consisting of a pair of parallel singe layered piezoelectric transducers submerged in a fluid used to form standing waves by a superposition of two counter-propagating waves is reported. The nodal positions of the standing wave are controlled by applying a variable phase difference to the transducers. This system was used to manipulate polystyrene micro-beads trapped at the nodal positions of the standing wave. The demonstrated good manipulation capability of the system is based on a lowering of the reflection coefficient in a narrow frequency band near the through-thickness resonance of the transducer plates.

  3. Gravitational Collapse of Gravitational Waves in 3D Numerical Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Alcubierre, M; Brügmann, B; Lanfermann, G; Seidel, E; Suen, W M; Tobias, M; Alcubierre, Miguel; Allen, Gabrielle; Bruegmann, Bernd; Lanfermann, Gerd; Seidel, Edward; Suen, Wai-Mo; Tobias, Malcolm

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that evolutions of three-dimensional, strongly non-linear gravitational waves can be followed in numerical relativity, hence allowing many interesting studies of both fundamental and observational consequences. We study the evolution of time-symmetric, axisymmetric {\\it and} non-axisymmetric Brill waves, including waves so strong that they collapse to form black holes under their own self-gravity. The critical amplitude for black hole formation is determined. The gravitational waves emitted in the black hole formation process are compared to those emitted in the head-on collision of two Misner black holes.

  4. Freely decaying weak turbulence for sea surface gravity waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M; Osborne, A R; Serio, M; Resio, D; Pushkarev, A; Zakharov, V E; Brandini, C

    2002-09-30

    We study the long-time evolution of deep-water ocean surface waves in order to better understand the behavior of the nonlinear interaction processes that need to be accurately predicted in numerical models of wind-generated ocean surface waves. Of particular interest are those nonlinear interactions which are predicted by weak turbulence theory to result in a wave energy spectrum of the form of [k](-2.5). We numerically implement the primitive Euler equations for surface waves and demonstrate agreement between weak turbulence theory and the numerical results.

  5. Low-frequency fluid waves in fractures and pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korneev, Valeri

    2010-09-01

    Low-frequency analytical solutions have been obtained for phase velocities of symmetrical fluid waves within both an infinite fracture and a pipe filled with a viscous fluid. Three different fluid wave regimes can exist in such objects, depending on the various combinations of parameters, such as fluid density, fluid viscosity, walls shear modulus, channel thickness, and frequency. Equations for velocities of all these regimes have explicit forms and are verified by comparisons with the exact solutions. The dominant role of fractures in rock permeability at field scales and the strong amplitude and frequency effects of Stoneley guided waves suggest the importance of including these wave effects into poroelastic theories.

  6. Effects of Schwarzschild Geometry on Isothermal Plasma Wave Dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of isothermal plasma waves has been analyzed near the Schwarzschild horizon. We consider a non-rotating background with non-magnetized and magnetized plasmas. The general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations for the Schwarzschild planar analogue spacetime with an isothermal state of the plasma are formulated. The perturbed form of these equations is linearized and Fourier analyzed by introducing simple harmonic waves. The determinant of these equations in each case leads to a complex dispersion relation, which gives complex values of the wave number. This has been used to discuss the nature of the waves and their characteristics near the horizon.

  7. Filtering of elastic waves by opal-based hypersonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasyuk, Alexey S; Scherbakov, Alexey V; Yakovlev, Dmitri R; Akimov, Andrey V; Kaplyanskii, Alexander A; Kaplan, Saveliy F; Grudinkin, Sergey A; Nashchekin, Alexey V; Pevtsov, Alexander B; Golubev, Valery G; Berstermann, Thorsten; Brüggemann, Christian; Bombeck, Michael; Bayer, Manfred

    2010-04-14

    We report experiments in which high quality silica opal films are used as three-dimensional hypersonic crystals in the 10 GHz range. Controlled sintering of these structures leads to well-defined elastic bonding between the submicrometer-sized silica spheres, due to which a band structure for elastic waves is formed. The sonic crystal properties are studied by injection of a broadband elastic wave packet with a femtosecond laser. Depending on the elastic bonding strength, the band structure separates long-living surface acoustic waves with frequencies in the complete band gap from bulk waves with band frequencies that propagate into the crystal leading to a fast decay.

  8. Parabolic Wave Equation for Surface Water Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    extended to wave propagation problems in other fields of physical sciences, such as nonlinear optics ( Svelto , 1974), plasma physics (Karpman, 1975...34 Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 72, pp. 373-384. Svelto , 0., 1974, Progress in Optics, North-Holland Pub., Chapter 1, pp. 1-51. Tappert, F.D., 1977, "The

  9. Colloidal solitary waves with temperature dependent compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, A.; Marchant, T. R.

    2014-05-01

    Spatial solitary waves which form in colloidal suspensions of dielectric nanoparticles are considered. The interactions, or compressibility, of the colloidal particles, is modelled using a series in the particle density, or packing fraction, where the virial, or series, coefficients depend on the type of particle interaction model. Both the theoretical hard disk and sphere repulsive models, and a model with temperature dependent compressibility, are considered. Experimental results show that particle interactions can be temperature dependent and either repulsive or attractive in nature, so we model the second virial coefficient using a physically realistic temperature power law. One- and two-dimensional semi-analytical colloidal solitary wave solutions are found. Trial functions, based on the form of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation soliton, are used, together with averaging, to develop the semi-analytical solutions. When the background packing fraction is low, the one-dimensional solitary waves have three solutions branches (with a bistable regime) while the two-dimensional solitary waves have two solution branches, with a single stable branch. The temperature dependent second virial coefficient results in changes to the solitary wave properties and the parameter space, in which multiple solutions branches occur. An excellent comparison is found between the semi-analytical and numerical solutions.

  10. Investigation of Wave Transmission from a Floating Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the calibration of the MIKE21BW model against the measured wave height reduction behind a 24 kW/m Wave Dragon (WD) wave energy converter. A numerical model is used to determine the wave transmission through the floating WD in varying wave conditions. The transmission obtained...

  11. Elimination of Spiral Waves and Competition between Travelling Wave Impulses and Spiral Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Guo-Yong; ZHANG Guang-Cai; WANG Guang-Rui; CHEN Shi-Gang; SUN Peng

    2005-01-01

    @@ The interaction between travelling wave impulses and spiral waves is studied and the results of their competition are related to the exciting period. From the results, it is known that the formation and development of spiral waves in cardiac tissue depend on the period by which the travelling wave impulses are excited. A method is proposed to eliminate spiral waves, which is easily operated.

  12. The Wave Function and Quantum Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shan

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the meaning of the wave function by analyzing the mass and charge density distribution of a quantum system. According to protective measurement, a charged quantum system has mass and charge density proportional to the modulus square of its wave function. It is shown that the mass and charge density is not real but effective, and it is formed by the ergodic motion of a localized particle with the total mass and charge of the system. Moreover, it is argued that the ergodic motion is not continuous but discontinuous and random. This result suggests a new interpretation of the wave function, according to which the wave function is a description of random discontinuous motion of particles, and the modulus square of the wave function gives the probability density of the particles being in certain locations. It is shown that the suggested interpretation of the wave function disfavors the de Broglie-Bohm theory and the many-worlds interpretation but favors the dynamical collapse theories, and the rando...

  13. Propagation of a constant velocity fission wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinert, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The ideal nuclear fuel cycle would require no enrichment, minimize the need fresh uranium, and produce few, if any, transuranic elements. Importantly, the latter goal would be met without the reprocessing. For purely physical reasons, no reactor system or fuel cycle can meet all of these objectives. However, a traveling-wave reactor, if feasible, could come remarkably close. The concept is simple: a large cylinder of natural (or depleted) uranium is subjected to a fast neutron source at one end, the neutrons would transmute the uranium downstream and produce plutonium. If the conditions were right, a self-sustaining fission wave would form, producing yet more neutrons which would breed more plutonium and leave behind little more than short-lived fission products. Numerical studies have shown that fission waves of this type are also possible. We have derived an exact solution for the propagation velocity of a fission wave through fertile material. The results show that these waves fall into a class of traveling wave phenomena that have been encountered in other systems. The solution places a strict conditions on the shapes of the flux, diffusive, and reactive profiles that would be required for such a phenomenon to persist. The results are confirmed numerically.

  14. Journal and Wave Bearing Impedance Calculation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanford, Amanda; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The wave bearing software suite is a MALTA application that computes bearing properties for user-specified wave bearing conditions, as well as plain journal bearings. Wave bearings are fluid film journal bearings with multi-lobed wave patterns around the circumference of the bearing surface. In this software suite, the dynamic coefficients are outputted in a way for easy implementation in a finite element model used in rotor dynamics analysis. The software has a graphical user interface (GUI) for inputting bearing geometry parameters, and uses MATLAB s structure interface for ease of interpreting data. This innovation was developed to provide the stiffness and damping components of wave bearing impedances. The computational method for computing bearing coefficients was originally designed for plain journal bearings and tilting pad bearings. Modifications to include a wave bearing profile consisted of changing the film thickness profile given by an equation, and writing an algorithm to locate the integration limits for each fluid region. Careful consideration was needed to implement the correct integration limits while computing the dynamic coefficients, depending on the form of the input/output variables specified in the algorithm.

  15. Fornemmelse for form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skude, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    Om den arkitektoniske forms afhængighed af aerodynamik, solens nedbrydning og optimering af materialers holdbarhed.......Om den arkitektoniske forms afhængighed af aerodynamik, solens nedbrydning og optimering af materialers holdbarhed....

  16. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  17. Nearby Stars as Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Sun-like stellar oscillations are excited by turbulent convection and have been discovered in some 500 main-sequence and sub-giant stars and in more than 12,000 red giant stars. When such stars are near gravitational wave sources, low-order quadrupole acoustic modes are also excited above the experimental threshold of detectability, and they can be observed, in principle, in the acoustic spectra of these stars. Such stars form a set of natural detectors to search for gravitational waves over a large spectral frequency range, from {10}-7 to {10}-2 Hz. In particular, these stars can probe the {10}-6-{10}-4 Hz spectral window which cannot be probed by current conventional gravitational wave detectors, such as the Square Kilometre Array and Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The Planetary Transits and Oscillations of State (PLATO) stellar seismic mission will achieve photospheric velocity amplitude accuracy of {cm} {{{s}}}-1. For a gravitational wave search, we will need to achieve accuracies of the order of {10}-2 {cm} {{{s}}}-1, i.e., at least one generation beyond PLATO. However, we have found that multi-body stellar systems have the ideal setup for this type of gravitational wave search. This is the case for triple stellar systems formed by a compact binary and an oscillating star. Continuous monitoring of the oscillation spectra of these stars to a distance of up to a kpc could lead to the discovery of gravitational waves originating in our galaxy or even elsewhere in the universe. Moreover, unlike experimental detectors, this observational network of stars will allow us to study the progression of gravitational waves throughout space.

  18. FORMS OF YOUTH TRAVEL

    OpenAIRE

    Moisã Claudia Olimpia

    2011-01-01

    Taking into account the suite of motivation that youth has when practicing tourism, it can be said that the youth travel takes highly diverse forms. These forms are educational tourism, volunteer programs and “work and travel”, cultural exchanges or sports tourism and adventure travel. In this article, we identified and analyzed in detail the main forms of youth travel both internationally and in Romania. We also illustrated for each form of tourism the specific tourism products targeting you...

  19. Forms in Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Paula

    1998-01-01

    Uses the work of M. C. Escher to instruct upper elementary students in the transformation of flat shape into three-dimensional form. Outlines the lesson as a series of sections: (1) reviewing form drawing; (2) creating three-dimensional effects; (3) imagining the forms in an inhabited world; and (4) using color and shading. (DSK)

  20. Mesonic Form Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederic D. R. Bonnet; Robert G. Edwards; George T. Fleming; Randal Lewis; David Richards

    2003-07-22

    We have started a program to compute the electromagnetic form factors of mesons. We discuss the techniques used to compute the pion form factor and present preliminary results computed with domain wall valence fermions on MILC asqtad lattices, as well as Wilson fermions on quenched lattices. These methods can easily be extended to rho-to-gamma-pi transition form factors.

  1. Abnormal Waves Modelled as Second-order Conditional Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents results for the expected second order short-crested wave conditional of a given wave crest at a specific point in time and space. The analysis is based on the second order Sharma and Dean shallow water wave theory. Numerical results showing the importance of the spectral density......, the water depth and the directional spreading on the conditional mean wave profile are presented. Application of conditional waves to model and explain abnormal waves, e.g. the well-known New Year Wave measured at the Draupner platform January 1st 1995, is discussed. Whereas the wave profile can be modelled...... quite well by the second order conditional wave including directional spreading and finite water depth the probability to encounter such a wave is still, however, extremely rare. The use of the second order conditional wave as initial condition to a fully non-linear three-dimensional analysis...

  2. Estimation of Wave Forces on Large Compliant Platforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirzaie Sefat S; Ketabdari M. J

    2009-01-01

    Compliant offshore structures such as spars, tension leg platforms (TLPs) and semi-submersibles have been dramatically improved in recent years due to their capability for deep water operation. Waves are the most important environmental phenomenon affecting these offshore structures. Estimation of wave forces is vital in offshore structure design. For large compliant offshore plat-forms, Morrison's equation is not valid anymore and usually diffraction theory is used. In this research, by using the finite difference method, a detailed analysis of the first-order diffraction of monochromatic waves on a large cylinder as a structural element is per-formed to solve the radiation and diffraction potentials. The results showed that the developed model is a reliable tool to estimate the wave forces and hydrodynamic coefficients on large structure elements when wave diffraction and radiation are considered.

  3. Artificial excitation of ELF waves with frequency of Schumann resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Guido, T.; Tulegenov, B.; Labenski, J.; Chang, C.-L.

    2014-11-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance. Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range 7.8-8.0 Hz when the ionosphere has a strong F layer, the frequency of the HF radiation is in the range 3.20-4.57 MHz, and the electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the ionosphere.

  4. Wave phenomena in sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhner-Böttcher, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Context: The dynamic atmosphere of the Sun exhibits a wealth of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In the presence of strong magnetic fields, most spectacular and powerful waves evolve in the sunspot atmosphere. Allover the sunspot area, continuously propagating waves generate strong oscillations in spectral intensity and velocity. The most prominent and fascinating phenomena are the 'umbral flashes' and 'running penumbral waves' as seen in the sunspot chromosphere. Their nature and relation have been under intense discussion in the last decades. Aims: Waves are suggested to propagate upward along the magnetic field lines of sunspots. An observational study is performed to prove or disprove the field-guided nature and coupling of the prevalent umbral and penumbral waves. Comprehensive spectroscopic observations at high resolution shall provide new insights into the wave characteristics and distribution across the sunspot atmosphere. Methods: Two prime sunspot observations were carried out with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory in New Mexico and with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Teide Observatory on Tenerife. The two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were performed with the interferometric spectrometers IBIS and TESOS. Multiple spectral lines are scanned co-temporally to sample the dynamics at the photospheric and chromospheric layers. The time series (1 - 2.5 h) taken at high spatial and temporal resolution are analyzed according to their evolution in spectral intensities and Doppler velocities. A wavelet analysis was used to obtain the wave power and dominating wave periods. A reconstruction of the magnetic field inclination based on sunspot oscillations was developed. Results and conclusions: Sunspot oscillations occur continuously in spectral intensity and velocity. The obtained wave characteristics of umbral flashes and running penumbral waves strongly support the scenario of slow-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagation along the

  5. Linear and nonlinear propagation of water wave groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, W. J., Jr.; Donelan, M. A.; Hui, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the evolution of waveforms with known analytical group shapes, in the form of both transient wave groups and the cloidal (cn) and dnoidal (dn) wave trains as derived from the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The waveforms were generated in a long wind-wave tank of the Canada Centre for Inland Waters. It was found that the low-amplitude transients behaved as predicted by the linear theory and that the cn and dn wave trains of moderate steepness behaved almost as predicted by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. Some of the results did not fit into any of the available theories for waves on water, but they provide important insight on how actual groups of waves propagate and on higher-order effects for a transient waveform.

  6. Wave Optics in Black Hole Spacetimes: Schwarzschild Case

    CERN Document Server

    Nambu, Yasusada

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the wave optics in the Schwarzschild spacetime. Applying the standard formalism of wave scattering problems, the Green function represented by the sum over the partial waves is evaluated using the Poisson sum formula. The effect of orbiting scattering due to the unstable circular orbit for null rays is taken into account as the contribution of the Regge poles of the scattering matrix and the asymptotic form of the scattering wave is obtained in the eikonal limit. Using this wave function, images of the black hole illuminated by a point source are reconstructed. We also discuss the wave effect in the frequency domain caused by the interference between the direct rays and the winding rays.

  7. Wave propagation in nanostructures nonlocal continuum mechanics formulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalakrishnan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Wave Propagation in Nanostructures describes the fundamental and advanced concepts of waves propagating in structures that have dimensions of the order of nanometers. The book is fundamentally based on non-local elasticity theory, which includes scale effects in the continuum model. The book predominantly addresses wave behavior in carbon nanotubes and graphene structures, although the methods of analysis provided in this text are equally applicable to other nanostructures. The book takes the reader from the fundamentals of wave propagation in nanotubes to more advanced topics such as rotating nanotubes, coupled nanotubes, and nanotubes with magnetic field and surface effects. The first few chapters cover the basics of wave propagation, different modeling schemes for nanostructures and introduce non-local elasticity theories, which form the building blocks for understanding the material provided in later chapters. A number of interesting examples are provided to illustrate the important features of wave behav...

  8. Opportunities for shear energy scaling in bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Sumy; Hueting, Raymond J E

    2014-10-01

    An important energy loss contribution in bulk acoustic wave resonators is formed by so-called shear waves, which are transversal waves that propagate vertically through the devices with a horizontal motion. In this work, we report for the first time scaling of the shear-confined spots, i.e., spots containing a high concentration of shear wave displacement, controlled by the frame region width at the edge of the resonator. We also demonstrate a novel methodology to arrive at an optimum frame region width for spurious mode suppression and shear wave confinement. This methodology makes use of dispersion curves obtained from finite-element method (FEM) eigenfrequency simulations for arriving at an optimum frame region width. The frame region optimization is demonstrated for solidly mounted resonators employing several shear wave optimized reflector stacks. Finally, the FEM simulation results are compared with measurements for resonators with Ta2O5/ SiO2 stacks showing suppression of the spurious modes.

  9. Wave propagation in a magneto-electro- elastic plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The wave propagation in a magneto-electro-elastic plate was studied. Some new characteristics were discovered: the guided waves are classified in the forms of the Quasi-P, Quasi-SV and Quasi-SH waves and arranged by the standing wavenumber; there are many patterns for the physical property of the magneto-electro-elastic dielectric medium influencing the stress wave propagation. We proposed a self-adjoint method, by which the guided-wave restriction condition was derived. After the corresponding orthogonal sets were found, the analytic dispersion equa-tion was obtained. In the end, an example was presented. The dispersive spectrum, the group velocity curved face and the steady-state response curve of a mag-neto-electro-elastic plate were plotted. Then the wave propagations affected by the induced electric and magnetic fields were analyzed.

  10. Direct exit-wave reconstruction from a single defocused image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A J; Martin, A V; D'Alfonso, A J; Putkunz, C T; Allen, L J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a direct, non-iterative method for the exact recovery of the complex wave in the exit-surface plane of a coherently illuminated object from a single defocused image. The method is applicable for a wide range of illumination conditions. The defocus range is subject to certain conditions, which if satisfied allow the complex exit-surface wave to be directly recovered by solving a set of linear equations. These linear equations, whose coefficients depend on the incident illumination, are obtained by analyzing the autocorrelation function of an auxiliary wave which is related to the exit-surface wave in a simple way. This autocorrelation is constructed by taking the inverse Fourier transform of the defocused image. We present an experimental proof of concept by recovering the exit-surface wave of a microfiber illuminated by a plane wave formed using a HeNe laser.

  11. Statistical model on the surface elevation of waves with breaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the surface wind drift layer with constant momentum flux, two sets of the consistent surface eleva- tion expressions with breaking and occurrence conditions for breaking are deduced from the first in- tegrals of the energy and vortex variations and the kinetic and mathematic breaking criterions, then the expression of the surface elevation with wave breaking is established by using the Heaviside function. On the basis of the form of the sea surface elevation with wave breaking and the understanding of small slope sea waves, a triple composite function of real sea waves is presented including the func- tions for the breaking, weak-nonlinear and basic waves. The expression of the triple composite func- tion and the normal distribution of basic waves are the expected theoretical model for surface elevation statistics.

  12. Magnetoacoustic waves in a partially ionized two-fluid plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Compressible disturbances propagate in a plasma in the form of magnetoacoustic waves driven by both gas pressure and magnetic forces. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of ionized and neutral species are coupled due to ion-neutral collisions. As a consequence, magnetoacoustic waves propagating through a partially ionized medium are affected by the ion-neutral coupling. The degree to which the behavior of the classic waves is modified depends on the physical properties of the various species and on the relative value of the wave frequency compared to the ion-neutral collision frequency. Here, we perform a comprehensive theoretical investigation of magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma using the two-fluid formalism. We consider an extensive range of values for the collision frequency, ionization ratio, and plasma $\\beta$, so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of astrophysical plasmas. We determine the modification of the wave frequencies and study the frictional da...

  13. Gravitational wave stress tensor from the linearised field equations

    CERN Document Server

    Balbus, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    A conserved stress energy tensor for weak field gravitational waves in standard general relativity is derived directly from the linearised wave equation alone, for an arbitrary gauge. The form of the tensor leads directly to the classical expression for the outgoing wave energy in any harmonic gauge. The method described here, however, is a much simpler, shorter, and more physically motivated approach than is the customary procedure, which involves a lengthy and cumbersome second-order (in wave-amplitude) calculation starting with the Einstein tensor. Our method has the added advantage of exhibiting the direct coupling between the outgoing energy flux in gravitational waves and the work done by the gravitational field on the sources. For nonharmonic gauges, the derived wave stress tensor has an index asymmetry. This coordinate artefact may be removed by techniques similar to those used in classical electrodynamics (where this issue also arises), but only by appeal to a more lengthy calculation. For any harmon...

  14. Elastic-wave generation in the evolution of displacement peaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, V.P.; Boldin, A.A.

    1988-06-01

    This paper investigated the character of elastic shock wave generation and damping in irradiated materials along with the possibility of their long-range influence on the structure of the irradiated materials. Dispersion at the elastoplastic stage of atomic displacement peak development was taken into account. The three-dimensional nonlinear wave was described by an equation in the approximation of weak nonlinearity and weak spatial dispersion. Numerical modeling of the propagation of a plane shock wave in a crystal lattice was conducted. The distribution of the density and mass velocity of the material at the instant of complete damping of the plastic shock-wave component was determined. The appearance of solitary waves (solitons) at large amplitudes, localized in space, which propagate without distortion to arbitrary distances and retain their amplitude and form in interacting with one another, was investigated. Some physical consequences of the influence of solitary waves on the irradiated materials were considered.

  15. Wave optics in black hole spacetimes: the Schwarzschild case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambu, Yasusada; Noda, Sousuke

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the wave optics in the Schwarzschild spacetime. Applying the standard formalism of wave-scattering problems, the Green function represented by the sum over the partial waves is evaluated using the Poisson sum formula. The effect of orbiting scattering due to the unstable circular orbit for null rays is taken into account as the contribution of the Regge poles of the scattering matrix and the asymptotic form of the scattering wave is obtained in the eikonal limit. Using this wave function, images of the black hole illuminated by a point source are reconstructed. We also discuss the wave effect in the frequency domain caused by the interference between the direct and the winding rays.

  16. Doppler-cancelled response to VLF gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporali, A.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of long periodic gravitational waves with a three link microwave system known as the Doppler Cancelling System is discussed. This system, which was developed for a gravitational redshift experiment, uses one-way and two-way Doppler informatin to construct the beat signal of two reference oscillators moving with respect to each other. The geometric optics approximation is used to derive the frequency shift produced on a light signal propagating in a gravitational wave space-time. The signature left on the Doppler-cancelled beat by burst and continuous gravitational waves is analyzed. A comparison is made between the response to gravitational waves of the Doppler Cancelling System and that of a Doppler tracking system which employs two-way, round-trip radio waves. A three-fold repetition of the gravitational wave form is found to be a common feature of the response functions of both systems. These two functions otherwise exhibit interesting differences.

  17. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmood, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter $H_{e}$ which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

  18. Existence,Orbital Stability and Instability of Solitary Waves for Coupled BBM Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-wei Cui

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the orbital stability/instability of solitary waves for coupled BBM equations which have Hamiltonian form.The explicit solitary wave solutions will be worked out first.Then by detailed spectral analysis and decaying estimates of solutions for the initial value problem,we obtain the orbital stability/instability of solitary waves.

  19. Enhanced localization of Dyakonov-like surface waves in left-handed materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crasovan, L. C.; Takayama, O.; Artigas, D.

    2006-01-01

    We address the existence and properties of hybrid surface waves forming at interfaces between left-handed materials and dielectric birefringent media. The existence conditions of such waves are found to be highly relaxed in comparison to Dyakonov waves existing in right-handed media. We show that...

  20. Modulational instability in wind-forced waves

    CERN Document Server

    Brunetti, Maura

    2014-01-01

    We consider the wind-forced nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation obtained in the potential flow framework when the Miles growth rate is of the order of the wave steepness. In this case, the form of the wind-forcing terms gives rise to the enhancement of the modulational instability and to a band of positive gain with infinite width. This regime is characterised by the fact that the ratio between wave momentum and norm is not a constant of motion, in contrast to what happens in the standard case where the Miles growth rate is of the order of the steepness squared.

  1. Pulse Wave Velocity in the Carotid Artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jensen, Julie Brinck; Udesen, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    The pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the carotid artery (CA) has been estimated based on ultrasound data collected by the experimental scanner RASMUS at DTU. Data is collected from one test subject using a frame rate (FR) of 4000 Hz. The influence of FRs is also investigated. The PWV is calculated from...... distension wave forms (DWF) estimated using cross-correlation. The obtained velocities give results in the area between 3-4 m/s, and the deviations between estimated PWV from two beats of a pulse are around 10%. The results indicate that the method presented is applicable for detecting the local PWV...

  2. Oblique Water Wave Diffraction by a Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolai P.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the problem of diffraction of an obliquely incident surface water wave train on an obstacle in the form of a finite step. Havelock expansions of water wave potentials are used in the mathematical analysis to obtain the physical parameters reflection and transmission coefficients in terms of integrals. Appropriate multi-term Galerkin approximations involving ultraspherical Gegenbauer polynomials are utilized to obtain a very accurate numerical estimate for reflection and transmission coefficients which are depicted graphically. From these figures various interesting results are discussed.

  3. Oblique Water Wave Diffraction by a Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolai, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of diffraction of an obliquely incident surface water wave train on an obstacle in the form of a finite step. Havelock expansions of water wave potentials are used in the mathematical analysis to obtain the physical parameters reflection and transmission coefficients in terms of integrals. Appropriate multi-term Galerkin approximations involving ultraspherical Gegenbauer polynomials are utilized to obtain a very accurate numerical estimate for reflection and transmission coefficients which are depicted graphically. From these figures various interesting results are discussed.

  4. Linear and Nonlinear Surface Waves in Electrohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Matthew; Vanden-broeck, Jean-Marc; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    2015-01-01

    The problem of interest in this article are waves on a layer of finite depth governed by the Euler equations in the presence of gravity, surface tension, and vertical electric fields. Perturbation theory is used to identify canonical scalings and to derive a Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation withan additional non-local term arising in interfacial electrohydrodynamics.When the Bond number is equal to 1/3, dispersion disappears and shock waves could potentially form. In the additional limit of vanishing electric fields, a new evolution equation is obtained which contains third and fifth-order dispersion as well as a non-local electric field term.

  5. Support grid with integral inclined waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, W.H.

    1991-06-18

    This paper describes improvement in a fuel element support grid for supporting a plurality of nuclear fuel elements intermediate their ends in spaced relation for fluid flow therebetween. The grid including a polygonal perimeter and a plurality of fuel element compartments defined by pairs of first and second intersecting and slottedly interlocked wave defining grid-forming strips attached to the perimeter and to each other. The improvement comprises: at least some of the strips having its waves defined by bends at spring bases inclined from the vertical and at least some of the strips having spring cantilevered into the compartments from the strips.

  6. Symmetric waves are traveling waves for a shallow water equation for surface waves of moderate amplitude

    OpenAIRE

    Geyer, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Following a general principle introduced by Ehrnstr\\"{o}m et.al. we prove that for an equation modeling the free surface evolution of moderate amplitude waves in shallow water, all symmetric waves are traveling waves.

  7. Symmetric waves are traveling waves for a shallow water equation for surface waves of moderate amplitude

    OpenAIRE

    Geyer, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Following a general principle introduced by Ehrnstr\\"{o}m et.al. we prove that for an equation modeling the free surface evolution of moderate amplitude waves in shallow water, all symmetric waves are traveling waves.

  8. Demonstration of Shear Waves, Lamb Waves, and Rayleigh Waves by Mode Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    Introduces an experiment that can be demonstrated in the classroom to show that shear waves, Rayleigh waves, and Lamb waves can be easily generated and observed by means of mode conversion. (Author/CS)

  9. A relationship between wave steepness and wave age for wind waves in deep water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin; DING Yun; GUAN Changlong

    2007-01-01

    Studying the relationship between wave steepness and wave age is import ant for describing wind wave growth with energy balance equation of significant waves. After invoking the dispersion relation of surface gravity wave in deep water, a new relationship between wave steepness and wave age is revealed based on the "3/2-power law" (Toba, 1972), in which wave steepness is a function of wave age with a drag coefficient as a parameter. With a given wave age, a larger drag coefficient would lead to larger wave steepness. This could be interpreted as the result of interaction between wind and waves.Comparing with previous relationships, the newly proposed one is more consistent with observational data in field and laboratory.

  10. Violent breaking wave impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Peregrine, D.H.; Bullock, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    for a homogeneous mixture of incompressible liquid and ideal gas. This enables a numerical description of both trapped air pockets and the propagation of pressure shock waves through the aerated water. An exact Riemann solver is developed to permit a finite-volume solution to the flow model with smallest possible...... local error. The high pressures measured during wave impacts on a breakwater are reproduced and it is shown that trapped air can be compressed to a pressure of several atmospheres. Pressure shock waves, reflected off nearby surfaces such as the seabed, can lead to pressures comparable with those...

  11. Vibrations and waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kaliski, S

    2013-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive overview of wave phenomena in different media with interacting mechanical, electromagnetic and other fields. Equations describing wave propagation in linear and non-linear elastic media are followed by equations of rheological models, models with internal rotational degrees of freedom and non-local interactions. Equations for coupled fields: thermal, elastic, electromagnetic, piezoelectric, and magneto-spin with adequate boundary conditions are also included. Together with its companion volume Vibrations and Waves. Part A: Vibrations this work provides a wealth

  12. Relativistic wave mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Corinaldesi, Ernesto

    1963-01-01

    Geared toward advanced undergraduate and graduate students of physics, this text provides readers with a background in relativistic wave mechanics and prepares them for the study of field theory. The treatment originated as a series of lectures from a course on advanced quantum mechanics that has been further amplified by student contributions.An introductory section related to particles and wave functions precedes the three-part treatment. An examination of particles of spin zero follows, addressing wave equation, Lagrangian formalism, physical quantities as mean values, translation and rotat

  13. Chiral Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Srimoyee

    2016-01-01

    We study shock waves in relativistic chiral matter. We argue that the conventional Rankine- Hugoinot relations are modified due to the presence of chiral transport phenomena. We show that the entropy discontinuity in a weak shock wave is linearly proportional to the pressure discontinuity when the effect of chiral transport becomes sufficiently large. We also show that rarefaction shock waves, which do not exist in usual nonchiral fluids, can appear in chiral matter. These features are exemplified by shock propagation in dense neutrino matter in the hydrodynamic regime.

  14. Ocean wave energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    McCormick, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    This volume will prove of vital interest to those studying the use of renewable resources. Scientists, engineers, and inventors will find it a valuable review of ocean wave mechanics as well as an introduction to wave energy conversion. It presents physical and mathematical descriptions of the nine generic wave energy conversion techniques, along with their uses and performance characteristics.Author Michael E. McCormick is the Corbin A. McNeill Professor of Naval Engineering at the U.S. Naval Academy. In addition to his timely and significant coverage of possible environmental effects associa

  15. Spin Waves in Terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden; Bjerrum Møller, Hans

    1975-01-01

    The energies of spin waves propagating in the c direction of Tb have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering, as a function of a magnetic field applied along the easy and hard directions in the basal plane, and as a function of temperature. From a general spin Hamiltonian, consistent...... with the symmetry, we deduce the dispersion relation for the spin waves in a basal-plane ferromagnet. This phenomenological spin-wave theory accounts for the observed behavior of the magnon energies in Tb. The two q⃗-dependent Bogoliubov components of the magnon energies are derived from the experimental results...

  16. Water wave scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Birendra Nath

    2015-01-01

    The theory of water waves is most varied and is a fascinating topic. It includes a wide range of natural phenomena in oceans, rivers, and lakes. It is mostly concerned with elucidation of some general aspects of wave motion including the prediction of behaviour of waves in the presence of obstacles of some special configurations that are of interest to ocean engineers. Unfortunately, even the apparently simple problems appear to be difficult to tackle mathematically unless some simplified assumptions are made. Fortunately, one can assume water to be an incompressible, in viscid and homogeneous

  17. Curvilinear parabolic approximation for surface wave transformation with wave current interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.

    2005-04-01

    The direct coordinate transformation method, which only transforms independent variables and retains Cartesian dependent variables, may not be an appropriate method for the purpose of simplifying the curvilinear parabolic approximation of the vector form of the wave-current equation given by Kirby [Higher-order approximations in the parabolic equation method for water waves, J. Geophys. Res. 91 (1986) 933-952]. In this paper, the covariant-contravariant tensor method is used for the curvilinear parabolic approximation. We use the covariant components of the wave number vector and contravariant components of the current velocity vector so that the derivation of the curvilinear equation closely follows the higher-order approximation in rectangular Cartesian coordinates in Kirby [Higher-order approximations in the parabolic equation method for water waves, J. Geophys. Res. 91 (1986) 933-952]. The resulting curvilinear equation can be easily implemented using the existing model structure and numerical schemes adopted in the Cartesian parabolic wave model [J.T. Kirby, R.A. Dalrymple, F. Shi, Combined Refraction/Diffraction Model REF/DIF 1, Version 2.6. Documentation and User's Manual, Research Report, Center for Applied Coastal Research, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, 2004]. Several examples of wave simulations in curvilinear coordinate systems, including a case with wave-current interaction, are shown with comparisons to theoretical solutions or measurement data.

  18. Impact of mountain gravity waves on infrasound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiens, Florentin; Lott, François; Millet, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Linear theory of acoustic propagation is used to analyze how mountain waves can change the characteristics of infrasound signals. The mountain wave model is based on the integration of the linear inviscid Taylor-Goldstein equation forced by a nonlinear surface boundary condition. For the acoustic propagation we solve the wave equation using the normal mode method together with the effective sound speed approximation. For large-amplitude mountain waves we use direct numerical simulations to compute the interactions between the mountain waves and the infrasound component. It is shown that the mountain waves perturb the low level waveguide, which leads to significant acoustic dispersion. The mountain waves also impact the arrival time and spread of the signals substantially and can produce a strong absorption of the wave signal. To interpret our results we follow each acoustic mode separately and show which mode is impacted and how. We also show that the phase shift between the acoustic modes over the horizontal length of the mountain wave field may yield to destructive interferences in the lee side of the mountain, resulting in a new form of infrasound absorption. The statistical relevance of those results is tested using a stochastic version of the mountain wave model and large enough sample sizes.

  19. Coherent control of light-matter interactions in polarization standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xu; MacDonald, Kevin F.; Plum, Eric; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that standing waves formed by two coherent counter-propagating light waves can take a variety of forms, offering new approaches to the interrogation and control of polarization-sensitive light-matter interactions in ultrathin (subwavelength thickness) media. In contrast to familiar energy standing waves, polarization standing waves have constant electric and magnetic energy densities and a periodically varying polarization state along the wave axis. counterintuitively, anisotropic ultrathin (meta)materials can be made sensitive or insensitive to such polarization variations by adjusting their azimuthal angle.

  20. Fast photography of plasma formed by laser ablation of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedanovska, E.; Ivkovic, M.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present results of the temporal and spatial analysis of laser induced plasma performed by use of ICCD fast photography. The plasma is formed by excimer laser ablation of aluminum target in vacuum, air or different pressures of argon and helium. It is shown how the plasma luminous intensity and duration depends on gas pressure. The obtained time dependence of wave propagation distance is also compared with predictions given by the blast wave and drag-force theory also.

  1. Some Further Results on Traveling Wave Solutions for the ZK-BBM( Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoyong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the traveling wave solutions for the ZK-BBM( equations by using bifurcation method of dynamical systems. Firstly, for ZK-BBM(2, 2 equation, we obtain peakon wave, periodic peakon wave, and smooth periodic wave solutions and point out that the peakon wave is the limit form of the periodic peakon wave. Secondly, for ZK-BBM(3, 2 equation, we obtain some elliptic function solutions which include periodic blow-up and periodic wave. Furthermore, from the limit forms of the elliptic function solutions, we obtain some trigonometric and hyperbolic function solutions which include periodic blow-up, blow-up, and smooth solitary wave. We also show that our work extends some previous results.

  2. Momentum and energy transport by waves in the solar atmosphere and solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fluid equations for the solar wind are presented in a form which includes the momentum and energy flux of waves in a general and consistent way. The concept of conservation of wave action is introduced and is used to derive expressions for the wave energy density as a function of heliocentric distance. The explicit form of the terms due to waves in both the momentum and energy equations are given for radially propagating acoustic, Alfven, and fast mode waves. The effect of waves as a source of momentum is explored by examining the critical points of the momentum equation for isothermal spherically symmetric flow. We find that the principal effect of waves on the solutions is to bring the critical point closer to the sun's surface and to increase the Mach number at the critical point. When a simple model of dissipation is included for acoustic waves, in some cases there are multiple critical points.

  3. Hyperbolic Mild Slope Equations with Inclusion of Amplitude Dispersion Effect: Regular Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Hong; ZOU Zhi-li

    2008-01-01

    A new form of hyperbolic mild slope equations is derived with the inclusion of the amplitude dispersion of nonlinear waves. The effects of including the amplitude dispersion effect on the wave propagation are discussed. Wave breaking mechanism is incorporated into the present model to apply the new equations to surf zone. The equations are solved numerically for regular wave propagation over a shoal and in surf zone, and a comparison is made against measurements. It is found that the inclusion of the amplitude dispersion can also improve model's performance on prediction of wave heights around breaking point for the wave motions in surf zone.

  4. Physical Investigation of Directional Wave Focusing and Breaking Waves in Wave Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-xue; Keyyong HONG

    2005-01-01

    An experimental scheme for the generation of directional focusing waves in a wave basin is established in this paper. The effects of the directional range, frequency width and center frequency on the wave focusing are studied. The distribution of maximum amplitude and the evolution of time series and spectra during wave packet propagation and the variation of water surface parameters are extensively investigated. The results reveal that the characteristics of focusing waves are significantly influenced by wave directionality and that the breaking criteria for directional waves are distinctly different from those for unidirectional waves.

  5. Alternative Forms of Enhanced Boussinesq Equations with Improved Nonlinearity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezhao Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose alternative forms of the Boussinesq equations which extend the equations of Madsen and Schäffer by introducing extra nonlinear terms during enhancement. Theoretical analysis shows that nonlinear characteristics are considerably improved. A numerical implementation of one-dimensional equations is described. Three tests involving strongly nonlinear evolution, namely, regular waves propagating over an elevated bar feature in a tank with an otherwise constant depth, wave group transformation over constant water depth, and nonlinear shoaling of unsteady waves over a sloping beach, are simulated by the model. The model is found to be effective.

  6. Effects on PP waves and Rayleigh waves of water column approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Ni, S.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral-element method (SEM) combines the flexibility of the finite-element method and the accuracy of the pseudo-spectral method. It can handle the complexity of the 3-D earth model, such as heterogeneity of velocity and density, anisotropy, anelasticity, sharp velocity and density contrasts, topography. And with water column approximation, it can also deal with oceans. Because of its powerful ability, there are a wide range of application of SEM in studies of PP waves and Rayleigh waves. PP wave and its precursors have been used in measuring topography of 410 km or 660 km. Rayleigh waves are the most recognizable part of the seismograms and have been broadly applied in crustal and uppermost mantle tomography. In global SEM simulation, oceans are usually assumed to be incompressible, which means that the entire water column moves as a whole as a result of the normal displacement of the seafloor. It is necessary to investigate the accuracy of water column approximation when thickness of ocean approaches wavelength of the wave in the ocean water. In this paper, based on plane wave assumption, we study both the accurate form and water column approximate form of effective boundary condition. The reflection coefficient equation of PP waves with effective boundary of water was derived. Accurate and approximate PP reflection coefficient with oceans in different depth is demonstrated. The formula of Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion with effective water boundary is also investigated. It is shown that water column approximation in global SEM simulation is not sufficient for some parts of the ocean.

  7. Traveling-wave photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  8. Sound wave transmission (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  9. Theory of Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tiec, Alexandre Le

    2016-01-01

    The existence of gravitational radiation is a natural prediction of any relativistic description of the gravitational interaction. In this chapter, we focus on gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity. First, we introduce those mathematical concepts that are necessary to properly formulate the physical theory, such as the notions of manifold, vector, tensor, metric, connection and curvature. Second, we motivate, formulate and then discuss Einstein's equation, which relates the geometry of spacetime to its matter content. Gravitational waves are later introduced as solutions of the linearized Einstein equation around flat spacetime. These waves are shown to propagate at the speed of light and to possess two polarization states. Gravitational waves can interact with matter, allowing for their direct detection by means of laser interferometers. Finally, Einstein's quadrupole formulas are derived and used to show that nonspherical compact objects moving at relativistic speeds a...

  10. NOAA NDBC SOS - waves

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NDBC SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have waves data. Because of the nature of SOS requests, requests for data...

  11. Global Coronal Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, P F

    2016-01-01

    After the {\\em Solar and Heliospheric Observatory} ({\\em SOHO}) was launched in 1996, the aboard Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) observed a global coronal wave phenomenon, which was initially named "EIT wave" after the telescope. The bright fronts are immediately followed by expanding dimmings. It has been shown that the brightenings and dimmings are mainly due to plasma density increase and depletion, respectively. Such a spectacular phenomenon sparked long-lasting interest and debates. The debates were concentrated on two topics, one is about the driving source, and the other is about the nature of this wavelike phenomenon. The controversies are most probably because there may exist two types of large-scale coronal waves that were not well resolved before the {\\em Solar Dynamics Observatory} ({\\em SDO}) was launched: one is a piston-driven shock wave straddling over the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME), and the other is an apparently propagating front, which may correspond to the CME frontal...

  12. Magnetoresistive waves in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, F. S.; Hunter, R. O., Jr.; Pereira, N. R.; Tajima, T.

    1982-10-01

    The self-generated magnetic field of a current diffusing into a plasma between conductors can magnetically insulate the plasma. Propagation of magnetoresistive waves in plasmas is analyzed. Applications to plasma opening switches are discussed.

  13. Waving in the rain

    CERN Document Server

    Cavaleri, Luigi; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2015-01-01

    We consider the effect of rain on wind wave generation and dissipation. Rain falling on a wavy surface may have a marked tendency to dampen the shorter waves in the tail of the spectrum, the related range increasing with the rain rate. Following the coupling between meteorological and wave models, we derive that on the whole this should imply stronger wind and higher waves in the most energetic part of the spectrum. This is supported by numerical experiments. However, a verification based on the comparison between operational model results and measured data suggests that the opposite is true. This leads to a keen analysis of the overall process, in particular on the role of the tail of the spectrum in modulating the wind input and the white-capping. We suggest that the relationship between white-capping and generation by wind is deeper and more implicative than presently generally assumed.

  14. Turbulence generation by waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  15. Refinement of a discontinuity-free edge-diffraction model describing focused wave fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedukhin, Andrey G

    2010-03-01

    Two equivalent forms of a refined discontinuity-free edge-diffraction model describing the structure of a stationary focused wave field are presented that are valid in the framework of the scalar Debye integral representation for a diffracted rotationally symmetric converging spherical wave of a limited yet not-too-low angular opening. The first form describes the field as the sum of a direct quasi-spherical wave and a plurality of edge quasi-conical waves of different orders, the optimum discontinuity-free angular spectrum functions of all the waves being dependent on the polar angle only. According to the second form, the focused field is fully characterized by only three components--the same quasi-spherical wave and two edge quasi-conical waves of the zero and first order, of which the optimum discontinuity-free angular spectrum functions are dependent on both the polar angle and the polar radius counted from the geometrical focus.

  16. Micro metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Micro Metal Forming, i. e. forming of parts and features with dimensions below 1 mm, is a young area of research in the wide field of metal forming technologies, expanding the limits for applying metal forming towards micro technology. The essential challenges arise from the reduced geometrical size and the increased lot size. In order to enable potential users to apply micro metal forming in production, information about the following topics are given: tribological behavior: friction between tool and work piece as well as tool wear mechanical behavior: strength and formability of the work piece material, durability of the work pieces size effects: basic description of effects occurring due to the fact, that the quantitative relation between different features changes with decreasing size process windows and limits for forming processes tool making methods numerical modeling of processes and process chains quality assurance and metrology All topics are discussed with respect to the questions relevant to micro...

  17. Prototype Testing of the Wave Energy Converter Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is an offshore wave energy converter of the overtopping type. It consists of two wave reflectors focusing the incoming waves towards a ramp, a reservoir for collecting the overtopping water and a number of hydro turbines for converting the pressure head into power. In the period...... from 1998 to 2001 extensive wave tank testing on a scale model was carried at Aalborg University. Then, a 57!27 m wide and 237 tonnes heavy (incl. ballast) prototype of the Wave Dragon, placed in Nissum Bredning, Denmark, was grid connected in May 2003 as the world’s first offshore wave energy...

  18. Prototype Testing of the Wave Energy Converter Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter Bak; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is an offshore wave energy converter of the overtopping type. It consists of two wave reflectors focusing the incoming waves towards a ramp, a reservoir for collecting the overtopping water and a number of hydro turbines for converting the pressure head into power. In the period...... from 1998 to 2001 extensive wave tank testing on a scale model was carried at Aalborg University. Then, a 57 x 27 m wide and 237 tonnes heavy (incl. ballast) prototype of the Wave Dragon, placed in Nissum Bredning, Denmark, was grid connected in May 2003 as the world's first offshore wave energy...

  19. Wave Equation Inversion of Skeletonized SurfaceWaves

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2015-08-19

    We present a surface-wave inversion method that inverts for the S-wave velocity from the Rayleigh dispersion curve for the fundamental-mode. We call this wave equation inversion of skeletonized surface waves because the dispersion curve for the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave is inverted using finite-difference solutions to the wave equation. The best match between the predicted and observed dispersion curves provides the optimal S-wave velocity model. Results with synthetic and field data illustrate the benefits and limitations of this method.

  20. The wave of the future - Searching for gravity waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, D.

    1991-04-01

    Research on gravity waves conducted by such scientists as Gamov, Wheeler, Weber and Zel'dovich is discussed. Particular attention is given to current trends in the theoretical analysis of gravity waves carried out by theorists Kip Thorne and Leonid Grishchuk. The problems discussed include the search for gravity waves; calculation of the types of gravity waves; the possibility of detecting gravity waves from localized sources, e.g., from the collision of two black holes in a distant galaxy or the collapse of a star, through the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory; and detection primordial gravity waves from the big bang.