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Sample records for wave accelerating cavity

  1. Slot-coupled CW standing wave accelerating cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shaoheng; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-05-16

    A slot-coupled CW standing wave multi-cell accelerating cavity. To achieve high efficiency graded beta acceleration, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include different cell lengths. Alternatively, to achieve high efficiency with acceleration for particles with beta equal to 1, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include the same cell design. Coupling between the cells is achieved with a plurality of axially aligned kidney-shaped slots on the wall between cells. The slot-coupling method makes the design very compact. The shape of the cell, including the slots and the cone, are optimized to maximize the power efficiency and minimize the peak power density on the surface. The slots are non-resonant, thereby enabling shorter slots and less power loss.

  2. Traveling wave linear accelerator with RF power flow outside of accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2016-06-28

    A high power RF traveling wave accelerator structure includes a symmetric RF feed, an input matching cell coupled to the symmetric RF feed, a sequence of regular accelerating cavities coupled to the input matching cell at an input beam pipe end of the sequence, one or more waveguides parallel to and coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities, an output matching cell coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities at an output beam pipe end of the sequence, and output waveguide circuit or RF loads coupled to the output matching cell. Each of the regular accelerating cavities has a nose cone that cuts off field propagating into the beam pipe and therefore all power flows in a traveling wave along the structure in the waveguide.

  3. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  4. Design and construction of planar mm-wave accelerating cavity structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Nassiri, A.; Song, J.J.; Feineman, A.D.; Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL

    1995-01-01

    Feasibility studies on the planar millimeter-wave cavity structures have been made. The structures could be used for linear accelerators, free electron lasers, mm-wave amplifiers, or mm-wave undulators. The cavity structures are intended to be manufactured by using DXL (deep x-ray lithography) microfabrication technology. The frequency of operation can be about 30GHz to 300GHz. For most applications, a complete structure consists of two identical planar half structures put together face-to-face. Construction and properties of constant gradient structures that have been investigated so far will be discussed. These cavity structures have been designed for 120GHz 2π/3-mode operation

  5. Design of cavities of a standing wave accelerating tube for a 6 MeV electron linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Zarei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Side-coupled standing wave tubes in  mode are widely used in the low-energy electron linear accelerator, due to high accelerating gradient and low sensitivity to construction tolerances. The use of various simulation software for designing these kinds of tubes is very common nowadays. In this paper, SUPERFISH code and COMSOL are used for designing the accelerating and coupling cavities for a 6 MeV electron linear accelerator. Finite difference method in SUPERFISH code and Finite element method in COMSOL are used to solve the equations. Besides, dimension of accelerating and coupling cavities and also coupling iris dimension are optimized to achieve resonance frequency of 2.9985 MHz and coupling constant of 0.0112. Considering the results of this study and designing of the RF energy injection port subsequently, the construction of 6 MeV electron tube will be provided

  6. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  7. Particle acceleration and wave emissions associated with the formation of auroral cavities and enhancements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winglee, R.M.; Pritchett, P.L.; Dusenbery, P.B.

    1988-01-01

    Observations from DE 1 and electrostatic particle simulations are combined in an effort to provide a unified model for (nightside) auroral particle acceleration and wave emissions and their association with plasma cavities and enhancements. The observations show that enhanced electron precipitation during inverted-V events is associated with broadband electrostatic bursts (BEB), increased upward field-aligned currents, and density enhancements. These regions are flanked by return current regions where the density is depleted (i.e., by plasma cavities). Perpendicular acceleration of ambient plasma ions can occur in both upward and return current regions. It is shown through the simulations that these processes are integrally related and are not independent of each other. The free energy for the auroral particle acceleration can be provided by energetic ion beams in the plasma sheet boundary layer with nonzero perpendicular energy. The perpendicular energy allows charge separation between the beam ions and costreaming electrons to occur. The resultant space charge fields accelerate electrons on the same field lines as the costreaming electrons downward toward the ionosphere, without the beam ions actually propagating down to auroral altitudes. Ambient plasma electrons on adjacent field lines are accelerated upward, forming a return current

  8. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  9. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  10. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  11. Design and construction of cavity frequency measurement and tuning systems of traveling wave electron linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ahmadiannamin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose for designing and constructing electroradio frequency linear accelerators is to reach better beam quality with higher power and energy by lower RF power consumption. The main step for this purpose is doing research and development in the area of designing, constructing, measuring and tuning of accelerator RF cavities. Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM linear accelerator projecta is the first Iranian project for construction of electrolinear accelerator. In this paper, a brief introduction to construction procedure has been given. Then, the measurement and tuning of a disk-loaded periodic structure before and after tuning was reported. In addition, the detailed design and measurement setup for electric field measurement by perturbation method was investigated  

  12. CEBAF: Accelerating cavities look good

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The first assembled pairs of superconducting accelerating cavities from German supplier Interatom for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, have exceeded performance specifications.

  13. CEBAF: Accelerating cavities look good

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The first assembled pairs of superconducting accelerating cavities from German supplier Interatom for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, have exceeded performance specifications

  14. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  15. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity. It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. There are 2 figure-of-eight loops on the ferrite loads for tuning the frequency throughout the acceleration cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm. The tube for forced-air cooling is visible in the left front. See also 8301084.

  16. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity.It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. 2 figure-of-eight loops tune the frequency throughout the accelerating cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm, and are forced-air cooled. The 2 round objects in the front-compartments are the final-stage power-tetrodes. See also 8111095.

  17. Prototype rf cavity for the HISTRAP accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosko, S.W.; Dowling, D.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    HISTRAP, a proposed synchrotron-cooling-storage ring designed to both accelerate and decelerate very highly charged very heavy ions for atomic physics research, requires an rf accelerating system to provide /+-/2.5 kV of peak accelerating voltage per turn while tuning through a 13.5:1 frequency range in a fraction of a second. A prototype half-wave, single gap rf cavity with biased ferrite tuning was built and tested over a continuous tuning range of 200 kHz through 2.7 MHz. Initial test results establish the feasibility of using ferrite tuning at the required rf power levels. The resonant system is located entirely outside of the accelerator's 15cm ID beam line vacuum enclosure except for a single rf window which serves as an accelerating gap. Physical separation of the cavity and the beam line permits in situ vacuum baking of the beam line at 300/degree/C

  18. Conduction cooling systems for linear accelerator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, Robert

    2017-05-02

    A conduction cooling system for linear accelerator cavities. The system conducts heat from the cavities to a refrigeration unit using at least one cavity cooler interconnected with a cooling connector. The cavity cooler and cooling connector are both made from solid material having a very high thermal conductivity of approximately 1.times.10.sup.4 W m.sup.-1 K.sup.-1 at temperatures of approximately 4 degrees K. This allows for very simple and effective conduction of waste heat from the linear accelerator cavities to the cavity cooler, along the cooling connector, and thence to the refrigeration unit.

  19. Prototype of cavity for lepton acceleration in the SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    The SPS was to be the injector for LEP and had to accelerate the electrons and positrons delivered by the PS. This is a prototype of a 200 MHz, single-cell, standing-wave, cavity for lepton acceleration in the SPS. On top of the cavity, at the back, is the tetrode amplifier, the tuning mechanism is leaning towards the viewer. See also 8103523 and Annual Report 1981, p.114.

  20. LEP superconducting accelerating cavity module

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    With its 27-kilometre circumference, the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built. The excavation of the LEP tunnel was Europe’s largest civil-engineering project prior to the Channel Tunnel. Three tunnel-boring machines started excavating the tunnel in February 1985 and the ring was completed three years later. In its first phase of operation, LEP consisted of 5176 magnets and 128 accelerating cavities. CERN’s accelerator complex provided the particles and four enormous detectors, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, observed the collisions. LEP was commissioned in July 1989 and the first beam circulated in the collider on 14 July. The collider's initial energy was chosen to be around 91 GeV, so that Z bosons could be produced. The Z boson and its charged partner the W boson, both discovered at CERN in 1983, are responsible for the weak force, which drives the Sun, for example. Observing the creation and decay of the short-lived Z boson was a critical test of...

  1. Superconducting rf cavities for accelerator application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proch, D.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a review of superconducting cavities for accelerator application (β = 1). The layout of a typical accelerating unit is described and important parameters are discussed. Recent cavity measurements and storage ring beam tests are reported and the present state of the art is summarized

  2. Preliminary simulation studies of accelerator cavity loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.

    1980-06-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of loading effects in a 350 MHz accelerator cavity have been performed. Electron currents of 1-10 kA have been accelerated in 5 MV/m fields. Higher order cavity modes induced by the beam may lead to emittance growth. Operation in an autoaccelerator mode has been studied

  3. Standing wave accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavadtsev, A.A.; Zverev, B.V.; Sobepin, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Accelerating ELA structures are considered and chosen for applied purposes of special designation. Accelerating structures with the standing wave are considered most effective for small size ELA. Designs and results of experimental investigation of two new accelerating structures are described. These are structures of the ''ring'' type with a decreased number of excitinq oscillation types and strucuture with transverse rods with a twice smaller transverse size as compared with the biperiodical structure with internal connection resonators. The accelerating biperiodical structures of the conventional type by the fact that the whole structure is not a linear chain of connected resonators, but a ring one. Model tests have shown that the homogeneous structure with transverse rods (STR) at the frequency of 2.8 GHz in the regime of the standing wave has an effective shunt resistance equalling 23 MOhm/m. It is shown that the small transverse size of biperiodic STR makes its application in logging linear electron accelerators

  4. High Accelerating Field Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, R. S.; Saito, K.; Furuta, F.; Saeki, T.; Inoue, H.; Morozumi, Y.; Higo, T.; Higashi, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Kazakov, S.; Yamaoka, H.; Ueno, K.; Sato, M.

    2008-06-01

    We have conducted a study of a series of single cell superconducting RF cavities at KEK. These tests were designed to investigate the effect of surface treatment on the maximum accelerating field attainable. All of these cavities are of the ICHIRO shape, based on the Low Loss shape. Our results indicate that accelerating fields as high as the theoretical maximum of 50MV/m are attainable.

  5. Plasma wave accelerator. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, W.; Joshi, C.; Dawson, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    It was shown that the insertion of a cross magnetic field prevents the particles from getting out of phase with the electric field of the plasma wave in the beat wave accelerator scheme. Thus, using a CO 2 laser, n/sub c//n/sub e/ = (ω 0 /ω/sub p/) 2 approx. 35, and a 300 kG magnetic field, electrons can be (in principle) accelerated to 100 GeV in 2 meters. For comparison without the magnetic field, the same energies may be obtained in a n/sub c//n/sub e/ approx. 10 5 plasma over a distance of 100 meters

  6. Traveling Wave Accelerating Structure for a Superconducting Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kanareykin, Alex; Solyak, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    We are presenting a superconducting traveling wave accelerating structure (STWA) concept, which may prove to be of crucial importance to the International Linear Collider. Compared to the existing design of a TESLA cavity, the traveling wave structure can provide ~20-40% higher accelerating gradient for the same aperture and the same peak surface magnetic RF field. The recently achieved SC structure gradient of 35 MV/m can be increased up to ~50 MV/m with the new STWA structure design. The STWA structure is supposed to be installed into the superconducting resonance ring and is fed by the two couplers with appropriate phase advance to excite a traveling wave inside the structure. The system requires two independent tuners to be able to adjust the cavity and feedback waveguide frequencies and hence to reduce the unwanted backward wave. In this presentation we discuss the structure design, optimization of the parameters, tuning requirements and plans for further development.

  7. section of an accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a section of an accelerating cavity from LEP, cut in half to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  8. Ferrite measurements for SNS accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendall, R.G.; Church, R.A.

    1979-03-01

    The RF system for the SNS has six double accelerating cavities each containing seventy ferrite toroids. Difficulties experienced in obtaining toroids to the required specifications are discussed and the two toroid test cavity built to test those supplied is described. Ferrite measurements are reported which were undertaken to measure; (a) μQf as a function of frequency and RF field level and (b) bias current as a function of frequency for different ranges of ferrite permeability μ. (U.K.)

  9. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yong; Hirshfield, Jay Leonard

    2016-01-01

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10"-"7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise Δ T. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field E_s_u_r"m"a"x< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating Δ T"m"a"x< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power - as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  10. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hirshfield, Jay Leonard [Omega-P R& D, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-11-10

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10-7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise ΔT. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field Esurmax< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating ΔTmax< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power—as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  11. A new awakening for accelerator cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Imagine: an accelerator unbound by length; one that can bring a beam up to the TeV level in just a few hundred metres. Sounds like a dream? Perhaps not for long. At CERN’s Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE), physicists may soon be working to bring this contemporary fairy-tale to life.   The AWAKE experiment in the CNGS facility. Wherever you find a modern linear particle accelerator, you’ll find with it a lengthy series of RF accelerating cavities. Although based on technology first developed over half a century ago, RF cavities have dominated the accelerating world since their inception. However, new developments in plasma accelerator systems may soon be bringing a new player into the game. By harnessing the power of wakefields generated by beams in plasma cells, physicists may be able to produce accelerator gradients of many GV/m –  hundreds of times higher than those achieved in current RF cavities. “Plasma wakef...

  12. Travelling Wave Structure of an SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The RF cavities for acceleration of particles in the SPS have a travelling-wave structure. They operate at a fixed frequency of 200 MHz (h = 4620). With a quality factor of Q = 100, the bandwidth covers the small frequency swing for the acceleration of protons from as low as 10 GeV to the top energy of 450 GeV. Later on, for the acceleration of ions, with a larger frequency swing, turn-to-turn phase jumps did the trick. Two cavities, each consisting of 5 tank sections, were installed in long straight section 3. Each cavity is driven by a power amplifier of 750 kW CW (1 MW pulsed). Another 2 cavities were added later on. See also 7411033 and 7802190.

  13. Superconducting cavities for the APT accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, F.L.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Haynes, B.; Montoya, D.I.; Rusnak, B.; Shapiro, A.H.

    1997-01-01

    The design of an Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) facility being investigated at Los Alamos includes a linear accelerator using superconducting rf-cavities for the acceleration of a high-current cw proton beam. For electron accelerators with particles moving at the speed of light (β ∼ 1.0), resonators with a rounded shape, consisting of ellipsoidal and cylindrical sections, are well established. They are referred to as elliptical cavities. For the APT-design, this shape has been adapted for much slower proton beams with β ranging from 0.60 to 0.94. This is a new energy range, in which resonators of an elliptical type have never been used before. Simulations with the well-proven electromagnetic modeling tools MAFIA and SUPERFISH were performed. The structures have been optimized for their rf and mechanical properties as well as for beam dynamics requirements. The TRAK-RF simulation code is used to investigate potential multipacting in these structures. All the simulations will be put to a final test in experiments performed on single cell cavities that have started in the structures laboratory

  14. Coupler tuning for constant gradient travelling wave accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xingkun; Ma Yanyun; Wang Xiulong

    2013-01-01

    The method of the coupler tuning for the constant gradient traveling wave accelerating structure was described and the formula of coupling coefficient p was deduced on the basis of analyzing the existing methods for the constant impedance traveling wave accelerating structures and coupling-cavity chain equivalent circuits. The method and formula were validated by the simulation result by CST and experiment data. (authors)

  15. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.

  16. Spiral loaded cavities for heavy ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schempp, A.; Klein, H.

    1976-01-01

    A transmission line theory of the spiral resonator has been performed and the calculated and measured properties will be compared. Shunt impedances up to 50 MΩ/m have been measured. In a number of high power tests the structure has been tested and its electrical and mechanical stability has been investigated. The static frequency shift due to ponderomotoric forces was between 0.2 and 50 kHz/kW dependent on the geometrical parameters of the spirals. The maximum field strength obtained on the axis was 16 MV/m in pulsed operation and 9.2 MV/m in cw, corresponding to a voltage gain per cavity of up to 0.96 MV. The results show that spiral resonators are well suited as heavy ion accelerator cavities. (author)

  17. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed

  18. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1993-07-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed.

  19. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  20. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C.R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.; Salonika Univ., Greece)

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts. 31 references

  1. Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavities for Low-Beta Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael

    2012-01-01

    High-power proton and ion linac projects based on superconducting accelerating cavities are driving a worldwide effort to develop and build superconducting cavities for beta < 1. Laboratories and institutions building quarter-wave, halfwave and single- or multi-spoke cavities continue to advance the state of the art for this class of cavities, and the common notion that low-beta SRF cavities fill a need in niche applications and have low performance is clearly no longer valid. This article reviews recent developments and results for SC cavity performance for cavities with beta up to approximately 0.5. The considerable ongoing effort on reduced beta elliptical cell cavities is not discussed. An overview of associated subsystems required to operate low-beta cavities, including rf power couplers and fast and slow tuners, is presented.

  2. Cavity characterization for general use in linear electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Neto, M.V. de.

    1985-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to is to develop measurement techniques for the characterization of microwave cavities used in linear electron accelerators. Methods are developed for the measurement of parameters that are essential to the design of an accelerator structure using conventional techniques of resonant cavities at low power. Disk-loaded cavities were designed and built, similar to those in most existing linear electron accelerators. As a result, the methods developed and the estimated accuracy were compared with those from other investigators. The results of this work are relevant for the design of cavities with the objective of developing linear electron accelerators. (author) [pt

  3. Numerical simulation of waveguide input/output couplers for a planar mm-wave linac cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.

    1994-01-01

    A double-sided planar mm-wave linear accelerating cavity structure has been studied. The input/output couplers for the accelerating cavity structure have been designed using the Hewlett-Packard High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS). The program is a frequency domain finite element 3-D field solver and can include matched port boundary conditions. The power transmission property of the structure is calculated in the frequency domain. The dimensions of the, coupling cavities and the irises at the input/output ports are adjusted to have the structure matched to rectangular waveguides. The field distributions in the accelerating structure for the 2π/3-mode traveling wave are shown

  4. Seismic wave interaction with underground cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Felix M.; Esterhazy, Sofi; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-04-01

    Realization of the future Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) will require ensuring its compliance, making the CTBT a prime example of forensic seismology. Following indications of a nuclear explosion obtained on the basis of the (IMS) monitoring network further evidence needs to be sought at the location of the suspicious event. For such an On-Site Inspection (OSI) at a possible nuclear test site the treaty lists several techniques that can be carried out by the inspection team, including aftershock monitoring and the conduction of active seismic surveys. While those techniques are already well established, a third group of methods labeled as "resonance seismometry" is less well defined and needs further elaboration. A prime structural target that is expected to be present as a remnant of an underground nuclear explosion is a cavity at the location and depth the bomb was fired. Originally "resonance seismometry" referred to resonant seismic emission of the cavity within the medium that could be stimulated by an incident seismic wave of the right frequency and observed as peaks in the spectrum of seismic stations in the vicinity of the cavity. However, it is not yet clear which are the conditions for which resonant emissions of the cavity could be observed. In order to define distance-, frequency- and amplitude ranges at which resonant emissions could be observed we study the interaction of seismic waves with underground cavities. As a generic model for possible resonances we use a spherical acoustic cavity in an elastic full-space. To solve the forward problem for the full elastic wave field around acoustic spherical inclusions, we implemented an analytical solution (Korneev, 1993). This yields the possibility of generating scattering cross-sections, amplitude spectrums and synthetic seismograms for plane incident waves. Here, we focus on the questions whether or not we can expect resonant responses in the wave field scattered from the cavity. We show

  5. Application of International Linear Collider superconducting cavities for acceleration of protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Ostroumov

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Beam acceleration in the International Linear Collider (ILC will be provided by 9-cell 1300 MHz superconducting (SC cavities. The cavities are designed for effective acceleration of charged particles moving with the speed of light and are operated on π-mode to provide a maximum accelerating gradient. A significant research and development effort has been devoted to develop ILC SC technology and its rf system which resulted in excellent performance of ILC cavities. Therefore, the proposed 8-GeV proton driver in Fermilab is based on ILC cavities above ∼1.2  GeV. The efficiency of proton beam acceleration by ILC cavities drops fast for lower velocities and it was proposed to develop squeezed ILC-type (S-ILC cavities operating at 1300 MHz and designed for β_{G}=0.81, geometrical beta, to accelerate protons or H^{-} from ∼420  MeV to 1.2 GeV. This paper discusses the possibility of avoiding the development of new β_{G}=0.81 cavities by operating ILC cavities on 8/9π-mode of standing wave oscillations.

  6. ECOLE POLYTECHNIQUE: Acceleration by plasma beat waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment by a multi-disciplinary team including laser, plasma, accelerator and particle detector specialists at the École Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France, has confirmed the principle of particle acceleration by the 'beating' of laser waves. The first accelerated electrons were detected in May 1994, just after the apparatus had been completely assembled, during the subsequent set of experiments in July, and again in January. In the continual quest for new acceleration methods, such ideas had been proposed for several decades, but it was only about ten years ago that experimental verification of these effects began. In existing accelerators using radiofrequency cavities the electric field is limited to some hundred megavolts per metre, beyond which breakdowns occur. The joint use of power lasers and plasmas, however, should make it possible to generate fields very much greater than a GV/m. The light wave fulfils the same purpose as radiofrequency and the material medium required to couple the electromagnetic energy to the particle beam is provided by the plasma which - already fully ionized - is not destroyed by a breakdown. In the wave-beating method, proposed in 1979 by Dawson and Tajima, two laser waves of adjacent frequencies are transmitted and produce 'beats'. If the frequency of these is equal to the natural oscillation frequency of the plasma electrons, there is resonant energy transfer. The resultant longitudinal electric field is propagated at slightly below the speed of light and may be used to accelerate particles injected into the plasma in the right phase

  7. Evaluation of a new method of RF power coupling to acceleration cavity of charged particles accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Poursaleh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the feasibility studty of a new method of RF power coupling to acceleration cavity of charged particles accelerator will be evaluated. In this method a slit is created around the accelerator cavity, and RF power amplifier modules is connected directly to the acceleration cavity. In fact, in this design, the cavity in addition to acting as an acceleration cavity, acts as a RF power combiner. The benefits of this method are avoiding the use of RF vacuum tubes, transmission lines, high power combiner and coupler. In this research, cylindrical and coaxial cavities were studied, and a small sample coaxial cavity is build by this method. The results of the resarch showed that compact, economical and safe RF accelerators can be achieved by the proposed method

  8. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J [Livermore, CA; Nelson, Scott D [Patterson, CA; Poole, Brian R [Tracy, CA

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  9. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR CAVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrage, D.

    2000-01-01

    The static and dynamic structural behavior of superconducting cavities for various projects was determined by finite element structural analysis. The β = 0.61 cavity shape for the Neutron Science Project was studied in detail and found to meet all design requirements if fabricated from five millimeter thick material with a single annular stiffener. This 600 MHz cavity will have a Lorentz coefficient of minus1.8 Hz/(Mv/meter) 2 and a lowest structural resonance of more than 100 Hz. Cavities at β = 0.48, 0.61, and 0.77 were analyzed for a Neutron Science Project concept which would incorporate 7-cell cavities. The medium and high beta cavities were found to meet all criteria but it was not possible to generate a β = 0.48 cavity with a Lorentz coefficient of less than minus3 Hz/(Mv/meter) 2

  10. Scattering of accelerated wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, S.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Della Valle, G.

    2018-03-01

    Wave-packet scattering from a stationary potential is significantly modified when the wave packet is subject to an external time-dependent force during the interaction. In the semiclassical limit, wave-packet motion is simply described by Newtonian equations, and the external force can, for example, cancel the potential force, making a potential barrier transparent. Here we consider wave-packet scattering from reflectionless potentials, where in general the potential becomes reflective when probed by an accelerated wave packet. In the particular case of the recently introduced class of complex Kramers-Kronig potentials we show that a broad class of time-dependent forces can be applied without inducing any scattering, while there is a breakdown of the reflectionless property when there is a broadband distribution of initial particle momentum, involving both positive and negative components.

  11. Status of the LCLS-II Accelerating Cavity Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Ed [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Marhauser, Frank [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Fitzpatrick, Jarrod A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, Ari D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Preble, Joe [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wilson, Katherine M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Grimm, C. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Burrill, Andrew B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gonnella, Daniel [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Cavity serial production for the LCLS-II 4 GeV CM SRF linac has started. A quantity of 266 accelerating cavities has been ordered from two industrial vendors. Jefferson Laboratory leads the cavity procurement activities for the project and has successfully transferred the Nitrogen-Doping process to the industrial partners in the initial phase, which is now being applied for the production cavities. We report on the results from vendor qualification and the status of the cavity production for LCLS-II.

  12. Niobium quarter-wave cavity for the New Delhi booster linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the completion of development of a 97 Mhz niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavity to be used in a booster linac for the New Delhi 16UD pellatron electrostatic accelerator. A prototype cavity, which incorporates a niobium-bellows tuning device, has been completed and operated at 4.2 K at accelerating gradients above 4 MV/m for extended periods of time

  13. Niobium quarter-wave cavity for the New Delhi booster linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1997-09-01

    This paper reports the completion of development of a 97 Mhz niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavity to be used in a booster linac for the New Delhi 16UD pellatron electrostatic accelerator. A prototype cavity, which incorporates a niobium-bellows tuning device, has been completed and operated at 4.2 K at accelerating gradients above 4 MV/m for extended periods of time.

  14. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Peter Gwin [IIT, Chicago

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  15. Design of inductively detuned RF extraction cavities for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Li, H.

    1995-04-01

    An inductively detuned traveling wave cavity for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator expected to extract high RF power at 11. 424 GHz for the 1 TeV Center of Mass Next Linear Collider has been designed. Longitudinal beam dynamics studies led to the following requirements on cavity design: (a) Extraction of 360 MW of RF power with RF component of the current being 1.15 kAmps at 11.424 GHz, (b) Inductively detuned traveling wave cavity with wave phase velocity equal to 4/3 the speed of light, (c) Output cavity with appropriate Q ext and eigenfrequency for proper matching. Furthermore, transverse beam dynamics require low shunt impedances to avoid the beam break-up instability. We describe the design effort to meet these criteria based on frequency-domain and time-domain computations using 2D- and 3D- electromagnetic codes

  16. Localization of rf breakdowns in a standing wave cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faya Wang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available At SLAC, a five-cell, normal-conducting, L-band (1.3 GHz, standing-wave (SW cavity was built as a prototype positron capture accelerator for the ILC. The structure met the ILC gradient goal but required extensive rf processing. When rf breakdowns occurred, a large variation was observed in the decay rate of the stored energy in the cavity after the input power was shut off. It appeared that the breakdowns were isolating sections of the cavity, and that the trapped energy in those sections was then partitioned among its natural modes, producing a distinct beating pattern during the decay. To explore this phenomenon further, an equivalent circuit model of cavity was created that reproduces well its normal operating characteristics. The model was then used to compute the spectra of trapped energy for different numbers of isolated cells. The resulting modal patterns agree well with those of the breakdown data, and thus such a comparison appears to provide a means of identifying the irises on which the breakdowns occurred.

  17. Modeling high-power RF accelerator cavities with SPICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical interactions between RF accelerator cavities and high-power beams can be treated on personal computers using a lumped circuit element model and the SPICE circuit analysis code. Applications include studies of wake potentials, two-beam accelerators, microwave sources, and transverse mode damping. This report describes the construction of analogs for TM mn0 modes and the creation of SPICE input for cylindrical cavities. The models were used to study continuous generation of kA electron beam pulses from a vacuum cavity driven by a high-power RF source

  18. Accelerator cavities as a probe of millicharged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gies, H. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Jaeckel, J.; Ringwald, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    We investigate Schwinger pair production of millicharged fermions in the strong electric field of cavities used for particle accelerators. Even without a direct detection mechanism at hand, millicharged particles, if they exist, contribute to the energy loss of the cavity and thus leave an imprint on the cavity's quality factor. Already conservative estimates substantially constrain the electric charge of these hypothetical particles; the resulting bounds are competitive with the currently best laboratory bounds which arise from experiments based on polarized laser light propagating in a magnetic field. We propose an experimental setup for measuring the electric current comprised of the millicharged particles produced in the cavity. (orig.)

  19. Low- to medium-β cavities for heavy ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facco, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Acceleration of low- and medium-β heavy ions by means of superconducting (SC) linear accelerators (linacs) was made possible by the development, during four decades, of a particular class of cavities characterized by low operation frequency, several different shapes and different electromagnetic modes of operation. Their performance, initially rather poor in operating accelerators, have steadily increased along with the technological progress and nowadays the gap with the high-β, elliptical cavities is close to be filled. Initially confined to a very small number of applications, this family of cavities evolved in many directions becoming one of the most widespread in linacs. Nowadays it is present in the majority of superconducting radio-frequency ion linac projects worldwide. An overview of low- and medium-β SC cavities for heavy ions, focused on their recent evolution and achievements, will be given.

  20. Study of superconducting cavities for high power proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biarrotte, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The research program on hybrid reactors has started in France in order to study the technologies allowing the transmutation of radioactive wastes thanks to a spallation neutron source supplied by a linear high intensity proton accelerator. The study of the high energy part of this accelerator (superconducting accelerator for hybrid) has started, and its aim is the design of superconducting radiofrequency cavities which make the two different sections of the accelerator (0.47 and 0.65). This thesis presents the advance of the work carried out on this topic since 1997, in particular the design and optimization of the 5-cell cavities which work at the 704.4 MHz frequency. The experimental part of the study has been carried out in parallel with the industrial fabrication (Cerca) of several prototypes of mono-cell cavities. These cavities have shown very good RF performances during the tests in vertical cryostat; the A 102 A cavity, in particular develops a Q0 of 7.10 10 (indicating very low RF losses) and reaches an accelerator field of 25 MV/m, i.e. more than two times the specified value (about 10 MV/V). Finally, a new risk analysis method for the excitation of the upper modes is proposed. This method shows in particular the uselessness of the implementation of HOM couplers on the cavities for a continuous beam use. (J.S.)

  1. Superconducting Accelerating Cavity Pressure Sensitivity Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodnizki, J.; Horvits, Z.; Ben Aliz, Y.; Grin, A.; Weissman, L.

    2014-01-01

    The measured sensitivity of the cavity was evaluated and it is full consistent with the measured values. It was explored that the tuning system (the fog structure) has a significant contribution to the cavity sensitivity. By using ribs or by modifying the rigidity of the fog we may reduce the HWR sensitivity. During cool down and warming up we have to analyze the stresses on the HWR to avoid plastic deformation to the HWR since the Niobium yield is an order of magnitude lower in room temperature

  2. Microscopic investigation of RF surfaces of 3 GHz niobium accelerator cavities following RF processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.; Barnes, P.; Flynn, T.; Kirchgessner, J.; Knobloch, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Sears, J.

    1993-01-01

    RF processing of Superconducting accelerating cavities is achieved through a change in the electron field emission (FE) characteristics of the RF surface. The authors have examined the RF surfaces of several single-cell 3 GHz cavities, following RF processing, in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The RF processing sessions included both High Peak Power (P ≤ 50 kW) pulsed processing, and low power (≤ 20 W) continuous wave processing. The experimental apparatus also included a thermometer array on the cavity outer wall, allowing temperature maps to characterize the emission before and after RF processing gains. Multiple sites have been located in cavities which showed improvements in cavity behavior due to RF processing. Several SEM-located sites can be correlated with changes in thermometer signals, indicating a direct relationship between the surface site and emission reduction due to RF processing. Information gained from the SEM investigations and thermometry are used to enhance the theoretical model of RF processing

  3. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) task is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic chemical sensing techniques and apply them to detecting proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Our primary application is detecting signatures of WMD production, but LWIR CES techniques are also capable of detecting chemical weapons. The LWIR CES task is concerned exclusively with developing novel point sensors; stand-off detection is addressed by other PNNL tasks and projects. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on LWIR CES sensor development.

  4. A water-filled radio frequency accelerating cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.; Pogue, E.W.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to study water-filled resonant cavities as a high-energy density source to drive high-current accelerator configurations. Basic considerations lead to the expectation that a dielectric-filled cavity should be able to store up to e/e o as much energy as a vacuum one with the same dimensions and thus be capable of accelerating a proportionately larger amount of charge before cavity depletion occurs. During this project, we confirmed that water-filled cavities with e/e o = 60-80 did indeed behave with the expected characteristics, in terms of resonant TM modes and cavity Q. We accomplished this result with numerical cavity eigenvalue codes; fully electromagnetic, two-dimensional, particle-in-cell codes; and, most significantly, with scaled experiments performed in water-filled aluminum cavities. The low-power experiments showed excellent agreement with the numerical results. Simulations of the high-field, high-current mode of operation indicated that charged-particle loss on the dielectric windows, which separate the cavity from the beamline, must be carefully controlled to avoid significant distortion of the axial fields

  5. Complex envelope control of pulsed accelerating fields in superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Czarski, T

    2010-01-01

    A digital control system for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented in this work. FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) based controller, managed by MATLAB, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The LLRF - Low Level Radio Frequency system for FLASH project in DESY is introduced. Essential modeling of a cavity resonator with signal and power analysis is considered as a key approach to the control methods. An electrical model is represented by the non-stationary state space equation for the complex envelope of the cavity voltage driven by the current generator and the beam loading. The electromechanical model of the superconducting cavity resonator including the Lorentz force detuning has been developed for a simulation purpose. The digital signal processing is proposed for the field vector detection. The field vector sum control is considered for multiple cavities driven by one klystron. An algebraic, complex domain model is proposed for the system analysis. The c...

  6. Secondary Electron Emission from Plasma Processed Accelerating Cavity Grade Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basovic, Milos [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the particle accelerator technology have enabled numerous fundamental discoveries in 20th century physics. Extensive interdisciplinary research has always supported further development of accelerator technology in efforts of reaching each new energy frontier. Accelerating cavities, which are used to transfer energy to accelerated charged particles, have been one of the main focuses of research and development in the particle accelerator field. Over the last fifty years, in the race to break energy barriers, there has been constant improvement of the maximum stable accelerating field achieved in accelerating cavities. Every increase in the maximum attainable accelerating fields allowed for higher energy upgrades of existing accelerators and more compact designs of new accelerators. Each new and improved technology was faced with ever emerging limiting factors. With the standard high accelerating gradients of more than 25 MV/m, free electrons inside the cavities get accelerated by the field, gaining enough energy to produce more electrons in their interactions with the walls of the cavity. The electron production is exponential and the electron energy transfer to the walls of a cavity can trigger detrimental processes, limiting the performance of the cavity. The root cause of the free electron number gain is a phenomenon called Secondary Electron Emission (SEE). Even though the phenomenon has been known and studied over a century, there are still no effective means of controlling it. The ratio between the electrons emitted from the surface and the impacting electrons is defined as the Secondary Electron Yield (SEY). A SEY ratio larger than 1 designates an increase in the total number of electrons. In the design of accelerator cavities, the goal is to reduce the SEY to be as low as possible using any form of surface manipulation. In this dissertation, an experimental setup was developed and used to study the SEY of various sample surfaces that were treated

  7. Secondary electron emission from plasma processed accelerating cavity grade niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basovic, Milos

    Advances in the particle accelerator technology have enabled numerous fundamental discoveries in 20th century physics. Extensive interdisciplinary research has always supported further development of accelerator technology in efforts of reaching each new energy frontier. Accelerating cavities, which are used to transfer energy to accelerated charged particles, have been one of the main focuses of research and development in the particle accelerator field. Over the last fifty years, in the race to break energy barriers, there has been constant improvement of the maximum stable accelerating field achieved in accelerating cavities. Every increase in the maximum attainable accelerating fields allowed for higher energy upgrades of existing accelerators and more compact designs of new accelerators. Each new and improved technology was faced with ever emerging limiting factors. With the standard high accelerating gradients of more than 25 MV/m, free electrons inside the cavities get accelerated by the field, gaining enough energy to produce more electrons in their interactions with the walls of the cavity. The electron production is exponential and the electron energy transfer to the walls of a cavity can trigger detrimental processes, limiting the performance of the cavity. The root cause of the free electron number gain is a phenomenon called Secondary Electron Emission (SEE). Even though the phenomenon has been known and studied over a century, there are still no effective means of controlling it. The ratio between the electrons emitted from the surface and the impacting electrons is defined as the Secondary Electron Yield (SEY). A SEY ratio larger than 1 designates an increase in the total number of electrons. In the design of accelerator cavities, the goal is to reduce the SEY to be as low as possible using any form of surface manipulation. In this dissertation, an experimental setup was developed and used to study the SEY of various sample surfaces that were treated

  8. Advanced low-beta cavity development for proton and ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Z.A., E-mail: zconway@anl.gov; Kelly, M.P.; Ostroumov, P.N.

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in designing and processing low-beta superconducting cavities at Argonne National Laboratory are very encouraging for future applications requiring compact proton and ion accelerators. One of the major benefits of these accelerating structures is achieving real-estate accelerating gradients greater than 3 MV/m very efficiently either continuously or for long-duty cycle operation (>1%). The technology has been implemented in low-beta accelerator cryomodules for the Argonne ATLAS heavy-ion linac where the cryomodules are required to have real-estate gradients of more than 3 MV/m. In offline testing low-beta cavities with even higher gradients have already been achieved. This paper will review this work where we have achieved surface fields greater than 166 mT magnetic and 117 MV/m electric in a 72 MHz quarter-wave resonator optimized for β = 0.077 ions.

  9. Advanced low-beta cavity development for proton and ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Z. A.; Kelly, M. P.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in designing and processing low-beta superconducting cavities at Argonne National Laboratory are very encouraging for future applications requiring compact proton and ion accelerators. One of the major benefits of these accelerating structures is achieving real-estate accelerating gradients greater than 3 MV/m very efficiently either continuously or for long-duty cycle operation (>1%). The technology has been implemented in low-beta accelerator cryomodules for the Argonne ATLAS heavy-ion linac where the cryomodules are required to have real-estate gradients of more than 3 MV/m. In offline testing low-beta cavities with even higher gradients have already been achieved. This paper will review this work where we have achieved surface fields greater than 166 mT magnetic and 117 MV/m electric in a 72 MHz quarter-wave resonator optimized for beta = 0.077 ions.

  10. Advanced low-beta cavity development for proton and ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, Z.A.; Kelly, M.P.; Ostroumov, P.N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in designing and processing low-beta superconducting cavities at Argonne National Laboratory are very encouraging for future applications requiring compact proton and ion accelerators. One of the major benefits of these accelerating structures is achieving real-estate accelerating gradients greater than 3 MV/m very efficiently either continuously or for long-duty cycle operation (>1%). The technology has been implemented in low-beta accelerator cryomodules for the Argonne ATLAS heavy-ion linac where the cryomodules are required to have real-estate gradients of more than 3 MV/m. In offline testing low-beta cavities with even higher gradients have already been achieved. This paper will review this work where we have achieved surface fields greater than 166 mT magnetic and 117 MV/m electric in a 72 MHz quarter-wave resonator optimized for β = 0.077 ions

  11. Laser polishing for topography management of accelerator cavity surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Klopf, J. Mike [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Improved energy efficiency and reduced cost are greatly desired for advanced particle accelerators. Progress toward both can be made by atomically-smoothing the interior surface of the niobium superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities at the machine's heart. Laser polishing offers a green alternative to the present aggressive chemical processes. We found parameters suitable for polishing niobium in all surface states expected for cavity production. As a result, careful measurement of the resulting surface chemistry revealed a modest thinning of the surface oxide layer, but no contamination.

  12. Electron-beam direct drive for rf accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahemow, M.D.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a Program to Demonstrate Electron-Beam Direct Drive for Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerators at the Westinghouse R and D Center. The experimental program was undertaken using an existing electron beam facility at the Westinghouse R and C Center to demonstrate the potential of the Direct Drive RF Cavities for High Power Beams concept discussed as part of a program to develop a viable alternate concept for driving RF linear accelerators

  13. Beam loading and cavity compensation for the ground test accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jachim, S.P.; Natter, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) will be a heavily beam-loaded H/sup minus/ linac with tight tolerances on accelerating field parameters. The methods used in modeling the effects of beam loading in this machine are described. The response of the cavity to both beam and radio-frequency (RF) drive stimulus is derived, including the effects of cavity detuning. This derivation is not restricted to a small-signal approximation. An analytical method for synthesizing a predistortion network that decouples the amplitude and phase responses of the cavity is also outlined. Simulation of performance, including beam loading, is achieved through use of a control system analysis software package. A straightforward method is presented for extrapolating this work to model large coupled structures with closely spaced parasitic modes. Results to date have enabled the RF control system designs for GTA to be optimized and have given insight into their operation. 6 refs., 10 figs

  14. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-01-01

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  15. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna, E-mail: anirban.bhattacharyya@physics.uu.se; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-11-21

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  16. Reducing the asymmetry in coupled cavity of linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Xianlin; Wu Congfeng

    2013-01-01

    Background: With the development of high energy physics, high performance of electron linear accelerator is required for large collider, FEL and high brightness synchrotron radiation light source. Structure asymmetry of single coupler destroys the symmetry of field distribution in coupled cavity, which reduces the quality of beam. Purpose: Optimize the asymmetry of field distribution in coupled cavity and improve the quality of beam. Methods: The simulation designs are made for single offset coupler, double symmetry coupler and the new coupler loaded by dielectric rods at X band by using CST microwave studio code. Results: The results show that the distribution of field in coupled cavity is better and all particles almost locate at the center of beam hole after beam passing through the coupler loaded by dielectric rods. The energy spread has also been significantly improved. Conclusions: The coupler loaded by dielectric rods can optimize the asymmetry of field distribution in coupled cavity and improve the quality of beam. (authors)

  17. Resonance control for a cw [continuous wave] accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Biddle, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    A resonance-control technique is described that has been successfully applied to several cw accelerating structures built by the Los Alamos National Laboratory for the National Bureau of Standards and for the University of Illinois. The technique involves sensing the rf fields in an accelerating structure as well as the rf power feeding into the cavity and, then, using the measurement to control the resonant frequency of the structure by altering the temperature of the structure. The temperature of the structure is altered by adjusting the temperature of the circulating cooling water. The technique has been applied to continuous wave (cw) side-coupled cavities only but should have applications with most high-average-power accelerator structures. Some additional effort would be required for pulsed systems

  18. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10 9 at 2.5K, and 8x10 9 at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers

  19. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10{sup 9} at 2.5K, and 8x10{sup 9} at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers.

  20. Niobium Coatings for the HIE-ISOLDE QWR Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jecklin, N; Delaup, B; Ferreira, L; Mondino, I; Sublet, A; Therasse, M; Venturini Desolaro, W

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy at ISOLDE) project is the upgrade of the existing ISOLDE (Isotope Separator On Line DEvice) facility at CERN, which is dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics experiments. A new linear accelerator made of 20 ȕ=10.3% and 12 ȕ=6.3% quarter-wave resonators (QWR) superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities at 101 MHz will be built, and in a first phase two cryomodules of 5 high-ȕ cavities each are scheduled to accelerate first beams in 2015. The cavities are made of a copper substrate, with a sputter-coated superconductive niobium (Nb) layer, operated at 4.5 K with an accelerating field of 6 MV/m at 10W Radio-Frequency (RF) losses (Q=4.5· 108). In this paper we will discuss the baseline surface treatment and coating procedure which allows obtaining the required performance, as well as the steps undertaken in order to prepare series production of the required number of cavities guaranteeing their quality and functional...

  1. Modulation of cavity-polaritons by surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lima, M. M.; Poel, Mike van der; Hey, R.

    2006-01-01

    We modulate cavity-polaritons using surface acoustic waves. The corresponding formation of a mini-Brillouin zone and band folding of the polariton dispersion is demonstrated for the first time. Results are in good agreement with model calculations.......We modulate cavity-polaritons using surface acoustic waves. The corresponding formation of a mini-Brillouin zone and band folding of the polariton dispersion is demonstrated for the first time. Results are in good agreement with model calculations....

  2. Comparison of SW and TW non-synchronous accelerating cavities as used in electron beam storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolfaghari, A.; Demos, P.T.; Flanz, J.B.; Jacobs, K.

    1991-01-01

    The authors relate the parameters of detuned standing wave (SW) and non-synchronous beam travelling wave (TW) accelerating cavities of equivalent equilibrium performance when used to compensate for radiation and parasitic energy losses by electrons circulating in a high energy electron storage ring. The relationship is expressed in terms of the coupling parameter β and cavity tuning angle ψ of the TW accelerator's equivalent SW system. A given TW cavity corresponds to a standing wave system possessing specific settings of β and ψ. This is shown for the constant impedance TW waveguide, for which β and ψ can be expressed as explicit functions of TW cavity length 1, attenuation factor I, RF electric field phase velocity V p , and shunt impedance r. Coupling parameter β depends additionally on SW cavity shunt impedance R. The basis they have used for formulating the equivalence of the two systems follows Travelling Wave Cavity Non-Synchronous Beam Loading theory developed by G.A. Loew and Standing Wave Circuit Analysis theory as described by P.B. Wilson

  3. Energy loss to parasitic modes of accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sands, M.

    1974-01-01

    At the maximum stored current, each circulating beam in PEP will consist of three bunches, each about 10 cm long containing 1.5 /times/ 10 12 particles. The large electric charge carried by such a bunch (2.5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/7/ coulomb) will, because of its short length, give rise to a large transient excitation of hundreds of parasitic modes in the accelerating cavities. The energy loss of the stored beam to the cavities from this process may be comparable to the loss to synchrotron radiation, and may, therefore, require a significant increase in power from the accelerating rf system. In this note I considered three aspects of this effect. First, an attempt is made to estimate the magnitude of the energy loss of a bunch in a single passage through the accelerating cavities. Then, I consider the effects of the periodic passages of the bunches in a single stored beam. And finally, I look at the consequences of storing two counter-rotating beams. The general conclusions are that the magnitude energy loss to the parasitic modes is serious, though probably not disastrous; and that, in general, the separate stored bunches will act incoherently. 2 refs., 7 figs

  4. Wake-field studies on photonic band gap accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Kroll, N.; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, M/S 26, P.O. Box 4349, Stanford, California; Smith, D.R.; Schultz, S.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the wake-field of several metal Photonic Band Gap (PBG) cavities which consist of either a square or a hexagonal array of metal cylinders, bounded on top and bottom by conducting or superconducting sheets, surrounded by placing microwave absorber at the periphery or by replacing outer rows of metal cylinders with lossy dielectric ones, or by metallic walls. A removed cylinder from the center of the array constitutes a site defect where a localized electromagnetic mode can occur. While both monopole and dipole wake-fields have been studied, we confine our attention here mainly to the dipole case. The dipole wake-field is produced by modes in the propagation bands which tend to fill the entire cavity more or less uniformly and are thus easy to damp selectively. MAFIA time domain simulation of the transverse wake-field has been compared with that of a cylindrical pill-box comparison cavity. Even without damping the wake-field of the metal PBG cavity is substantially smaller than that of the pill-box cavity and may be further reduced by increasing the size of the lattice. By introducing lossy material at the periphery we have been able to produce Q factors for the dipole modes in the 40 to 120 range without significantly degrading the accelerating mode. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  5. Analytical approach and scaling laws in the design of disk-loaded travelling wave accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.

    1993-09-01

    Starting from a single resonant rf cavity, disk-loaded travelling (forward or backward) wave accelerating structures' properties are determined by rather simple analytical formulae. They include the coupling coefficient K in the dispersion relation, group velocity v g , shunt impedance R, wake potential W (longitudinal and transverse), the coupling coefficient β of the coupler cavity and the coupler cavity axis shift δ r which is introduced to compensate the asymmetry caused by the coupling aperture. (author) 12 refs., 18 figs

  6. Demountable damped cavity for HOM-damping in ILC superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konomi, T., E-mail: konomi@ims.ac.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yasuda, F. [University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Furuta, F. [Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Saito, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-01-11

    We have designed a new higher-order-mode (HOM) damper called a demountable damped cavity (DDC) as part of the R and D efforts for the superconducting cavity of the International Linear Collider (ILC). The DDC has two design concepts. The first is an axially symmetrical layout to obtain high damping efficiency. The DDC has a coaxial structure along the beam axis to realize strong coupling with HOMs. HOMs are damped by an RF absorber at the end of the coaxial waveguide and the accelerating mode is reflected by a choke filter mounted at the entrance of the coaxial waveguide. The second design concept is a demountable structure to facilitate cleaning, in order to suppress the Q-slope problem in a high field. A single-cell cavity with the DDC was fabricated to test four performance parameters. The first was frequency matching between the accelerating cavity and the choke filter. Since the bandwidth of the resonance frequency in a superconducting cavity is very narrow, there is a possibility that the accelerating field will leak to the RF absorber because of thermal shrinkage. The design bandwidth of the choke filter is 25 kHz. It was demonstrated that frequency matching adjusted at room temperature could be successfully maintained at 2 K. The second parameter was the performance of the demountable structure. At the joint, the magnetic field is 1/6 of the maximum field in the accelerating cavity. Ultimately, the accelerating field reached 19 MV/m and Q{sub 0} was 1.5×10{sup 10} with a knife-edge shape. The third parameter was field emission and multipacting. Although the choke structure has numerous parallel surfaces that are susceptible to the multipacting problem, it was found that neither field emission nor multipacting presented problems in both an experiment and simulation. The final parameter was the Q values of the HOM. The RF absorber adopted in the system is a Ni–Zn ferrite type. The RF absorber shape was designed based on the measurement data of permittivity

  7. Demountable damped cavity for HOM-damping in ILC superconducting accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomi, T.; Yasuda, F.; Furuta, F.; Saito, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed a new higher-order-mode (HOM) damper called a demountable damped cavity (DDC) as part of the R and D efforts for the superconducting cavity of the International Linear Collider (ILC). The DDC has two design concepts. The first is an axially symmetrical layout to obtain high damping efficiency. The DDC has a coaxial structure along the beam axis to realize strong coupling with HOMs. HOMs are damped by an RF absorber at the end of the coaxial waveguide and the accelerating mode is reflected by a choke filter mounted at the entrance of the coaxial waveguide. The second design concept is a demountable structure to facilitate cleaning, in order to suppress the Q-slope problem in a high field. A single-cell cavity with the DDC was fabricated to test four performance parameters. The first was frequency matching between the accelerating cavity and the choke filter. Since the bandwidth of the resonance frequency in a superconducting cavity is very narrow, there is a possibility that the accelerating field will leak to the RF absorber because of thermal shrinkage. The design bandwidth of the choke filter is 25 kHz. It was demonstrated that frequency matching adjusted at room temperature could be successfully maintained at 2 K. The second parameter was the performance of the demountable structure. At the joint, the magnetic field is 1/6 of the maximum field in the accelerating cavity. Ultimately, the accelerating field reached 19 MV/m and Q 0 was 1.5×10 10 with a knife-edge shape. The third parameter was field emission and multipacting. Although the choke structure has numerous parallel surfaces that are susceptible to the multipacting problem, it was found that neither field emission nor multipacting presented problems in both an experiment and simulation. The final parameter was the Q values of the HOM. The RF absorber adopted in the system is a Ni–Zn ferrite type. The RF absorber shape was designed based on the measurement data of permittivity and

  8. A mm-wave planar microcavity structure for electron linear accelerator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.; Mills, F.; Mavrogenes, G.; Henke, H.

    1993-01-01

    The muffin-tin cavity structure is planar and well suited for mm-wave accelerator with silicon etching techniques. A constant impedance traveling-wave structure is considered for design simplicity. The RF parameters are calculated and the shunt impedance is compared with the shunt impedance of a disk loaded cylindrical structure

  9. Electromagnetic Wave Chaos in Gradient Refractive Index Optical Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, P. B.; Fromhold, T. M.; Taylor, R. P.; Micolich, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave chaos is investigated using two-dimensional optical cavities formed in a cylindrical gradient refractive index lens with reflective surfaces. When the planar ends of the lens are cut at an angle to its axis, the geometrical ray paths are chaotic. In this regime, the electromagnetic mode spectrum of the cavity is modulated by both real and ghost periodic ray paths, which also 'scar' the electric field intensity distributions of many modes. When the cavity is coupled to waveguides, the eigenmodes generate complex series of resonant peaks in the electromagnetic transmission spectrum

  10. Particle acceleration by plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, C.

    2006-01-01

    In an advanced particle accelerator particles are driven near by light velocity through ionized gas. Such plasma devices are compact, cost efficient and usable in many fields. Examples are given in detail. (GL)

  11. Prototyping high-gradient mm-wave accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Haase, Andrew; Neilson, Jeffrey; Tantawi, Sami

    2017-01-01

    We present single-cell accelerating structures designed for high-gradient testing at 110 GHz. The purpose of this work is to study the basic physics of ultrahigh vacuum RF breakdown in high-gradient RF accelerators. The accelerating structures are π-mode standing-wave cavities fed with a TM 01 circular waveguide. The structures are fabricated using precision milling out of two metal blocks, and the blocks are joined with diffusion bonding and brazing. The impact of fabrication and joining techniques on the cell geometry and RF performance will be discussed. First prototypes had a measured Q 0 of 2800, approaching the theoretical design value of 3300. The geometry of these accelerating structures are as close as practical to singlecell standing-wave X-band accelerating structures more than 40 of which were tested at SLAC. This wealth of X-band data will serve as a baseline for these 110 GHz tests. Furthermore, the structures will be powered with short pulses from a MW gyrotron oscillator. RF power of 1 MW may allow an accelerating gradient of 400 MeV/m to be reached.

  12. Enhanced efficiency of plasma acceleration in the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badziak, J; Rosiński, M; Jabłoński, S; Pisarczyk, T; Chodukowski, T; Parys, P; Rączka, P; Krousky, E; Ullschmied, J; Liska, R; Kucharik, M

    2015-01-01

    Among various methods for the acceleration of dense plasmas the mechanism called laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) is capable of achieving the highest energetic efficiency. In the LICPA scheme, a projectile placed in a cavity is accelerated along a guiding channel by the laser-induced thermal plasma pressure or by the radiation pressure of an intense laser radiation trapped in the cavity. This arrangement leads to a significant enhancement of the hydrodynamic or electromagnetic forces driving the projectile, relative to standard laser acceleration schemes. The aim of this paper is to review recent experimental and numerical works on LICPA with the emphasis on the acceleration of heavy plasma macroparticles and dense ion beams. The main experimental part concerns the research carried out at the kilojoule sub-nanosecond PALS laser facility in Prague. Our measurements performed at this facility, supported by advanced two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, have demonstrated that the LICPA accelerator working in the long-pulse hydrodynamic regime can be a highly efficient tool for the acceleration of heavy plasma macroparticles to hyper-velocities and the generation of ultra-high-pressure (>100 Mbar) shocks through the collision of the macroparticle with a solid target. The energetic efficiency of the macroparticle acceleration and the shock generation has been found to be significantly higher than that for other laser-based methods used so far. Using particle-in-cell simulations it is shown that the LICPA scheme is highly efficient also in the short-pulse high-intensity regime and, in particular, may be used for production of intense ion beams of multi-MeV to GeV ion energies with the energetic efficiency of tens of per cent, much higher than for conventional laser acceleration schemes. (paper)

  13. Continuous wave room temperature external ring cavity quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revin, D. G., E-mail: d.revin@sheffield.ac.uk; Hemingway, M.; Vaitiekus, D.; Cockburn, J. W. [Physics and Astronomy Department, The University of Sheffield, S3 7RH Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hempler, N.; Maker, G. T.; Malcolm, G. P. A. [M Squared Lasers Ltd., G20 0SP Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-29

    An external ring cavity quantum cascade laser operating at ∼5.2 μm wavelength in a continuous-wave regime at the temperature of 15 °C is demonstrated. Out-coupled continuous-wave optical powers of up to 23 mW are observed for light of one propagation direction with an estimated total intra-cavity optical power flux in excess of 340 mW. The uni-directional regime characterized by the intensity ratio of more than 60 for the light propagating in the opposite directions was achieved. A single emission peak wavelength tuning range of 90 cm{sup −1} is realized by the incorporation of a diffraction grating into the cavity.

  14. Continuous wave room temperature external ring cavity quantum cascade laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Vaitiekus, D.; Cockburn, J. W.; Hempler, N.; Maker, G. T.; Malcolm, G. P. A.

    2015-01-01

    An external ring cavity quantum cascade laser operating at ∼5.2 μm wavelength in a continuous-wave regime at the temperature of 15 °C is demonstrated. Out-coupled continuous-wave optical powers of up to 23 mW are observed for light of one propagation direction with an estimated total intra-cavity optical power flux in excess of 340 mW. The uni-directional regime characterized by the intensity ratio of more than 60 for the light propagating in the opposite directions was achieved. A single emission peak wavelength tuning range of 90 cm −1 is realized by the incorporation of a diffraction grating into the cavity

  15. Analysis of a three-cell cavity which suppresses instabilities associated with the accelerating mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Kageyama, T.

    1994-01-01

    In a large ring with extremely heavy beam loading such as a B-factory it is possible that the accelerating mode, itself, gives rise to a longitudinal coupled-bunch instability. In order to solve this problem Shintake proposed to attach a storage cavity to an accelerating cavity. The present paper shows that the system can be put into practical use, if one adds a coupling cavity in between the two cavities. (author)

  16. Lower hybrid wave cavities detected by the FREJA satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecseli, H.L.; Iranpour, K.; Holter, Oe.; Lybekk, B.; Holtet J.; Truelsen, J.; Holback, B.

    1994-12-01

    Localized electrostatic wave packets in the frequency region of lower-hybrid waves have been detected by the instruments on the FREJA satellite. These waves are usually associated with local density depletions indicating that the structures can be interpreted as wave filled cavities. The basic features of the observations are discussed. Based on simple statistical arguments it is attempted to present some characteristics which have to be accommodated within an ultimate theory describing the observed wave phenomena. An explanation in terms of collapse of nonlinear lower-hybrid waves is discussed in particular. It is argued that such a model seems inapplicable, at least in its simplest form, by providing time and length scales which are not in agreement with observations. Alternatives to this model are presented. 24 refs., 8 figs

  17. Thermal gravitational waves in accelerating universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ghayour

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational waves are considered in thermal vacuum state. The amplitude and spectral energy density of gravitational waves are found enhanced in thermal vacuum state compared to its zero temperature counterpart. Therefore, the allowed amount of enhancement depends on the upper bound of WMAP-5 and WMAP-7 for the amplitude and spectral energy density of gravitational waves. The enhancement of amplitude and spectral energy density of the waves in thermal vacuum state is consistent with current accelerating phase of the universe. The enhancement feature of amplitude and spectral energy density of the waves is independent of the expansion model of the universe and hence the thermal effect accounts for it. Therefore, existence of thermal gravitational waves is not ruled out

  18. Acceleration waves in non-ideal magnetogasdynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Singh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of propagation of acceleration waves in an unsteady inviscid non-ideal gas under the influence of magnetic field is investigated. The characteristic solution to the problem in the neighbourhood of leading characteristics has been determined. An evolution equation governing the behaviour of acceleration waves has been derived. It is shown that a linear solution in the characteristic plane exhibits non-linear behaviour in physical plane. The effect of magnetic field on the formation of shock in non-ideal gas flow with planar and cylindrical symmetry is analysed. It is noticed that all compressive waves terminate into a shock wave. Further, we also compare/contrast the nature of solution in ideal and non-ideal magnetogasdynamic regime.

  19. Particle acceleration and shock wave structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DRURY, L.O'C.

    1989-01-01

    A significant determinant in the large-scale structure and evolution of strong collisionless shocks under astrophysical conditions is probably the acceleration of charged particles. The reaction of these particles on the dynamical structure of the shock wave is discussed both theoretically and in the light of recent numerical calculations. Astrophysical implications for the evolution of supernova remnants, are considered. (author). 15 refs

  20. Beam loading effects in a standing wave accelerator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Shigeaki; Katayama, Takeshi; Tojyo, Eiki; Yoshida, Katsuhide.

    1978-11-01

    The steady-state beam loading effects on the accelerating field in the disk-loaded structure of a standing wave type have been systematically studied. The electron bunch from a 15 MeV electron linac is injected at arbitrary phase of the external driving field in the test structure. The change of the phase shift of the accelerating field and that of the stored energy are measured as a function of the phase on which the bunch rides. The former shows drastic change when the bunch is around the crest of the driving field and when the beam loading is heavy, whereas the latter varies sinusoidally for any beam loading. The resonant frequency shift of the structure due to beam loading is estimated by using the measured results. All the experimental results are well explained by the normal mode analysis of the microwave cavity theory. (author)

  1. A tuning method for nonuniform traveling-wave accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Cunkui; Zheng Shuxin; Shao Jiahang; Jia Xiaoyu; Chen Huaibi

    2013-01-01

    The tuning method of uniform traveling-wave structures based on non-resonant perturbation field distribution measurement has been widely used in tuning both constant-impedance and constant-gradient structures. In this paper, the method of tuning nonuniform structures is proposed on the basis of the above theory. The internal reflection coefficient of each cell is obtained from analyzing the normalized voltage distribution. A numerical simulation of tuning process according to the coupled cavity chain theory has been done and the result shows each cell is in right phase advance after tuning. The method will be used in the tuning of a disk-loaded traveling-wave structure being developed at the Accelerator Laboratory, Tsinghua University. (authors)

  2. High-Q superconducting niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Paula, L A N; Furtado, S R; Aguiar, O D; N F Oliveira Jr, N F Oliveira Jr; Castro, P J; Barroso, J J

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to optimize the electric Q-factor of superconducting niobium klystron cavities to be used in parametric transducers of the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector. Many cavities were manufactured from niobium with relatively high tantalum impurities (1420 ppm) and they were cryogenically tested to determine their resonance frequencies, unloaded electrical quality factors (Q 0 ) and electromagnetic couplings. These cavities were closed with a flat niobium plate with tantalum impurities below 1000 ppm and an unloaded electrical quality factors of the order of 10 5 have been obtained. AC conductivity of the order of 10 12 S/m has been found for niobium cavities when matching experimental results with computational simulations. These values for the Q-factor would allow the detector to reach the quantum limit of sensitivity of ∼ 10 −22 Hz −1/2 in the near future, making it possible to search for gravitational waves around 3.2 kHz. The experimental tests were performed at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv - CTA)

  3. Study on the dependence of the resonance frequency of accelerators on the cavities internal diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrao, V.A.; Franco, M.A.R.; Fuhrmann, C.

    1988-05-01

    The resonance frequencies of individual cavities and of a six cell disk-loaded prototype of an accelerating structure were measured as a function of cavity inner diameter. A linear relationship between the indidual cavity frequency and the six cell stack 2Π/3 mode frequency was obtained that will be very useful during the final tuning of the accelerating strutures of the IEAV linac. The dispersion diagrams were also obtained for various internal cavity diameters; these diagrams were utilized to estimate the group velocity and the RF filling time of the accelerating structure. (author) [pt

  4. Double layers, waves and particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, D.A.; Perry, C.H.; Bingham, R.; de Angelis, U.

    1993-09-01

    The author's conclusions that static potential differences, including those associated with double layers, could not be the cause of auroral electron acceleration, and that resonance with electrostatic wave turbulence provided a possible mechanism were dismissed in a recent publication as being totally incorrect. In this reply, the author finds the criticism to be built upon a number of misconceptions and factual errors which render it invalid. He is, therefore, able to re-affirm his earlier conclusions.

  5. Continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy based on the control of cavity reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixin; Ma, Weiguang; Fu, Xiaofang; Tan, Wei; Zhao, Gang; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2013-07-29

    A new type of continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectrometer based on the control of cavity reflection for trace gas detection was designed and evaluated. The technique separated the acquisitions of the ringdown event and the trigger signal to optical switch by detecting the cavity reflection and transmission, respectively. A detailed description of the time sequence of the measurement process was presented. In order to avoid the wrong extraction of ringdown time encountered accidentally in fitting procedure, the laser frequency and cavity length were scanned synchronously. Based on the statistical analysis of measured ringdown times, the frequency normalized minimum detectable absorption in the reflection control mode was 1.7 × 10(-9)cm(-1)Hz(-1/2), which was 5.4 times smaller than that in the transmission control mode. However the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption spectrum was only 3 times improved since the etalon effect existed. Finally, the peak absorption coefficients of the C(2)H(2) transition near 1530.9nm under different pressures showed a good agreement with the theoretical values.

  6. Suppression of beam-break-up in a standing wave free electron laser two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Kim, J.S.

    1994-03-01

    Various schemes are examined in this study on the suppression of beam break-up (BBU) in a standing wave free electron laser two-beam accelerator (SWFEL/TBA). Two schemes are found to be not only able to effectively suppress the BBU but at the same time have minimum effect on the microwave generation process inside the SWFEL cavities. One is making the cavity-iris junction sufficiently gradual and the other is stagger-tuning the cavities

  7. Technical training: RF superconductivity and accelerator cavity applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training

    2016-01-01

    We are happy to announce a new training course organised by the TE-VSC group in the field of the physics and applications of superconductors. The course provides an overview and update of the theory of radiofrequency and superconductors:   RF Superconductivity and Accelerator Cavity Applications https://cern.ch/course/?164VAC19 One timetable only:  Tuesday, 8 March 2016: from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, 9 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 10 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Monday, 14 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Tuesday, 15 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Wednesday, 16 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 17 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Target audience: Experts in radiofrequency or solid state physics (PhD level). Pre-requisites: Basic knowledge of quantum physics and superc...

  8. Resonant spin wave excitations in a magnonic crystal cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N.; Prabhakar, A.

    2018-03-01

    Spin polarized electric current, injected into permalloy (Py) through a nano contact, exerts a torque on the magnetization. The spin waves (SWs) thus excited propagate radially outward. We propose an antidot magnonic crystal (MC) with a three-hole defect (L3) around the nano contact, designed so that the frequency of the excited SWs, lies in the band gap of the MC. L3 thus acts as a resonant SW cavity. The energy in this magnonic crystal cavity can be tapped by an adjacent MC waveguide (MCW). An analysis of the simulated micromagnetic power spectrum, at the output port of the MCW reveals stable SW oscillations. The quality factor of the device, calculated using the decay method, was estimated as Q > 105 for an injected spin current density of 7 ×1012 A/m2.

  9. Self-accelerating parabolic cylinder waves in 1-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuce, C., E-mail: cyuce@anadolu.edu.tr

    2016-11-25

    Highlights: • We find a new class of self-accelerating waves. • We show that parabolic cylinder waves self-accelerates in a parabolic potential. • We discuss that truncated parabolic cylinder waves propagates large distance without almost being non-diffracted in free space. - Abstract: We introduce a new self-accelerating wave packet solution of the Schrodinger equation in one dimension. We obtain an exact analytical parabolic cylinder wave for the inverted harmonic potential. We show that truncated parabolic cylinder waves exhibits their accelerating feature.

  10. Vertical and horizontal test results of 3.9-GHz accelerating cavities at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabiboulline, T.; Edwards, H.; Foley, M.; Harms, E.; Hocker, James Andrew; Mitchell, D.; Rowe, A.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The 3rd harmonic 3.9GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve the beam performance of the VUV FEL, FLASH. In the frame of a collaborative agreement, Fermilab will provide DESY with a cryomodule containing a string of four cavities. Seven 9-cell Nb cavities were tested and six of them did reach accelerating gradient up to 24 MV/m almost twice more than design value of 14 MV/m. Two of these cavities are with new HOM couplers with improved design. In this paper we present all results of the vertical and horizontal tests.

  11. Conceptual design of an L-band recirculating superconducting traveling wave accelerating structure for ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrakhov, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Liu, Z.; Kazakov, S.; KEK, Tsukuba; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; Gai, W.

    2007-01-01

    With this paper, we propose the conceptual design of a traveling wave accelerating structure for a superconducting accelerator. The overall goal is to study a traveling wave (TW) superconducting (SC) accelerating structure for ILC that allows an increased accelerating gradient and, therefore reduction of the length of the collider. The conceptual studies were performed in order to optimize the acceleration structure design by minimizing the surface fields inside the cavity of the structure, to make the design compatible with existing technology, and to determine the maximum achievable gain in the accelerating gradient. The proposed solution considers RF feedback system redirecting the accelerating wave that passed through the superconducting traveling wave acceleration (STWA) section back to the input of the accelerating structure. The STWA structure has more cells per unit length than a TESLA structure but provides an accelerating gradient higher than a TESLA structure, consequently reducing the cost. In this paper, the STWA cell shape optimization, coupler cell design and feedback waveguide solution are considered. We also discuss the field flatness in the superconducting TW structure, the HOM modes and multipactor performance have been studied as well. The proposed TW structure design gives an overall 46% gain over the SW ILC structure if the 10 m long TW structure is employed

  12. Relic gravitational waves in the accelerating Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yang; Yuan Yefei; Zhao Wen; Chen Yingtian

    2005-01-01

    Recent observations have indicated that the Universe at the present stage is in an accelerating expansion, a process that has great implications. We evaluate the spectrum of relic gravitational waves in the current accelerating Universe and find that there are new features appearing in the resulting spectrum as compared to the decelerating models. In the low-frequency range the peak of the spectrum is now located at a frequency ν E ∼ (OMEGA m /OMEGA Λ ) 1/3 ν H , where ν H is the Hubble frequency, and there appears a new segment of spectrum between ν E and ν H . In all other intervals of frequencies ≥ν H , the spectral amplitude acquires an extra factor (OMEGA m /OMEGA Λ ), due to the current acceleration; otherwise the shape of the spectrum is similar to that in the decelerating models. The recent WMAP result of CMB anisotropies is used to normalize the amplitude for gravitational waves. The slope of the power spectrum depends sensitively on the scale factor a(τ) ∝ vertical bar τ vertical bar 1+β during the inflationary stage with β = -2 for the exact de Sitter space. With increasing β, the resulting spectrum is tilted to be flatter with more power at high frequencies, and the sensitivity of the second science run of the LIGO detectors puts a restriction on the parameter β ≤ -1.8. We also give a numerical solution which confirms these features

  13. Superstrong coupling of thin film magnetostatic waves with microwave cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Tang, Hong X., E-mail: hong.tang@yale.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Zou, Changling [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Jiang, Liang [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    We experimentally demonstrated the strong coupling between a microwave cavity and standing magnetostatic magnon modes in a yttrium iron garnet film. Such strong coupling can be observed for various spin wave modes under different magnetic field bias configurations, with a coupling strength inversely proportional to the transverse mode number. A comb-like spectrum can be obtained from these high order modes. The collectively enhanced magnon-microwave photon coupling strength is comparable with the magnon free spectral range and therefore leads to the superstrong coupling regime. Our findings pave the road towards designing a new type of strongly hybridized magnon-photon system.

  14. Reducing field emission in the superconducting rf cavities for the next generation of particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Q.S.; Hartung, W.; Leibovich, A.; Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Sears, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on field emission, which is an obstacle to reaching the higher fields called for in future applications of superconducting radio frequency cavities to particle accelerators. The authors used heat treatment up to 1500 degrees C in an ultra-high vacuum furnace, along with processing of cavities and temperature mapping, to suppress field emission and analyze emitter properties. In 27 tests of 1-cell 1500 MHz fired accelerating cavities, on the average the accelerating field E acc increased to 24 MV/m (H pk = 1250 Oe) from 13 MV/m with chemical treatment alone; the highest E acc reached was 30.5 MV/m

  15. Relativistic electron Wigner crystal formation in a cavity for electron acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Johannes; Pukhov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    It is known that a gas of electrons in a uniform neutralizing background can crystallize and form a lattice if the electron density is less than a critical value. This crystallization may have two- or three-dimensional structure. Since the wake field potential in the highly-nonlinear-broken-wave regime (bubble regime) has the form of a cavity where the background electrons are evacuated from and only the positively charged ions remain, it is suited for crystallization of trapped and accelerated electron bunch. However, in this case, the crystal is moving relativistically and shows new three-dimensional structures that we call relativistic Wigner crystals. We analyze these structures using a relativistic Hamiltonian approach. We also check for stability and phase transitions of the relativistic Wigner crystals.

  16. Ultimate Gradient Limitation in Niobium Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Grassellino, Anna [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Posen, Sam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The present study is addressed to the theoretical description of the ultimate gradient limitation in SRF cavities. Our intent is to exploit experimental data to confirm models which provide feed-backs on how to improve the current state-of-art. New theoretical insight on the cavities limiting factor can be suitable to improve the quench field of N-doped cavities, and therefore to take advantage of high Q0 at high gradients.

  17. Rf transfer in the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A significant technical problem associated with the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator is the transfer of RF energy from the drive accelerator to the high-gradient accelerator. Several concepts have been advanced to solve this problem. This paper examines one possible solution in which the drive and high-gradient cavities are directly coupled to one another by means of holes in the cavity walls or coupled indirectly through a third intermediate transfer cavity. Energy cascades through the cavities on a beat frequency time scale which must be made small compared to the cavity skin time but large compared to the FEL pulse length. The transfer is complicated by the fact that each of the cavities in the system can support many resonant modes near the chosen frequency of operation. A generalized set of coupled-cavity equations has been developed to model the energy transfer between the various modes in each of the cavities. For a two cavity case transfer efficiencies in excess of 95% can be achieved. 3 refs., 2 figs

  18. High current electron beam acceleration in dielectric-filled RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    The acceleration of charged particles in radio frequency (RF) cavities is a widely used mode in high energy accelerators. Advantages include very high accelerating gradients and very stable phase control. A traditional limitation for such acceleration has been their use for intense, high current beam generation. This constraint arises from the inability to store a large amount of electromagnetic energy in the cavity and from loading effects of the beam on the cavity. The authors have studied a simple modification to transcend these limitations. Following Humphries and Huang, they have conducted analytic and numerical investigations of RF accelerator cavities in which a high dielectric constant material, such as water, replaces most of the cavity volume. This raises the stored energy in a cavity of given dimensions by a factor var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 . For a water fill, var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ∼ 80, depending on the frequency. This introduction of high dielectric constant material into the cavity reduces the resonant frequencies by a factor of (var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ) 1/2 . This reduced operating frequency mans that existing high efficiency power supplies, at lower frequencies, can be used for an accelerator

  19. Fabrication of mm-wave undulator cavities using deep x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.; Feinerman, A.; Kang, Y.; Kustom, R.; Lai, B.; Nassiri, A.; White, V.; Well, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of fabricating mm-wave radio frequency cavities (100 endash 300 GHz) using deep x-ray lithography (DXRL) is being investigated. The fabrication process includes manufacture of precision x-ray masks, exposure of positive resist by x-ray through the mask, resist development, and electroforming of the final microstructure. Highly precise, two-dimensional features can be machined onto wafers using DXRL. Major challenges are: fabrication of the wafers into three-dimensional rf structures; alignment and overlay accuracy of structures; adhesion of the PMMA on the copper substrate; and selection of a developer to obtain high resolution. Rectangular cavity geometry is best suited to this fabrication technique. A 30- or 84-cell 108-GHz mm-wave structure can serve as an electromagnetic undulator. A mm-wave undulator, which will be discussed later, may have special features compared to the conventional undulator. First harmonic undulator radiation at 5.2 keV would be possible using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac system, which provides a low-emittance electron beam by using an rf thermionic gun with an energy as high as 750 MeV. More detailed rf simulation, heat extraction analysis, beam dynamics using a mm-wave structure, and measurements on 10x larger scale models can be found in these proceedings [Y.W. Kang et al., open-quote open-quote Design and Construction of Planar mm-wave Accelerating Cavity Structures close-quote close-quote] copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  20. Industrial production of SC RF accelerating cavities at CERCA. Latest results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutes, J.L.; Maccioni, P.

    1996-01-01

    CERCA is one of the most experienced companies throughout the world for the manufacture of superconducting RF accelerating devices. The latest results obtained during the past 2 years on CERCA's superconducting cavities are presented. (K.A.)

  1. Integration of Transients in Axisymmetrical Cavities for Accelerators: Formulation and applications to BNL Photocathode Gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.; Serafini, L.

    1992-04-01

    This note provides a sketch of the formalism used for the Integration of Transients in Axisymmetrical Cavities for Accelerators, (ITACA). Application to study the BNL Photocathode Gun via the code ITACA is also included

  2. Research and development for electropolishing of Nb for ILC accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to 1, Expand the scientific and technological understanding of the effect of post-treatment (electropolish, buffered chemical polish, low-temperature baking) on the surface of niobium; 2, Relate the knowledge to the performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities; and, 3, Thereby design and demonstrate an electropolish process that can be applied to complete cavities

  3. Acceleration of low energy charged particles by gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyatzis, G. [University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)]. E-mail: voyatzis@auth.gr; Vlahos, L. [University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Ichtiaroglou, S. [University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papadopoulos, D. [University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2006-04-03

    The acceleration of charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and gravitational waves is under consideration. It is shown that the weak gravitational waves can cause the acceleration of low energy particles under appropriate conditions. Such conditions may be satisfied close to the source of the gravitational waves if the magnetized plasma is in a turbulent state.

  4. Acceleration of low energy charged particles by gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voyatzis, G.; Vlahos, L.; Ichtiaroglou, S.; Papadopoulos, D.

    2006-01-01

    The acceleration of charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and gravitational waves is under consideration. It is shown that the weak gravitational waves can cause the acceleration of low energy particles under appropriate conditions. Such conditions may be satisfied close to the source of the gravitational waves if the magnetized plasma is in a turbulent state

  5. Linear induction accelerators made from pulse-line cavities with external pulse injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, I.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of linear induction accelerator have been reported previously. In one, unidirectional voltage pulses are generated outside the accelerator and injected into the accelerator cavity modules, which contain ferromagnetic material to reduce energy losses in the form of currents induced, in parallel with the beam, in the cavity structure. In the other type, the accelerator cavity modules are themselves pulse-forming lines with energy storage and switches; parallel current losses are made zero by the use of circuits that generate bidirectional acceleration waveforms with a zero voltage-time integral. In a third type of design described here, the cavities are externally driven, and 100% efficient coupling of energy to the beam is obtained by designing the external pulse generators to produce bidirectional voltage waveforms with zero voltage-time integral. A design for such a pulse generator is described that is itself one hundred percent efficient and which is well suited to existing pulse power techniques. Two accelerator cavity designs are described that can couple the pulse from such a generator to the beam; one of these designs provides voltage doubling. Comparison is made between the accelerating gradients that can be obtained with this and the preceding types of induction accelerator

  6. Development of superconducting crossbar-H-mode cavities for proton and ion accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dziuba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The crossbar-H-mode (CH structure is the first superconducting multicell drift tube cavity for the low and medium energy range operated in the H_{21} mode. Because of the large energy gain per cavity, which leads to high real estate gradients, it is an excellent candidate for the efficient acceleration in high power proton and ion accelerators with fixed velocity profile. A prototype cavity has been developed and tested successfully with a gradient of 7  MV/m. A few new superconducting CH cavities with improved geometries for different high power applications are under development at present. One cavity (f=325  MHz, β=0.16, seven cells is currently under construction and studied with respect to a possible upgrade option for the GSI UNILAC. Another cavity (f=217  MHz, β=0.059, 15 cells is designed for a cw operated energy variable heavy ion linac application. Furthermore, the EUROTRANS project (European research program for the transmutation of high level nuclear waste in an accelerator driven system, 600 MeV protons, 352 MHz is one of many possible applications for this kind of superconducting rf cavity. In this context a layout of the 17 MeV EUROTRANS injector containing four superconducting CH cavities was proposed by the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP Frankfurt. The status of the cavity development related to the EUROTRANS injector is presented.

  7. Fabrication and measurement of a 10x scale model of a double-sided planar mm-wave linac cavity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Matthews, P.; Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    A double-sided planar mm-wave linear accelerating cavity, structure has been investigated. An 80-cell constant impedance structure working with 2π/3-mode traveling wave was chosen as an accelerator section. A 10x scale model of the structure has been fabricated and the basic electrical performances have been tested. The nodal shift measurement technique with a rectangular detuning plunger was used to measure the phase advance between the cells with a vector network analyzer

  8. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, P., E-mail: kneisel@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Saito, K. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Singer, W.; Singer, X. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Myneni, G.R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of E{sub acc}=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  9. Cooling the APS storage ring radio-frequency accelerating cavities: Thermal/stress/fatigue analysis and cavity cooling configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primdahl, K.; Kustom, R.

    1995-01-01

    The 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source positron storage ring requires sixteen separate 352-MHz radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities. Cavities are installed as groups of four, in straight sections used elsewhere for insertion devices. They occupy the first such straight section after injection, along with the last three just before injection. Cooling is provided by a subsystem of the sitewide deionized water system. Pumping equipment is located in a building directly adjacent to the accelerator enclosure. A prototype cavity was fabricated and tested where cooling was via twelve 19-mm-diameter [3/4 in] brazed-on tubes in a series-parallel flow configuration. Unfortunately, the thermal contact to some tubes was poor due to inadequate braze filler. Here, heat transfer studies, including finite-element analysis and test results, of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring 352-MHz rf accelerating cavities are described. Stress and fatigue life of the copper are discussed. Configuration of water cooling is presented

  10. Unlimited electron acceleration in laser-driven plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the limitation to the energy gain of 2(ω/ω/sub p/) 2 mc 2 of an electron in the laser-plasma beat-wave accelerator can be overcome by imposing a magnetic field of appropriate strength perpendicular to the plasma wave. This accelerates particles parallel to the phase fronts of the accelerating wave which keeps them in phase with it. Arbitrarily large energy is theoretically possible

  11. Design of rf-cavities in the funnel of accelerators for transmutation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, F.L.; Bultman, N.K.; Chan, K.D.C.; Martineau, R.L.; Nath, S.; Young, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    Funnels are a key component of accelerator structures proposed for transmutation technologies. In addition to conventional accelerator elements, specialized rf-cavities are needed for these structures. Simulations were done to obtain their electromagnetic field distribution and to minimize the rf-induced heat loads. Using these results a structural and thermal analysis of these cavities was performed to insure their reliability at high average power and to determine their cooling requirements. For one cavity the thermal expansion data in return was used to estimate the thermal detuning

  12. Standing Wave Linear Accelerators: An Investigation of the Fundamental Field Stability and Tuning Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The first accelerators were designed as a tool in high-energy particle physics. Their development has given rise to numerous applications in industry, such as materials processing, sterilization, food preservation, and radiopharmaceutical product generation (Barbalat, 1994). Modern day linear accelerators for particle physics accelerate multiple bunches of electrons and positrons up to 50 GeV. Accelerators of the next generation, such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC), aim to accelerate the bunches initially to a center of mass of 500GeV and later to 1.5 TeV (Decking 2001, Miyamoto 2002, Phinney 2002). The NLC will operate under gradient fields on the order of 70 MV/m (Phinney, 2002). For all accelerators, two issues are fundamental for their construction: maximizing the efficiency of acceleration while, at the same time, preserving the luminosity of the beam. These issues are critically important in the design of the NLC. A linear accelerator operates as follows: An electron gun fires electrons into a structure that bunches the electrons and tightly focuses the beam. At the same time, a radiofrequency wave is fed into the accelerating structure. The electron bunches enter the accelerating structure in phase with the crest of the radiofrequency wave in order to achieve maximum energy. There are two principal types of accelerating structures: traveling wave (TW) and standing wave (SW). The electromagnetic wave in a TW structure travels in one direction; the electromagnetic wave in a SW structure travels in two directions. Many TW structures have been designed for the NLC, but recent experiments indicate that TW structures suffer from electrical breakdown at high gradients (Miller et. al., 2001). To address this problem, SW structures are being considered as the alternative for the NLC (Jones and Miller et. al., 2002). The input power required for an accelerating cavity increases with the length of the cavity (Miller et. al., 2001). Since SW structures can be made

  13. Development of L-band niobium superconducting RF cavities with high accelerating field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Ono, Masaaki; Kako, Eiji; Shishido, Toshio; Matsuoka, Masanori; Suzuki, Takafusa; Higuchi, Tamawo.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting RF cavity is a candidate for the TeV energy e + /e - linear collider of next generation if the accelerating field is improved to 25-30 MV/m and much cost down is achieved in cavity fabrication. Since 1990, KEK has continued R and D of L-band niobium superconducting cavities focusing on the high field issue. A serious problem like Q-degradation due to vacuum discharge came out on the way, however, it has been overcome and presently all of cavities which were annealed at 1400degC achieved the accelerating field of >25 MV/m with enough Qo value. Recent results on single cell cavities are described in this paper. (author)

  14. Proton acceleration by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobajima, Masaaki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Ohnishi, Masami; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Masuda, Kai [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    1997-03-01

    We found that protons are accelerated significantly by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity. In this method, protons get the perpendicular kinetic energy, so we thought it might be a compact accelerator, and studied the feasibility by numerical simulation. (author)

  15. Mechanical design considerations of a standing wave s-band accelerator with on-axis couplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.B.; Funk, L.W.; Schriber, S.O.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanical design of S-band standing wave accelerator structures with on-axis coupling cells includes material selection, cavity design, segment production, rf tuning and brazing procedures. Pre-assembly tuning operations have been minimized by determining segment dimensions and tolerances so that segments can easily be fabricated in a near-finished condition by a commercial machining firm. Final tuning, if necessary, is easily achieved by removal of material from the cavity wall or drift tube nose. Considerations in choosing brazing procedures were vacuum integrity, resistivity of brazing alloy, joint thickness, alignment of the structure assembly and restriction of grain growth. (author)

  16. Acceleration mechanisms flares, magnetic reconnection and shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    Several mechanisms are briefly discussed for the acceleration of particles in the astrophysical environment. Included are hydrodynamic acceleration, spherically convergent shocks, shock and a density gradient, coherent electromagnetic acceleration, the flux tube origin, symmetries and instabilities, reconnection, galactic flares, intergalactic acceleration, stochastic acceleration, and astrophysical shocks. It is noted that the supernova shock wave models still depend critically on the presupernova star structure and the assumption of highly compact presupernova models for type I supernovae. 37 references

  17. Fundamental mode rf power dissipated in a waveguide attached to an accelerating cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.

    1993-01-01

    An accelerating RF cavity usually requires accessory devices such as a tuner, a coupler, and a damper to perform properly. Since a device is attached to the wall of the cavity to have certain electrical coupling of the cavity field through the opening. RF power dissipation is involved. In a high power accelerating cavity, the RF power coupled and dissipated in the opening and in the device must be estimated to design a proper cooling system for the device. The single cell cavities of the APS storage ring will use the same accessories. These cavities are rotationally symmetric and the fields around the equator can be approximated with the fields of the cylindrical pillbox cavity. In the following, the coupled and dissipated fundamental mode RF power in a waveguide attached to a pillbox cavity is discussed. The waveguide configurations are (1) aperture-coupled cylindrical waveguide with matched load termination; (2) short-circuited cylindrical waveguide; and (3) E-probe or H-loop coupled coaxial waveguide. A short-circuited, one-wavelength coaxial structure is considered for the fundamental frequency rejection circuit of an H-loop damper

  18. Analysis of beam acceleration and instability on TWRR accelerator structure in PNC by beam-cavity interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Shin`ichi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-07-01

    It is important for high current accelerators to estimate the contribution of the space charge effect to keep the beam off its beak up (BBU). The CW electron linac is designed in order to study BBU experimentally. The design is primary on the consideration which type of accelerator structure is suitable to reduce the BBU threshold, and how to observe and control BBU when it appears. The contribution of beam charge for the acceleration characteristics is surveyed by means of the comparison between traveling wave and standing wave structures in this report. At first, the characteristics of both traveling wave and standing wave structures are calculated analytically and the conversion efficiency and accelerator gain are presented. The merits and drawbacks are also mentioned concerning with unit accelerator length. Next, the choice of RF frequency on energy conversion is mentioned as independent matter of the types of accelerator structure. After that, the characteristics of TWRR are described as the advanced accelerator structure compared with above structures. The effect of longitudinal induced field is estimated by means of the loss parameter. The result from the analysis shows that the unit accelerator length is 1 m to get high conversion ratio from RF to beam power and that the BBU for transverse component is small. Therefore, total BBU is expected small in the accelerator, for transverse BBU is already expected small in previous reports. (author)

  19. Auroral electron acceleration by lower-hybrid waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, R.; Bryant, D.A.; Hall, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    Because the particles and electric fields association with inverted-V electron streams do not have the characteristics expected for acceleration by a quasistatic potential difference, the possiblity that the electrons are stochastically accelerated by waves is investigated. It is demonstrated that the lower hybrid waves seen on auroral field lines have the righ properties to account for the electron acceleration. It is further shown that the lower hybrid wave power measured on auroral field lines can be generated by the streaming ions observed at the boundary of the plasma sheet, and that this wave power is sufficient to account for the electron power observed close to the atmosphere. (author)

  20. Detection of Second Sound in He-II for Thermal Quench Mapping of Superconducting Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Stegmaier, Tobias; Kind, Matthias; Furci, Hernán; Koettig, Torsten; Peters, Benedikt

    The development of future particle accelerators requires intensive testing of superconducting radio frequency cavities with different sizes and geometries. Non-contact thermometry quench localisation techniques proved to be beneficial for the localisation of surface defects that can originate a quench (sudden loss of superconducting state). These techniques are based on the detection of second sound in helium II. Transition Edge Sensors (TES) are highly sensitive thin film thermometers with fast time response. In the present work, their capability as a thermal quench mapping device for superconducting radio frequency cavities is proven experimentally by detecting second sound waves emitted by SMD heaters in a He-II bath at saturated vapour pressure. A characterisation of the sensors at steady bath temperatures was conducted to calculate the thermal sensitivity. An intense metallurgical study of gold-tin TES with different compositions revealed important relations between the superconducting behaviour and the ...

  1. Beam Acceleration by a Multicell RF Cavity Structure Proposed for an Improved Yield in Hydroforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yoon W.; Shin, Ki; Fathy, A.E.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    We study the accelerating properties of a new multicell cavity structure with irises forming a rectangular aperture between the cavity cells. We are interested in this structure because, from a mechanical point of view, it may be possible to manufacture with high quality using a hydroforming process. RF analysis shows that the rectangular iris shape provides some asymmetric transverse focusing per half RF period, particularly for low beam energies. If the horizontal and vertical rectangular irises are interleaved, the net transverse focusing could be increased. Here we present studies of the acceleration and transport properties of these cavities by tracking particles using the ORBIT Code through time-dependent 3D cavity fields taken from CST MWS.

  2. In-situ plasma processing to increase the accelerating gradients of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleans, M.; Tyagi, P. V.; Afanador, R.; McMahan, C. J.; Ball, J. A.; Barnhart, D. L.; Blokland, W.; Crofford, M. T.; Degraff, B. D.; Gold, S. W.; Hannah, B. S.; Howell, M. P.; Kim, S.-H.; Lee, S.-W.; Mammosser, J.; Neustadt, T. S.; Saunders, J. W.; Stewart, S.; Strong, W. H.; Vandygriff, D. J.; Vandygriff, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new in-situ plasma processing technique is being developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to improve the performance of the cavities in operation. The technique utilizes a low-density reactive oxygen plasma at room temperature to remove top surface hydrocarbons. The plasma processing technique increases the work function of the cavity surface and reduces the overall amount of vacuum and electron activity during cavity operation; in particular it increases the field emission onset, which enables cavity operation at higher accelerating gradients. Experimental evidence also suggests that the SEY of the Nb surface decreases after plasma processing which helps mitigating multipacting issues. In this article, the main developments and results from the plasma processing R&D are presented and experimental results for in-situ plasma processing of dressed cavities in the SNS horizontal test apparatus are discussed.

  3. Study of Nb-Cu 1.3 GHz SRF cavity resonators for future particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Amelin, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Niobium-coated superconducting radio-frequency cavities have a number of advantages over cavities made from bulk niobium. Cavities coated with high-power impulse magnetron sputtering are tested at CERN in order to optimize the coating and study the Q-slope that limits the performance. To accurately measure the quality factor as a function of accelerating field, it is important to have good matching between an input antenna and a cavity impedance. To improve the matching, a variable coupler that changes the length of the antenna can be used. We have shown that the Q-factor of the input antenna can be changed between $10^7-10^{11}$ by moving the antenna, which should allow to achieve critical coupling with a cavity. This technology could be used in future measurements, so that reflections are always minimized.

  4. Conceptual design of the RF accelerating cavities for a superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggiore, M.; Calabretta, L.; Di Giacomo, M.; Rifuggiato, D.; Battaglia, D.; Piazza, L.

    2006-01-01

    A superconducting cyclotron accelerating ions up to 250 A MeV, for medical applications and radioactive ions production is being studied at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud in Catania. The radio frequency (RF) system, working in the fourth harmonic, is based on four normal conducting radio frequency cavities operating at 93 MHz. This paper describes an unusual multi-stem cavity design, performed with 3D electromagnetic codes. Our aim is to obtain a cavity, completely housed inside the cyclotron, with a voltage distribution ranging from 65 kV in the injection region to a peak value of 120 kV in the extraction region, and having a low power consumption

  5. Tuning of External Q And Phase for The Cavities of A Superconducting Linear Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Katalev, V V

    2004-01-01

    The RF power required for a certain gradient of a superconducting cavity depends on the beam current and coupling between the cavity and waveguide. The coupling with the cavity may be changed by variation of Qext. Different devices can be used to adjust Qext or phase. In this paper three stub and E-H tuners are compared and their usability for the RF power distribution system for the superconducting accelerator of the European Xray laser and the TESLA linear collider is considered. The tuners were analyzed by using the scattering matrix. Advantages and limitations of the devices are presented.

  6. Stochastic particle acceleration by plasma waves in AGN jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hui; Colgate, S.A.; Miller, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The free energy stored in the stressed magnetic fields in AGN jets could be dissipated via generating turbulent plasma waves. The authors review several key wave-particle resonant interactions and point out the importance of a broad wave spectrum. Under several idealized assumptions, they show that the transit-time damping process can accelerate electrons to TeV energies in an AGN jet environment, and present a preliminary calculation on the evolution of plasma wave, electron, and photon distributions. The authors especially emphasize several open questions on particle acceleration by waves, and argue that a plausible scenario is to energize electrons out of the thermal background via transit-time damping and further accelerate them by the parallel propagating right-handed waves

  7. Dynamics of an atomic wave packet in a standing-wave cavity field: A cavity-assisted single-atom detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chough, Young-Tak; Nha, Hyunchul; Kim, Sang Wook; An, Kyungwon; Youn, Sun-Hyun

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the single-atom detection system using an optical standing-wave cavity, from the viewpoint of the quantized center-of-mass motion of the atomic wave packet. We show that since the atom-field coupling strength depends upon the overlap integral of the atomic wave packet and the field mode function, the effect of the wave-packet spreading via the momentum exchange process brings about a significant effect in the detection efficiency. We find that, as a result, the detection efficiency is not sensitive to the individual atomic trajectory for reasonably slow atoms. We also address an interesting phenomenon of the atomic wave-packet splitting occurring when an atom passes through a node of the cavity field

  8. In-phased second harmonic wave array generation with intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirosawa, Kenichi; Shohda, Fumio; Yanagisawa, Takayuki; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2015-03-23

    The Talbot cavity is one promising method to synchronize the phase of a laser array. However, it does not achieve the lowest array mode with the same phase but the highest array mode with the anti-phase between every two adjacent lasers, which is called out-phase locking. Consequently, their far-field images exhibit 2-peak profiles. We propose intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling. By placing a nonlinear crystal in a Talbot cavity, the Talbot cavity generates an out-phased fundamental wave array, which is converted into an in-phase-locked second harmonic wave array at the nonlinear crystal. We demonstrate numerical calculations and experiments on intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling and obtain an in-phase-locked second harmonic wave array for a Nd:YVO₄ array laser.

  9. Standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.; Whittum, D.H.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    A free-electron laser (FEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) is proposed, in which the FEL interaction takes place in a series of drive cavities, rather than in a waveguide. Each drive cavity is 'beat-coupled' to a section of the accelerating structure. This standing-wave TBA is investigated theoretically and numerically, with analyses included of microwave extraction, growth of the FEL signal through saturation, equilibrium longitudinal beam dynamics following saturation, and sensitivity of the microwave amplitude and phase to errors in current and energy. It is found that phase errors due to current jitter are substantially reduced from previous versions of the TBA. Analytic scalings and numerical simulations are used to obtain an illustrative TBA parameter set. (orig.)

  10. Effect of a gravitational wave on electromagnetic radiation confined in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourrenc, P.

    1978-01-01

    Gravitational radiation is considered within the first-order approximation. A pattern of an electromagnetic cavity is studied: Gravitational waves give rise to a deformation of the planes limiting the cavity. This deformation alters the electromagnetic radiation. Several cases are studied and orders of magnitude are put forward. (author)

  11. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1  μm for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  12. Towards a Cryogen-Free MgB2-Based Superconducting Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Alireza

    Studies on the application of Magnesium diboride (MgB2) superconducting films have shown promise for use with the radio-frequency (SRF) accelerating cavities. MgB2\\ coating is a potential candidate to replace bulk niobium (Nb) SRF cavities. The ultimate goal of our research is to demonstrate MgB2 coating on copper cavities to allow operation at about 20 K or so as a result of the high transition temperature (Tc) of MgB2 and taking advantage of the excellent thermal conductivity of copper. Here, we will report on our recent experimental results of applying hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) to grow MgB2 films on 2-inch diameter copper discs as well as on a 2.8 GHz resonator cavity *Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06H11357.

  13. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. I.; Ainsworth, R.; Aryshev, A.; Boogert, S. T.; Boorman, G.; Frisch, J.; Heo, A.; Honda, Y.; Hwang, W. H.; Huang, J. Y.; Kim, E.-S.; Kim, S. H.; Lyapin, A.; Naito, T.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Mellor, R. E.; Molloy, S.; Nelson, J.; Park, S. J.; Park, Y. J.; Ross, M.; Shin, S.; Swinson, C.; Smith, T.; Terunuma, N.; Tauchi, T.; Urakawa, J.; White, G. R.

    2012-04-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM) system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1μm for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  14. High energy particle acceleration by relativistic plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiranoff, F.; Jacquet, F.; Mora, P.; Matthieussent, G.

    1991-01-01

    Accelerating schemes using plasmas, lasers or electron beams are proposed and compared to electron bunches in dielectric media or laser propagation through a slow wave structure made of liquid droplets. (L.C.J.A.). 33 refs, 20 figs

  15. The acceleration of cosmic ray by shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, W.I.; Leer, E.; Skadron, G.

    1977-01-01

    The acceleration of cosmic rays in flows involving shocks and other compressional waves is considered in terms of one-dimensionl, steady flows and the diffusion approximation. The results suggest that very substantial energy conversion can occur. (author)

  16. Mode Conversion of a Solar Extreme-ultraviolet Wave over a Coronal Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zong, Weiguo [Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Center for Space Weather, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing 100081 (China); Dai, Yu, E-mail: ydai@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics (Nanjing University), Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2017-01-10

    We report on observations of an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave event in the Sun on 2011 January 13 by Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory in quadrature. Both the trailing edge and the leading edge of the EUV wave front in the north direction are reliably traced, revealing generally compatible propagation velocities in both perspectives and a velocity ratio of about 1/3. When the wave front encounters a coronal cavity near the northern polar coronal hole, the trailing edge of the front stops while its leading edge just shows a small gap and extends over the cavity, meanwhile getting significantly decelerated but intensified. We propose that the trailing edge and the leading edge of the northward propagating wave front correspond to a non-wave coronal mass ejection component and a fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic wave component, respectively. The interaction of the fast-mode wave and the coronal cavity may involve a mode conversion process, through which part of the fast-mode wave is converted to a slow-mode wave that is trapped along the magnetic field lines. This scenario can reasonably account for the unusual behavior of the wave front over the coronal cavity.

  17. A theoretical investigation of the collective acceleration of cluster ions with accelerated potential waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Enjoji, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Motoichi; Noritake, Toshiya

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical treatment of the acceleration of cluster ions for additional heating of fusion plasma using the trapping effect in an accelerated potential wave is described. The conceptual design of the accelerator is the same as that by Enjoji, and the potential wave used is sinusoidal. For simplicity, collisions among cluster ions and the resulting breakups are neglected. The masses of the cluster ions are specified to range from 100 m sub(D) to 1000 m sub(D) (m sub(D): mass of a deuterium atom). Theoretical treatment is carried out only for the injection velocity which coincides with the phase velocity of the applied wave at the entrance of the accelerator. An equation describing the rate for successful acceleration of ions with a certain mass is deduced for the continuous injection of cluster ions. Computation for a typical mass distribution shows that more than 70% of the injected particles are effectively accelerated. (author)

  18. New particle accelerations by magnetized plasma shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Three mechanisms concerning particle accelerations are proposed to account for the high energy of cosmic rays. A model of magnetized plasma clouds is used to simulate a shock-type wave. The attainable energies of test particles colliding with the moving magnetic clouds are investigated by analytical and numerical methods for the three mechanisms. The magnetic trapping acceleration is a new type of particle trapping and acceleration in which, in principle, the test particle is accelerated indefinitely; hence, this mechanism surpasses the Fermi-type acceleration. In the single-step acceleration, the test particle obtains a significant energy gain even though it only experiences a single collision. Lastly, there is the bouncing acceleration by which the test particle is substantially accelerated due to repeated collisions

  19. Development of a cryostat for the 4-cell 352 MHz sc accelerating cavities at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stierlin, R.

    1988-01-01

    The upgrading of LEP by s.c. cavities will require installation and operation of a few hundred 350 MHz, 4-cell cavities in the accelerator tunnel. It is at present anticipated to install eight cavities per rf-cell which have a length of ∼ 24 m. A tunnel slope of up to 1.5% and a tunnel diameter of 4.4 m have to be accommodated. For the design of adequate cryostats the following guiding lines were considered: up to eight cavities with their He tank could be housed in a common insulation vacuum. Cryostats should be modular and allow installation of individual cavities or groups of two cavities (with a total length not exceeding 6 m thus enabling normal transport inside the access pits and machine tunnel). A high accessibility to all critical parts like couplers, tuners and beam tube connections should be guaranteed. This requirement dictates a lateral access through the vacuum tank and thermal radiation shield which should also permit the removal and replacement of any one 4-cell cavity without disturbing the neighboring units. Cavity connections to the beam vacuum system as well as repairs should be possible under reasonably clean and dust-free conditions, particularly when keeping cavities under a slight overpressure of dry, dust-free protective gas. A test program was launched and a 1/5 scale model vacuum tank was constructed and tested. The main feature of this model was a frame and sealing skin design which offers complete accessibility to the inside of the vessel. The results obtained prompted the design and construction of a full size model which was completed in 1985 and proved the feasibility of the new concepts. A thin copper radiation shield mechanically clamped to the piping carrying the refrigerant and thus easily removable to meet the requirement of accessibility also proved adequate to intercept and evacuate the heat radiated by the vacuum tank. 4 references, 6 figures

  20. Energy cascading in the beat-wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinstrie, C.J.; Batha, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    A review is given of energy cascading in the beat-wave accelerator. The properties of the electromagnetic cascade and the corresponding plasma-wave evolution are well understood within the framework of an approximate analytic model. Based on this model, idealized laser-plasma coupling efficiencies of the order of 10% do not seem unreasonable. 28 refs

  1. Conversion of localized lower hybrid oscillations and fast magnetosonic waves at a plasma density cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.O.

    2004-01-01

    Analytic expressions are presented for conversion of localized lower hybrid oscillations and magnetosonic waves by scattering off a small scale density cavity. The governing equations are solved in slab geometry with wave vectors perpendicular to both the ambient magnetic field and the density gradient associated with density cavity using a scale length separation method. The theory predicts strong excitation of localized lower hybrid oscillations for a set of frequencies between the lower hybrid frequency of the ambient plasma and the minimum lower hybrid frequency inside the cavity. The theory is relevant for the lower hybrid solitary structures observed in space plasmas

  2. THz cavities and injectors for compact electron acceleration using laser-driven THz sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Fakhari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a design methodology for developing ultrasmall electron injectors and accelerators based on cascaded cavities excited by short multicycle THz pulses obtained from laser-driven THz generation schemes. Based on the developed concept for optimal coupling of the THz pulse, a THz electron injector and two accelerating stages are designed. The designed electron gun consists of a four cell cavity operating at 300 GHz and a door-knob waveguide to coaxial coupler. Moreover, special designs are proposed to mitigate the problem of thermal heat flow and induced mechanical stress to achieve a stable device. We demonstrated a gun based on cascaded cavities that is powered by only 1.1 mJ of THz energy in 300 cycles to accelerate electron bunches up to 250 keV. An additional two linac sections can be added with five and four cell cavities both operating at 300 GHz boosting the bunch energy up to 1.2 MeV using a 4-mJ THz pulse.

  3. A Massively Parallel Solver for the Mechanical Harmonic Analysis of Accelerator Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    ACE3P is a 3D massively parallel simulation suite that developed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory that can perform coupled electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical study. Effectively utilizing supercomputer resources, ACE3P has become a key simulation tool for particle accelerator R and D. A new frequency domain solver to perform mechanical harmonic response analysis of accelerator components is developed within the existing parallel framework. This solver is designed to determine the frequency response of the mechanical system to external harmonic excitations for time-efficient accurate analysis of the large-scale problems. Coupled with the ACE3P electromagnetic modules, this capability complements a set of multi-physics tools for a comprehensive study of microphonics in superconducting accelerating cavities in order to understand the RF response and feedback requirements for the operational reliability of a particle accelerator. (auth)

  4. Measurements of beat wave accelerated electrons in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.H.

    1992-06-01

    Electrons are accelerated by large amplitude electron plasma waves driven by counter-propagating microwaves with a difference frequency approximately equal to the electron plasma frequency. Energetic electrons are observed only when the phase velocity of the wave is in the range 3v e ph e (v ph was varied 2v e ph e ), where v e is the electron thermal velocity, (kT e /m e ) 1/2 . As the phase velocity increases, fewer electrons are accelerated to higher velocities. The measured current contained in these accelerated electrons has the power dependence predicted by theory, but the magnitude is lower than predicted

  5. Characterization of the SPS 800MHz travelling wave cavities.

    CERN Document Server

    Bazyl, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that HOMs in RF cavities are a potentially dangerous source of beam impedance. Therefore, HOMs (both longitudinal and transverse) can drive the beam unstable . The 800MHz cavities of the SPS were studied in the past. However, very little documentation was left behind. Currently, the performance of the SPS is limited by a longitudinal beam instability. In order to study this instability, an accurate impedance model of the whole SPS is needed.

  6. Effects of rear cavities on the wake behind an accelerating D-shaped bluff body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite-Díez, M.; Jiménez-González, J. I.; Gutiérrez-Montes, C.; Martínez-Bazán, C.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate experimentally and numerically the transient development of the wake induced by a constant acceleration of a D-shaped bluff body, starting from rest and reaching a permanent regime of Reynolds number Re = 2000, under different values of acceleration and implementing three distinct rear geometrical configurations. Thus, alongside the classical blunt base, two control passive devices, namely, a straight cavity and an optimized, curved cavity, recently designed using adjoint optimization techniques, have also been used to assess their performance in transient flow conditions. Particle image velocimetry measurements were performed in a towing tank to characterize the near wake development in the early transient stages. It has been observed that the flow first develops symmetric shear layers with primary eddies attracted toward the base of the body due to the flow suction generated by the accelerated motion. Eventually, the interaction between the upper and lower shear layers provokes the destabilization of the flow and the symmetry breaking of the wake, finally giving rise to an alternate transitional vortex shedding regime. The transition between these phases is sped-up when the optimized cavity is used, reaching earlier the permanent flow conditions. In particular, the use of the optimized geometry has been shown to limit the growth of the primary eddies, decreasing both the recirculation and vortex formation length and providing with a more regularized, more organized vortex shedding. In addition, numerical simulations have been performed to evaluate the distribution of forces induced by the addition of rear cavities. In general, the aforementioned smoother and faster transition related to the use of optimized cavity translates into a lower averaged value of the drag coefficient, together with less energetic force fluctuations, regardless of the acceleration value.

  7. Particle acceleration by coronal and interplanetary shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesses, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Utilizing many years of observation from deep space and near-earth spacecraft a theoretical understanding has evolved on how ions and electrons are accelerated in interplanetary shock waves. This understanding is now being applied to solar flare-induced shock waves propagating through the solar atmosphere. Such solar flare phenomena as gamma-ray line and neutron emissions, interplanetary energetic electron and ion events, and Type II and moving Type IV radio bursts appear understandable in terms of particle acceleration in shock waves

  8. Electron Acceleration by High Power Radio Waves in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Paul

    2012-10-01

    At the highest ERP of the High Altitude Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, high frequency (HF) electromagnetic (EM) waves in the ionosphere produce artificial aurora and electron-ion plasma layers. Using HAARP, electrons are accelerated by high power electrostatic (ES) waves to energies >100 times the thermal temperature of the ambient plasma. These ES waves are driven by decay of the pump EM wave tuned to plasma resonances. The most efficient acceleration process occurs near the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency in earth's magnetic field. Mode conversion plays a role in transforming the ES waves into EM signals that are recorded with ground receivers. These diagnostic waves, called stimulated EM emissions (SEE), show unique resonant signatures of the strongest electron acceleration. This SEE also provides clues about the ES waves responsible for electron acceleration. The electron gas is accelerated by high frequency modes including Langmuir (electron plasma), upper hybrid, and electron Bernstein waves. All of these waves have been identified in the scattered EM spectra as downshifted sidebands of the EM pump frequency. Parametric decay is responsible low frequency companion modes such as ion acoustic, lower hybrid, and ion Bernstein waves. The temporal evolution of the scattered EM spectrum indicates development of field aligned irregularities that aid the mode conversion process. The onset of certain spectral features is strongly correlated with glow plasma discharge structures that are both visible with the unaided eye and detectable using radio backscatter techniques at HF and UHF frequencies. The primary goals are to understand natural plasma layers, to study basic plasma physics in a unique ``laboratory with walls,'' and to create artificial plasma structures that can aid radio communications.

  9. Resonant ion acceleration by collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Resonant ion acceleration ( the ν/sub rho/xΒ acceleration ) in laminar magnetosonic shock waves is studied by theory and simulation. Theoretical analysis based on a two-fluid model shows that, in laminar shocks, the electric field strength in the direction of the wave normal is about (m/sub i/m/sub e/) 1 2 times large for quasi-perpendicular shocks than that for the quasi-parallel shocks, which is a reflection of the fact that the width of quasi-perpendicular shocks is much smaller than that of the quasi-parallel shocks. Trapped ions can be accelerated up to the speed about ν/sub A/(m/sub i/m/sub e/) 1 2(M/sub A/-1) 3 2 in quasi-perpendicular shocks. Time evolution of self-consistent magnetosonic shock waves is studied by using a 2-12 dimensional fully relativistic, fully electromagnetic particle simulation with full ion and electron dynamics. Even a low-Mach-number shock wave can significantly accelerate trapped ions by the ν/sub rho/xΒ acceleration. The resonant ion acceleration occurs more strongly in quasi-perpendicular shocks, because the magnitude of this acceleration is proportional to the electric field strength

  10. Airy Wave Packets Accelerating in Space-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.

    2018-04-01

    Although diffractive spreading is an unavoidable feature of all wave phenomena, certain waveforms can attain propagation invariance. A lesser-explored strategy for achieving optical self-similar propagation exploits the modification of the spatiotemporal field structure when observed in reference frames moving at relativistic speeds. For such an observer, it is predicted that the associated Lorentz boost can bring to a halt the axial dynamics of a wave packet of an arbitrary profile. This phenomenon is particularly striking in the case of a self-accelerating beam—such as an Airy beam—whose peak normally undergoes a transverse displacement upon free propagation. Here we synthesize an acceleration-free Airy wave packet that travels in a straight line by deforming its spatiotemporal spectrum to reproduce the impact of a Lorentz boost. The roles of the axial spatial coordinate and time are swapped, leading to "time diffraction" manifested in self-acceleration observed in the propagating Airy wave-packet frame.

  11. Advanced Accelerators: Particle, Photon and Plasma Wave Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ronald L. [Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2017-06-29

    The overall objective of this project was to study the acceleration of electrons to very high energies over very short distances based on trapping slowly moving electrons in the fast moving potential wells of large amplitude plasma waves, which have relativistic phase velocities. These relativistic plasma waves, or wakefields, are the basis of table-top accelerators that have been shown to accelerate electrons to the same high energies as kilometer-length linear particle colliders operating using traditional decades-old acceleration techniques. The accelerating electrostatic fields of the relativistic plasma wave accelerators can be as large as GigaVolts/meter, and our goal was to study techniques for remotely measuring these large fields by injecting low energy probe electron beams across the plasma wave and measuring the beam’s deflection. Our method of study was via computer simulations, and these results suggested that the deflection of the probe electron beam was directly proportional to the amplitude of the plasma wave. This is the basis of a proposed diagnostic technique, and numerous studies were performed to determine the effects of changing the electron beam, plasma wave and laser beam parameters. Further simulation studies included copropagating laser beams with the relativistic plasma waves. New interesting results came out of these studies including the prediction that very small scale electron beam bunching occurs, and an anomalous line focusing of the electron beam occurs under certain conditions. These studies were summarized in the dissertation of a graduate student who obtained the Ph.D. in physics. This past research program has motivated ideas for further research to corroborate these results using particle-in-cell simulation tools which will help design a test-of-concept experiment in our laboratory and a scaled up version for testing at a major wakefield accelerator facility.

  12. Effect of low temperature baking on the RF properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2004-01-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some ''anomalous'' losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low temperature (100 C-150 C) ''in situ'' bake under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from ''anomalous'' losses (so-called ''Q-drop'') without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37 K-280 K and resonant frequency shift between 6 K-9.3 K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models

  13. Acceleration of auroral electrons by waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, D.S.

    1983-06-01

    The evolution of the auroral electron distribution function as the electrons traverse a region of plasma turbulence is discussed. Electron measurements are used to illustrate that if the energy densities of the waves associated with the turbulence are distributed in a particular way, various features of the electron distributions can be accounted for by changes in the details of the wave spectra without changes in the overall form. (author)

  14. Real-time cavity simulator-based low-level radio-frequency test bench and applications for accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miura, Takako; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Liu, Na; Wibowo, Sigit Basuki

    2018-03-01

    A Low-level radio-frequency (LLRF) control systems is required to regulate the rf field in the rf cavity used for beam acceleration. As the LLRF system is usually complex, testing of the basic functions or control algorithms of this system in real time and in advance of beam commissioning is strongly recommended. However, the equipment necessary to test the LLRF system, such as superconducting cavities and high-power rf sources, is very expensive; therefore, we have developed a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based cavity simulator as a substitute for real rf cavities. Digital models of the cavity and other rf systems are implemented in the FPGA. The main components include cavity baseband models for the fundamental and parasitic modes, a mechanical model of the Lorentz force detuning, and a model of the beam current. Furthermore, in our simulator, the disturbance model used to simulate the power-supply ripples and microphonics is also carefully considered. Based on the presented cavity simulator, we have established an LLRF system test bench that can be applied to different cavity operational conditions. The simulator performance has been verified by comparison with real cavities in KEK accelerators. In this paper, the development and implementation of this cavity simulator is presented first, and the LLRF test bench based on the presented simulator is constructed. The results are then compared with those for KEK accelerators. Finally, several LLRF applications of the cavity simulator are illustrated.

  15. Real-time cavity simulator-based low-level radio-frequency test bench and applications for accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A Low-level radio-frequency (LLRF control systems is required to regulate the rf field in the rf cavity used for beam acceleration. As the LLRF system is usually complex, testing of the basic functions or control algorithms of this system in real time and in advance of beam commissioning is strongly recommended. However, the equipment necessary to test the LLRF system, such as superconducting cavities and high-power rf sources, is very expensive; therefore, we have developed a field-programmable gate array (FPGA-based cavity simulator as a substitute for real rf cavities. Digital models of the cavity and other rf systems are implemented in the FPGA. The main components include cavity baseband models for the fundamental and parasitic modes, a mechanical model of the Lorentz force detuning, and a model of the beam current. Furthermore, in our simulator, the disturbance model used to simulate the power-supply ripples and microphonics is also carefully considered. Based on the presented cavity simulator, we have established an LLRF system test bench that can be applied to different cavity operational conditions. The simulator performance has been verified by comparison with real cavities in KEK accelerators. In this paper, the development and implementation of this cavity simulator is presented first, and the LLRF test bench based on the presented simulator is constructed. The results are then compared with those for KEK accelerators. Finally, several LLRF applications of the cavity simulator are illustrated.

  16. Surface wave resonance and chirality in a tubular cavity with metasurface design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuzhou; Fang, Yangfu; Wang, Lu; Tang, Shiwei; Sun, Shulin; Liu, Zhaowei; Mei, Yongfeng

    2018-06-01

    Optical microcavities with whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) have been indispensable in both photonic researches and applications. Besides, metasurfaces, have attracted much attention recently due to their strong abilities to manipulate electromagnetic waves. Here, combining these two optical elements together, we show a tubular cavity can convert input propagating cylindrical waves into directed localized surface waves (SWs), enabling the circulating like WGMs along the wall surface of the designed tubular cavity. Finite element method (FEM) simulations demonstrate that such near-field WGM shows both large chirality and high local field. This work may stimulate interesting potential applications in e.g. directional emission, sensing, and lasing.

  17. Cavity Cooling of Nanoparticles: Towards Matter-Wave experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, James; Kuhn, Stefan; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Levitated systems are a fascinating addition to the world of optically-controlled mechanical resonators. It is predicted that nanoparticles can be cooled to their c.o.m. ground state via the interaction with an optical cavity. By freeing the oscillator from clamping forces dissipation and decoherence is greatly reduced, leading to the potential to produce long-lived, macroscopically spread, mechanical quantum states, allowing tests of collapse models and any mass limit of quantum physics. Reaching the low pressures required to cavity-cool to the ground state has proved challenging. Our approach is to cavity cool a beam of nanoparticles in high vacuum. We can cool the c.o.m. motion of nanospheres a few hundred nanometers in size. Looking forward, we will utilize novel microcavities to enhance optomechanical cooling, preparing particles in a coherent beam ideally suited to ultra-high mass interferometry at 107 a.m.u.

  18. Formulation of electromagnetic-wave analysis by boundary element method and its application to the analysis of RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washizu, Masao; Tanabe, Yoshio.

    1986-01-01

    In a system handling the electromagnetic waves of large power such as the cavity resonator for a high energy accelerator and the high frequency heater for a nuclear fusion apparatus, the margin in the thermal and mechanical design of a wave guide system cannot be taken large, accordingly, the detailed analysis of electromagnetic waves is required. When the analysis in a general form is carried out, boundary element method may be a useful method of solution. This time, the authors carried out the formulation of steady electromagnetic wave problems by boundary element method, and it was shown that the formulation was able to be carried out under the physically clear boundary condition also in this case, and especially in the case of a perfect conductor system, a very simple form was obtained. In this paper, first, the techniques of formulation in a general case, and next, as a special case, the formulation for a perfect conductor system are described. Taking the analysis of the cavity resonators of cylindrical and rectangular parallelepiped forms as examples, the comparison with the analytical solution was carried out. (Kako, I.)

  19. Metal forming technology for the fabrication of seamless Superconducting radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The world of Particle accelerators is rather unique, since in a few high-energy Physics great laboratories, such at CERN for example, there have been built the largest technological installations ever conceived by humankind. The Radiofrequency resonant cavities are the pulsing heart of an accelerator. In case of superconducting accelerators, bulk niobium cavities, able to perform accelerating gradients up to 40 MeV/m, are just a jewel of modern technology. The standard fabrication technology foresees the cutting of circular blanks, their deep-drawing into half-cells, and its further joining by electron beam welding under ultra high vacuum environment that takes several hours. However, proposals such as the International Linear Collider, to which more than 900 scientists from all over the world participate, foresee the installation of 20.000 cavities. In numbers, it means the electron beam weld one by one under Ultra High Vacuum of 360,000 hemi-cells. At a cost of 500 €/Kg of high purity Niobium, this will mean a couple of hundreds of millions of Euros only for the bare material. In this panorama it is evident that a cost reducing approach must be considered. In alternative the author has proposed a seamless and low cost fabrication method based on spinning of fully resonators. Preliminary RF tests at low temperatures have proved that high accelerating gradients are achievable and that they are not worse than those obtainable with the standard technology. Nevertheless up to when the next accelerator will be decided to be built there is still room for improvement.

  20. Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K

    2008-01-01

    In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm

  1. Methodology for the structural design of single spoke accelerating cavities at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passarelli, Donato; Merio, Margherita; Ristori, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Fermilab is planning to upgrade its accelerator complex to deliver a more powerful and intense proton-beam for neutrino experiments. In the framework of the so-called Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II), we are designing and developing a cryomodule containing superconducting accelerating cavities, the Single Spoke Resonators of type 1 (SSR1). In this paper, we present the sequence of analysis and calculations performed for the structural de- sign of these cavities, using the rules of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC). The lack of an accepted procedure for addressing the design, fabrication, and inspection of such unique pressure vessels makes the task demanding and challenging every time. Several factors such as exotic materials, unqualified brazing procedures, limited nondestructive examination, and the general R&D nature of these early generations of cavity design, conspire to make it impractical to obtain full compliance with all ASME BPVC requirements. However, the presented approach allowed us to validate the design of these new generation of single spoke cavities with values of maximum allowable working pressure that exceed the safety requirements. This set of rules could be used as a starting point for the structural design and development of similar objects.

  2. Plasma production for electron acceleration by resonant plasma wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anania, M.P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.P.; Filippi, F.; Ghigo, A.; Lollo, V.; Pella, S.; Pompili, R.; Romeo, S.; Ferrario, M.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10–100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeter. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators (large energy spread, low repetition rate, and large emittance); radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in accelerating field (10–100 MV/m) requiring therefore hundred of meters of distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. To combine high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC-LAB (Ferrario et al., 2013 [1]). In particular here we focus on hydrogen plasma discharge, and in particular on the theoretical and numerical estimates of the ionization process which are very useful to design the discharge circuit and to evaluate the current needed to be supplied to the gas in order to have full ionization. Eventually, the current supplied to the gas simulated will be compared to that measured experimentally.

  3. Plasma production for electron acceleration by resonant plasma wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anania, M.P., E-mail: maria.pia.anania@lnf.infn.it [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [University of Rome Tor Vergata - INFN, via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); INFN, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Croia, M.; Curcio, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.P. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Filippi, F. [University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Ghigo, A.; Lollo, V.; Pella, S.; Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Romeo, S. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Ferrario, M. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10–100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeter. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators (large energy spread, low repetition rate, and large emittance); radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in accelerating field (10–100 MV/m) requiring therefore hundred of meters of distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. To combine high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC-LAB (Ferrario et al., 2013 [1]). In particular here we focus on hydrogen plasma discharge, and in particular on the theoretical and numerical estimates of the ionization process which are very useful to design the discharge circuit and to evaluate the current needed to be supplied to the gas in order to have full ionization. Eventually, the current supplied to the gas simulated will be compared to that measured experimentally.

  4. CHALLENGES ENCOUNTERED DURING THE PROCESSING OF THE BNL ERL 5 CELL ACCELERATING CAVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURRILL,A.

    2007-06-25

    One of the key components for the Energy Recovery Linac being built by the Electron cooling group in the Collider Accelerator Department is the 5 cell accelerating cavity which is designed to accelerate 2 MeV electrons from the gun up to 15-20 MeV, allow them to make one pass through the ring and then decelerate them back down to 2 MeV prior to sending them to the dump. This cavity was designed by BNL and fabricated by AES in Medford, NY. Following fabrication it was sent to Thomas Jefferson Lab in VA for chemical processing, testing and assembly into a string assembly suitable for shipment back to BNL for integration into the ERL. The steps involved in this processing sequence will be reviewed and the deviations from processing of similar SRF cavities will be discussed. The lessons learned from this process are documented to help future projects where the scope is different from that normally encountered.

  5. Challenges Encountered during the Processing of the BNL ERL 5 Cell Accelerating Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Burrill; I. Ben-Zvi; R. Calaga; H. Hahn; V. Litvinenko; G. T. McIntyre; P. Kneisel; J. Mammosser; J. P. Preble; C. E. Reece; R. A. Rimmer; J. Saunders

    2007-08-01

    One of the key components for the Energy Recovery Linac being built by the Electron cooling group in the Collider Accelerator Department is the 5 cell accelerating cavity which is designed to accelerate 2 MeV electrons from the gun up to 15-20 MeV, allow them to make one pass through the ring and then decelerate them back down to 2 MeV prior to sending them to the dump. This cavity was designed by BNL and fabricated by AES in Medford, NY. Following fabrication it was sent to Thomas Jefferson Lab in VA for chemical processing, testing and assembly into a string assembly suitable for shipment back to BNL and integration into the ERL. The steps involved in this processing sequence will be reviewed and the deviations from processing of similar SRF cavities will be discussed. The lessons learned from this process are documented to help future projects where the scope is different from that normally encountered.

  6. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Pei

    2013-02-01

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrumentation. At the FLASH facility in DESY, 1.3 GHz (known as TESLA) and 3.9 GHz (third harmonic) cavities are installed. Wakefields in 3.9 GHz cavities are significantly larger than in the 1.3 GHz cavities. It is therefore important to mitigate the adverse effects of HOMs to the beam by aligning the beam on the electric axis of the cavities. This alignment requires an accurate beam position diagnostics inside the 3.9 GHz cavities. It is this aspect that is focused on in this thesis. Although the principle of beam diagnostics with HOM has been demonstrated on 1.3 GHz cavities, the realization in 3.9 GHz cavities is considerably more challenging. This is due to the dense HOM spectrum and the relatively strong coupling of most HOMs amongst the four cavities in the third harmonic cryo-module. A comprehensive series of simulations and HOM spectra measurements have been performed in order to study the modal band structure of the 3.9 GHz cavities. The dependencies of

  7. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei

    2013-02-15

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrumentation. At the FLASH facility in DESY, 1.3 GHz (known as TESLA) and 3.9 GHz (third harmonic) cavities are installed. Wakefields in 3.9 GHz cavities are significantly larger than in the 1.3 GHz cavities. It is therefore important to mitigate the adverse effects of HOMs to the beam by aligning the beam on the electric axis of the cavities. This alignment requires an accurate beam position diagnostics inside the 3.9 GHz cavities. It is this aspect that is focused on in this thesis. Although the principle of beam diagnostics with HOM has been demonstrated on 1.3 GHz cavities, the realization in 3.9 GHz cavities is considerably more challenging. This is due to the dense HOM spectrum and the relatively strong coupling of most HOMs amongst the four cavities in the third harmonic cryo-module. A comprehensive series of simulations and HOM spectra measurements have been performed in order to study the modal band structure of the 3.9 GHz cavities. The dependencies of

  8. Continuing studies of the plasma beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, C.

    1990-01-01

    This is a proposal for the release of third year funds for the ''Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator'' program (PBWA) at UCLA under the direction of Professor C. Joshi. This report is also a summary of progress on this project since March 1990; i.e., the date of the last report to the DOE. Once again we note that although the program is for historical reasons called the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator Program, our group is active in all areas of applications of lasers and plasmas in future high energy accelerators. These are as follows: heat gradient plasma structures; excited by plasma beat wave technique; laser wake field technique; and plasma wake field technique. Development of a photoinjector-driven, 20 MeV linac; and theoretical studies of the plasma lens and use of plasmas at the final focus

  9. Compact 400-Mhz Half-Wave Spoke Resonator Crab Cavity for the LHC Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zenghai

    2010-01-01

    Crab cavities are proposed for the LHC upgrade to improve the luminosity. There are two possible crab cavity installations for the LHC upgrade: the global scheme at Interaction Region (IR) 4 where the beam-beam separation is about 420-mm, and the local scheme at the IR5 where the beam-beam separation is only 194-mm. One of the design requirements as the result of a recent LHC-Crab cavity workshop is to develop a 400-MHz cavity design that can be utilized for either the global or local schemes at IR4 or IR5. Such a design would offer more flexibility for the final upgrade installation, as the final crabbing scheme is yet to be determined, and save R and D cost. The cavity size of such a design, however, is limited by the beam-beam separation at IR5 which can only accommodate a cavity with a horizontal size of about 145-mm, which is a design challenge for a 400-MHz cavity. To meet the new design requirements, we have developed a compact 400-MHz half-wave spoke resonator (HWSR) crab cavity that can fit into the tight spaces available at either IR4 or IR5. In this paper, we present the optimization of the HWSR cavity shape and the design of HOM, LOM, and SOM couplers for wakefield damping.

  10. Concepts and limitations of macroparticle accelerators using travelling magnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wipf, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of an accelerator using a travelling magnetic wave acting on magnetized projectiles is discussed. Although superconductors have a high potential as projectile material, their low critical temperature makes them unsuitable. Among ferromagnetic materials dysprosium seems to be superior. For stable suspension and guidance a high conductivity, preferably superconducting, guide sheet is necessary. Magnetic field gradients of 10 9 A/m 2 travelling at 10 6 m/s should be achievable using present state-of-the-art components; resulting accelerations are greater than or equal to 500 km/s 2 . A linear accelerator for final speeds of 50 km/s needs a length of 2.5 km. Guidance forces sufficient to produce acceleration of 2 x 10 6 m/s 2 allow circular accelerators of reasonable size to achieve hypervelocities for small (50 to 100 mg) projectiles. An accelerator of 170 m diameter would surpass the best results from light gas guns. Travelling waves suitable for accelerations of the order of 10 4 m/s 2 can be produced without switching, by means of flux displacing rotors, easily adapted to circular accelerators

  11. Ion Acceleration in Plasmas with Alfven Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesnychenko, O.Ya.; Lutsenko, V.V.; White, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of elliptically polarized Alfven waves on thermal ions are investigated. Both regular oscillations and stochastic motion of the particles are observed. It is found that during regular oscillations the energy of the thermal ions can reach magnitudes well exceeding the plasma temperature, the effect being largest in low-beta plasmas (beta is the ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure). Conditions of a low stochasticity threshold are obtained. It is shown that stochasticity can arise even for waves propagating along the magnetic field provided that the frequency spectrum is non-monochromatic. The analysis carried out is based on equations derived by using a Lagrangian formalism. A code solving these equations is developed. Steady-state perturbations and perturbations with the amplitude slowly varying in time are considered

  12. Some nonlinear processes relevant to the beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, R.; Mori, W.B.

    1985-03-01

    The beat wave accelerator depends on the generation of a large amplitude plasma wave with a phase velocity close to the velocity of light c. The plasma wave (ωsub(p), ksub(p)) is generated by beating colinear laser beams (ω 1 , k 1 ) and (ω 2 ,k 2 ) with ωsub(p) = ω 1 -ω 2 , ksub(p) = k 1 -k 2 . Since the process involves both large amplitude transverse and longitudinal waves, various nonlinear instabilities associated with either wave may occur. The object of the article is to discuss some of the processes that may compete with the beat wave generation listing their threshold and growth rate. (author)

  13. Particle acceleration by Alfven wave turbulence in radio galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilek, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Radio galaxies show evidence for acceleration of relativistic electrons locally within the diffuse radio luminous plasma. One likely candidate for the reacceleration mechanism is acceleration by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence which exists within the plasma. If Alfven waves are generated by a fluid turbulent cascade described by a power law energy-wavenumber spectrum, the particle spectrum in the presence of synchrotron losses will evolve towards an asymptotic power law which agrees with the particle spectra observed in these sources

  14. High frequency single mode traveling wave structure for particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanyan, M.I.; Danielyan, V.A.; Grigoryan, B.A.; Grigoryan, A.H. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Tsakanian, A.V. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut TEMF, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Tsakanov, V.M., E-mail: tsakanov@asls.candle.am [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Vardanyan, A.S.; Zakaryan, S.V. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia)

    2016-09-01

    The development of the new high frequency slow traveling wave structures is one of the promising directions in accomplishment of charged particles high acceleration gradient. The disc and dielectric loaded structures are the most known structures with slowly propagating modes. In this paper a large aperture high frequency metallic two-layer accelerating structure is studied. The electrodynamical properties of the slowly propagating TM{sub 01} mode in a metallic tube with internally coated low conductive thin layer are examined.

  15. Design, prototyping, and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Binping; Alberty, Luis; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdu-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-04-01

    We proposed a novel design for a compact superconducting crab cavity with a double quarter wave (DQWCC) shape. After fabrication and surface treatments, this niobium proof-of-principle cavity was tested cryogenically in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service in the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The cavity's electromagnetic properties are well suited for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the required 3.34 MV for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC. In this paper, we present the design, prototyping, and results from testing the DQWCC.

  16. Regenerative BBU starting currents in standing wave cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, A.M.; Buller, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical method for determining regenerative beam breakup (BBU) starting current, in which the contributions of single-cell field configuration and multi-cell structure mode are separated, is described. The field configuration within each cell is determined to close approximation through the use of mesh codes, which also relate the wall losses to the voltage drop along the beam path. The cell-to-cell amplitude variation may be determined by bead pull measurements on model cavities, or by assuming idealized structure modes. As an example, the I S Q L product for TM 110 -like modes of a 433-MHz, 5-cell, slot-coupled cavity is obtained. (author). 3 figs

  17. Wave-filter-based approach for generation of a quiet space in a rectangular cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Nobuo; Sanada, Akira

    2018-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the generation of a quiet space in a rectangular cavity using active wave control methodology. It is the purpose of this paper to present the wave filtering method for a rectangular cavity using multiple microphones and its application to an adaptive feedforward control system. Firstly, the transfer matrix method is introduced for describing the wave dynamics of the sound field, and then feedforward control laws for eliminating transmitted waves is derived. Furthermore, some numerical simulations are conducted that show the best possible result of active wave control. This is followed by the derivation of the wave filtering equations that indicates the structure of the wave filter. It is clarified that the wave filter consists of three portions; modal group filter, rearrangement filter and wave decomposition filter. Next, from a numerical point of view, the accuracy of the wave decomposition filter which is expressed as a function of frequency is investigated using condition numbers. Finally, an experiment on the adaptive feedforward control system using the wave filter is carried out, demonstrating that a quiet space is generated in the target space by the proposed method.

  18. Astigmatism compensation in mode-cleaner cavities for the next generation of gravitational wave interferometric detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, Pablo J. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)]. E-mail: pbarriga@cyllene.uwa.edu.au; Zhao Chunnong [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Blair, David G. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2005-06-06

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors use triangular ring cavities to filter spatial and frequency instabilities from the input laser beam. The next generation of interferometric detectors will use high laser power and greatly increased circulating power inside the cavities. The increased power inside the cavities increases thermal effects in their mirrors. The triangular configuration of conventional mode-cleaners creates an intrinsic astigmatism that can be corrected by using the thermal effects to advantage. In this Letter we show that an astigmatism free output beam can be created if the design parameters are correctly chosen.

  19. Astigmatism compensation in mode-cleaner cavities for the next generation of gravitational wave interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga, Pablo J.; Zhao Chunnong; Blair, David G.

    2005-01-01

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors use triangular ring cavities to filter spatial and frequency instabilities from the input laser beam. The next generation of interferometric detectors will use high laser power and greatly increased circulating power inside the cavities. The increased power inside the cavities increases thermal effects in their mirrors. The triangular configuration of conventional mode-cleaners creates an intrinsic astigmatism that can be corrected by using the thermal effects to advantage. In this Letter we show that an astigmatism free output beam can be created if the design parameters are correctly chosen

  20. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OBSERVED ABOVE A QUIET-SUN REGION IN A DARK CAVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jiajia; Zhou Zhenjun; Wang Yuming; Liu Rui; Liao Chijian; Shen Chenglong; Zheng Huinan; Miao Bin; Su Zhenpeng; Wang, S. [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wang Bin, E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn [Beijing Institute of Tracking and Telecommunication Technology, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2012-10-20

    Waves play a crucial role in diagnosing the plasma properties of various structures in the solar corona and coronal heating. Slow magnetoacoustic (MA) waves are one of the important types of magnetohydrodynamic waves. In past decades, numerous slow MA waves were detected above active regions and coronal holes, but were rarely found elsewhere. Here, we investigate a 'tornado'-like structure consisting of quasi-periodic streaks within a dark cavity at about 40-110 Mm above a quiet-Sun region on 2011 September 25. Our analysis reveals that these streaks are actually slow MA wave trains. The properties of these wave trains, including phase speed, compression ratio, and kinetic energy density, are similar to those of the reported slow MA waves, except that the period of these waves is about 50 s, much shorter than the typical reported values (3-5 minutes).

  1. Electron cyclotron wave acceleration outside a flaring loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1983-01-01

    A model for the secondary acceleration of electrons outside a flaring loop is proposed. The results suggest that the narrow bandwidth radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring loop can become the driver for secondary electron acceleration outside the loop. It is shown that a system of electrons gyrating about and streaming along an adiabatically spatially varying, static magnetic field can be efficiently accelerated to high energies by an electromagnetic wave propagating along and polarized transverse to the static magnetic field. The predictions from our model appear to be in general agreement with existing observations.

  2. Electron cyclotron wave acceleration outside a flaring loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1983-01-01

    We propose a model for the secondary acceleration of electrons outside a flaring loop. Our results suggest that the narrow bandwidth radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring loop can become the driver for secondary electron acceleration outside the loop. We show that a system of electrons gyrating about and streaming along an adiabatically spatially varying, static magnetic field can be efficiently accelerated to high energies by an electromagnetic wave propagating along and polarized transverse to the static magnetic field. The predictions from our model appear to be in general agreement with existing observations

  3. High-power, solid-state rf source for accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, D.R.; Mols, G.E.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past few years the Defense and Electronics Center of Westinghouse Electric Corporation has developed a solid-state, 250-kW peak, rf amplifier for use with the SPS-40 radar system. This system has a pulse length of 60 μs and operates across the frequency band from 400 to 450 MHz. Because of the potential use of such a system as an rf source for accelerator applications, a collaborative experiment was initiated between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Westinghouse to simulate the resonant load conditions of an accelerator cavity. This paper describes the positive results of that experiment as well as the solid-state amplifier architecture. It also explores the future of high-power, solid-state amplifiers as rf sources for accelerator structures

  4. A generic travelling wave solution in dissipative laser cavity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-09

    Sep 9, 2016 ... Abstract. A large family of cosh-Gaussian travelling wave solution of a complex Ginzburg–Landau equation ... pling, wherein the real part represents diffusive coupling ... knowledge, this is the first time that cosh-Gaussian pro-.

  5. Synchronization of RF fields of Indus 2 RF cavities for proper injection and acceleration of beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Nitesh; Bagduwal, Pritam S.; Lad, M.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Indus-2 is a synchrotron light source with designed parameters of 2.5 GeV, 300 mA beam current. Four RF cavities fed from four RF power stations have been used for beam acceleration from 550 MeV to 2.5 GeV and synchrotron loss compensation. Particle should reach the RF cavity at the proper phase for proper acceptance of the beam in ring. At injection if the phase is not proper the acceptance efficiency reduces and the maximum stored current in the ring also gets limited. Equal contribution from four cavities at every value of current and energy level is very important. Improper phase will cause the imbalance of the power among different station hence will limit maximum stored current and reduce life time of the stored beam. Phase optimization was done in two-step, first at injection to have better injection rate and the stations were operated at the sufficient power for control loops to operate. Then at 2 GeV and 2.5 GeV energy so that beam extracts equal power from all four RF stations. Phase synchronization of all four cavities from injection to 2.5 GeV has already been done at 50 mA stored beam current. If phases of RF fields inside four RF cavities is not proper then beam will not see the total RF voltage as summation of all four cavity gap voltages, hence it is a very important parameter to be optimized and maintained during operation. (author)

  6. Plasma acceleration in a wave with varying frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzilka, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The averaged velocity of a test particle and the averaged velocity of a plasma in an electromagnetic wave packet with varying frequency (e.g., a radiation pulse from pulsar) is derived. The total momentum left by the wave packet in regions of plasma inhomogeneity is found. In case the plasma concentration is changing due to ionization the plasma may be accelerated parallelly or antiparallelly to the direction of the wave packet propagation which is relevant for a laser induced breakdown in gas. (author)

  7. Laser cavities with self-pumped phase conjugation by mixing of four waves in an amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillard, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this research thesis is to characterise a new type of cavities with self-pumped phase conjugation which uses a mixing of four waves degenerated in a solid amplifier. After a definition of phase conjugation and a brief overview of the history of this technique, the author describes and compares the different laser architectures with phase conjugation. He explains benefits and perspectives related to cavities with self-pumped phase conjugation using a mixing of four waves in an amplifier. He develops the necessary formalism for the resolution of the coupled equations of four wave mixing in transient regime for a resonant and saturated non-linearity. He shows how these results can be applied to solid amplifiers, in particularly to the Nd:YAG amplifier which is used in all experiments. In the next part, the author describes the principle and characteristics of cavity with self-pumped phase conjugation injected by another laser. An experiment is performed with two conventional Nd:YAG amplifiers pumped by flash lamps. The excellent performance of the cavity allows the study of cavity without this injection, but self-oscillating is to be envisaged, and a modelling of self-oscillating cavities is proposed and studied. Results are compared with those obtained with two N:YAG amplifiers pumped by flash lamps. Polarisation properties of the self-oscillating cavity are also studied. Finally, the author reports an experimental validation of a cavity with self-pumped phase conjugation all in solid state, pumped by laser diodes (a more efficient pumping) [fr

  8. Studies of niobium and development of niobium resonant RF cavities for accelerator driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    The present approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Jefferson Laboratory pioneered the use of large-grain/single-crystal Nb directly sliced from an ingot for the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. The large grain/single crystal niobium has several potential advantages over the polycrystalline niobium and has become a viable alternative to the standard fine grain (ASTM grain size>6 μm), high purity (RRR ≥ 250 ) niobium for the fabrication of high-performance SRF cavities for particle accelerators. The present study includes the prototype single cell low beta cavity design, fabrication, EB welding and low temperature RF test at 2K. In this study also the medium field Q-Slope has been analyzed with the help of an added non linear term in Heabel's analytical model and a linear increase of surface resistance Rs with the magnetic field

  9. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Baboi, Nicoleta

    2012-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrum...

  10. Beat-wave accelerator studies at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The study carried out in 1982-83 at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory to examine how one might use the beat-wave principle to construct a useful high energy accelerator is reviewed, and comments are made on later developments. A number of problems are evident to which solutions cannot at present be foreseen. (author)

  11. Cosmic Rays Accelerated at Cosmological Shock Waves Renyi Ma1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cosmic Rays Accelerated at Cosmological Shock Waves. Renyi Ma1,2,∗ ... ratio of CR to thermal energy in the ICM and WHIM based on numerical simulations and diffusive shock ... Hence, the nonthermal radiation of CRs may provide us a.

  12. Enhanced efficiency of plasma acceleration in the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration scheme

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.; Jabłonski, S.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Parys, P.; Raczka, P.; Krouský, Eduard; Ullschmied, Jiří; Liska, R.; Kucharik, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2015), 014007 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LM2010014 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser ion acceleration * laser plasma * fast ignition * ion diagnostics * LICPA Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UFP-V) Impact factor: 2.404, year: 2015

  13. Highly efficient accelerator of dense matter using laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badziak, J.; Jabloňski, S.; Pisarczyk, T.; Rączka, P.; Krouský, Eduard; Liska, R.; Kucharik, M.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Parys, P.; Rosiński, M.; Borodziuk, S.; Ullschmied, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 5 (2012), s. 1-8 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma accelerators * plasma density * plasma inertial confinement * plasma light propagation * plasma pressure * plasma transport processes Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.376, year: 2012

  14. Nonlinear cyclotron-resonance accelerations by a generalized EM wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, K.; Hojo, H.

    2004-01-01

    Particle accelerations by a one-dimensional, electromagnetic, dispersive pulse in an external magnetic field are investigated. It is found that the well-known cyclotron resonance may be classified into three regimes as the length and/or the amplitude of the pulse are varied. Namely, as the pulse amplitude increases, the transit-time cyclotron-resonance acceleration (CRA) evolves to phase trapping, and reflect particles. The amplitude and wave dispersion as well as the pulse length strongly affect those accelerations. The interesting phenomena of quantization of resonance velocities in between the two regimes are also investigated. This new mechanism may lead to wave amplification at some discrete frequencies other than the cyclotron frequency. (authors)

  15. High-energy terahertz wave parametric oscillator with a surface-emitted ring-cavity configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Xu, Wentao; Duan, Pan; Yan, Chao; Tang, Longhuang; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-05-15

    A surface-emitted ring-cavity terahertz (THz) wave parametric oscillator has been demonstrated for high-energy THz output and fast frequency tuning in a wide frequency range. Through the special optical design with a galvano-optical scanner and four-mirror ring-cavity structure, the maximum THz wave output energy of 12.9 μJ/pulse is achieved at 1.359 THz under the pump energy of 172.8 mJ. The fast THz frequency tuning in the range of 0.7-2.8 THz can be accessed with the step response of 600 μs. Moreover, the maximum THz wave output energy from this configuration is 3.29 times as large as that obtained from the conventional surface-emitted THz wave parametric oscillator with the same experimental conditions.

  16. Biased HiPIMS technology for superconducting rf accelerating cavities coating

    CERN Document Server

    G. Rosaz, G.; Sonato, D.; Calatroni, S.; Ehiasarian, A.; Junginger, T.; Taborelli, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years the interest of the thin film science and technology community on High Impulse Power Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) coatings has steadily increased. HIPIMS literature shows that better thin film morphology, denser and smoother films can be achieved when compared with standard dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS) coating technology. Furthermore the capability of HIPIMS to produce a high quantity of ionized species can allow conformal coatings also for complex geometries. CERN already studied the possibility to use such a coating method for SRF accelerating cavities. Results are promising but not better from a RF point of view than dcMS coatings. Thanks to these results the next step is to go towards a biased HiPIMS approach. However the geometry of the cavities leads to complex changes in the coating setup in order to apply a bias voltage. Coating system tweaking and first superconducting properties of biased samples are presented.

  17. Higher-order-mode (HOM) power in elliptical superconducting cavities for intense pulsed proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Sang Ho Kim; Dong O Jeon; Sundeli, R

    2002-01-01

    In linacs for intense pulsed proton accelerators, the beam has a multiple time-structure, and each beam time-structure generates resonance. When a higher-order mode (HOM) is near these resonance frequencies, the induced voltage could be large and accordingly the resulting HOM power, too. In order to understand the effects of a complex beam time-structure on the mode excitations and the resulting HOM powers in elliptical superconducting cavities, analytic expressions are developed, with which the beam-induced voltage and corresponding power are explored, taking into account the properties of HOM frequency behavior in elliptical superconducting cavities. The results and understandings from this analysis are presented with the beam parameters of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) superconducting linac.

  18. Surface characterization of Nb samples electropolished with real superconducting rf accelerator cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of surface characterizations of niobium (Nb samples electropolished together with a single cell superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavity. These witness samples were located in three regions of the cavity, namely at the equator, the iris, and the beam pipe. Auger electron spectroscopy was utilized to probe the chemical composition of the topmost four atomic layers. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x ray for elemental analysis was used to observe the surface topography and chemical composition at the micrometer scale. A few atomic layers of sulfur (S were found covering the samples nonuniformly. Niobium oxide granules with a sharp geometry were observed on every sample. Some Nb-O granules appeared to also contain sulfur.

  19. RESULTS OF ACCELERATED LIFE TESTING OF LCLS-II CAVITY TUNER MOTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2018-04-01

    An Accelerated Life Test (ALT) of the Phytron stepper motor used in the LCLS-II cavity tuner has been conducted at JLab. Since the motor will reside inside the cryomodule, any failure would lead to a very costly and arduous repair. As such, the motor was tested for the equivalent of 30 lifetimes before being approved for use in the production cryomodules. The 9-cell LCLS-II cavity is simulated by disc springs with an equivalent spring constant. Plots of the motor position vs. tuner position ' measured via an installed linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) ' are used to measure motor motion. The titanium spindle was inspected for loss of lubrication. The motor passed the ALT, and is set to be installed in the LCLS-II cryomodules.

  20. Experimental investigation of starting characteristics and wave propagation from a shallow open cavity and its acoustic emission at supersonic speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, S.; Desikan, S. L. N.; Niranjan, Sahoo

    2018-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on a shallow open cavity (L/D = 5) at a supersonic Mach number (M = 1.8) to understand its transient starting characteristics, wave propagation (inside and outside the cavity) during one vortex shedding cycle, and acoustic emission. Starting characteristics and wave propagation were visualized through time resolved schlieren images, while acoustic emissions were captured through unsteady pressure measurements. Results showed a complex shock system during the starting process which includes characteristics of the bifurcated shock system, shock train, flow separation, and shock wave boundary layer interaction. In one vortex shedding cycle, vortex convection from cavity leading edge to cavity trailing edge was observed. Flow features outside the cavity demonstrated the formation and downstream movement of a λ-shock due to the interaction of shock from the cavity leading edge and shock due to vortex and generation of waves on account of shear layer impingement at the cavity trailing edge. On the other hand, interesting wave structures and its propagation were monitored inside the cavity. In one vortex shedding cycle, two waves such as a reflected compression wave from a cavity leading edge in the previous vortex shedding cycle and a compression wave due to the reflection of Mach wave at the cavity trailing edge corner in the current vortex shedding cycle were visualized. The acoustic emission from the cavity indicated that the 2nd to 4th modes/tones are dominant, whereas the 1st mode contains broadband spectrum. In the present studies, the cavity feedback mechanism was demonstrated through a derived parameter coherence coefficient.

  1. Cavity digital control testing system by Simulink step operation method for TESLA linear accelerator and free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Simrock, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The cavity control system for the TESLA -- TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator project is initially introduced in this paper. The FPGA -- Field Programmable Gate Array technology has been implemented for digital controller stabilizing cavity field gradient. The cavity SIMULINK model has been applied to test the hardware controller. The step operation method has been developed for testing the FPGA device coupled to the SIMULINK model of the analog real plant. The FPGA signal processing has been verified according to the required algorithm of the reference MATLAB controller. Some experimental results have been presented for different cavity operational conditions.

  2. Evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy for enhanced detection of surface binding under flow injection analysis conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Sneppen, L.; Ariese, F.; Gooijer, C.; Ubachs, W.

    2008-01-01

    In evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy, one (or more) of the re°ections inside the cavity is a total internal re°ection (TIR) event. Only the evanescent wave associated with this TIR is being used for prob-ing the sample. This technique is therefore highly surface-speci-c and attractive

  3. Design, prototyping, and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binping Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a novel design for a compact superconducting crab cavity with a double quarter wave (DQWCC shape. After fabrication and surface treatments, this niobium proof-of-principle cavity was tested cryogenically in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service in the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The cavity’s electromagnetic properties are well suited for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the required 3.34 MV for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC. In this paper, we present the design, prototyping, and results from testing the DQWCC.

  4. Continuous-wave optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Liu, Zhixiong; Alatawi, Abdullah; Ng, Tien Khee; Wu, Tao; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    We report an optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter operating in continuous-wave (CW) with a power density threshold of ~89 kW/cm2. The device has an active region of CH3NH3PbBr3 embedded in a dielectric microcavity

  5. Measurements on the SPS 200 MHz Travelling Wave Cavity towards an Impedance Model

    CERN Document Server

    Roggen, Toon; Caspers, Fritz; Vollinger, Christine; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This note discusses the contribution of the SPS 200 MHz TWC (Travelling Wave Cavity) to the SPS longitudinal impedance model. The measurement method and setup is briefly explained and a comparison with simulations is discussed for both the fundamental pass band (FPB) as well as the Higher Order Modes (HOMs). In addition a number of improvements to the measurement setup are discussed.

  6. Scattering of E Polarized Plane Wave by Rectangular Cavity With Finite Flanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Elena D.

    2017-11-01

    The rigorous Method of Regularization is implemented for accurate analysis of wave scattering by rectangular cavity with finite flanges. The solution is free from limitations on problem parameters. The calculation of the induced surface current, bistatic radar cross section (RCS) and frequency dependence of monostatic RCS are performed with controlled accuracy in a wide frequency band.

  7. Laser Processing on the Surface of Niobium Superconducting Radio-Frequency Accelerator Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravelu, Senthilraja; Klopf, Michael; Krafft, Geoffrey; Kelley, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting Radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities are at the heart of an increasing number of particle accelerators.~ Their performance is dominated by a several nm thick layer at the interior surface. ~Maximizing its smoothness is found to be critical and aggressive chemical treatments are employed to this end.~ We describe laser-induced surface melting as an alternative ``greener'' approach.~ Modeling guided selection of parameters for irradiation with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.~ The resulting topography was examined by SEM, AFM and Stylus Profilometry.

  8. Multi-pulse enhanced laser ion acceleration using plasma half cavity targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, G. G.; Brenner, C. M.; Neely, D.; Green, J. S.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Spindloe, C.; Bagnoud, V.; Brabetz, C.; Zielbauer, B.; Carroll, D. C.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Roth, M.; Wagner, F.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a plasma half cavity target design for laser driven ion acceleration that enhances the laser to proton energy conversion efficiency and has been found to modify the low energy region of the proton spectrum. The target design utilizes the high fraction of laser energy reflected from an ionized surface and refocuses it such that a double pulse interaction is attained. We report on numerical simulations and experimental results demonstrating that conversion efficiencies can be doubled, compared to planar foil interactions, when the secondary pulse is delivered within picoseconds of the primary pulse.

  9. Multi-pulse enhanced laser ion acceleration using plasma half cavity targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, G. G.; Brenner, C. M.; Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, OX11 0QX Didcot (United Kingdom); Department of Physics SUPA, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Green, J. S.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Spindloe, C. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, OX11 0QX Didcot (United Kingdom); Bagnoud, V.; Brabetz, C.; Zielbauer, B. [PHELIX Group, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Carroll, D. C.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P. [Department of Physics SUPA, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Roth, M. [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Wagner, F. [PHELIX Group, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-09

    We report on a plasma half cavity target design for laser driven ion acceleration that enhances the laser to proton energy conversion efficiency and has been found to modify the low energy region of the proton spectrum. The target design utilizes the high fraction of laser energy reflected from an ionized surface and refocuses it such that a double pulse interaction is attained. We report on numerical simulations and experimental results demonstrating that conversion efficiencies can be doubled, compared to planar foil interactions, when the secondary pulse is delivered within picoseconds of the primary pulse.

  10. Fermilab 500 GeV main accelerator rf cavity 128 MHz mode damper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Miller, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    The Fermilab 500-GeV main accelerating system has been operating for a year now with the aid of 128-MHz mode dampers. Such dampers proved to be necessary to achieve stable operation and a reasonably smooth slow spill at intensities of approximately 2 x 10 13 protons per pulse, and furthermore are low-cost and reliable. The approach used to identify troublesome modes, the observed beam blow-up without dampers, and the steps taken to design and install suitable dampers on eighteen main ring cavities are discussed. Spectrum analyzer pictures help illustrate the performance

  11. Design and fabrication of a continuous wave electron accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Jiro

    1997-01-01

    The Physics Institute of Sao Paulo University, SP, Brazil is fabricating a 31 MeV cw racetrack microtron (RTM) designed for nuclear physics research. This is a two-stage microtron that includes a 1.93 MeV injector linac feeding a five-turn microtron booster. After 28 turns, the main microtron delivers a 31 MeV continuous electron beam. The objective of this work is the development and fabrication of an advanced, beta=l, cw accelerating structure for the main microtron. The accelerating structure will be a side-coupled structure (SCS). We have chosen this kind of cavity, because it presents good vacuum properties, allows operation at higher accelerating electric fields and has a shunt impedance better than 81 MQ/m, with a high coupling factor ( 3 - 5%). The engineering design is the Los Alamos one. There will be two tuning plungers placed at both ends of the accelerating structure. They automatically and quickly compensate for the variation in the resonance frequency caused by changes in the structure temperature. Our design represents an advanced accelerating structure with the optimum SCS properties coexisting with the plunger's good tuning properties. (author)

  12. Atom-field interaction in the single-quantum limit in a two dimensional travelling-wave cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Sun Hyun; Chough, Young Tak; An, Kyung Won

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the interaction of an atom with two dimensional travelling-wave cavity modes in the strong coupling region, with the quantized atomic center of mass motion taken into account. Analytic and numerical calculation shows that the atom in two independent pairs of travelling wave modes can be made to interact only with a particular travelling mode by matching the initial momentum and the detuning of the cavities. We also numerically investigate the atomic momentum deflection in the cavities

  13. Stochastic acceleration by a single wave in a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.

    1977-01-01

    A particularly simple problem exhibiting stochasticity is the motion of a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field and a single wave. Detailed studies of this wave-particle interaction show the following features. An electrostatic wave propagating obliquely to the magnetic field causes stochastic motion if the wave amplitude exceeds a certain threshold. The overlap of cyclotron resonances then destroys a constant of the motion, allowing strong particle acceleration. A wave of large enough amplitude would thus suffer severe damping and lead to rapid heating of a particle distribution. The stochastic motion resembles a diffusion process even though the wave spectrum contains only a single wave. The motion of ions in a nonuniform magnetic field and a single electrostatic wave is treated in our study of a possible saturation mechanism of the dissipative trapped-ion instability in a tokamak. A theory involving the overlap of bounce resonances predicts the main features found in the numerical integration of the equations of motion. Ions in a layer near the trapped-circulating boundary move stochastically. This motion leads to nonlinear stabilization mechanisms which are described qualitatively

  14. Cherenkov Radiation Control via Self-accelerating Wave-packets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Li, Zhili; Wetzel, Benjamin; Morandotti, Roberto; Chen, Zhigang; Xu, Jingjun

    2017-08-18

    Cherenkov radiation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature. It describes electromagnetic radiation from a charged particle moving in a medium with a uniform velocity larger than the phase velocity of light in the same medium. Such a picture is typically adopted in the investigation of traditional Cherenkov radiation as well as its counterparts in different branches of physics, including nonlinear optics, spintronics and plasmonics. In these cases, the radiation emitted spreads along a "cone", making it impractical for most applications. Here, we employ a self-accelerating optical pump wave-packet to demonstrate controlled shaping of one type of generalized Cherenkov radiation - dispersive waves in optical fibers. We show that, by tuning the parameters of the wave-packet, the emitted waves can be judiciously compressed and focused at desired locations, paving the way to such control in any physical system.

  15. Common analysis of the relativistic klystron and the standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtele, J.S.; Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.

    1992-07-01

    This paper summarizes a new formalism which makes the analysis and understanding of both the relativistic klystron (RK) and the standing-wave free-electron laser (SWFEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) available to a wide audience of accelerator physicists. A ''coupling impedance'' for both the RK and SWFEL is introduced, which can include realistic cavity features, such as beam and vacuum ports, in a simple manner. The RK and SWFEL macroparticle equations, which govern the energy and phase evolution of successive bunches in the beam, are of identical form, differing only by multiplicative factors. The analysis allows, for the first time, a relative comparison of the RF and SWFEL TBAs

  16. Coherent wave packet dynamics in a double-well potential in cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li; Li, Gang; Ding, Ming-Song; Wang, Yong-Liang; Zhang, Yun-Cui

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the coherent wave packet dynamics of a two-level atom trapped in a symmetric double-well potential in a near-resonance cavity. Prepared on one side of the double-well potential, the atom wave packet oscillates between the left and right wells, while recoil induced by the emitted photon from the atom entangles the atomic internal and external degrees of freedom. The collapse and revival of the tunneling occurs. Adjusting the width of the wave packets, one can modify the tunneling frequency and suppress the tunneling.

  17. Measurement of beam phase at FLASH using HOMs in accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Lianliang; Jones, Roger M; Joshi, Nirav

    2017-01-01

    The beam phase relative to the accelerating field is of vital importance for the quality of photon beams produced in modern Free Electron Lasers based on superconducting cavities. Normally, the phase is determined by detecting the transient field induced by the beam. In this way the phase of each cavity is checked and adjusted typically every few months. In this paper, we present an on-line method of beam phase determination, based on higher order modes (HOMs) excited in the 2nd monopole band by the beam inside these cavities. A circuit model of this HOM band is also presented. Various effects on the resolution have been studied. The results indicate that the resolution is strongly dependent on the signal to noise ratio and the sampling rate. Preliminary experimental results, based on a broadband setup, reveal a resolution of ca. 0.1° RMS. These are in good agreement with simulation results. The work will pave the way for a dedicated system of beam phase monitoring, which is under development for the Europea...

  18. Inverse free electron laser beat-wave accelerator research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, T.C.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    1993-09-01

    A calculation on the stabilization of the sideband instability in the free electron laser (FEL) and inverse FEL (IFEL) was completed. The issue arises in connection with the use of a tapered (''variable-parameter'') undulator of extended length, such as might be used in an ''enhanced efficiency'' traveling-wave FEL or an IFEL accelerator. In addition, the FEL facility at Columbia was configured as a traveling wave amplifier for a 10-kW signal from a 24-GHz magnetron. The space charge field in the bunches of the FEL was measured. Completed work has been published

  19. Dynamics of electron acceleration in laser-driven wakefields. Acceleration limits and asymmetric plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Antonia

    2011-12-16

    The experiments presented in this thesis study several aspects of electron acceleration in a laser-driven plasma wave. High-intensity lasers can efficiently drive a plasma wave that sustains electric fields on the order of 100 GV/m. Electrons that are trapped in this plasma wave can be accelerated to GeV-scale energies. As the accelerating fields in this scheme are 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, the necessary acceleration distance can be reduced by the same factor, turning laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) into a promising compact, and potentially cheaper, alternative. However, laser-accelerated electron bunches have not yet reached the parameter standards of conventional accelerators. This work will help to gain better insight into the acceleration process and to optimize the electron bunch properties. The 25 fs, 1.8 J-pulses of the ATLAS laser at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics were focused into a steady-state flow gas cell. This very reproducible and turbulence-free gas target allows for stable acceleration of electron bunches. Thus the sensitivity of electron parameters to subtle changes of the experimental setup could be determined with meaningful statistics. At optimized experimental parameters, electron bunches of {approx}50 pC total charge were accelerated to energies up to 450 MeV with a divergence of {approx}2 mrad FWHM. As, in a new design of the gas cell, its length can be varied from 2 to 14 mm, the electron bunch energy could be evaluated after different acceleration distances, at two different electron densities. From this evolution important acceleration parameters could be extracted. At an electron density of 6.43. 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} the maximum electric field strength in the plasma wave was determined to be {approx}160 GV/m. The length after which the relativistic electrons outrun the accelerating phase of the electric field and are decelerated again, the so-called dephasing length

  20. Dynamics of electron acceleration in laser-driven wakefields. Acceleration limits and asymmetric plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, Antonia

    2011-01-01

    The experiments presented in this thesis study several aspects of electron acceleration in a laser-driven plasma wave. High-intensity lasers can efficiently drive a plasma wave that sustains electric fields on the order of 100 GV/m. Electrons that are trapped in this plasma wave can be accelerated to GeV-scale energies. As the accelerating fields in this scheme are 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, the necessary acceleration distance can be reduced by the same factor, turning laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) into a promising compact, and potentially cheaper, alternative. However, laser-accelerated electron bunches have not yet reached the parameter standards of conventional accelerators. This work will help to gain better insight into the acceleration process and to optimize the electron bunch properties. The 25 fs, 1.8 J-pulses of the ATLAS laser at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics were focused into a steady-state flow gas cell. This very reproducible and turbulence-free gas target allows for stable acceleration of electron bunches. Thus the sensitivity of electron parameters to subtle changes of the experimental setup could be determined with meaningful statistics. At optimized experimental parameters, electron bunches of ∼50 pC total charge were accelerated to energies up to 450 MeV with a divergence of ∼2 mrad FWHM. As, in a new design of the gas cell, its length can be varied from 2 to 14 mm, the electron bunch energy could be evaluated after different acceleration distances, at two different electron densities. From this evolution important acceleration parameters could be extracted. At an electron density of 6.43. 10 18 cm -3 the maximum electric field strength in the plasma wave was determined to be ∼160 GV/m. The length after which the relativistic electrons outrun the accelerating phase of the electric field and are decelerated again, the so-called dephasing length, was found to be 4.9 mm

  1. Numerical survey of pressure wave propagation around and inside an underground cavity with high order FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterhazy, Sofi; Schneider, Felix; Schöberl, Joachim; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-04-01

    The research on purely numerical methods for modeling seismic waves has been more and more intensified over last decades. This development is mainly driven by the fact that on the one hand for subsurface models of interest in exploration and global seismology exact analytic solutions do not exist, but, on the other hand, retrieving full seismic waveforms is important to get insides into spectral characteristics and for the interpretation of seismic phases and amplitudes. Furthermore, the computational potential has dramatically increased in the recent past such that it became worthwhile to perform computations for large-scale problems as those arising in the field of computational seismology. Algorithms based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) are becoming increasingly popular for the propagation of acoustic and elastic waves in geophysical models as they provide more geometrical flexibility in terms of complexity as well as heterogeneity of the materials. In particular, we want to demonstrate the benefit of high-order FEMs as they also provide a better control on the accuracy. Our computations are done with the parallel Finite Element Library NGSOLVE ontop of the automatic 2D/3D mesh generator NETGEN (http://sourceforge.net/projects/ngsolve/). Further we are interested in the generation of synthetic seismograms including direct, refracted and converted waves in correlation to the presence of an underground cavity and the detailed simulation of the comprehensive wave field inside and around such a cavity that would have been created by a nuclear explosion. The motivation of this application comes from the need to find evidence of a nuclear test as they are forbidden by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). With this approach it is possible for us to investigate the wave field over a large bandwidth of wave numbers. This again will help to provide a better understanding on the characteristic signatures of an underground cavity, improve the protocols for

  2. CONDOR simulation of an 11.4-GHz traveling wave output cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, Y.; Yu, D.

    1991-01-01

    The CONDOR code is used to simulate the cold test and the beam-induced microwave amplification of an 11.4-GHz, six-cell, disk-loaded, traveling wave cavity. Cold test simulation results are in agreement with a modified Slater's theory. Power extraction at the output port is calculated by launching a train of Gaussian electron bunches through the structure. Results are consistent with recent relativistic klystron experiments using a similar TW output cavity. It is further shown that, depending on operating beam parameters, the power extraction efficiency can be maximized by modification of various cells in the TW structure

  3. Entanglement of two atoms interacting with a dissipative coherent cavity field without rotating wave approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Guo-Dong; Fang Mao-Fa; Ouyang Xi-Cheng; Deng Xiao-Juan

    2010-01-01

    Considering two identical two-level atoms interacting with a single-model dissipative coherent cavity field without rotating wave approximation, we explore the entanglement dynamics of the two atoms prepared in different states using concurrence. Interestingly, our results show that the entanglement between the two atoms that initially disentangled will come up to a large constant rapidly, and then keeps steady in the following time or always has its maximum when prepared in some special Bell states. The model considered in this study is a good candidate for quantum information processing especially for quantum computation as steady high-degree atomic entanglement resource obtained in dissipative cavity

  4. Bloch-wave engineered submicron-diameter quantum-dot micropillars for cavity QED experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Lermer, Matthias; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The semiconductor micropillar is attractive for cavity QED experiments. For strong coupling, the figure of merit is proportional to Q/√V, and a design combining a high Q and a low mode volume V is thus desired. However, for the standard submicron diameter design, poor mode matching between the ca...... the cavity and the DBR Bloch mode limits the Q. We present a novel adiabatic design where Bloch-wave engineering is employed to improve the mode matching, allowing the demonstration of a record-high vacuum Rabi splitting of 85 μeV and a Q of 13600 for a 850 nm diameter micropillar....

  5. Electromagnetic Waves and Bursty Electron Acceleration: Implications from Freja

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Laila; Ivchenko, N.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Clemmons, J.; Gustavsson, B.; Eliasson, L.

    2000-01-01

    Dispersive Alfven wave activity is identified in four dayside auroral oval events measured by the Freja satellite. The events are characterized by ion injection, bursty electron precipitation below about I keV, transverse ion heating and broadband extremely low frequency (ELF) emissions below the lower hybrid cutoff frequency (a few kHz). The broadband emissions are observed to become more electrostatic towards higher frequencies. Large-scale density depletions/cavities, as determined by the Langmuir probe measurements, and strong electrostatic emissions are often observed simultaneously. A correlation study has been carried out between the E- and B-field fluctuations below 64 Hz (the dc instrument's upper threshold) and the characteristics of the precipitating electrons. This study revealed that the energization of electrons is indeed related to the broadband ELF emissions and that the electrostatic component plays a predominant role during very active magnetospheric conditions. Furthermore, the effect of the ELF electromagnetic emissions on the larger scale field-aligned current systems has been investigated, and it is found that such an effect cannot be detected. Instead, the Alfvenic activity creates a local region of field-aligned currents. It is suggested that dispersive Alfven waves set up these local field-aligned current regions and in turn trigger more electrostatic emissions during certain conditions. In these regions ions are transversely heated, and large-scale density depletions/cavities may be created during especially active periods.

  6. Stochastic acceleration of electrons from multiple uncorrelated plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, David; Michel, Pierre; Wurtele, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    One-dimensional theory puts a strict limit on the maximum energy attainable by an electron trapped and accelerated by an electron plasma wave (EPW). However, experimental measurements of hot electron distributions accelerated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in ICF experiments typically show a thermal distribution with temperatures of the order of the kinetic energy of the resonant EPW's (Thot mvp2 , where vp is the phase velocity of the EPW's driven by SRS) and no clear cutoff at high energies. In this project, we are investigating conditions under which electrons can be stochastically accelerated by multiple uncorrelated EPW's, such as those generated by incoherent laser speckles in large laser spots like the ones used on NIF ( mm-size), and reproduce distributions similar to those observed in experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Surface Characterization of Impurities in Superconducting Niobium for Radio Frequency (RF) Cavities used in Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Prateek

    Niobium (Nb) is the material of choice for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Cavities used in particle accelerators owing to its high critical temperature (Tc = 9.2 K) and critical magnetic field (≈ 200mT). However, niobium tends to harbor interstitial impurities such as H, C, O and N, which are detrimental to cavity performance. Since the magnetic field penetration depth (lambda) of niobium is 40nm, it is important to characterize these impurities using surface characterization techniques. Also, it is known that certain heat treatments improve cavity efficiency via interstitial impurity removal from the surface of niobium. Thus, a systematic study on the effect of these heat treatments on the surface impurity levels is needed. In this work, surface analysis of both heat treated and non heat treated (120°C-1400°C) large grain (single crystal) bulk niobium samples was performed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Impurity levels were compared on the surface using SIMS after various types of heat treatments expected to improve cavity performance, and the effect of these heat treatments on the surface impurities were examined. SIMS characterization of ion implanted standards of C, N, O, D showed that quantification of C, N and O impurities in Nb is achievable and indicated that H is very mobile in Nb. It was hence determined that quantification of H in Nb is not possible using SIMS due to its high diffusivity in Nb. However, a comparative study of the high temperature heat treated (600°C-1400°C) and non heat treated (control) samples revealed that hydrogen levels decreased by upto a factor of 100. This is attributed to the dissociation of the niobium surface oxide layer, which acts as a passivating film on the surface, and subsequent desorption of hydrogen. Reformation of this oxide layer on cool down disallows any re-absorption of hydrogen, indicating that the oxide acts as a surface barrier for

  8. Highly efficient generation of ultraintense high-energy ion beams using laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.; Raczka, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Euratom Association, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-08-20

    Results of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of fast ion generation in the recently proposed laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) scheme in which a picosecond circularly polarized laser pulse of intensity {approx}10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} irradiates a carbon target placed in a cavity are presented. It is shown that due to circulation of the laser pulse in the cavity, the laser-ions energy conversion efficiency in the LICPA scheme is more than twice as high as that for the conventional (without a cavity) radiation pressure acceleration scheme and a quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beam of the mean ion energy {approx}0.5 GeV and the energy fluence {approx}0.5 GJ/cm{sup 2} is produced with the efficiency {approx}40%. The results of PIC simulations are found to be in fairly good agreement with the predictions of the generalized light-sail model.

  9. Development of high gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities for international linear collider and energy recovery linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kenji; Furuta, Fumio; Saeki, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities were used for storage rings like TRISTAN at KEK, HERA at DESY and LEP-II at CERN in 1990-2000. This technology has been accepted as a common accelerator technology. In August 2004, ITPR recommended an electron/positron linear collider based on SRF technology for the future high energy physics. ICFA accepted the recommendation and named it ILC (International Linear Collider). SRF cavities have a very unique feature due to its very small surface resistance. Energy recovery is another very exciting application. Many laboratories are proposing ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) as a next bright photon source. In these accelerators, production of SRF cavities with reliably high performance is the most important issue. In this paper the activities of ILC high gradient cavities will be introduced. ERL activity will be briefly presented. (author)

  10. Development of High Gradient Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities for International Linear Collider and Energy Recovery Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kenji; Furuta, Fumio; Saeki, Takayuki

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities were used for storage rings like TRISTAN at KEK, HERA at DESY and LEP-II at CERN in 1990-2000. This technology has been accepted as a common accelerator technology. In August 2004, ITPR recommended an electron/positron linear collider based on SRF technology for the future high energy physics. ICFA accepted the recommendation and named it ILC (International Linear Collider). SRF cavities have a very unique feature due to its very small surface resistance. Energy recovery is another very exciting application. Many laboratories are proposing ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) as a next bright photon source. In these accelerators, production of SRF cavities with reliably high performance is the most important issue. In this paper the activities of ILC high gradient cavities will be introduced. ERL activity will be briefly presented.

  11. Plasma acceleration by magnetic nozzles and shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Kunihiko; Murakami, Fumitake; Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Imasaki, Atsushi; Yoshinuma, Mikirou; Ando, Akira; Inutake, Masaaki

    2001-01-01

    We have measured axial profiles of ion acoustic Mach number, M i , of a plasma flow blowing off from an MPD (magneto-plasma-dynamic) arc-jet in various magnetic configurations. It is found that the Mach number increases in a divergent nozzle up to 3, while it stays at about unity in a uniform magnetic channel. When a magnetic bump is added in the exit of the divergent magnetic nozzle, the Mach number suddenly decreases below unity, due to an occurrence of shock wave. The subsonic flow after the shock wave is re-accelerated to a supersonic flow through a magnetic Laval nozzle. This behavior is explained well by the one-dimensional isotropic flow model. The shock wave is discussed in relation to the Rankine-Hugoniot relation. (author)

  12. Improved ion acceleration via laser surface plasma waves excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigongiari, A. [CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); TIPS/LULI, Université Paris 6, CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, 3, rue Galilée, 94200 Ivry-sur-Seine (France); Raynaud, M. [CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Riconda, C. [TIPS/LULI, Université Paris 6, CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, 3, rue Galilée, 94200 Ivry-sur-Seine (France); Héron, A. [CPHT, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2013-05-15

    The possibility of enhancing the emission of the ions accelerated in the interaction of a high intensity ultra-short (<100 fs) laser pulse with a thin target (<10λ{sub 0}), via surface plasma wave excitation is investigated. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed for laser intensities ranging from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2}. The surface wave is resonantly excited by the laser via the coupling with a modulation at the target surface. In the cases where the surface wave is excited, we find an enhancement of the maximum ion energy of a factor ∼2 compared to the cases where the target surface is flat.

  13. Commercialization of an S-band standing-wave electron accelerator for industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jin-Hyeok; Kwak, Gyeong-Il; Han, Jae-Ik; Lee, Gyu-Baek; Jeon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Young; Hwang, Cheol-Bin; Lee, Gi-Yong; Kim, Young-Man; Park, Sung-Ju

    2016-09-01

    An electron accelerator system has been developed for use in industrial, as well as possible medical, applications. Based on our experiences achieved during prototype system development and various electron beam acceleration tests, we have built a stable and compact system for sales purposes. We have integrated a self-developed accelerating cavity, an E-gun pulse driver, a radio-frequency (RF) power system, a vacuum system, a cooling system, etc. into a frame with a size of 1800 × 1000 × 1500 mm3. The accelerating structure is a side-coupled standing-wave type operating in the π/2 mode (tuned to~3 GHz). The RF power is provided by using a magnetron driven by a solid-state modulator. The electron gun is a triode type with a dispenser cathode (diameter of 11 mm). The system is capable of delivering a maximum 900-W average electron beam power with tight focusing at the target. Until now, we have performed various electron beam tests and X-ray beam tests after having built the system, have completed the beam assessment for commercializations, and have been preparing full-fledged sales activity. This article reports on our system development processes and on some of our early test results for commercializations.

  14. Nitrogen and argon doping of niobium for superconducting radio frequency cavities: a pathway to highly efficient accelerating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Sergatskov, D.; Melnychuk, O.; Trenikhina, Y.; Crawford, A.; Rowe, A.; Wong, M.; Khabiboulline, T.; Barkov, F.

    2013-10-01

    We report a surface treatment that systematically improves the quality factor of niobium radio frequency cavities beyond the expected limit for niobium. A combination of annealing in a partial pressure of nitrogen or argon gas and subsequent electropolishing of the niobium cavity surface leads to unprecedented low values of the microwave surface resistance, and an improvement in the efficiency of the accelerating structures up to a factor of 3, reducing the cryogenic load of superconducting cavities for both pulsed and continuous duty cycles. The field dependence of the surface resistance is reversed compared to standardly treated niobium.

  15. Characterization of Nb coating in HIE-ISOLDE QWR superconducting accelerating cavities by means of SEM-FIB and TEM

    CERN Document Server

    Bartova, Barbora; Taborelli, M; Aebersold, A B; Alexander, D T L; Cantoni, M; Calatroni, Sergio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The Quarter Wave Resonators (QWR) high-β cavities (0.3 m diameter and 0.9 m height) are made from OFE 3D-forged copper and are coated by DC-bias diode sputtering with a thin superconducting layer of niobium. The Nb film thickness, morphology, purity and quality are critical parameters for RF performances of the cavity. They have been investigated in a detailed material study.

  16. Phase velocity of nonlinear plasma waves in the laser beat-wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The suggested plasma-laser accelerator is an attempt to achieve a very high energy gradient by resonantly exciting a longitudinal wave traveling at close to the speed of light in cold plasma by means of the beat-wave generated by the transverse fields in two laser beams. Previous calculations to all orders in v/sub z/ have been done essentially from the laboratory frame point of view and have treated the plasma wave as having sharply defined phase velocity equal to the speed of light. However a high energy particle beam undergoing acceleration sees the plasma wave from a nearly light-like frame of reference and hence is very sensitive to small deviations in its phase velocity. Here the authors introduce a calculational scheme that includes all orders in v/sub z/ and in the plasma density, and additionally takes into account the influence of plasma nonlinearities on the wave's phase velocity. The main assumption is that the laser frequencies are very large compared to the plasma frequency - under which they are able to in essence formally sum up all orders of forward Raman scattering. They find that the nonlinear plasma wave does not have simply a single phase velocity - it is really a superposition of many - but that the beat-wave which drives it is usefully described by a non-local effective phase velocity function

  17. HOM damping and multipacting analysis of the quarter-wave crab cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.

    2012-01-01

    The quarter-wave crab cavity design has been analyzed further to accommodate LHC requirements. The goal for the design is to provide strong deflecting voltage to the proton bunches at the IP, while keeping the effective length as short as possible. We will evaluate the higher order mode damping with two or four magnetic coupling dampers installed in different configuration. In this paper, we also show possible multipacting locations which are simulated by 2D and 3D codes.

  18. Numerical study of wave propagation around an underground cavity: acoustic case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterhazy, Sofi; Perugia, Ilaria; Schöberl, Joachim; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-04-01

    Motivated by the need to detect an underground cavity within the procedure of an On-Site-Inspection (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), which might be caused by a nuclear explosion/weapon testing, we aim to provide a basic numerical study of the wave propagation around and inside such an underground cavity. The aim of the CTBTO is to ban all nuclear explosions of any size anywhere, by anyone. Therefore, it is essential to build a powerful strategy to efficiently investigate and detect critical signatures such as gas filled cavities, rubble zones and fracture networks below the surface. One method to investigate the geophysical properties of an underground cavity allowed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-test Ban Treaty is referred to as 'resonance seismometry' - a resonance method that uses passive or active seismic techniques, relying on seismic cavity vibrations. This method is in fact not yet entirely determined by the Treaty and there are also only few experimental examples that have been suitably documented to build a proper scientific groundwork. This motivates to investigate this problem on a purely numerical level and to simulate these events based on recent advances in the mathematical understanding of the underlying physical phenomena. Here, we focus our numerical study on the propagation of P-waves in two dimensions. An extension to three dimensions as well as an inclusion of the full elastic wave field is planned in the following. For the numerical simulations of wave propagation we use a high order finite element discretization which has the significant advantage that it can be extended easily from simple toy designs to complex and irregularly shaped geometries without excessive effort. Our computations are done with the parallel Finite Element Library NGSOLVE ontop of the automatic 2D/3D tetrahedral mesh generator NETGEN (http://sourceforge.net/projects/ngsolve/). Using the basic mathematical understanding of the

  19. Low power RF measurements of travelling wave type linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Sivananda; Wanmode, Yashwant; Bhisikar, A.; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2015-01-01

    RRCAT is engaged in the development of travelling wave (TW) type linear accelerator for irradiation of industrial and agricultural products. TW accelerator designed for 2π/3 mode to operate at frequency of 2856 MHz. It consists of input coupler, buncher cells, regular cells and output coupler. Low power measurement of this structure includes measurement of resonant frequency of the cells for different resonant modes and quality factor, tuning of input-output coupler and measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field in the structure. Steele's non-resonant perturbation technique has been used for measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field in the structure. Kyhl's method has been used for the tuning of input-output coupler. Computer based automated bead pull set-up has been developed for measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field profile in the structure. All the codes are written in Python for interfacing of Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) , stepper motor with computer. These codes also automate the measurement process. This paper describes the test set- up for measurement and results of measurement of travelling wave type linear accelerating structure. (author)

  20. MgB2 for Application to RF Cavities for Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Canabal, A.; Zhao, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Moeckly, B.H.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.; Phillips, L.; Iwashita, Y.; Campisi, I.E.

    2007-01-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB 2 ) has a transition temperature (T c ) of ∼40 K, i.e., about 4 times as high as that of niobium (Nb).We have been evaluating MgB 2 as a candidate material for radio-frequency (RF) cavities for future particle accelerators. Studies in the last 3 years have shown that it could have about one order of magnitude less RF surface resistance (Rs) than Nb at 4 K. A power dependence test using a 6 GHz TE011 mode cavity has shown little power dependence up to ∼12 mT (120 Oe), limited by available power, compared to other high-Tc materials such as YBCO. A recent study showed, however, that the power dependence of Rs is dependent on the coating method. A film made with on-axis pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has showed rapid increase in Rs compared to the film deposited by reactive evaporation method. This paper shows these results as well as future plans

  1. Analysis of the surface resistance of the superconducting accelerating cavities of the S-DALINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunken, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, Darmstadt D-64289 (Germany); Gopych, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, Darmstadt D-64289 (Germany); Graef, H.-D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, Darmstadt D-64289 (Germany); Laier, U. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, Darmstadt D-64289 (Germany)]. E-mail: U.Laier@gsi.de; Mueller, W. [Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 8, Darmstadt D-64289 (Germany); Platz, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, Darmstadt D-64289 (Germany); Richter, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, Darmstadt D-64289 (Germany); Watzlawik, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, Darmstadt D-64289 (Germany); Weiland, T. [Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 8, Darmstadt D-64289 (Germany)

    2006-08-01

    The quality factors of the 20 cell, 3GHz niobium cavities of the S-DALINAC are smaller by almost a factor of three compared to their design value. Combined with the limited cryogenic power of the helium refrigerator in use, this restricts the maximum electron energy of the S-DALINAC in continuous wave operation. Extensive studies to elaborate the origin of this degradation are presented. A 120{sup -}bar C baking combined with appropriate diagnostic tools for an attempt to improve the Q values has been applied to nine of the 11 cavities. The impact of this treatment on the BCS and residual resistance was evaluated and both were improved. Additionally, quality factor measurements of all modes of the TM{sub 010} passband allowed to derive a spatial distribution of the mean surface resistance. The RF losses in the end cells are systematically higher compared to the inner cells. The studies presented in this article allowed to develop a model describing the Q degradation of the resonators and thereby identifying possible prospects to cure this limitation.

  2. Evanescent-wave and ambient chiral sensing by signal-reversing cavity ringdown polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofikitis, Dimitris; Bougas, Lykourgos; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2014-10-02

    Detecting and quantifying chirality is important in fields ranging from analytical and biological chemistry to pharmacology and fundamental physics: it can aid drug design and synthesis, contribute to protein structure determination, and help detect parity violation of the weak force. Recent developments employ microwaves, femtosecond pulses, superchiral light or photoionization to determine chirality, yet the most widely used methods remain the traditional methods of measuring circular dichroism and optical rotation. However, these signals are typically very weak against larger time-dependent backgrounds. Cavity-enhanced optical methods can be used to amplify weak signals by passing them repeatedly through an optical cavity, and two-mirror cavities achieving up to 10(5) cavity passes have enabled absorption and birefringence measurements with record sensitivities. But chiral signals cancel when passing back and forth through a cavity, while the ubiquitous spurious linear birefringence background is enhanced. Even when intracavity optics overcome these problems, absolute chirality measurements remain difficult and sometimes impossible. Here we use a pulsed-laser bowtie cavity ringdown polarimeter with counter-propagating beams to enhance chiral signals by a factor equal to the number of cavity passes (typically >10(3)); to suppress the effects of linear birefringence by means of a large induced intracavity Faraday rotation; and to effect rapid signal reversals by reversing the Faraday rotation and subtracting signals from the counter-propagating beams. These features allow absolute chiral signal measurements in environments where background subtraction is not feasible: we determine optical rotation from α-pinene vapour in open air, and from maltodextrin and fructose solutions in the evanescent wave produced by total internal reflection at a prism surface. The limits of the present polarimeter, when using a continuous-wave laser locked to a stable, high

  3. Design and Measurements of an X-Band Accelerating Cavity for SPARC

    CERN Document Server

    Alesini, David; Falone, Antonio; Ferrario, Massimo; Migliorati, Mauro; Mostacci, Andrea; Palpini, Federica; Palumbo, Luigi; Spataro, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the design of an X-band accelerating section for linearizing the longitudinal phase space in the Frascati Linac Coherent Light Source (SPARC). The structure, operating on the pi standing wave mode, is a 9 cells structure feeded by a central waveguide coupler and has been designed to obtain a 5 MV accelerating voltage. The 2D profile has been obtained using the e.m. codes SUPERFISH and OSCARD2D while the coupler has been designed using HFSS. Bead-pull measurement made on a copper prototype are illustrated and compared with the numerical results. Mechanical details of the realized prototype and RF properties of the structure as a function of the assembly characteristics are also discussed.

  4. Electron acceleration by wave turbulence in a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, A.; Cruz, F.; Albertazzi, B.; Bamford, R.; Bell, A. R.; Cross, J. E.; Fraschetti, F.; Graham, P.; Hara, Y.; Kozlowski, P. M.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lebedev, S.; Marques, J. R.; Miniati, F.; Morita, T.; Oliver, M.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Sarkar, S.; Spindloe, C.; Trines, R.; Tzeferacos, P.; Silva, L. O.; Bingham, R.; Koenig, M.; Gregori, G.

    2018-05-01

    Astrophysical shocks are commonly revealed by the non-thermal emission of energetic electrons accelerated in situ1-3. Strong shocks are expected to accelerate particles to very high energies4-6; however, they require a source of particles with velocities fast enough to permit multiple shock crossings. While the resulting diffusive shock acceleration4 process can account for observations, the kinetic physics regulating the continuous injection of non-thermal particles is not well understood. Indeed, this injection problem is particularly acute for electrons, which rely on high-frequency plasma fluctuations to raise them above the thermal pool7,8. Here we show, using laboratory laser-produced shock experiments, that, in the presence of a strong magnetic field, significant electron pre-heating is achieved. We demonstrate that the key mechanism in producing these energetic electrons is through the generation of lower-hybrid turbulence via shock-reflected ions. Our experimental results are analogous to many astrophysical systems, including the interaction of a comet with the solar wind9, a setting where electron acceleration via lower-hybrid waves is possible.

  5. Waves and particles in the Fermi accelerator model. Numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meplan, O.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to a numerical study of the quantum dynamics of the Fermi accelerator which is classically chaotic: it is particle in a one dimensional box with a oscillating wall. First, we study the classical dynamics: we show that the time of impact of the particle with the moving wall and its energy in the wall frame are conjugated variables and that Poincare surface of sections in these variables are more understandable than the usual stroboscopic sections. Then, the quantum dynamics of this systems is studied by the means of two numerical methods. The first one is a generalization of the KKR method in the space-time; it is enough to solve an integral equation on the boundary of a space-time billiard. The second method is faster and is based on successive free propagations and kicks of potential. This allows us to obtain Floquet states which we can on one hand, compare to the classical dynamics with the help of Husimi distributions and on the other hand, study as a function of parameters of the system. This study leads us to nice illustrations of phenomenons such as spatial localizations of a wave packet in a vibrating well or tunnel effects. In the adiabatic situation, we give a formula for quasi-energies which exhibits a phase term independent of states. In this regime, there exist some particular situations where the quasi-energy spectrum presents a total quasi-degeneracy. Then, the wave packet energy can increase significantly. This phenomenon is quite surprising for smooth motion of the wall. The third part deals with the evolution of a classical wave in the Fermi accelerator. Using generalized KKR method, we show a surprising phenomenon: in most of situations (so long as the wall motion is periodic), a wave is localized exponentially in the well and its energy increases in a geometric way. (author). 107 refs., 66 figs., 5 tabs. 2 appends

  6. Fabrication of mm-wave undulator cavities using deep x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.J.; Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Lai, B.; Nassiri, A.; Feinerman, A.D.; White, V.; Well, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of fabricating mm-wave radio frequency cavities (100-300 GHz) using deep x-ray lithography (DXRL) is being investigated. The fabrication process includes manufacture of precision x-ray masks, exposure of positive resist by x-ray through the mask, resist development, and electroforming of the final microstructure. Highly precise, two-dimensional features can be machined onto wafers using DXRL. Major challenges are: fabrication of the wafers into three-dimensional rf structures; alignment and overlay accuracy of structures; adhesion of the PMMA on the copper substrate; and selection of a developer to obtain high resolution. Rectangular cavity geometry is best suited to this fabrication technique. A 30- or 84-cell 108-GHz mm-wave structure can serve as an electromagnetic undulator. A mm-wave undulator, which will be discussed later, may have special features compared to the conventional undulator. First harmonic undulator radiation at 5.2 KeV would be possible using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac system, which provides a low-emittance electron beam by using an rf thermionic gun with an energy as high as 750-MeV. More detailed rf simulation, heat extraction analysis, beam dynamics using a mm-wave structure, and measurements on lOx larger scale models can be found in these proceedings

  7. Multilayer coating for higher accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities: a review of theoretical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    The theory of the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) multilayer structure for application in superconducting accelerating cavities is reviewed. The theoretical field limit, optimum layer thicknesses and material combination, and surface resistance are discussed for the SIS structure and are also reviewed for the superconductor-superconductor bilayer structure.

  8. Multilayer coating for higher accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities: a review of theoretical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Theory of the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (S-I-S) multilayer structure in superconducting accelerating cavity application is reviewed. The theoretical field limit, optimum layer thicknesses and material combination, and surface resistance are discussed. Those for the S-S bilayer structure are also reviewed.

  9. Fast acceleration of 2D wave propagation simulations using modern computational accelerators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available Recent developments in modern computational accelerators like Graphics Processing Units (GPUs and coprocessors provide great opportunities for making scientific applications run faster than ever before. However, efficient parallelization of scientific code using new programming tools like CUDA requires a high level of expertise that is not available to many scientists. This, plus the fact that parallelized code is usually not portable to different architectures, creates major challenges for exploiting the full capabilities of modern computational accelerators. In this work, we sought to overcome these challenges by studying how to achieve both automated parallelization using OpenACC and enhanced portability using OpenCL. We applied our parallelization schemes using GPUs as well as Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC coprocessor to reduce the run time of wave propagation simulations. We used a well-established 2D cardiac action potential model as a specific case-study. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to study auto-parallelization of 2D cardiac wave propagation simulations using OpenACC. Our results identify several approaches that provide substantial speedups. The OpenACC-generated GPU code achieved more than 150x speedup above the sequential implementation and required the addition of only a few OpenACC pragmas to the code. An OpenCL implementation provided speedups on GPUs of at least 200x faster than the sequential implementation and 30x faster than a parallelized OpenMP implementation. An implementation of OpenMP on Intel MIC coprocessor provided speedups of 120x with only a few code changes to the sequential implementation. We highlight that OpenACC provides an automatic, efficient, and portable approach to achieve parallelization of 2D cardiac wave simulations on GPUs. Our approach of using OpenACC, OpenCL, and OpenMP to parallelize this particular model on modern computational accelerators should be applicable to other

  10. High-power tests of a single-cell copper accelerating cavity driven by two input couplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, D.; Bromberek, D.; Meyer, D.; Waldschmidt, G.

    2008-01-01

    High-power tests were conducted on a 350-MHz, single-cell copper accelerating cavity driven simultaneously by two H-loop input couplers for the purpose of determining the reliability, performance, and power-handling capability of the cavity and related components, which have routinely operated at 100-kW power levels. The test was carried out utilizing the APS 350-MHz RF Test Stand, which was modified to split the input rf power into two frac12-power feeds, each supplying power to a separate H-loop coupler on the cavity. Electromagnetic simulations of the two-coupler feed system were used to determine coupler match, peak cavity fields, and the effect of phasing errors between the coupler feed lines. The test was conducted up to a maximum total rf input power of 164-kW CW. Test apparatus details and performance data will be presented.

  11. Study of Temperature Wave Propagation in Superfluid Helium Focusing on Radio-Frequency Cavity Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Koettig, T; Avellino, S; Junginger, T; Bremer, J

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating Superleak Transducers (OSTs) can be used to localize quenches of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Local hot spots at the cavity surface initiate temperature waves in the surrounding superfluid helium that acts as cooling fluid at typical temperatures in the range of 1.6 K to 2 K. The temperature wave is characterised by the properties of superfluid helium such as the second sound velocity. For high heat load densities second sound velocities greater than the standard literature values are observed. This fast propagation has been verified in dedicated small scale experiments. Resistors were used to simulate the quench spots under controlled conditions. The three dimensional propagation of second sound is linked to OST signals. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of the OST signal especially the incident angle dependency. The characterised OSTs are used as a tool for quench localisation on a real size cavity. Their sensitivity as well as the time resolution was proven to b...

  12. The Path to High Q-Factors in Superconducting Accelerating Cavities: Flux Expulsion and Surface Resistance Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Accelerating cavities are devices resonating in the radio-frequency (RF) range used to accelerate charged particles in accelerators. Superconducting accelerating cavities are made out of niobium and operate at the liquid helium temperature. Even if superconducting, these resonating structures have some RF driven surface resistance that causes power dissipation. In order to decrease as much as possible the power losses, the cavity quality factor must be increased by decreasing the surface resistance. In this dissertation, the RF surface resistance is analyzed for a large variety of cavities made with different state-of-the-art surface treatments, with the goal of finding the surface treatment capable to return the highest Q-factor values in a cryomodule-like environment. This study analyzes not only the superconducting properties described by the BCS surface resistance, which is the contribution that takes into account dissipation due to quasi-particle excitations, but also the increasing of the surface resistance due to trapped flux. When cavities are cooled down below their critical temperature inside a cryomodule, there is always some remnant magnetic field that may be trapped increasing the global RF surface resistance. This thesis also analyzes how the fraction of external magnetic field, which is actually trapped in the cavity during the cooldown, can be minimized. This study is performed on an elliptical single-cell horizontally cooled cavity, resembling the geometry of cavities cooled in accelerator cryomodules. The horizontal cooldown study reveals that, as in case of the vertical cooldown, when the cooling is performed fast, large thermal gradients are created along the cavity helping magnetic flux expulsion. However, for this geometry the complete magnetic flux expulsion from the cavity equator is more difficult to achieve. This becomes even more challenging in presence of orthogonal magnetic field, that is easily trapped on top of the cavity equator

  13. The path to high Q-factors in superconducting accelerating cavities: Flux expulsion and surface resistance optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinello, Martina

    Accelerating cavities are devices resonating in the radio-frequency (RF) range used to accelerate charged particles in accelerators. Superconducting accelerating cavities are made out of niobium and operate at the liquid helium temperature. Even if superconducting, these resonating structures have some RF driven surface resistance that causes power dissipation. In order to decrease as much as possible the power losses, the cavity quality factor must be increased by decreasing the surface resistance. In this dissertation, the RF surface resistance is analyzed for a large variety of cavities made with different state-of-the-art surface treatments, with the goal of finding the surface treatment capable to return the highest Q-factor values in a cryomodule-like environment. This study analyzes not only the superconducting properties described by the BCS surface resistance, which is the contribution that takes into account dissipation due to quasi-particle excitations, but also the increasing of the surface resistance due to trapped flux. When cavities are cooled down below their critical temperature inside a cryomodule, there is always some remnant magnetic field that may be trapped increasing the global RF surface resistance. This thesis also analyzes how the fraction of external magnetic field, which is actually trapped in the cavity during the cooldown, can be minimized. This study is performed on an elliptical single-cell horizontally cooled cavity, resembling the geometry of cavities cooled in accelerator cryomodules. The horizontal cooldown study reveals that, as in case of the vertical cooldown, when the cooling is performed fast, large thermal gradients are created along the cavity helping magnetic flux expulsion. However, for this geometry the complete magnetic flux expulsion from the cavity equator is more difficult to achieve. This becomes even more challenging in presence of orthogonal magnetic field, that is easily trapped on top of the cavity equator

  14. Hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy followed by radical surgery in locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeller, U.; Biertz, I.; Tribius, S.; Alberti, W.; Flinzberg, S.; Schmelzle, R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the outcome of hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy and subsequent planned primary tumor resection and radical neck dissection in locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity. Patients and Methods: this retrospective analysis evaluates 126 subsequent patients who were treated between 1988 and 1997 for locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity (with extension into the oropharynx in 17 patients), 34 (27%) AJCC stage III and 92 (73%) stage IV. Primary tumor and nodal metastases were irradiated with 1.4 Gy bid to a median total dose of 72.8 Gy (range 58.8-75.6 Gy). Then, planned radical surgery of the primary site according to the initial tumor extent and cervical nodes was performed. Median follow-up of living patients was 6 years (range 1-11 years). Results: 4 weeks after radiotherapy, 14 patients (11%) had complete tumor remission, 92 (73%) partial remission, 15 (12%) no change, and five (4%) progressive disease. Complete resection was achieved in 117 (93%) patients (nine incomplete resections). 5-year locoregional control rate was 62 ± 9%, overall survival 36 ± 9%. Surgery-related morbidity occurred in 42 patients (33%; mainly delayed wound healing and fistulae), overall severe treatment-related morbidity in 46 patients (36%). 24/84 relapse-free patients (29%) required a percutaneous gastrostomy or nasal tube ≥ 1 year after therapy. Conclusion: in this study, the outcome of combined curative radiotherapy and planned surgery of the primary tumor and neck nodes was comparable to reported results of hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without salvage surgery of the neck nodes with respect to locoregional control and overall survival. Planned surgery carries a substantial risk of morbidity and seems to offer no benefit in comparison to salvage surgery of the neck nodes only. Therefore, salvage surgery is preferred. (orig.)

  15. Frequency-agile terahertz-wave parametric oscillator in a ring-cavity configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamide, Hiroaki; Ikari, Tomofumi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2009-12-01

    We demonstrate a frequency-agile terahertz wave parametric oscillator (TPO) in a ring-cavity configuration (ring-TPO). The TPO consists of three mirrors and a MgO:LiNbO(3) crystal under noncollinear phase-matching conditions. A novel, fast frequency-tuning method was realized by controlling a mirror of the three-mirror ring cavity. The wide tuning range between 0.93 and 2.7 THz was accomplished. For first demonstration using the ring-TPO, terahertz spectroscopy was performed as the verification of the frequency-agile performance, measuring the transmission spectrum of the monosaccharide glucose. The spectrum was obtained within about 8 s in good comparison to those of Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

  16. Dual-recycled cavity-enhanced Michelson interferometer for gravitational-wave detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Guido; Delker, Tom; Tanner, David B; Reitze, David

    2003-03-01

    The baseline design for an Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO) is a dual-recycled Michelson interferometer with cavities in each of the Michelson interferometer arms. We describe one possible length-sensing and control scheme for such a dual-recycled, cavity-enhanced Michelson interferometer. We discuss the principles of this scheme and derive the first-order sensing signals. We also present a successful experimental verification of our length-sensing system using a prototype tabletop interferometer. Our results demonstrate the robustness of the scheme against deviations from the idealized design. We also identify potential weaknesses and discuss possible improvements. These results as well as other benchtop experiments that we present form the basis for a sensing and control scheme for Advanced LIGO.

  17. Continuous-wave optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2017-09-11

    We report an optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter operating in continuous-wave (CW) with a power density threshold of ~89 kW/cm2. The device has an active region of CH3NH3PbBr3 embedded in a dielectric microcavity; this feat was achieved with a combination of optimal spectral alignment of the optical cavity modes with the perovskite optical gain, an adequate Q-factor of the microcavity, adequate thermal stability, and improved material quality with a smooth, passivated, and annealed thin active layer. Our results signify a way towards efficient CW perovskite emitter operation and electrical injection using low-cost fabrication methods for addressing monolithic optoelectronic integration and lasing in the green gap.

  18. Systematical study on superconducting radio frequency elliptic cavity shapes applicable to future high energy accelerators and energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemelin, Valery; Zadeh, Shahnam Gorgi; Heller, Johann; van Rienen, Ursula

    2016-10-01

    Elliptic cavities at medium- and high-β range are receiving broader use in the particle accelerator applications. Optimizing the shape of these cavities is a complex and demanding process. In this paper we propose an optimization approach to minimize the ratio of peak magnetic field to the acceleration field Hpk/Eacc while keeping the ratio of peak surface electric field to the accelerating field Epk/Eacc, aperture radius and wall slope angle α at some permitted values. We show that it is possible to substantially vary the cavity geometry without violating the constraints or deteriorating the objective of the optimization. This gives us freedom in designing the geometry to overcome problems such as multipactor while maintaining the minimal Hpk/Eacc . The optimization is then performed to find a set of optimized geometries with minimum Hpk/Eacc for different β 's ranging from 0.4 to 1, different peak surface electric fields, wall slope angles and aperture radii. These data could be generally used as a suitable starting point in designing elliptic cavities.

  19. Systematical study on superconducting radio frequency elliptic cavity shapes applicable to future high energy accelerators and energy recovery linacs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Shemelin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Elliptic cavities at medium- and high-β range are receiving broader use in the particle accelerator applications. Optimizing the shape of these cavities is a complex and demanding process. In this paper we propose an optimization approach to minimize the ratio of peak magnetic field to the acceleration field H_{pk}/E_{acc} while keeping the ratio of peak surface electric field to the accelerating field E_{pk}/E_{acc}, aperture radius and wall slope angle α at some permitted values. We show that it is possible to substantially vary the cavity geometry without violating the constraints or deteriorating the objective of the optimization. This gives us freedom in designing the geometry to overcome problems such as multipactor while maintaining the minimal H_{pk}/E_{acc}. The optimization is then performed to find a set of optimized geometries with minimum H_{pk}/E_{acc} for different β’s ranging from 0.4 to 1, different peak surface electric fields, wall slope angles and aperture radii. These data could be generally used as a suitable starting point in designing elliptic cavities.

  20. Cavity losses for the dissipative Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian beyond rotating wave approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scala, M; Militello, B; Messina, A; Maniscalco, S; Piilo, J; Suominen, K-A

    2007-01-01

    A microscopic derivation of the master equation for the Jaynes-Cummings model with cavity losses is given, taking into account the terms in the dissipator which vary with frequencies of the order of the vacuum Rabi frequency. Our approach allows us to single out physical contexts wherein the usual phenomenological dissipator turns out to be fully justified and constitutes an extension of our previous analysis (Scala et al 2007 Phys. Rev. A 75 013811), where a microscopic derivation was given in the framework of the rotating wave approximation

  1. Miniature Chemical Sensor Combining Molecular Recognition with Evanescent Wave Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.; Meuse, Curtis W.

    2002-01-01

    To address the chemical sensing needs of DOE, a new class of chemical sensors is being developed that enables qualitative and quantitative, remote, real-time, optical diagnostics of chemical species in hazardous gas, liquid, and semi-solid phases by employing evanescent wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (EW-CRDS). The sensitivity of EW-CRDS was demonstrated previously under Project No.60231. The objective of this project is to enhance the range of application and selectivity of the technique by combining EW-CRDS with refractive-index-sensitive nanoparticle optics, molecular recognition (MR) chemistry, and by utilizing the polarization-dependence of EW-CRDS. Research Progress and Implications

  2. Jump chaotic behaviour of ultra low loss bulk acoustic wave cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goryachev, Maxim, E-mail: maxim.goryachev@uwa.edu.au; Farr, Warrick G.; Tobar, Michael E. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Galliou, Serge [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST Institute, ENSMM, 26 Chemin de l' Épitaphe 25000 Besançon (France)

    2014-08-11

    We demonstrate a previously unobserved nonlinear phenomenon in an ultra-low loss quartz bulk acoustic wave cavity (Q>3>10{sup 9}), which only occurs below 20 mK in temperature and under relatively weak pumping. The phenomenon reveals the emergence of several stable equilibria (at least two foci and two nodes) and jumps between these quasi states at random times. The degree of this randomness as well as separations between levels can be controlled by the frequency of the incident carrier signal. It is demonstrated that the nature of the effect lies beyond the standard Duffing model.

  3. Miniature scanning electron microscope for investigation of the interior surface of a superconducting Nb radiofrequency accelerating cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathewson, A.G.; Grillot, A.

    1982-01-01

    A miniature scanning electron microscope with an electron beam diameter approx.1 μm has been constructed for high resolution examination at room temperature of the interior surface of a superconducting Nb radiofrequency accelerating cavity. Various objects and surface structures were observed, some of which could be correlated with lossy regions or ''hot spots'' detected previously on the outside surface during cavity operation at < or =4.2 K by a chain of carbon resistors. No internal surface features were observed which could conclusively be correlated with field emitting electron sources

  4. Status of higher order mode beam position monitors in 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Flisgen, T; Van Rienen, U; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  5. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  6. Shock-Wave Acceleration of Protons on OMEGA EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberberger, D.; Froula, D. H.; Pak, A.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; Fiuza, F.; Tochitsky, S.; Joshi, C.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental results using shock-wave acceleration (SWA) driven by a CO2 laser in a H2 gas-jet plasma have shown the possibility of producing proton beams with energy spreads emission from a UV ablated material. The desired characteristics optimal for SWA are met: (a) peak plasma density is overcritical for the 1- μm main pulse and (b) the plasma profile exponentially decays over a long scale length on the rear side. Results will be shown using a 4 ω probe to experimentally characterize the plasma density profile. Scaling from simulations of the SWA mechanism shows that ion energies in the range of 100 MeV/amu are achievable with a focused a0 of 5 from the OMEGA EP Laser System. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. Shock drift acceleration in the presence of waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the initial results of a model designed to study the modification of the scatter-free, shock drift acceleration of energetic test particles by wave activity in the vicinity of a quasi-perpendicular, fast-mode MHD shock. It is emphasized that the concept of magnetic moment conservation is a valid approximation only in the perpendicular and nearly perpendicular regimes, when the angle theta-Bn between the shock normal and the upstream magnetic field vector is in the range from 70 deg to 90 deg. The present investigation is concerned with one step in a program which is being developed to combine the shock drift and diffusive processes at a shock of arbitrary theta-Bn.

  8. Effect of low-temperature baking on the radio-frequency properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2004-01-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some 'anomalous' losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low-temperature (100-150 deg. C) 'in situ' bake under ultrahigh vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from 'anomalous' losses (so-called 'Q drop') without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37-280 K and resonant frequency shift between 6-9.3 K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth, and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with nuclear reaction analysis. The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models. This paper

  9. Effect of low-temperature baking on the radio-frequency properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2004-08-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some "anomalous" losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low-temperature (100-150°C) "in situ" bake under ultrahigh vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from "anomalous" losses (so-called "Q drop") without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37-280K and resonant frequency shift between 6-9.3K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth, and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with nuclear reaction analysis. The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models. This paper describes

  10. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  11. Study of field-limiting defects in superconducting RF cavities for electron-accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderhold, Sebastian

    2015-02-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency resonators made from niobium are an integral part of many accelerator projects. Their main advantage are the low ohmic losses resulting in the possibility for a long pulse structure and high duty cycles up to continous wave (cw) operation. The European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) are based on this technology. In some cases the resonators reach accelerating electric fields close to the theoretical limit of bulk niobium. Yet most resonators are limited at lower fields and mass production for large scale accelerator projects suffers from the spread in the achievable gradient per resonator. The main limitations are field emission and the breakdown of superconductivity (quench). While field emission is mostly attributed to the overall surface cleanliness of the resonator, quench is usually associated with local defects. Optical inspection of the inner surface of the resonators with unprecedented resolution, accuracy and a special illumination has been established at DESY and used to study such local surface defects. More than 30 resonators have been inspected. Distinctive features from these inspections have been catalogued and assessed for their potential risk for the performance of the resonator. Several confirmed quenching defects could be extracted for further analysis and could be traced back to likely origins in the production process. A new, automated set-up for optical inspection of large series of resonators, named OBACHT, has been developed and successfully commissioned. Its design includes the minimal need for operator interference, reproducibility, robustness and versatility, in order to fit the requirements for application both in a laboratory and in a production environment. To facilitate the comparison of the results obtained during the global R and D effort on resonators for the ILC, the ILC global yield database has been established. The yield and selection rules for the

  12. The 938 MHz resonant damping loops for the 200 MHz SPS travelling wave cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the beam stability in the SPS in 1982 - 1983 have shown a transversal instability for high intensity beams [1]. The fact that this related technical note is published nearly 30 years later, is related to the revival of interest in the frame of SPS impedance evaluation for LS1. Until now there was just a barely known paper folder available which could be consulted on request. The instability mentioned above was identified from beam measurements as raised by a deflecting mode at approximately 940 MHz in the 200 MHz travelling wave cavities of the SPS. Estimates showed that an attenuation of this particular mode by 20 dB would be desirable. In order to achieve this attenuation some vacuum ports on top of the cavities were available. For the damping devices three requirements had to be met: - sufficient damping at about 940 MHz - no serious change of cavity input VSWR at 200 MHz - no water cooling requirement for this higher order mode coupler.

  13. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Through the ZR Z-Pinch Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.; Madrid, E. A.; Miller, C. L.; Clark, R. E.; Stygar, W. A.; Struve, K.; Corcoran, P. A.; Whitney, B.

    2009-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional electromagnetic model of the major pulsed power components of the 26-MA ZR accelerator is presented. This large-scale simulation model tracks the evolution of electromagnetic waves through the intermediate storage capacitors, laser-triggered gas switches, pulse-forming lines, water switches, tri-plate transmission lines, and water convolute to the vacuum insulator stack. The plates at the insulator stack are coupled to a transmission line circuit model of the four-level magnetically-insulated transmission line section and post-hole convolutes. The vacuum section circuit model is terminated by either a short-circuit load or dynamic models of imploding z-pinch loads. The simulations results are compared with electrical measurements made throughout the ZR accelerator and good agreement is found, especially for times before and up to peak load power. This modeling effort represents new opportunities for modeling existing and future large-scale pulsed power systems used in a variety of high energy density physics and radiographic applications.

  14. One and two dimensional simulations on beat wave acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, W.; Joshi, C.; Dawson, J.M.; Forslund, D.W.; Kindel, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of fast-large-amplitude plasma waves as the basis for a high energy particle accelerator. In these schemes, lasers are used to create the plasma wave. To date the few simulation studies on this subject have been limited to one-dimensional, short rise time simulations. Here the authors present results from simulations in which more realistic parameters are used. In addition, they present the first two dimensional simulations on this subject. One dimensional simulations on a 2 1/2-D relativistic electromagnetic particle code, in which only a few cells were used in one direction, on colinear optical mixing are presented. In these simulations the laser rise time, laser intensity, plasma density, plasma temperature and system size were varied. The simulations indicate that the theory of Rosenbluth and Liu is applicable over a wide range of parameters. In addition, simulations with a DC magnetic field are presented in order to study the ''Surfatron'' concept

  15. Ultra-Trace Chemical Sensing with Long-Wave Infrared Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopic Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Williams, Richard M.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-02-20

    The infrared sensors task of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project (Task B of Project PL211) is focused on the science and technology of remote and in-situ spectroscopic chemical sensors for detecting proliferation and coun-tering terrorism. Missions to be addressed by remote chemical sensor development in-clude detecting proliferation of nuclear or chemical weapons, and providing warning of terrorist use of chemical weapons. Missions to be addressed by in-situ chemical sensor development include countering terrorism by screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons, or chemical weapons residues, and mapping contaminated areas. The science and technology is also relevant to chemical weapons defense, air operations support, monitoring emissions from chemi-cal weapons destruction or industrial activities, law enforcement, medical diagnostics, and other applications. Sensors for most of these missions will require extreme chemical sensitivity and selectiv-ity because the signature chemicals of importance are expected to be present in low con-centrations or have low vapor pressures, and the ambient air is likely to contain pollutants or other chemicals with interfering spectra. Cavity-enhanced chemical sensors (CES) that draw air samples into optical cavities for laser-based interrogation of their chemical content promise real-time, in-situ chemical detection with extreme sensitivity to specified target molecules and superb immunity to spectral interference and other sources of noise. PNNL is developing CES based on quantum cascade (QC) lasers that operate in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR - 3 to 5 microns) and long-wave infrared (LWIR - 8 to 14 mi-crons), and CES based on telecommunications lasers operating in the short-wave infrared (SWIR - 1 to 2 microns). All three spectral regions are promising because smaller mo-lecular absorption cross sections in the SWIR

  16. Miniature chemical sensor combining molecular recognition with evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.

    2004-01-01

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages

  17. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y.Q., E-mail: tengjian@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zhou, W.M.; Cao, L.F.

    2013-11-21

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  18. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  19. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y.Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zhou, W.M.; Cao, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator

  20. Detection of Second Sound in He-II for Thermal Quench Mapping of Superconducting Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Stegmaier, Tobias; Grohmann, Steffen; Kind, Matthias; Furci, Hernán; Koettig, Torsten; Peters, Benedikt

    2018-01-01

    The development of future particle accelerators requires intensive testing of superconducting radio frequency cavities with different sizes and geometries. Non-contact thermometry quench localisation techniques proved to be beneficial for the localisation of surface defects that can originate a quench (sudden loss of superconducting state). These techniques are based on the detection of second sound in helium II. Transition Edge Sensors (TES) are highly sensitive thin film thermometers with f...

  1. Eigenmode simulations of third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities for FLASH and the European XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    The third harmonic nine-cell cavity (3.9 GHz) for FLASH and the European XFEL has been investigated using simulations performed with the computer code CST Microwave Studio registered. The band structure of monopole, dipole, quadrupole and sextupole modes for an ideal cavity has been studied. The higher order modes for the nine-cell structure are compared with that of the cavity mid-cell. The R/Q of these eigenmodes are calculated.

  2. Impedance-based analysis and study of phase sensitivity in slow-wave two-beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtele, J.S.; Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents a new formalism which makes the analysis and understanding of both the relativistic klystron (RK) and the standing-wave free-electron laser (SWFEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) available to a wide audience of accelerator physicists. A ''coupling impedance'' for both the RK and SWFEWL is introduced, which can include realistic cavity features, such as beam and vacuum ports, in a simple manner. The RK and SWFEL macroparticle equations, which govern the energy and phase evolution of successive bunches in the beam, are of identical form, differing only by multiplicative factors. Expressions are derived for the phase and amplitude sensitivities of the TBA schemes to errors (shot-to-shot jitter) in current and energy. The analysis allows, for the first time, relative comparisons of the RK and the SWFEL TBAs

  3. Digital Measurement System for the HIE-Isolde Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Elias, Michal

    Extensive R&D efforts are being invested at CERN into the fundamental science of the RF superconductivity, cavity design, niobium sputtering, coating and RF properties of superconducting cavities. Fast and precise characterization and measurements of RF parameters of the newly produced cavities is essential for advances with the cavity production. The currently deployed analogue measurement system based on an analogue phase discriminators and tracking RF generators is not optimal for efficient work at the SM18 superconducting cavity test stand. If exact properties of the cavity under test are not known a traditional feedback loop will not be able to find resonant frequency in a reasonable time or even at all. This is mainly due to a very high Q factor. The resonance peak is very narrow (fraction of a Hz at 100 MHz). If the resonant frequency is off by several bandwidths, small changes of the cavity field during the tuning will not be measureable. Also cavity field will react only very slowly to any change...

  4. Relativistic acceleration of captured particles by a longitudinal wave in a slightly inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erokhin, N.S.; Zol'nikova, N.N.; Mikhajlovskaya, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic acceleration of charged particles, captured by a longitudinal wave in a slightly inhomogeneous plasma without an external magnetic field is considered numerically and analytically. It is shown that with the growth of the plasma inhomogeneity parameter the maximum energy of accelerated captured particles exponentially increases. Attention is paid to the possibility of 'eternal' confinement and, respectively, unlimited acceleration of captured particles by an undamped longitudinal wave in a plasma without a magnetic field

  5. Dual-cavity mode converter for a fundamental mode output in an over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiawei; Huang, Wenhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Shao, Hao; Chen, Changhua; Zhu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    A dual-cavity TM 02 –TM 01 mode converter is designed for a dual-mode operation over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator. With the converter, the fundamental mode output is achieved. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the efficiency of beam-wave conversion was over 46% and a pureTM 01 mode output was obtained. Effects of end reflection provided by the mode converter were studied. Adequate TM 01 mode feedback provided by the converter enhances conversion efficiency. The distance between the mode converter and extraction cavity critically affect the generation of microwaves depending on the reflection phase of TM 01 mode feedback

  6. Alfven wave excitation in a cavity with a transverse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bures, M.

    1982-12-01

    A transversely magnetized cylindrical plasma model with an internal rod conductor is used to approximate the FIVA internal ring device of Spherator type with a purely poloidal magnetic field. It is shown that an excitation asymmetry along the plasma column, i.e. with a wave number k sub (z) does not equal 0, introduces a coupling between the magnetoacoustic and shear Alfven waves in the frequency range #betta#<<#betta# sub (ci). The introduction of an equilibrium mass motion along the plasma cylinder introduces a flow continuum. Simultaneously the Alfven resonance frequency becomes Doppler shifted. The experimental observations indicate that cavity modes do not build up in the FIVA device in the case of nonsymmetric excitation. If on the other hand the exciting structure becomes symmetric, i.e. with k sub (z) equals 0, the magnetoacoustic resonance become excited. The resulting Q values are rather low which indicates that the coupling to the shear wave through the Hall electric field cannot be neglected. (Author)

  7. Relativistic electron beam acceleration by cascading nonlinear Landau damping of electromagnetic waves in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugaya, R.; Ue, A.; Maehara, T.; Sugawa, M.

    1996-01-01

    Acceleration and heating of a relativistic electron beam by cascading nonlinear Landau damping involving three or four intense electromagnetic waves in a plasma are studied theoretically based on kinetic wave equations and transport equations derived from relativistic Vlasov endash Maxwell equations. Three or four electromagnetic waves excite successively two or three nonresonant beat-wave-driven relativistic electron plasma waves with a phase velocity near the speed of light [v p =c(1-γ -2 p ) 1/2 , γ p =ω/ω pe ]. Three beat waves interact nonlinearly with the electron beam and accelerate it to a highly relativistic energy γ p m e c 2 more effectively than by the usual nonlinear Landau damping of two electromagnetic waves. It is proved that the electron beam can be accelerated to more highly relativistic energy in the plasma whose electron density decreases temporally with an appropriate rate because of the temporal increase of γ p . copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  8. Coherent stacking of picosecond laser pulses in a high-Q optical cavity for accelerator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.P.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Telegin, Yu.N.

    2007-01-01

    We have performed the harmonic analysis of the steady-state coherent pulse-stacking process in a high-Q Fabry-Perot cavity. The expression for the stacked pulse shape is obtained as a function of both the laser cavity and pulse-stacking cavity parameters. We have also estimated the pulse power gains attainable in the laser-optical system of NESTOR storage ring, which is under development at Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology. It is shown that high power gains (∼10 4 ) can be, in principle, achieved in a cavity, formed with low-absorption, high reflectivity (R ∼ 0.9999) mirrors, if the laser cavity length will differ exactly by half wavelength from the pulse-stacking cavity length. It implies development of the sophisticated frequency stabilization loop for maintaining the cavity length constant within a sub-nanometer range. At the same time, power gains of ∼10 3 can be obtained with medium reflectivity mirrors (R ∼ 0.999) at considerably lower cost

  9. High gradient RF test results of S-band and C-band cavities for medical linear accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiovanni, A.; Bonomi, R.; Garlasché, M.; Verdú-Andrés, S.; Wegner, R.; Amaldi, U.

    2018-05-01

    TERA Foundation has proposed and designed hadrontherapy facilities based on novel linacs, i.e. high gradient linacs which accelerate either protons or light ions. The overall length of the linac, and therefore its cost, is almost inversely proportional to the average accelerating gradient. With the scope of studying the limiting factors for high gradient operation and to optimize the linac design, TERA, in collaboration with the CLIC Structure Development Group, has conducted a series of high gradient experiments. The main goals were to study the high gradient behavior and to evaluate the maximum gradient reached in 3 and 5.7 GHz structures to direct the design of medical accelerators based on high gradient linacs. This paper summarizes the results of the high power tests of 3.0 and 5.7 GHz single-cell cavities.

  10. Interaction of surface plasmon polaritons and acoustic waves inside an acoustic cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlov, Nikolai; Knyazev, Grigoriy; Glavin, Boris; Shtykov, Yakov; Romanov, Oleg; Belotelov, Vladimir

    2017-09-15

    In this Letter, we introduce an approach for manipulation of active plasmon polaritons via acoustic waves at sub-terahertz frequency range. The acoustic structures considered are designed as phononic Fabry-Perot microresonators where mirrors are presented with an acoustic superlattice and the structure's surface, and a plasmonic grating is placed on top of the acoustic cavity so formed. It provides phonon localization in the vicinity of the plasmonic grating at frequencies within the phononic stop band enhancing phonon-light interaction. We consider phonon excitation by shining a femtosecond laser pulse on the plasmonic grating. Appropriate theoretical model was used to describe the acoustic process caused by the pump laser pulse in the GaAs/AlAs-based acoustic cavity with a gold grating on top. Strongest modulation is achieved upon excitation of propagating surface plasmon polaritons and hybridization of propagating and localized plasmons. The relative changes in the optical reflectivity of the structure are more than an order of magnitude higher than for the structure without the plasmonic film.

  11. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  12. JACoW N-doped niobium accelerating cavities: Analyzing model applicability

    CERN Document Server

    Eichhorn, Ralf; Weingarten, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this research was to analyse data from multiple cavities in order to test the viability of a model for surface resistance proposed previously. The model intends to describe the behaviour of the quality factor with respect to the RF field strength, while exploring the physical cause of this phenomenon; the model is pretty general, but will be checked here specifically for N-doped niobium cavities. The data were obtained from two single-cell 1.3 GHz cavities manufactured and tested at Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, USA.

  13. Mechanical design and fabrication of power feed cavity test setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodke, S.R.; Dhavle, A.S.; Sharma, Vijay; Sarkar, Shreya; Kumar, Mahendra; Nayak, Susanta; Barnwal, Rajesh; Jayaprakash, D.; Mondal, J.; Nimje, V.T.; Mittal, K.C.; Gantayet, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Power feed cavity set up consists of nine number of accelerating cavity and eight numbers of coupling cavity for testing of power feed cavity with coupling flange for 2856 MHz S band standing wave coupled cavity linac. When we are assembling the cavity and applying the pressure, its resonance frequency changes with applied pressure/load. After some critical pressure/load frequency change becomes negligible or zero. This set up will be used to find out assembly performance of power feed cavity and its coupler. Top four cavity or eight half cells as well as bottom four cavity or eight half cells will be brazed separately. Power feed cavity will be sandwiched between this two brazed cavity assemblies. This paper discuss about linear motion bush, linear motion rod, load cell, hydraulic actuator, power pack, stepper motor PLC control, jig boring, alignment, tolerances and assembly procedure for this test setup. (author)

  14. Charged particle and photon acceleration by wakefield plasma waves in non-uniform plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanov, S.V.; Kirsanov, V.I.; Sakharov, A.S.; Pegoraro, F.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the acceleration of charged particles and the upshift of the frequency of short wave packets of laser radiation. The acceleration and the upshift are caused by wake plasma waves excited by a strong laser pulse in a non-uniform plasma. We show that unlimited acceleration of charged particles is possible for specific spatial dependencies of the plasma density. In this unlimited acceleration regime, particles have a fixed phase relationship with respect to the plasma wave, while their energy increases with time. When the wave breaking limit is approached and surpassed, the efficiency of the acceleration of the charged particles and of the frequency upshift of the photons can be increased significantly. (author) 3 refs

  15. Physical and mechanical metallurgy of high purity Nb for accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieler, T.R.; Wright, N.T.; Pourboghrat, F.; Compton, C.; Hartwig, K.T.; Baars, D.; Zamiri, A.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Darbandi, P.; Jiang, H.; Skoug, E.; Balachandran, S.; Ice, G.E.; Liu, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade, high Q values have been achieved in high purity Nb superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Fundamental understanding of the physical metallurgy of Nb that enables these achievements is beginning to reveal what challenges remain to establish reproducible and cost-effective production of high performance SRF cavities. Recent studies of dislocation substructure development and effects of recrystallization arising from welding and heat treatments and their correlations with cavity performance are considered. With better fundamental understanding of the effects of dislocation substructure evolution and recrystallization on electron and phonon conduction, as well as the interior and surface states, it will be possible to design optimal processing paths for cost-effective performance using approaches such as hydroforming, which minimizes or eliminates welds in a cavity.

  16. Physical and mechanical metallurgy of high purity Nb for accelerator cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Bieler

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, high Q values have been achieved in high purity Nb superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities. Fundamental understanding of the physical metallurgy of Nb that enables these achievements is beginning to reveal what challenges remain to establish reproducible and cost-effective production of high performance SRF cavities. Recent studies of dislocation substructure development and effects of recrystallization arising from welding and heat treatments and their correlations with cavity performance are considered. With better fundamental understanding of the effects of dislocation substructure evolution and recrystallization on electron and phonon conduction, as well as the interior and surface states, it will be possible to design optimal processing paths for cost-effective performance using approaches such as hydroforming, which minimizes or eliminates welds in a cavity.

  17. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  18. Adiabatic description of capture into resonance and surfatron acceleration of charged particles by electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A V; Neishtadt, A I; Zelenyi, L M; Vainchtein, D L

    2010-12-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the surfatron acceleration of nonrelativistic charged particles by electromagnetic waves. The acceleration is caused by capture of particles into resonance with one of the waves. We investigate capture for systems with one or two waves and provide conditions under which the obtained results can be applied to systems with more than two waves. In the case of a single wave, the once captured particles never leave the resonance and their velocity grows linearly with time. However, if there are two waves in the system, the upper bound of the energy gain may exist and we find the analytical value of that bound. We discuss several generalizations including the relativistic limit, different wave amplitudes, and a wide range of the waves' wavenumbers. The obtained results are used for qualitative description of some phenomena observed in the Earth's magnetosphere. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Efficiency of different methods of extra-cavity second harmonic generation of continuous wave single-frequency radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khripunov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey; Radnatarov, Daba

    2016-01-20

    This work presents for the first time to the best of our knowledge a comparative efficiency analysis among various techniques of extra-cavity second harmonic generation (SHG) of continuous-wave single-frequency radiation in nonperiodically poled nonlinear crystals within a broad range of power levels. Efficiency of nonlinear radiation transformation at powers from 1 W to 10 kW was studied in three different configurations: with an external power-enhancement cavity and without the cavity in the case of single and double radiation pass through a nonlinear crystal. It is demonstrated that at power levels exceeding 1 kW, the efficiencies of methods with and without external power-enhancement cavities become comparable, whereas at even higher powers, SHG by a single or double pass through a nonlinear crystal becomes preferable because of the relatively high efficiency of nonlinear transformation and fairly simple implementation.

  20. Research of time-domain equivalent circuit method in solving dispersion of coupled-cavity traveling-wave tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjun; China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang; Xu Zhou; Li Ming; Yang Xingfan; Chen Yanan; Liu Jie; Jin Xiao; Lin Yuzheng

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a time-domain equivalent circuit method is applied to solve dispersion of coupled-cavity travelling-wave tube (CCTWT). First, the time-domain circuit equations of CCTWT coupled-cavity chain are deduced from the equivalent circuit model. Then, the equations are solved numerically by fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and a program CTTDCP is developed using MATLAB. Last, a L-band CCTWT is calculated using CTTDCP and the cavity pass-band of this tube is computed to be 1.08-1.48 GHz, which is consistent with the experimental results and the simulation results of electromagnetic code and demonstrates the validity of the time-domain equivalent circuit method. In addition, a new design method which uses the equivalent circuit method and electromagnetic simulation together to optimize the cold cavity characteristics of CCTWT is proposed. (authors)

  1. Surface Characterization of Nb Samples Electro-polished Together With Real Superconducting Radio-frequency Accelerator Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Rong-Li; Tyagi, P.V.; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kato, Shigeki; Nishiwaki, Michiru; Saeki, Takayuki; Sawabe, Motoaki

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of surface characterizations of niobium (Nb) samples electropolished together with a single cell superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavity. These witness samples were located in three regions of the cavity, namely at the equator, the iris and the beam-pipe. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was utilized to probe the chemical composition of the topmost four atomic layers. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray for elemental analysis (SEM/EDX) was used to observe the surface topography and chemical composition at the micrometer scale. A few atomic layers of sulfur (S) were found covering the samples non-uniformly. Niobium oxide granules with a sharp geometry were observed on every sample. Some Nb-O granules appeared to also contain sulfur.

  2. THE CHROMOSPHERIC SOLAR MILLIMETER-WAVE CAVITY ORIGINATES IN THE TEMPERATURE MINIMUM REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Luz, Victor [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla, Mexico, Apdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 (Mexico); Raulin, Jean-Pierre [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP 01302-907 (Brazil); Lara, Alejandro [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico 04510 (Mexico)

    2013-01-10

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the local radio emission at the lower part of the solar atmosphere. To accomplish this, we have used a numerical code to simulate the emission and transport of high-frequency electromagnetic waves from 2 GHz up to 10 THz. As initial conditions, we used VALC, SEL05, and C7 solar chromospheric models. In this way, the generated synthetic spectra allow us to study the local emission and absorption processes with high resolution in both altitude and frequency. Associated with the temperature minimum predicted by these models, we found that the local optical depth at millimeter wavelengths remains constant, producing an optically thin layer that is surrounded by two layers of high local emission. We call this structure the Chromospheric Solar Millimeter-wave Cavity (CSMC). The temperature profile, which features temperature minimum layers and a subsequent temperature rise, produces the CSMC phenomenon. The CSMC shows the complexity of the relation between the theoretical temperature profile and the observed brightness temperature and may help us to understand the dispersion of the observed brightness temperature in the millimeter wavelength range.

  3. Collective acceleration of protons by the plasma waves in a counterstreaming electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    A novel advanced accelerator is proposed. The counterstreaming electron beam accelerator relies on the same physical mechanism as that of the plasma accelerator but replaces the stationary plasma in the plasma accelerator by a magnetized relativistic electron beam, drifting antiparallel to the driving source and the driven particles, as the wave supporting medium. The plasma wave in a counterstreaming electron beam can be excited either by a density-ramped driving electron beam or by properly beating two laser beams. The fundamental advantages of the counterstreaming electron beam accelerator over the plasma accelerator are a longer and tunable plasma wavelength, a longer pump depletion length or a larger transformer ratio, and easier pulse shaping for the driving source and the driven beam. Thus the energy gain of the driven particles can be greatly enhanced whereas the trapping threshold can be dramatically reduced so as to admit the possibility for proton acceleration

  4. Model for initiation of quality factor degradation at high accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzyuba, A; Romanenko, A; Cooley, L D

    2010-01-01

    A model for the onset of the reduction in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity quality factor, the so-called Q-drop, at high accelerating electric fields is presented. Since magnetic fields at the cavity equator are tied to accelerating electric fields by a simple geometric factor, the onset of magnetic flux penetration determines the onset of Q-drop. We consider breakdown of the surface barrier at triangular grooves to predict the magnetic field of first flux penetration H pen . Such defects were argued to be the worst case by Buzdin and Daumens (1998 Physica C 294 257), whose approach, moreover, incorporates both the geometry of the groove and local contamination via the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. Since previous Q-drop models focused on either topography or contamination alone, the proposed model allows new comparisons of one effect in relation to the other. The model predicts equivalent reduction of H pen when either roughness or contamination were varied alone, so smooth but dirty surfaces limit cavity performance about as much as rough but clean surfaces do. Still lower H pen was predicted when both effects were combined, i.e. contamination should exacerbate the negative effects of roughness and vice versa. To test the model with actual data, coupons were prepared by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing, and stylus profilometry was used to obtain distributions of angles. From these data, curves for surface resistance generated by simple flux flow as a function of magnetic field were generated by integrating over the distribution of angles for reasonable values of κ. This showed that combined effects of roughness and contamination indeed reduce the Q-drop onset field by ∼ 20%, and that contamination contributes to Q-drop as much as roughness. The latter point may be overlooked by SRF cavity research, since access to the cavity interior by spectroscopy tools is very difficult, whereas optical images have become commonplace. The model

  5. Model for initiation of quality factor degradation at high accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyuba, A.; Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    A model for the onset of the reduction in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity quality factor, the so-called Q-drop, at high accelerating electric fields is presented. Since magnetic fields at the cavity equator are tied to accelerating electric fields by a simple geometric factor, the onset of magnetic flux penetration determines the onset of Q-drop. We consider breakdown of the surface barrier at triangular grooves to predict the magnetic field of first flux penetration Hpen. Such defects were argued to be the worst case by Buzdin and Daumens (1998 Physica C 294 257), whose approach, moreover, incorporates both the geometry of the groove and local contamination via the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. Since previous Q-drop models focused on either topography or contamination alone, the proposed model allows new comparisons of one effect in relation to the other. The model predicts equivalent reduction of Hpen when either roughness or contamination were varied alone, so smooth but dirty surfaces limit cavity performance about as much as rough but clean surfaces do. Still lower Hpen was predicted when both effects were combined, i.e. contamination should exacerbate the negative effects of roughness and vice versa. To test the model with actual data, coupons were prepared by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing, and stylus profilometry was used to obtain distributions of angles. From these data, curves for surface resistance generated by simple flux flow as a function of magnetic field were generated by integrating over the distribution of angles for reasonable values of κ. This showed that combined effects of roughness and contamination indeed reduce the Q-drop onset field by ~ 20%, and that contamination contributes to Q-drop as much as roughness. The latter point may be overlooked by SRF cavity research, since access to the cavity interior by spectroscopy tools is very difficult, whereas optical images have become commonplace. The model was

  6. Accelerator structure for a charged particle linear accelerator working in standing wave mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, D.T.; Tronc, Dominique.

    1977-01-01

    Charged particle accelerators generally include a pre-grouping or pre-accelerating structure associated with the accelerator structure itself. But pre-grouping or pre-accelerating structures of known type (Patent application No. 70 39261 for example) present electric and dimensional characteristics that rule them out for accelerators working at high frequencies (C or X bands for example), since the distance separating the interaction spaces becomes very small in this case. The accelerator structure mentioned in this invention can be used to advantage for such accelerators [fr

  7. Acceleration of particles by electron plasma waves in a moderate magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    A general scheme is established to examine any magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) configuration for its acceleration potential including the effects of various types of plasma waves. The analysis is restricted to plasma waves in a magnetic field with electron cyclotron frequency less than, but comparable to, the electron plasma frequency (moderate field). The general role of electron plasma waves is examined in this paper independent of a specific MHD configuration or generating mechanism in the weak turbulence limit. The evolution of arbitrary wave spectra in a non-relativistic plasma is examined, and it is shown that the nonlinear process of induced scattering on the polarization clouds of ions leads to the collapse of the waves to an almost one-dimensional spectrum directed along the magnetic field. The subsequent acceleration of non-relativistic and relativistic particles is considered. It is shown for non-relativistic particles that when the wave distribution has a negative slope the acceleration is retarded for lower velocities and enhanced for higher velocities compared to acceleration by an isotropic distribution of electron plasma waves in a magnetic field. This change in behaviour is expected to affect the development of wave spectra and the subsequent acceleration spectrum. (Auth.)

  8. Stability study of the higher order mode beam position monitors at the Accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, L; Jones., R M

    2014-01-01

    erating cavities at FLASH linac, DESY, are equipped with electronics for beam position monitoring, which are based on HOM signals from special couplers. These monitors provide the beam position without additional vacuum components and at low cost. Moreover, they can be used to align the beam in the cavities to reduce the HOM effects on the beam. However, the HOMBPM (Higher Order Mode based Beam Position Monitor) shows an instability problem over time. In this paper, we will present the status of studies on this issue. Several methods are utilized to calibrate the HOMBPMs. These methods include DLR (Direct Linear Regression), and SVD (Singular Value Decomposition). We found that SVD generally is more suitable for HOMBPM calibration. We focus on the HOMBPMs at 1.3 GHz cavities. Techniques developed here are applicable to 3.9 ...

  9. Ferruleless coupled-cavity traveling-wave tube cold-test characteristics simulated with micro-SOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Dana L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional, electromagnetic circuit analysis code, Micro-SOS, can be used to reduce expensive and time consuming experimental 'cold-testing' of traveling-wave tube (TWT) circuits. The frequency-phase dispersion and beam interaction impedance characteristics of a ferruleless coupled-cavity traveling-wave tube slow-wave circuit were simulated using the code. Computer results agree closely with experimental data. Variations in the cavity geometry dimensions of period length and gap-to-period ratio were modeled. These variations can be used in velocity taper designs to reduce the radiofrequency (RF) phase velocity in synchronism with the decelerating electron beam. Such circuit designs can result in enhanced TWT power and efficiency.

  10. Alfvén wave interaction with inhomogeneous plasmas: acceleration and energy cascade towards small-scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Génot

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the process of electron acceleration in auroral regions, we present a study of the temporal evolution of the interaction of Alfvén waves (AW with a plasma inhomogeneous in a direction transverse to the static magnetic field. This type of inhomogeneity is typical of the density cavities extended along the magnetic field in auroral acceleration regions. We use self-consistent Particle In Cell (PIC simulations which are able to reproduce the full nonlinear evolution of the electromagnetic waves, as well as the trajectories of ions and electrons in phase space. Physical processes are studied down to the ion Larmor radius and electron skin depth scales. We show that the AW propagation on sharp density gradients leads to the formation of a significant parallel (to the magnetic field electric field (E-field. It results from an electric charge separation generated on the density gradients by the polarization drift associated with the time varying AW E-field. Its amplitude may reach a few percents of the AW E-field. This parallel component accelerates electrons up to keV energies over a distance of a few hundred Debye lengths, and induces the formation of electron beams. These beams trigger electrostatic plasma instabilities which evolve toward the formation of nonlinear electrostatic structures (identified as electron holes and double layers. When the electrostatic turbulence is fully developed we show that it reduces the further wave/particle exchange. This sequence of mechanisms is analyzed with the program WHAMP, to identify the instabilities at work and wavelet analysis techniques are used to characterize the regime of energy conversions (from electromagnetic to electrostatic structures, from large to small length scales. This study elucidates a possible scenario to account for the particle acceleration and the wave dissipation in inhomogeneous plasmas. It would consist of successive phases of acceleration along the magnetic field

  11. A new measurement tool for characterization of superconducting rf accelerator cavities using high-performance LTS SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Neubert, R [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Nietzsche, S [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Knaack, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Wittenburg, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Peters, A [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a new system to measure very low currents in an accelerator environment, using a cryogenic current comparator (CCC). In principle a CCC is a conventional current transformer using the high-performance SQUID technology to sense the magnetic fields caused by the beam current. Since the system is sensitive on a pA level, it is an optimum device to detect dark currents of superconducting cavities. The system presented here is designed for the test facilities of the superconducting accelerator modules for the European XFEL at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg. Measurements in a quiet environment showed that an intrinsic noise level of the CCC of 40 pA Hz{sup -1/2} could be achieved.

  12. Recent results on the beat wave acceleration of externally injected electrons on a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, C.E.; Marsh, K.; Dyson, A.; Everett, M.; Lal, A.; Josh, C.; Williams, R.; Katsouleas, T.

    1992-01-01

    In the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) two laser beams of slightly different frequencies resonantly beat in a plasma in such a way that their frequency and wavenumber differences correspond to the plasma wave frequency and wavenumber. The amplitude-modulated electromagnetic wave envelope of the laser pulse exerts a periodic nonlinear force on the plasma electrons, causing them to bunch. The resulting space-charge wave can have a phase velocity nearly equal to the speed of light. If an electron bunch is injected with a velocity close to this it can be trapped and accelerated. The UCLA program investigating PBWA has found that tunnel or multi-photon ionized plasmas a re homogeneous enough for coherent macroscopic acceleration. The laser pulse should be short, and the peak laser intensity should be such that Iλ 2 ∼ 2 x 10 16 W/cm 2 μm 2 in order to get substantial beat wave amplitudes. tab., 3 refs

  13. A qubit strongly coupled to a resonant cavity: asymmetry of the spontaneous emission spectrum beyond the rotating wave approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); You, J Q; Nori, F [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Zheng, H, E-mail: xfcao@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the spontaneous emission (SE) spectrum of a qubit in a lossy resonant cavity. We use neither the rotating-wave approximation nor the Markov approximation. For the weak-coupling case, the SE spectrum of the qubit is a single peak, with its location depending on the spectral density of the qubit environment. Then, the asymmetry (of the location and heights of the two peaks) of the two SE peaks (which are related to the vacuum Rabi splitting) changes as the qubit-cavity coupling increases. Explicitly, for a qubit in a low-frequency intrinsic bath, the height asymmetry of the splitting peaks is enhanced as the qubit-cavity coupling strength increases. However, for a qubit in an Ohmic bath, the height asymmetry of the spectral peaks is inverted compared to the low-frequency bath case. With further increasing the qubit-cavity coupling to the ultra-strong regime, the height asymmetry of the left and right peaks is slightly inverted, which is consistent with the corresponding case of a low-frequency bath. This inversion of the asymmetry arises from the competition between the Ohmic bath and the cavity bath. Therefore, after considering the anti-rotating terms, our results explicitly show how the height asymmetry in the SE spectrum peaks depends on the qubit-cavity coupling and the type of intrinsic noise experienced by the qubit.

  14. Development of small C-band standing-wave accelerator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, S.; Takahashi, A.; Hisanaga, N.; Sekido, H.; Yoshizumi, A.

    2000-01-01

    We have newly developed a compact C-band (5712 MHz) standing-wave accelerator for the medical product/waste sterilization applications. The accelerator consists of an electron gun operating at 25 kV DC followed by a single-cell pre-buncher and 3-cell buncher section, and 11-cell of the side-coupled standing-wave accelerating structure. The total length including the electron gun is about 600 mm. The first high-power test was performed in March 2000, where the accelerator successively generated the electron beam of 9 MeV energy and 160 mA peak-current at 3.8 MW RF input power. Mitsubishi Heavy Industry starts to serve the sterilization systems using C-band accelerator reported here, and also supplies the accelerator components for the medical oncology applications. (author)

  15. The SPS acceleration system: travelling wave drift-tube structure for the CERN SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dome, G.

    1976-01-01

    The SPS accelerating structure is essentially a high energy proton linac, except for a small frequency swing during the acceleration cycle. It is operated almost CW with a travelling wave giving an energy gain around 0.1 MeV/m. The guide-lines for the design of such a structure are explained, and practical solutions are described. (author)

  16. Power efficiency optimization of disk-loaded waveguide traveling wave structure of electron linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinghe; Li Jinhai; Li Chunguang

    2014-01-01

    Disk-loaded waveguide traveling wave structure (TWS), which is widely used in scientific research and industry, is a vital accelerating structure in electron linear accelerator. The power efficiency is an important parameter for designing TWS, which greatly effects the expenses for the fabrication and commercial running. The key parameters related with power efficiency were studied for TWS optimization. The result was proved by experiment result, and it shows some help for accelerator engineering. (authors)

  17. Ionospheric electron acceleration by electromagnetic waves near regions of plasma resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalon, E.

    1989-01-01

    Electron acceleration by electromagnetic fields propagating in the inhomogeneous ionospheric plasma is investigated. It is found that high-amplitude short wavelength electrostatic waves are generated by the incident electromagnetic fields that penetrate the radio window. These waves can very efficiently transfer their energy to the electrons if the incident frequency is near the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency

  18. Nonstationary self-action of electromagnetic wave beams in the beat accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramyan, L.A.; Litvak, A.G.; Mironov, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    The resonance excitation of a plasma wave in a modified accelerator using the beats of two electromagnetic waves permits to increase considerably the intensity of the accelerating field and, consequently, the rate of the accumulation of the energy by charged particles. The efficiency of the electromagnetic radiation conversion to the longitudinal wave is defined by nonlinear processes. The saturation of the accelerating field is considered which is due to the appearance of multiflux motion of electrons oscillating in the wave field with overturn of waves, due to the development of parametric instabilities and due to the change of natural frequency of plasma oscillations caused by the relativistic increase of electron mass. The effects of self-action which change the form of the electromagnetic radiation pulse and the wave beam structure play a significant role in the most promising laser plasma beat accelerator. We consider dynamics of space distribution of the plasma wave in a self-consistent field of the wave beam. (author) 5 refs., 2 figs

  19. Beat-wave laser accelerators, further comment including note on the 'Surfatron' concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    The paper deals with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) study of the beat-wave particle accelerator, intended for high energy physics. Three factors; the build-up of beat-wave, the surfatron concept and the self-focusing effects are considered in the context of the RAL study. (U.K.)

  20. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Arun [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  1. PIV measurements of velocities and accelerations under breaking waves on a slope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested, Malene Hovgaard; Carstensen, Stefan; Christensen, Erik Damgaard

    2017-01-01

    waves. In this study, we have investigated the wave kinematics under steep and breaking waves on a laboratory beach with a slope of 1/25. The velocity field was measured by use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) at a sample rate of 96Hz. The high sample rate allowed for the accelerations...... to be determined directly from the sampled velocities. It was found that both velocities and accelerations differ from the ones predicted from common wave theories such as streamfunction theory. This was especially evident at the top part of the wave close to the surface. This was not surprising, since...... the breaking event is a highly non-linear process. The results presented here may facilitate computations of the impact force on offshore structures and furthermore be used for validation of CFD models while altogether shedding light on the mechanisms behind breaking waves....

  2. Nonlinear theory of diffusive acceleration of particles by shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkov, M.A. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)]. E-mail: mmalkov@ucsd.edu; Drury, L. O' C. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 5 Merrion Square, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2001-04-01

    Among the various acceleration mechanisms which have been suggested as responsible for the nonthermal particle spectra and associated radiation observed in many astrophysical and space physics environments, diffusive shock acceleration appears to be the most successful. We review the current theoretical understanding of this process, from the basic ideas of how a shock energizes a few reactionless particles to the advanced nonlinear approaches treating the shock and accelerated particles as a symbiotic self-organizing system. By means of direct solution of the nonlinear problem we set the limit to the test-particle approximation and demonstrate the fundamental role of nonlinearity in shocks of astrophysical size and lifetime. We study the bifurcation of this system, proceeding from the hydrodynamic to kinetic description under a realistic condition of Bohm diffusivity. We emphasize the importance of collective plasma phenomena for the global flow structure and acceleration efficiency by considering the injection process, an initial stage of acceleration and, the related aspects of the physics of collisionless shocks. We calculate the injection rate for different shock parameters and different species. This, together with differential acceleration resulting from nonlinear large-scale modification, determines the chemical composition of accelerated particles. The review concentrates on theoretical and analytical aspects but our strategic goal is to link the fundamental theoretical ideas with the rapidly growing wealth of observational data. (author)

  3. Travelling wave accelerating structure design for TESLA positron injector linac

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, K; Zhou, F; Flöttmann, K

    2000-01-01

    A modified cup-like TW accelerating structure for TESLA Positron Pre-Accelerator (PPA) is designed by optimizing the structure geometry and by changing the iris thickness cell by cell in a section . This structure has high shunt-impedance and a large iris radius to meet with the requirements of high gradient and large transverse acceptance. The beam dynamics in the structure with the optimum solenoid focus field are studied. A satisfactory positron beam transmission and the beam performance at the PPA output have been obtained. In this paper the accelerating structure design is described in detail and the results are presented.

  4. Mode stability analysis in the beam—wave interaction process for a three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Ji-Run; Zhu Min; Guo Wei; Cui Jian

    2013-01-01

    Based on space-charge wave theory, the formulae of the beam—wave coupling coefficient and the beam-loaded conductance are given for the beam—wave interaction in an N-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain. The ratio of the non-beam-loaded quality factor of the coupled cavity chain to the beam quality factor is used to determine the stability of the beam—wave interaction. As an example, the stabilities of the beam—wave interaction in a three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain are discussed with the formulae and the CST code for the operations of the 2π, π, and π/2 modes, respectively. The results show that stable operation of the 2π, π, and π/2 modes may all be realized in an extended-interaction klystron with the three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain

  5. Understanding the seismic wave propagation inside and around an underground cavity from a 3D numerical survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterhazy, Sofi; Schneider, Felix; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by the need to detect an underground cavity within the procedure of an On-Site-Inspection (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), which might be caused by a nuclear explosion/weapon testing, we aim to provide a basic numerical study of the wave propagation around and inside such an underground cavity. One method to investigate the geophysical properties of an underground cavity allowed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-test Ban Treaty is referred to as "resonance seismometry" - a resonance method that uses passive or active seismic techniques, relying on seismic cavity vibrations. This method is in fact not yet entirely determined by the Treaty and so far, there are only very few experimental examples that have been suitably documented to build a proper scientific groundwork. This motivates to investigate this problem on a purely numerical level and to simulate these events based on recent advances in numerical modeling of wave propagation problems. Our numerical study includes the full elastic wave field in three dimensions. We consider the effects from an incoming plane wave as well as point source located in the surrounding of the cavity at the surface. While the former can be considered as passive source like a tele-seismic earthquake, the latter represents a man-made explosion or a viborseis as used for/in active seismic techniques. Further we want to demonstrate the specific characteristics of the scattered wave field from a P-waves and S-wave separately. For our simulations in 3D we use the discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Element Code SPEED developed by MOX (The Laboratory for Modeling and Scientific Computing, Department of Mathematics) and DICA (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering) at the Politecnico di Milano. The computations are carried out on the Vienna Scientific Cluster (VSC). The accurate numerical modeling can facilitate the development of proper analysis techniques to detect the remnants of an

  6. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Ribeill, Guilhem; Xu, Chen; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  7. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hui; Ribeill, Guilhem; Xu Chen; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  8. Acceleration of cosmic rays in SNR shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, L.O'C.; Markiewicz, W.J.; Voelk, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The time dependence of the energy density of cosmic rays accelerated in the outer shock of a supernova is studied in simple nonlinear models. The solutions are classified in their dependence on the parameters of the system. (orig.)

  9. Particle acceleration through the resonance of high magnetic field and high frequency electromagnetic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Liu; He, X.T.; Chen, S.G.; Zhang, W.Y.; He, X.T.; Hong, Liu

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new particle acceleration mechanism. Electrons can be accelerated to relativistic energy within a few electromagnetic wave cycles through the mechanism which is named electromagnetic and magnetic field resonance acceleration (EMRA). We find that the electron acceleration depends not only on the electromagnetic wave intensity, but also on the ratio between electron Larmor frequency and electromagnetic wave frequency. As the ratio approaches to unity, a clear resonance peak is observed, corresponding to the EMRA. Near the resonance regime, the strong magnetic fields still affect the electron acceleration dramatically. We derive an approximate analytical solution of the relativistic electron energy in adiabatic limit, which provides a full understanding of this phenomenon. In typical parameters of pulsar magnetospheres, the mechanism allows particles to increase their energies through the resonance of high magnetic field and high frequency electromagnetic wave in each electromagnetic wave period. The energy spectra of the accelerated particles exhibit the synchrotron radiation behavior. These can help to understand the remaining emission of high energy electron from radio pulsar within supernova remnant. The other potential application of our theory in fast ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion is also discussed. (authors)

  10. Study of a power coupler for superconducting RF cavities used in high intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souli, M.

    2007-07-01

    The coaxial power coupler needed for superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the protons beam. The calculated RF and dielectric losses in the power coupler (inner and outer conductor, RF window) are relatively high. Consequently, it is necessary to design very carefully the cooling circuits in order to remove the generated heat and to ensure stable and reliable operating conditions for the coupler cavity system. After calculating all type of losses in the power coupler, we have designed and validated the inner conductor cooling circuit using numerical simulations results. We have also designed and optimized the outer conductor cooling circuit by establishing its hydraulic and thermal characteristics. Next, an experiment dedicated to study the thermal interaction between the power coupler and the cavity was successfully performed at CRYOHLAB test facility. The critical heat load Qc for which a strong degradation of the cavity RF performance was measured leading to Q c in the range 3 W-5 W. The measured heat load will be considered as an upper limit of the residual heat flux at the outer conductor cold extremity. A dedicated test facility was developed and successfully operated for measuring the performance of the outer conductor heat exchanger using supercritical helium as coolant. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryo-module. The first experimental results have confirmed the excellent performance of the tested heat exchanger. The maximum residual heat flux measured was 60 mW for a 127 W thermal load. As the RF losses in the coupler are proportional to the incident RF power, we can deduce that the outer conductor heat exchanger performance is continued up to 800 kW RF power. Heat exchanger thermal conductance has been identified using a 2D axisymmetric thermal model by comparing

  11. Electron acceleration by surface plasma waves in double metal surface structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. S.; Kumar, Gagan; Singh, D. B.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2007-12-01

    Two parallel metal sheets, separated by a vacuum region, support a surface plasma wave whose amplitude is maximum on the two parallel interfaces and minimum in the middle. This mode can be excited by a laser using a glass prism. An electron beam launched into the middle region experiences a longitudinal ponderomotive force due to the surface plasma wave and gets accelerated to velocities of the order of phase velocity of the surface wave. The scheme is viable to achieve beams of tens of keV energy. In the case of a surface plasma wave excited on a single metal-vacuum interface, the field gradient normal to the interface pushes the electrons away from the high field region, limiting the acceleration process. The acceleration energy thus achieved is in agreement with the experimental observations.

  12. Correlated observations of intensified whistler waves and electron acceleration around the geostationary orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Fuliang; He Zhaoguo; Tang Lijun; Zong Qiugang; Wang Chengrui; Su Zhenpeng

    2012-01-01

    We report correlated observations of enhanced whistler waves and energetic electron acceleration collected by multiple satellites specifically near the geostationary orbit during the 7–10 November 2004 superstorms, together with multi-site observations of ULF wave power measured on the ground. Energetic (>0.6 MeV) electron fluxes are found to increase significantly during the recovery phase, reaching a peak value by ∼100 higher than the prestorm level. In particular, such high electron flux corresponds to intensified whistler wave activities but to the weak ULF wave power. This result suggests that wave–particle interaction appears to be more important than inward radial diffusion in acceleration of outer radiation belt energetic electrons in this event, assisting to better understand the acceleration mechanism. (paper)

  13. Dual-cavity mode converter for a fundamental mode output in an over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiawei; Huang, Wenhua [Department of Electronic Engineering and Information Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China); Xiao, Renzhen; Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Shao, Hao; Chen, Changhua [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China); Zhu, Qi [Department of Electronic Engineering and Information Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China)

    2015-03-16

    A dual-cavity TM{sub 02}–TM{sub 01} mode converter is designed for a dual-mode operation over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator. With the converter, the fundamental mode output is achieved. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the efficiency of beam-wave conversion was over 46% and a pureTM{sub 01} mode output was obtained. Effects of end reflection provided by the mode converter were studied. Adequate TM{sub 01} mode feedback provided by the converter enhances conversion efficiency. The distance between the mode converter and extraction cavity critically affect the generation of microwaves depending on the reflection phase of TM{sub 01} mode feedback.

  14. Acceleration test with mixed higher harmonics in HIMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, M.; Sugiura, A.; Misu, T.

    2004-01-01

    In HIMAC synchrotron, beam tests with a magnetic ally loaded cavity have been performed. This cavity has very low Q-value of about 0.5, and can be added higher harmonics with fundamental acceleration frequency. In our tested system for higher harmonics, wave form of a DDS (Direct Digital Synthesizer) can be rewrite, and arbitrary wave form can be used for beam acceleration. In the beam test, second and third harmonic wave were added on the fundamental acceleration frequency, and increases of the accelerated beam intensity have been achieved. In this paper, results of the beam test and the acceleration system are presented. (author)

  15. Further studies on beam breakup growth reduction by cavity cross-couplings in recirculating accelerators: Effects of long pulse length and multiturn recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombant, D.; Lau, Y.Y.

    1992-01-01

    Cavity cross-coupling was recently found to reduce beam breakup (BBU) growth in a recirculating accelerator known as the Spiral Line Induction Accelerator (SLIA). Here, we extend the analysis in two prespects: ong beam pulse lengths and a SLIA upgrade geometry which accelerates a 10 kA, 35 ns beam to 25 MeV via a 70 cavity, 7 turn recirculation. We found that when the beam pulse length τ exceeds the beam's transit time τ' between cross-coupled cavities, BBU growth may be worsened as a result of the cross-coupling among cavities. This situation is not unlike other long pulse recirculating accelerators where beam recirculation leads to beam breakup of a regenerative type. Thus, the advantage of BBU reduction by cavity cross-coupling is restricted primarily to beams with τ<τ', a condition envisioned for all SLIA geometries. For the 70 gap, 7 turn SLIA upgrade, we found that cavity cross-coupling may reduce BBU growth up to factors of a thousand when the quality factor Q of the deflecting modes are relatively high (like 100). In these high Q cases, the amount of growth reduction depends on the arrangement and sequence of beam recirculation. For Q < or approx. 20, BBU growth reduction by factors of hundreds is observed, but this reduction is insensitive to the sequence of beam recirculation. The above conclusions were based on simple models of cavity coupling that have been used in conventional microwave literature. Not addressed is the detail design consideration that leads to the desired degree of cavity coupling. (orig.)

  16. Traveling wave accelerating structures with a large phase advance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramonov, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    The cells RF parameters for the well known Disk Loaded Waveguide (DLW) are considered in higher pass bands of TM01 wave, providing operating phase advance between 180 o - 1230 o per cell. With an appropriate shape optimization and some additional elements proposed traveling wave structures with such large phase advance overlap the classical first band DLW in RF efficiency. Examples of proposed structures together with RF and dispersion properties are presented.

  17. Quantitative one-dimensional thermal-wave cavity measurements of fluid thermophysical properties through equivalence studies with three-dimensional geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matvienko, Anna; Mandelis, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The thermal-wave field in a photopyroelectric thermal-wave cavity was calculated with two theoretical approaches: a computationally straightforward, conventional, one-dimensional approach and a three-dimensional experimentally more realistic approach. The calculations show that the dimensionality of the thermal-wave field in the cavity depends on the lateral heat transfer boundary conditions and the relation between the beam size of the laser impinging on the thermal-wave generating metallic film and the diameter of the film itself. The theoretical calculations and the experimental data on the photopyroelectric signal in the cavity were compared. The study resulted in identifying ranges of heat transfer rates, beam sizes, and cavity radii for which accurate quantitative measurements of the thermal diffusivity of intracavity fluids can be made within the far simpler, but only approximate, one-dimensional approach conventionally adopted by users of thermal-wave cavities. It was shown that the major parameters affecting the dimensionality of thermal-wave cavities are the laser beam spot size and the Biot number of the medium comprising the sidewalls of the (cylindrical) cavity

  18. The wake field acceleration using a cavity of elliptical cross section, part 1: WELL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Yongho.

    1983-11-01

    A computer code WELL is developed for the calculation of the wake fields in a cavity of elliptical cross section. The method is basically an extention of that of BCI to the 3-dimensional computation, i.e., Maxwell's equations are solved in the time domain with boundary conditions. Open boundary conditions are used so as to simulate infinitely long beam pipes. Good agreements within a few percents are shown between the results of the computation by WELL and BCI in a cylindrically symmetrical structure. An example of computation in an elliptical structure gives a reasonable result and points out that the deflection of particles by the transverse wake field is severe. (author)

  19. Excitation of Accelerating Plasma Waves by Counter-propagating Laser Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gennady Shvets; Nathaniel J. Fisch; Alexander Pukhov

    2001-01-01

    Generation of accelerating plasma waves using two counter-propagating laser beams is considered. Colliding-beam accelerator requires two laser pulses: the long pump and the short timing beam. We emphasize the similarities and differences between the conventional laser wakefield accelerator and the colliding-beam accelerator (CBA). The highly nonlinear nature of the wake excitation is explained using both nonlinear optics and plasma physics concepts. Two regimes of CBA are considered: (i) the short-pulse regime, where the timing beam is shorter than the plasma period, and (ii) the parametric excitation regime, where the timing beam is longer than the plasma period. Possible future experiments are also outlined

  20. Introduction to RF linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.

    1994-01-01

    The basic features of RF linear accelerators are described. The concept of the 'loaded cavity', essential for the synchronism wave-particle, is introduced, and formulae describing the action of electromagnetic fields on the beam are given. The treatment of intense beams is mentioned, and various existing linear accelerators are presented as examples. (orig.)

  1. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties Using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, A. W.; Owano, T.; Castaneda, R.; Baer, D. S.; Paldus, B. A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This abstract describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5/Mm). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  2. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  3. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Tian, Hui; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2012-04-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  4. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, Charles; Tian, Hui; Kelley, Michael; Xu, Chen

    2012-01-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  5. Continuous-wave dual-wavelength operation of a distributed feedback laser diode with an external cavity using a volume Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yujin; Sekine, Takashi; Kurita, Takashi; Kato, Yoshinori; Kawashima, Toshiyuki

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate continuous-wave dual-wavelength operation of a broad-area distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode with a single external-cavity configuration. This high-power DFB laser has a narrow bandwidth (current and temperature ranges.

  6. The acceleration of particles by relativistic electron plasma waves driven by the optical mixing of laser light in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahim, N.A.; Douglas, S.R.

    1992-03-01

    Electron acceleration by relativistic large-amplitude electron plasma waves is studied by theory and particle simulations. The maximum acceleration that can be obtained from this process depends on many different factors. This report presents a study of how these various factors impact on the acceleration mechanism. Although particular reference is made to the laser plasma beatwave concept, the study is equally relevant to the acceleration of particles in the plasma wakefield accelerator and the laser wakefield accelerator

  7. Effect of losses on acceleration of energetic particles by diffusive scattering through shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelk, H.J.; Morfill, G.E.; Forman, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of local losses on the acceleration of energetic particles by shocks is discussed considering both energy losses of individual particles and damping processes for the scattering hydromagnetic waves. The calculations are all time asymptotic and steady state. For locally plane and infinitely extended shocks, the requirement for acceleration is that the loss time exceed the acceleration time. The resulting modifications of the spatial structure and of the momentum dependence of the cosmic-ray distribution are described. For acceleration to be a local effect within the Galaxy, the local scattering mean free path must be small compared to the effective overall galactic mean free path as deduced from the cosmic-ray escape time. The required strengths of the scattering wave fields are such that neutral molecular clouds do not allow acceleration; in a partially ionized, warm interstellar medium, quite large shock strengths are needed. Such strong shock discontinuities are surrounded by an ionization layer within which Alfven wave damping is presumably negligible. Given the spatial extent of the layer for strong shocks propagating into neutral interstellar clouds, the possibility of localized diffusive acceleration is investigated. The estimated strength and extent of the scattering region is not large enough to confine acceleration within the layer. Rather, it will extend across the whole cloud, whose integrated losses then determine the efficiency

  8. Structural and superconducting properties of sputter-deposited niobium films for applications in RF accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Peck, M A

    2000-01-01

    The present work presents the results of a systematic study of superconducting and structural properties of niobium films sputter deposited onto the inner walls of radiofrequency copper resonators. The measured superconducting quantities include the surface resistance, the critical temperature, the penetration depth and the upper and lower critical fields. In addition to films grown with different discharge gases (Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne and Ar-Ne mixtures) and to films grown on substrates prepared under different conditions, the study also includes massive niobium cavities. The surface resistance is analysed in terms of its dependence on the temperature and on the rf field amplitude and, when possible, compared to theoretical predictions. In general, good agreement with BCS theory is observed. All experimental results are presented in the form of a simple, but adequate parameterisation. The residual resistance is observed to be essentially uncorrelated with the other variables, but strongly dependent on the macroscop...

  9. Ionizing wave via high-power HF acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Mishin, Evgeny; Pedersen, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Recent ionospheric modification experiments with the 3.6 MW transmitter at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska led to discovery of artificial ionization descending from the nominal interaction altitude in the background F-region ionosphere by ~60 km. This paper presents a physical model of an ionizing wavefront created by suprathermal electrons accelerated by the HF-excited plasma turbulence.

  10. Design and fabrication of a traveling-wave muffin-tin accelerating structure at 90 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, P.J.; Bowden, G.B.; Copeland, M.R.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.

    1997-05-01

    A prototype of a muffin-tin accelerating structure operating at 32 times the SLAC frequency (2.856 GHz) was built for research in high gradient acceleration. A traveling-wave design with single input and output feeds was chosen for the prototype which was fabricated by wire electrodischarge machining. Features of the mechanical design for the prototype are described. Design improvements are presented including considerations of cooling and vacuum

  11. Displacement-noise-free gravitational-wave detection with a single Fabry-Perot cavity: A toy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarabrin, Sergey P.; Vyatchanin, Sergey P.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a detuned Fabry-Perot cavity, pumped through both the mirrors, as a toy model of the gravitational-wave (GW) detector partially free from displacement noise of the test masses. It is demonstrated that the noise of cavity mirrors can be eliminated, but the one of lasers and detectors cannot. The isolation of the GW signal from displacement noise of the mirrors is achieved in a proper linear combination of the cavity output signals. The construction of such a linear combination is possible due to the difference between the reflected and transmitted output signals of detuned cavity. We demonstrate that in low-frequency region the obtained displacement-noise-free response signal is much stronger than the f gw 3 -limited sensitivity of displacement-noise-free interferometers recently proposed by S. Kawamura and Y. Chen. However, the loss of the resonant gain in the noise cancelation procedure results is the sensitivity limitation of our toy model by displacement noise of lasers and detectors

  12. Simulation and analysis of TE wave propagation for measurement of electron cloud densities in particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnad, Kiran G., E-mail: kgs52@cornell.edu [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Hammond, Kenneth C. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schwartz, Robert M. [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Veitzer, Seth A. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The use of transverse electric (TE) waves has proved to be a powerful, noninvasive method for estimating the densities of electron clouds formed in particle accelerators. Results from the plasma simulation program VSim have served as a useful guide for experimental studies related to this method, which have been performed at various accelerator facilities. This paper provides results of the simulation and modeling work done in conjunction with experimental efforts carried out at the Cornell electron storage ring “Test Accelerator” (CESRTA). This paper begins with a discussion of the phase shift induced by electron clouds in the transmission of RF waves, followed by the effect of reflections along the beam pipe, simulation of the resonant standing wave frequency shifts and finally the effects of external magnetic fields, namely dipoles and wigglers. A derivation of the dispersion relationship of wave propagation for arbitrary geometries in field free regions with a cold, uniform cloud density is also provided.

  13. Multiperiodic accelerator structures for linear particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, D.T.

    1975-01-01

    High efficiency linear accelerator structures, comprised of a succession of cylindrical resonant cavities for acceleration, are described. Coupling annular cavities are located at the periphery, each being coupled to two adjacent cylindrical cavities. (auth)

  14. Electron acceleration at Jupiter: input from cyclotron-resonant interaction with whistler-mode chorus waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jupiter has the most intense radiation belts of all the outer planets. It is not yet known how electrons can be accelerated to energies of 10 MeV or more. It has been suggested that cyclotron-resonant wave-particle interactions by chorus waves could accelerate electrons to a few MeV near the orbit of Io. Here we use the chorus wave intensities observed by the Galileo spacecraft to calculate the changes in electron flux as a result of pitch angle and energy diffusion. We show that, when the bandwidth of the waves and its variation with L are taken into account, pitch angle and energy diffusion due to chorus waves is a factor of 8 larger at L-shells greater than 10 than previously shown. We have used the latitudinal wave intensity profile from Galileo data to model the time evolution of the electron flux using the British Antarctic Survey Radiation Belt (BAS model. This profile confines intense chorus waves near the magnetic equator with a peak intensity at ∼5° latitude. Electron fluxes in the BAS model increase by an order of magnitude for energies around 3 MeV. Extending our results to L = 14 shows that cyclotron-resonant interactions with chorus waves are equally important for electron acceleration beyond L = 10. These results suggest that there is significant electron acceleration by cyclotron-resonant interactions at Jupiter contributing to the creation of Jupiter's radiation belts and also increasing the range of L-shells over which this mechanism should be considered.

  15. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildiz, H. Duran; Cakir, R.; Porsuk, D.

    2015-01-01

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; E c =19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles

  16. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, H. Duran, E-mail: hdyildiz@ankara.edu.tr [Institute of Accelerator Technologies, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey); Cakir, R. [Nanotechnology Engineering Department, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Rize (Turkey); Porsuk, D. [Physics Department, Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey)

    2015-06-11

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; E{sub c}=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles.

  17. Efficient continuous-wave eye-safe region signal output from intra-cavity singly resonant optical parametric oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bin; Ding Xin; Sheng Quan; Yin Su-Jia; Shi Chun-Peng; Li Xue; Wen Wu-Qi; Yao Jian-Quan; Yu Xuan-Yi

    2012-01-01

    We report an efficient continuous-wave (CW) tunable intra-cavity singly resonant optical parametric oscillator based on the multi-period periodically poled lithium niobate and using a laser diode (LD) end-pumped CW 1064 nm Nd:YVO 4 laser as the pump source. A highly efficiency CW operation is realized through a careful cavity design for mode matching and thermal stability. The signal tuning range is 1401–1500 nm obtained by varying the domain period. The maximum output power of 2.2 W at 1500 nm is obtained with a 17.1 W 808 nm LD power and the corresponding conversion efficiency is 12.9%. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Efficient continuous-wave nonlinear frequency conversion in high-Q gallium nitride photonic crystal cavities on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sabry Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on nonlinear frequency conversion from the telecom range via second harmonic generation (SHG and third harmonic generation (THG in suspended gallium nitride slab photonic crystal (PhC cavities on silicon, under continuous-wave resonant excitation. Optimized two-dimensional PhC cavities with augmented far-field coupling have been characterized with quality factors as high as 4.4 × 104, approaching the computed theoretical values. The strong enhancement in light confinement has enabled efficient SHG, achieving a normalized conversion efficiency of 2.4 × 10−3 W−1, as well as simultaneous THG. SHG emission power of up to 0.74 nW has been detected without saturation. The results herein validate the suitability of gallium nitride for integrated nonlinear optical processing.

  19. Design of the buncher of travelling-wave linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi, F.; Abbasi Davani, F.; Lamehi Rashti, M.; Shaker, H.

    2011-01-01

    The project of design and construction of linear electron accelerator is being performed by the Ministry of Science, Research and Technology and Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM). The aim of the current research is to achieve the knowledge and the technology of manufacturing the components of linear accelerator; one of these components is buncher. In this paper, two types of bunchers are introduced, while the disk-loaded type has been selected to be fabricated. Studying the electrons motion in the field through the aperture of the disks and using the equations of disk-loaded waveguide theory, the dimensions of the desired buncher for this project were obtained. MATLAB software and SUPERFISH code were used in calculations and simulations. The design led to the initial and final phase ranges of 348 degrees and 50 degrees, respectively. The mentioned values for the initial and final phase ranges resulted in a bunching factor of about 7 that is appropriate for this type of the bunchers.

  20. Physical design of 9 MeV travelling wave electron linac accelerating tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huaibi; Ding Xiaodong; Lin Yuzheng

    2000-01-01

    An accelerating tube is described. It is a part of an accelerator used for inspection of vehicle cargoes in rail cars, trucks, shipping containers, or airplanes in customs. A klystron with power of 4 MW and frequency of 2856 MHz will be applied to supply microwave power. The electrons can be accelerated by a travelling wave in the accelerating tube about 220 cm long, with a buncher whose capture efficiency is more than 80%. Energy of electrons after travelling through the tube can reach 9 MeV (pulse current intensity 170 mA) or 6 MeV (pulse current intensity 300 mA). Physical design of the accelerating tube, including the calculations of longitudinal particle dynamics, structure parameter and working character is carried out

  1. Relationship between Alfvén Wave and Quasi-Static Acceleration in Earth's Auroral Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottez, Fabrice

    2016-02-01

    There are two main categories of acceleration processes in the Earth's auroral zone: those based on quasi-static structures, and those based on Alfvén wave (AW). AWs play a nonnegligible role in the global energy budget of the plasma surrounding the Earth because they participate in auroral acceleration, and because auroral acceleration conveys a large portion of the energy flux across the magnetosphere. Acceleration events by double layers (DLs) and by AW have mostly been investigated separately, but many studies cited in this chapter show that they are not independent: these processes can occur simultaneously, and one process can be the cause of the other. The quasi-simultaneous occurrences of acceleration by AW and by quasi-static structures have been observed predominantly at the polar cap boundary of auroral arc systems, where often new bright arcs develop or intensify.

  2. A Fast GPU-accelerated Mixed-precision Strategy for Fully NonlinearWater Wave Computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glimberg, Stefan Lemvig; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Madsen, Morten G.

    2011-01-01

    We present performance results of a mixed-precision strategy developed to improve a recently developed massively parallel GPU-accelerated tool for fast and scalable simulation of unsteady fully nonlinear free surface water waves over uneven depths (Engsig-Karup et.al. 2011). The underlying wave......-preconditioned defect correction method. The improved strategy improves the performance by exploiting architectural features of modern GPUs for mixed precision computations and is tested in a recently developed generic library for fast prototyping of PDE solvers. The new wave tool is applicable to solve and analyze...

  3. Acceleration of galactic cosmic rays in shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.O.

    1981-06-01

    The old problem of the origin of cosmic rays has triggered off fresh interest owing to the discovery of a new model which enables a lot of energy to be transferred to a small number of particles on the one hand and the discovery of the coronal environment in which this transfer occurs, on the other. In this paper, interest is taken in the galactic cosmic rays and an endeavour is made to find out if the model can reveal the existence of cosmic rays over a wide energy range. The existence of an energy break, predicted by the model, was recognized fairly early but, in the literature, it varies from 30 GeV ro 10 6 GeV according to the authors. A study has been made of the two main causes of an energy break: the sphericity of the shock and the life time of the shock wave [fr

  4. Heating and acceleration of solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous expanding plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofman, Leon, E-mail: Leon.Ofman@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Visiting, Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ozak, Nataly [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Near the Sun (< 10R{sub s}) the acceleration, heating, and propagation of the solar wind are likely affected by the background inhomogeneities of the magnetized plasma. The heating and the acceleration of the solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous plasma is studied using a 2.5D hybrid model. The hybrid model describes the kinetics of the ions, while the electrons are modeled as massless neutralizing fluid in an expanding box approach. Turbulent magnetic fluctuations dominated by power-law frequency spectra, which are evident from in-situ as well as remote sensing measurements, are used in our models. The effects of background density inhomogeneity across the magnetic field on the resonant ion heating are studied. The effect of super-Alfvénic ion drift on the ion heating is investigated. It is found that the turbulent wave spectrum of initially parallel propagating waves cascades to oblique modes, and leads to enhanced resonant ion heating due to the inhomogeneity. The acceleration of the solar wind ions is achieved by the parametric instability of large amplitude waves in the spectrum, and is also affected by the inhomogeneity. The results of the study provide the ion temperature anisotropy and drift velocity temporal evolution due to relaxation of the instability. The non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of the ions are modeled in the inhomogeneous solar wind plasma in the acceleration region close to the Sun.

  5. Detection of benzene and toluene gases using a midinfrared continuous-wave external cavity quantum cascade laser at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydoryk, Ihor; Lim, Alan; Jäger, Wolfgang; Tulip, John; Parsons, Matthew T

    2010-02-20

    We demonstrate the application of a commercially available widely tunable continuous-wave external cavity quantum cascade laser as a spectroscopic source for the simultaneous detection of multiple gases. We measured broad absorption features of benzene and toluene between 1012 and 1063 cm(-1) (9.88 and 9.41 microm) at atmospheric pressure using an astigmatic Herriott multipass cell. Our results show experimental detection limits of 0.26 and 0.41 ppm for benzene and toluene, respectively, with a 100 m path length for these two gases.

  6. Strong ion accelerating by collisionless magnetosonic shock wave propagating perpendicular to a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsawa, Yukiharu.

    1984-12-01

    A 2-1/2 dimensional fully relativistic, fully electromagnetic particle code is used to study a time evolution of nonlinear magnetosonic pulse propagating in the direction perpendicular to a magnetic field. The pulse is excited by an instantaneous piston acceleration, and evolves totally self-consistently. Large amplitude pulse traps some ions and accelerates them parallel to the wave front. They are detrapped when their velocities become of the order of the sum of the ExB drift velocity and the wave phase velocity, where E is the electric field in the direction of wave propagation. The pulse develops into a quasi-shock wave in a collisionless plasma by a dissipation due to the resonant ion acceleration. Simple nonlinear wave theory for a cold plasma well describes the shock properties observed in the simulation except for the effects of resonant ions. In particular, magnitude of an electric potential across the shock region is derived analytically and is found to be in good agreement with our simulations. The potential jump is proportional to B 2 , and hence the ExB drift velocity of the trapped ions is proportional to B. (author)

  7. Superconducting radio frequency cavities: design, development and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, P.N.; Mistri, K.K.; Sonti, S.S.K.; Sacharias, J.; Raiand, A.; Kanjilal, D.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the development of superconducting niobium cavities has evoked a lot of interest among the accelerator physics community of India. Many laboratories are planning to develop superconducting niobium cavities for new accelerators and applications. Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) has been engaged in the indigenous development of niobium resonators for over a decade. During this period, several quarter wave resonators have been successfully built, tested and installed in the superconducting linac at IUAC. A new niobium low beta resonator for the High Current Injector (HCI) project has been designed, prototyped and tested. In addition to the in-house projects, IUAC is nearing completion of two niobium single spoke resonators (SSR1) for Fermi Lab, USA. Under the Indian Institutions and Fermi Lab Collaboration (IIFC), Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore and Inter-University Accelerator Centre have jointly developed TESLA-type 1.3 GHz single cell cavities which have achieved very high accelerating gradients. Buoyed by the success of this work, a 5-cell 1.3 GHz cavity with simple end tubes has been successfully built. This cavity is presently at Fermi Lab for 2 K tests. Recently, a 650 MHz, β=0.9 single cell cavity has also been successfully completed and is ready for cold tests. There are plans to develop a 650 MHz, β=0.6 single cell cavity in collaboration with VECC, Kolkata. This paper presents the status of the niobium cavities developed at Inter-University Accelerator Centre. (author)

  8. Resonant acceleration of alpha particles by ion cyclotron waves in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberoff, L.; Elgueta, R.

    1991-06-01

    Preferential acceleration of alpha particles interacting with left-hand polarized ion cyclotron waves is studied. It is shown that a small positive drift velocity between alpha particles and protons can lead to alpha particle velocities well in excess of the proton bulk velocity. During the acceleration process, which is assumed to take place at heliocentric distances less than 0.3 AU, the alpha particle drift velocity should exceed the proton bulk velocity, and then the gap which exists around the alpha particle gyrofrequency should disappear. It is also shown that for proton thermal anisotropies of the order of those observed in fast solar wind, the waves either grow or are not damped excessively, so that the waves can exist and might thus lead to the observed differential speeds. However, the way in which the alpha particles exceed the proton velocity remains unexplained.

  9. Measuring test mass acceleration noise in space-based gravitational wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    The basic constituent of interferometric gravitational wave detectors—the test-mass-to-test-mass interferometric link—behaves as a differential dynamometer measuring effective differential forces, comprising an integrated measure of gravity curvature, inertial effects, as well as nongravitational spurious forces. This last contribution is going to be characterized by the LISA Pathfinder mission, a technology precursor of future space-borne detectors like eLISA. Changing the perspective from displacement to acceleration can benefit the data analysis of LISA Pathfinder and future detectors. The response in differential acceleration to gravitational waves is derived for a space-based detector's interferometric link. The acceleration formalism can also be integrated into time delay interferometry by building up the unequal-arm Michelson differential acceleration combination. The differential acceleration is nominally insensitive to the system's free evolution dominating the slow displacement dynamics of low-frequency detectors. Working with acceleration also provides an effective way to subtract measured signals acting as systematics, including the actuation forces. Because of the strong similarity with the equations of motion, the optimal subtraction of systematic signals, known within some amplitude and time shift, with the focus on measuring the noise provides an effective way to solve the problem and marginalize over nuisance parameters. The F statistic, in widespread use throughout the gravitation waves community, is included in the method and suitably generalized to marginalize over linear parameters and noise at the same time. The method is applied to LPF simulator data and, thanks to its generality, can also be applied to the data reduction and analysis of future gravitational wave detectors.

  10. Challenges to self-acceleration in modified gravity from gravitational waves and large-scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombriser, Lucas, E-mail: llo@roe.ac.uk; Lima, Nelson A.

    2017-02-10

    With the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy marked by the aLIGO GW150914 and GW151226 observations, a measurement of the cosmological speed of gravity will likely soon be realised. We show that a confirmation of equality to the speed of light as indicated by indirect Galactic observations will have important consequences for a very large class of alternative explanations of the late-time accelerated expansion of our Universe. It will break the dark degeneracy of self-accelerated Horndeski scalar–tensor theories in the large-scale structure that currently limits a rigorous discrimination between acceleration from modified gravity and from a cosmological constant or dark energy. Signatures of a self-acceleration must then manifest in the linear, unscreened cosmological structure. We describe the minimal modification required for self-acceleration with standard gravitational-wave speed and show that its maximum likelihood yields a 3σ poorer fit to cosmological observations compared to a cosmological constant. Hence, equality between the speeds challenges the concept of cosmic acceleration from a genuine scalar–tensor modification of gravity.

  11. Challenges to self-acceleration in modified gravity from gravitational waves and large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombriser, Lucas; Lima, Nelson A.

    2017-02-01

    With the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy marked by the aLIGO GW150914 and GW151226 observations, a measurement of the cosmological speed of gravity will likely soon be realised. We show that a confirmation of equality to the speed of light as indicated by indirect Galactic observations will have important consequences for a very large class of alternative explanations of the late-time accelerated expansion of our Universe. It will break the dark degeneracy of self-accelerated Horndeski scalar-tensor theories in the large-scale structure that currently limits a rigorous discrimination between acceleration from modified gravity and from a cosmological constant or dark energy. Signatures of a self-acceleration must then manifest in the linear, unscreened cosmological structure. We describe the minimal modification required for self-acceleration with standard gravitational-wave speed and show that its maximum likelihood yields a 3σ poorer fit to cosmological observations compared to a cosmological constant. Hence, equality between the speeds challenges the concept of cosmic acceleration from a genuine scalar-tensor modification of gravity.

  12. Challenges to self-acceleration in modified gravity from gravitational waves and large-scale structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Lombriser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy marked by the aLIGO GW150914 and GW151226 observations, a measurement of the cosmological speed of gravity will likely soon be realised. We show that a confirmation of equality to the speed of light as indicated by indirect Galactic observations will have important consequences for a very large class of alternative explanations of the late-time accelerated expansion of our Universe. It will break the dark degeneracy of self-accelerated Horndeski scalar–tensor theories in the large-scale structure that currently limits a rigorous discrimination between acceleration from modified gravity and from a cosmological constant or dark energy. Signatures of a self-acceleration must then manifest in the linear, unscreened cosmological structure. We describe the minimal modification required for self-acceleration with standard gravitational-wave speed and show that its maximum likelihood yields a 3σ poorer fit to cosmological observations compared to a cosmological constant. Hence, equality between the speeds challenges the concept of cosmic acceleration from a genuine scalar–tensor modification of gravity.

  13. Laser-driven accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Several devices for using laser fields have been proposed and they can be classified in three broad categories - 'far-field' accelerators (such as the principle of inverse free electron lasers), 'media' accelerators (which, for example, use the inverse Cherenkov effect or laser-controlled plasma waves), and 'near-field' accelerators (using a loaded guiding structure such as cavities or gratings). These different approaches come from the fact that a particle cannot be accelerated by the absorption of single photons (because of momentum conservation) and thus some other element has to intervene. (orig./HSI).

  14. Amplitude variations of ELF radio waves in the Earth-ionosphere cavity with the day-night non-uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuk, Yu P.; Nickolaenko, A. P.; Hayakawa, M.

    2018-04-01

    The real structure of lower ionosphere should be taken into account when modeling the sub-ionospheric radio propagation in the extremely low frequency (ELF) band and studying the global electromagnetic (Schumann) resonance of the Earth-ionosphere cavity. In the present work we use the 2D (two dimensional) telegraph equations (2DTE) for evaluating the effect of the ionosphere day-night non-uniformity on the electromagnetic field amplitude at the Schumann resonance and higher frequencies. Properties of the cavity upper boundary were taken into account by the full wave solution technique for realistic vertical profiles of atmosphere conductivity in the ambient day and ambient night conditions. We solved the electromagnetic problem in a cavity with the day-night non-uniformity by using the 2DTE technique. Initially, the testing of the 2DTE solution was performed in the model of the sharp day-night interface. The further computations were carried out in the model of the smooth day-night transition. The major attention was directed to the effects at propagation paths "perpendicular" or "parallel" to the solar terminator line. Data were computed for a series of frequencies, the comparison of the results was made and interpretation was given to the observed effects.

  15. Investigation of ultra-high sensitivity Klystron cavity transducers for broadband resonant-mass gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, Guilherme Leite

    2008-01-01

    We show that, with a suitable choice of the parameters of the gravitational wave detector Mario Schoenberg, with technological accessible parameters (using state-of-art electronics), its sensitivity curve can be improved over the current project curve to become competitive with interferometric detectors in a frequency band of 1500 Hz, in the region from 1000 to 10000 Hz (these competitive bands are centered at the sphere's quadrupole modes). The sensitivity curve of an array of 100 identical spheres identical to the Schoenberg one is also analyzed, and is competitive against advanced LIGO in the entire band. A detailed study of the project's viability is conducted, with an emphasis on the project of the klystron resonant cavity, which will have a center post with a 1 nm gap, which represents a great technological challenge. This challenge is analyzed in terms of the cavity project as well as with a focus on the Casimir effect on the cavity. This could open an opportunity for precise measurements of this effect on a new distance scale compared to current measurements (in the μm scale). (author)

  16. Dynamics of the relativistic acceleration of charged particles in space plasma while surfing the package electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erokhin, N.S.; Zol'nikova, N.N.; Kuznetsov, E.A.; Mikhajlovskaya, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Based on numerical calculations considered the relativistic acceleration of charged particles in space plasma when surfing on the spatially localized package of electromagnetic waves. The problem is reduced to the study of unsteady, nonlinear equation for the wave phase at the carrier frequency at the location of the accelerated charge, which is solved numerically. We study the temporal dynamics of the relativistic factor, the component of momentum and velocity of the particle, its trajectory is given gyro-rotation in an external magnetic field after the departure of the effective potential well. Dependence of the dynamics of a particle interacting with the wave of the sign of the velocity of the charge along the wave front. We formulate the optimal conditions of the relativistic particle acceleration wave packet, indicate the possibility of again (after a number gyro-turnover) charge trapping wave with an additional relativistic acceleration.

  17. Coupled hydromagnetic wave excitation and ion acceleration upstream of the earth's bow shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent theory is presented for the excitation of hydromagnetic waves and the acceleration of diffuse ions upstream of the earth's bow shock in the quasi-equilibrium that results when the solar wind velocity and the interplanetary magnetic field are nearly parallel. For the waves the quasi-equilibrium results from a balance between excitation by the ions, which stream relative to the solar wind plasma, and convective loss to the magnetosheath. For the diffuse ions the quasi-equilibrium results from a balance between injection at the shock front, confinement to the foreshock by pitch angle scattering on the waves, acceleration by compression at the shock front, loss to the magnetosheath, loss due to escape upstream of the foreshock, and loss via diffusion perpendicular to the average magnetic field onto field lines that do not connect to the shock front. Diffusion equations describing the ion transport and wave kinetic equations describing the hydromagnetic wave transport are solved self-consistently to yield analytical expressions for the differential wave intensity spectrum as a function of frequency and distance from the bow shock z and for the ion omnidirectional distribution functions and anisotropies as functions of energy and z, In quantitative agreement with observations, the theory predicts (1) exponential spectra at the bow shock in energy per charge, (2) a decrease in intensity and hardening of the ion spectra with increasing z, (3) a 30-keV proton anisotropy parallel to z increasing from -0.28 at the bow shock to +0.51 as z→infinity (4) a linearly polarized wave intensity spectrum with a minimum at approx.6 x 10 -3 Hz and a maximum at approx.2--3 x 10 -2 Hz, (5) a decrease in the wave intensity spectrum with increasing z, (6) a total energy density in protons with energies >15 keV about eight times that in the hydromagnetic waves

  18. Cavity design programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous computer programs are available to help accelerator physicists and engineers model and design accelerator cavities and other microwave components. This article discusses the problems these programs solve and the principles upon which these programs are based. Some examples of how these programs are used in the design of accelerator cavities are also given

  19. Effective shunt impedance comparison between s-band standing wave accelerators with on-axis and off-axis couplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriber, S.O.; Funk, L.W.; Hutcheon, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    The effective shunt impedances of a side-coupled S-band standing wave accelerating structure and a structure employing on-axis couplers have been compared by measuring the energy of accelerated electrons. Criteria for choosing an on-axis coupled structure compared to side-coupled and ''disk and washer'' accelerating structures are given. (author)

  20. The heating and acceleration actions of the solar plasma wave by QFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    solar plasma will left-right separate by Lorentz force and by the feedback mechanism of Lorentz force the positive - negative charge will left-right vibrate. The plasma on the move will accompany with up-down and left-right vibrating and become the wave. Though the frequent of the plasma wave is not high, but its heating and acceleration actions will be not less then that of the microwave and laser because of its mass and energy far large then that of the microwave and laser.

  1. Cosmic ray acceleration by shock waves in a diffusion medium. Research of high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.O.

    1982-06-01

    The problem of galactic cosmic-ray acceleration is presented with the study of a new acceleration mechanism by supernova shock waves in a diffusive medium. The question is: do supernova shocks have enough time to accelerate cosmic rays beyond 10 4 -10 5 GeV. A firm upper limit to the energy that can be acquired by particles is established and it is considered that the mean free path of the particle has its lowest possible value and the most favorable model of supernova evolution. The diffusion coefficients which are relevant for the determination of the high energy cut off are investigated. The effect of the spatial dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the rate of acceleration of particles is examined. A more realistic cut off energy is calculated. We find E max = 2 10 4 GeV [fr

  2. Enhancement of sensitivity and bandwidth of gravitational wave detectors using fast-light-based white light cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salit, M; Shahriar, M S

    2010-01-01

    The effect of gravitational waves (GWs) has been observed indirectly, by monitoring the change in the orbital frequency of neutron stars in a binary system as they lose energy via gravitational radiation. However, GWs have not yet been observed directly. The initial LIGO apparatus has not yet observed GWs. The advanced LIGO (AdLIGO) will use a combination of improved techniques in order to increase the sensitivity. Along with power recycling and a higher power laser source, the AdLIGO will employ signal recycling (SR). While SR would increase sensitivity, it would also reduce the bandwidth significantly. Previously, we and others have investigated, theoretically and experimentally, the feasibility of using a fast-light-based white light cavity (WLC) to circumvent this constraint. However, in the previous work, it was not clear how one would incorporate the white light cavity effect. Here, we first develop a general model for Michelson-interferometer-based GW detectors that can be easily adapted to include the effects of incorporating a WLC into the design. We then describe a concrete design of a WLC constructed as a compound mirror, to replace the signal recycling mirror. This design is simple, robust, completely non-invasive, and can be added to the AdLIGO system without changing any other optical elements. We show a choice of parameters for which the signal sensitivity as well as the bandwidth are enhanced significantly over what is planned for the AdLIGO, covering the entire spectrum of interest for gravitational waves

  3. Acousto-optical interaction of surface acoustic and optical waves in a two-dimensional phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian-Xue; Zou, Kui; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Su, Xiao-Xing

    2014-11-17

    Phoxonic crystal is a promising material for manipulating sound and light simultaneously. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate the propagation of acoustic and optical waves along the truncated surface of a two-dimensional square-latticed phoxonic crystal. Further, a phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity is proposed, which can simultaneously confine surface acoustic and optical waves. The interface motion and photoelastic effects are taken into account in the acousto-optical coupling. The results show obvious shifts in eigenfrequencies of the photonic cavity modes induced by different phononic cavity modes. The symmetry of the phononic cavity modes plays a more important role in the single-phonon exchange process than in the case of the multi-phonon exchange. Under the same deformation, the frequency shift of the photonic transverse electric mode is larger than that of the transverse magnetic mode.

  4. Heating and Acceleration of Solar Wind Ions by Turbulent Wave Spectrum in Inhomogeneous Expanding Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Ozak, Nataly; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2016-01-01

    Near the Sun (plasma. The heating and the acceleration of the solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous plasma is studied using a 2.5D hybrid model. The hybrid model describes the kinetics of the ions, while the electrons are modeled as massless neutralizing fluid in an expanding box approach. Turbulent magnetic fluctuations dominated by power-law frequency spectra, which are evident from in-situ as well as remote sensing measurements, are used in our models. The effects of background density inhomogeneity across the magnetic field on the resonant ion heating are studied. The effect of super- Alfvenic ion drift on the ion heating is investigated. It is found that the turbulent wave spectrum of initially parallel propagating waves cascades to oblique modes, and leads to enhanced resonant ion heating due to the inhomogeneity. The acceleration of the solar wind ions is achieved by the parametric instability of large amplitude waves in the spectrum, and is also affected by the inhomogeneity. The results of the study provide the ion temperature anisotropy and drift velocity temporal evolution due to relaxation of the instability. The non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of the ions are modeled in the inhomogeneous solar wind plasma in the acceleration region close to the Sun.

  5. Auroral particle acceleration by Alfvén waves and ionospheric feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, R. L.; Song, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Recent observations, particularly by Polar and FAST, have indicated that Alfvén waves can directly accelerate auroral electrons. A model for this interaction has been developed that can describe the linear modification of the Alfvén wave profile by the kinetic effects of electrons, including acceleration and heating of the electron population. While many of the heated electrons are accelerated upward into the magnetosphere by the mirror force, a significant fraction of the input Poynting flux due to Alfvén waves can be converted into precipitating electron energy flux. An important aspect of this particle precipitation is that the hot electrons do not arrive at the ionosphere in phase with the field-aligned current, which at ionospheric altitudes is largely carried by cold electrons. This phase shift has direct implications for models of ionospheric feedback that usually assume that the precipitating flux is in phase with the field-aligned current. The effects of quasi-static electric fields can be included in the model, which will introduce new particle populations such as the effects of secondary electrons of ionospheric origin that are reflected by the parallel potential drop. The possible role of Alfvén waves trapped in the ionospheric resonator in creating small-scale auroral structures through feedback and nonlinear interactions will be discussed.

  6. Travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing breaks the limits of cavity-enhanced all-optical wavelength conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morichetti, Francesco; Canciamilla, Antonio; Ferrari, Carlo; Samarelli, Antonio; Sorel, Marc; Melloni, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Wave mixing inside optical resonators, while experiencing a large enhancement of the nonlinear interaction efficiency, suffers from strong bandwidth constraints, preventing its practical exploitation for processing broad-band signals. Here we show that such limits are overcome by the new concept of travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing (FWM). This approach combines the efficiency enhancement provided by resonant propagation with a wide-band conversion process. Compared with conventional FWM in bare waveguides, it exhibits higher robustness against chromatic dispersion and propagation loss, while preserving transparency to modulation formats. Travelling-wave resonant FWM has been demonstrated in silicon-coupled ring resonators and was exploited to realize a 630-μm-long wavelength converter operating over a wavelength range wider than 60 nm and with 28-dB gain with respect to a bare waveguide of the same physical length. Full compatibility of the travelling-wave resonant FWM with optical signal processing applications has been demonstrated through signal retiming and reshaping at 10 Gb s(-1).

  7. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Pei [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M.; Shinton, Ian R. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Flisgen, Thomas; Glock, Hans-Walter [Institut fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using higher order mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band, and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR), and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  8. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Shinton, I R R; Flisgen, T; Glock, H W

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using Higher Order Mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR) and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  9. Spectral-element Seismic Wave Propagation on CUDA/OpenCL Hardware Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, D. B.; Videau, B.; Pouget, K.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wave propagation codes are essential tools to investigate a variety of wave phenomena in the Earth. Furthermore, they can now be used for seismic full-waveform inversions in regional- and global-scale adjoint tomography. Although these seismic wave propagation solvers are crucial ingredients to improve the resolution of tomographic images to answer important questions about the nature of Earth's internal processes and subsurface structure, their practical application is often limited due to high computational costs. They thus need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities to improving the current state of knowledge. At present, numerous large HPC systems embed many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) to enhance numerical performance. Such hardware accelerators can be programmed using either the CUDA programming environment or the OpenCL language standard. CUDA software development targets NVIDIA graphic cards while OpenCL was adopted by additional hardware accelerators, like e.g. AMD graphic cards, ARM-based processors as well as Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. For seismic wave propagation simulations using the open-source spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE, we incorporated an automatic source-to-source code generation tool (BOAST) which allows us to use meta-programming of all computational kernels for forward and adjoint runs. Using our BOAST kernels, we generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages within the source code package. Thus, seismic wave simulations are able now to fully utilize CUDA and OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show benchmarks of forward seismic wave propagation simulations using SPECFEM3D_GLOBE on CUDA/OpenCL GPUs, validating results and comparing performances for different simulations and hardware usages.

  10. On the Detectability of Acoustic Waves Induced Following Irradiation by a Radiotherapy Linear Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickling, Susannah; Leger, Pierre; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-02-11

    Irradiating an object with a megavoltage photon beam generated by a clinical radiotherapy linear accelerator (linac) induces acoustic waves through the photoacoustic effect. The detection and characterization of such acoustic waves has potential applications in radiation therapy dosimetry. The purpose of this work was to gain insight into the properties of such acoustic waves by simulating and experimentally detecting them in a well-defined system consisting of a metal block suspended in a water tank. A novel simulation workflow was developed by combining radiotherapy Monte Carlo and acoustic wave transport simulation techniques. Different set-up parameters such as photon beam energy, metal block depth, metal block width, and metal block material were varied, and the simulated and experimental acoustic waveforms showed the same relative amplitude trends and frequency variations for such setup changes. The simulation platform developed in this work can easily be extended to other irradiation situations, and will be an invaluable tool for developing a radiotherapy dosimetry system based on the detection of the acoustic waves induced following linear accelerator irradiation.

  11. SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC ISLANDS IN THE SOLAR WIND AND THEIR ROLE IN PARTICLE ACCELERATION. II. PARTICLE ENERGIZATION INSIDE MAGNETICALLY CONFINED CAVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.; Malandraki, Olga E.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the role of heliospheric magnetic field configurations and conditions that favor the generation and confinement of small-scale magnetic islands associated with atypical energetic particle events (AEPEs) in the solar wind. Some AEPEs do not align with standard particle acceleration mechanisms, such as flare-related or simple diffusive shock acceleration processes related to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs). As we have shown recently, energetic particle flux enhancements may well originate locally and can be explained by particle acceleration in regions filled with small-scale magnetic islands with a typical width of ∼0.01 au or less, which is often observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The particle energization is a consequence of magnetic reconnection-related processes in islands experiencing either merging or contraction, observed, for example, in HCS ripples. Here we provide more observations that support the idea and the theory of particle energization produced by small-scale-flux-rope dynamics (Zank et al. and Le Roux et al.). If the particles are pre-accelerated to keV energies via classical mechanisms, they may be additionally accelerated up to 1–1.5 MeV inside magnetically confined cavities of various origins. The magnetic cavities, formed by current sheets, may occur at the interface of different streams such as CIRs and ICMEs or ICMEs and coronal hole flows. They may also form during the HCS interaction with interplanetary shocks (ISs) or CIRs/ICMEs. Particle acceleration inside magnetic cavities may explain puzzling AEPEs occurring far beyond ISs, within ICMEs, before approaching CIRs as well as between CIRs.

  12. The design and performance of a water cooling system for a prototype coupled cavity linear particle accelerator for the spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardin, John D.; Ammerman, Curtt N.; Hopkins, Steve M.

    2002-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a facility being designed for scientific and industrial research and development. The SNS will generate and employ neutrons as a research tool in a variety of disciplines including biology, material science, superconductivity, chemistry, etc. The neutrons will be produced by bombarding a heavy metal target with a high-energy beam of protons, generated and accelerated with a linear particle accelerator, or linac. The low energy end of the linac consists of, in part, a multi-cell copper structure termed a coupled cavity linac (CCL). The CCL is responsible for accelerating the protons from an energy of 87 MeV, to 185 MeV. Acceleration of the charged protons is achieved by the use of large electrical field gradients established within specially designed contoured cavities of the CCL. While a large amount of the electrical energy is used to accelerate the protons, approximately 60-80% of this electrical energy is dissipated in the CCL's copper structure. To maintain an acceptable operating temperature, as well as minimize thermal stresses and maintain desired contours of the accelerator cavities, the electrical waste heat must be removed from the CCL structure. This is done using specially designed water cooling passages within the linac's copper structure. Cooling water is supplied to these cooling passages by a complex water cooling and temperature control system. This paper discusses the design, analysis, and testing of a water cooling system for a prototype CCL. First, the design concept and method of water temperature control is discussed. Second, the layout of the prototype water cooling system, including the selection of plumbing components, instrumentation, as well as controller hardware and software is presented. Next, the development of a numerical network model used to size the pump, heat exchanger, and plumbing equipment, is discussed. Finally, empirical pressure, flow rate, and temperature data from the prototype CCL

  13. Contribution to the study of standing wave bi-periodical accelerating structures for electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, Celso

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results on bi-periodic standing wave accelerating structures are presented. These structures which are characterized by a high effective shunt impedance, are designed for standing wave, high duty cycle electron accelerators. Two types of structures are studied: the on-axis coupled structure and the coaxial coupled structure. The expressions for the dispersion relation, coupling coefficients, phase and group velocity are derived from a coupled resonator model. An experimental method to eliminate the stop-band is put forward. The influence of the coupling slots on the dispersion curves is studied experimentally. The effective shunt impedance and the transit time factor are measured by the field perturbation techniques. Measured parameters are compared with SUPERFISH theoretical calculations. The field perturbation technique is also applied to measure the transverse shunt impedance of the dipole modes which are responsible for the beam breakup phenomenon. (author) [fr

  14. Forward and adjoint spectral-element simulations of seismic wave propagation using hardware accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Daniel; Videau, Brice; Pouget, Kevin; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    Improving the resolution of tomographic images is crucial to answer important questions on the nature of Earth's subsurface structure and internal processes. Seismic tomography is the most prominent approach where seismic signals from ground-motion records are used to infer physical properties of internal structures such as compressional- and shear-wave speeds, anisotropy and attenuation. Recent advances in regional- and global-scale seismic inversions move towards full-waveform inversions which require accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3D media, providing access to the full 3D seismic wavefields. However, these numerical simulations are computationally very expensive and need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities for further improving the current state of knowledge. During recent years, many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) have been added to available large HPC systems. Such GPU-accelerated computing together with advances in multi-core central processing units (CPUs) can greatly accelerate scientific applications. There are mainly two possible choices of language support for GPU cards, the CUDA programming environment and OpenCL language standard. CUDA software development targets NVIDIA graphic cards while OpenCL was adopted mainly by AMD graphic cards. In order to employ such hardware accelerators for seismic wave propagation simulations, we incorporated a code generation tool BOAST into an existing spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. This allows us to use meta-programming of computational kernels and generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages, running simulations on either CUDA or OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show here applications of forward and adjoint seismic wave propagation on CUDA/OpenCL GPUs, validating results and comparing performances for different simulations and hardware usages.

  15. High power millimeter-wave free electron laser based on recirculating electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Sun-Kook; Jeong, Young-Uk; Cho, Sung-Oh; Lee, Jongmin

    1995-01-01

    Progress in the development of a high power, millimeter-wave free electron laser driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator is reported. The energy and the current of electron beam are 430 keV and 2 A, respectively. The expected average output power is above 10 kW at the wavelength of 3-10 mm. Minimizing of the beam loss is a key issue for CW operation of the FEL with high efficiency. (author)

  16. Proof-of-principle experiment of the vacuum beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.

    1997-01-01

    The vacuum beat wave accelerator (VBWA) is discussed and design parameters for proof-of-principle experiment are presented. The VBWA utilizes two focused laser beams of differing wavelengths to generate a beat wave that can impart a net acceleration to charged particles. Theory and simulations show that the single-stage energy gain of the VBWA is limited by diffraction of the laser beams, particle slippage in phase and velocity, and radial walk-off. In the simulations the particles are synchronous with the beat wave for a short interval of time and the energy gain has the nature of an impulse delivered near the focal region. Simulations also show that the problem of radial walk-off may be ameliorated by using a converging beam of particles. For terawatt-level laser beams, with wavelengths 1 μm and 0.5 μm, and a 4.5 MeV finite-emittance electron beam the energy can be increased to ∼12.5MeV in a non-synchronous interaction over a distance of under 4 mm, with a peak acceleration gradient >15GeV/m and an estimated trapping fraction of -1%. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. Experimental Insights into the Mechanisms of Particle Acceleration by Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    The generation of shock waves is common during explosive volcanic eruptions. Particles acceleration following shock wave propagation has been experimentally observed suggesting the potential hazard related to this phenomenon. Experiments and numerical models focused on the dynamics of formation and propagation of different types of shock waves when overpressurized eruptive mixtures are suddenly released in the atmosphere, using a pseudo-gas approximation to model those mixtures. Nevertheless, the results of several studies indicated that the mechanism of coupling between a gas and solid particles is valid for a limited grain-size range, which at present is not well defined. We are investigating particle acceleration mechanisms using a vertical shock tube consisting of a high-pressure steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in diameter), pressurized with argon, and a low-pressure 140 mm long acrylic glass autoclave, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Shock waves are generated by Ar decompression at atmospheric pressures at Pres/Pamb 100:1 to 150:1, through the failure of a diaphragm. Experiments were performed either with empty autoclave or suspending solid analogue particles 150 μm in size inside the LP autoclave. Incident Mach number varied from 1.7 to 2.1. Absolute and relative pressure sensors monitored P histories during the entire process, and a high-speed camera recorded particles movement at 20,000 to 30,000 fps. Preliminary results indicate pressure multiplication at the contact between shock waves and the particles in a time lapse of 100s μs, suggesting a possible different mechanism with respect to gas-particle coupling for particle acceleration.

  18. Study of the scheme of two-beam accelerator driver with accompanying electromagnetic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elzhov, A.V.; Kaminskij, A.K.; Kazacha, V.I.; Perel'shtejn, E.A.; Sedykh, S.N.; Sergeev, A.P.

    2000-01-01

    A novel scheme of two-beam accelerator (TBA) driver based on a linear induction accelerator is considered. In this scheme the bunched beam propagates in the accompanying enhanced microwave that provides the steady longitudinal beam bunching along the whole driver. A travelling wave tube (TWT) is used as the wave-slowing periodic structure. Major merits of the driver scheme in hand are the possibilities of providing the microwave phase and amplitude stability and the preliminary beam bunching at a rather low initial energy (∼ 1 MeV). The numerical simulation has shown that a steady state could be found when electron bunches accompanied by an amplified microwave are simultaneously accelerated in the external electric field. The total power, which is inserted into the beam by the accelerating field, transforms into the microwave power in the steady state. The first set of experiments was fulfilled with the buncher on the base of the JINR LIU-3000 linac (electron beam energy ∼ 600 keV, electron current ∼ 150 A). The considerable level of the amplified microwave power (∼ 5 MW) and high enough bunching parameter (∼ 0.4) were obtained. The electron beam bunching at the frequency of 36.4 GHz was registered by means of the Cherenkov radiation of the electron bunches that occurred at their passing through the special target. The beam keeps a high bunching level at the distance ∼ 10 cm from the TWT exit being accompanied by the amplified microwave

  19. Slow waves in microchannel metal waveguides and application to particle acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Steinhauer

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Conventional metal-wall waveguides support waveguide modes with phase velocities exceeding the speed of light. However, for infrared frequencies and guide dimensions of a fraction of a millimeter, one of the waveguide modes can have a phase velocity equal to or less than the speed of light. Such a metal microchannel then acts as a slow-wave structure. Furthermore, if it is a transverse magnetic mode, the electric field has a component along the direction of propagation. Therefore, a strong exchange of energy can occur between a beam of charged particles and this slow-waveguide mode. Moreover, the energy exchange can be sustained over a distance limited only by the natural damping of the wave. This makes the microchannel metal waveguide an attractive possibility for high-gradient electron laser acceleration because the wave can be directly energized by a long-wavelength laser. Indeed the frequency of CO_{2} lasers lies at a fortuitous wavelength that produces a strong laser-particle interaction in a channel of reasonable macroscopic size (e.g., ∼0.6  mm. The dispersion properties including phase velocity and damping for the slow wave are developed. The performance and other issues related to laser accelerator applications are discussed.

  20. Slow waves in microchannel metal waveguides and application to particle acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2003-06-01

    Conventional metal-wall waveguides support waveguide modes with phase velocities exceeding the speed of light. However, for infrared frequencies and guide dimensions of a fraction of a millimeter, one of the waveguide modes can have a phase velocity equal to or less than the speed of light. Such a metal microchannel then acts as a slow-wave structure. Furthermore, if it is a transverse magnetic mode, the electric field has a component along the direction of propagation. Therefore, a strong exchange of energy can occur between a beam of charged particles and this slow-waveguide mode. Moreover, the energy exchange can be sustained over a distance limited only by the natural damping of the wave. This makes the microchannel metal waveguide an attractive possibility for high-gradient electron laser acceleration because the wave can be directly energized by a long-wavelength laser. Indeed the frequency of CO2 lasers lies at a fortuitous wavelength that produces a strong laser-particle interaction in a channel of reasonable macroscopic size (e.g., ˜0.6 mm). The dispersion properties including phase velocity and damping for the slow wave are developed. The performance and other issues related to laser accelerator applications are discussed.

  1. The elimination of pump depletion in laser-plasma beat-wave accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jinxiu; Xu Zhizhan

    1988-01-01

    The pump depletion is a severe problem which hinders the laser-plasma beat-wave accelerator concept from being practical. Starting with the weak relativistic equation of beat-wave excitation of electron plasma waves, the authors have derived the condition for eliminating the pump depletion in the fame moving with the light pulse for arbitrary pulse shapes. It is shown that the depletion can be eliminated by a phase jump of π at the center of the pump pulse and by the appropriated choice of initial plasma density detuning. The numerical calculation have yielded the dependence of the initial detuning on the pump intensity for square pump pulses, and have supported the methods used in this paper

  2. Particle-in-cell analysis of beam-wave interaction in gyrotron cavity with tapered magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A., E-mail: anil.gyrotron@gmail.com [Gyrotron Lab., Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Inst. (CEERI, CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan (India); Banasthali Univ., Dept. of Physics, Banasthali, Rajasthan (India); Khatun, H.; Kumar, N.; Singh, U.; Sinha, A.K. [Gyrotron Lab., Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Inst. (CEERI, CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan (India); Vyas, V. [Banasthali Univ., Dept. of Physics, Banasthali, Rajasthan (India)

    2010-11-15

    A commercially available electromagnetic simulator -- MAGIC, a particle-in-cell (PIC) code -- has been used to carry out a comparative study of the beam-wave interaction under uniform and tapered magnetic field profiles of a 42 GHz, 200kW gyrotron. The magnetic field profile across the resonant cavity varies by ±6.5% with a peak value of 1.615 T. The MAGIC simulation shows the desire performance of the gyrotron under both magnetic field conditions with an operating mode TE{sub 03} and a pitch factor of 1.26. The analysis of the simulated results show that stability in the power growth was reached more quickly and achieved higher output power in the case of a tapered magnetic field. (author)

  3. Observation of the fundamental Nyquist noise limit in an ultra-high Q-factor cryogenic bulk acoustic wave cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goryachev, Maxim, E-mail: maxim.goryachev@uwa.edu.au; Ivanov, Eugene N.; Tobar, Michael E. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Kann, Frank van [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Galliou, Serge [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST Institute, ENSMM, 26 Chemin de l' Épitaphe, 25000 Besançon (France)

    2014-10-13

    Thermal Nyquist noise fluctuations of high-Q bulk acoustic wave cavities have been observed at cryogenic temperatures with a DC superconducting quantum interference device amplifier. High Q modes with bandwidths of few tens of milliHz produce thermal fluctuations with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 23 dB. The estimated effective temperature from the Nyquist noise is in good agreement with the physical temperature of the device, confirming the validity of the equivalent circuit model and the non-existence of any excess resonator self-noise. The measurements also confirm that the quality factor remains extremely high (Q > 10{sup 8} at low order overtones) for very weak (thermal) system motion at low temperatures, when compared to values measured with relatively strong external excitation. This result represents an enabling step towards operating such a high-Q acoustic device at the standard quantum limit.

  4. Electron acceleration during the decay of nonlinear Whistler waves in low-beta electron-ion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Saito, Shinji; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic electron acceleration through dissipation of a nonlinear, short-wavelength, and monochromatic electromagnetic whistler wave in low-beta plasma is investigated by utilizing a one-dimensional fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The nonlinear (large-amplitude) parent whistler wave decays through the parametric instability which enhances electrostatic ion acoustic waves and electromagnetic whistler waves. These waves satisfy the condition of three-wave coupling. Through the decay instability, the energy of electron bulk velocity supporting the parent wave is converted to the thermal energy perpendicular to the background magnetic field. Increase of the perpendicular temperature triggers the electron temperature anisotropy instability which generates broadband whistler waves and heats electrons in the parallel direction. The broadband whistler waves are inverse-cascaded during the relaxation of the electron temperature anisotropy. In lower-beta conditions, electrons with a pitch angle of about 90° are successively accelerated by inverse-cascaded whistler waves, and selected electrons are accelerated to over a Lorentz factor of 10. The result implies that the nonlinear dissipation of a finite-amplitude and short-wavelength whistler wave plays an important role in producing relativistic nonthermal electrons over a few MeV especially at lower beta plasmas.

  5. Excitation of accelerating plasma waves by counter-propagating laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvets, Gennady; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Pukhov, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The conventional approach to exciting high phase velocity waves in plasmas is to employ a laser pulse moving in the direction of the desired particle acceleration. Photon downshifting then causes momentum transfer to the plasma and wave excitation. Novel approaches to plasma wake excitation, colliding-beam accelerator (CBA), which involve photon exchange between the long and short counter-propagating laser beams, are described. Depending on the frequency detuning Δω between beams and duration τ L of the short pulse, there are two approaches to CBA. First approach assumes (τ L ≅2/ω p ). Photons exchanged between the beams deposit their recoil momentum in the plasma driving the plasma wake. Frequency detuning between the beams determines the direction of the photon exchange, thereby controlling the phase of the plasma wake. This phase control can be used for reversing the slippage of the accelerated particles with respect to the wake. A variation on the same theme, super-beatwave accelerator, is also described. In the second approach, a short pulse with τ L >>ω p -1 detuned by Δω∼2ω p from the counter-propagating beam is employed. While parametric excitation of plasma waves by the electromagnetic beatwave at 2ω p of two co-propagating lasers was first predicted by Rosenbluth and Liu [M. N. Rosenbluth and C. S. Liu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 701 (1972)], it is demonstrated that the two excitation beams can be counter-propagating. The advantages of using this geometry (higher instability growth rate, insensitivity to plasma inhomogeneity) are explained, and supporting numerical simulations presented

  6. Pressure and intracorporal acceleration measurements in pigs exposed to strong shock waves in a free field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassout, P.; Franke, R.; Parmentier, G.; Evrard, G.; Dancer, A.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical study on the propagation of a pressure wave in a diphasic medium, when compared to the onset mechanism of pulmonary lesions in subjects exposed to strong shock waves, shows an increase in the incident overpressure at the interface level. Using hydrophones, intracorporal pressure was measured in pigs. The authors recorded the costal wall acceleration on the side directly exposed to the shock wave and calculated the displacement of the costal wall after a shock wave passed by. These experiments were conducted for shock waves in a free field, at an overpressure peak level ranging from 26 kFPa to 380 kPa and for a first positive phase lasting 2 ms. Sensors placed in an intracorporal position detected no increase of the overpressure level for any value of the incident pressure. A comparison of the costal wall displacement, measured experimentally, relative to the theoretical displacement of the entire animal mass indicates that the largest relative displacement of the costal wall could be the origin of the pulmonary lesions found. 5 refs., 13 figs

  7. An efficient hexagonal switched beam antenna structure based on Fabry-Perot cavity leaky-wave antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymen El Cafsi, Mohamed; Nedil, Mourad; Osman, Lotfi; Gharsallah, Ali

    2015-11-01

    A novel design of switched beam antenna (SBA) system based on Fabry-Perot cavity leaky-wave antenna (FPC LWA) is designed and fabricated for base station operating in the unlicensed ISM central frequency band at 5.8 GHz of the wireless local area network (WLAN) standard. The proposed SBA is designed with hexagonal shape of FPC LWA Arrays in order to get 360° of coverage. The single element of FPC LWA array is composed of a patch antenna and covered by a Partially Reflective Surface (PRS), which is composed of a Metal Strip Grating and printed on a high permittivity Superstrate. First, the Transmission Line Model of FPC LWA is introduced to analyse and calculate the far-field components in E- and H planes by using the Transverse Equivalent Network. This approach is then compared with other full wave's commercial software such as Ansoft HFSS and CST Microwave Studio. Second, a parametric study is performed to evaluate the effect of the angle formed by the two successive FPC LWA on the radiation efficiency of the activate sector. To examine the performance of the proposed SBA, experimental prototype was fabricated and measured. As a result, multiple orthogonal beams (six beams) of 10 dBi of gain with low Side Lobes Level and 360° of coverage are produced. This SBA structure is suitable for WLAN communication systems.

  8. Evolving Waves and Turbulence in the Outer Corona and Inner Heliosphere: The Accelerating Expanding Box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenerani, Anna; Velli, Marco [EPSS, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Alfvénic fluctuations in the solar wind display many properties reflecting an ongoing nonlinear cascade, e.g., a well-defined spectrum in frequency, together with some characteristics more commonly associated with the linear propagation of waves from the Sun, such as the variation of fluctuation amplitude with distance, dominated by solar wind expansion effects. Therefore, both nonlinearities and expansion must be included simultaneously in any successful model of solar wind turbulence evolution. Because of the disparate spatial scales involved, direct numerical simulations of turbulence in the solar wind represent an arduous task, especially if one wants to go beyond the incompressible approximation. Indeed, most simulations neglect solar wind expansion effects entirely. Here we develop a numerical model to simulate turbulent fluctuations from the outer corona to 1 au and beyond, including the sub-Alfvénic corona. The accelerating expanding box (AEB) extends the validity of previous expanding box models by taking into account both the acceleration of the solar wind and the inhomogeneity of background density and magnetic field. Our method incorporates a background accelerating wind within a magnetic field that naturally follows the Parker spiral evolution using a two-scale analysis in which the macroscopic spatial effect coupling fluctuations with background gradients becomes a time-dependent coupling term in a homogeneous box. In this paper we describe the AEB model in detail and discuss its main properties, illustrating its validity by studying Alfvén wave propagation across the Alfvén critical point.

  9. Physics and chemistry of niobium materials in the context of superconducting RF cavity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.B.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities excel over the normal conducting RF cavities in the long pulse or continuous wave high energy particle accelerations, and niobium (Nb) is currently the material of choice for fabrication of such SCRF cavities. However the accelerating gradients attained in the Nb SCRF cavities deployed in various high energy particle accelerators are significantly below the theoretical limit predicted by the superconducting properties of Nb. Thus it is very important to understand the physics and chemistry of Nb materials in some details so as to maximize the SCRF cavity performance. This abstract will discuss some issues which help in the development of high gradient and energy efficient Nb SCRF cavities in a cost effective manner. (author)

  10. JDiffraction: A GPGPU-accelerated JAVA library for numerical propagation of scalar wave fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedrahita-Quintero, Pablo; Trujillo, Carlos; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2017-05-01

    JDiffraction, a GPGPU-accelerated JAVA library for numerical propagation of scalar wave fields, is presented. Angular spectrum, Fresnel transform, and Fresnel-Bluestein transform are the numerical algorithms implemented in the methods and functions of the library to compute the scalar propagation of the complex wavefield. The functionality of the library is tested with the modeling of easy to forecast numerical experiments and also with the numerical reconstruction of a digitally recorded hologram. The performance of JDiffraction is contrasted with a library written for C++, showing great competitiveness in the apparently less complex environment of JAVA language. JDiffraction also includes JAVA easy-to-use methods and functions that take advantage of the computation power of the graphic processing units to accelerate the processing times of 2048×2048 pixel images up to 74 frames per second.

  11. Realisation of a linear electron accelerator. Application to the production of millimetre wavelength waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combe, Rene

    1956-01-01

    In the first part of this research thesis, the author reports the development of a linear electron accelerator with a presentation of charged waveguides which are their main components. He also proposes a recall of the charged waveguide theory, an overview of some experimental guides, a description of the calculation method, and reports the actual realisation of the accelerator waveguide. The apparatus is precisely described, and results obtained during tests are presented. The second part of the thesis addresses the study of millimetre wavelength waves. It reports the study of the electron movement in a sinusoidal inverter, and in a helical inverter (a solenoid in which the electron has a helical trajectory). Then, the author proposes a detailed presentation of electron radiation theory: fundamental wavelength, total radiated power, angular and spectral distribution of radiation. The author finally reports a comparison between radiations obtained with different devices [fr

  12. Enhancement of acousto-optical coupling in two-dimensional air-slot phoxonic crystal cavities by utilizing surface acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Tian-Xue [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang, Yue-Sheng, E-mail: yswang@bjtu.edu.cn [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhang, Chuanzeng [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2017-01-30

    A phoxonic crystal is a periodically patterned material that can simultaneously localize optical and acoustic modes. The acousto-optical coupling in two-dimensional air-slot phoxonic crystal cavities is investigated numerically. The photons can be well confined in the slot owing to the large electric field discontinuity at the air/dielectric interfaces. Besides, the surface acoustic modes lead to the localization of the phonons near the air-slot. The high overlap of the photonic and phononic cavity modes near the slot results in a significant enhancement of the moving interface effect, and thus strengthens the total acousto-optical interaction. The results of two cavities with different slot widths show that the coupling strength is dependent on the slot width. It is expected to achieve a strong acousto-optical/optomechanical coupling in air-slot phoxonic crystal structures by utilizing surface acoustic modes. - Highlights: • Two-dimensional air-slot phoxonic crystal cavities which can confine simultaneously optical and acoustic waves are proposed. • The acoustic and optical waves are highly confined near/in the air-slot. • The high overlap of the photonic and phononic cavity modes significantly enhances the moving interface effect. • Different factors which affect the acousto-optical coupling are discussed.

  13. Beam characterization of a new continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, A., E-mail: aperry4@hawk.iit.edu [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Dickerson, C.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Zinkann, G. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    A new Continuous Wave (CW) Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) for the ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System) Intensity Upgrade was developed, built and tested at Argonne National Laboratory. We present here a characterization of the RFQ output beam in the longitudinal phase space, as well as a measurement of the transverse beam halo. Measurement results are compared to simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK. -- Highlights: • Beam commissioning of a new CW RFQ has been performed at Argonne National Laboratory. • Energy spread and bunch shape measurements were conducted. • The formation of a beam halo in the transverse phase space was studied.

  14. Physical interpretation of Monte Carlo wave-function and stochastic Schroedinger equation methods for cavity quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kist, Tarso B.L.; Orszag, M.; Davidovich, L.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of open system is frequently modeled in terms of a small system S coupled to a reservoir R, the last having an infinitely larger number of degree of freedom than S. Usually the dynamics of the S variables may be of interest, which can be studied using either Langevin equations, or master equations, or yet the path integral formulation. Useful alternatives for the master equation method are the Monte Carlo Wave-function method (MCWF), and Stochastic Schroedinger Equations (SSE's). The methods MCWF and SSE's recently experienced a fast development both in their theoretical background and applications to the study of the dissipative quantum systems dynamics in quantum optics. Even though these alternatives can be shown to be formally equivalent to the master equation approach, they are often regarded as mathematical tricks, with no relation to a concrete physical evolution of the system. The advantage of using them is that one has to deal with state vectors, instead of density matrices, thus reducing the total amount of matrix elements to be calculated. In this work, we consider the possibility of giving a physical interpretation to these methods, in terms of continuous measurements made on the evolving system. We show that physical realizations of the two methods are indeed possible, for a mode of the electromagnetic field in a cavity interacting with a continuum of modes corresponding to the field outside the cavity. Two schemes are proposed, consisting of a mode of the electromagnetic field interacting with a beam of Rydberg two-level atoms. In these schemes, the field mode plays the role of a small system and the atomic beam plays the role of a reservoir (infinitely larger number of degrees of freedom at finite temperature, the interaction between them being given by the Jaynes-Cummings model

  15. Plasma accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, R.; Angelis, U. de; Johnston, T.W.

    1991-01-01

    Recently attention has focused on charged particle acceleration in a plasma by a fast, large amplitude, longitudinal electron plasma wave. The plasma beat wave and plasma wakefield accelerators are two efficient ways of producing ultra-high accelerating gradients. Starting with the plasma beat wave accelerator (PBWA) and laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) schemes and the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) steady progress has been made in theory, simulations and experiments. Computations are presented for the study of LWFA. (author)

  16. Generation of ultra-high-pressure shocks by collision of a fast plasma projectile driven in the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration scheme with a solid target

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.; Krouský, Eduard; Kucharik, M.; Liska, R.; Ullschmied, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2015), s. 1-11, č. článku 032709. ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089; GA MŠk LM2010014 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * ultra-high-pressure shocks * laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.207, year: 2015

  17. Theoretical and experimental investigation of the electromagnetic adjustment of a quadrupolar radio-frequency cavity accelerating an intense ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoens, Francois

    2002-01-01

    The first part of this research thesis describes radio-frequency quadrupolar (RFQ) cavities in terms of electrostatic and electro-dynamic properties. It describes the construction of a RFQ four-wire model which leads to a differential equation describing the cavity electromagnetic behaviour. The operator spectral theory allows the eigenvalue problem to be solved. An experimental methodology applied to this cavity is presented, and experimental studies are reported with a good correlation between the model resonance modes and measurements performed on the mock-up. The second part reports the development of a mathematical formulation based on the perturbation of line parameters of the previously developed model. This allows the assessment of mechanical defects and of tuning piston control

  18. Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Radiation Therapy for External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: Evaluation of Delivered Dose and Intrafractional Cavity Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Mazur, Thomas R.; Curcuru, Austen; Sona, Karl; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Ochoa, Laura; Mutic, Sasa; Zoberi, Imran; Li, H. Harold; Thomas, Maria A., E-mail: mthomas@radonc.wustl.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To use magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) to (1) determine intrafractional motion of the breast surgical cavity; and (2) assess delivered dose versus planned dose. Methods and Materials: Thirty women with breast cancer (stages 0-I) who underwent breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in a prospective registry evaluating APBI using a 0.35-T MR-IGRT system. Clinical target volume was defined as the surgical cavity plus a 1-cm margin (excluding chest wall, pectoral muscles, and 5 mm from skin). No additional margin was added for the planning target volume (PTV). A volumetric MR image was acquired before each fraction, and patients were set up to the surgical cavity as visualized on MR imaging. To determine the delivered dose for each fraction, the electron density map and contours from the computed tomography simulation were transferred to the pretreatment MR image via rigid registration. Intrafractional motion of the surgical cavity was determined by applying a tracking algorithm to the cavity contour as visualized on cine MR. Results: Median PTV volume was reduced by 52% when using no PTV margin compared with a 1-cm PTV margin used conventionally. The mean (± standard deviation) difference between planned and delivered dose to the PTV (V95) was 0.6% ± 0.1%. The mean cavity displacement in the anterior–posterior and superior–inferior directions was 0.6 ± 0.4 mm and 0.6 ± 0.3 mm, respectively. The mean margin required for at least 90% of the cavity to be contained by the margin for 90% of the time was 0.7 mm (5th-95th percentile: 0-2.7 mm). Conclusion: Minimal intrafractional motion was observed, and the mean difference between planned and delivered dose was less than 1%. Assessment of efficacy and cosmesis of this MR-guided APBI approach is under way.

  19. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Z. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Physics Division; Ge, M. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Iwashita, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2017-01-12

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  20. Acceleration rate of mitral inflow E wave: a novel transmitral doppler index for assessing diastolic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badkoubeh, Roya Sattarzadeh; Tavoosi, Anahita; Jabbari, Mostafa; Parsa, Amir Farhang Zand; Geraeli, Babak; Saadat, Mohammad; Larti, Farnoosh; Meysamie, Ali Pasha; Salehi, Mehrdad

    2016-06-10

    We performed comprehensive transmitral and pulmonary venous Doppler echocardiographic studies to devise a novel index of diastolic function. This is the first study to assess the utility of the acceleration rate (AR) of the E wave of mitral inflow as a primary diagnostic modality for assessing diastolic function. Study group consisted of 84 patients (53 + 11 years) with left ventricle (LV) diastolic dysfunction and 34 healthy people (35 ± 9 years) as control group, who were referred for clinically indicated two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) during 2012 and 2013 to Imam Hospital. Normal controls were defined as patients without clinical evidence of cardiac disease and had normal TTE. LV diastolic function was determined according to standardized protocol of American Society of Echocardiography (ASE). As our new parameter, AR of E wave of mitral inflow was also measured in all patients. It was represented by the slope of the line between onset of E wave and peak of it. Correlation between AR of E wave and LV diastolic function grade was measured using the Spearman correlation coefficient. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of AR of E wave in diagnosing LV diastolic dysfunction in randomly selected two-thirds of population then its derived cutoff was evaluated in rest of the population. The institutional review board of the hospital approved the study protocol. All participants gave written informed consent. This investigation was in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. The mean value of AR was 1010 ± 420 cm/s(2) in patients whereas the mean value for the normal controls was 701 ± 210 cm/s(2). There was a strong and graded relation between AR of E wave of mitral inflow and LV diastolic function grade (Spearman P ≤0.0001, rs =0.69). ROC curve analysis revealed that AR of E wave of mitral inflow =750 cm/s(2) predicted moderate or severe LV diastolic

  1. APT accelerator technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J. David

    1996-01-01

    The proposed accelerator production of tritium (APT) project requires an accelerator that provides a cw proton beam of 100 m A at 1300 MeV. Since the majority of the technical risk of a high-current cw (continuous-wave, 100% DF) accelerator resides in the low-energy section, Los Alamos is building a 20 MeV duplicate of the accelerator front end to confirm design codes, beam performance, and demonstrate operational reliability. We report on design details of this low-energy demonstration accelerator (LEDA) and discuss the integrated design of the full accelerator for the APT plant. LEDA's proton injector is under test and has produced more than 130 mA at 75 keV. Fabrication is proceeding on a 6.7- MeV, 8-meter-long RFQ, and detailed design is underway on coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) structures. In addition, detailed design and technology experiments are underway on medium-beta superconducting cavities to assess the feasibility of replacing the conventional (room-temperature copper) high-energy linac with a linac made of niobium superconducting RF cavities. (author)

  2. Finite element analysis and frequency shift studies for the bridge coupler of the coupled cavity linear accelerator of the spallation neutron source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z. (Zukun)

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron scattering research facility. The linear accelerator (linac) is the principal accelerating structure and divided into a room-temperature linac and a superconducting linac. The normal conducting linac system that consists of a Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and a Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) is to be built by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The CCL structure is 55.36-meters long. It accelerates H- beam from 86.8 Mev to 185.6 Mev at operating frequency of 805 MHz. This side coupled cavity structure has 8 cells per segment, 12 segments and 11 bridge couplers per module, and 4 modules total. A 5-MW klystron powers each module. The number 3 and number 9 bridge coupler of each module are connected to the 5-MW RF power supply. The bridge coupler with length of 2.5 {beta}{gamma} is a three-cell structure and located between the segments and allows power flow through the module. The center cell of each bridge coupler is excited during normal operation. To obtain a uniform electromagnetic filed and meet the resonant frequency shift, the RF induced heat must be removed. Thus, the thermal deformation and frequency shift studies are performed via numerical simulations in order to have an appropriate cooling design and predict the frequency shift under operation. The center cell of the bridge coupler also contains a large 4-inch slug tuner and a tuning post that used to provide bulk frequency adjustment and field intensity adjustment, so that produce the proper total field distribution in the module assembly.

  3. Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) as a probe of macromolecule adsorption kinetics at functionalized interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Michael A; de Cuendias, Anne; Gayet, Florence; Shirley, Ian M; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Haddleton, David M; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-05-01

    Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) has been employed to study the interfacial adsorption kinetics of coumarin-tagged macromolecules onto a range of functionalized planar surfaces. Such studies are valuable in designing polymers for complex systems where the degree of interaction between the polymer and surface needs to be tailored. Three tagged synthetic polymers with different functionalities are examined: poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) (PSPMA), and a mannose-modified glycopolymer. Adsorption transients at the silica/water interface are found to be characteristic for each polymer, and kinetics are deduced from the initial rates. The chemistry of the adsorption interfaces has been varied by, first, manipulation of silica surface chemistry via the bulk pH, followed by surfaces modified by poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA) and cellulose, giving five chemically different surfaces. Complementary atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging has been used for additional surface characterization of adsorbed layers and functionalized interfaces to allow adsorption rates to be interpreted more fully. Adsorption rates for PSPMA and the glycopolymer are seen to be highly surface sensitive, with significantly higher rates on cellulose-modified surfaces, whereas PAA shows a much smaller rate dependence on the nature of the adsorption surface.

  4. ACCELERATING WAVES IN POLAR CORONAL HOLES AS SEEN BY EIS AND SUMER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G. R.; Banerjee, D.; Teriaca, L.; Solanki, S.; Imada, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present EIS/Hinode and SUMER/SOHO observations of propagating disturbances detected in coronal lines in inter-plume and plume regions of a polar coronal hole. The observation was carried out on 2007 November 13 as part of the JOP196/HOP045 program. The SUMER spectroscopic observation gives information about fluctuations in radiance and on both resolved (Doppler shift) and unresolved (Doppler width) line-of-sight velocities, whereas EIS 40'' wide slot images detect fluctuations only in radiance but maximize the probability of overlapping field of view between the two instruments. From distance-time radiance maps, we detect the presence of propagating waves in a polar inter-plume region with a period of 15-20 minutes and a propagation speed increasing from 130 ± 14 km s -1 just above the limb to 330 ± 140 km s -1 around 160'' above the limb. These waves can be traced to originate from a bright region of the on-disk part of the coronal hole where the propagation speed is in the range of 25 ± 1.3 to 38 ± 4.5 km s -1 , with the same periodicity. These on-disk bright regions can be visualized as the base of the coronal funnels. The adjacent plume region also shows the presence of propagating disturbances with the same range of periodicity but with propagation speeds in the range of 135 ± 18 to 165 ± 43 km s -1 only. A comparison between the distance-time radiance map of the two regions indicates that the waves within the plumes are not observable (may be getting dissipated) far off-limb, whereas this is not the case in the inter-plume region. A correlation analysis was also performed to find out the time delay between the oscillations at several heights in the off-limb region, finding results consistent with those from the analysis of the distance-time maps. To our knowledge, this result provides first spectroscopic evidence of the acceleration of propagating disturbances in the polar region close to the Sun (within 1.2 R/R sun ), which provides clues to the

  5. Study of a spoke-type superconducting cavity for high power proton accelerators; Etude d'une cavite acceleratrice supraconductrice Spoke pour les accelerateurs de protons de forte intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olry, G

    2003-04-01

    Since a few years, a lot of projects (especially dedicated to transmutation, radioactive beams production, spallation neutron sources or neutrinos factories) are based on high power proton linear accelerators. It has been demonstrated, thanks to their excellent RF performances, that superconducting elliptical cavities represent the best technological solution for the high energy part of these linacs (proton energy from typically 100 MeV). On the contrary, between 5 and 100 MeV, nothing is clearly settled and intensive studies on low-beta cavities are under progress. The main objective of this thesis is the study of a new low-beta cavity, called 'spoke', which could be used in the low energy part of European XADS (experimental accelerator driven system) and EURISOL (European isotope separation on-line) accelerators projects. A complete study of a beta 0.35 spoke cavity has been done: from its electromagnetic and mechanical optimization to warm and, above all, cold experimental tests: an accelerating field of 12.2 MV/m has been reached at T=4.2 K, that is to say one of the best value among the spoke cavities performances in the world. It has been shown that the specific ratio of a third, between the spoke bar diameter and the cavity length, led to optimize the surface electromagnetic fields. Moreover, spoke cavities can be used without any trouble, in the low energy part, due to their good rigidity. The experimental measurements performed on the cavity have confirmed the theoretical calculations, especially, concerning the expected frequency and mechanical behavior. Another study, performed on elliptical cavities, gave an explanation of the discrepancies between the measured and calculated frequencies thanks to a precise 3-dimensional geometrical control. (author)

  6. Beam induced rf cavity transient voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.L.; Wang, J.M.

    1998-10-01

    The authors calculate the transient voltage induced in a radio frequency cavity by the injection of a relativistic bunched beam into a circular accelerator. A simplified model of the beam induced voltage, using a single tone current signal, is generated and compared with the voltage induced by a more realistic model of a point-like bunched beam. The high Q limit of the bunched beam model is shown to be related simply to the simplified model. Both models are shown to induce voltages at the resonant frequency ω r of the cavity and at an integer multiple of the bunch revolution frequency (i.e. the accelerating frequency for powered cavity operation) hω ο . The presence of two nearby frequencies in the cavity leads to a modulation of the carrier wave exp(hω ο t). A special emphasis is placed in this paper on studying the modulation function. These models prove useful for computing the transient voltage induced in superconducting rf cavities, which was the motivation behind this research. The modulation of the transient cavity voltage discussed in this paper is the physical basis of the recently observed and explained new kinds of longitudinal rigid dipole mode which differs from the conventional Robinson mode

  7. Analysis of the dependence of surfatron acceleration of electrons by an electromagnetic wave in space plasma on the particle momentum along the wave front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erokhin, A. N., E-mail: nerokhin@mx.iki.rssi.ru [People’s Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation); Zol’nikova, N. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation); Erokhin, N. S. [People’s Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear nonstationary second-order equation for the wave phase on the particle trajectory, the dynamics of surfatron acceleration of electrons by an electromagnetic wave propagating across the external magnetic field in space plasma is analyzed as a function of the electron momentum along the wave front. Numerical calculations show that, for strongly relativistic initial values of the electron momentum component along the wave front g{sub y}(0) (the other parameters of the problem being the same), electrons are trapped into the regime of ultrarelativistic surfatron acceleration within a certain interval of the initial wave phase Ψ(0) on the particle trajectory. It is assumed in the calculations that vertical bar Ψ(0) vertical bar ≤ π. For strongly relativistic values of g{sub y}(0), electrons are immediately trapped by the wave for 19% of the initial values of the phase Ψ(0) (favorable phases). For the rest of the values of Ψ(0), trapping does not occur even at long times. This circumstance substantially simplifies estimations of the wave damping due to particle acceleration in subsequent calculations. The dynamics of the relativistic factor and the components of the electron velocity and momentum under surfatron acceleration is also analyzed. The obtained results are of interest for the development of modern concepts of possible mechanisms of generation of ultrarelativistic particle fluxes in relatively calm space plasma, as well as for correct interpretation of observational data on the fluxes of such particles and explanation of possible reasons for the deviation of ultrarelativistic particle spectra detected in the heliosphere from the standard power-law scalings and the relation of these variations to space weather and large-scale atmospheric processes similar to tropical cyclones.

  8. Analysis of the dependence of surfatron acceleration of electrons by an electromagnetic wave in space plasma on the particle momentum along the wave front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erokhin, A. N.; Zol’nikova, N. N.; Erokhin, N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear nonstationary second-order equation for the wave phase on the particle trajectory, the dynamics of surfatron acceleration of electrons by an electromagnetic wave propagating across the external magnetic field in space plasma is analyzed as a function of the electron momentum along the wave front. Numerical calculations show that, for strongly relativistic initial values of the electron momentum component along the wave front g y (0) (the other parameters of the problem being the same), electrons are trapped into the regime of ultrarelativistic surfatron acceleration within a certain interval of the initial wave phase Ψ(0) on the particle trajectory. It is assumed in the calculations that vertical bar Ψ(0) vertical bar ≤ π. For strongly relativistic values of g y (0), electrons are immediately trapped by the wave for 19% of the initial values of the phase Ψ(0) (favorable phases). For the rest of the values of Ψ(0), trapping does not occur even at long times. This circumstance substantially simplifies estimations of the wave damping due to particle acceleration in subsequent calculations. The dynamics of the relativistic factor and the components of the electron velocity and momentum under surfatron acceleration is also analyzed. The obtained results are of interest for the development of modern concepts of possible mechanisms of generation of ultrarelativistic particle fluxes in relatively calm space plasma, as well as for correct interpretation of observational data on the fluxes of such particles and explanation of possible reasons for the deviation of ultrarelativistic particle spectra detected in the heliosphere from the standard power-law scalings and the relation of these variations to space weather and large-scale atmospheric processes similar to tropical cyclones

  9. Coupled superconducting resonant cavities for a heavy ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K W [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A [Nuclear Science Center, New Delhi (India)

    1992-11-01

    A design for a superconducting niobium slow-wave accelerating structure has been explored that may have performance and cost advantages over existing technology. The option considered is an array of pairs of quarter-wave coaxial-line resonant cavities, the two elements of each pair strongly coupled through a short superconducting transmission line. In the linac formed by such an array, each paired structure is independently phased. A disadvantage of two-gap slow wave structures is that each cavity is relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased elements is required for a linac. Increasing the number of drift tubes per cavity reduces the number of independently-phased elements but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original, single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss in velocity acceptance. (Author) 2 figs., 8 refs.

  10. Coupled superconducting resonant cavities for a heavy ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.

    1992-01-01

    A design for a superconducting niobium slow-wave accelerating structure has been explored that may have performance and cost advantages over existing technology. The option considered is an array of pairs of quarter-wave coaxial-line resonant cavities, the two elements of each pair strongly coupled through a short superconducting transmission line. In the linac formed by such an array, each paired structure is independently phased. A disadvantage of two-gap slow wave structures is that each cavity is relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased elements is required for a linac. Increasing the number of drift tubes per cavity reduces the number of independently-phased elements but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original, single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss in velocity acceptance. (Author) 2 figs., 8 refs

  11. Accelerated rogue waves generated by soliton fusion at the advanced stage of supercontinuum formation in photonic-crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driben, Rodislav; Babushkin, Ihar

    2012-12-15

    Soliton fusion is a fascinating and delicate phenomenon that manifests itself in optical fibers in case of interaction between copropagating solitons with small temporal and wavelength separation. We show that the mechanism of acceleration of a trailing soliton by dispersive waves radiated from the preceding one provides necessary conditions for soliton fusion at the advanced stage of supercontinuum generation in photonic-crystal fibers. As a result of fusion, large-intensity robust light structures arise and propagate over significant distances. In the presence of small random noise the delicate condition for the effective fusion between solitons can easily be broken, making the fusion-induced giant waves a rare statistical event. Thus oblong-shaped giant accelerated waves become excellent candidates for optical rogue waves.

  12. Accelerating 3D Elastic Wave Equations on Knights Landing based Intel Xeon Phi processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourouri, Mohammed; Birger Raknes, Espen

    2017-04-01

    In advanced imaging methods like reverse-time migration (RTM) and full waveform inversion (FWI) the elastic wave equation (EWE) is numerically solved many times to create the seismic image or the elastic parameter model update. Thus, it is essential to optimize the solution time for solving the EWE as this will have a major impact on the total computational cost in running RTM or FWI. From a computational point of view applications implementing EWEs are associated with two major challenges. The first challenge is the amount of memory-bound computations involved, while the second challenge is the execution of such computations over very large datasets. So far, multi-core processors have not been able to tackle these two challenges, which eventually led to the adoption of accelerators such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Compared to conventional CPUs, GPUs are densely populated with many floating-point units and fast memory, a type of architecture that has proven to map well to many scientific computations. Despite its architectural advantages, full-scale adoption of accelerators has yet to materialize. First, accelerators require a significant programming effort imposed by programming models such as CUDA or OpenCL. Second, accelerators come with a limited amount of memory, which also require explicit data transfers between the CPU and the accelerator over the slow PCI bus. The second generation of the Xeon Phi processor based on the Knights Landing (KNL) architecture, promises the computational capabilities of an accelerator but require the same programming effort as traditional multi-core processors. The high computational performance is realized through many integrated cores (number of cores and tiles and memory varies with the model) organized in tiles that are connected via a 2D mesh based interconnect. In contrary to accelerators, KNL is a self-hosted system, meaning explicit data transfers over the PCI bus are no longer required. However, like most

  13. Characterizing a Model of Coronal Heating and Solar Wind Acceleration Based on Wave Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.; Velli, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the nature of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration is a key goal in solar and heliospheric research. While there have been many theoretical advances in both topics, including suggestions that they may be intimately related, the inherent scale coupling and complexity of these phenomena limits our ability to construct models that test them on a fundamental level for realistic solar conditions. At the same time, there is an ever increasing impetus to improve our spaceweather models, and incorporating treatments for these processes that capture their basic features while remaining tractable is an important goal. With this in mind, I will give an overview of our exploration of a wave-turbulence driven (WTD) model for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration based on low-frequency Alfvénic turbulence. Here we attempt to bridge the gap between theory and practical modeling by exploring this model in 1D HD and multi-dimensional MHD contexts. The key questions that we explore are: What properties must the model possess to be a viable model for coronal heating? What is the influence of the magnetic field topology (open, closed, rapidly expanding)? And can we simultaneously capture coronal heating and solar wind acceleration with such a quasi-steady formulation? Our initial results suggest that a WTD based formulation performs adequately for a variety of solar and heliospheric conditions, while significantly reducing the number of free parameters when compared to empirical heating and solar wind models. The challenges, applications, and future prospects of this type of approach will also be discussed.

  14. Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    The talk summarizes the principles of particle acceleration and addresses problems related to storage rings like LEP and LHC. Special emphasis will be given to orbit stability, long term stability of the particle motion, collective effects and synchrotron radiation.

  15. Suitability of tunneling ionization produced plasmas for the plasma beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeman, W.P.; Clayton, C.E.; Marsh, K.A.; Dyson, A.; Joshi, C.

    1991-01-01

    Tunneling ionization can be thought of as the high intensity, low frequency limit of multi-photon ionization (MPI). Extremely uniform plasmas were produced by the latter process at Rutherford lab for beat wave excitation experiments using a 0.5 μm laser. Plasmas with 100% ionization were produced with densities exceeding 10 17 cm -3 . The experiment uses a CO 2 laser (I max ∼ 5 x 10 14 W/cm 2 ) which allows the formation of plasmas via the tunneling process. For the experiments the authors need plasmas with densities in the range of 5 to 10 x 10 16 cm -3 . Using Thomson scattering as a diagnostic they have explored the density and temperature regime of tunneling ionization produced plasmas. They find that plasmas with densities up to 10 16 cm -3 can indeed be produced and that these plasmas are hot. Beyond this density strong refraction of laser radiation occurs due to the radial profile of the plasma. Implications of this work to the Beat Wave Accelerator program will be discussed

  16. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; /Argonne; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  17. CLIC crab cavity design optimisation for maximum luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, A.C., E-mail: a.dexter@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K. [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Jones, R. [University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-21

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  18. Compact electro-absorption modulator integrated with vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser for highly efficient millimeter-wave modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Ahmed, Moustafa; Bakry, Ahmed; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact electro-absorption slow-light modulator laterally-integrated with an 850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), which enables highly efficient millimeter-wave modulation. We found a strong leaky travelling wave in the lateral direction between the two cavities via widening the waveguide width with a taper shape. The small signal response of the fabricated device shows a large enhancement of over 55 dB in the modulation amplitude at frequencies beyond 35 GHz; thanks to the photon-photon resonance. A large group index of over 150 in a Bragg reflector waveguide enables the resonance at millimeter wave frequencies for 25 μm long compact modulator. Based on the modeling, we expect a resonant modulation at a higher frequency of 70 GHz. The resonant modulation in a compact slow-light modulator plays a significant key role for high efficient narrow-band modulation in the millimeter wave range far beyond the intrinsic modulation bandwidth of VCSELs.

  19. Electron diodes and cavity design for the new 4-MeV injector of the recirculating linear accelerator (RLA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Smith, D.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Bennett, L.F.; Olson, W.R.; Turman, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have designed and constructed four types of electron-beam diodes for the new 4-MV RLA injector: a non-immersed foilless diode, a magnetically immersed foilless diode, a foil diode and an ion-focused foilless diode, They are tailored to fit the new injector cavity. The design goals were to produce high quality 10-kA to 20-kA electron beams with a β perpendicular smaller than 0.2 and a beam radius of the order of 2 cm. These beams will be matched to the RLA IFR channel so β perpendicular must be equal to or smaller than the square root of the ratio of the beam current versus Alfven current for f e = 1. A reentrant anode geometry was selected for the injector cavity design, because it offers substantial savings on the required amount of feromagnetic cores. The inner radius of the outside shell, now only 30 cm, would have been twice as large (60 cm) if a coaxial non-reentrant geometry had been adopted. The shape of the anode and cathode electrodes were carefully selected to minimize the electric field stresses. The field stresses on the inner surface of the outer shell do not exceed 200 kV/cm

  20. Industrialization of the nitrogen-doping preparation for SRF cavities for LCLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, D.; Aderhold, S.; Burrill, A.; Daly, E.; Davis, K.; Grassellino, A.; Grimm, C.; Khabiboulline, T.; Marhauser, F.; Melnychuk, O.; Palczewski, A.; Posen, S.; Ross, M.; Sergatskov, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Wilson, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is a new state-of-the-art coherent X-ray source being constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. It employs 280 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities in order operate in continuous wave (CW) mode. To reduce the overall cryogenic cost of such a large accelerator, nitrogen-doping of the SRF cavities is being used. Nitrogen-doping has consistently been shown to increase the efficiency of SRF cavities operating in the 2.0 K regime and at medium fields (15-20 MV/m) in vertical cavity tests and horizontal cryomodule tests. While nitrogen-doping's efficacy for improvement of cavity performance was demonstrated at three independent labs, Fermilab, Jefferson Lab, and Cornell University, transfer of the technology to industry for LCLS-II production was not without challenges. Here we present results from the beginning of LCLS-II cavity production. We discuss qualification of the cavity vendors and the first cavities from each vendor. Finally, we demonstrate that nitrogen-doping has been successfully transferred to SRF cavity vendors, resulting in consistent production of cavities with better cryogenic efficiency than has ever been achieved for a large-scale accelerator.

  1. Ten-year results of accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiation with concomitant boost to the lumpectomy cavity after conserving surgery for early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cante, Domenico; Petrucci, Edoardo; Sciacero, Piera; Piva, Cristina; Ferrario, Silvia; Bagnera, Silvia; Patania, Sebastiano; Mondini, Guido; Pasquino, Massimo; Casanova Borca, Valeria; Vellani, Giorgio; La Porta, Maria Rosa; Franco, Pierfrancesco

    2017-09-01

    Accelerated hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is considered a standard therapeutic option for early breast cancer (EBC) in the postoperative setting after breast conservation (BCS). A boost to the lumpectomy cavity may further increase local control. We herein report on the 10-year results of a series of EBC patients treated after BCS with hypofractionated WBRT with a concomitant photon boost to the surgical bed over 4 weeks. Between 2005 and 2007, 178 EBC patients were treated with a basic course of radiotherapy consisting of 45 Gy to the whole breast in 20 fractions (2.25 Gy daily) with an additional boost dose of 0.25 Gy delivered concomitantly to the lumpectomy cavity, for an additional dose of 5 Gy. Median follow-up period was 117 months. At 10-year, overall, cancer-specific, disease-free survival and local control were 92.2% (95% CI 88.7-93.4%), 99.2% (95% CI 96.7-99.7%), 95.5% (95% CI 91.2-97.2%) and 97.3% (95% CI 94.5-98.9%), respectively. Only eight patients recurred. Four in-breast recurrences, two axillary node relapses and two metastatic localizations were observed. Fourteen patients died during the observation period due to other causes while breast cancer-related deaths were eight. At last follow-up, ≥G2 fibrosis and telangiectasia were seen in 7% and 5% of patients. No major lung and heart toxicities were observed. Cosmetic results were excellent/good in 87.8% of patients and fair/poor in 12.2%. Hypofractionated WBRT with concomitant boost to the lumpectomy cavity after BCS in EBC led to consistent clinical results at 10 years. Hence, it can be considered a valid treatment option in this setting.

  2. Statistical methods for transverse beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei, E-mail: pei.zhang@desy.de [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Cockcroft Institute of Science and Technology, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute of Science and Technology, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-11

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOMs) can be used to provide beam diagnostics. Here we focus on 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities. In particular we study dipole mode excitation and its application to beam position determinations. In order to extract beam position information, linear regression can be used. Due to a large number of sampling points in the waveforms, statistical methods are used to effectively reduce the dimension of the system, such as singular value decomposition (SVD) and k-means clustering. These are compared with the direct linear regression (DLR) on the entire waveforms. A cross-validation technique is used to study the sample independent precisions of the position predictions given by these three methods. A RMS prediction error in the beam position of approximately 50 μm can be achieved by DLR and SVD, while k-means clustering suggests 70 μm.

  3. Statistical methods for transverse beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M

    2014-01-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) can be used to provide beam diagnostics. Here we focus on 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities. In particular we study dipole mode excitation and its application to beam position determinations. In order to extract beam position information, linear regression can be used. Due to a large number of sampling points in the waveforms, statistical methods are used to effectively reduce the dimension of the system, such as singular value decomposition (SVD) and k-means clustering. These are compared with the direct linear regression (DLR) on the entire waveforms. A cross-validation technique is used to study the sample independent precisions of the position predictions given by these three methods. A RMS prediction error in the beam position of approximately 50 micron can be achieved by DLR and SVD, while k-means clustering suggests 70 micron.

  4. Pump depletion limited evolution of the relativistic plasma wave-front in a forced laser-wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, F; Clayton, C E; Marsh, K A; Pak, A E; Ralph, J E; Joshi, C; Lopes, N C

    2009-01-01

    In a forced laser-wakefield accelerator experiment (Malka et al 2002 Science 298 1596) where the length of the pump laser pulse is a few plasma periods long, the leading edge of the laser pulse undergoes frequency downshifting and head erosion as the laser energy is transferred to the wake. Therefore, after some propagation distance, the group velocity of the leading edge of the pump pulse-and thus of the driven electron plasma wave-will slow down. This can have implications for the dephasing length of the accelerated electrons and therefore needs to be understood experimentally. We have carried out an experimental investigation where we have measured the velocity v f of the 'wave-front' of the plasma wave driven by a nominally 50 fs (full width half maximum), intense (a 0 ≅ 1), 0.815 μm laser pulse. To determine the speed of the wave front, time- and space-resolved refractometry, interferometry and Thomson scattering were used. Although a laser pulse propagating through a relatively low-density plasma (n e = 1.3 x 10 19 cm -3 ) showed no measurable changes in v f over 1.3 mm (and no accelerated electrons), a high-density plasma (n e = 5 x 10 19 cm -3 ) generated accelerated electrons and showed a continuous change in v f as the laser pulse propagated through the plasma. Possible causes and consequences of the observed v f evolution are discussed.

  5. Broadband multi-wavelength Brillouin lasers with an operating wavelength range of 1500–1600 nm generated by four-wave mixing in a dual wavelength Brillouin fiber laser cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Jia, Z. X.; Weng, H. Z.; Li, Z. R.; Yang, Y. D.; Xiao, J. L.; Chen, S. W.; Huang, Y. Z.; Qin, W. P.; Qin, G. S.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate broadband multi-wavelength Brillouin lasers with an operating wavelength range of 1500–1600 nm and a frequency separation of ~9.28 GHz generated by four-wave mixing in a dual wavelength Brillouin fiber laser cavity. By using one continuous-wave laser as the pump source, multi-wavelength Brillouin lasers with an operating wavelength range of 1554–1574 nm were generated via cascaded Brillouin scattering and four-wave mixing. Interestingly, when pumped by two continuous-wave lasers with an appropriate frequency separation, the operating wavelength range of the multi-wavelength Brillouin lasers was increased to 1500–1600 nm due to cavity-enhanced cascaded four-wave mixing among the frequency components generated by two pump lasers in the dual wavelength Brillouin laser cavity.

  6. Trajectories of electrons with large longitudinal momenta in the phase plane during surfatron acceleration by an electromagnetic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkrtichyan, G. S., E-mail: hay-13@mail.ru [Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The trajectories of electrons with large longitudinal momenta in the phase plane in the course of their surfatron acceleration by an electromagnetic wave propagating in space plasma across the external magnetic field are analyzed. Electrons with large longitudinal momenta are trapped immediately if the initial wave phase Ψ(0) on the particle trajectory is positive. For negative values of Ψ(0), no electrons trapping by the wave is observed over the available computational times. According to numerical calculations, the trajectories of trapped particles in the phase plane have a singular point of the stable focus type and the behavior of the trajectory corresponds to the motion in a complex nonstationary effective potential well. For some initial phases, electrons are confined in the region of the accelerating electric field for relatively short time, the energy gain being about 50–130% and more.

  7. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-01-01

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications

  8. Laser frequency stabilization and control of optical cavities with suspended mirrors for the VIRGO interferometric detector of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsuglia, Matteo

    1999-01-01

    The VIRGO detector is an interferometer with 3 km Fabry-Perot cavities in the arms. It is aimed at the detection of gravitational radiation emitted by astrophysical sources. This thesis comprises two independent parts. The first part is devoted to the laser frequency stabilization. In the second one we present a study of a suspended cavity. We determine the impact of laser frequency fluctuations on the overall VIRGO sensitivity. We study the frequency stabilization of the interferometer considered as an ultra-stable standard and we evaluate the noise pertaining to different signals taken into consideration. A strategy of control is discussed. We then study the VIRGO mode-cleaner prototype, a 30 m suspended triangular cavity, for which we have developed a control in order to keep it locked. Finally, we characterize this cavity in terms of mode spectra, finesse and mechanical transfer functions. (author)

  9. Stereotactic Irradiation of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastasis: A Frameless Linear Accelerator-Based Case Series and Review of the Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Paul J.; Lin Yijie Brittany; Yu, Alvin Y.; Alexander, Brian M.; Hacker, Fred; Marcus, Karen J.; Weiss, Stephanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is the standard of care after resection of a brain metastasis. However, concern regarding possible neurocognitive effects and the lack of survival benefit with this approach has led to the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the resection cavity in place of WBRT. We report our initial experience using an image-guided linear accelerator-based frameless stereotactic system and review the technical issues in applying this technique. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the setup accuracy, treatment outcome, and patterns of failure of the first 18 consecutive cases treated at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. The target volume was the resection cavity without a margin excluding the surgical track. Results: The median number of brain metastases per patient was 1 (range, 1–3). The median planning target volume was 3.49 mL. The median prescribed dose was 18 Gy (range, 15–18 Gy) with normalization ranging from 68% to 85%. In all cases, 99% of the planning target volume was covered by the prescribed dose. The median conformity index was 1.6 (range, 1.41–1.92). The SRS was delivered with submillimeter accuracy. At a median follow-up of 12.7 months, local control was achieved in 16/18 cavities treated. True local recurrence occurred in 2 patients. No marginal failures occurred. Distant recurrence occurred in 6/17 patients. Median time to any failure was 7.4 months. No Grade 3 or higher toxicity was recorded. A long interval between initial cancer diagnosis and the development of brain metastasis was the only factor that trended toward a significant association with the absence of recurrence (local or distant) (log-rank p = 0.097). Conclusions: Frameless stereotactic irradiation of the resection cavity after surgery for a brain metastasis is a safe and accurate technique that offers durable local control and defers the use of WBRT in select patients. This technique should be tested in larger prospective

  10. Stereotactic Irradiation of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastasis: A Frameless Linear Accelerator-Based Case Series and Review of the Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Paul J., E-mail: pkelly@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States); Lin Yijie Brittany; Yu, Alvin Y. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Alexander, Brian M.; Hacker, Fred; Marcus, Karen J.; Weiss, Stephanie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is the standard of care after resection of a brain metastasis. However, concern regarding possible neurocognitive effects and the lack of survival benefit with this approach has led to the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the resection cavity in place of WBRT. We report our initial experience using an image-guided linear accelerator-based frameless stereotactic system and review the technical issues in applying this technique. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the setup accuracy, treatment outcome, and patterns of failure of the first 18 consecutive cases treated at Brigham and Women's Hospital. The target volume was the resection cavity without a margin excluding the surgical track. Results: The median number of brain metastases per patient was 1 (range, 1-3). The median planning target volume was 3.49 mL. The median prescribed dose was 18 Gy (range, 15-18 Gy) with normalization ranging from 68% to 85%. In all cases, 99% of the planning target volume was covered by the prescribed dose. The median conformity index was 1.6 (range, 1.41-1.92). The SRS was delivered with submillimeter accuracy. At a median follow-up of 12.7 months, local control was achieved in 16/18 cavities treated. True local recurrence occurred in 2 patients. No marginal failures occurred. Distant recurrence occurred in 6/17 patients. Median time to any failure was 7.4 months. No Grade 3 or higher toxicity was recorded. A long interval between initial cancer diagnosis and the development of brain metastasis was the only factor that trended toward a significant association with the absence of recurrence (local or distant) (log-rank p = 0.097). Conclusions: Frameless stereotactic irradiation of the resection cavity after surgery for a brain metastasis is a safe and accurate technique that offers durable local control and defers the use of WBRT in select patients. This technique should be tested in larger prospective studies.

  11. Feasibility Study of Using Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (SWIR-CRDS) for Biological Agent Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aker, Pam M.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Richard M.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2007-10-01

    This project focused on determining the feasibility of using short wave infrared (SWIR) cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as a means for real-time detection of biological aerosols. The first part of the project involved identifying biological agent signatures that could be detected with SWIR CRDS. After an exhaustive search of the open literature it was determined that whole biological spores and/or cells would not be good candidates for direct SWIR CRDS probing because they have no unique SWIR signatures. It was postulated that while whole cells or spores are not good candidates for SWIR CRDS detection, their pyrolysis break-down products might be. A literature search was then conducted to find biological pyrolysis products with low molecular weights and high symmetry since these species most likely would have overtone and combination vibrational bands that can be detected in the SWIR. It was determined that pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide were good candidates for evaluation. These molecules are formed when proteins and porphyrins, proteins and dipicolinic acid, and dipicolinic acid are pyrolyzed, respectively. The second part of the project involved measuring quantitative SWIR spectra of pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide in PNNL’s FTIR Spectroscopy Laboratory. Spectral information about these molecules, in the vapor phase is sparse – there were only a few prior studies that measured line positions and no information on absorption cross sections. Absorption cross sections are needed in order to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity, and line position determines what type of laser will be needed for the sensor. The results of the spectroscopy studies allowed us to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity for pyrrole to be 3 x 1012 molec cm-3 or 0.1 ppmv, and for pyridine it was 1.5 x 1015 molec cm-3 or 0.6 ppmv. These detection sensitivity limits are close what we have measured for ammonia. Given these detection limits we then estimated the

  12. The linear proton accelerator for the MYRRHA-ADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandeplassche, D.; Medeiros Ramao, L.

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the development of a linear proton accelerator for the MYRRHA Accelerator Driven System (ADS). The linear proton accelerator provides a high energy and high intensity proton beam that is directed to a spallation target, which will deliver neutrons to a subcritical nuclear reactor core. The article describes the MYRRHA linear accelerator, which mainly consists of a sequence of superconducting accelerating radiofrequent cavities that are positioned in a linear configuration. The beam requirements for MYRRHA are discussed involving, amongst others, a continuous wave beam delivery mode with a high reliability goal. The key concepts to increase the reliability of the accelerator are described.

  13. Ion acceleration in electrostatic field of charged cavity created by ultra-short laser pulses of 1020-1021 W/cm2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Singh, P. K.; Ahmed, H.; Kakolee, K. F.; Scullion, C.; Jeong, T. W.; Hadjisolomou, P.; Alejo, A.; Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2017-01-01

    Ion acceleration resulting from the interaction of ultra-high intensity and ultra-high contrast (˜10-10) laser pulses with thin A l foil targets at 30° angle of laser incidence is studied. Proton maximum energies of 30 and 18 MeV are measured along the target normal rear and front sides, respectively, showing intensity scaling as Ib . For the target front bf r o n t= 0.5-0.6 and for the target rear br e a r= 0.7-0.8 is observed in the intensity range 1020-1021 W/cm2. The fast scaling from the target rear ˜I0.75 can be attributed enhancement of laser energy absorption as already observed at relatively low intensities. The backward acceleration of the front side protons with intensity scaling as ˜I0.5 can be attributed to the to the formation of a positively charged cavity at the target front via ponderomotive displacement of the target electrons at the interaction of relativistic intense laser pulses with a solid target. The experimental results are in a good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  14. Accelerator update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    When the Accelerator Conference, combined International High Energy and US Particle versions, held in Dallas in May, was initially scheduled, progress nearby for the US Superconducting Supercollider was high on the preliminary agenda. With the SSC voted down by Congress in October 1993, this was no longer the case. However the content of the meeting, in terms of both its deep implications for ambitious new projects and the breadth of its scope, showed that the worldwide particle accelerator field is far from being moribund. A traditional feature of such accelerator conferences is the multiplicity of parallel sessions. No one person can attend all sessions, so that delegates can follow completely different paths and emerge with totally different impressions. Despite this overload, and despite the SSC cancellation, the general picture is one of encouraging progress over a wide range of major new projects throughout the world. At the same time, spinoff from, and applications of, accelerators and accelerator technology are becoming increasingly important. Centrestage is now CERN's LHC proton-proton collider, where a test string of superconducting magnets is operating over long periods at the nominal LHC field of 8.36 tesla or more. The assignment of the underground areas in the existing 27- kilometre LEP tunnel is now quasidefinitive (see page 3). For CERN's existing big machine, the LEP electron-positron collider, ongoing work concentrates on boosting performance using improved optics and bunch trains. But the main objective is the LEP2 scheme using superconducting accelerating cavities to boost the beam energy (see page 6). After some initial teething problems, production and operation of these cavities appears to have been mastered, at least under test conditions. A highlight at CERN last year was the first run with lead ions (December 1994, page 15). Handling these heavy particles with systems originally designed for protons calls for ingenuity. The SPS

  15. Accelerator update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-09-15

    When the Accelerator Conference, combined International High Energy and US Particle versions, held in Dallas in May, was initially scheduled, progress nearby for the US Superconducting Supercollider was high on the preliminary agenda. With the SSC voted down by Congress in October 1993, this was no longer the case. However the content of the meeting, in terms of both its deep implications for ambitious new projects and the breadth of its scope, showed that the worldwide particle accelerator field is far from being moribund. A traditional feature of such accelerator conferences is the multiplicity of parallel sessions. No one person can attend all sessions, so that delegates can follow completely different paths and emerge with totally different impressions. Despite this overload, and despite the SSC cancellation, the general picture is one of encouraging progress over a wide range of major new projects throughout the world. At the same time, spinoff from, and applications of, accelerators and accelerator technology are becoming increasingly important. Centrestage is now CERN's LHC proton-proton collider, where a test string of superconducting magnets is operating over long periods at the nominal LHC field of 8.36 tesla or more. The assignment of the underground areas in the existing 27- kilometre LEP tunnel is now quasidefinitive (see page 3). For CERN's existing big machine, the LEP electron-positron collider, ongoing work concentrates on boosting performance using improved optics and bunch trains. But the main objective is the LEP2 scheme using superconducting accelerating cavities to boost the beam energy (see page 6). After some initial teething problems, production and operation of these cavities appears to have been mastered, at least under test conditions. A highlight at CERN last year was the first run with lead ions (December 1994, page 15). Handling these heavy particles with systems originally designed for protons calls for ingenuity. The SPS has managed

  16. Fundamental Power Couplers for Superconducting Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isidoro E. Campisi

    2001-01-01

    Fundamental power couplers (FPC's) for superconducting cavities must meet very strict requirements to perform at high power levels (hundreds of kilowatts) and in a variety of conditions (CS, pulsed, travelling wave, standing wave) without adversely affecting the performance of the cavities they are powering. Producing good coupler designs and achieving operational performances in accelerator environments are challenging tasks that have traditionally involved large resources from many laboratories. The designs involve state-of-the-art activities in RF, cryogenic and mechanical engineering, materials science, vacuum technology, and electromagnetic field modeling. Handling, assembly and conditioning procedures have been developed to achieve ever-increasing power levels and more reliable operation. In this paper, the technical issues associated with the design, construction, assembly, processing, and operation of FPC's will be reviewed, together with the progress in FPC activities in several laboratories during the past few years

  17. Stability and Resolution Studies of HOMBPMs for the 1.3 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Liangliang; Jones, Roger

    2015-01-01

    HOMBPMs (HOM based Beam Position Monitors) are installed at the FLASH facility at DESY, Hamburg. These are aimed at aligning the beam and monitoring the beam position. Over time, the accuracy of beam position prediction is degraded. This is due to instability issues in the 1.3 GHz and 3.9 GHz superconducting cavities and associated electronics. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a measurement technique which is stable and can be relied upon over a period of three months with unprecedented resolution (below 4 μm horizontally and 2 μm vertically). We attribute this improvement in stability to a focused campaign on various signal processing and analysis techniques. These techniques include SVD (Singular Value Decomposition), ANN (Artificial Neural Network) and PLS (Partial Least Square). We found the best resolution and computational power using the latter method, PLS. These techniques are directly applicable to the HOMBPM system at the European XFEL that is currently under construction. However,...

  18. Accelerated radiation therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx selected according to tumor cell kinetics--a phase II multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognoni, Paolo; Bignardi, Mario; Cazzaniga, L. Franco; Poli, A. Marisa; Richetti, Antonella; Bossi, Alberto; Rampello, Giuseppina; Barbera, Fernando; Soatti, Carlo; Bardelli, Donata; Giordano, Monica; Danova, Marco

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A Phase II multicenter trial testing an accelerated regimen of radiotherapy in locally advanced and inoperable cancers of the head and neck, in patients selected on the basis of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/DNA flow cytometry-derived tumor potential doubling time (T pot ). Methods and Materials: From September 1992 to September 1993, 23 patients consecutively diagnosed to have locally advanced, inoperable carcinomas of the oral cavity and the oropharynx, with T pot of ≤5 days, received an accelerated radiotherapy regimen (AF) based on a modification of the concomitant boost technique: 2 Gy/fraction once a day, delivered 5 days a week up to 26 Gy, followed by 2 Gy/fraction twice a day, with a 6-h interval, one of the two fractions being delivered as a concomitant boost to reduced fields, up to 66 Gy total dose (off-cord reduction at 46 Gy), shortening the overall treatment time to 4.5 weeks. A contemporary control group of 46 patients with T pot of >5 days or unknown was treated with conventional fractionation (CF): 2 Gy/fraction once a day, 5 days a week, up to 66 Gy in 6.5 weeks, with fields shrinkage after 46 Gy. Results: All patients completed the accelerated regimen according to protocol and in the prescribed overall treatment time. Immediate tolerance was fairly good: 65% of the patients in the AF group experienced Grade 3 mucositis vs. 45% in the CF group (p = n.s.). Symptoms related to mucosal reactions seemed to persist longer in AF than in CF patients. The crude proportion of mild (Grades 1 and 2) late effects on skin (p < 0.01) and salivary glands (p < 0.05) was higher in AF than in CF patients, although these reactions did not exceed the limits of tolerance. Three patients in the AF and 1 in the CF arm experienced a late Grade 4 bone complication. Actuarial estimates of severe (Grades 3 and 4) late complications showed a 2-year hazard of 33.3% in the AF arm and 49.7% in CF (p = NS). The actuarial 2-year local control rate of the AF patients was 49

  19. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting (SC accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006cavities have been widely applied to cw acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the U.S. and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front end of such linacs, particularly for the postacceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008<β=v/c<0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication, and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3–4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  20. The quest for high-gradient superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting RF cavities excel in applications requiring continuous waves or long pulse voltages. Since power losses in the walls of the cavity increase as the square of the accelerating voltage, copper cavities become uneconomical as demand for high continuous wave voltage grows with particle energy. For these reasons, RF superconductivity has become an important technology for high energy and high luminosity accelerators. The state of art in performance of sheet metal niobium cavities is best represented by the statistics of more than 300 5-cell, 1.5-GHz cavities built for CEBAF. Key aspects responsible for the outstanding performance of the CEBAF cavities set are the anti-multipactor, elliptical cell shape, good fabrication and welding techniques, high thermal conductivity niobium, and clean surface preparation. On average, field emission starts at the electric field of 8.7 MV/m, but there is a large spread, even though the cavities received nominally the same surface treatment and assembly procedures. In some cavities, field emission was detected as low as 3 MV/m. In others, it was found to be as high as 19 MV/m. As we will discuss, the reason for the large spread in the gradients is the large spread in emitter characteristics and the random occurrence of emitters on the surface. One important phenomenon that limits the achievable RF magnetic field is thermal breakdown of superconductivity, originating at sub-millimeter-size regions of high RF loss, called defects. Simulation reveal that if the defect is a normal conducting region of 200 mm radius, it will break down at 5 MV/m. Producing high gradients and high Q in superconducting cavities demands excellent control of material properties and surface cleanliness. The spread in gradients that arises from the random occurrence of defects and emitters must be reduced. It will be important to improve installation procedures to preserve the excellent gradients now obtained in laboratory test in vertical cryostats

  1. High brightness electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.; Carlsten, B.E.; Young, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of accelerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electrons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electrons as the electrons enter the first cavity. 5 figs

  2. Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padamsee, Hasan S.

    2014-10-01

    Superconducting cavities have been operating routinely in a variety of accelerators with a range of demanding applications. With the success of completed projects, niobium cavities have become an enabling technology, offering upgrade paths for existing facilities and pushing frontier accelerators for nuclear physics, high-energy physics, materials science, and the life sciences. With continued progress in basic understanding of radio-frequency superconductivity, the performance of cavities has steadily improved to approach theoretical capabilities.

  3. The LHC superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Häbel, E; Kindermann, H P; Losito, R; Marque, S; Rödel, V; Stirbet, M

    1999-01-01

    The LHC RF system, which must handle high intensity (0.5 A d.c.) beams, makes use of superconducting single-cell cavities, best suited to minimizing the effects of periodic transient beam loading. There will be eight cavities per beam, each capable of delivering 2 MV (5 MV/m accelerating field) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industry, using niobium-on-copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A cavity unit includes a helium tank (4.5 K operating temperature) built around a cavity cell, RF and HOM couplers and a mechanical tuner, all housed in a modular cryostat. Four-unit modules are ultimately foreseen for the LHC (two per beam), while at present a prototype version with two complete units is being extensively tested. In addition to a detailed description of the cavity and its ancillary equipment, the first test results of the prototype will be reported.

  4. Electron acceleration by an obliquely propagating electromagnetic wave in the regime of validity of the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Vlahos, L.; Polymilis, C.

    1989-01-01

    The relativistic motion of an ensemble of electrons in an intense monochromatic electromagnetic wave propagating obliquely in a uniform external magnetic field is studied. The problem is formulated from the viewpoint of Hamiltonian theory and the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov approach analyzed by Hizanidis (1989), leading to a one-dimensional diffusive acceleration along paths of constant zeroth-order generalized Hamiltonian. For values of the wave amplitude and the propagating angle inside the analytically predicted stochastic region, the numerical results suggest that the diffusion probes proceeds in stages. In the first stage, the electrons are accelerated to relatively high energies by sampling the first few overlapping resonances one by one. During that stage, the ensemble-average square deviation of the variable involved scales quadratically with time. During the second stage, they scale linearly with time. For much longer times, deviation from linear scaling slowly sets in.

  5. Validation of the superconducting 3.9 GHz cavity package for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiano, C. G.; Branlard, J.; Hüning, M.; Jensch, K.; Kostin, D.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W.-D.; Sulimov, A.; Vogel, E.; Bosotti, A.; Chen, J. F.; Moretti, M.; Paparella, R.; Pierini, P.; Sertore, D.

    2017-04-01

    A full test of the cavity package concept under realistic operating condition was a necessary step before the assembly of the European XFEL (EXFEL) 3.9 GHz superconducting system and its installation in the accelerator. One cavity, equipped with magnetic shielding, power coupler and frequency tuner has been tested in a specially designed single cavity cryostat in one of the test benches of the DESY Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF). The cavity was operated at high pulsed power up to an accelerating field of 24 MV /m , above the quench accelerating field of 21 MV /m achieved during the continuous wave (CW) vertical qualification test and with a large margin with respect to the EXFEL maximum operating specification of 15 MV /m for the 3.9 GHz system. All subsystems under test—coupler, tuner, waveguide tuners, low level radio-frequency (LLRF) system—were qualified to their design performances.

  6. Pump depletion limited evolution of the relativistic plasma wave-front in a forced laser-wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, F; Clayton, C E; Marsh, K A; Pak, A E; Ralph, J E; Joshi, C [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Lopes, N C [Grupo de Lasers e Plasmas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: cclayton@ucla.edu

    2009-02-15

    In a forced laser-wakefield accelerator experiment (Malka et al 2002 Science 298 1596) where the length of the pump laser pulse is a few plasma periods long, the leading edge of the laser pulse undergoes frequency downshifting and head erosion as the laser energy is transferred to the wake. Therefore, after some propagation distance, the group velocity of the leading edge of the pump pulse-and thus of the driven electron plasma wave-will slow down. This can have implications for the dephasing length of the accelerated electrons and therefore needs to be understood experimentally. We have carried out an experimental investigation where we have measured the velocity v{sub f} of the 'wave-front' of the plasma wave driven by a nominally 50 fs (full width half maximum), intense (a{sub 0} {approx_equal} 1), 0.815 {mu}m laser pulse. To determine the speed of the wave front, time- and space-resolved refractometry, interferometry and Thomson scattering were used. Although a laser pulse propagating through a relatively low-density plasma (n{sub e} = 1.3 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) showed no measurable changes in v{sub f} over 1.3 mm (and no accelerated electrons), a high-density plasma (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) generated accelerated electrons and showed a continuous change in v{sub f} as the laser pulse propagated through the plasma. Possible causes and consequences of the observed v{sub f} evolution are discussed.

  7. Extreme Scale FMM-Accelerated Boundary Integral Equation Solver for Wave Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    AbdulJabbar, Mustafa Abdulmajeed

    2018-03-27

    Algorithmic and architecture-oriented optimizations are essential for achieving performance worthy of anticipated energy-austere exascale systems. In this paper, we present an extreme scale FMM-accelerated boundary integral equation solver for wave scattering, which uses FMM as a matrix-vector multiplication inside the GMRES iterative method. Our FMM Helmholtz kernels treat nontrivial singular and near-field integration points. We implement highly optimized kernels for both shared and distributed memory, targeting emerging Intel extreme performance HPC architectures. We extract the potential thread- and data-level parallelism of the key Helmholtz kernels of FMM. Our application code is well optimized to exploit the AVX-512 SIMD units of Intel Skylake and Knights Landing architectures. We provide different performance models for tuning the task-based tree traversal implementation of FMM, and develop optimal architecture-specific and algorithm aware partitioning, load balancing, and communication reducing mechanisms to scale up to 6,144 compute nodes of a Cray XC40 with 196,608 hardware cores. With shared memory optimizations, we achieve roughly 77% of peak single precision floating point performance of a 56-core Skylake processor, and on average 60% of peak single precision floating point performance of a 72-core KNL. These numbers represent nearly 5.4x and 10x speedup on Skylake and KNL, respectively, compared to the baseline scalar code. With distributed memory optimizations, on the other hand, we report near-optimal efficiency in the weak scalability study with respect to both the logarithmic communication complexity as well as the theoretical scaling complexity of FMM. In addition, we exhibit up to 85% efficiency in strong scaling. We compute in excess of 2 billion DoF on the full-scale of the Cray XC40 supercomputer.

  8. High-Q perpendicular-biased ferrite-tuned cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlini, R.D.; Thiessen, H.A.; Potter, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Rapid-cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Modest power tests of a small (10-cm-dia) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by nickel-zinc ferrites and aluminum-doped garnets indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity at power levels from 2 to 200 watts

  9. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  10. Implosion of Cylindrical Cavities via Short Duration Impulsive Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneault, Justin; Higgins, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    An apparatus has been developed to study the collapse of a cylindrical cavity in gelatin subjected to a symmetric impact-driven impulsive loading. A gas-driven annular projectile is accelerated to approximately 50 m/s, at which point it impacts a gelatin casting confined by curved steel surfaces that allow a transition from an annular geometry to a cylindrically imploding motion. The implosion is visualized by a high-speed camera through a window which forms the top confining wall of the implosion cavity. The initial size of the cavity is such that the gelatin wall is two to five times thicker than the impacting projectile. Thus, during impact the compression wave which travels towards the cavity is closely followed by a rarefaction resulting from the free surface reflection of the compression wave in the projectile. As the compression wave in the gelatin reaches the inner surface, it will also reflect as a rarefaction wave. The interaction between the rarefaction waves from the gelatin and projectile free surfaces leads to large tensile stresses resulting in the spallation of a relatively thin shell. The study focuses on the effect of impact parameters on the thickness and uniformity of the imploding shell formed by the cavitation in the imploding gelatin cylinder.

  11. Cavity Processing and Preparation of 650 MHz Elliptical Cell Cavities for PIP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Allan [Fermilab; Chandrasekaran, Saravan Kumar [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermilab; Merio, Margherita [Fermilab; Reid, Thomas [Argonne (main); Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    The PIP-II project at Fermilab requires fifteen 650 MHz SRF cryomodules as part of the 800 MeV LINAC that will provide a high intensity proton beam to the Fermilab neutrino program. A total of fifty-seven high-performance SRF cavities will populate the cryomodules and will operate in both pulsed and continuous wave modes. These cavities will be processed and prepared for performance testing utilizing adapted cavity processing infrastructure already in place at Fermilab and Argonne. The processing recipes implemented for these structures will incorporate state-of-the art processing and cleaning techniques developed for 1.3 GHz SRF cavities for the ILC, XFEL, and LCLS-II projects. This paper describes the details of the processing recipes and associated chemistry, heat treatment, and cleanroom processes at the Fermilab and Argonne cavity processing facilities. This paper also presents single and multi-cell cavity test results with quality factors above 5·10¹⁰ and accelerating gradients above 30 MV/m.

  12. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  13. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-02-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV /m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV /m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30 - 35 MV /m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV /m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc=30 - 35 MV /m . One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been

  14. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients E_{acc} up to 35  MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP and up to 42  MV/m after electropolishing (EP. More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients E_{acc} of 30–35  MV/m were measured after BCP and E_{acc} up to 40  MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of E_{acc}=30–35  MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and

  15. First demonstration and performance of an injection locked continuous wave magnetron to phase control a superconducting cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Dexter

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The applications of magnetrons to high power proton and cw electron linacs are discussed. An experiment is described where a 2.45 GHz magnetron has been used to drive a single cell superconducting cavity. With the magnetron injection locked, a modest phase control accuracy of 0.95° rms has been demonstrated. Factors limiting performance have been identified.

  16. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations

  17. Cluster observations of particle acceleration up to supra-thermal energies in the cusp region related to low-frequency wave activity – possible implications for the substorm initiation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Fritz

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study is to investigate the way particles are accelerated up to supra-thermal energies in the cusp diamagnetic cavities. For this reason we have examined a number of Cluster cusp crossings, originally identified by Zhang et al. (2005, for the years 2001 and 2002 using data from RAPID, STAFF, EFW, CIS, PEACE, and FGM experiments. In the present study we focus on two particular cusp crossings on 25 March 2002 and on 10 April 2002 which demonstrate in a clear way the general characteristics of the events in our survey. Both events exhibit very sharp spatial boundaries seen both in CNO (primarily single-charged oxygen of ionospheric origin based on CIS observations and H+ flux increases within the RAPID energy range with the magnetic field intensity being anti-correlated. Unlike the first event, the second one shows also a moderate electron flux increase. The fact that the duskward electric field Ey has relatively low values <5 mV/m while the local wave activity is very intense provides a strong indication that particle energization is caused primarily by wave-particle interactions. The wave power spectra and propagation parameters during these cusp events are examined in detail. It is concluded that the high ion fluxes and at the same time the presence or absence of any sign of energization in the electrons clearly shows that the particle acceleration depends on the wave power near the local particle gyrofrequency and on the persistence of the wave-particle interaction process before particles escape from cusp region. Furthermore, the continuous existence of energetic O+ ions suggests that energetic O+ populations are of spatial nature at least for the eight events that we have studied so far.

  18. Research on backward traveling wave electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huaibi; Zheng Shuxin; Ding Xiaodong; Lin Yuzheng

    1999-01-01

    Future electron linacs require high gradient acceleration. The studies on the high shunt impedance backward traveling wave electron linac accelerating structure (BTW) are presented. At first, the characteristics of BTW are researched. The option of mode and optimal design methods of accelerating cavity for BTW are studied. A physical design method for BTW accelerators, including longitudinal and transversal particle dynamics, is given. Based on above studies, a 9 MeV BTW accelerating tube at 3π/4 mode with frequency 2856 MHz for inspecting large container as radiation source at customs is designed, and a comparison with disk-loaded waveguide accelerating tube is made. The result of research leads to the conclusion that backward traveling wave accelerating structure is preferable. Because BTW has higher effective shunt impedance, shorter filling time and more stable operation

  19. Modeling the dynamics of a storm-time acceleration event: combining MHD effects with wave-particle interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkington, S. R.; Alam, S. S.; Chan, A. A.; Albert, J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    Global simulations of radiation belt dynamics are often undertaken using either a transport formalism (e.g. Fokker-Plank), or via test particle simulations in model electric and magnetic fields. While transport formalisms offer computational efficiency and the ability to deal with a wide range of wave-particle interactions, they typically rely on simplified background fields, and often are limited to empirically-specified stochastic (diffusive) wave-particle interactions. On the other hand, test particle simulations may be carried out in global MHD simulations that include realistic physical effects such as magnetopause shadowing, convection, and substorm injections, but lack the ability to handle physics outside the MHD approximation in the realm of higher frequency (kHz) wave populations.In this work we introduce a comprehensive simulation framework combining global MHD/test particle techniques to provide realistic background fields and radial transport processes, with a Stochastic Differential Equation (SDE) method for addressing high frequency wave-particle interactions. We examine the March 17, 2013 storm-time acceleration period, an NSF-GEM focus challenge event, and use the framework to examine the relative importance of physical effects such as magnetopause shadowing, diffusive and advective transport processes, and wave-particle interactions through the various phases of the storm.

  20. On waves below the local proton gyrofrequency in auroral acceleration regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, G.; Andre, M.; Matson, L.; Koskinen, H.

    1990-01-01

    The Viking wave electric field and density fluctuation measurements together with simultaneous particle observations are used to study waves at frequencies below the local proton gyrofrequency. Such waves were observed during about 20% of nightside auroral field line crossings by Viking at altitudes between 2,000 and 10,000 km. The observations are different from earlier spacecraft observations of similar waves in such a way that the center frequency in about one out of four of the observed events was below the gyrofrequency of singly charged helium, which has not been reported previously. The waves were well correlated with precipitating electrons of energies of a few keV and with VLF auroral hiss. Detailed investigations of simultaneously observed wave emissions, particles, and total densities strongly suggest that secondary peaks at keV energies in the distributions of downgoing electrons can cause the emissions