WorldWideScience

Sample records for water-to-air stopping power

  1. Monte Carlo simulations on the water-to-air stopping power ratio for carbon ion dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkner, Katrin; Bassler, Niels; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Jäkel, Oliver

    2009-04-01

    Many papers discussed the I value for water given by the ICRU, concluding that a value of about 80 +/- 2 eV instead of 67.2 eV would reproduce measured ion depth-dose curves. A change in the I value for water would have an effect on the stopping power and, hence, on the water-to-air stopping power ratio, which is important in clinical dosimetry of proton and ion beams. For energies ranging from 50 to 330 MeV/u and for one spread out Bragg peak, the authors compare the impact of the I value on the water-to-air stopping power ratio. The authors calculate ratios from different ICRU stopping power tables and ICRU reports. The stopping power ratio is calculated via track-length dose calculation with SHIELD-HIT07. In the calculations, the stopping power ratio is reduced to a value of 1.119 in the plateau region as compared to the cited value of 1.13 in IAEA TRS-398. At low energies the stopping power ratio increases by up to 6% in the last few tenths of a mm toward the Bragg peak. For a spread out Bragg peak of 13.5 mm width at 130 mm depth, the stopping power ratio increases by about 1% toward the distal end.

  2. Monte Carlo Simulations on the water-to-air stopping power ratio for carbon ion dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkner, Katrin; Bassler, Niels; Sobolevsky, Nikolai;

    2009-01-01

    Many papers discussed the I value for water given by the ICRU, concluding that a value of about 80±2  eV instead of 67.2  eV would reproduce measured ion depth-dose curves. A change in the I value for water would have an effect on the stopping power and, hence, on the water-to-air stopping power...... ratio, which is important in clinical dosimetry of proton and ion beams. For energies ranging from 50  to  330  MeV/u and for one spread out Bragg peak, the authors compare the impact of the I value on the water-to-air stopping power ratio. The authors calculate ratios from different ICRU stopping power...... tables and ICRU reports. The stopping power ratio is calculated via track-length dose calculation with SHIELD-HIT07. In the calculations, the stopping power ratio is reduced to a value of 1.119 in the plateau region as compared to the cited value of 1.13 in IAEA TRS-398. At low energies the stopping...

  3. Experimental study of the water-to-air stopping power ratio of monoenergetic carbon ion beams for particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D; Gemmel, A; Jäkel, O; Parodi, K; Rietzel, E

    2012-06-07

    Reference dosimetry with ionization chambers requires a number of chamber-specific and beam-specific calibration factors. For carbon ion beams, IAEA report TRS-398 yields a total uncertainty of 3% in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, for which the biggest contribution arises from the water-to-air stopping power ratio (s(w, air)), with an uncertainty of 2%. The variation of (s(w, air)) along the treatment field has been studied in several Monte Carlo works presented over the last few years. Their results were, in all cases, strongly dependent on the choice of mean ionization potentials (I-values) for air and water. A smaller dependence of (s(w, air)) with penetration depth was observed. Since a consensus on I(w, air) and I(air) has not yet been reached, the validity of such studies for clinical use cannot be assessed independently. Our approach is based on a direct experimental measurement of water-equivalent thicknesses of different air gaps at different beam energies. A theoretical expression describing the variation of the stopping power ratio with kinetic energy, s(w,air)(E), was derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula and fit to the measured data, yielding a coherent pair of I(w) and I(air) values with I(air)/I(w) = 1.157 ± 0.023. Additionally, the data from five different beam energies were combined in an average value of s(w,air) = 1.132 ± 0.003 (statistical) ± 0.003 (variation over energy range), valid for monoenergetic carbon ion beams at the plateau area of the depth dose distribution. A detailed uncertainty analysis was performed on the data, in order to assess the limitations of the method, yielding an overall standard uncertainty below 1% in s(w,air)(E). Therefore, when properly combined with the appropriate models for the fragment spectra, our experimental work can contribute to narrow the uncertainty margins currently in use in absorbed dose to water determination for dosimetry of carbon ion beam radiotherapy.

  4. Analytical expressions for water-to-air stopping-power ratios relevant for accurate dosimetry in particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Armin; Hansen, David C; Jäkel, Oliver; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Bassler, Niels

    2011-04-21

    In particle therapy, knowledge of the stopping-power ratio (STPR) of the ion beam for water and air is necessary for accurate ionization chamber dosimetry. Earlier work has investigated the STPR for pristine carbon ion beams, but here we expand the calculations to a range of ions (1 ≤ z ≤ 18) as well as spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) and provide a theoretical in-depth study with a special focus on the parameter regime relevant for particle therapy. The Monte Carlo transport code SHIELD-HIT is used to calculate complete particle-fluence spectra which are required for determining the STPR according to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The STPR at a depth d depends primarily on the average energy of the primary ions at d rather than on their charge z or absolute position in the medium. However, STPRs for different sets of stopping-power data for water and air recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements are compared, including also the recently revised data for water, yielding deviations up to 2% in the plateau region. In comparison, the influence of the secondary particle spectra on the STPR is about two orders of magnitude smaller in the whole region up till the practical range. The gained insights enable us to propose simple analytical expressions for the STPR for both pristine and SOBPs as a function of penetration depth depending parametrically on the practical range.

  5. Influence of the delta ray production threshold on water-to-air stopping power ratio calculations for carbon ion beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D; Gemmel, A; Jäkel, O; Rietzel, E; Parodi, K

    2013-01-07

    Previous calculations of the water-to-air stopping power ratio (s(w,)(air)) for carbon ion beams did not involve tracking of delta ray electrons, even though previous calculations with protons predict an effect up to 1%. We investigate the effect of the delta ray production threshold in s(w,)(air) calculations and propose an empirical expression which takes into account the effect of the delta ray threshold as well as the uncertainty in the mean ionization potentials (I-values) of air and water. The formula is derived from the results of Monte Carlo calculations using the most up-to-date experimental data for I-values and a delta ray production threshold of 10 keV. It allows us to reduce the standard uncertainty in s(w,)(air) below 0.8%, instead of the current 2% given in international protocols, which results in a reduction of the overall uncertainty for absolute dosimetry based on air-filled ionization chambers.

  6. Stopping Power for Degenerate Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, Jr., Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    This is a first attempt at calculating the BPS stopping power with electron degeneracy corrections. Section I establishes some notation and basic facts. Section II outlines the basics of the calculation, and in Section III contains some brief notes on how to proceed with the details of the calculation. The remaining work for the calculation starts with Section III.

  7. Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 7 NIST Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials (PC database for purchase)   The EPSTAR database provides rapid calculations of stopping powers (collisional, radiative, and total), CSDA ranges, radiation yields and density effect corrections for incident electrons or positrons with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 10 GeV, and for any chemically defined target material.

  8. The Potential Stopping Power of Student Photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that capturing photographs that have "stopping power" should not be an impossible task, but a reality for student photographers. Lists 19 recent publications and web sites on photography and photojournalism. Discusses ways for scholastic photographers to take pictures with stopping power. (RS)

  9. Calculation of stopping power ratios for carbon ion dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithner, Oksana; Andreo, P; Sobolevsky, N; Hartmann, G; Jäkel, O

    2006-05-07

    Water-to-air stopping power ratio calculations for the ionization chamber dosimetry of clinical carbon ion beams with initial energies from 50 to 450 MeV/u have been performed using the Monte Carlo technique. To simulate the transport of a particle in water the computer code SHIELD-HIT v2 was used, which is a newly developed version where substantial modifications were implemented on its predecessor SHIELD-HIT v1 (Gudowska et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 1933-58). The code was completely rewritten replacing formerly used single precision variables with double precision variables. The lowest particle transport specific energy was decreased from 1 MeV/u down to 10 keV/u by modifying the Bethe-Bloch formula, thus widening its range for medical dosimetry applications. In addition, the code includes optionally MSTAR and ICRU-73 stopping power data. The fragmentation model was verified and its parameters were also adjusted. The present code version shows excellent agreement with experimental data. It has been used to compute the physical quantities needed for the calculation of stopping power ratios, s(water,air), of carbon beams. Compared with the recommended constant value given in the IAEA Code of Practice, the differences found in the present investigations varied between 0.5% and 1% at the plateau region, respectively for 400 MeV/u and 50 MeV/u beams, and up to 2.3% in the vicinity of the Bragg peak for 50 MeV/u.

  10. Unitary water-to-air heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.

    1977-10-01

    Performance and cost functions for nine unitary water-to-air heat pumps ranging in nominal size from /sup 1///sub 2/ to 26 tons are presented in mathematical form for easy use in heat pump computer simulations. COPs at nominal water source temperature of 60/sup 0/F range from 2.5 to 3.4 during the heating cycle; during the cooling cycle EERs range from 8.33 to 9.09 with 85/sup 0/F entering water source temperatures. The COP and EER values do not include water source pumping power or any energy requirements associated with a central heat source and heat rejection equipment.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of classical stopping power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Paul E; Surh, Michael P; Richards, David F; Graziani, Frank R; Murillo, Michael S

    2013-11-22

    Molecular dynamics can provide very accurate tests of classical kinetic theory; for example, unambiguous comparisons can be made for classical particles interacting via a repulsive 1/r potential. The plasma stopping power problem, of great interest in its own right, provides an especially stringent test of a velocity-dependent transport property. We have performed large-scale (~10(4)-10(6) particles) molecular dynamics simulations of charged-particle stopping in a classical electron gas that span the weak to moderately strong intratarget coupling regimes. Projectile-target coupling is varied with projectile charge and velocity. Comparisons are made with disparate kinetic theories (both Boltzmann and Lenard-Balescu classes) and fully convergent theories to establish regimes of validity. We extend these various stopping models to improve agreement with the MD data and provide a useful fit to our results.

  12. Electron mass stopping power in H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursa, Dmitry V.; Zammit, Mark C.; Threlfall, Robert L.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Bray, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Calculations of electron mass stopping power (SP) of electrons in H2 have been performed using the convergent close-coupling method for incident electron energies up to 2000 eV. Convergence of the calculated SP has been established by increasing the size of the close-coupling expansion from 9 to 491 states. Good agreement was found with the SP measurements of Munoz et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 433, 253 (2007), 10.1016/j.cplett.2006.10.114].

  13. Antiproton stopping at low energies: confirmation of velocity-proportional stopping power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, S P; Csete, A; Ichioka, T; Knudsen, H; Uggerhøj, U I; Andersen, H H

    2002-05-13

    The stopping power for antiprotons in various solid targets has been measured in the low-energy range of 1-100 keV. In agreement with most models, in particular free-electron gas models, the stopping power is found to be proportional to the projectile velocity below the stopping-power maximum. Although a stopping power proportional to velocity has also been observed for protons, the interpretation of such measurements is difficult due to the presence of charge exchange processes. Hence, the present measurements constitute the first unambiguous support for a velocity-proportional stopping power due to target excitations by a pointlike projectile.

  14. Ion stopping powers and CT numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, Michael F; Sardesai, Milind; Sun, Sean; Miller, Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    One of the advantages of ion beam therapy is the steep dose gradient produced near the ion's range. Use of this advantage makes knowledge of the stopping powers for all materials through which the beam passes critical. Most treatment planning systems calculate dose distributions using depth dose data measured in water and an algorithm that converts the kilovoltage X-ray computed tomography (CT) number of a given material to its linear stopping power relative to water. Some materials present in kilovoltage scans of patients and simulation phantoms do not lie on the standard tissue conversion curve. The relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs) of 21 different tissue substitutes and positioning, registration, immobilization, and beamline materials were measured in beams of protons accelerated to energies of 155, 200, and 250 MeV; carbon ions accelerated to 290 MeV/n; and iron ions accelerated to 970 MeV/n. These same materials were scanned with both kilovoltage and megavoltage CT scanners to obtain their CT numbers. Measured RLSPs and CT numbers were compared with calculated and/or literature values. Relationships of RLSPs to physical densities, electronic densities, kilovoltage CT numbers, megavoltage CT numbers, and water equivalence values converted by a treatment planning system are given. Usage of CT numbers and substitution of measured values into treatment plans to provide accurate patient and phantom simulations are discussed. 2010 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stopping power of charged particles due to ion wave excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, H; Muroki, C; Nambu, M

    2002-08-01

    Stopping power due to ion wave excitations is derived for a charged particle moving in a two-component plasma. Unlike previous theories based on ion-acoustic-wave approximation (IAWA), the excitation of short-wavelength ion waves is taken into account. The obtained stopping power has a magnitude larger than that of IAWA. Stopping power at subsonic velocities, where stopping power in IAWA disappears, is even larger than that of supersonic velocities.

  16. Stopping power of charged particles due to ion wave excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, H.; Muroki, C.; Nambu, M.

    2002-08-01

    Stopping power due to ion wave excitations is derived for a charged particle moving in a two-component plasma. Unlike previous theories based on ion-acoustic-wave approximation (IAWA), the excitation of short-wavelength ion waves is taken into account. The obtained stopping power has a magnitude larger than that of IAWA. Stopping power at subsonic velocities, where stopping power in IAWA disappears, is even larger than that of supersonic velocities.

  17. Stopping power: Effect of the projectile deceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kompaneets, Roman, E-mail: kompaneets@mpe.mpg.de; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Morfill, Gregor E. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstr. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    The stopping force is the force exerted on the projectile by its wake. Since the wake does not instantly adjust to the projectile velocity, the stopping force should be affected by the projectile deceleration caused by the stopping force itself. We address this effect by deriving the corresponding correction to the stopping force in the cold plasma approximation. By using the derived expression, we estimate that if the projectile is an ion passing through an electron-proton plasma, the correction is small when the stopping force is due to the plasma electrons, but can be significant when the stopping force is due to the protons.

  18. The phase effect of electronic stopping power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaZhong-Quan; ZhengYu-Feng

    1998-01-01

    A corrective factor(φ(E,ρ)≤1) dependent on ion energy and mass density of material for energy loss has been introduced into Bethe-Bloch formula,so that the energy deposition process of fast ion penetrating through the allotropic solid films are well discussed with the two-component assumption.An analysis expression of electronic stopping power for different phase structures has been derived from the contribution of "valence ”and “Core” electrons.The two thirds of inelastic scattering arisen from valence electron was revealed by comparing the theoretical calculation and experimental results on both random and oriented lattice site.THe corrective factor representative to the role of inner electrons increases with the projectile energy but decreases with mass density of solids.

  19. Fast modelling of spectra and stopping-power ratios using differentiated fluence pencil kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2008-08-21

    Modern radiotherapy steadily utilizes more of the available degrees of freedom provided by radiotherapy equipment, raising the need for the dosimetric methods to deliver reliable measurements for situations where the spectral properties of the radiation field may also vary. A kernel-based superposition method is presented for which the spectra from any field modulation can be instantly calculated, thus facilitating the determination of dosimetric quantities at arbitrary locations. A database of fluence pencil kernels describing the fluence resulting from point monodirectional monoenergetic beams incident onto a water phantom has been calculated with the PENELOPE-2005 Monte Carlo package. Spectra calculated by means of the kernels are presented for various 6 MV fields. The spectra have been used to investigate depth and lateral variations of water-to-air stopping-power ratios. Results show that the stopping-power ratio decreases with depth, and that this effect is more pronounced for small fields. These variations are clearly connected to spectral variations. For a 10 x 10 cm(2) field, the difference between the stopping-power ratio at 2.5 cm depth and 30 cm depth is less than 0.3% while for a 0.3 x 0.3 cm(2) field this difference is 0.7%. Ratios outside the field were found to be sensitive to the collimator leakage spectral variations.

  20. Stopping, goal-conflict, trait anxiety and frontal rhythmic power in the stop-signal task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Phoebe S-H; Thurlow, Jane K; McNaughton, Neil

    2011-12-01

    The medial right frontal cortex is implicated in fast stopping of an initiated motor action in the stop-signal task (SST). To assess whether this region is also involved in the slower behavioural inhibition induced by goal conflict, we tested for effects of goal conflict (when stop and go tendencies are balanced) on low-frequency rhythms in the SST. Stop trials were divided, according to the delays at which the stop signal occurred, into short-, intermediate-, and long-delay trials. Consistent with goal-conflict processing, intermediate-delay trials were associated with greater 7-8 Hz EEG power than short- or long-delay trials at medial right frontal sites (Fz, F4, and F8). At F8, 7-8 Hz power was linked to high trait anxiety and neuroticism. A separate 4-7 Hz power increase was also seen in stop, relative to go, trials, but this was independent of delay, was maximal at the central midline site Cz, and predicted faster stopping. Together with previous data on the SST, these results suggest that the right frontal region could be involved in multiple inhibition mechanisms. We propose a hierarchical model of the control of stopping that integrates the literature on the neural control of fast motor stopping with that on slower, motive-directed behavioural inhibition.

  1. Ion Stopping Powers and Ranges Whenever You Need Them

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Christensen, Casper; Tørresø, Jesper Rosholm

    A new app "Electronic Stopping Power" for Android mobile phones and tablets, looks up stopping powers using the ICRU 49 (protons and alphas) and the revised ICRU 73 (lithium and heavier ions) tables. In addition, also MSTAR and an implementation of the Bethe equation expanded to low energies...

  2. Measurement of the antiproton stopping power of gold - the Barkas effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1991-05-01

    The stopping power of gold has been measured for antiprotons in the energy range 0.2-3 MeV using a novel time-of-flight technique. The antiproton stopping power is found to be less than half the equivalent proton stopping power near the electronic stopping power maximum. In the high-energy limit the two stopping powers merge.

  3. Measurement of the antiproton stopping power of gold - the Barkas effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E.; Worm, T. (Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1991-05-06

    The stopping power of gold has been measured for antiprotons in the energy range 0.2-3 MeV using a novel time-of-flight technique. The antiproton stopping power is found to be less than half the equivalent proton stopping power near the electronic stopping power maximum. In the high-energy limit the two stopping powers merge. (orig.).

  4. Stopping Powers and Ranges of Electrons and Positions,

    Science.gov (United States)

    2) use of the general formulation of Sternheimer and Peierls for the density-effect correcting to the collision stopping power; and (3) use of theoretical bremsstrahlung cross sections of Tseng and Pratt. (Author)

  5. Calculation of the relativistic Bloch correction to stopping power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlen, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Bloch's technique of joining the nonrelativistic Bethe and Bohr stopping-power expressions by taking into account wave-packet effects for close collisions is extended to the relativistic case. It is found that Bloch's nonrelativistic correction term must be modified and that charge asymmetric terms appear. Excellent agreement is observed by comparing the results of these calculations to recent data on the stopping power of relativistic heavy ions.

  6. Proton Stopping Power of Different Density Profile Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, David; Andreev, Alexander A; Schnürer, Matthias; Morales, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the stopping power of a partially ionized plasma is analyzed by means of free electron stopping and bound electron stopping. For the first one, the RPA dielectric function is used, and for the latter one, an interpolation of high and low projectile velocity formulas is used. The dynamical energy loss of an ion beam inside a plasma is estimated by using an iterative scheme of calculation. The Abel inversion is also applied when we have a plasma with radial symmetry. Finally, we compare our methods with two kind of plasmas. In the first one, we estimate the energy loss in a plasma created by a laser prepulse, whose density is approximated by a piecewise function. For the latter one, a radial electron density is supposed and the stopping is obtained as function of radius from the calculated lateral points. In both cases, the dependence with the density profile is observed.

  7. PROTON STOPPING POWER OF DIFFERENT DENSITY PROFILE PLASMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Casas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the stopping power of a partially ionized plasma is analyzed by means of free electron stopping and bound electron stopping. For the first instance, the RPA dielectric function is used, and for the latter one, an interpolation of high and low projectile velocity formulas is used. The dynamical energy loss of a ion beam inside a plasma is estimated by using an iterative scheme of calculation. The Abel inversion is also applied when we have a plasma with radial symmetry. Finally, we compare our methods with two kind of plasmas. In the first one, we estimate the energy loss in a plasma created by a laser prepulse, whose density is approximated by a piecewise function. For the latter one, a radial electron density is supposed and the stopping is obtained as a function of radius from the calculated lateral points. In both cases, the dependence with the density profile is observed.

  8. Stopping power of an electron gas with anisotropic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelemelia, O. V.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    A general theory of motion of a heavy charged particle in the electron gas with an anisotropic velocity distribution is developed within the quantum-field method. The analytical expressions for the dielectric susceptibility and the stopping power of the electron gas differs in no way from well-known classic formulas in the approximation of large and small velocities. Stopping power of the electron gas with anisotropic temperature in the framework of the quantum-field method is numerically calculated for an arbitrary angle between directions of the motion of the projectile particle and the electron beam. The results of the numerical calculations are compared with the dielectric model approach.

  9. Beam characteristics and stopping-power ratios of small radiosurgery photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X; Ding, Frances

    2012-09-07

    Small megavoltage (MV) photon fields of dimensions less than 3 × 3 cm(2) are increasingly being used in modern radiation therapy. To our knowledge, small beam characteristics and dosimetric parameters, such as the energy spectra, particle fluence, and water-to-air stopping-power ratios (SPRs) directly affect the accuracy of small field dosimetry. This study presents the characteristics of small photon beams and investigates the variations of energy spectra of photons and electrons as a function of field size and their effects on the water-to-air SPRs for field sizes ranging from a small 4 mm diameter circular field to a 10 × 10 cm(2) field. It sheds light on the differences between small fields collimated by the cone accessory and X- and Y-jaws and on beam characteristics outside the primary radiation fields. In addition, we also investigated the use of an 'intermediate machine-specific-reference field' (Alfonso et al 2008 Med. Phys. 35 5179-86) to determine if the variations between a small and a reference field can be eased by introducing an intermediate 4 × 4 cm(2) field instead of a standard 10 × 10 cm(2) reference field. The Monte Carlo simulation codes BEAMnrc, DOSXYZnrc and SPRRZnrc were used in this study. The accelerator head and circular cone accessory were simulated in detail including two designs of flattening filters: one for a standard-dose rate (100-600 MU min(-1)) and the other for a high-dose rate (1000 MU min(-1)) 6 MV beam. The mean energy of photons at depths (1.5-30 cm) in water are 1.72-2.36 MeV, 1.55-1.97 MeV, and 1.44-1.74 MeV for field sizes of 4 mm diameter, 4 × 4 cm(2), and 10 × 10 cm(2), respectively. The mean energy also varies significantly for electrons at depths (1.5-30 cm): 0.99-1.25 MeV, 0.94-1.09 MeV, and 0.93-1.04 MeV for field sizes of 4 mm, 4 × 4 cm(2), and 10 × 10 cm(2), respectively. The calculated water-to-air SPRs at depths (1.5-30 cm) are 1.120-1.113, 1.121-1.117, and 1.122-1.119 for field sizes of 4 mm, 4 × 4 cm

  10. Measurements of output factors with different detector types and Monte Carlo calculations of stopping-power ratios for degraded electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Peter; Knöös, Tommy; Nilsson, Per

    2004-10-07

    The aim of the present study was to investigate three different detector types (a parallel-plate ionization chamber, a p-type silicon diode and a diamond detector) with regard to output factor measurements in degraded electron beams, such as those encountered in small-electron-field radiotherapy and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The Monte Carlo method was used to calculate mass collision stopping-power ratios between water and the different detector materials for these complex electron beams (nominal energies of 6, 12 and 20 MeV). The diamond detector was shown to exhibit excellent properties for output factor measurements in degraded beams and was therefore used as a reference. The diode detector was found to be well suited for practical measurements of output factors, although the water-to-silicon stopping-power ratio was shown to vary slightly with treatment set-up and irradiation depth (especially for lower electron energies). Application of ionization-chamber-based dosimetry, according to international dosimetry protocols, will introduce uncertainties smaller than 0.3% into the output factor determination for conventional IORT beams if the variation of the water-to-air stopping-power ratio is not taken into account. The IORT system at our department includes a 0.3 cm thin plastic scatterer inside the therapeutic beam, which furthermore increases the energy degradation of the electrons. By ignoring the change in the water-to-air stopping-power ratio due to this scatterer, the output factor could be underestimated by up to 1.3%. This was verified by the measurements. In small-electron-beam dosimetry, the water-to-air stopping-power ratio variation with field size could mostly be ignored. For fields with flat lateral dose profiles (>3 x 3 cm2), output factors determined with the ionization chamber were found to be in close agreement with the results of the diamond detector. For smaller field sizes the lateral extension of the ionization chamber hampers

  11. Electronic stopping power in LiF from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruneda, J M; Sánchez-Portal, D; Arnau, A; Juaristi, J I; Artacho, Emilio

    2007-12-07

    Using time-dependent density-functional theory we calculate from first principles the rate of energy transfer from a moving proton or antiproton to the electrons of an insulating material, LiF. The behavior of the electronic stopping power versus projectile velocity displays an effective threshold velocity of approximately 0.2 a.u. for the proton, consistent with recent experimental observations, and also for the antiproton. The calculated proton/antiproton stopping-power ratio is approximately 2.4 at velocities slightly above the threshold (v approximately 0.4 a.u.), as compared to the experimental value of 2.1. The projectile energy loss mechanism is observed to be extremely local.

  12. Stopping power of C, O and Cl in tantalum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barradas, Nuno P., E-mail: nunoni@ctn.ist.utl.pt [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Laboratório de Engenharia Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Alves, E. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal); Fonseca, M. [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829- 516 Caparica (Portugal); ISLA Campus Lisboa| Laureate International Universities, 1500-210 Lisboa (Portugal); Siketić, Z.; Bogdanović Radović, I. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: •We measured the stopping power of C, O, and Cl in tantalum oxide. •A bulk sample method was used, with Bayesian inference data analysis. •Good agreement was found with SRIM2012 calculations. -- Abstract: Tantalum oxide is used in a variety of applications due to its high bandgap, high-K and high index of refraction. Unintentional impurities can change properties of tantalum oxide, and heavy ion elastic recoil detection is a method that can play a fundamental role in the quantification of those impurities. Furthermore, tantalum oxide is frequently part of the samples that also include other materials, which are often analysed with ion beam techniques. However, there are very few reported stopping power measurements for tantalum oxide, and data analysis relies not only on interpolation from a sparse data base but also on the Bragg rule. As is well known, the Bragg rule is often inaccurate for oxides, particularly when the difference in atomic numbers of the involved elements is very large as is case for Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. We have used a bulk method, previously developed by us and applied successfully to other systems, to determine experimentally the stopping power of tantalum oxide for three different ion types: C, O and Cl. In the present paper the results of our measurements and bulk method analysis are presented.

  13. Stopping power for particle therapy: the generic library libdEdx and clinically relevant stopping-power ratios for light ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Toftegaard, Jakob; Kantemiris, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    to be known accurately for dosimetry. Methods: An open-source computer library called libdEdx (library for energy loss per unit path length, dE/dx, calculations) is developed, providing stopping-power data from data tables and computer programs as well as a stopping-power formula comprising a large list...

  14. New stopping power formula for intermediate energy electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, Hasan

    2008-12-01

    This study presents a new stopping power (SP) formula for electrons. In the modified Bethe-Bloch SP expression, analytical expressions for the effective charge and effective mean excitation energies (EMEE) of target atoms are used, while for the effective charge of incoming electrons, Sugiyama's semiempirical formula from Peterson and Green is used. An analytical expression for practical SP calculations is obtained using the Bethe approximation and a Thomas-Fermi model of the atom. The calculated results of the SP for electrons in some materials, such as H(2)O, H(2), CO(2), N(2), and O(2), are compared with experimental data, together with Penelope code results and a number of other semiempirical and analytical calculations.

  15. Stopping power and CSDA range calculations for incident electrons and positrons in breast and brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufan, Mustafa Çağatay; Namdar, Tuba; Gümüş, Hasan

    2013-05-01

    The stopping power in some biological compounds for electrons and positrons was calculated over the energy range from 100 eV to 1 GeV. Total stopping power was obtained by summing the electronic (collisional) and radiative stopping power of the target materials and then employing the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) to calculate the path length of incident particles in the target. An effective charge approximation was used for the calculation of collisional stopping power, and an analytical expression for the radiation length was applied to obtain the radiative stopping power. Calculations of stopping power and CSDA range were based mostly on analytical expressions, to allow for an easy calculation of these parameters. The results were tabulated and compared with available data.

  16. Stopping powers of energetic electrons penetrating condensed matter--theory and application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Zhen-Yu; XIA Yue-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    In this review article, the motivation of studying inelastic energy loss for energetic electrons penetrating through matter and the corresponding technological importance have been outlined. The theoretical development and method for the calculation of stopping powers are described. The stopping power data tables for a group of polymers and bioorganic compounds are presented, and the application aspects of the stopping power data are briefly discussed.

  17. Measurement of the stopping power for 16O in 4He gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, D.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Fernández Garcia, J. P.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Zadro, M.

    2016-12-01

    The stopping power for 16O ions in 4He gas from 1 to 31 MeV is measured using an indirect method. The 16O beam of fixed energy entered a scattering chamber filled with 4He gas at different pressures and its residual energy is measured. The stopping power is determined by differentiating the thickness versus residual energy curve. The measured stopping power is compared with those calculated with the codes SRIM and MSTAR.

  18. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 124 Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions (Web, free access)   The databases ESTAR, PSTAR, and ASTAR calculate stopping-power and range tables for electrons, protons, or helium ions. Stopping-power and range tables can be calculated for electrons in any user-specified material and for protons and helium ions in 74 materials.

  19. Stopping power measurements with the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, Cristiano L., E-mail: fontana@pd.infn.it [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Chen, Chien-Hung; Crespillo, Miguel L.; Graham, Joseph T.; Xue, Haizhou [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A review of measurements of the stopping power of ions in matter is presented along with new measurements of the stopping powers of O, Si, Ti, and Au ions in self-supporting thin foils of SiO{sub 2}, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. A Time-of-Flight system at the Ion Beam Materials Laboratory at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, was used in transmission geometry in order to reduce experimental uncertainties. The resulting stopping powers show good precision and accuracy and corroborate previously quoted values in the literature. New stopping data are determined.

  20. An experimental investigation of charge-dependent deviations from the Bethe stopping power formula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Simonsen, H.; Sørensen, H.

    1969-01-01

    The stopping powers of aluminiun and tantalum for 5–13.5 MeV protons and deuterons and 8–20 MeV 3He and 4He have been measured. At identical velocities, the ratio between the stopping powers for the double-charged and the single-charged ions is systematically higher than the factor four predicted...

  1. Certain features of the stopping power of gases for fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidovich, N.N.; Nakhutin, I.E.; Shatunov, V.G.

    1975-11-20

    The stopping power for the Cf/sup 252/ spontaneous fission fragments in air down to energies approx.0.8 MeV was investigated. The experimental dependence of the electronic stopping power of air for fission fragments differs from that predicted by the theory. (AIP)

  2. Electronic stopping power of hydrogen in KCl at the stopping maximum and at very low energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primetzhofer, D.; Markin, S. N.; Bauer, P.

    2011-10-01

    The electronic energy loss of hydrogen ions in KCl was investigated in a wide energy range. Thin films of KCl were evaporated on an Au/Si substrate. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was performed with protons and deuterons at energies from 30 to 400 keV/nucleon. At lower energies experiments were performed by Time-Of-Flight Low energy ion scattering (TOF-LEIS) again with proton and deuteron projectiles. Experimental results are compared to calculated/tabulated values for the electronic energy loss. Whereas at energies beyond the stopping maximum very good agreement is found, at lower ion energies discrepancies between experiment and calculations increase. At very low ion velocities the extrapolated stopping cross section ɛ predicts vanishing electronic energy loss at energies below 100 eV/nucleon.

  3. Calculations on the stopping power of a heterogeneous Warm Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, David; Schnürer, Matthias; Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D; Morales, Roberto; González-Gallego, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The stopping power of Warm Dense Matter (WDM) is estimated by means of the individual contributions of free electrons and bound electrons existing in this special kind of matter, located between classical and degenerate plasmas. For free electrons, the dielectric formalism, well described in previous works of our research group, is used to estimate free electron stopping power. For bound electrons, mean excitation energy of ions is used. Excitation energies are obtained through atomic calculations of the whole atom or, shell by shell in order to estimate their stopping power. Influence of temperature and density is analyzed in case of an impinging projectile. This influence became important for low projectile velocities and negligible for high ones. Using both analysis, the stopping power of an extended WDM is inferred from a dynamical calculation of energy transferred from the projectile to the plasma, where the Bragg peak and stopping range are calculated. Finally, this theoretical framework is used to stud...

  4. Measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons between 0. 2 and 3 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E.; Worm, T. (Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H. (Inst. of Physics, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1991-05-01

    Our previous measurement of the stopping power of silicon power of silicon for antiprotons has been extended down to 200 keV. The antiproton stopping power is found to be more than 30% lower than that for equivelocity protons at 200 keV. The ''Z{sub 1}{sup 3} contribution'' to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons. Comparisons to theoretical estimates are made. (orig.).

  5. Shell correction for the stopping power of K electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, P. T.; Rustgi, M. L.; Long, S. A. T.

    1986-01-01

    In view of the inapplicability of the asymptotic expressions for the stopping number available in the literature at high energies, an alternative approach is taken to compute the shell correction to the stopping number of K electrons. Anholt's formula for the K-shell ionization has been used to calculate the excitation function for longitudinal interaction and numerical integration over energy has been carried out to evaluate the shell correction. Comparison with other theoretical calculations is made. It is proposed that, with the inclusion of relativistic effects, an asymptotic expansion of the stopping number with a leading-term logarithmic in the energy of the incident particle would be more meaningful and might enable one to extract the relativistic contribution to the shell correction from it.

  6. Stopping power of {sup 1}H and {sup 4}He in lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barradas, N.P., E-mail: nunoni@ctn.ist.utl.pt [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Laboratório de Engenharia Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Marques, J.G. [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Laboratório de Engenharia Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Alves, E. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: •We measured the stopping power of {sup 1}H in LiNbO{sub 3} between 0.27 and 2.33 MeV. •We measured the stopping power of {sup 4}He in LiNbO{sub 3} between 0.44 and 2.33 MeV. •Good agreement was found with SRIM2012 calculations. -- Abstract: Lithium niobate is an important material for applications in bulk optoelectronics and integrated optics devices. Ion beam analysis methods are often used to study this material. However, to our knowledge a single study has been presented in 1996 on measurement of stopping powers in LiNbO{sub 3} at velocities usual in ion beam analysis, for protons and deuterons near the stopping power maximum. The results were 15% lower than the values calculated from the elemental Li, Nb and O stopping powers then available together with the Bragg rule. In practice, all ion beam analysis studies of LiNbO{sub 3} still use the Bragg rule. We have used a bulk method, previously developed by us and applied successfully to other systems, to determine experimentally the stopping power of lithium niobate for {sup 1}H and {sup 4}He ions in the energy range 0.3–2.3 MeV. The results of our measurements and bulk method analysis are presented and discussed in the context of currently available stopping power calculations.

  7. Stopping Power of Solid Argon for Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Grauersen, O.

    1981-01-01

    By means of the Rutherford-backscattering method, the stopping cross section of solid argon has been measured for 0.5–3 MeV helium ions to an accuracy of not, vert, similar3%. The results agree within the experimental accuracies with our earlier measurements for gaseous argon over the energy region...

  8. Influence of electron motion in target atom on stopping power for low-energetic ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Nenad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the stopping power was calculated, representing the electrons of the target atom as an assembly of quantum oscillators. It was considered that the electrons in the atoms have some velocity before interaction with the projectile, which is the main contribution of this paper. The influence of electron velocity on stopping power for different projectiles and targets was investigated. It was found that the velocity of the electron stopping power has the greatest influence at low energies of the projectile.

  9. Modified Bethe formula for low-energy electron stopping power without fitting parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Truong, Hieu T

    2015-02-01

    We propose a modified Bethe formula for low-energy electron stopping power without fitting parameters for a wide range of elements and compounds. This formula maintains the generality of the Bethe formula and gives reasonable agreement in comparing the predicted stopping powers for 15 elements and 6 compounds with the experimental data and those calculated within dielectric theory including the exchange effect. Use of the stopping power obtained from this formula for hydrogen silsesquioxane in Monte Carlo simulation gives the energy deposition distribution in consistent with the experimental data.

  10. Measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons between 0.2 and 3 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1991-05-01

    Our previous measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons has been extended down to 200 keV. The antiproton stopping power is found to be more than 30% lower than that for equivelocity protons at 200 keV. The " Z13 contribution" to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons. Comparisons to theoretical estimates are made.

  11. Measurement of the Z31 contribution to the stopping power using MeV protons and antiprotons: The Barkas effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Möller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Uggerhöj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1989-04-01

    The stopping power for antiprotons has been measured for the first time. The antiproton stopping power of silicon is found to be 3%-19% lower than for equivelocity protons over the energy range 3.01 to 0.538 MeV. The ``Z31 contribution'' to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons.

  12. Electronic stopping power for heavy ions in SiC and SiO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ke [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Zhu, Zihua [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Grove, David A. [Luxel Corporation; Xue, Haizhou [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Xue, Jianming [Peking University; Weber, William J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Accurate information of electronic stopping power is fundamental for broad advances in electronic industry, space exploration, national security, and sustainable energy technologies. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code has been widely applied to predict stopping powers and ion distributions for decades. Recent experimental results have, however, shown considerable errors in the SRIM predictions for stopping of heavy ions in compounds containing light elements, indicating an urgent need to improve current stopping power models. The electronic stopping powers of 35Cl, 80Br, 127I, and 197Au ions are experimentally determined in two important functional materials, SiC and SiO2, from tens to hundreds keV/u based on a single ion technique. By combining with the reciprocity theory, new electronic stopping powers are suggested in a region from 0 to 15 MeV, where large deviations from SRIM predictions are observed. For independent experimental validation of the electronic stopping powers we determined, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are utilized to measure the depth profiles of implanted Au ions in SiC with energies from 700 keV to 15 MeV. The measured ion distributions from both RBS and SIMS are considerably deeper (up to ~30%) than the predictions from the commercial SRIM code. In comparison, the new electronic stopping power values are utilized in a modified TRIM-85 (the original version of the SRIM) code, M-TRIM, to predict ion distributions, and the results are in good agreement with the experimentally measured ion distributions.

  13. A theoretical model for calculation of molecular stopping power. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. J.

    1984-01-01

    A modified local plasma model is established. The Gordon-Kim's molecular charged density model is employed to obtain a formula to evaluate the stopping power of many useful molecular systems. The stopping power of H2 and He gas was calculated for incident proton energy ranging from 100 keV to 2.5 MeV. The stopping power of O2, N2, and water vapor was also calculated for incident proton energy ranging from 40 keV. to 2.5 MeV. Good agreement with experimental data was obtained. A discussion of molecular effects leading to department from Bragg's rule is presented. The equipartition rule and the effect of nuclear momentum recoiling in stopping power are also discussed.

  14. Relationship between %dd(10)x and stopping-power ratios for flattening filter free accelerators: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guoming; Rogers, D W O

    2008-05-01

    The relationship between the photon beam quality specifier %dd(10)x and the Spencer-Attix water water to air restricted mass collision stopping-power ratio, (L/rho))air(water), is studied using Monte Carlo simulation with realistic beams in contrast to the previously used realistic but uniform spectra from an isotropic point source. The differences between accelerators with and without flattening filters are investigated since flattening filter free accelerators appear to be useful for IMRT. Our results show that the standard relationship between %dd(10)x and (L/rho)air(water), which is used in the TG-51 protocol to calculate the quality conversion factor kQ, is acceptable for beams with or without a flattening filter with a maximum error of 0.4%, although a fit to the new data would reduce the maximum error to 0.2%. Reasons for differences between the individual values of %dd(10)x and (L/ rho)air(water) with and without a flattening filter are studied. Specifically the differences due to the softening of the beam, the change in shape of the profile, and the inclusion of radial variations in the photon energy spectra, are investigated. It is shown that if TPR10(20) is used as a beam quality specifier, there are two different relationships between TPR10(20) and (L/rho)air(water) which differ by 0.4%-1%. When using TPR10(20) as a beam quality specifier in a beam without a flattening filter, one should subtract 0.5% from the value of kQ for a given value of TPR10(20).

  15. Stopping power of neutrinos and antineutrinos in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustgi, M. L.; Leung, P. T.; Long, S. A. T.

    1985-01-01

    The Weinberg-Salam model is applied to quantify the energy loss of antineutrinos and neutrinos encountering polymers. The scattering cross-sectional energy due to encounters with electrons is calculated, along with the probability that an antineutrino will remain the same particle. The energy loss reaches a maximum, i.e., stopping occurs, when the probability is unity. The technique is applied to study the energy losses in kapton, a solid organic insulator used for antennas on spacecraft exposed to solar neutrinos with energies ranging from 0.5-10 MeV. The energy loss is found to be negligible.

  16. Stopping Power of Be, Al, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au for 5-12-MeV Protons and Deuterons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Hanke, C.; Sørensen, H.;

    1967-01-01

    Recent measurements on stopping power of aluminum have been continued with the stopping materials Be, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au. The method of measuring stopping powers utilizing a thermometric compensation technique working at liquid-helium temperature has been used. Results are obtained with a standar...

  17. Monte Carlo based water/medium stopping-power ratios for various ICRP and ICRU tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Varea, José M; Carrasco, Pablo; Panettieri, Vanessa; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2007-11-07

    Water/medium stopping-power ratios, s(w,m), have been calculated for several ICRP and ICRU tissues, namely adipose tissue, brain, cortical bone, liver, lung (deflated and inflated) and spongiosa. The considered clinical beams were 6 and 18 MV x-rays and the field size was 10 x 10 cm(2). Fluence distributions were scored at a depth of 10 cm using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. The collision stopping powers for the studied tissues were evaluated employing the formalism of ICRU Report 37 (1984 Stopping Powers for Electrons and Positrons (Bethesda, MD: ICRU)). The Bragg-Gray values of s(w,m) calculated with these ingredients range from about 0.98 (adipose tissue) to nearly 1.14 (cortical bone), displaying a rather small variation with beam quality. Excellent agreement, to within 0.1%, is found with stopping-power ratios reported by Siebers et al (2000a Phys. Med. Biol. 45 983-95) for cortical bone, inflated lung and spongiosa. In the case of cortical bone, s(w,m) changes approximately 2% when either ICRP or ICRU compositions are adopted, whereas the stopping-power ratios of lung, brain and adipose tissue are less sensitive to the selected composition. The mass density of lung also influences the calculated values of s(w,m), reducing them by around 1% (6 MV) and 2% (18 MV) when going from deflated to inflated lung.

  18. The calculation of proton and secondary electron stopping powers in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouane, Abdelhak; Inchaouh, Jamal; Ouaskit, Said; Fathi, Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    The stopping power of energetic protons in liquid water has been calculated using a new model based on different theoretical and semi-empirical approaches. In this model, we consider the relativistic corrections along with the electronic and nuclear stopping power. The present work accounts for the different interactions made with electrons and nuclei inside the target. Interactions of the incident particle with the target's electrons dominate in the high energy regime; in the low energy regime, the interactions of the projectile with the target nuclei contribute importantly and are included in the calculation. We also compute the stopping cross sections and the stopping power of secondary electrons ejected from proton and hydrogen ionization impact, and generated by hydrogen electron loss processes. The consideration of secondary electrons' stopping power can contribute to the study of nano-dosimetry. Our results are in good agreement with existing experimental data. This calculation model can be useful for different applications in medical physics and space radiation health, such as hadron therapy for cancer treatment or radiation protection for astronauts.

  19. Electronic stopping power in gold: the role of d electrons and the H/He anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, M Ahsan; Kohanoff, J; Sánchez-Portal, D; Arnau, A; Juaristi, J I; Artacho, Emilio

    2012-06-01

    The electronic stopping power of H and He moving through gold is obtained to high accuracy using time-evolving density-functional theory, thereby bringing usual first principles accuracies into this kind of strongly coupled, continuum nonadiabatic processes in condensed matter. The two key unexplained features of what observed experimentally have been reproduced and understood: (i) The nonlinear behavior of stopping power versus velocity is a gradual crossover as excitations tail into the d-electron spectrum; and (ii) the low-velocity H/He anomaly (the relative stopping powers are contrary to established theory) is explained by the substantial involvement of the d electrons in the screening of the projectile even at the lowest velocities where the energy loss is generated by s-like electron-hole pair formation only.

  20. Intermediate energy proton stopping power for hydrogen molecules and monoatomic helium gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Stopping power in the intermediate energy region (100 keV to 1 MeV) was investigated, based on the work of Lindhard and Winther, and on the local plasma model. The theory is applied to calculate stopping power of hydrogen molecules and helium gas for protons of energy ranging from 100 keV to 2.5 MeV. Agreement with the experimental data is found to be within 10 percent. Previously announced in STAR as N84-16955

  1. Power in discursive practices: The case of the STOP EPAs campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Felice, Celina

    2014-01-01

    Transnational activism has increased in relation to international trade and development politics in the past decades, yet their power has been inadequately studied. This article analyses the STOP EPAs campaign (2004-2009) which aimed to influence the negotiations of Economic Partnership Agreements

  2. Stopping power of antiprotons in H, H2, and He targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The stopping power of antiprotons in atomic and molecular hydrogen as well as helium was calculated in an impact-energy range from 1 keV to 6.4 MeV. In the case of H2 and He the targets were described with a single-active electron model centered on the target. The collision process was treated wi...

  3. Evidence for higher-order contributions to the stopping power of relativistic iron nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarle, G.; Solarz, M.

    1978-01-01

    Measured ranges of 600-MeV/amu Fe-56 ions in a variety of substances are shorter than predicted by the standard Bethe stopping-power theory. The ranges are consistent with values computed using high-order corrections to the Mott cross section.

  4. Stopping power of aluminium for 5-12 MeV protons and deuterons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Hanke, C.C.;

    1966-01-01

    The stopping power of aluminium for 5-12 MeV protons and deuterons has been measured by a thermometric compensation technique working at liquid helium temperature. The experimental method is described and the standard deviation of the results is found to be 0.3%. In order to obtain this accuracy...

  5. Fast-projectile stopping power of quantal multicomponent strongly coupled plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, D; Tkachenko, I M

    2008-08-15

    The Bethe-Larkin formula for the fast-projectile stopping power is extended to multicomponent plasmas. The results are to contribute to the correct interpretation of the experimental data, which could permit us to test existing and future models of thermodynamic, static, and dynamic characteristics of strongly coupled Coulomb systems.

  6. Power in discursive practices: The case of the STOP EPAs campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Felice, Celina

    2014-01-01

    Transnational activism has increased in relation to international trade and development politics in the past decades, yet their power has been inadequately studied. This article analyses the STOP EPAs campaign (2004-2009) which aimed to influence the negotiations of Economic Partnership Agreements b

  7. Stopping powers for MeV Ge ions in Al foil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Stopping powers for Ge ions (3.5MeV~8.0MeV) in Al foil were measured with RBS (Rutherford backscattering) technique and determined with a new method. Our results are much smaller than the values predicted by the TRIM code and LSS theory.

  8. Simple polynomial approximation to modified Bethe formula low-energy electron stopping powers data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taborda, A., E-mail: ana.taborda@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Desbrée, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Reis, M.A. [C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-08-01

    A recently published detailed and exhaustive paper on cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons clearly shows that electron phenomena occurring in parallel with X-ray processes may have been dramatically overlooked for many years, mainly when low atomic number species are involved since, in these cases, the fluorescence coefficient is smaller than the Auger yield. An immediate problem is encountered while attempting to tackle the issue. Accounting for electron phenomena requires the knowledge of the stopping power of electrons within, at least, a reasonably small error. Still, the Bethe formula for stopping powers is known to not be valid for electron energies below 30 keV, and its use leads to values far off experimental ones. Recently, a few authors have addressed this problem and both detailed tables of electron stopping powers for various atomic species and attempts to simplify the calculations, have emerged. Nevertheless, its implementation in software routines to efficiently calculate keV electron effects in materials quickly becomes a bit cumbersome. Following a procedure already used to establish efficient methods to calculate ionisation cross-sections by protons and alpha particles, it became clear that a simple polynomial approximation could be set, which allows retrieving the electronic stopping powers with errors of less than 20% for energies above 500 eV and less than 50% for energies between 50 eV and 500 eV. In this work, we present this approximation which, based on just six parameters, allows to recover electron stopping power values that are less than 20% different from recently published experimentally validated tabulated data.

  9. WE-D-BRF-05: Quantitative Dual-Energy CT Imaging for Proton Stopping Power Computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D; Williamson, J [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Siebers, J [University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To extend the two-parameter separable basis-vector model (BVM) to estimation of proton stopping power from dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging. Methods: BVM assumes that the photon cross sections of any unknown material can be represented as a linear combination of the corresponding quantities for two bracketing basis materials. We show that both the electron density (ρe) and mean excitation energy (Iex) can be modeled by BVM, enabling stopping power to be estimated from the Bethe-Bloch equation. We have implemented an idealized post-processing dual energy imaging (pDECT) simulation consisting of monogenetic 45 keV and 80 keV scanning beams with polystyrene-water and water-CaCl2 solution basis pairs for soft tissues and bony tissues, respectively. The coefficients of 24 standard ICRU tissue compositions were estimated by pDECT. The corresponding ρe, Iex, and stopping power tables were evaluated via BVM and compared to tabulated ICRU 44 reference values. Results: BVM-based pDECT was found to estimate ρe and Iex with average and maximum errors of 0.5% and 2%, respectively, for the 24 tissues. Proton stopping power values at 175 MeV, show average/maximum errors of 0.8%/1.4%. For adipose, muscle and bone, these errors result range prediction accuracies less than 1%. Conclusion: A new two-parameter separable DECT model (BVM) for estimating proton stopping power was developed. Compared to competing parametric fit DECT models, BVM has the comparable prediction accuracy without necessitating iterative solution of nonlinear equations or a sample-dependent empirical relationship between effective atomic number and Iex. Based on the proton BVM, an efficient iterative statistical DECT reconstruction model is under development.

  10. A simulation study on proton computed tomography (CT) stopping power accuracy using dual energy CT scans as benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Seco, Joao; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2015-01-01

    Background. Accurate stopping power estimation is crucial for treatment planning in proton therapy, and the uncertainties in stopping power are currently the largest contributor to the employed dose margins. Dual energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) (clinically available) and proton CT (in...

  11. Stopping Power of Al, Cu, Ag, Au, Pb, and U for 5-18-MeV Protons and Deuterons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.; Andersen, Hans Henrik

    1973-01-01

    High energy protons and deuterons of energies between 9 and 18 MeV have been used to extend earlier measurements of the stopping power of Al, Cu, Ag and Au and the stopping powers of Pb and U in the range 5-18 MeV have been determined for the first time. Mean excitation potentials have been...

  12. Electronic stopping power of liquid water for protons down to the Bragg peak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emfietzoglou, D; Pathak, A; Nikjoo, H

    2007-01-01

    An improved dielectric response model that accurately represents the recent experimental data for liquid water over the whole Bethe surface is used to calculate the electronic stopping power of protons (of fixed-charge) in liquid water from several MeV down to the Bragg peak region. The results are by approximately 20% lower than the ICRU values and earlier studies. A shell-correction term with a contribution of 15-20% to Bethe's high-energy stopping number is obtained. The present work offers a first-principle approach for stopping power calculations that overcomes the well-known limitations of Bethe's stopping theory, namely, the need for separate determination of the mean excitation energy (the I-value) and the shell-corrections. In particular, all type of inner-shell effects are built into the model through the kinematically restricted integrals over the Bethe surface. The net contribution of higher-order corrections is found to be minimal over most of the present range. Thus, within the uncertainty of the dielectric model (few %) the present calculations are 'exact' down to approximately 100 keV.

  13. Analytical Solution for the Stopping Power of the Cherenkov Radiation in a Uniaxial Nanowire Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago A. Morgado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We derive closed analytical formulae for the power emitted by moving charged particles in a uniaxial wire medium by means of an eigenfunction expansion. Our analytical expressions demonstrate that, in the absence of material dispersion, the stopping power of the uniaxial wire medium is proportional to the charge velocity, and that there is no velocity threshold for the Cherenkov emission. It is shown that the eigenfunction expansion formalism can be extended to the case of dispersive lossless media. Furthermore, in the presence of material dispersion, the optimal charge velocity that maximizes the emitted Cherenkov power may be less than the speed of light in a vacuum.

  14. Stopping powers of gases for 40 MeV/u tellurium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbot, R.; Khoumri, A.; Fahli, A.; Barbey, S.; Benfoughal, T.; Mirea, M.; Hachem, A.; Fares, G.; Anne, R.; Delagrange, H.; Tribouillard, C.; Georget, Y.; Foy, J. C.

    2000-10-01

    The stopping powers of six gaseous media have been measured for incident 40 MeV/u 125Te heavy ions. The energy losses of ions in various "thicknesses" of gas have been accurately determined. The gases were confined in a cell. The amount of matter traversed by the ions was determined from temperature and pressure measurements. The beam energy before and after slowing down were measured using the LISE magnetic spectrometer at GANIL. These experimental gas stopping powers are lower by about 10% than the corresponding tabulated values for solid media. This means that the gas-solid effect is still significant at 40 MeV/u for Te ions. The projectile effective charges derived from these measurements depend on the target atomic number, thus confirming the trend observed in previous experiments performed with lighter ions or at lower energies.

  15. Ab initio research of stopping power for energetic ions in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Bin, E-mail: hebin-rc@163.com; Meng, Xu-Jun; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-01

    A new physical scenario is suggested to estimate the stopping power of energetic α particles in solid-density Be, Na, and Al at room temperature in an ab initio way based on the average atom model. In the scenario the stopping power is caused by the transition of free electrons to higher energy states and the ionization of bound electrons of the atom. Our results are found generally in good agreement with the recommended data in Al, Be and Na as well as the experimental data in Al. A comparison of energy loss with the recent experiment of protons in Be indicates that the scenario is more reasonable than the local density approximation in this case.

  16. Ab initio research of stopping power for energetic ions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Meng, Xu-Jun; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-01

    A new physical scenario is suggested to estimate the stopping power of energetic α particles in solid-density Be, Na, and Al at room temperature in an ab initio way based on the average atom model. In the scenario the stopping power is caused by the transition of free electrons to higher energy states and the ionization of bound electrons of the atom. Our results are found generally in good agreement with the recommended data in Al, Be and Na as well as the experimental data in Al. A comparison of energy loss with the recent experiment of protons in Be indicates that the scenario is more reasonable than the local density approximation in this case.

  17. Comparison of Stopping Power and Range Databases for Radiation Transport Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, H.; Bichsel, Hans; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Badavi, Francis F.

    1997-01-01

    The codes used to calculate stopping power and range for the space radiation shielding program at the Langley Research Center are based on the work of Ziegler but with modifications. As more experience is gained from experiments at heavy ion accelerators, prudence dictates a reevaluation of the current databases. Numerical values of stopping power and range calculated from four different codes currently in use are presented for selected ions and materials in the energy domain suitable for space radiation transport. This study of radiation transport has found that for most collision systems and for intermediate particle energies, agreement is less than 1 percent, in general, among all the codes. However, greater discrepancies are seen for heavy systems, especially at low particle energies.

  18. Stopping power of He ions in niobium from a comparison of RBS and X-ray reflectivity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Baving, P; Rolfs, C; Zabel, H

    2002-01-01

    Textured films of niobium sputtered onto saphire substrates have been characterized by X-ray reflectivity (XR) as well as by Rutherford backscattering (RBS) of sup 4 He ions with 2 MeV. Comparison of the results shows that the stopping power of niobium is about 10% smaller than assumed previously. The energy dependence of the stopping power also has been measured in the energy range between 0.4 and 2.6 MeV. The combination of RBS and XR measurements appears to be a powerful method to measure the stopping power of ions in matter beyond the scope of the case discussed here.

  19. Dielectric function of dense plasmas, their stopping power, and sum rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, Yu V; Ashikbayeva, A B; Askaruly, A; Davletov, A E; Tkachenko, I M

    2014-11-01

    Mathematical, particularly, asymptotic properties of the random-phase approximation, Mermin approximation, and extended Mermin-type approximation of the coupled plasma dielectric function are analyzed within the method of moments. These models are generalized for two-component plasmas. Some drawbacks and advantages of the above models are pointed out. The two-component plasma stopping power is shown to be enhanced with respect to that of the electron fluid.

  20. Improved calibration of mass stopping power in low density tissue for a proton pencil beam algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Daniel R; Partridge, Mike; Hill, Mark A; Peach, Ken

    2015-06-07

    Dose distributions for proton therapy treatments are almost exclusively calculated using pencil beam algorithms. An essential input to these algorithms is the patient model, derived from x-ray computed tomography (CT), which is used to estimate proton stopping power along the pencil beam paths. This study highlights a potential inaccuracy in the mapping between mass density and proton stopping power used by a clinical pencil beam algorithm in materials less dense than water. It proposes an alternative physically-motivated function (the mass average, or MA, formula) for use in this region. Comparisons are made between dose-depth curves calculated by the pencil beam method and those calculated by the Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNPX in a one-dimensional lung model. Proton range differences of up to 3% are observed between the methods, reduced to  stopping power calculation methodology results in relatively minor differences in dose when plans use three fields, but differences are observed at the 2%-2 mm level when a single field uniform dose technique is adopted. It is therefore suggested that the MA formula is adopted by users of the pencil beam algorithm for optimal dose calculation in lung, and that a similar approach is considered when beams traverse other low density regions such as the paranasal sinuses and mastoid process.

  1. Operating characteristics of sample size re-estimation with futility stopping based on conditional power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachin, John M

    2006-10-15

    Various methods have been described for re-estimating the final sample size in a clinical trial based on an interim assessment of the treatment effect. Many re-weight the observations after re-sizing so as to control the pursuant inflation in the type I error probability alpha. Lan and Trost (Estimation of parameters and sample size re-estimation. Proceedings of the American Statistical Association Biopharmaceutical Section 1997; 48-51) proposed a simple procedure based on conditional power calculated under the current trend in the data (CPT). The study is terminated for futility if CPT or = CU, or re-sized by a factor m to yield CPT = CU if CL stopping for futility can balance the inflation due to sample size re-estimation, thus permitting any form of final analysis with no re-weighting. Herein the statistical properties of this approach are described including an evaluation of the probabilities of stopping for futility or re-sizing, the distribution of the re-sizing factor m, and the unconditional type I and II error probabilities alpha and beta. Since futility stopping does not allow a type I error but commits a type II error, then as the probability of stopping for futility increases, alpha decreases and beta increases. An iterative procedure is described for choice of the critical test value and the futility stopping boundary so as to ensure that specified alpha and beta are obtained. However, inflation in beta is controlled by reducing the probability of futility stopping, that in turn dramatically increases the possible re-sizing factor m. The procedure is also generalized to limit the maximum sample size inflation factor, such as at m max = 4. However, doing so then allows for a non-trivial fraction of studies to be re-sized at this level that still have low conditional power. These properties also apply to other methods for sample size re-estimation with a provision for stopping for futility. Sample size re-estimation procedures should be used with caution

  2. Examining real-time time-dependent density functional theory nonequilibrium simulations for the calculation of electronic stopping power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Dillon C.; Yao, Yi; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-09-01

    In ion irradiation processes, electronic stopping power describes the energy transfer rate from the irradiating ion to the target material's electrons. Due to the scarcity and significant uncertainties in experimental electronic stopping power data for materials beyond simple solids, there has been growing interest in the use of first-principles theory for calculating electronic stopping power. In recent years, advances in high-performance computing have opened the door to fully first-principles nonequilibrium simulations based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). While it has been demonstrated that the RT-TDDFT approach is capable of predicting electronic stopping power for a wide range of condensed matter systems, there has yet to be an exhaustive examination of the physical and numerical approximations involved and their effects on the calculated stopping power. We discuss the results of such a study for crystalline silicon with protons as irradiating ions. We examine the influences of key approximations in RT-TDDFT nonequilibrium simulations on the calculated electronic stopping power, including approximations related to basis sets, finite size effects, exchange-correlation approximation, pseudopotentials, and more. Finally, we propose a simple and efficient correction scheme to account for the contribution from core-electron excitations to the stopping power, as it was found to be significant for large proton velocities.

  3. Inelastic scattering and stopping power of low-energy electrons (0.01-10 keV) in toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, G; Blanco, F; Grau Carles, A; Grau Malonda, A

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the stopping power for electrons in toluene is reported for incident energies ranging from 10 to 10,000 eV. The present results have been obtained by combining the calculated inelastic electron scattering cross-sections with an experimental energy loss procedure. Calculations have been carried out by means of a quasifree absorption model whose reliability has been checked by comparison with empirical electron scattering total cross section data. Results have been compared with the high-energy stopping power data available in the literature. For energies below 1 keV these are the first results of the stopping power for electrons in toluene.

  4. A review of methods for futility stopping based on conditional power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachin, John M

    2005-09-30

    Conditional power (CP) is the probability that the final study result will be statistically significant, given the data observed thus far and a specific assumption about the pattern of the data to be observed in the remainder of the study, such as assuming the original design effect, or the effect estimated from the current data, or under the null hypothesis. In many clinical trials, a CP computation at a pre-specified point in the study, such as mid-way, is used as the basis for early termination for futility when there is little evidence of a beneficial effect. Brownian motion can be used to describe the distribution of the interim Z-test value, the corresponding B-value, and the CP values under a specific assumption about the future data. A stopping boundary on the CP value specifies an equivalent boundary on the B-value from which the probability of stopping for futility can then be computed based on the planned study design (sample size and duration) and the assumed true effect size. This yields expressions for the total type I and II error probabilities. As the probability of stopping increases, the probability of a type I error alpha decreases from the nominal desired level (e.g. 0.05) while the probability of a type II error beta increases from the level specified in the study design. Thus a stopping boundary on the B-value can be determined such that the inflation in type II error probability is controlled at a desired level. An iterative procedure is also described that determines a stopping boundary on the B-value and a final test critical Z-value with specified type I and II error probabilities. The implementation in conjunction with a group sequential analysis for effectiveness is also described.

  5. Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons as a Test of Stopping Power in Degenerate Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C; Schulz, A E; Boswell, M; Fowler, M M; Grim, G; Klein, A; Rundberg, R S; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilson, D

    2014-01-01

    We present the first measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons in an inertial confinement fusion system. The experiments were carried out at the National Ignition Facility, using both Low Foot and High Foot drives and cryogenic plastic capsules. In both cases, the high-energy RIF ($E_n>$ 15 MeV) component of the neutron spectrum was found to be about $10^{-4}$ of the total. The majority of the RIF neutrons were produced in the dense cold fuel surrounding the burning hotspot of the capsule and the data are consistent with a compressed cold fuel that is moderately to strongly coupled $(\\Gamma\\sim$0.6) and electron degenerate $(\\theta_\\mathrm{Fermi}/\\theta_e\\sim$4). The production of RIF neutrons is controlled by the stopping power in the plasma. Thus, the current RIF measurements provide a unique test of stopping power models in an experimentally unexplored plasma regime. We find that the measured RIF data strongly constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions and some models are ruled out b...

  6. The stopping power and energy straggling of heavy ions in silicon nitride and polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikšová, R., E-mail: miksova@ujf.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Science of the Czech Republic v.v. i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J. E. Purkinje University, Ceske Mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Hnatowicz, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Science of the Czech Republic v.v. i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Macková, A.; Malinský, P. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Science of the Czech Republic v.v. i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J. E. Purkinje University, Ceske Mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Slepička, P. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    The stopping power and energy straggling of {sup 12}C{sup 3+} and {sup 16}O{sup 3+} ions with energies between 4.5 and 7.8 MeV in a 0.166-μm-thin silicon nitride and in 4-μm-thin polypropylene foils were measured by means of an indirect transmission method using a half-covered PIPS detector. Ions scattered from a thin gold layer under a scattering angle of 150° were used. The energy spectra of back-scattered and decelerated ions were registered and evaluated simultaneously. The measured stopping powers were compared with the theoretical predictions simulated by SRIM-2008 and MSTAR codes. SRIM prediction of energy stopping is reasonably close to the experimentally obtained values comparing to MSTAR values. Better agreement between experimental and predicted data was observed for C{sup 3+} ion energy losses comparing to O{sup 3+} ions. The experimental data from Paul’s database and our previous experimental data were also discussed. The obtained experimental energy-straggling data were compared to those calculated by using Bohr’s, Yang’s models etc. The predictions by Yang are in good agreement with our experiment within a frame of uncertainty of 25%.

  7. Economic and safety analysis of unconventional peak regulation on power unit of peak shifting start-stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X.; Zhao, J. F.; Duan, X. Q.; Jin, Y. A.

    2017-01-01

    Tthe capacity difference of peak regulation between the power gird and the actual demand has become a serious problem considering the growth in the difference between electricity supply and demand. Therefore, peak regulation of power grid needs to be deeply studied. Unconventional peak regulation on unit of peak shifting start-stop is a way that can broaden the range of power regulation, as well as benefit safe operation of the power grid. However, it requires frequent and fast unit start-stop, complex operation, and more staff labor. By carrying out unconventional thermal power unit load test, the start-stop mode of peak auxiliary equipment is studied in this paper, indicating that it has a positive effect on safety and economic of load-peaking operation. The best working conditions of the peak units is found by analysing consumption cost, safety specifications, and life lost of the start-stop peak regulation mode.

  8. Ab initio approach to the ion stopping power at the plasma-solid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, Michael; Schlünzen, Niclas; Wulff, Lasse; Joost, Jan-Philip; Balzer, Karsten

    2016-10-01

    The energy loss of ions in solids is of key relevance for many applications of plasmas, ranging from plasma technology to fusion. Standard approaches are based on density functional theory or SRIM simulations, however, the applicability range and accuracy of these results are difficult to assess, in particular, for low energies. Here we present an independent approach that is based on ab initio nonequilibrium Green functions theory, e.g. that allows to incorporate electronic correlations effects of the solid. We present the first application of this method to low-temperature plasmas, concentrating on proton and alpha-particle stopping in a graphene layer. In addition to the stopping power we present time-dependent results for the local electron density, the spectral function and the photoemission spectrum that is directly accessible in optical, UV or x-ray diagnostics. http://www.itap.uni-kiel.de/theo-physik/bonitz/.

  9. Stopping power and polarization induced in a plasma by a fast charged particle in circular motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villo-Perez, Isidro [Departamento de Electronica, Tecnologia de las Computadoras y Proyectos, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Cartagena (Spain); Arista, Nestor R. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia (Spain)

    2002-03-28

    We describe the perturbation induced in a plasma by a charged particle in circular motion, analysing in detail the evolution of the induced charge, the electrostatic potential and the energy loss of the particle. We describe the initial transitory behaviour and the different ways in which convergence to final stationary solutions may be obtained depending on the basic parameters of the problem. The results for the stopping power show a resonant behaviour which may give place to large stopping enhancement values as compared with the case of particles in straight-line motion with the same linear velocity. The results also explain a resonant effect recently obtained for particles in circular motion in magnetized plasmas. (author)

  10. An Experiment to Measure Range, Range Straggling, Stopping Power, and Energy Straggling of Alpha Particles in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, P. J.; Mostovych, Andrew

    1978-01-01

    Experiments to measure range, range straggling, stopping power, and energy straggling of alpha particles are discussed in this article. Commercially available equipment with simple modifications is used for these measurements. (Author/GA)

  11. Stopping power of heavy ions (22<= Z{sub 1} <= 28) in Au and Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, R.; Medina, N.H.; Oliveira, J.R.B.; Cybulska, E.W.; Seale, W.A.; Wiedemann, K.T.; Toufen, D.L.; Allegro, P.R.P.; Ribas, R.V. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Accurate prediction of heavy ion stopping at low energies is necessary in nuclear structure physics, with the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM). In this technique, knowledge of stopping power is used to determine a timescale for the decaying nuclei while slowing down in a heavy substrate, usually Au. Since ab initio calculations are unable to produce reliable estimates, most models currently in use are of semiempirical nature. Regarding to low energies this is especially true due to additional difficulties arising from a complicated dependence on atomic numbers of stopper medium and projectile ion. The main aim of this contribution is to present new experimental data for Ti, V, Cr, Co and Ni ions slowing down in Ge and Au in the energy range from 5 to 20 MeV. Experimental data for Ti, V, Cr ions were obtained using the elastic scattering technique, where a primary beam is used to scatter heavy ions from a thin target ({approx} 100 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}). The scattered primary beam produces recoiling atoms of the target at low energies at a given direction. Experimental data for Co and Ni ions were measured using a ToF-E apparatus (Time of Flight - Energy detection system) which allows measuring stopping over a continuous energy range. Our experimental data were compared to current models addressed to low energies. (author)

  12. Starting and stopping control on power conditioner in photovoltaic power system; Taiyoko hatsuden system ni okeru power conditioner no kido teishi seigyo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, M.; Ishihara, Y.; Todaka, T.; Harada, K. [Doshisha University, Kyoto (Japan); Oshiro, H.; Nakamura, H. [Japan Quality Assurance Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    Studies are made about the control of the power conditioner over the maximum power point tracking (MPPT) function in a photovoltaic power generation system. The analysis is conducted by means of computer simulation into the effect of a start/stop function added to the control of MPPT and the effect on the generation of power of the setting of parameters in the start/stop function. The reduction in output power due to difference between the actual operation point and the optimum operation point is evaluated by use of a load matching correction factor. In this simulation, it is assumed that the solar cell array consists of 13 rows in 5 parallel columns, is capable of a normal output of 3.149kW, has a panel tilted at 30 degrees, and faces due south. The power conditioner is assumed to be a system rated at 3kVA, equipped with system interconnection and back flow features. As a result, it is learned that the stop voltage should be set at 180V or lower and the steady voltage near 185.5V for a good result and that there is not much need after all for the start/stop technique. 2 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Stopping power for electrons in pyrimidine in the energy range 20-3000 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares, R; Sanz, A G; Fuss, M C; Blanco, F; García, G

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present new experimental electron energy loss distribution functions for pyrimidine (C4H4N2) measured for the incident energy range 30-2000 eV. Theoretical total and elastic cross sections for electron scattering from pyrimidine were calculated using the screening-corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) method. Based on the mean energy loss observed in the experiment and the theoretical integral inelastic cross section, the stopping power for electrons in pyrimidine is calculated in the energy range 20-3000 eV.

  14. A study of stopping power in nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Lehaut, G; Lopez, O

    2010-01-01

    We show a systematic experimental study based on INDRA data of the stopping power in central symmetric nuclear reactions. Total mass of the systems goes from 80 to 400 nucleons while the incident energy range is from 12 AMeV to 100 AMeV. The role of isospin diffusion at 32 and 45 MeV/nucleon with 124,136Xe projectiles on 112,124Sn targets performed at GANIL is also discussed. Results suggest a strong memory of the entrance channel above 20 AMeV/A (nuclear transparency) and, as such, constitute valuable tests of the microscopic transport models.

  15. Improvements in the stopping power library libdEdx and release of the web GUI dedx.au.dk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sobolevsky, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    from several well-known stopping power sources into one ready-to-use package being 1) freely available and 2) easy accessible via a web-based front end. Methods: Currently, stopping power data from PSTAR, ASTAR, MSTAR and ICRU49+73 are implemented along with a version of the Bethe formula. The library...... is programmed in the language C to provide broad portability and high performance. A clean API provides full access to the underlying functions and thread safety in multi-threaded applications. The possibility to define arbitrary materials complements the list of predefined ICRU materials. Furthermore, we...... introduced a collection of tools, e.g., inverse stopping power look-up as well as CSDA range calculation and its inverse. Results: On a standard desktop PC libdEdx calculates 22 million look-ups/sec. A web GUI (available at http://dedx.au.dk) provides easy access to libdEdx and download of stopping data...

  16. Electronic stopping power data of heavy ions in polymeric foils in the ion energy domain of LSS theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, A.; Ammi, H.; Hedibel, M.; Guesmia, A.; Mammeri, S.; Msimanga, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    A continuous energy loss measurements of 63Cu, 28Si, 27Al, 24Mg, 19F, 16O and 12C ions over an energy range of (0.06-0.65) MeV/nucleon through thin polymeric foils (Mylar, Polypropylene and Formvar) were carried out by time of flight spectrometry. The deduced experimental stopping data have been used in order to assess our proposed semi empirical formula. The proposed approach based on the Firsov and Lindhard-Scharff stopping power models is provided for well describing-the electronic stopping power of heavy ions (3 ⩽ Z < 100) in various solids targets at low energy range. The ζe factor, which was approximated to be ∼Z11/6 , involved in Lindhard, Scharff and Schiott (LSS) formula has been suitably modified in the light of the available experimental stopping power data. The calculated stopping power values after incorporating, effective charge Z1∗ of moving heavy ions with low velocities (v ⩽v0Z12/3) and modified ζe in LSS formula, have been found to be in close agreement with measured values in various solids targets. A reason of energy loss measurements is to obtain data that help to assess our understanding of the stopping power theories. For this, the obtained results are compared with, LSS calculations, MSTAR and SRIM-2013 predictions code.

  17. The stopping power and energy straggling of light ions in graphene oxide foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikšová, R.; Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Sofer, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Energy-loss and straggling experiments were performed using 2-4 MeV 1H+ and 7.4-9.0 MeV 4He2+ ions in graphene oxide foils by the transmission technique. The thickness of the graphene oxide foils was determined using a detailed image analysis of a graphene oxide cut, which was used to refine the graphene oxide density. The density was determined by the standard technique of micro-balance weighing. The stoichiometry of the graphene oxide foils before the irradiation was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) using 2 and 2.5 MeV 4He+. The measured energy stopping powers for hydrogen and helium ions in graphene oxide were compared with the predictions obtained from the SRIM-2013 code. The energy straggling was compared with that calculated using Bohr's, Bethe-Livingston and Yang predictions. The results show that the stopping power of graphene oxide foils irradiated by both ion species decreases with increasing energies, the differences between the measured and predicted values being below 3.8%. The energy straggling determined in our experiment is higher than Bohr's and Bethe-Livingston predicted values; the predictions by Yang are in better agreement with our experiment.

  18. The stopping powers and energy straggling of heavy ions in polymer foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikšová, R.; Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Hnatowicz, V.; Slepička, P.

    2014-07-01

    The stopping power and energy straggling of 7Li, 12C and 16O ions in thin poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) foils were measured in the incident beam energy range of 9.4-11.8 MeV using an indirect transmission method. Ions scattered from a thin gold target at an angle of 150° were registered by a partially depleted PIPS detector, partly shielded with a polymer foil placed in front of the detector. Therefore, the signals from both direct and slowed down ions were visible in the same energy spectrum, which was evaluated by the ITAP code, developed at our laboratory. The ITAP code was employed to perform a Gaussian-fitting procedure to provide a complete analysis of each measured spectrum. The measured stopping powers were compared with the predictions obtained from the SRIM-2008 and MSTAR codes and with previous experimental data. The energy straggling data were compared with those calculated by using Bohr's, Lindhard-Scharff and Bethe-Livingston theories.

  19. The stopping powers and energy straggling of heavy ions in polymer foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikšová, R., E-mail: miksova@ujf.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske Mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Macková, A.; Malinský, P. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske Mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Hnatowicz, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Slepička, P. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-15

    The stopping power and energy straggling of {sup 7}Li, {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O ions in thin poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) foils were measured in the incident beam energy range of 9.4–11.8 MeV using an indirect transmission method. Ions scattered from a thin gold target at an angle of 150° were registered by a partially depleted PIPS detector, partly shielded with a polymer foil placed in front of the detector. Therefore, the signals from both direct and slowed down ions were visible in the same energy spectrum, which was evaluated by the ITAP code, developed at our laboratory. The ITAP code was employed to perform a Gaussian-fitting procedure to provide a complete analysis of each measured spectrum. The measured stopping powers were compared with the predictions obtained from the SRIM-2008 and MSTAR codes and with previous experimental data. The energy straggling data were compared with those calculated by using Bohr’s, Lindhard–Scharff and Bethe–Livingston theories.

  20. Inter-comparison of relative stopping power estimation models for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolan, P. J.; Collins-Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Dias, Marta F.; Ruggieri, Thomas A.; D'Souza, Derek; Seco, Joao

    2016-11-01

    Theoretical stopping power values were inter-compared for the Bichsel, Janni, ICRU and Schneider relative stopping power (RSP) estimation models, for a variety of tissues and tissue substitute materials taken from the literature. The RSPs of eleven plastic tissue substitutes were measured using Bragg peak shift measurements in water in order to establish a gold standard of RSP values specific to our centre’s proton beam characteristics. The theoretical tissue substitute RSP values were computed based on literature compositions to assess the four different computation approaches. The Bichsel/Janni/ICRU approaches led to mean errors in the RSP of  -0.1/+0.7/-0.8%, respectively. Errors when using the Schneider approach, with I-values from the Bichsel, Janni and ICRU sources, followed the same pattern but were generally larger. Following this, the mean elemental ionisation energies were optimized until the differences between theoretical RSP values matched measurements. Failing to use optimized I-values when applying the Schneider technique to 72 human tissues could introduce errors in the RSP of up to  -1.7/+1.1/-0.4% when using Bichsel/Janni/ICRU I-values, respectively. As such, it may be necessary to introduce an additional step in the current stoichiometric calibration procedure in which tissue insert RSPs are measured in a proton beam. Elemental I-values can then optimized to match these measurements, reducing the uncertainty when calculating human tissue RSPs.

  1. Improved calibration of mass stopping power in low density tissue for a proton pencil beam algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Daniel R.; Partridge, Mike; Hill, Mark A.; Peach, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Dose distributions for proton therapy treatments are almost exclusively calculated using pencil beam algorithms. An essential input to these algorithms is the patient model, derived from x-ray computed tomography (CT), which is used to estimate proton stopping power along the pencil beam paths. This study highlights a potential inaccuracy in the mapping between mass density and proton stopping power used by a clinical pencil beam algorithm in materials less dense than water. It proposes an alternative physically-motivated function (the mass average, or MA, formula) for use in this region. Comparisons are made between dose-depth curves calculated by the pencil beam method and those calculated by the Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNPX in a one-dimensional lung model. Proton range differences of up to 3% are observed between the methods, reduced to  calculation methodology results in relatively minor differences in dose when plans use three fields, but differences are observed at the 2%-2 mm level when a single field uniform dose technique is adopted. It is therefore suggested that the MA formula is adopted by users of the pencil beam algorithm for optimal dose calculation in lung, and that a similar approach is considered when beams traverse other low density regions such as the paranasal sinuses and mastoid process.

  2. Analytical expressions for stopping-power ratios relevant for accurate dosimetry in particle therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lühr, Armin; Jäkel, Oliver; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Bassler, Niels

    2010-01-01

    In particle therapy, knowledge of the stopping-power ratios (STPRs) of the ion beam for air and water is necessary for accurate ionization chamber dosimetry. Earlier work has investigated the STPRs for pristine carbon ion beams, but here we expand the calculations to a range of ions (1 <= z <= 18) as well as spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) and provide a theoretical in-depth study with a special focus on the parameter regime relevant for particle therapy. The Monte Carlo transport code SHIELD-HIT is used to calculate complete particle-fluence spectra which are required for determining STPRs according to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We confirm that the STPR depends primarily on the current energy of the ions rather than on their charge z or absolute position in the medium. However, STPRs for different sets of stopping-power data for water and air recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements (ICRU) are compared, including also the...

  3. Analytical model for ion stopping power and range in the therapeutic energy interval for beams of hydrogen and heavier ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, William; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Ziegler, James F.

    2016-09-01

    Many different approaches exist to calculate stopping power and range of protons and heavy charged particles. These methods may be broadly categorized as physically complete theories (widely applicable and complex) or semi-empirical approaches (narrowly applicable and simple). However, little attention has been paid in the literature to approaches that are both widely applicable and simple. We developed simple analytical models of stopping power and range for ions of hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium that spanned intervals of ion energy from 351 keV u-1 to 450 MeV u-1 or wider. The analytical models typically reproduced the best-available evaluated stopping powers within 1% and ranges within 0.1 mm. The computational speed of the analytical stopping power model was 28% faster than a full-theoretical approach. The calculation of range using the analytic range model was 945 times faster than a widely-used numerical integration technique. The results of this study revealed that the new, simple analytical models are accurate, fast, and broadly applicable. The new models require just 6 parameters to calculate stopping power and range for a given ion and absorber. The proposed model may be useful as an alternative to traditional approaches, especially in applications that demand fast computation speed, small memory footprint, and simplicity.

  4. Analytical model for ion stopping power and range in the therapeutic energy interval for beams of hydrogen and heavier ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, William; Newhauser, Wayne D; Ziegler, James F

    2016-09-01

    Many different approaches exist to calculate stopping power and range of protons and heavy charged particles. These methods may be broadly categorized as physically complete theories (widely applicable and complex) or semi-empirical approaches (narrowly applicable and simple). However, little attention has been paid in the literature to approaches that are both widely applicable and simple. We developed simple analytical models of stopping power and range for ions of hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium that spanned intervals of ion energy from 351 keV u(-1) to 450 MeV u(-1) or wider. The analytical models typically reproduced the best-available evaluated stopping powers within 1% and ranges within 0.1 mm. The computational speed of the analytical stopping power model was 28% faster than a full-theoretical approach. The calculation of range using the analytic range model was 945 times faster than a widely-used numerical integration technique. The results of this study revealed that the new, simple analytical models are accurate, fast, and broadly applicable. The new models require just 6 parameters to calculate stopping power and range for a given ion and absorber. The proposed model may be useful as an alternative to traditional approaches, especially in applications that demand fast computation speed, small memory footprint, and simplicity.

  5. Electronic stopping power calculation for water under the Lindhard formalism for application in proton computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, A. F.; Mesa, J.

    2016-07-01

    Because of the behavior that charged particles have when they interact with biological material, proton therapy is shaping the future of radiation therapy in cancer treatment. The planning of radiation therapy is made up of several stages. The first one is the diagnostic image, in which you have an idea of the density, size and type of tumor being treated; to understand this it is important to know how the particles beam interacts with the tissue. In this work, by using de Lindhard formalism and the Y.R. Waghmare model for the charge distribution of the proton, the electronic stopping power (SP) for a proton beam interacting with a liquid water target in the range of proton energies 101 eV - 1010 eV taking into account all the charge states is calculated.

  6. Experimental verification of ion stopping power prediction from dual energy CT data in tissue surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo

    2014-11-21

    A two-steps procedure is presented to convert dual-energy CT data to stopping power ratio (SPR), relative to water. In the first step the relative electron density (RED) is calculated from dual-energy CT-numbers by means of a bi-linear relationship: RED=a HUscH+b HUscL+c, where HUscH and HUscL are scaled units (HUsc=HU+1000) acquired at high and low energy respectively, and the three parameters a, b and c has to be determined for each CT scanner. In the second step the RED values were converted into SPR by means of published poly-line functions, which are invariant as they do not depend on a specific CT scanner. The comparison with other methods provides encouraging results, with residual SPR error on human tissue within 1%. The distinctive features of the proposed method are its simplicity and the generality of the conversion functions.

  7. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials composed of elements hydrogen through argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The local plasma model is used to study the effects of the chemical and physical state of a medium on its stopping power. The relationship between that model and a more exact quantum treatment of bound systems is elucidated by examining related quantities in both theories for the case of one and two-electron systems. Atomic mean excitation energies and straggling parameters in the local plasma model are compared with the accurate calculations of Inokuti et al. (1975, 1978, 1981). The use of the Gordon-Kim electron gas model of molecular bonding is used to determine the effects of covalent chemical bond shifts on the mean excitation energies for elements of the first two rows. Calculations of mean excitation energies of ionic bonded substances are presented, and the mean excitation energies of metals are discussed.

  8. The sensitivity of backscattering coefficients to elastic scattering cross-sections and electron stopping powers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C G H; Matthew, J A D; El-Gomati, M M

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of Monte Carlo estimates of backscattering coefficients η to the accuracy of their input data is examined by studying the percentage change in η due to changes of 10% and 20% in the differential elastic scattering cross-section dσ/dΩ and corresponding changes in the stopping power S(E) in the primary energy range 200-10,000 eV. To a good approximation equivalent elastic and inelastic scattering changes produce equal and opposite shifts in η, a result consistent with predictions of transport theory. For medium to high atomic numbers an x% error in the specification of either S(E) or dσ/dΩ produces a percentage change in η significantly less than x%, while at low atomic number Δη/η increases approximately linearly with ln E so that Monte Carlo predictions are then more sensitive to parameter precision at high energy.

  9. Charged Particle Stopping Power Effects on Ignition: Some Results from an Exact Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Singleton, Robert L

    2007-01-01

    A completely rigorous first-principles calculation of the charged particle stopping power has recently been performed by Brown, Preston, and Singleton (BPS). This calculation is exact to leading and next-to-leading order in the plasma number density, including an exact treatment of two-body quantum scattering. The BPS calculation is therefore extremely accurate in the plasma regime realized during the ignition and burn of an inertial confinement fusion capsule. For deuterium-tritium fusion, the 3.5 MeV alpha particle range tends to be 20-30% longer than most models in the literature have predicted, and the energy deposition into the ions tends to be smaller. Preliminary numerical simulations indicate that this increases the rho-R required to achieve ignition.

  10. The stopping power and energy straggling of the energetic C and O ions in polyimide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikšová, R.; Macková, A.; Slepička, P.

    2016-03-01

    The stopping power and energy straggling of 12Cn+ and 16On+ heavy ions in the energy range 5.3-8.0 MeV in 8 μm thick polyimide (PI) foil were measured by means of an indirect transmission method using a half-covered a PIPS detector. Ions scattered from thin gold layer, under the scattering angle 150° were detected and the spectrum of ions penetrating the PI foil and without foil was recorded. The values of the experimentally determined stopping powers were compared to the calculated data by SRIM-2013 and MSTAR codes. Measured data were in good agreement with data calculated by SRIM-2013, especially for C ions was observed better agreement than for O ions. The energy straggling was determined and compared to those calculated by using Bohr's, Bethe-Livingston and Yang models. The measured energy straggling values in the PI foil was corrected for foil roughness and thickness inhomogeneity determined from AFM. Bethe-Livingston predicting formula has been modified to make it appropriate for thicker targets. The energy straggling determined in our experiment was obtained higher than Bohr's predicted value; the predictions by Yang are in good agreement with our experiment. Bethe-Livingston formulation of the energy straggling shows better agreement with the experimental data after the modified formula implementation which assumes that the thick target was consisted to be composed of n-number of thin layers. Influence of the charge-exchange phenomena to the energy straggling of C and O ions in PI was discussed.

  11. Relative stopping power measurements to aid in the design of anthropomorphic phantoms for proton radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Ryan L; Summers, Paige A; Neihart, James L; Blatnica, Anthony P; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael T; Followill, David S; Ibbott, Geoffrey S

    2014-03-06

    The delivery of accurate proton dose for clinical trials requires that the appropriate conversion function from Hounsfield unit (HU) to relative linear stopping power (RLSP) be used in proton treatment planning systems (TPS). One way of verifying that the TPS is calculating the correct dose is an end-to-end test using an anthropomorphic phantom containing tissue equivalent materials and dosimeters. Many of the phantoms in use for such end-to-end tests were originally designed using tissue-equivalent materials that had physical characteristics to match patient tissues when irradiated with megavoltage photon beams. The aim of this study was to measure the RLSP of materials used in the phantoms, as well as alternative materials to enable modifying phantoms for use at proton therapy centers. Samples of materials used and projected for use in the phantoms were measured and compared to the HU assigned by the treatment planning system. A percent difference in RLSP of 5% was used as the cutoff for materials deemed acceptable for use in proton therapy (i.e., proton equivalent). Until proper tissue-substitute materials are identified and incorporated, institutions that conduct end-to-end tests with the phantoms are instructed to override the TPS with the measured stopping powers we provide. To date, the RLSPs of 18 materials have been measured using a water phantom and/or multilayer ion chamber (MLIC). Nine materials were identified as acceptable for use in anthropomorphic phantoms. Some of the failing tissue substitute materials are still used in the current phantoms. Further investigation for additional appropriate tissue substitute materials in proton beams is ongoing. Until all anthropomorphic phantoms are constructed of appropriate materials, a unique HU-RLSP phantom has been developed to be used during site visits to verify the proton facility's treatment planning HU-RLSP calibration curve.

  12. Stopping power of SiO sub 2 for 0.2-3.0 MeV He ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pascual-Izarra, C; Lulli, G; Summonte, C

    2002-01-01

    The stopping power of SiO sub 2 for 200 keV-3 MeV He ions has been evaluated by Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and a semiempirical stopping power curve is proposed in this energy range. The curve is parameterized using the Andersen and Ziegler's formula, allowing for an easy implementation in any simulation program. The estimated accuracy of the present stopping power curve is of the order of 2%. Samples used for the measurements consist of thin SiO sub 2 films grown by wet thermal oxidation of Si(1 0 0) wafers. The thickness of each sample was independently determined by reflectance spectroscopy. The fitting of the experimental RBS spectra was performed using full Monte Carlo calculation of trajectories in the binary collision approximation.

  13. Power Minimization through Packet Retention in Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks under Interference and Delay Constraints: An Optimal Stopping Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Y. Elnakeeb

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is twofold: First, we study the problem of packets retention in a queue with the aim of minimizing transmission power in delay-tolerant applications. The problem is classified as an optimal stopping problem. The optimal stopping rule has been derived as well. Optimal number of released packets is determined in each round through an Integer Linear Programming (ILP optimization problem. This transmission paradigm is tested via simulations in an interference-free environment leading to a significant reduction in transmission power (at least 55%. Second, we address the problem of applying the scheme of packets retention through the Optimal Stopping Policy (OSP to underlay Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks (CRSNs where strict interference threshold does exist. Simulations proved that our scheme outperforms traditional transmission method as far as dropped packet rate and Average Power per Transmitted Packet (APTP are concerned.

  14. Hydrodynamic theory for ion structure and stopping power in quantum plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P K; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M

    2013-04-01

    We present a theory for the dynamical ion structure factor (DISF) and ion stopping power in an unmagnetized collisional quantum plasma with degenerate electron fluids and nondegenerate strongly correlated ion fluids. Our theory is based on the fluctuation dissipation theorem and the quantum plasma dielectric constant that is deduced from a linearized viscoelastic quantum hydrodynamical (LVQHD) model. The latter incorporates the essential physics of quantum forces, which are associated with the quantum statistical pressure, electron-exchange, and electron-correlation effects, the quantum electron recoil effect caused by the dispersion of overlapping electron wave functions that control the dynamics of degenerate electron fluids, and the viscoelastic properties of strongly correlated ion fluids. Both degenerate electrons and nondegenerate strongly correlated ions are coupled with each other via the space charge electric force. Thus, our LVQHD theory is valid for a collisional quantum plasma at atomic scales with a wide range of the ion coupling parameter, the plasma composition, and plasma number densities that are relevant for compressed plasmas in laboratories (inertial confinement fusion schemes) and in astrophysical environments (e.g., warm dense matter and the cores of white dwarf stars). It is found that quantum electron effects and viscoelastic properties of strongly correlated ions significantly affect the features of the DISF and the ion stopping power (ISP). Unlike previous theories, which have studied ion correlations in terms of the ion coupling parameter, by neglecting the essential physics of collective effects that are competing among each other, we have here developed a method to evaluate the dependence of the plasma static and dynamical features in terms of individual parameters, like the Wigner-Seitz radius, the ion atomic number, and the ion temperature. It is found that due to the complex nature of charge screening in quantum plasmas, the ion

  15. Hydrodynamic theory for ion structure and stopping power in quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2013-04-01

    We present a theory for the dynamical ion structure factor (DISF) and ion stopping power in an unmagnetized collisional quantum plasma with degenerate electron fluids and nondegenerate strongly correlated ion fluids. Our theory is based on the fluctuation dissipation theorem and the quantum plasma dielectric constant that is deduced from a linearized viscoelastic quantum hydrodynamical (LVQHD) model. The latter incorporates the essential physics of quantum forces, which are associated with the quantum statistical pressure, electron-exchange, and electron-correlation effects, the quantum electron recoil effect caused by the dispersion of overlapping electron wave functions that control the dynamics of degenerate electron fluids, and the viscoelastic properties of strongly correlated ion fluids. Both degenerate electrons and nondegenerate strongly correlated ions are coupled with each other via the space charge electric force. Thus, our LVQHD theory is valid for a collisional quantum plasma at atomic scales with a wide range of the ion coupling parameter, the plasma composition, and plasma number densities that are relevant for compressed plasmas in laboratories (inertial confinement fusion schemes) and in astrophysical environments (e.g., warm dense matter and the cores of white dwarf stars). It is found that quantum electron effects and viscoelastic properties of strongly correlated ions significantly affect the features of the DISF and the ion stopping power (ISP). Unlike previous theories, which have studied ion correlations in terms of the ion coupling parameter, by neglecting the essential physics of collective effects that are competing among each other, we have here developed a method to evaluate the dependence of the plasma static and dynamical features in terms of individual parameters, like the Wigner-Seitz radius, the ion atomic number, and the ion temperature. It is found that due to the complex nature of charge screening in quantum plasmas, the ion

  16. Stopping power of 1.0-3.0 MeV helium in Mylar, Makrofol and Kapton foils

    CERN Document Server

    Chekirine, M

    1999-01-01

    The stopping powers of 1.0-3.0 MeV of helium ( sup 4 He) in Makrofol KG, Mylar and Kapton were measured. The results were compared with scanty experimental data in the literature and with values predicted by both Bragg's rule and cores-and-bonds model. These values agree with each other within the uncertainties; maximum deviations are <5%.

  17. Stopping power of the elements Z=20 through Z=30 for 5-12-MeV protons and deuterons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Henrik; Hanke, C.C.; Simonsen, H.;

    1968-01-01

    The stopping power for 5-12-MeV protons and deuterons of Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn has been measured. For most of the materials, the accuracy is ±0.3%. For Ca, Sc, Cr, and Mn, which were rather difficult to handle, the results are somewhat less accurate. The results have been...

  18. Getting deeper insight into stopping power problems in radiation physics using the Noether's theorem corollary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Vladimir M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The theories that combine two different approaches in dealing with interacting objects, for instance, treating electromagnetic laser field classically, and the interacting atom as a quantum object, have some ambiguities and, as such, they should be labeled as “mixed”. From the Noether's Theorem Corollary, which we proved earlier, about the conservation laws of energy, momentum and angular momentum in mixed theories, follows that the aforementioned theories do not support the law of angular momentum/spin conservation (to be precise, the obtained result does not imply that the law of conservation of angular momentum and spin is not valid generally, but rather that mixed theories can produce the results which might violate this law. In present paper, an additional explanation following our Corollary is given to why the calculation of the stopping power in the fully quantized theory gives better results than those that were obtained in mixed theories, which further confirms the predictions of our Corollary. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171021: The experimental and theoretical research in radiation physics and radioecology

  19. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials using local plasma oscillator strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The basic model of Lindhard and Scharff, known as the local plasma model, is used to study the effects on stopping power of the chemical and physical state of the medium. Unlike previous work with the local plasma model, in which individual electron shifts in the plasma frequency were estimated empirically, he Pines correction derived for a degenerate Fermi gas is shown herein to provide a reasonable estimate, even on the atomic scale. Thus, the model is moved to a complete theoretical base requiring no empirical adjustments, as characteristic of past applications. The principal remaining error is in the overestimation of the low-energy absorption properties that are characteristic of the plasma model in the region of the atomic discrete spectrum, although higher-energy phenomena are accurately represented, and even excitation-to-ionization ratios are given to fair accuracy. Mean excitation energies for covalent-bonded gases and solids, for ionic gases and crystals, and for metals are calculated using first-order models of the bonded states.

  20. Barkas effect in the stopping power for ions with different ionization degrees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archubi, Claudio D., E-mail: archubi@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio, C1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Abril, Isabel [Departament de Física Aplicada, Universitat d’Alacant, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Física – Centro de Investigación en Óptica y Nanofísica, Universidad de Murcia, E 30100 Murcia (Spain); Arista, Néstor R. [Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2013-12-01

    The Barkas effect in the electronic stopping power for dressed projectiles moving in a free electron gas is studied for a wide range of velocities v. The interaction of the projectile with the target is described using screened interaction potentials, which take into account the self screening due to the projectile bound electrons and the external screening produced by the target electron gas. The Barkas factor is obtained from a classical simulation of the scattering of the target electrons in the potential of the projectile and that of its antiparticle, following the transport cross section model. A large set of numerical simulations were made for different projectiles, degrees of ionization and velocities. We find that the Barkas factor increases at high energies with the number of projectile bound electrons, whereas its velocity dependence changes from the v{sup -3} behavior for bare projectiles to a v{sup -2} behavior for neutral ones. Interesting effects of curve crossings in the Barkas factor at different degrees of ionization as a function of the projectile velocity are observed. A simple scaling law for neutral and fully ionized projectiles is also derived.

  1. Projectile- and charge-state-dependent electron yields from ion penetration of solids as a probe of preequilibrium stopping power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothard, H.; Schou, Jørgen; Groeneveld, K.-O.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetic electron-emission yields gamma from swift ion penetration of solids are proportional to the (electronic) stopping power gamma approximately Beta-S*, if the preequilibrium evolution of the charge and excitation states of the positively charged ions is taken into account. We show...... that the concept of the preequilibrium near-surface stopping S* can be applied successfully to describe the dependence of the ion-induced electron yields on the projectile atomic number Z(P) and on the charge states q(i) of the incoming ions. We discuss the implementation of this concept into Schou's transport...

  2. Optimal Stopping Problems with Power Function of Lévy Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surya, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    This talk is based on the joint paper with A.E. Kyprianou: "Kyprianou, A. E., and Surya, B. A. On the Novikov-Shiryaev optimal stopping problems in continuous time. Elect. Comm. in Probab., 10 (2005), 146-154.

  3. SU-E-J-149: Secondary Emission Detection for Improved Proton Relative Stopping Power Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, J; Musall, B; Erickson, A [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This research investigates application of secondary prompt gamma (PG) emission spectra, resulting from nuclear reactions induced by protons, to characterize tissue composition along the particle path. The objective of utilizing the intensity of discrete high-energy peaks of PG is to improve the accuracy of relative stopping power (RSP) values available for proton therapy treatment planning on a patient specific basis and to reduce uncertainty in dose depth calculations. Methods: In this research, MCNP6 was used to simulate PG emission spectra generated from proton induced nuclear reactions in medium of varying composition of carbon, oxygen, calcium and nitrogen, the predominant elements found in human tissue. The relative peak intensities at discrete energies predicted by MCNP6 were compared to the corresponding atomic composition of the medium. Results: The results have shown a good general agreement with experimentally measured values reported by other investigators. Unexpected divergence from experimental spectra was noted in the peak intensities for some cases depending on the source of the cross-section data when using compiled proton table libraries vs. physics models built into MCNP6. While the use of proton cross-section libraries is generally recommended when available, these libraries lack data for several less abundant isotopes. This limits the range of their applicability and forces the simulations to rely on physics models for reactions with natural atomic compositions. Conclusion: Current end-of-range proton imaging provides an average RSP for the total estimated track length. The accurate identification of tissue composition along the incident particle path using PG detection and characterization allows for improved determination of the tissue RSP on the local level. While this would allow for more accurate depth calculations resulting in tighter treatment margins, precise understanding of proton beam behavior in tissue of various

  4. Analysis of a Residential Heating System Utilizing a Solar Assisted Water-to-Air Heat Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    heat pump heating system were analyzed. A realistic residence and solar assisted water-to-air heat pump system were modeled for this northern climate using the transient simulation computer code TRNSYS developed by the University of Wisconsin. The system was studied over a one month winter period, December, using actual hourly weather data. The system was analyzed for both the cloudiest and clearest December weather recorded in the last 30 years. The collector area and storage tank capacity were varied and the effects on system performance were

  5. Electronic Stopping Power for 0.05-10 MeV Protons in a Group of Organic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Zhen-Yu; XIA Yue-Yuan; ZHAO Ming-Wen; LIU Xiang-Dong; ZHANG Li-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Electronic stopping powers for 0.05-10 Me V protons in a group of organic materials are systematically calculated. The calculations are based on Ashley's dielectric model, and an evaluation approach of optical energy loss function is incorporated into Ashley's model because no experimental optical data are available for most of the organic materials under consideration. The Barkas-effect correction and Bloch correction are included. The proton stopping powers for the considered organic materials except for mylar in the energy range from 0.05 to 10 MeV are presented for the first time. The results may be useful for studies of various radiation effects in these materials and for space research.

  6. Response of a DRAM to single-ion tracks of different heavy-ion species and stopping powers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Smith, L. S.; Edmonds, L. D.

    1990-01-01

    Multiple-bit errors caused by single-ion tracks in a 256-kb DRAM fabricated by a bulk process were observed for different ion species and stopping power values. The results demonstrate the utility of this device for the evaluation of ion-beam uniformity and ion-beam-induced charge collection in IC devices. The data indicate that single-ion-induced charge transport results in multiple-bit error clusters due to lateral diffusion of excess minority carriers (electrons). Charge collection occurred from a depth of up to 35 microns from the surface of the device. An apparent charge loss was observed for very heavy ions with a high stopping power (Au at 350 MeV).

  7. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic-production processes due to two-photon exchange in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Feynman diagrams for two-photon exchange are evaluated using quantum electrodynamics. The total cross section and stopping power for projectile and target nuclei of identical charge are found to be significant for heavy nuclei above a few GeV per nucleon-incident energy.

  8. Low-energy proton stopping power of N2, O2 and water vapor and deviations from Bragg's rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A modified local plasma model, based on the works of Lindhard and Winther; and Bethe, Brown, and Walske, is established. The Gordon-Kim model for molecular electron density is used to calculate stopping power of N2, O2, and water vapor for protons of energy ranging from 40 keV to 2.5 MeV, resulting in good agreement with experimental data. Deviations from Bragg's rule are evaluated and are discussed under the present theoretical model.

  9. Irrelevance of the power stroke for the directionality, stopping force, and optimal efficiency of chemically driven molecular machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astumian, R Dean

    2015-01-20

    A simple model for a chemically driven molecular walker shows that the elastic energy stored by the molecule and released during the conformational change known as the power-stroke (i.e., the free-energy difference between the pre- and post-power-stroke states) is irrelevant for determining the directionality, stopping force, and efficiency of the motor. Further, the apportionment of the dependence on the externally applied force between the forward and reverse rate constants of the power-stroke (or indeed among all rate constants) is irrelevant for determining the directionality, stopping force, and efficiency of the motor. Arguments based on the principle of microscopic reversibility demonstrate that this result is general for all chemically driven molecular machines, and even more broadly that the relative energies of the states of the motor have no role in determining the directionality, stopping force, or optimal efficiency of the machine. Instead, the directionality, stopping force, and optimal efficiency are determined solely by the relative heights of the energy barriers between the states. Molecular recognition--the ability of a molecular machine to discriminate between substrate and product depending on the state of the machine--is far more important for determining the intrinsic directionality and thermodynamics of chemo-mechanical coupling than are the details of the internal mechanical conformational motions of the machine. In contrast to the conclusions for chemical driving, a power-stroke is very important for the directionality and efficiency of light-driven molecular machines and for molecular machines driven by external modulation of thermodynamic parameters.

  10. Studies of endothelial monolayer formation on irradiated poly-L-lactide acid with ions of different stopping power and velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeitman, Claudia R.; del Grosso, Mariela F.; Ibañez, Irene L.; Behar, Moni; Grasselli, Mariano; Bermúdez, Gerardo García

    2015-12-01

    In this work we study cell viability, proliferation and morphology of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) cultured on poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) modified by heavy ion irradiation. In a previous study comparing ions beams with the same stopping power we observed an increase in cell density and a better cell morphology at higher ion velocities. In the present work we continued this study using heavy ions beam with different stopping power and ion velocities. To this end thin films of 50 μm thickness were irradiated with 2 MeV/u and 0.10 MeV/u ion beams provided the Tandar (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and Tandetron (Porto Alegre, Brazil) accelerators, respectively. The results suggest that a more dense and elongated cell shapes, similar to the BAEC cells on the internal surface of bovine aorta, was obtained for stopping power of 18.2-22.1 MeV cm2 mg-1 and ion velocity of 2 MeV/u. On the other hand, for low ion velocity 0.10 MeV/u the cells present a more globular shapes.

  11. Studies of endothelial monolayer formation on irradiated poly-L-lactide acid with ions of different stopping power and velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeitman, Claudia R. [CONICET – Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); UNQ – IMBICE – CCT – CONICET – LA PLATA (Argentina); Grosso, Mariela F. del [CONICET – Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); Ibañez, Irene L. [CONICET – Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Behar, Moni [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Grasselli, Mariano [UNQ – IMBICE – CCT – CONICET – LA PLATA (Argentina); Bermúdez, Gerardo García [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    In this work we study cell viability, proliferation and morphology of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) cultured on poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) modified by heavy ion irradiation. In a previous study comparing ions beams with the same stopping power we observed an increase in cell density and a better cell morphology at higher ion velocities. In the present work we continued this study using heavy ions beam with different stopping power and ion velocities. To this end thin films of 50 μm thickness were irradiated with 2 MeV/u and 0.10 MeV/u ion beams provided the Tandar (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and Tandetron (Porto Alegre, Brazil) accelerators, respectively. The results suggest that a more dense and elongated cell shapes, similar to the BAEC cells on the internal surface of bovine aorta, was obtained for stopping power of 18.2–22.1 MeV cm{sup 2} mg{sup −1} and ion velocity of 2 MeV/u. On the other hand, for low ion velocity 0.10 MeV/u the cells present a more globular shapes.

  12. A linear, separable two-parameter model for dual energy CT imaging of proton stopping power computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dong, E-mail: radon.han@gmail.com; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Siebers, Jeffrey V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and robustness of a simple, linear, separable, two-parameter model (basis vector model, BVM) in mapping proton stopping powers via dual energy computed tomography (DECT) imaging. Methods: The BVM assumes that photon cross sections (attenuation coefficients) of unknown materials are linear combinations of the corresponding radiological quantities of dissimilar basis substances (i.e., polystyrene, CaCl{sub 2} aqueous solution, and water). The authors have extended this approach to the estimation of electron density and mean excitation energy, which are required parameters for computing proton stopping powers via the Bethe–Bloch equation. The authors compared the stopping power estimation accuracy of the BVM with that of a nonlinear, nonseparable photon cross section Torikoshi parametric fit model (VCU tPFM) as implemented by the authors and by Yang et al. [“Theoretical variance analysis of single- and dual-energy computed tomography methods for calculating proton stopping power ratios of biological tissues,” Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 1343–1362 (2010)]. Using an idealized monoenergetic DECT imaging model, proton ranges estimated by the BVM, VCU tPFM, and Yang tPFM were compared to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) published reference values. The robustness of the stopping power prediction accuracy of tissue composition variations was assessed for both of the BVM and VCU tPFM. The sensitivity of accuracy to CT image uncertainty was also evaluated. Results: Based on the authors’ idealized, error-free DECT imaging model, the root-mean-square error of BVM proton stopping power estimation for 175 MeV protons relative to ICRU reference values for 34 ICRU standard tissues is 0.20%, compared to 0.23% and 0.68% for the Yang and VCU tPFM models, respectively. The range estimation errors were less than 1 mm for the BVM and Yang tPFM models, respectively. The BVM estimation accuracy is not dependent on

  13. Reaction-in-Flight neutrons as a test of stopping power in degenerate plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.; Cerjan, C. J.; Jungman, G.; Fowler, M. M.; Gooden, M. E.; Grim, G. P.; Henry, E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Sepke, S. M.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Singleton, R. L.; Tonchev, A. P.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-05-01

    Cryogenically cooled inertial confinement fusion capsule designs are suitable for studies of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons. RIF neutrons occur when energetically up-scattered ions undergo DT reactions with a thermal ion in the plasma, producing neutrons in the energy range 9-30 MeV. The knock-on ions lose energy as they traverse the plasma, which directly affects the spectrum of the produced RIF neutrons. Here we present measurements from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of RIF neutrons produced in cryogenic capsules, with energies above 15 MeV. We show that the measured RIFs probe stopping under previously unexplored degenerate plasma conditions and constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions.

  14. A Bayesian approach to solve proton stopping powers from noisy multi-energy CT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Arthur; Bär, Esther; Bouchard, Hugo

    2017-07-28

    To propose a new formalism allowing the characterization of human tissues from multienergy computed tomography (MECT) data affected by noise and to evaluate its performance in estimating proton stopping powers (SPR). A recently published formalism based on principal component analysis called eigentissue decomposition (ETD) is adapted to the context of noise using a Bayesian estimator. The method, named Bayesian ETD, uses the maximum a posteriori fractions of eigentissues in each voxel to determine physical parameters relevant for proton beam dose calculation. Simulated dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) data are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method to estimate SPR and to compare it to the initially proposed maximum-likelihood ETD and to a state-of-the-art ρe  - Z formalism. To test the robustness of each method towards clinical reality, three different levels of noise are implemented, as well as variations in elemental composition and density of reference tissues. The impact of using more than two energy bins to determine SPR is also investigated by simulating MECT data using two to five energy bins. Finally, the impact of using MECT over DECT for range prediction is evaluated using a probabilistic model. For simulated DECT data of reference tissues, the Bayesian ETD approach systematically gives lower root-mean-square (RMS) errors with negligible bias. For a medium level of noise, the RMS errors on SPR are found to be 2.78%, 2.76% and 1.53% for ρe  - Z, maximum-likelihood ETD, and Bayesian ETD, respectively. When variations are introduced to the elemental composition and density, all implemented methods give similar performances at low noise. However, for a medium noise level, the proposed Bayesian method outperforms the two others with a RMS error of 1.94%, compared to 2.79% and 2.78% for ρe  - Z and maximum-likelihood ETD, respectively. When more than two energy spectra are used, the Bayesian ETD is able to reduce RMS error on SPR

  15. Stopping power of liquid water for carbon ions in the energy range between 1 MeV and 6 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, J M; Baek, W Y; Rabus, H; Hofsäss, H

    2014-07-21

    The stopping power of liquid water was measured for the first time for carbon ions in the energy range between 1 and 6 MeV using the inverted Doppler shift attenuation method. The feasibility study carried out within the scope of the present work shows that this method is well suited for the quantification of the controversial condensed phased effect in the stopping power for heavy ions in the intermediate energy range. The preliminary results of this work indicate that the stopping power of water for carbon ions with energies prevailing in the Bragg-peak region is significantly lower than that of water vapor. In view of the relatively high uncertainty of the present results, a new experiment with uncertainties less than the predicted difference between the stopping powers of both water phases is planned.

  16. Spencer-Attix water/medium stopping-power ratios for the dosimetry of proton pencil beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomà, C; Andreo, P; Sempau, J

    2013-04-21

    This paper uses Monte Carlo simulations to calculate the Spencer-Attix water/medium stopping-power ratios (sw, med) for the dosimetry of scanned proton pencil beams. It includes proton energies from 30 to 350 MeV and typical detection materials such as air (ionization chambers), radiochromic film, gadolinium oxysulfide (scintillating screens), silicon and lithium fluoride. Track-ends and particles heavier than protons were found to have a negligible effect on the water/air stopping-power ratios (sw, air), whereas the mean excitation energy values were found to carry the largest source of uncertainty. The initial energy spread of the beam was found to have a minor influence on the sw, air values in depth. The water/medium stopping-power ratios as a function of depth in water were found to be quite constant for air and radiochromic film-within 2.5%. Also, the sw, med values were found to have no clinically relevant dependence on the radial distance-except for the case of gadolinium oxysulfide and proton radiography beams. In conclusion, the most suitable detection materials for depth-dose measurements in water were found to be air and radiochromic film active layer, although a small correction is still needed to compensate for the different sw, med values between the plateau and the Bragg peak region. Also, all the detection materials studied in this work-except for gadolinium oxysulfide-were found to be suitable for lateral dose profiles and field-specific dose distribution measurements in water.

  17. Atomic mean excitation energies for stopping powers from local plasma oscillator strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Chang, C. K.; Kamaratos, E.

    1984-01-01

    The stopping of a charged particle by isolated atoms is investigated theoretically using an 'atomic plasma' model in which atomic oscillator strengths are replaced by the plasma frequency spectrum. The plasma-frequency correction factor for individual electron motion proposed by Pines (1953) is incorporated, and atomic mean excitation energies are calculated for atoms through Sr. The results are compared in a graph with those obtained theoretically by Inokuti et al. (1978, 1981) and Dehmer et al. (1975) and with the experimental values compiled by Seltzer and Berger (1982): good agreement is shown.

  18. Semi empirical formula for electronic stopping power determination of 24Mg, 27Al and 28Si ions crossing Formvar foil in the ion energy domain of LSS theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guesmia, A.; Ammi, H.; Mammeri, S.; Dib, A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Msimanga, M.; Hedibel, M.

    2014-03-01

    We have determined continuous stopping power of heavy ions in thin Formvar foil for 28Si, 27Al and 24Mg ions over an energy range of (0.1-0.5) MeV/nucleon. Heavy Ions Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (HI-ERDA) technique coupled with time of flight (ToF) spectrometer has been used to measure energy loss of charged particles in this thin absorber. Lindhard, Scharff and Schiott (LSS) theory compared with the corresponding determined stopping values in Formvar, shows significantly large deviations. However, a novel semi empirical expression has been proposed here and tested for better stopping power calculations at low velocity in the ion energy domain of LSS theory for 28Si, 27Al and 24Mg ions crossing thin Formvar foil. The results were compared to the obtained experimental stopping power data, predictions of LSS theory and also to those generated by SRIM-2010 computer code. The obtained results exhibit good agreement with experimental data.

  19. Patient specific optimization of the relation between CT-hounsfield units and proton stopping power with proton radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uwe; Pemler, Peter; Besserer, Jürgen; Pedroni, Eros; Lomax, Antony; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to show the feasibility of using in vivo proton radiography of a radiotherapy patient for the patient individual optimization of the calibration from CT-Hounsfield units to relative proton stopping power. Water equivalent tissue (WET) calibrated proton radiographs of a dog patient treated for a nasal tumor were used as baseline in comparison with integrated proton stopping power through the calibrated CT of the dog. In an optimization procedure starting with a stoichiometric calibration curve, the calibration was modified randomly. The result of this iteration is an optimized calibration curve which was used to recalculate the dose distribution of the patient. One result of this experiment was that the mean value of the deviations between WET calculations based on the stoichiometric calibration curve and the measurements was shifted systematically away from zero. The calibration produced by the optimization procedure reduced this shift to around 0.4 mm. Another result was that the precision of the calibration, reflected as the standard deviation of the normally distributed deviations between WET calculation and measurement, could be reduced from 7.9 to 6.7 mm with the optimized calibration. The dose distributions based on the two calibration curves showed major deviations at the distal end of the target volume.

  20. Relativistic high-current electron-beam stopping-power characterization in solids and plasmas: collisional versus resistive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauzour, B; Santos, J J; Debayle, A; Hulin, S; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Vaisseau, X; Batani, D; Baton, S D; Honrubia, J J; Nicolaï, Ph; Beg, F N; Benocci, R; Chawla, S; Coury, M; Dorchies, F; Fourment, C; d'Humières, E; Jarrot, L C; McKenna, P; Rhee, Y J; Tikhonchuk, V T; Volpe, L; Yahia, V

    2012-12-21

    We present experimental and numerical results on intense-laser-pulse-produced fast electron beams transport through aluminum samples, either solid or compressed and heated by laser-induced planar shock propagation. Thanks to absolute K(α) yield measurements and its very good agreement with results from numerical simulations, we quantify the collisional and resistive fast electron stopping powers: for electron current densities of ≈ 8 × 10(10) A/cm(2) they reach 1.5 keV/μm and 0.8 keV/μm, respectively. For higher current densities up to 10(12)A/cm(2), numerical simulations show resistive and collisional energy losses at comparable levels. Analytical estimations predict the resistive stopping power will be kept on the level of 1 keV/μm for electron current densities of 10(14)A/cm(2), representative of the full-scale conditions in the fast ignition of inertially confined fusion targets.

  1. A practical scattering power for Gaussian beam model of heavy charged particles stopping in tissue-like matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Dose calculation in treatment planning of radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions deals with a large volume of path integrals involving a scattering power of body tissue. This work provides a simple formulation for such demanding applications. Empirical linearity between RMS end-point displacement and range of incident particles in water was translated into a linear formula, from which a simple scattering power was derived. The simplicity enabled analytical formulation for ions stopping in water, which was designed to be equivalent with the extended Highland model and agreed with measurements better than 2% or 0.02 cm in RMS displacement. The simplicity will also improve the efficiency of numerical path integrals in the presence of heterogeneity.

  2. 论警察的盘查权%On Police’s Power to Stop and Frisk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑曦

    2012-01-01

      The police’s exercise of the stop and frisk power is of effective prevention for conditions such as illegal activities occurrence, damage expansion, evidence elimination, suspects escape, etc. However, due to its nature of emergency, the control over stop and frisk is relatively weak that the abuse of this power would cause great harm to people’s right of freedom. So in order to well regulate the power, three aspects should be paid more attention to, i.e. reasonable suspicion or basis being as the cause at the initial, the principle of proportionality being as the implementation standard during the process, and supervision and judicial control being as the power constraint means afterwards. There are some flaws in China’s current stop and frisk system, eg. discrimination, needing urgently reforms to reverse the present situation.%  警察行使盘查权能够有效地防止违法行为的发生、危害结果的扩大、证据的消湮和嫌疑人逃跑等情况的出现。但盘查权由于紧急性等特征,对其控制相对较弱,一旦滥用,将对公民的自由权利造成重大伤害。故应当从盘查启动时以合理怀疑或合理根据为依据、盘查中以比例原则为施行标准和盘查后以监督与司法控制为权力制约手段几个方面加以规制。中国现有的盘查制度存在一些不足之处,如存在歧视性盘查等现象,急需通过改革扭转目前的现状。

  3. Stopping power measurements for {sup 16}O, {sup 19}F and {sup 28}Si ions in Mylar by a transmission technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekirine, M., E-mail: chekirine_mamoun@yahoo.fr [Departement de physique, Faculte des sciences, Universite Saad Dahleb, B.P. 270, route de Soumaa, Blida (Algeria); Ammi, H., E-mail: hakim_ammi@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2, Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare (Algeria); Choudhury, R.K.; Biswas, D.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Nuclear Physics Division, Mumbai (India); Tobbeche, S., E-mail: said_tobbeche@yahoo.com [Faculte des sciences, Universite El-Hadj Lakhdar, Batna 05000 (Algeria)

    2011-12-15

    Electronic energy loss of charged particles in materials is a fundamental process responsible for the unique response of materials in applications of advanced nuclear power, radiation detectors and advanced processing of electronic devices. In this study, stopping powers of {sup 16}O, {sup 19}F and {sup 28}Si heavy ions crossing thin Mylar foils have been determined in transmission geometry. The energy loss was measured over a continuous range of energies from 1.6 to 5.5 MeV/n (MeV per nucleon) using the data that was tagged by a surface barrier detector (SBD) with and without stopping foils. We have compared the obtained stopping values to those predicted by SRIM-2008 computer code, ICRU-73 stopping data tables and MSTAR calculations. The effective charge values of these heavy ions have been also deduced from the experimental set of data.

  4. Improving spatial resolution of high stopping power X- and gamma-ray cameras:. fibers or slat-structured detectors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenmayer, J.-L.

    2000-11-01

    For medical imaging applications, the earliness of the detection is an essential factor to increase chances of recovery; in the field of industrial imaging, nondestructive testing with lower detectivity threshold to ensure quality and safe conduct. Accordingly, in all areas using the up-to-date compact (much less-expensive facilities) high-energy pulsed electron accelerators (HF or induction linac, Marx generator) to produce energetic photons (bremsstrahlung), such as industrial and medical numerical imaging, flash radiography, radiotherapy positioning, computed tomography, detection of small- or low-contrasted details require two-dimensional (2D) detectors with an even more improved combination of sensitivity (which implies high stopping power), spatial resolution (millimetric or sub-millimetric) and speed, working in integrating mode (i.e. dose measurement) because bremsstrahlung X-ray sources provide short pulses. The purpose of this paper is to highlight some of the issues involved in the development of high-performance position-sensitive X- and gamma-ray cameras for high-energy flash imaging. The basic idea is that, examining in detail the energy deposition and its statistics (quantum noise), we shall be able to determine in real detectors the following features, such as detectors composition and pixel size, which can simultaneously lead to good detection efficiency and good spatial resolution. In general, conclusions can be transposed to other particle imaging detectors as neutron imagers (changing "dense" metal by "high energy transfer" material). There are, of course, challenges to get such detectors, although new technologies have already provided some prototypes offering more than 30% stopping power and less than 2 mm spatial resolution (blur) for 50 ns long 5 MeV X-ray pulses. There are various detector-segmentation methods that can be applied in order to improve the stopping power (macroscopic cross-section) and reduce the effect of the lateral energy

  5. Electronic stopping power of slow H+ and He2+ ions in CdTe from first principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-kai; Mao, Fei; Fu, Yan-long; Liao, Bin; Ouyang, Xiao-ping; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2017-02-01

    We study through time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) method the electronic stopping power of low-energy protons and helium ions moving through CdTe under the condition of channeling. The agreement between our calculated results and SRIM data roughly up to the stopping maximum for the proton along the and crystalline axes and for helium ions along crystalline axis is satisfactory, which can be explained by the energy transfer mechanism that electron-hole excitation caused by ions in the solid. However, in the channel of for helium ions, a transition between two velocities regimes is observed at about v = 0.4 a.u. This may be an indication of extra energy loss channel beyond the electron-hole excitation. To analyze it, we calculate the amount of electrons captured by the moving projectiles in real time. It is found that the soft transition between two velocities regimes can be attributed to the charge transfer and charge resonance between helium ion and host atoms of CdTe crystal, which are considered as additional energy loss channels.

  6. Power-law behavior in a cascade process with stopping events: a solvable model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ken; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    The present paper proposes a stochastic model to be solved analytically, and a power-law-like distribution is derived. This model is formulated based on a cascade fracture with the additional effect that each fragment at each stage of a cascade ceases fracture with a certain probability. When the probability is constant, the exponent of the power-law cumulative distribution lies between -1 and 0, depending not only on the probability but the distribution of fracture points. Whereas, when the probability depends on the size of a fragment, the exponent is less than -1, irrespective of the distribution of fracture points. The applicability of our model is also discussed.

  7. Stopping powers of LiF thin films deposited onto self-supporting Al foils for swift protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damache, Smail [Division de Physique, CRNA, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-gare, Algiers (Algeria); Moussa, Djamel [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Ouichaoui, Saâd, E-mail: souichaoui@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-08-01

    The energy losses of ∼(0.273–3.334) MeV protons in LiF thin films deposited by vacuum evaporation onto self-supporting Al foils have been measured using the transmission method. The thicknesses of selected and used LiF/Al target samples were accurately determined via systematic energy loss measurements for alpha particles from a very thin mixed {sup 241}Am/{sup 239}Pu/{sup 233}U radioactive source. The samples were investigated in detail for their stoichiometry and their impurity contents by backscattering Rutherford spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. Then, LiF stopping powers have been determined with overall relative uncertainty of less than 2.7% arising mainly from errors in the determination of target sample thicknesses. These S(E) data are reported and discussed in comparison to previous experimental data sets from the literature and to values calculated by the Sigmund–Schinner binary collision stopping theory both for molecular LiF, and for the LiF compound assuming Bragg–Kleeman’s additivity rule. Our S(E) data show to be in excellent agreement with the latter theory for molecular LiF over the whole proton energy range explored, which supports the use of modified electronic hydrogen wave functions for evaluating atomic shell corrections in the case of low-Z{sub 2} target materials. In contrast, they exhibit a slightly increasing deviation from theoretical values derived for the LiF compound with assuming stopping force additivity as the proton energy decreases from E ≈ 400 keV towards lower proton velocities. This deviation in excess relative to experimental data, amounting only up to (at most) ∼2.5%, can be ascribed to strong effects of 2s-state valence electrons of Li atoms within the LiF compound. Besides, the comparison to values calculated by the SRIM-2008 computer code indicates that this program satisfactorily accounts for our S(E) data above E ≈ 1.30 MeV but underestimates them with substantially increasing deviations (up to

  8. Water-to-air transfer of branched and linear PFOA: Influence of pH, concentration and water type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana H. Johansson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The volatilisation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA was measured experimentally at a range of pH values using a previously published laboratory method. Water-to-air transfer was studied for five structural isomers, namely: the linear isomer (n-PFOA and the four most commonly occurring branched isomers (3-, 4-, 5- and 6-PFOA. The influence of water concentration and water type on the pH-dependent water-to-air transfer was also investigated for n-PFOA. The water-to-air transfer was studied over the course of 48 h at pH values ranging from 0.2 to 5.5. Under all experimental conditions tested, the volatilisation of PFOA was negligible at pH > 2.5. In experiments performed with MilliQ water, volatilisation increased with decreasing water pH. In experiments performed with tap water and lake water, maximum volatilisation was observed at pH 1. The concentration of PFOA in water had no influence on the pH value at which water-to-air transfer was observed (i.e. at pH < 2.5 for the concentration range tested (0.1–50 μg/L PFOA in deionised water. Although the percentage of PFOA volatilised was significantly different for the four branched isomers at low pH, volatilisation was not observed above pH 2.5 for any branched isomer suggesting that all PFOA isomers have a low pKa. Overall, these laboratory results demonstrate that volatilisation of any structural isomer of PFOA from water is negligible at environmentally-relevant conditions. It is unlikely that PFOA isomers will be fractionated in the environment as a result of volatilisation because it is a process of negligible environmental relevance.

  9. SU-E-T-407: Evaluation of the Stopping Power and Imaging Visibility for Iodine Based Contrast in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, H; Zhao, L; Rana, S; Chacko, M; Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between calculated and measured relative linear stopping power (RLSP) for contrast medium in proton therapy. Furthermore, the visibility for different concentrations in prostate phantom on orthogonal X-ray system was evaluated Methods and Materials: In prostate cancer patient, rectal balloon along with the contrast media was used to visualize the balloon position, thus facilitating the patient setup during each fraction of the uniform scanning proton treatment. There were no fiducial markers implanted in the prostate for this patient. A blue wax phantom with outer dimensions 10cm(H) x 14.5cm(L) x 10cm(W) was made in house. To hold iodine based contrast solution, a rectangular shaped hole with dimensions 7cm(H) x 8cm(L) x 4cm(W) was made inside the phantom. Organically bound 8.5% iodine based Cystografin Dilute contrast agent with molecular formula C11H9I3N2O4.C7H17NO5 was used in this study. Six solutions were prepared; each mixture of water and iodine based contrast agent at different concentrations as 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 50%. During computed tomographic(CT) simulation, solutions were placed together at the isocenter of CT and scanned at 120kVp using the same protocol as for prostate cancer patients. The treatment planning was done in CMS-XiO system. Multi-layer-ion-chamber (MLIC) was used to measure residual proton range. Results: The 50% concentration contrast solution was used during treatment for better visualization on orthogonal X-ray image. The measured RLSP for 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% & 50% solutions were 1.005, 1.010, 1.018, 1.023 & 1.033; and similarly calculated RLSP from XiO were 1.090, 1.135, 1.222, 1.299 & 1.448 respectively. Conclusion: The treatment planning system could overestimates the relative stopping power of contrast solution with high concentrations. It is recommended to override the contrast with measured RLSP for high atomic number based contrast solution in treatment

  10. Interaction of antiprotons with Rb atoms and a comparison of antiproton stopping powers of the atoms H, Li, Na, K, and Rb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Fischer, Nicolas; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Ionization and excitation cross sections as well as electron-energy spectra and stopping powers of the alkali metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb colliding with antiprotons were calculated using a time-dependent channel-coupling approach. An impact-energy range from 0.25 to 4000 keV was considered. The...

  11. Stopping power of Zr, Gd, and Ta for 5-12-MeV protons and deuterons. Further evidence of an oscillatory behavior of the excitation potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Simonsen, H.; Sørensen, H.;

    1969-01-01

    The stopping power of Zr, Gd, and Ta for 5-12-MeV protons and deuterons was measured. The accuracy was 0.3% for Zr and Ta and 0.6% for Gd. The results are compared with Riso data published earlier and it is shown that the ratio between the mean excitation potential and the atomic number cannot...

  12. 78 FR 15714 - Welch Motel, Inc., Welch Oil, Inc., Boondocks USA Truck Stop, Bob Welch v. Midland Power...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Welch Motel, Inc., Welch Oil, Inc., Boondocks USA Truck Stop, Bob Welch v... (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206, Welch Motel, Inc., Welch Oil, Inc., Boondocks USA Truck Stop, and Bob...

  13. Effects of alpha stopping power modelling on the ignition threshold in a directly-driven inertial confinement fusion capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temporal, Mauro; Canaud, Benoit; Cayzac, Witold; Ramis, Rafael; Singleton, Robert L.

    2017-05-01

    The alpha-particle energy deposition mechanism modifies the ignition conditions of the thermonuclear Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions, and constitutes a key issue in achieving high gain in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations have been performed with the code Multi-IFE [R. Ramis, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Comput. Phys. Commun. 203, 226 (2016)] to simulate the implosion of a capsule directly irradiated by a laser beam. The diffusion approximation for the alpha energy deposition has been used to optimize three laser profiles corresponding to different implosion velocities. A Monte-Carlo package has been included in Multi-IFE to calculate the alpha energy transport, and in this case the energy deposition uses both the LP [C.K. Li, R.D. Petrasso, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3059 (1993)] and the BPS [L.S. Brown, D.L. Preston, R.L. Singleton Jr., Phys. Rep. 410, 237 (2005)] stopping power models. Homothetic transformations that maintain a constant implosion velocity have been used to map out the transition region between marginally-igniting and high-gain configurations. The results provided by the two models have been compared and it is found that - close to the ignition threshold - in order to produce the same fusion energy, the calculations performed with the BPS model require about 10% more invested energy with respect to the LP model.

  14. Effective particle energies for stopping power calculation in radiotherapy treatment planning with protons and helium, carbon, and oxygen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.

    2016-10-01

    The stopping power ratio (SPR) of body tissues relative to water depends on the particle energy. For simplicity, however, most analytical dose planning systems do not account for SPR variation with particle energy along the beam’s path, but rather assume a constant energy for SPR estimation. The range error due to this simplification could be indispensable depending on the particle species and the assumed energy. This error can be minimized by assuming a suitable energy referred to as an ‘effective energy’ in SPR estimation. To date, however, the effective energy has never been investigated for realistic patient geometries. We investigated the effective energies for proton, helium-, carbon-, and oxygen-ion radiotherapy using volumetric models of the reference male and female phantoms provided by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The range errors were estimated by comparing the particle ranges calculated when particle energy variations were and were not considered. The effective energies per nucleon for protons and helium, carbon, and oxygen ions were 70 MeV, 70 MeV, 131 MeV, and 156 MeV, respectively. Using the determined effective energies, the range errors were reduced to  ⩽0.3 mm for respective particle species. For SPR estimation of multiple particle species, an effective energy of 100 MeV is recommended, with which the range error is  ⩽0.5 mm for all particle species.

  15. Patient-specific stopping power calibration for proton therapy planning based on single-detector proton radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolan, P J; Testa, M; Sharp, G; Bentefour, E H; Royle, G; Lu, H-M

    2015-03-07

    A simple robust optimizer has been developed that can produce patient-specific calibration curves to convert x-ray computed tomography (CT) numbers to relative stopping powers (HU-RSPs) for proton therapy treatment planning. The difference between a digitally reconstructed radiograph water-equivalent path length (DRRWEPL) map through the x-ray CT dataset and a proton radiograph (set as the ground truth) is minimized by optimizing the HU-RSP calibration curve. The function of the optimizer is validated with synthetic datasets that contain no noise and its robustness is shown against CT noise. Application of the procedure is then demonstrated on a plastic and a real tissue phantom, with proton radiographs produced using a single detector. The mean errors using generic/optimized calibration curves between the DRRWEPL map and the proton radiograph were 1.8/0.4% for a plastic phantom and -2.1/ - 0.2% for a real tissue phantom. It was then demonstrated that these optimized calibration curves offer a better prediction of the water equivalent path length at a therapeutic depth. We believe that these promising results are suggestive that a single proton radiograph could be used to generate a patient-specific calibration curve as part of the current proton treatment planning workflow.

  16. DETERMINATION OF THE STOPPING POWER AND FAILURE TIME OF SPACECRAFT COMPONENTS DUE TO PROTON INTERACTION USING GOES 11 ACQUISITION DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Jibiri

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the several ways to describe the net effect of charged-particles’ interaction is the rate of energy loss along the particle’s path. In this study, the mass stopping power (Sp of selected spacecraft materials through which the particle traverses the range (R of the particle in the materials and the distance (d it travelled through the materials have been calculated and analyzed. The dose (in Gy as a function of particle flux and energy, deposited by the particle as it traverses through the material(s was also determined. Predictions of their possible effects on space system operations and life-span were made, particularly as values exceeded certain threshold/limit. Using GOES 11 acquired data (for 3 months, from estimations and calculations, and under certain space radiation environmental conditions, in the Geosynchronous orbit (without of mitigation of any sort, a spacecraft whose body is 20mm thick and made of Al alloy housing sensitive Electrical, Electronic andElectrochemical Components, theoretically has a safe period of about 3 years and risk period of about 29 years (due to Total Ionizing Dose within which it would experience a catastrophic failure.

  17. Optimization of the stopping-power-ratio to Hounsfield-value calibration curve in proton and heavy ion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Matthias; Weber, Uli; Kellner, Daniel; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Zink, Klemens

    2015-09-01

    For CT-based dose calculation in ion therapy a link between the attenuation coefficients of photons and the stopping-power of particles has to be provided. There are two commonly known approaches to establish such a calibration curve, the stoichiometric calibration and direct measurements with tissue substitutes or animal samples. Both methods were investigated and compared. As input for the stoichiometric calibration the data from ICRP-report 23 were compared to newly available data from ICRP-report 110. By employing the newer data no relevant difference could be observed. The differences between the two acquisition methods (direct measurement and stoichiometric calibration) were systematically analyzed and quantified. The most relevant change was caused by the exchange of carbon and oxygen content in the substitutes in comparison to the data of the ICRP-reports and results in a general overshoot of the Bragg peak. The consequence of the differences between the calibration curves was investigated with treatment planning studies and iso-range surfaces. Range differences up to 6mm in treatment plans of the head were observed. Additionally two improvements are suggested which increase the accuracy of the calibration curve.

  18. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to stopping-power-ratio estimation using dual-energy CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Lee, H. C.; Duan, X.; Shen, C.; Zhou, L.; Jia, X.; Yang, M.

    2017-09-01

    The dual-energy CT-based (DECT) approach holds promise in reducing the overall uncertainty in proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimation as compared to the conventional stoichiometric calibration approach. The objective of this study was to analyze the factors contributing to uncertainty in SPR estimation using the DECT-based approach and to derive a comprehensive estimate of the range uncertainty associated with SPR estimation in treatment planning. Two state-of-the-art DECT-based methods were selected and implemented on a Siemens SOMATOM Force DECT scanner. The uncertainties were first divided into five independent categories. The uncertainty associated with each category was estimated for lung, soft and bone tissues separately. A single composite uncertainty estimate was eventually determined for three tumor sites (lung, prostate and head-and-neck) by weighting the relative proportion of each tissue group for that specific site. The uncertainties associated with the two selected DECT methods were found to be similar, therefore the following results applied to both methods. The overall uncertainty (1σ) in SPR estimation with the DECT-based approach was estimated to be 3.8%, 1.2% and 2.0% for lung, soft and bone tissues, respectively. The dominant factor contributing to uncertainty in the DECT approach was the imaging uncertainties, followed by the DECT modeling uncertainties. Our study showed that the DECT approach can reduce the overall range uncertainty to approximately 2.2% (2σ) in clinical scenarios, in contrast to the previously reported 1%.

  19. Stopping power and energy loss straggling of thin Formvar foil for 0.3-2.7 MeV protons and alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammeri, S.; Ammi, H.; Dib, A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Ourabah, S.; Msimanga, M.; Chekirine, M.; Guesmia, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stopping power and energy loss straggling data for protons (1H+) and alpha particles (4He+) crossing Formvar thin polymeric foils (thickness of ˜0.3 μm) have been measured in the energy range (0.3-2.7) MeV by using the indirect transmission technique. The determined stopping power data were compared to SRIM-2010, PSTAR or ASTAR calculation codes and then analyzed in term of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory to extract the target mean excitation and ionization potential . A resulting value of ≈(69.2±1.8) eV was deduced from proton stopping data. The measured straggling data were corrected from surface roughness effects due to target thickness inhomogeneity observed by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The obtained data were then compared to derived straggling values by Bohr's and Bethe-Livingston's classical theories or by Yang's empirical formula. A deviation of ˜40%-80% from the Bohr's straggling value has been observed for all reported energies, suggesting that the Bohr theory cannot be correctly applied to describe the electronic energy loss straggling process with the used low thickness of Formvar foil. The inner-shell contribution of target electrons to energy loss process is also advanced to explain the observed deviation from experiment in case of He+ ions. Finally, the reliability of Bragg's additivity rule was discussed in case of stopping power and straggling results.

  20. A dielectric response study of the electronic stopping power of liquid water for energetic protons and a new I-value for water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emfietzoglou, D; Garcia-Molina, R; Kyriakou, I; Abril, I; Nikjoo, H

    2009-06-07

    The electronic stopping power of liquid water for protons over the 50 keV to 10 MeV energy range is studied using an improved dielectric response model which is in good agreement with the best available experimental data. The mean excitation energy (I) of stopping power theory is calculated to be 77.8 eV. Shell corrections are accounted for in a self-consistent manner through analytic dispersion relations for the momentum dependence of the dielectric function. It is shown that widely used dispersion schemes based on the random-phase approximation (RPA) can result in sizeable errors due to the neglect of damping and local field effects that lead to a momentum broadening and shifting of the energy-loss function. Low-energy Born corrections for the Barkas, Bloch and charge-state effects practically cancel out down to 100 keV proton energies. Differences with ICRU Report 49 stopping power values and earlier calculations are found to be at the approximately 20% level in the region of the stopping maximum. The present work overcomes the limitations of the Bethe formula below 1 MeV and improves the accuracy of previous calculations through a more consistent account of the dielectric response properties of liquid water.

  1. Stopping power measurements of heavy ions (3 {<=} Z{sub 1} {<=} 14) in Mylar foil by time-of-flight spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammi, H., E-mail: hakim_ammi@yahoo.f [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2, Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare (Algeria); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [iThemba Labs, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Cape Town (South Africa); Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences, CPUT, P.O. Box 1906, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Mammeri, S. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2, Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare (Algeria); Msimanga, M. [iThemba Labs, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Cape Town (South Africa); Ourabah, S.; Dib, A. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2, Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare (Algeria)

    2011-02-01

    Heavy ions elastic recoil detection analysis coupled with time of flight spectrometer (HIERDA{sub T}oF-E) have been used to measure energy loss of charged particles in thin absorber. The stopping power of heavy ions has been determined in Mylar for {sup 28}Si, {sup 27}Al, {sup 24}Mg, {sup 19}F, {sup 16}O, {sup 12}C and {sup 7}Li ions over a continuous range of energies 0.14-0.80 MeV/nucleon. The ions were recoils from the bombardment of different samples (Si, MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, LiF and C) with a 27.5 MeV Kr{sup +} beam. The energy loss of the recoil atoms is measured with and without additional foils placed in front of a Surface Barrier Detector (SBD). The energy of individual ions is determined from its ToF data; the exit energy after the stopping foil is measured using the SBD detector. We have compared our stopping values to those predicted by SRIM-2008 computer code, ICRU-73 stopping data tables, MSTAR calculations and to the published data from literature. The results show good agreement with limited existing data but indicate a large deviation among the predicted theoretical values at the low energy side of the stopping maximum peak.

  2. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to patient stopping-power-ratio estimation using the stoichiometric calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Zhu, X Ronald; Park, Peter C; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe; Virshup, Gary; Clayton, James E; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-07

    The purpose of this study was to analyze factors affecting proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimations and range uncertainties in proton therapy planning using the standard stoichiometric calibration. The SPR uncertainties were grouped into five categories according to their origins and then estimated based on previously published reports or measurements. For the first time, the impact of tissue composition variations on SPR estimation was assessed and the uncertainty estimates of each category were determined for low-density (lung), soft, and high-density (bone) tissues. A composite, 95th percentile water-equivalent-thickness uncertainty was calculated from multiple beam directions in 15 patients with various types of cancer undergoing proton therapy. The SPR uncertainties (1σ) were quite different (ranging from 1.6% to 5.0%) in different tissue groups, although the final combined uncertainty (95th percentile) for different treatment sites was fairly consistent at 3.0-3.4%, primarily because soft tissue is the dominant tissue type in the human body. The dominant contributing factor for uncertainties in soft tissues was the degeneracy of Hounsfield numbers in the presence of tissue composition variations. To reduce the overall uncertainties in SPR estimation, the use of dual-energy computed tomography is suggested. The values recommended in this study based on typical treatment sites and a small group of patients roughly agree with the commonly referenced value (3.5%) used for margin design. By using tissue-specific range uncertainties, one could estimate the beam-specific range margin by accounting for different types and amounts of tissues along a beam, which may allow for customization of range uncertainty for each beam direction.

  3. Monte Carlo-based Spencer-Attix and Bragg-Gray tissue-to-air stopping power ratios for ISO beta sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, T Palani; Vandana, S; Bakshi, A K; Babu, D A R

    2016-02-01

    Spencer-Attix (SA) and Bragg-Gray (BG) mass-collision-stopping-power ratios of tissue-to-air are calculated using a modified version of EGSnrc-based SPRRZnrc user-code for the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) beta sources such as (147)Pm, (85)Kr, (90)Sr/(90)Y and (106)Ru/(106)Rh. The ratios are calculated at 5 and 70 µm depths along the central axis of the unit density ICRU-4-element tissue phantom as a function of air-cavity lengths of the extrapolation chamber l = 0.025-0.25 cm. The study shows that the BG values are independent of l and agree well with the ISO-reported values for the above sources. The overall variation in the SA values is ∼0.3% for all the investigated sources, when l is varied from 0.025 to 0.25 cm. As energy of the beta increases the SA stopping-power ratio for a given cavity length decreases. For example, SA values of (147)Pm are higher by ∼2% when compared with the corresponding values of (106)Ru/(106)Rh source. SA stopping-power ratios are higher than the BG stopping-power ratios and the degree of variation depends on type of source and the value of l. For example, the difference is up to 0.7 % at l = 0.025 cm for the (90)Sr/(90)Y source. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Pre-treatment patient-specific stopping power by combining list-mode proton radiography and x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Brousmiche, Sébastien; Hansen, David C.; Beaulieu, Luc; Seco, Joao

    2017-09-01

    The relative stopping power (RSP) uncertainty is the largest contributor to the range uncertainty in proton therapy. The purpose of this work was to develop a systematic method that yields accurate and patient-specific RSPs by combining (1) pre-treatment x-ray CT and (2) daily proton radiography of the patient. The method was formulated as a penalized least squares optimization problem (argmin(\\Vert {A}{x}-{b}\\Vert _22 )). The parameter A represents the cumulative path-length crossed by the proton in each material, separated by thresholding on the HU. The material RSPs (water equivalent thickness/physical thickness) are denoted by x. The parameter b is the list-mode proton radiography produced using Geant4 simulations. The problem was solved using a non-negative linear-solver with {x}≥slant0 . A was computed by superposing proton trajectories calculated with a cubic or linear spline approach to the CT. The material’s RSP assigned in Geant4 were used for reference while the clinical HU-RSP calibration curve was used for comparison. The Gammex RMI-467 phantom was first investigated. The standard deviation between the estimated material RSP and the calculated RSP is 0.45%. The robustness of the techniques was then assessed as a function of the number of projections and initial proton energy. Optimization with two initial projections yields precise RSP (⩽1.0%) for 330 MeV protons. 250 MeV protons have shown higher uncertainty (⩽2.0%) due to the loss of precision in the path estimate. Anthropomorphic phantoms of the head, pelvis, and lung were subsequently evaluated. Accurate RSP has been obtained for the head (μ =0.21+/-1.63% ), the lung (μ=0.06+/-0.99% ) and the pelvis (μ=0.90+/-3.87% ). The range precision has been optimized using the calibration curves obtained with the algorithm, yielding a mean R80 difference to the reference of 0.11  ±0.09%, 0.28  ±  0.34% and 0.05 +/- 0.06% in the same order. The solution’s accuracy is limited by the

  5. Comparison of x ray computed tomography number to proton relative linear stopping power conversion functions using a standard phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyers, M. F., E-mail: MFMoyers@roadrunner.com [Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Shanghai, China 201321 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Adequate evaluation of the results from multi-institutional trials involving light ion beam treatments requires consideration of the planning margins applied to both targets and organs at risk. A major uncertainty that affects the size of these margins is the conversion of x ray computed tomography numbers (XCTNs) to relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs). Various facilities engaged in multi-institutional clinical trials involving proton beams have been applying significantly different margins in their patient planning. This study was performed to determine the variance in the conversion functions used at proton facilities in the U.S.A. wishing to participate in National Cancer Institute sponsored clinical trials. Methods: A simplified method of determining the conversion function was developed using a standard phantom containing only water and aluminum. The new method was based on the premise that all scanners have their XCTNs for air and water calibrated daily to constant values but that the XCTNs for high density/high atomic number materials are variable with different scanning conditions. The standard phantom was taken to 10 different proton facilities and scanned with the local protocols resulting in 14 derived conversion functions which were compared to the conversion functions used at the local facilities. Results: For tissues within ±300 XCTN of water, all facility functions produced converted RLSP values within ±6% of the values produced by the standard function and within 8% of the values from any other facility's function. For XCTNs corresponding to lung tissue, converted RLSP values differed by as great as ±8% from the standard and up to 16% from the values of other facilities. For XCTNs corresponding to low-density immobilization foam, the maximum to minimum values differed by as much as 40%. Conclusions: The new method greatly simplifies determination of the conversion function, reduces ambiguity, and in the future could promote

  6. Comparison of x ray computed tomography number to proton relative linear stopping power conversion functions using a standard phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, M F

    2014-06-01

    Adequate evaluation of the results from multi-institutional trials involving light ion beam treatments requires consideration of the planning margins applied to both targets and organs at risk. A major uncertainty that affects the size of these margins is the conversion of x ray computed tomography numbers (XCTNs) to relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs). Various facilities engaged in multi-institutional clinical trials involving proton beams have been applying significantly different margins in their patient planning. This study was performed to determine the variance in the conversion functions used at proton facilities in the U.S.A. wishing to participate in National Cancer Institute sponsored clinical trials. A simplified method of determining the conversion function was developed using a standard phantom containing only water and aluminum. The new method was based on the premise that all scanners have their XCTNs for air and water calibrated daily to constant values but that the XCTNs for high density/high atomic number materials are variable with different scanning conditions. The standard phantom was taken to 10 different proton facilities and scanned with the local protocols resulting in 14 derived conversion functions which were compared to the conversion functions used at the local facilities. For tissues within ±300 XCTN of water, all facility functions produced converted RLSP values within ±6% of the values produced by the standard function and within 8% of the values from any other facility's function. For XCTNs corresponding to lung tissue, converted RLSP values differed by as great as ±8% from the standard and up to 16% from the values of other facilities. For XCTNs corresponding to low-density immobilization foam, the maximum to minimum values differed by as much as 40%. The new method greatly simplifies determination of the conversion function, reduces ambiguity, and in the future could promote standardization between facilities. Although it

  7. Ionization chamber dosimetry of small photon fields: a Monte Carlo study on stopping-power ratios for radiosurgery and IMRT beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Doblado, F; Andreo, P; Capote, R; Leal, A; Perucha, M; Arráns, R; Núñez, L; Mainegra, E; Lagares, J I; Carrasco, E

    2003-07-21

    Absolute dosimetry with ionization chambers of the narrow photon fields used in stereotactic techniques and IMRT beamlets is constrained by lack of electron equilibrium in the radiation field. It is questionable that stopping-power ratio in dosimetry protocols, obtained for broad photon beams and quasi-electron equilibrium conditions, can be used in the dosimetry of narrow fields while keeping the uncertainty at the same level as for the broad beams used in accelerator calibrations. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for two 6 MV clinical accelerators (Elekta SL-18 and Siemens Mevatron Primus), equipped with radiosurgery applicators and MLC. Narrow circular and Z-shaped on-axis and off-axis fields, as well as broad IMRT configured beams, have been simulated together with reference 10 x 10 cm2 beams. Phase-space data have been used to generate 3D dose distributions which have been compared satisfactorily with experimental profiles (ion chamber, diodes and film). Photon and electron spectra at various depths in water have been calculated, followed by Spencer-Attix (delta = 10 keV) stopping-power ratio calculations which have been compared to those used in the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. For water/air and PMMA/air stopping-power ratios, agreements within 0.1% have been obtained for the 10 x 10 cm2 fields. For radiosurgery applicators and narrow MLC beams, the calculated s(w,air) values agree with the reference within +/-0.3%, well within the estimated standard uncertainty of the reference stopping-power ratios (0.5%). Ionization chamber dosimetry of narrow beams at the photon qualities used in this work (6 MV) can therefore be based on stopping-power ratios data in dosimetry protocols. For a modulated 6 MV broad beam used in clinical IMRT, s(w,air) agrees within 0.1% with the value for 10 x 10 cm2, confirming that at low energies IMRT absolute dosimetry can also be based on data for open reference fields. At higher energies (24 MV) the difference in s

  8. Ionization chamber dosimetry of small photon fields: a Monte Carlo study on stopping-power ratios for radiosurgery and IMRT beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Doblado, F [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Andreo, P [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, University of Stockholm, Karolinska Institute, PO Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Capote, R [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Leal, A [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Perucha, M [Dpto Fisica Medica y Biofisica, F Medicina, Universidad Sevilla (Spain); Arrans, R [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Nunez, L [Radiofisica, Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain); Mainegra, E [National Research Council, Ottawa (Canada); Lagares, J I [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Carrasco, E [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-07-21

    Absolute dosimetry with ionization chambers of the narrow photon fields used in stereotactic techniques and IMRT beamlets is constrained by lack of electron equilibrium in the radiation field. It is questionable that stopping-power ratio in dosimetry protocols, obtained for broad photon beams and quasi-electron equilibrium conditions, can be used in the dosimetry of narrow fields while keeping the uncertainty at the same level as for the broad beams used in accelerator calibrations. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for two 6 MV clinical accelerators (Elekta SL-18 and Siemens Mevatron Primus), equipped with radiosurgery applicators and MLC. Narrow circular and Z-shaped on-axis and off-axis fields, as well as broad IMRT configured beams, have been simulated together with reference 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} beams. Phase-space data have been used to generate 3D dose distributions which have been compared satisfactorily with experimental profiles (ion chamber, diodes and film). Photon and electron spectra at various depths in water have been calculated, followed by Spencer-Attix ({delta} = 10 keV) stopping-power ratio calculations which have been compared to those used in the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. For water/air and PMMA/air stopping-power ratios, agreements within 0.1% have been obtained for the 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} fields. For radiosurgery applicators and narrow MLC beams, the calculated s{sub w,air} values agree with the reference within {+-}0.3%, well within the estimated standard uncertainty of the reference stopping-power ratios (0.5%). Ionization chamber dosimetry of narrow beams at the photon qualities used in this work (6 MV) can therefore be based on stopping-power ratios data in dosimetry protocols. For a modulated 6 MV broad beam used in clinical IMRT, s{sub w,air} agrees within 0.1% with the value for 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, confirming that at low energies IMRT absolute dosimetry can also be based on data for open reference fields. At higher energies (24

  9. Wake effect and stopping power for a charged ion moving in magnetized two-component plasmas: two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhang-Hu; Song, Yuan-Hong; Wang, You-Nian

    2010-08-01

    A two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) model is proposed to study the wake field and stopping power induced by a nonrelativistic charged particle moving perpendicular to the external magnetic field in two-component plasmas. The effects of the magnetic field on the wake potential and the stopping due to the polarization of both the plasma ions and electrons are discussed. The velocity fields of plasma ions and electrons are investigated, respectively, in the weak and strong magnetic field cases. Our simulation results show that in the case of weak magnetic field and high ion velocity, the wakes exhibit typical V-shaped cone structures and the opening cone angles decrease with the increasing ion velocity. As the magnetic field becomes strong, the wakes lose their typical V-shaped structures and become highly asymmetrical. Similar results can be obtained in the case of low ion velocity and strong magnetic field. In addition, stopping power is calculated and compared with previous one-dimensional and full three-dimensional PIC results.

  10. Stabilization of the 12 V onboard power supply. Ultracapacitors in start-stop systems; Stabilisierung des 12-V-Bordnetzes. Ultrakondensatoren in Start-Stopp-Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr, Rainer; Gilch, Markus [Unit Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Regensburg (Germany). Div. Powertrain Business; Auer, Juergen; Wieser, Christoph [Maxwell Technologies GmbH, Gilching (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The market of start-stop systems is growing fast and so strongly, that vehicle manufacturers want to remedy weaknesses, which they had accepted approvingly in the beginning. The lack of capacity of the AGM batteries limited considerably the operation and the active times of start-stop. Continental is now announcing a voltage stabilizing system for the 12 V onboard power supply to be ready for serial production, in order to remedy weaknesses. The supplier falls back onto improved double layer capacitors by Maxwell. In addition to the reduction of components of the current short-term memory, the production processes were optimized, which are meant to make the capacitor more reliable and more cost-effective during operation. (orig.)

  11. Variations in energy spectra and water-to-material stopping-power ratios in three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated photon fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Si Young; Liu, H Helen; Mohan, Radhe; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2007-04-01

    Because of complex dose distributions and dose gradients that are created in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), photon- and electron-energy spectra might change significantly with spatial locations and doses. This study examined variations in photon- and electron-energy spectra in 3D-CRT and IMRT photon fields. The effects of spectral variations on water-to-material stopping-power ratios used in Monte Carlo treatment planning systems and the responses of energy-dependent dosimeters, such as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and radiographic films were further studied. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to simulate megavoltage 3D-CRT and IMRT photon fields. The photon- and electron-energy spectra were calculated in 3D water phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms based on the fluence scored in voxel grids. We then obtained the water-to-material stopping-power ratios in the local voxels using the Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Changes in the responses of films and TLDs were estimated based on the calculated local energy spectra and published data on the dosimeter energy dependency. Results showed that the photon-energy spectra strongly depended on spatial positions and doses in both the 3D-CRT and IMRT fields. The relative fraction of low-energy photons (stopping-power ratio over the range of calculated dose for both 3D-CRT and IMRT was negligible (< 1.0%) for ICRU tissue, cortical bone, and soft bone and less than 3.6% for dry air and lung. Because of spectral softening at low doses, radiographic films in the phantoms could over-respond to dose by more than 30%, whereas the over-response of TLDs was less than 10%. Thus, spatial variations of the photon- and electron-energy spectra should be considered as important factors in 3D-CRT and IMRT dosimetry.

  12. Re-evaluation of the product of (W/e)air and the graphite to air stopping-power ratio for 60Co air kerma standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R M; Rogers, D W O

    2010-07-07

    Experiments which determine the product of (W/e)air, the average energy deposited per coulomb of charge of one sign released by an electron coming to rest in dry air, and (LDelta/rho)Ca, the Spencer-Attix mean restricted mass collision stopping-power ratio for graphite to air, in a 60Co or 137Cs beam are reanalysed. Correction factors, e.g., to account for gaps about a calorimeter core or perturbations due to a cavity's presence, are calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system and these generally decrease the value of (W/e)air(LDelta/rho)Ca for each experiment. Stopping-power ratios are calculated for different choices of density correction and average excitation energy (I-value) for graphite. To calculate an average value (W/e)air(LBIPM/rho)Ca for the BIPM air kerma standard, each experimental result is multiplied by the ratio (LBIPM/rho)Ca/(LDelta/Rho)Ca. While individual values of (LDelta/rho)Ca are sensitive to the I-values and density corrections assumed, this ratio varies by less than 0.1% for different choices. Hence, the product (W/e)air(LBIPM/rho)Ca is relatively insensitive to these choices. The weighted mean of the updated data is (W/e)air(LBIPM/rho)Ca=33.68 J C(-1)+/-0.2%, suggesting that the accepted value of 33.97 J C(-1)+/-0.1% is 0.8% too high. This has implications for primary 60Co air kerma standards worldwide and potentially for the choice of graphite I-value and density correction for the calculation of the graphite stopping power, as well as the value of (W/e)air.

  13. Measurement of the stopping power of water for carbon ions in the energy range of 1 MeV-6 MeV using the inverted Doppler-shift attenuation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahm, Johannes Martin

    2016-10-31

    Cancer therapy using carbon ions has gained increasing interest in the last decade due to its advantageous dose distributions. For the dosimetry and treatment planning, the accurate knowledge of the stopping power of water for carbon ions is of crucial importance. In the high energy region, the stopping power can be calculated rather accurately by means of the Bethe-Bloch formula. In the case of projectile velocities comparable to those of the valence electrons of the target, these calculations are subject to large uncertainties. There exist no experimental data for the stopping power of water for projectile energies prevailing in the so-called Bragg peak region. The currently available stopping power data for water are derived from measurements in water vapour or D{sub 2}O ice and, hence, neglect the dependence on the state of aggregation. The stopping power of water for charged particles is of high interest not only for practical applications but also to consider how physical and chemical state of the target influence the collisional energy transfer. For the measurement of the stopping power of water, the inverted Doppler-shift attenuation method was used in this work. This method has the advantage that the projectile itself is not needed to be detected and can be slowed down entirely in the target. In this method, the stopping power is determined from the Doppler-shift of the gamma-quanta emitted by projectiles during their slow down. This experiment can be performed at atmospheric pressure and consequently, the stopping power of water can be measured in its real physiological condition. In this work, the stopping power of water for carbon ions was measured for the first time in the energy range between 1 MeV and 6 MeV covering the kinetic energies of carbon ions in the Bragg peak region. The experimental method is presented in detail along with the design of the apparatus and of the data acquisition system. A comprehensive analysis of instrumental effects

  14. Thermal Power Plant Boiler Start & Stop Oil-saving Improvement%火电厂锅炉启停节油改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小松

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on technology of nebulized bubble burning directly to fire puluerized coal to start the boiler in Ruiming Power Plant # 1,According to the practical operation experience of the boiler start ,stop and stable run in low load of Ruiming # 1,we can provide the best way to adjust and optimize the operation for oil-saving.%本文介绍瑞明电厂#1炉采用小油量气泡雾化燃烧直接点燃煤粉启动锅炉技术,并通过在锅炉启、停和低负荷稳燃中的实际应用,着重讨论瑞明电厂#1炉小油枪改造后的运行优化调整,提供节油经验.

  15. Calculations of stopping powers and inelastic mean free paths for 20 eV-20 keV electrons in 11 types of human tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhenyu; Liu, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Systematic calculations are performed for determining the stopping powers (SP) and inelastic mean free paths (IMFP) for 20 eV-20 keV electrons in 11 types of human tissue. The calculations are based on a dielectric model, including the Born-Ochkur exchange correction. The optical energy loss functions (OELF) are empirically evaluated, because of the lack of available experimental optical data for the 11 tissues under consideration. The evaluated OELFs are examined by the f-sum rule expected from the dielectric response theory, and by calculation of the mean excitation energy. The calculated SPs are compared with those for PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate, a tissue equivalent material) and liquid water. The SP and IMFP data presented here are the results for the 11 human tissues over the energy range of 20 eV-20 keV, and are of importance in radiotherapy planning and for studies of various radiation effects on human tissues.

  16. A new calculation on the stopping power and mean free path for low energy electrons in toluene over energy range of 20-10000 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhenyu; Xia, Yueyuan; Liu, Xiangdong; Zhao, Mingwen; Zhang, Liming

    2009-04-01

    A new calculation of the stopping powers (SP) and inelastic mean free paths (IMFP) for electrons in toluene at energies below 10 keV has been presented. The calculation is based on the dielectric model and on an empirical evaluation approach of optical energy loss function (OELF). The reliability for the evaluated OELFs of several hydrocarbons with available experimental optical data has been systematically checked. For toluene, using the empirical OELF, the evaluated mean ionization potential, is compared with that given by Bragg's rule, and the calculated SP at 10 keV is also compared with the Bethe-Bloch prediction. The present results for SP and IMFP provide an alternative basic data for the study on the energy deposition of low-energy electrons transport through toluene, and also show that the method used in this work may be a good one for evaluating the SP and IMFP for hydrocarbons.

  17. Stopping power and mean free path for low-energy electrons in ten scintillators over energy range of 20-20,000 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhenyu; Xia, Yueyuan

    2012-01-01

    Systematic calculations of the stopping powers (SP) and inelastic mean free paths (IMFP) for 20-20,000eV electrons in a group of 10 important scintillators have been carried out. The calculations are based on the dielectric model including the Born-Ochkur exchange correction and the optical energy loss functions (OELFs) are empirically evaluated because of the lack of available experimental optical data for the scintillators under consideration. The evaluated OELFs are examined by both the f-sum rule and the calculation of mean ionization potential. The SP and IMFP data presented here are the first results for the 10 scintillators over the energy range of 20-20,000eV, and are of key importance for the investigation of liquid scintillation counting.

  18. Roos and NACP-02 ion chamber perturbations and water-air stopping-power ratios for clinical electron beams for energies from 4 to 22 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, M; Shipley, D R; Manning, J W

    2015-02-07

    Empirical fits are developed for depth-compensated wall- and cavity-replacement perturbations in the PTW Roos 34001 and IBA / Scanditronix NACP-02 parallel-plate ionisation chambers, for electron beam qualities from 4 to 22 MeV for depths up to approximately 1.1 × R₅₀,D. These are based on calculations using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code EGSnrc and its user codes with a full simulation of the linac treatment head modelled using BEAMnrc. These fits are used with calculated restricted stopping-power ratios between air and water to match measured depth-dose distributions in water from an Elekta Synergy clinical linear accelerator at the UK National Physical Laboratory. Results compare well with those from recent publications and from the IPEM 2003 electron beam radiotherapy Code of Practice.

  19. Misconceptions impairing the validity of the stopping power tables in the SRIM library and suggestions for doing better in the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    inconsistently from the predictions of Lindhard-Scharff (LS) theory; they also exhibit various forms of exotic velocity dependence. These deviations are primarily due to the fact that the range of validity of BB theory is artificially extended to velocities at which the 'effective-charge' concept is assumed to be applicable. Coupled Z1,2 scaling as in theories of LS or Firsov would be much more appropriate. Overall, the electronic stopping cross sections by SRIM are of unpredictable value and often strongly misleading below 1 MeV/u. (iv) Another consequence of the tight link to the Z1,2 dependence of BB theory is that only 2 × 92 master sets of electronic stopping cross sections were required to generate all conceivable 89 × 92 tables from Se,f-ratios for elemental targets (the tables for H, He and Li projectiles are derived separately). The information contained in the SRIM library at large thus exhibits a highly redundant character. (v) The nuclear stopping cross sections Sn mirror the predictions of the universal potential due by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark, which differ from alternative suggestions typically by less than 15%. With this uncertainty, range distributions may be calculated with the TRIM program of SRIM, but only at energies where Sn dominates so that uncertainties in Se play a minor role. (vi) As a side aspect, an example is presented illustrating the efforts required to identify incorrect experimental data, notably when respected authors are accountable. (vii) Other approaches to establish stopping power tables are shown to be subject to the same problems as SRIM. It is recommended to add a warning to all theses tables, informing users at which energies the data are likely to lack reliability. (viii) The currently unacceptable quality of Se,f-data below 1 MeV/u could be improved significantly in the future if the user friendly TRIM(SRIM) code were modified to allow simulations with a free choice of nuclear and electronic stopping cross sections

  20. Stopping powers and energy loss straggling for (0.9-3.4) MeV protons in a kapton polyimide thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damache, S.; Djaroum, S.; Ouichaoui, S.; Amari, L.; Moussa, D.

    2016-09-01

    The energy loss and energy loss straggling widths have been measured in transmission for Ep ≈ (0.9-3.4) MeV protons traversing a thin kapton polyimide foil. In a prior step, the thickness and non-uniformity of the target foil were carefully investigated. The overall relative uncertainties in the stopping power and energy loss straggling variance data amount, respectively, to less than 2% and 8%. The S(E) experimental data show to be in excellent agreement with available previous ones and with those compiled in the ICRU-49 report. They are fully consistent with the predictions of Sigmund-Schinner's binary collision theory of electronic stopping over the whole proton energy range explored. An average deviation of ∼2.5% relative to values calculated by the SRIM-2008 code, likely due to effects of valence electrons involving the Csbnd H, Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O bonds, is however observed at low proton velocities. The measured energy loss straggling data, which are unique to our knowledge, are found to be in good agreement with values derived by the classical Bohr formula for Ep ≳ 1300 keV but they significantly exceed Bohr's collisional energy loss straggling at lower proton velocities where target electrons can no longer be considered as free. They also show to be consistent with the predictions of the Bethe-Livingston and Sigmund-Schinner theories over the low proton velocity region (Ep 1300 keV, while deviations above the latter amounting up to ∼18% are observed at lower proton velocities.

  1. One-stop Remote Service Center of Renewable Power%可再生能源发电的一站式远程服务中心

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    北京ABB贝利工程有限公司

    2015-01-01

    监控和管理可再生能源发电,提高产能并降低运维成本,对于投资者和业主而言愈来愈重要,尤其是地理分散的太阳能、风电、生物质等可再生能源。ABB推出的可再生能源发电一站式远程服务中心解决方案,不仅仅是先进技术的结晶,而且将对运行、维护商业模式产生重大推动作用。%It is increasingly important for investors and owners to monitor, control and manage the renewable power, especially the solar, wind, biomass energy and etc. which are geographically widely spread. The solution of one-stop remote service center of renewable power proposed by ABB is not only the result of advancedtechnology, but also an impulse to the business model of operation and maintenance.

  2. Stop smoking support programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokeless tobacco - stop smoking programs; Stop smoking techniques; Smoking cessation programs; Smoking cessation techniques ... It is hard to quit smoking if you are acting alone. Smokers may have a ... of quitting with a support program. Stop smoking programs ...

  3. Accurate stopping power measurements for (0.21–2.68) MeV/u {sup 1}H{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} ions crossing thin Al foils; extraction of the (I, b) parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussa, D., E-mail: djamelmoussa@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Damache, S. [Division de Physique, CRNA, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-gare, Algiers (Algeria); Ouichaoui, S., E-mail: souichaoui@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-01-15

    The stopping powers of thin Al foils for H{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} ions have been measured over the energy range E=(206.03–2680.05) keV/amu with an overall relative uncertainty better than 1% using the transmission method. The derived S(E) experimental data are compared to previous ones from the literature, to values derived by the SRIM-2008 code or compiled in the ICRU-49 report, and to the predictions of Sigmund–Schinner binary collision stopping theory. Besides, the S(E) data for H{sup +} ions together with those for He{sup 2+} ions reported by Andersen et al. (1977) have been analyzed over the energy interval E>1.0 MeV using the modified Bethe–Bloch stopping theory. The following sets of values have been inferred for the mean excitation potential, I, and the Barkas–Andersen parameter, b, for H{sup +} and He{sup +} projectiles, respectively: {(I=164±3)) eV, (b=1.40} and {(I=163±2.5)) eV, (b=1.38}. As expected, the I parameter is found to be independent of the projectile electronic structure presumably indicating that the contribution of charge exchange effects becomes negligible as the projectile velocity increases. Therefore, the I parameter must be determined from precise stopping power measurements performed at high projectile energies where the Bethe stopping theory is fully valid.

  4. The influence of field size on stopping-power ratios in- and out-of-field: quantitative data for the BrainLAB m3 micro-multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael; Kairn, Tanya; Kron, Tomas; Dunn, Leon; Johnston, Peter N; Franich, Rick D

    2012-11-08

    The objective of this work is to quantify the systematic errors introduced by the common assumption of invariant secondary electron spectra with changing field sizes, as relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and other treatment modes incorporating small beam segments delivered with a linac-based stereotactic unit. The EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to construct a dosimetrically-matched model of a Varian 600C linear accelerator with mounted BrainLAB micro-multileaf collimator. Stopping-power ratios were calculated for field sizes ranging from 6 × 6 mm2 up to the maximum (98 × 98 mm2), and differences between these and the reference field were computed. Quantitative stopping power data for the BrainLAB micro-multileaf collimator has been compiled. Field size dependent differences to reference conditions increase with decreasing field size and increasing depth, but remain a fraction of a percent for all field sizes studied. However, for dosimetry outside the primary field, errors induced by the assumption of invariant electron spectra can be greater than 1%, increasing with field size. It is also shown that simplification of the Spencer-Attix formulation by ignoring secondary electrons below the cutoff kinetic energy applied to the integration results in underestimation of stopping-power ratios of about 0.3% (and is independent of field size and depth). This work is the first to quantify stopping powers from a BrainLAB micro-multileaf collimator. Many earlier studies model simplified beams, ignoring collimator scatter, which is shown to significantly influence the spectrum. Importantly, we have confirmed that the assumption of unchanging electron spectra with varying field sizes is justifiable when performing (typical) in-field dosimetry of stereotactic fields. Clinicians and physicists undertaking precise out-of-field measurements for the purposes of risk estimation, ought to be aware that the more pronounced spectral variation results

  5. Extrapolation of the Bethe equation for electron stopping powers to intermediate and low electron energies by empirical simulation of target effective mean excitation energy and atomic number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglevanny, I.I., E-mail: sianko@list.ru [Volgograd State Social Pedagogical University, 27 Lenin Avenue, Volgograd 400131 (Russian Federation); Smolar, V.A.; Nguyen, H.T.T. [Volgograd State Technical University, 28 Lenin Avenue, Volgograd 400131 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-01

    A series of simple stopping power (SP) formulas, modified from the relativistic Bethe equation, is presented that is based on the concepts of target effective atomic number and mean excitation energy (MEE). The analytical model function is constructed to approximate experimental or calculated SPs at low electron energies and tend asymptotically to the relativistic Bethe function at high energies. The energy dependencies of our effective values, in contrast with theoretical approaches, are defined empirically by parametrization with tuning parameters. A least-squares fitting routine based on the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm was developed. We utilize the material parameters and numerical calculations of SPs from optical data using the full Penn-algorithm. Our formula is thought to be applicable for energies above 60 eV. Our simulations of SPs for 41 elemental solids are found to be in good agreement with published numerical results. The flexibility of a general empirical formula is shown. Shortened formulas were developed that are applicable for particular energy ranges, and effective MEEs are proposed that differ from previously recommended values. The presented formulas may be used for analytical calculation of SPs over a broad projectile energy region.

  6. Theoretical variance analysis of single- and dual-energy computed tomography methods for calculating proton stopping power ratios of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M; Virshup, G; Clayton, J; Zhu, X R; Mohan, R; Dong, L

    2010-03-07

    We discovered an empirical relationship between the logarithm of mean excitation energy (ln Im) and the effective atomic number (EAN) of human tissues, which allows for computing patient-specific proton stopping power ratios (SPRs) using dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging. The accuracy of the DECT method was evaluated for 'standard' human tissues as well as their variance. The DECT method was compared to the existing standard clinical practice-a procedure introduced by Schneider et al at the Paul Scherrer Institute (the stoichiometric calibration method). In this simulation study, SPRs were derived from calculated CT numbers of known material compositions, rather than from measurement. For standard human tissues, both methods achieved good accuracy with the root-mean-square (RMS) error well below 1%. For human tissues with small perturbations from standard human tissue compositions, the DECT method was shown to be less sensitive than the stoichiometric calibration method. The RMS error remained below 1% for most cases using the DECT method, which implies that the DECT method might be more suitable for measuring patient-specific tissue compositions to improve the accuracy of treatment planning for charged particle therapy. In this study, the effects of CT imaging artifacts due to the beam hardening effect, scatter, noise, patient movement, etc were not analyzed. The true potential of the DECT method achieved in theoretical conditions may not be fully achievable in clinical settings. Further research and development may be needed to take advantage of the DECT method to characterize individual human tissues.

  7. Formulae for the secondary electron yield and total stopping power from 0.8 keV to 10 keV for metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    XIE A G; XIAO S Y; WANG L

    2016-05-01

    Based on the range–energy relationship, the characteristics of secondary electron emission, some relationship between the secondary electron yield $\\delta$ and experimental results, the universal formulae for $\\delta_{0.8−2}$ (the subscript indicates that the energy range of primary energy atthe surface W$_{\\rm po}$ is from 0.8 keV to 2 keV) and $\\delta_{2−10}$ for metals were deduced. The $\\delta_{0.8−10}$ calculated with the universal formulae and the$\\delta_{0.8−10}$ measured experimentally were compared, and the scattering of $\\delta$ for the same metal was analysed. Finally, we concluded that the formulae were universal for $\\delta_{0.8−10}$ for metals. On the basis of some relationship between parameters of $\\delta$, wededuce a formula for expressing total stopping power $S_{0.8−10}$ as a function of $S_{10−30}, \\delta_{0.8−10}, \\delta_{10−30}$, backscattered coefficient $\\heta_{0.8−10}, \\heta_{10−30}$ and W$_{\\rm po}. The calculated $S_{0.8−10}$ were compared with the values measured experimentally and it was concluded that the formula to estimate $S_{0.8−10}$ was universal for metals.

  8. Determination of the Stopping Power and Failure-time of Spacecraft Components due to Proton Interaction Using GOES 11 Acquisition Data

    CERN Document Server

    Jibiri, N N; Kio, Michael

    2013-01-01

    One of the several ways to describe the net effect of charged-particles' interaction is the rate of energy loss along the particles' path. In this study, the mass stopping power (Sp) of selected spacecraft composite materials, through which the particle traverses, its range (R) and the distance (d) travelled (by the particles) through the materials have been calculated and analyzed. The dose (in Gy) as a function of particle flux and deposited energy was also determined. Predictions of their possible effects on space system operations and life-span were made, especially as values exceeded certain threshold (limit). Using GOES 11 acquired data for 3 months, estimations and/or calculations were made to determine the risk and safe period of a satellite in the geosynchronous orbit. Under certain space radiation environmental conditions (without mitigation of any sort), a spacecraft whose body is 20 mm thick and with Al alloy casing, was theoretically estimated to have a safe period of about 3 years and risk perio...

  9. Stopping powers and energy loss straggling for (0.9–3.4) MeV protons in a kapton polyimide thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damache, S. [Division de Physique, CRNA, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-gare, Algiers (Algeria); Djaroum, S. [Division de Technologie Nucléaire, CRNB, B.P. 180 Ain-Oussara, Djelfa (Algeria); Ouichaoui, S., E-mail: souichaoui@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Amari, L.; Moussa, D. [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2016-09-15

    The energy loss and energy loss straggling widths have been measured in transmission for E{sub p} ≈ (0.9–3.4) MeV protons traversing a thin kapton polyimide foil. In a prior step, the thickness and non-uniformity of the target foil were carefully investigated. The overall relative uncertainties in the stopping power and energy loss straggling variance data amount, respectively, to less than 2% and 8%. The S(E) experimental data show to be in excellent agreement with available previous ones and with those compiled in the ICRU-49 report. They are fully consistent with the predictions of Sigmund-Schinner’s binary collision theory of electronic stopping over the whole proton energy range explored. An average deviation of ∼2.5% relative to values calculated by the SRIM-2008 code, likely due to effects of valence electrons involving the C−H, C=C and C=O bonds, is however observed at low proton velocities. The measured energy loss straggling data, which are unique to our knowledge, are found to be in good agreement with values derived by the classical Bohr formula for E{sub p} ≳ 1300 keV but they significantly exceed Bohr’s collisional energy loss straggling at lower proton velocities where target electrons can no longer be considered as free. They also show to be consistent with the predictions of the Bethe-Livingston and Sigmund-Schinner theories over the low proton velocity region (E{sub p} < 1300 keV). However, they are significantly overestimated by these theories over the intermediate and high proton velocity regions, which may be due to bunching effect by inner shell electrons of the polymer target. Besides, our energy loss straggling data are in better overall consistency with the Yang, O’Connor and Wang empirical formula for E{sub p} > 1300 keV, while deviations above the latter amounting up to ∼18% are observed at lower proton velocities.

  10. SU-C-204-02: Improved Patient-Specific Optimization of the Stopping Power Calibration for Proton Therapy Planning Using a Single Proton Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, I [Lyon 1 University and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Villeurbanne (France); Ludwig Maximilian University, Garching, DE (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, DE (Germany); Parodi, K [Ludwig Maximilian University, Garching, DE (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, DE (Germany); Krah, N [Heidelberg Collaboratory for Image Processing, Heidelberg, DE (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We present an improved method to calculate patient-specific calibration curves to convert X-ray computed tomography (CT) Hounsfield Unit (HU) to relative stopping powers (RSP) for proton therapy treatment planning. Methods: By optimizing the HU-RSP calibration curve, the difference between a proton radiographic image and a digitally reconstructed X-ray radiography (DRR) is minimized. The feasibility of this approach has previously been demonstrated. This scenario assumes that all discrepancies between proton radiography and DRR originate from uncertainties in the HU-RSP curve. In reality, external factors cause imperfections in the proton radiography, such as misalignment compared to the DRR and unfaithful representation of geometric structures (“blurring”). We analyze these effects based on synthetic datasets of anthropomorphic phantoms and suggest an extended optimization scheme which explicitly accounts for these effects. Performance of the method is been tested for various simulated irradiation parameters. The ultimate purpose of the optimization is to minimize uncertainties in the HU-RSP calibration curve. We therefore suggest and perform a thorough statistical treatment to quantify the accuracy of the optimized HU-RSP curve. Results: We demonstrate that without extending the optimization scheme, spatial blurring (equivalent to FWHM=3mm convolution) in the proton radiographies can cause up to 10% deviation between the optimized and the ground truth HU-RSP calibration curve. Instead, results obtained with our extended method reach 1% or better correspondence. We have further calculated gamma index maps for different acceptance levels. With DTA=0.5mm and RD=0.5%, a passing ratio of 100% is obtained with the extended method, while an optimization neglecting effects of spatial blurring only reach ∼90%. Conclusion: Our contribution underlines the potential of a single proton radiography to generate a patient-specific calibration curve and to improve

  11. TU-EF-304-06: A Comparison of CT Number to Relative Linear Stopping Power Conversion Curves Used by Proton Therapy Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P; Lowenstein, J; Kry, S; Ibbott, G; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the CT Number (CTN) to Relative Linear Stopping Power (RLSP) conversion curves used by 14 proton institutions in their dose calculations. Methods: The proton institution’s CTN to RLSP conversion curves were collected by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center during its on-site dosimetry review audits. The CTN values were converted to scaled CT Numbers. The scaling assigns a CTN of 0 to air and 1000 to water to allow intercomparison. The conversion curves were compared and the mean curve was calculated based on institutions’ predicted RLSP values for air (CTN 0), lung (CTN 250), fat (CTN 950), water (1000), liver (CTN 1050), and bone (CTN 2000) points. Results: One institution’s curve was found to have a unique curve shape between the scaled CTN of 1025 to 1225. This institution modified its curve based on the findings. Another institution had higher RLSP values than expected for both low and high CTNs. This institution recalibrated their two CT scanners and the new data placed their curve closer to the mean of all institutions. After corrections were made to several conversion curves, four institutions still fall outside 2 standard deviations at very low CTNs (100–200), and two institutions fall outside between CTN 850–900. The largest percent difference in RLSP values between institutions for the specific tissues reviewed was 22% for the lung point. Conclusion: The review and comparison of CTN to RLSP conversion curves allows IROC Houston to identify any outliers and make recommendations for improvement. Several institutions improved their clinical dose calculation accuracy as a Result of this review. There is still area for improvement, particularly in the lung area of the curve. The IROC Houston QA Center is supported by NCI grant CA180803.

  12. Closing the stop gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czakon, Michal [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchnphysik und Kosmologie; Mitov, Alexander [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Cavendish Lab.; Papucci, Michele [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Ruderman, Joshua T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; New York Univ., NY (United States). Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics; Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.

    2014-07-15

    Light stops are a hallmark of the most natural realizations of weak-scale supersymmetry. While stops have been extensively searched for, there remain open gaps around and below the top mass, due to similarities of stop and top signals with current statistics. We propose a new fast-track avenue to improve light stop searches for R-parity conserving supersymmetry, by comparing top cross section measurements to the theoretical prediction. Stop masses below ∝180 GeV can now be ruled out for a light neutralino. The possibility of a stop signal contaminating the top mass measurement is also briefly addressed.

  13. Calculation of the protons stopping power in water using dielectric formalism in the MELF-GOS approach; Calculo do poder de freamento de protons em agua utilizando o formalismo dieletrico na aproximacao MELF-GOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Franciane; Mazer, Amanda Cristina; Hormaza, Joel Mesa [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    In order to calculate the stopping power of protons, there are many very successful models at high energies, which are extrapolated to low-energy regions. From the point of view of application of proton beam in cancer treatment is just this low energy region the most relevant due to the dose deposition profile in depth for protons. In this work, we present a calculation of the stopping power of protons in a water target using the dielectric formalism in MELF-GOS approach. The results when compared to other models show good agreement for energies above 100 keV and lower values below this energy. This result should impact the range of values of protons and the Bragg peak position. (author)

  14. Determination of electronic stopping powers of 0.05-1 MeV/u 131Xe ions in C-, Ni- and Au-absorbers with calorimetric low temperature detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Grabitz, P.; Kettunen, H.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Laitinen, M.; Müller, K.; Rossi, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Virtanen, A.

    2017-01-01

    A new experimental system for precise determination of electronic stopping powers of heavy ions has been set up at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä. The new setup, combining an established B-ToF system and an array of calorimetric low temperature detectors (CLTDs), has been used for the determination of electronic stopping powers of 0.05-1 MeV/u 131Xe ions in carbon, nickel and gold. Thereby advantage of the improved linearity and energy resolution of CLTDs as compared to the previously used ionization detector was taken to reduce energy calibration errors and to increase sensitivity for the energy loss determination, in particular at very low energies. The total uncertainties of 3-4% for C- and Ni-targets, and 5-7% for Au-targets, respectively, are dominated by the target properties, i.e. thickness determination and inhomogeneities. The results are compared to data from literature and to predictions of different theoretical computer codes. In the high energy part of the examined energy range the results are in good agreement with previously published data, while new stopping power data for very heavy ions in different Z2-materials have been obtained at lower energies. Moreover, unexpectedly strong channeling effects for the transmission of the 131Xe ions in thin, partly polycrystalline nickel and gold target foils have been observed and investigated.

  15. CSDA range, stopping power and mean penetration depth energy relationships in some hydrocarbons and biologic materials for 10 eV to 100 MeV with the modified Rohrlich-Carlson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guemues, Hasan [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Samsun (Turkey); Bentabet, Abdelouahab [Bordj Bou Arreridj University, LCVRN, SNVSTU Faculty, El Anasser (Algeria)

    2017-05-15

    In this study, for some hydrocarbons and biological compounds, stopping power formula are presented, being valid for low and intermediate electron energies. In addition, calculation of the continuous slowing down approximation range (CSDA range) from the stopping power is also made. Calculation of the CSDA range for some hydrocarbons: C{sub 2}H{sub 6} (ethane), C{sub 4}H{sub 10} (butane), C{sub 6}H{sub 14} (hexane) C{sub 8}H{sub 18} (octane), C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5} (adenine) and C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}O (guanine) have been introduced for incident electrons in the energy range 30 eV to 1 MeV. The range of electrons has been calculated within the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) using modified Rohrlich and Carlson formula of stopping power. Besides, we have calculated the mean penetration depths using a spherical geometric model developed by Bentabet (Vacuum 86:1855-1859, 35). The results have been compared with the other theoretical results, Monte Carlo code such as PENELOPE predictions and semi-empirical results. The calculated results of CSDA ranges for electrons in the energy range from 20 eV to 100 MeV are found to be in good agreement to within 10% with available date. (orig.)

  16. Does kV-MV dual-energy computed tomography have an advantage in determining proton stopping power ratios in patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M; Virshup, G; Clayton, J; Zhu, X R; Mohan, R; Dong, L

    2011-07-21

    Conventional kilovoltage (kV) x-ray-based dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging using two different x-ray energy spectra is sensitive to image noise and beam hardening effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the theoretical advantage of the DECT method for determining proton stopping power ratios (SPRs) using a combination of kV and megavoltage (MV) x-ray energies. We investigated three representative x-ray energy pairs: 100 and 140 kVp comprised the kV-kV pair, 100 kVp and 1 MV comprised the kV-MV pair, and two 1 MV x-ray beams-one with and one without external filtration-comprised the MV-MV pair. The SPRs of 34 human tissues were determined using the DECT method with these three x-ray energy pairs. Small perturbations were introduced into the CT numbers and x-ray spectra used for the DECT calculation to simulate the effects of random noise and beam hardening. An error propagation analysis was performed on the DECT calculation algorithm to investigate the propagation of CT number uncertainty to final SPR estimation and to suggest the best x-ray energy combination. We found that the DECT method using each of the three beam pairs achieved similar accuracy in determining the SPRs of human tissues in ideal conditions. However, when CT number uncertainties and artifacts such as imaging noise and beam hardening effects were considered, the kV-MV DECT improved the accuracy of SPR estimation substantially over the kV-kV or MV-MV DECT methods. Furthermore, our error propagation analysis showed that the combination of 100 kVp and 1 MV beams was close to the optimal selection when using the DECT method to determine SPRs. Overall, the kV-MV combination makes the DECT method more robust in resolving the effective atomic numbers for biological tissues than the traditional kV-kV DECT method.

  17. Temporary Plugging Design of Concrete Stop Log Gate of Radial Flow Power Plant%径流式电站厂房混凝土叠梁门临时封堵设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱春生; 何毅

    2014-01-01

    With low investment, single section and light weight, concrete stop log gate, of which the hoisting equipment ability request is not high, is often used as temporary plugging gate at the inlet and outlet of the radial flow power plant.Despite the concrete stop log gate is a temporary construction engineering in the process of hydropower station construction, it directly affects the safe operation of hydropower station unit installation and power generation on schedule, therefore it is very important in the engineering construction.This article will take Shihutang navigation-power junction project on Gan river in Jiangxi as an example and introduce the main temporary plugging design technology points of concrete stop log gate of water intake gate of the power plant and provide reference for similar projects.%钢筋混凝土叠梁门具有投资省、单节重量轻及对吊装设备能力要求不高等特点,因此常被用作径流式电站厂房进、出口临时封堵闸门。尽管钢筋混凝土叠梁门在水电站建设过程中属临时建筑工程,但它的安全运行直接影响到水电站机组的安装及电站按期投产发电,因此在工程建设中至关重要。本文结合江西赣江石虎塘航电枢纽工程实例,介绍该工程电站厂房进水口混凝土叠梁门临时封堵设计技术要点,供类似工程参考。

  18. Corrigendum to "Misconceptions impairing the validity of the stopping power tables in the SRIM library and suggestions for doing better in the future" [Nucl. Instr. Meth. B 380 (2016) 57-70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, Klaus

    2016-12-01

    In the Introduction of the above paper I made joint reference to four previous publications containing tables of electronic stopping cross sections. However, not all of the reports are similar in nature, a fact that I missed to clarify; the error also escaped attention of the reviewer. The first three cited sets of tables were prepared in analogy to the SRIM library, using a rather limited number of available experimental data for extrapolation based on an approach that I showed to have no justification. This main subject of my paper is not repeated here. The fourth reference, the ICRU Report 73 [1] is completely different in character. The first part comprises a very valuable overview on stopping power theory as well as on methods to measure energy losses. The second part contains electronic stopping cross sections predicted by the binary-collision code PASS developed by Sigmund and Schinner [2]. The early application of the code [1] was limited to projectile numbers Z1 ⩽ 18 (Ar) and reduced energies E/M1 ⩾ 25 keV/u. More recent work suggests that there is room for a wider range of applications of the PASS code [3].

  19. Stop-water Structure Design of Shandong Haiyang Nuclear Power Plant Maritime Project%山东海阳核电厂海域工程截渗结构设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周庆文; 邹湧

    2012-01-01

    海域工程干地施工围堰的截渗设计是保证工程施工质量和安全的重要环节,山东海阳核电厂海域工程的干地施工围堰采用柔性地连墙与高压帷幕灌浆相结合的截渗结构,这在大型海域工程施工中尚属首次应用,在降低施工难度、缩短工期、节省工程投资方面效果显著,本工程的成功经验可供其他同类工程借鉴.%The stop-water design guarantees the construction quality and safety of dry construction cofferdam in the maritime project. The dry construction cofferdam of Shandong Haiyang Nuclear Power Plant maritime project is determined to apply the stop-water structure which combines the flexible diaphragm wall with high-pressure curtain grouting method. The above stop-water design is adopted firstly in the construction of a large maritime project,which play an important role in decreasing construction difficulty,shortening construction period and reducing cost. The project experiences may provide references for similar projects.

  20. First-principles study of the threshold effect in the electronic stopping power of LiF and SiO2 for low-velocity protons and helium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Fei; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Jinxia; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2014-02-01

    Nonadiabatic dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the electronic stopping power of LiF and SiO2-cristobalite-high crystalline thin films when protons and helium ions are hyperchanneling in the axis. In this theoretical framework, ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory calculations for electrons are combined with molecular dynamics simulations for ions in real time and real space. The energy transfer process between the ions and the electronic subsystem of LiF and SiO2 nanostructures is studied. The velocity-proportional stopping power of LiF and SiO2 for protons and helium ions is predicted in the low-energy range. The measured velocity thresholds of protons in LiF and SiO2, and helium ions in LiF are reproduced. The convergence of the threshold effect with respect to the separation of grid points is confirmed. The underlying physics of the threshold effect is clarified by analyzing the conduction band electron distribution. In addition, the electron transfer processes between the projectile ions and solid atoms in hyperchanneling condition are studied, and its effects on the energy loss is investigated.

  1. When the brain simulates stopping: Neural activity recorded during real and imagined stop-signal tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Villar, Alberto J; Bonilla, F Mauricio; Carrillo-de-la-Peña, María T

    2016-10-01

    It has been suggested that mental rehearsal activates brain areas similar to those activated by real performance. Although inhibition is a key function of human behavior, there are no previous reports of brain activity during imagined response cancellation. We analyzed event-related potentials (ERPs) and time-frequency data associated with motor execution and inhibition during real and imagined performance of a stop-signal task. The ERPs characteristic of stop trials-that is, the stop-N2 and stop-P3-were also observed during covert performance of the task. Imagined stop (IS) trials yielded smaller stop-N2 amplitudes than did successful stop (SS) and unsuccessful stop (US) trials, but midfrontal theta power similar to that in SS trials. The stop-P3 amplitude for IS was intermediate between those observed for SS and US. The results may be explained by the absence of error-processing and correction processes during imagined performance. For go trials, real execution was associated with higher mu and beta desynchronization over motor areas, which confirms previous reports of lower motor activation during imagined execution and also with larger P3b amplitudes, probably indicating increased top-down attention to the real task. The similar patterns of activity observed for imagined and real performance suggest that imagination tasks may be useful for training inhibitory processes. Nevertheless, brain activation was generally weaker during mental rehearsal, probably as a result of the reduced engagement of top-down mechanisms and limited error processing.

  2. Vaccines Stop Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  3. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  4. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  5. (Light) Stop Signs

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Zhenyu; Krohn, David; Reece, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Stop squarks with a mass just above the top's and which decay to a nearly massless LSP are difficult to probe because of the large SM di-top background. Here we discuss search strategies which could be used to set more stringent bounds in this difficult region. In particular, we note that both the rapidity difference Delta y(t,tbar) and spin correlations (inferred from, for example, Delta phi(l+,l-)) are sensitive to the presence of stops. We emphasize that systematic uncertainties in top quark production can confound analyses looking for stops, making theoretical and experimental progress on the understanding of Standard Model top production at high precision a very important task. We estimate that spin correlation alone, which is relatively robust against such systematic uncertainties, can exclude a 200 GeV stop at 95% confidence with 20 fb^-1 at the 8 TeV LHC.

  6. Fault Tree Analysis of Power Distribution Vehicle Started Stop in Low Temperature%电源配电车低温启动后停机的故障树分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪峰; 李锐敏; 杨淑霞

    2014-01-01

    某型号电源配电车做环境试验,低温环境启动成功后停机。更换手打输油泵后,启动成功,工作正常。针对这种现象,根据低温启动的技术要求和原理、发电机组低温启动成功后停机故障树,分析原因,现场采取措施有效,实施效果良好,得到了同行的认可及推广。%The type power distribution vehicle for environmental testing , low temperature environment stop after a successful started .After change hands oil transfer pump , start the success , working properly .In this paper , ac-cording to this phenomenon , the technology requirements of the low temperature start and principle , generating set after the success of the low-temperature start stop the fault tree , analysis the reason , the measures to effectively , implementing effect is very good and get the approvl .

  7. Sneaky light stop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Eifert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Due to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.

  8. Ready to stop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molitoris, Joseph; Dribe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    the Roteman Database for Stockholm, Sweden between 1878 and 1926 to examine the association of socioeconomic status and fertility and the adoption of stopping behaviour during the city's transition. Using piecewise constant hazard models and logistic regression, we find that a clear class pattern arises...... in which the elite were early practitioners of fertility control, followed by the working classes. As the transition unfolded, socioeconomic differences in stopping behaviour disappeared and overall fertility differentials were also minimized, both of them being consistent with patterns observed in rural...

  9. Stopping the unstoppable

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    How do you stop two very high energy proton beams circulating in opposite directions around a 27-kilometre ring? The answer is the beam dumps. Two tunnels, pointing in opposite directions, are being constructed at point 6 of the LHC. These will allow the beams to be directed into two large beam dumps housed at the ends of the tunnels.

  10. One-stop shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, C

    1996-11-25

    The long-term-care industry's new mantras are "continuum of care" and "one-stop shopping." Companies are trying to please consumers who are clamoring for more senior-living options and managed-care organizations that want administratively simple contracting arrangements.

  11. Stopping the Bottle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is coming later. The next week, eliminate another bottle feeding and provide milk in a cup instead. Try to do this when your baby is sitting at the table in a high chair. Generally, the last bottle to stop should be the nighttime bottle. That ...

  12. Stopping the flood of contracts. New standard contract for operators of solar power systems; Vertragsflut eindaemmen. Ein neuer Mustervertrag bietet Rechtssicherheit fuer Betreiber von Solarstromanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seltmann, T.

    2001-09-01

    The Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Sonnenenergie and the Solarenergie-Foerderverein Aachen developed a new standard contract for operators of solar power systems. The new standard contract should be applied nation-wide. [German] Mit einem Mustervertrag wollen die Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Sonnenenergie und der Solarenergie-Foerderverein Aachen den Stromnetzbetreibern bei ihrem Widerstand gegen den Solarstrom den Wind aus den Segeln nehmen. Ziel der Solarverbaende ist ein bundesweit einheitlicher Einspeisevertrag fuer Solarstrom. (orig.)

  13. Moments of random sums and Robbins' problem of optimal stopping

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Robbins' problem of optimal stopping asks one to minimise the expected {\\it rank} of observation chosen by some nonanticipating stopping rule. We settle a conjecture regarding the {\\it value} of the stopped variable under the rule optimal in the sense of the rank, by embedding the problem in a much more general context of selection problems with the nonanticipation constraint lifted, and with the payoff growing like a power function of the rank.

  14. Animating with Stop Motion Pro

    CERN Document Server

    Sawicki, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Animating with Stop Motion Pro is comprehensive, hands-on guide to achieving professional results with Stop Motion Pro 7.0 software. Gone are the days of stop motion guesswork and waiting to see the finalized result of your meticulous, labor intensive animations. With the push of a mouse button and the Stop Motion Pro software, animators have ten times the capability of simple camera stop motion capture. Re-visualize stop motion character movements, graph these movements and composite characters into a flawless animations with the techniques and step by step tutorials featured in Animating wit

  15. BEAM STOP DESIGN METHODOLOGY AND DESCRIPTION OF A NEW SNS BEAM STOP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Plum, Michael A [ORNL; Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Jacobs, Lorelei L [ORNL; Lu, Wei [ORNL; McTeer, Stephen Mark [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The design of accelerator components such as magnets, accelerator cavities and beam instruments tends to be a fairly standardized and collective effort within the particle accelerator community with well established performance, reliability and, in some cases, even budgetary criteria. Beam stop design, by contrast, has been comparatively subjective historically with much more general goals. This lack of rigor has lead to a variety of facility implementations with limited standardization and minimal consensus on approach to development within the particle accelerator community. At the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), for example, there are four high power beam stops in use, three of which have significantly different design solutions. This paper describes the design of a new off-momentum beam stop for the SNS. The technical description of the system will be complemented by a discussion of design methodology. This paper presented an overview of the new SNS HEBT off-momentum beam stop and outlined a methodology for beam stop system design. The new beam stop consists of aluminium and steel blocks cooled by a closed-loop forced-air system and is expected to be commissioned this summer. The design methodology outlined in the paper represents a basic description of the process, data, analyses and critical decisions involved in the development of a beam stop system.

  16. Ready to stop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molitoris, Joseph; Dribe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    the Roteman Database for Stockholm, Sweden between 1878 and 1926 to examine the association of socioeconomic status and fertility and the adoption of stopping behaviour during the city's transition. Using piecewise constant hazard models and logistic regression, we find that a clear class pattern arises...... in which the elite were early practitioners of fertility control, followed by the working classes. As the transition unfolded, socioeconomic differences in stopping behaviour disappeared and overall fertility differentials were also minimized, both of them being consistent with patterns observed in rural......The western fertility decline is arguably the most significant demographic change to have occurred in the past 200 years, yet its causes and processes are still shrouded in ambiguity due to a lack of individual-level longitudinal data. A growing body of research has helped improve our understanding...

  17. The stop on top

    CERN Document Server

    Zakareishvili, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Supersymmetric partners of the top quark have been sought since the top quark has been discovered at the Tevatron. The searches are more easily performed in scenarios where the mass splitting between the top and the stop is large and where differences in kinematics are striking. The region in which top and stop are almost degenerate in mass is more difficult to explore experimentally as the final state kinematics are very similar, apart from angular-related distributions which reflect the spin/parity difference between the two particles. Usually the searches are performed looking for deviations on the measured top-quark pair production cross section with respect to the standard model prediction, or looking to simple variables such as the difference in the azimuthal angle between two leptons produced after top quark decays.

  18. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    OpenAIRE

    TEMPLETON, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important ...

  19. Does aging stop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrestani, Parvin; Mueller, Laurence D; Rose, Michael R

    2009-03-01

    Human mortality data show stabilization in mortality rates at very late ages. But human mortality data are difficult to interpret because they are affected by changing medical practices and other historically variable causes of death. However, in the 1990s, data from a variety of labs showed that the mortality rates of medflies, fruit flies, wasps, yeasts, and nematodes also stabilize at very late ages. These reproducible "mortality-rate plateaus" forced biologists to develop theories for their existence. There are two main theories of this kind. "Lifelong heterogeneity" theories suppose that highly robust subcohorts are more abundant at later ages because less robust subcohorts have mostly died off. On this type of theory, aging does not stop; aging continues inexorably in all individuals. In contrast, in evolutionary theories for mortality-rate plateaus, based on the eventual plateaus in Hamilton's Forces of Natural Selection at late ages, aging does indeed stop. A variety of experiments have cast doubt on lifelong heterogeneity theories as explanations of mortality-rate plateaus. A few experiments have corroborated the Hamiltonian theory. This has the important corollary that it appears to be possible for aging to stop, at sufficiently late ages, at least among some populations. The implications of this result for aging research are profound. Most importantly, it suggests the possibility that the physiology of adults undergoing aging may be substantially different from the physiology of life after aging.

  20. Optimally Stopped Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, Walter; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-11-01

    We combine the fields of heuristic optimization and optimal stopping. We propose a strategy for benchmarking randomized optimization algorithms that minimizes the expected total cost for obtaining a good solution with an optimal number of calls to the solver. To do so, rather than letting the objective function alone define a cost to be minimized, we introduce a further cost-per-call of the algorithm. We show that this problem can be formulated using optimal stopping theory. The expected cost is a flexible figure of merit for benchmarking probabilistic solvers that can be computed when the optimal solution is not known and that avoids the biases and arbitrariness that affect other measures. The optimal stopping formulation of benchmarking directly leads to a real-time optimal-utilization strategy for probabilistic optimizers with practical impact. We apply our formulation to benchmark simulated annealing on a class of maximum-2-satisfiability (MAX2SAT) problems. We also compare the performance of a D-Wave 2X quantum annealer to the Hamze-Freitas-Selby (HFS) solver, a specialized classical heuristic algorithm designed for low-tree-width graphs. On a set of frustrated-loop instances with planted solutions defined on up to N =1098 variables, the D-Wave device is 2 orders of magnitude faster than the HFS solver, and, modulo known caveats related to suboptimal annealing times, exhibits identical scaling with problem size.

  1. Tourette Syndrome: Help Stop Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Past Emails Tourette Syndrome: Help Stop Bullying Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... you can increase acceptance by helping to stop bullying of children with TS. Bullying doesn't just ...

  2. An Analysis and Prevention of Stop Marks in Weaving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ge; LIN Shen; CHEN Ming

    2002-01-01

    The cause of stop marks of fabrics in weaving is introduced, and the floating displacement of the cloth fell during loom stoppage is a primary cause of stop marks. The stop marks caused by fabric system are analyzed. A new method to eliminate stop marks by using the electronic let-off system is presented. This new method needn't any special detecting equipment, it can control the fell position by the powerful control program,so the cost is decreased greatly. The method is so flexible that can be applied to weaving all kinds of fabrics.

  3. You can't stop the music: reduced auditory alpha power and coupling between auditory and memory regions facilitate the illusory perception of music during noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Nadia; Keil, Julian; Obleser, Jonas; Schulz, Hannah; Grunwald, Thomas; Bernays, René-Ludwig; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Weisz, Nathan

    2013-10-01

    Our brain has the capacity of providing an experience of hearing even in the absence of auditory stimulation. This can be seen as illusory conscious perception. While increasing evidence postulates that conscious perception requires specific brain states that systematically relate to specific patterns of oscillatory activity, the relationship between auditory illusions and oscillatory activity remains mostly unexplained. To investigate this we recorded brain activity with magnetoencephalography and collected intracranial data from epilepsy patients while participants listened to familiar as well as unknown music that was partly replaced by sections of pink noise. We hypothesized that participants have a stronger experience of hearing music throughout noise when the noise sections are embedded in familiar compared to unfamiliar music. This was supported by the behavioral results showing that participants rated the perception of music during noise as stronger when noise was presented in a familiar context. Time-frequency data show that the illusory perception of music is associated with a decrease in auditory alpha power pointing to increased auditory cortex excitability. Furthermore, the right auditory cortex is concurrently synchronized with the medial temporal lobe, putatively mediating memory aspects associated with the music illusion. We thus assume that neuronal activity in the highly excitable auditory cortex is shaped through extensive communication between the auditory cortex and the medial temporal lobe, thereby generating the illusion of hearing music during noise. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Report on the first VLHC photon stop cryogenic design experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Geynisman, M; Bossert, R; Darve, C; Ewald, K D; Klebaner, A; Limon, P; Martínez, A

    2004-01-01

    As part of Fermilab's study of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC), a water-cooled photon stop was proposed as a device to intercept the synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy proton beams in the high-field superconducting magnets with minimal plug-cooling power. Photon stops are radiation absorbers operating at room temperature that protrude into the beam tube at the end of each bending magnet to scrape the synchrotron light emitted by the beam one magnet up- stream. Among the technological challenges regarding photon stops is their cryo-design. The photon stop is water-cooled and operates in a cryogenic environment. A careful cryo-design is therefore essential to enable operation at minimum heat transfer between the room temperature sections and the cryogenic parts. A photon stop cryo- design was developed and a prototype was built. This paper presents the results of the cryogenic experiments conducted on the first VLHC photon-stop prototype.

  5. GMSB with Light Stops

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, Antonio; Quiros, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB) is an elegant mechanism to transmit supersymmetry breaking from the hidden to the MSSM observable sector, which solves the supersymmetric flavor problem. However the smallness of the generated stop mixing requires superheavy stops to reproduce the experimental value of the Higgs mass. Two possible ways out are: i) To extend GMSB by direct superpotential messenger-MSSM Yukawa couplings to generate sizeable mixing, thus reintroducing the flavor problem; ii) To extend the MSSM Higgs sector with singlets and/or triplets providing extra tree-level corrections to the Higgs mass. Singlets will not get any soft mass from GMSB and triplets will contribute to the $\\rho$ parameter which could be an issue. In this paper we explore the second way by introducing extra supersymmetric triplets with hypercharges $Y=(0,\\pm 1)$, with a tree-level custodial $SU(2)_L\\otimes SU(2)_R$ global symmetry in the Higgs sector protecting the $\\rho$ parameter: a supersymmetric generalization of ...

  6. Book Review: Stop, Write!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Thulesius

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This book on writing grounded theory is intended for the empirical GT researcher who wants to pursue his/her research until publication. It is the first book devoted entirely to such a crucial issue as writing grounded theory. Thus, Stop, Write: Writing Grounded Theory, is a practical book that fills a gap in GT methodology. In the first chapter of the book, Dr. Glaser says, “Stop unending conceptualization, unending data coverage, and unending listening to others who would egg you on with additional data, ideas and/or requirements or simply wait too long”. The book teaches the reader how to actually write a grounded theory by “simply” writing up the sorted memos. This requires efficient sorting that is dealt with in chapter two on Sorting Memos, which includes precious repetition from Theoretical Sensitivity (1978. How writing can be done effectively is outlined in chapter three The Working Paper. Then follows chapter four on how to rework the first draft with the different tasks of editing for language and professionalism. Thereafter Dr. Glaser discusses Writing Problems in chapter five where he gives useful guidance on how to overcome writing blocks and problems with supervisors and dissertation committees. The book also deals with publishing and with collaboration as experienced between Barney Glaser and the cofounder of grounded theory, Anselm Strauss.

  7. Baryon stopping probes deconfinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolschin, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Stopping and baryon transport in central relativistic Pb + Pb and Au + Au collisions are reconsidered with the aim to find indications for the transition from hadronic to partonic processes. At energies reached at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron ( √{s_{NN}} = 6.3-17.3 GeV) and at RHIC (62.4 GeV) the fragmentation-peak positions as obtained from the data depend linearly on the beam rapidity and are in agreement with earlier results from a QCD-based approach that accounts for gluon saturation. No discontinuities in the net-proton fragmentation peak positions occur in the expected transition region from partons to hadrons at 6-10GeV. In contrast, the mean rapidity loss is predicted to depend linearly on the beam rapidity only at high energies beyond the RHIC scale. The combination of both results offers a clue for the transition from hard partonic to soft hadronic processes in baryon stopping. NICA results could corroborate these findings.

  8. Development of methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power for low energy conversion electrons; Desenvolvimento de uma metodologia para estimativa da dose absorvida e do poder de freamento para eletrons de conversao de baixa energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    1995-08-01

    The evaluation of absorbed dose in the case of external and internalcontamination due to radionuclides is sometimes hard, because of the difficulties in the assessment of the absorbed dose caused by electrons with energy less than 100 KeV in mucous membrane. In this work, a methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power in VYNS (co-polymer of polivinyl chloride - acetate) absorbers, for the 62.5 KeV and 84-88 KeV energy {sup 109} Cd conversion electrons, working with a 4 {pi} proportional pressurized detector, is presented. In order to assure the reproducibility of measurement conditions, one of the detector halves has been used to obtain a spectrum of a thin {sup 109} Cd source, without absorber. The other half of the detector was used in concomitance to obtain spectra with different thicknesses if absorber. The absorbed energy was obtained subtracting each spectrum with absorber from the spectrum without absorber, which were stored in a microcomputer connected to signal processing systems by ACE type interface. The VYNS weight and thickness were evaluated using common radionuclide metrology procedures. As VYNS has characteristics similar to a tissue equivalent material, the results obtained are consistent with dosimetric concepts and have a good agreement with those of the literature. (author)

  9. Discussing the Theoretical Calculation of Stopping Power of Inner-support Anti-sliding Device%关于铁道车辆内撑式停车防溜器制动能力理论计算的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾继峰; 张继生

    2011-01-01

    The index of stopping power of inner-support anti-sliding device could be gained mainly through the free rolling experiment on dispatching line. In order to give theoretical support for the design of inner-support anti-sliding device,the authors establish calculation model by taking T·TK-92 controllable stopping device as example,calculate the major technical parameters and stopping power,study the theoretical calculation method for calculating the stopping power of inner-support anti-sliding device. The results show that the calculation values are very similar to those gained by experiment,the errors are in the acceptable ranges.%内撑式停车防溜器的制动能力指标主要通过调车线溜放试验获取,为给内撑式停车防溜器设计提供理论支持,以T.TK-92型可控停车器为例,建立计算模型,计算主要技术参数和制动能力,研究内撑式停车防溜器制动能力的理论计算方法。结果表明,计算所得数值与车辆溜放制动实测数值基本一致,在允许误差范围内。

  10. Light Stops from extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Pepin, Mateo

    2016-01-01

    In supersymmetric models the mass of the stops can be considered as the naturalness measure of the theory. Roughly, the lighter the stops are, the more natural the theory is. Both, the absence of supersymmetric signals at experiment and the measurement of the Higgs mass, put scenarios with light stops under increasing tension. I will present a supersymmetry breaking mechanism of the Scherk-Schwarz type that, by introducing extra $SU(2)_L$ triplets in the Higgs sector, is able to generate the correct Higgs mass while keeping stops light.

  11. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  12. Has human evolution stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Alan R

    2010-07-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  13. UDI STOP Femminicidio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Crivelli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available L'UDI, Unione Donne in Italia, ha collaborato con l'Osservatorio dei Processi Comunicativi a un numero monografico della rivista scientifica M@gm@ dal titolo "Violenza maschile e femminicidio". Il numero monografico vuole mettere a disposizione le analisi, l’esperienza e la storia nostra e delle nostre interlocutrici, come contributo al nostro comune lavoro di sensibilizzazione, contrasto alla violenza maschile sulle donne – femminicidio. “UDI STOP femminicidio” è da anni la nostra campagna contro la violenza di genere, la collaborazione con l’Osservatorio dei Processi Comunicativi è parte integrante di questo sforzo. Il primo e dichiarato dei nostri progetti politici è il contrasto alla cultura e al potere ideologico che consente il femminicidio, la subordinazione culturale e sociale, la percezione della donna come oggetto di dominio, la riduzione in schiavitù di tante donne, comprese molte donne prostitute... Sappiamo di non voler tradire una “responsabilità di genere” che deve necessariamente concretizzarsi in tanti “gesti responsabili”, nella lunga pazienza quotidiana che consente la sedimentazione di un cambiamento radicale nelle coscienze. Vogliamo continuare ad essere l’associazione che coniuga insieme la soggettività personale e l'assunzione diretta di responsabilità, della progettualità a lungo termine che non trova “contraddittorio” misurarsi con la solidarietà concreta e quotidiana con le altre donne, nel tentativo di far nascere le nuove maniere di pensare.

  14. Higgs-stoponium mixing near the stop-antistop threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T.; Chung, Hee Sok; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model contain additional heavy neutral Higgs bosons that are coupled to heavy scalar top quarks (stops). This system exhibits interesting field theoretic phenomena when the Higgs mass is close to the stop-antistop production threshold. Existing work in the literature has examined the digluon-to-diphoton cross section near threshold and has focused on enhancements in the cross section that might arise either from the perturbative contributions to the Higgs-to-digluon and Higgs-to-diphoton form factors or from mixing of the Higgs boson with stoponium states. Near threshold, enhancements in the relevant amplitudes that go as inverse powers of the stop-antistop relative velocity require resummations of perturbation theory and/or nonperturbative treatments. We present a complete formulation of threshold effects at leading order in the stop-antistop relative velocity in terms of nonrelativistic effective field theory. We give detailed numerical calculations for the case in which the stop-antistop Green's function is modeled with a Coulomb-Schrödinger Green's function. We find several general effects that do not appear in a purely perturbative treatment. Higgs-stop-antistop mixing effects displace physical masses from the threshold region, thereby rendering the perturbative threshold enhancements inoperative. In the case of large Higgs-stop-antistop couplings, the displacement of a physical state above threshold substantially increases its width, owing to its decay width to a stop-antistop pair, and greatly reduces its contribution to the cross section.

  15. LHC Availability 2016: Technical Stop 1 to Technical Stop 2

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Technical Stop 1 (TS1) to Technical Stop 2 (TS2) in 2016. This period was dedicated to proton physics with a bunch spacing of 25ns. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  16. LHC Availability 2016: Technical Stop 2 to Technical Stop 3

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Technical Stop 2 (TS2) to Technical Stop 3 (TS3) in 2016. This period was dedicated to proton physics with a bunch spacing of 25ns. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  17. LHC Availability 2017: Technical Stop 1 to Technical Stop 2

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; Walsh, David John; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Technical Stop 1 (TS1) to Technical Stop 2 (TS2) in 2017. This period was dedicated to proton physics with a bunch spacing of 25ns. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  18. Probing Light Stops with Stoponium

    CERN Document Server

    Batell, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We derive new limits on light stops from diboson resonance searches in the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z \\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$ and $hh$ channels from the first run of the LHC. If the two-body decays of the light stop are mildly suppressed or kinematically forbidden, stoponium bound states will form in $pp$ collisions and subsequently decay via the pair annihilation of the constituent stops to diboson final states, yielding striking resonance signatures. Remarkably, we find that stoponium searches are highly complementary to direct collider searches and indirect probes of light stops such as Higgs coupling measurements. Using an empirical quarkonia potential model and including the first two $S$-wave stoponium states, we find that in the decoupling limit $m_{\\widetilde t_1} \\lesssim 130$ GeV is excluded for any value of the stop mixing angle and heavy stop mass by the combination of the latest resonance searches and the indirect constraints. The $\\gamma \\gamma$ searches are the most complementary to the indirect constraint...

  19. Analytical and Experimental Investigation on A Dynamic Thermo-Sensitive Electrical Parameter with Maximum dIC/dt during Turn-off for High Power Trench Gate/Field-Stop IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Luo, Haoze; Li, Wuhua

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a dynamic thermo-sensitive electrical parameter (DTSEP) for extracting the junction temperature of the trench gate/field-stop insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules by using the maximum collector current falling rate is proposed. First, a theoretical model of the transient...

  20. Second stop and sbottom searches with a stealth stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Li, Lingfeng; Qin, Qin

    2016-11-01

    The top squarks (stops) may be the most wanted particles after the Higgs boson discovery. The searches for the lightest stop have put strong constraints on its mass. However, there is still a search gap in the low mass region if the spectrum of the stop and the lightest neutralino is compressed. In that case, it may be easier to look for the second stop since naturalness requires both stops to be close to the weak scale. The current experimental searches for the second stop are based on the simplified model approach with the decay modes {overset{˜ }{t}}_2to {overset{˜ }{t}}_1Z and {overset{˜ }{t}}_2to {overset{˜ }{t}}_1h . However, in a realistic supersymmetric spectrum there is always a sbottom lighter than the second stop, hence the decay patterns are usually more complicated than the simplified model assumptions. In particular, there are often large branching ratios of the decays {overset{˜ }{t}}_2to {overset{˜ }{b}}_1W and {overset{˜ }{b}}_1to {overset{˜ }{t}}_1W as long as they are open. The decay chains can be even more complex if there are intermediate states of additional charginos and neutralinos in the decays. By studying several MSSM benchmark models at the 14 TeV LHC, we point out the importance of the multi- W final states in the second stop and the sbottom searches, such as the same-sign dilepton and multilepton signals, aside from the traditional search modes. The observed same-sign dilepton excesses at LHC Run 1 and Run 2 may be explained by some of our benchmark models. We also suggest that the vector boson tagging and a new kinematic variable may help to suppress the backgrounds and increase the signal significance for some search channels. Due to the complex decay patterns and lack of the dominant decay channels, the best reaches likely require a combination of various search channels at the LHC for the second stop and the lightest sbottom.

  1. Higgs-Stoponium Mixing Near the Stop-Antistop Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T; Wagner, Carlos E M

    2016-01-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model contain additional heavy neutral Higgs bosons that are coupled to heavy scalar top quarks (stops). This system exhibits interesting field theoretic phenomena when the Higgs mass is close to the stop-antistop production threshold. Existing work in the literature has examined the digluon-to-diphoton cross section near threshold and has focused on enhancements in the cross section that might arise either from the perturbative contributions to the Higgs-to-digluon and Higgs-to-diphoton form factors or from mixing of the Higgs boson with stoponium states. Near threshold, enhancements in the relevant amplitudes that go as inverse powers of the stop-antistop relative velocity require resummations of perturbation theory and/or nonperturbative treatments. We present a complete formulation of threshold effects at leading order in the stop-antistop relative velocity in terms of nonrelativistic effective field theory. We give detailed numerical calculations for the case in ...

  2. 压水堆核电站反应堆保护系统投运与退出方案论述%Discussion for the Scheme of Run and Stop of Reactor Protect System in Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白杰; 王博; 姚兴瑞

    2015-01-01

    During every fuel cycle, the unit of nuclear power plant need back up for maintenance and fuel replacing. And then up and running again. In this phase, the reactor protect system need run and stop. The article discusses the scheme of run and stop of reactor protect system in one pressurized water reactor.%核电厂每个换料周期,机组需要下行进行换料和大修,结束后再重新上行至正常运行,这期间反应堆保护系统需要投运和退出.本文结合某压水堆核电站反应堆保护系统的设计原理和实现方式,介绍了压水堆核电站反应堆保护系统投运与退出的方案.

  3. Stop searches in flavourful supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellin, Andreas; Haisch, Ulrich; Tunstall, Lewis C.

    2016-09-01

    Natural realisations of supersymmetry require light stops {tilde{t}}_1 , making them a prime target of LHC searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. Depending on the kinematic region, the main search channels are {tilde{t}}_1to t{tilde{χ}}_1^0 , {tilde{t}}_1to W b{tilde{χ}}_1^0 and {tilde{t}}_1to c{tilde{χ}}_1^0 . We first examine the interplay of these decay modes with {tilde{c}}_1to c{tilde{χ}}_1^0 in a model-independent fashion, revealing that a large parameter space region with stop mass values {m_{tilde{t}}}{_1} up to 530 GeV is excluded for any {tilde{t}}_1to c{tilde{χ}}_1^0 branching ratio by LHC Run I data. The impact of {tilde{c}}_1to c{tilde{χ}}_1^0 decays is further illustrated for scenarios with stop-scharm mixing in the right-handed sector, where it has previously been observed that the stop mass limits can be significantly weakened for large mixing. Our analysis shows that once the {tilde{c}}_1to c{tilde{χ}}_1^0 bounds are taken into account, non-zero stop-scharm mixing can lead to an increase in the allowed parameter space by at most 35%, with large areas excluded for arbitrary mixing.

  4. Range Distribution Parameters and Electronic Stopping Power for 19F+ Ions in SnO2, Indium-Tin Oxide, AgGaSe2 and AgGaS2:Comparison Between Theory and Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Hui-Hao; LIU Xiang-Dong

    2004-01-01

    @@ Range distributions of fluorine for 19F+- implantation into SnO2, indium-tin oxide, AgGaS2 and AgGaSe2 are measured by using the 1gF(p,αγ)16O resonant nuclear reactions. The electronic stopping cross sections for 19F ions in these materials are derived from the measured range distributions. These experimental results are compared with those obtained from the newest version of stopping and range computer code, SRIM2003. The values of projected range predicted by the SRIM2003 agree well with the measured values for AgGaS2 and AgGaSe2 substrates. However, the values given by the SRIM2003 substantially deviate from the experimental values for the oxide materials SnO2 and ITO.

  5. Stopped nucleons in configuration space

    CERN Document Server

    Bialas, Andrzej; Koch, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In this note, using the colour string model, we study the configuration space distribution of stopped nucleons in heavy-ion collisions. We find that the stopped nucleons from the target and the projectile end up separated from each other by the distance increasing with the collision energy. In consequence, for the center of mass energies larger than 6 or 10 GeV (depending on the details of the model) it appears that the system created is not in thermal and chemical equilibrium, and the net baryon density reached is likely not much higher than that already present in the colliding nuclei.

  6. Stop. Write! Writing Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, PhD, Hon. PhD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The message in this book, the dictum in this book, is to stop and write when the Grounded Theory (GT methodology puts you in that ready position. Stop unending conceptualization, unending data coverage, and unending listening to others who would egg you on with additional data, ideas and/or requirements or simply wait too long. I will discuss these ideas in detail. My experience with PhD candidates is that for the few who write when ready, many do not and SHOULD. Simply put, many write-up, but many more should.

  7. Remote Shutoff Stops Runaway Lawnmower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambo, Alan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how electronics students at Central Nine Career Center designed a kill switch circuit to stop a runaway lawnmower. This project is ideal for a career center since the electronics/robotics, small engines and horticulture classes can all work together on their respective parts of the modification, installation…

  8. Stop searches in flavourful supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Crivellin, Andreas; Tunstall, Lewis C.

    2016-01-01

    Natural realisations of supersymmetry require light stops ${\\tilde t}_1$, making them a prime target of LHC searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. Depending on the kinematic region, the main search channels are ${\\tilde t_1}\\to t \\tilde \\chi^0_1$, ${\\tilde t_1}\\to W b \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ and ${\\tilde t_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$. We first examine the interplay of these decay modes with ${\\tilde c_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ in a model-independent fashion, revealing the existence of large regions in parameter space which are excluded for any ${\\tilde t_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ branching ratio. This effect is then illustrated for scenarios with stop-scharm mixing in the right-handed sector, where it has previously been observed that the stop mass limits can be significantly weakened for large mixing. Our analysis shows that once the LHC bounds from ${\\tilde c_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ searches are taken into account, non-zero stop-scharm mixing leads only to a modest increase in the allowed regions of parameter...

  9. Remote Shutoff Stops Runaway Lawnmower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambo, Alan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how electronics students at Central Nine Career Center designed a kill switch circuit to stop a runaway lawnmower. This project is ideal for a career center since the electronics/robotics, small engines and horticulture classes can all work together on their respective parts of the modification, installation…

  10. In Defence of Thought Stopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Gary Maria

    2009-01-01

    Thought stopping (TS) has a long and established history as an effective mental control technique among the cognitive behavioural therapies (CBT). Recent claims have arisen, particularly from acceptance and mindfulness-based authors, that thought suppression--and therefore TS--is counterproductive. These claims take the syllogistic form: TS is a…

  11. Reparametrizations with given stop data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    In [1], we performed a systematic investigation of reparametrizations of continuous paths in a Hausdorff space that relies crucially on a proper understanding of stop data of a (weakly increasing) reparametrization of the unit interval. I am indebted to Marco Grandis (Genova) for pointing out tome...

  12. Reparametrizations with given stop data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In [1] we performed a systematic investigation of reparametrizations of continuous paths in a Hausdorff space that relies crucially on a proper understanding of stop data of a (weakly increasing) reprametrizations of the unit interval. I am grateful to Marco Grandis (Genova) for pointing out to me...

  13. Plagiarism: Can It Be Stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, G. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism can be controlled, not stopped. The more appropriate question to ask is: What can be done to encourage students to "cheat" correctly by doing the assignment the way it was intended? Cheating by college students continues to reach epidemic proportions on selected campuses, as witnessed by the recent episode at Central Florida University,…

  14. Analysis and Elimination of the Non-stop Typical Fault for a Type of Power Station%浅析某型电站无法停机典型故障的排除及思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘富林; 欧阳艳蓉; 丁朋; 王声

    2015-01-01

    柴油机不停机故障由燃料系统核心器件喷油泵引起,从其主要结构入手对输油泵、回油电磁阀、供油/停油电磁阀等核心物件的工作要点进行了叙述,分析故障产生的原因及诊断排除的过程,并对回油电磁阀故障导致供油/停油电磁阀不停油造成柴油机不停机的原因进行了剖析,提出了解决办法。%The non-stop fault of diesel is caused by fuel pump which is the core component in fuel system. In this paper, we describe work points of the key component fuel delivery pump, oil return solenoid value and oil sup-ply/cut-out solenoid value from their main structure, analyze the causes of failure and diagnosis the process of elim-ination. The reason of non-stop fault that oil supply/cut-out solenoid value has no oil supply caused by the fault of oil return solenoid value was analyzed.

  15. Progress in understanding heavy-ion stopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, P.; Schinner, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report some highlights of our work with heavy-ion stopping in the energy range where Bethe stopping theory breaks down. Main tools are our binary stopping theory (PASS code), the reciprocity principle, and Paul's data base. Comparisons are made between PASS and three alternative theoretical schemes (CasP, HISTOP and SLPA). In addition to equilibrium stopping we discuss frozen-charge stopping, deviations from linear velocity dependence below the Bragg peak, application of the reciprocity principle in low-velocity stopping, modeling of equilibrium charges, and the significance of the so-called effective charge.

  16. Randomly Stopped Sums: Models and Psychological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSmithson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an approach to modeling the sums of a continuous random variable over a number of measurement occasions when the number of occasions also is a random variable. A typical example is summing the amounts of time spent attending to pieces of information in an information search task leading to a decision to obtain the total time taken to decide. Although there is a large literature on randomly stopped sums in financial statistics, it is largely absent from psychology. The paper begins with the standard modeling approaches used in financial statistics, and then extends them in two ways. First, the randomly stopped sums are modeled as ``life distributions'' such as the gamma or log-normal distribution. A simulation study investigates Type I error rate accuracy and power for gamma and log-normal versions of this model. Second, a Bayesian hierarchical approach is used for constructing an appropriate general linear model of the sums. Model diagnostics are discussed, and three illustrations are presented from real datasets.

  17. Summary the race to reinvent energy and stop global warming

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Complete summary of Fred Krupp and Miriam Horn's book: ""Earth: The Sequel: The Race to Reinvent Energy and Stop Global Warming"". This summary of the ideas from Fred Krupp and Miriam Horn's book ""Earth: The Sequel"" explains how capitalism, as the most powerful economic force in the world, is the only engine of change that has the strength to stop global warming. In their book, the authors demonstrate how this can be achieved by installing a cap-and-trade initiative, providing genuine economic incentives for companies and reducing their carbon footprint. This summary explains their theory in

  18. The calcaneo-stop procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuelli, F G; Montrasio, U Alfieri

    2012-06-01

    Flexible flatfoot is one of the most common deformities. Arthroereisis procedures are designed to correct this deformity. Among them, the calcaneo-stop is a procedure with both biomechanical and proprioceptive properties. It is designed for pediatric treatment. Results similar to endorthesis procedure are reported. Theoretically the procedure can be applied to adults if combined with other procedures to obtain a stable plantigrade foot, but medium-term follow up studies are missing.

  19. Stopping of Ships Equipped with Azipods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Nowicki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a description of different possibilities of stopping a large ship equipped with azipods. The model tests were carried out to compare the effectiveness of stopping the ship using the different methods. The ship model used in stopping tests reproduces a large LNG carrier of capacity ~150 000 m3

  20. Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Claus Westergård; Fogsgaard, Morten

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the dynamics of power in processes of creativity, and show its paradoxical nature as both a bridge and a barrier to creativity in organisations. Recent social psychological experimental research (Slighte, de Dreu & Nijstad, 2011) on the relation between power...... and creativity suggests that when managers give people the opportunity to gain power and explicate that there is reason to be more creative, people will show a boost in creative behaviour. Moreover, this process works best in unstable power hierarchies, which implies that power is treated as a negotiable...... and floating source for empowering people in the organisation. We will explore and discuss here the potentials, challenges and pitfalls of power in relation to creativity in the life of organisations today. The aim is to demonstrate that power struggles may be utilised as constructive sources of creativity...

  1. Which Srategy will stop Flu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Shamsheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine is essentially the only measure by which there is a real opportunity to eliminate an infectious disease. And the flu is no exception. The high variability of influenza virus A/H1N1, which causes a pandemic, and most epidemics, is the problem of creating effective etiotropic treatments and vaccines. The emergence of new vaccine manufacturing technologies, such as genetic engineering, DNA technology, allows for a fresh look at the problem of influenza eradication on the planet. Universal year-round mass vaccination against influenza, not just high-risk groups, should be included in all national vaccination program, but this strategy will help stop influenza infection.

  2. Gauge mediation with light stops

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, Antonio; Quiros, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB) solves the supersymmetric flavor problem although it requires superheavy stops to reproduce the experimental value (125 GeV) of the Higgs mass. A possible way out is to extend the MSSM Higgs sector with triplets which provide extra tree-level corrections to the Higgs mass. Triplets with neutral components getting vacuum expectation values (VEV) have the problem of generating a tree-level correction to the \\rho parameter. We introduce supersymmetric triplets with hypercharges Y=(0,\\pm 1), with a tree-level custodial SU(2)_L\\otimes SU(2)_R global symmetry in the Higgs sector protecting the \\rho parameter: a supersymmetric generalization of the Georgi-Machacek model. The renormalization group running from the messenger to the electroweak scale mildly breaks the custodial symmetry. We will present realistic low-scale scenarios, their main features being a Bino-like neutralino or right-handed stau as the NLSP, light (1 TeV) stops, exotic couplings (H^\\p...

  3. Revised emission factors for gas engines including start/stop emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Malene; Boll Illerup, J.; Birr-Petersen, K.

    2008-06-15

    Liberalisation of the electricity market has led to Danish gas engine plants increasingly converting to the spot and regulating power markets. In order to offer regulating power, plants need to be able to start and stop the engines at the plants quickly. The liberalisation causes a considerable change of operation practice of the engines e.g. less full load operation hours /year. The project provides an inventory determining the scale of the emissions during the start and stop sequence as well as proposals for engine modifications aimed at reducing start/stop emissions. This report includes calculation of emission factors as well as an inventory of total emissions and reduction potentials. (au)

  4. Improving stopping construction to minimize leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Roy H; Mazzella, Andrew L; Martikainen, Anu L

    2012-07-01

    The proper sealing of stoppings is an important step in reducing leakage from the intake to the return airways. Leakage and the subsequent loss of ventilation resulting from improperly sealed stoppings can lead to unhealthy and unsafe working conditions. The research presented in this paper investigates the total leakage of a stopping, including air leakage through the stopping, at the stopping perimeter, and through the coalbed. The study also examines sealing considerations for stoppings that are constructed under roof control screen, the effects that wooden wedges had on inhibiting efficient application of polyurethane foam sealant, and airflow leakage through the surrounding coal. The work involved building a stopping in a dead end room of the NIOSH Safety Research Coal Mine and then pressurising the room using compressed air. Stopping leakage was evaluated by measuring air pressure loss in the enclosed room due to the air leakage. Part of the research utilises a diluted soap solution that was applied to the stopping and the surrounding coal to detect air leakage signified by bubble formations. The results show that stopping leakage can be minimised with proper sealing.

  5. Organic materials irradiated at very low temperature and at different stopping powers: examples of polyethylene and of cyclohexane molecules trapped in matrix; Materiaux organiques irradies a tres basse temperature et a differents pouvoirs d'arret: cas du polyethylene et des molecules de cyclohexane isolees en matrice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melot, M

    2003-10-15

    This thesis concerns the formation mechanisms of defects created in organic materials during irradiation under vacuum, at very low temperature and at different electronic stopping powers. Analysis have been realised by infrared spectroscopy. The first part concerns polyethylene. Irradiating at 8 K allows to dissociate the direct irradiation effects (in cage reactions) and the radical recombination effects. According to the considered chemical groups, the radical mobility leads to very different changes for the formation radiochemical yields. The second part concerns the irradiation of cyclohexane molecules trapped in a solid argon matrix. We evaluate the contribution of intermolecular and intramolecular reactions. The intermolecular reactions have limited consequences when using low ionising radiations but are crucial for heavy ion irradiations. (author)

  6. Stopping of relativistic hydrogen- and heliumlike heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Soerensen, A H

    2002-01-01

    The stopping power for hydrogen- and heliumlike heavy ions penetrating matter at energies of 100-1000 MeV/u is calculated. For hydrogenlike ions the difference in dE/dx for an extended and a collapsed electron distribution is at the level of 1% and nonperturbative effects easily account for half of the difference. Differences of this magnitude have drastic effects on charge-exchange straggling. The theoretical results lead to good agreement with experimental values when applied in simulations.

  7. Compression and extraction of stopped muons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taqqu, D

    2006-11-10

    Efficient conversion of a standard positive muon beam into a high-quality slow muon beam is shown to be achievable by compression of a muon swarm stopped in an extended gas volume. The stopped swarm can be squeezed into a mm-size swarm flow that can be extracted into vacuum through a small opening in the stop target walls. Novel techniques of swarm compression are considered. In particular, a density gradient in crossed electric and magnetic fields is used.

  8. Light stop squarks and b-tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Ferretti, Gabriele; Petersson, Christoffer; Torre, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    A significant part of the parameter space for light stop squarks still remains unconstrained by collider searches. For both R-Parity Conserving (RPC) and R-Parity Violating (RPV) scenarios there are regions in which the stop mass is around or below the top quark mass that are particularly challenging experimentally. Here we review the status of light stop searches, both in RPC and RPV scenarios. We also propose strategies, generally based on exploiting b-tagging, to cover the unconstrained regions.

  9. Substorm onset: Current sheet avalanche and stop layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-03-01

    located just earthward of the stop layer in the near-dipolar magnetosphere and be powered by the internal energy of the flow bursts. The stop layer mechanism is in some way the inverse of reconnection, as it converts flow into electromagnetic energy, and may have wide applicability in astrophysical plasmas.

  10. 14 CFR 29.675 - Stops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.675 Stops. (a) Each... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about...

  11. 14 CFR 27.675 - Stops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.675 Stops. (a) Each... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about...

  12. Stop the Violence: Overcoming Self-Destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Nelson, Ed.

    The story of the Stop the Violence movement among rap music artists and music industry colleagues is told, along with the story of a video that was produced as part of this initiative. The Stop the Violence project grew out of the reaction to violence among concert goers at a 1987 rap concert on Long Island (New York). Rap musicians have joined…

  13. Variance optimal stopping for geometric Levy processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Kamille Sofie Tågholt; Pedersen, Jesper Lund

    2015-01-01

    The main result of this paper is the solution to the optimal stopping problem of maximizing the variance of a geometric Lévy process. We call this problem the variance problem. We show that, for some geometric Lévy processes, we achieve higher variances by allowing randomized stopping. Furthermore...

  14. Addressing production stops in the food industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Herbert, Luke Thomas; Jacobsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the challenges in the food industry which causes the production lines to stop, illustrated by a case study of an SME size company in the baked goods sector in Denmark. The paper proposes key elements this sector needs to be aware of to effectively address production stops......, and gives examples of the unique challenges faced by the SME food industry....

  15. Stopping Mass Atrocities: Targeting the Dictator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje Weerdesteijn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The international community has determined it carries the responsibility to protect civilians from atrocity crimes if a state is unable or unwilling to do so. These crimes are often perpetrated in authoritarian regimes where they are legitimized through an exclusionary ideology. A comparative case study of Pol Pot and Milosevic indicates that whether the leader truly believes in the ideology he puts forward or merely uses it instrumentally to manipulate the population, is an important variable, which affects the manner in which third parties can respond effectively to these crimes. While Pol Pot was motivated by his ideological zeal, Milosevic used ideology to create a climate in which mass atrocities could be perpetrated in order to garner further power and prestige. In Max Weber’s terminology, Milosevic was guided by instrumental rationality while Pol Pot acted on the basis of value rationality. This case study compares two crucial moments—Vietnam’s invasion of Cambodia and NATO’s bombing of Serbia when the crisis in Kosovo escalated—to analyze the responsiveness of the two leaders. It is argued that ideological leaders are less responsive than non-ideological leaders to foreign policy measures targeted to stop or mitigate the occurrence of atrocities.

  16. Stopping Mass Atrocities: Targeting the Dictator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje Weerdesteijn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The international community has determined it carries the responsibility to protect civilians from atrocity crimes if a state is unable or unwilling to do so. These crimes are often perpetrated in authoritarian regimes where they are legitimized through an exclusionary ideology. A comparative case study of Pol Pot and Milosevic indicates that whether the leader truly believes in the ideology he puts forward or merely uses it instrumentally to manipulate the population, is an important variable, which affects the manner in which third parties can respond effectively to these crimes. While Pol Pot was motivated by his ideological zeal, Milosevic used ideology to create a climate in which mass atrocities could be perpetrated in order to garner further power and prestige. In Max Weber’s terminology, Milosevic was guided by instrumental rationality while Pol Pot acted on the basis of value rationality. This case study compares two crucial moments—Vietnam’s invasion of Cambodia and NATO’s bombing of Serbia when the crisis in Kosovo escalated—to analyze the responsiveness of the two leaders. It is argued that ideological leaders are less responsive than non-ideological leaders to foreign policy measures targeted to stop or mitigate the occurrence of atrocities.

  17. Stimulus devaluation induced by stopping action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jan R; O'Doherty, John P; Berkebile, Michael M; Linderman, David; Aron, Adam R

    2014-12-01

    Impulsive behavior in humans partly relates to inappropriate overvaluation of reward-associated stimuli. Hence, it is desirable to develop methods of behavioral modification that can reduce stimulus value. Here, we tested whether one kind of behavioral modification--the rapid stopping of actions in the face of reward-associated stimuli--could lead to subsequent devaluation of those stimuli. We developed a novel paradigm with three consecutive phases: implicit reward learning, a stop-signal task, and an auction procedure. In the learning phase, we associated abstract shapes with different levels of reward. In the stop-signal phase, we paired half those shapes with occasional stop-signals, requiring the rapid stopping of an initiated motor response, while the other half of shapes was not paired with stop signals. In the auction phase, we assessed the subjective value of each shape via willingness-to-pay. In 2 experiments, we found that participants bid less for shapes that were paired with stop-signals compared to shapes that were not. This suggests that the requirement to try to rapidly stop a response decrements stimulus value. Two follow-on control experiments suggested that the result was specifically due to stopping action rather than aversiveness, effort, conflict, or salience associated with stop signals. This study makes a theoretical link between research on inhibitory control and value. It also provides a novel behavioral paradigm with carefully operationalized learning, treatment, and valuation phases. This framework lends itself to both behavioral modification procedures in clinical disorders and research on the neural underpinnings of stimulus devaluation.

  18. Application of Remote Tripping and Bus Differential Protection Stops Sending Letters of 1 1 0 kV Double Power Supply Lines of Communication%浅谈110 kV双电源联络线“远跳”及“母差停信”功能的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高峰; 李巧荣

    2014-01-01

    Taking PSL621and ISA-311G as the example,this article elaborated the principle of remote tripping and bus differential protection stops sending letters of 1 1 0 kV double power supply lines of communication,and introduced the function application and the realization.Finally,for 1 1 0 kV double power source lines of communication,when dead area failure and the bus failure,it proposed several matters needing attention to ensure fast and reliable removal on both sides.%文中以PSL621和 ISA-311G为例阐述了110 kV双电源联络线的“远跳”及“母差停信”原理,并对其功能的应用和实现作了相应的介绍,最后针对110 kV双电源联络线线路死区故障及母线故障时,确保两侧快速可靠切除提出了几点注意事项。

  19. Sudden stopping in patients with cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Mariano; Conte, Carmela; Casali, Carlo; Ranavolo, Alberto; Mari, Silvia; Di Fabio, Roberto; Perrotta, Armando; Coppola, Gianluca; Padua, Luca; Monamì, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Stopping during walking, a dynamic motor task frequent in everyday life, is very challenging for ataxic patients, as it reduces their gait stability and increases the incidence of falls. This study was conducted to analyse the biomechanical characteristics of upper and lower body segments during abrupt stopping in ataxic patients in order to identify possible strategies used to counteract the instability in the sagittal and frontal plane. Twelve patients with primary degenerative cerebellar ataxia and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were studied. Time-distance parameters, dynamic stability of the centre of mass, upper body measures and lower joint kinematic and kinetic parameters were analysed. The results indicate that ataxic patients have a great difficulty in stopping abruptly during walking and adopt a multi-step stopping strategy, occasionally with feet parallel, to compensate for their inability to coordinate the upper body and to generate a well-coordinated lower limb joint flexor-extensor pattern and appropriate braking forces for progressively decelerating the progression of the body in the sagittal plane. A specific rehabilitation treatment designed to improve the ability of ataxic patients to transform unplanned stopping into planned stopping, to coordinate upper body and to execute an effective flexion-extension pattern of the hip and knee joints may be useful in these patients in order to improve their stopping performance and prevent falls.

  20. Optimal design of a beam stop for Indus-2 using finite element heat transfer studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Sinha; K J S Sawhney; R V Nandedkar

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes the design of an in-vacuum, water-cooled beam stop (X-ray shutter) for the materials science (X-ray diffraction) beamline proposed to be built on the wavelength shifter in the Indus-2 (2.5 GeV) synchrotron radiation source. The radiation source impinges ∼ 1 kW power on the beam stop and the heat transfer capabilities of the beam stop have been evaluated. Temperature distribution in the beam stop has been obtained under various cooling conditions using the finite element analysis calculations with ANSYS software. Design parameters of the beam stop have been optimised. It is also shown that radiation cooling alone is not sufficient for taking away the heat load. Water-cooling of the beam stop is essential.

  1. When your cancer treatment stops working

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000851.htm When your cancer treatment stops working To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cancer treatments can keep cancer from spreading and even cure ...

  2. Stop-Catalyzed Baryogenesis Beyond the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Andrey; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J; Winslow, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Non-minimal supersymmetric models that predict a tree-level Higgs mass above the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) bound are well motivated by naturalness considerations. Indirect constraints on the stop sector parameters of such models are significantly relaxed compared to the MSSM; in particular, both stops can have weak-scale masses. We revisit the stop-catalyzed electroweak baryogenesis (EWB) scenario in this context. We find that the LHC measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates already rule out the possibility of stop-catalyzed EWB. We also introduce a gauge-invariant analysis framework that may generalize to other scenarios in which interactions outside the gauge sector drive the electroweak phase transition.

  3. What Would Happen If We Stopped Vaccinations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newsletters Events What Would Happen If We Stopped Vaccinations? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Before the ... and Texas – mainly among groups with low vaccination rates. If vaccination rates dropped to low levels ...

  4. Imagine stopping the progression of Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Imagine stopping the progression of Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... I have friends and loved ones suffering from Alzheimer's. But I can imagine… and hope for… a ...

  5. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a dermatologist Home ... how to avoid these situations and develop a plan to stop. Just knowing when you’re inclined ...

  6. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mohs AUC MyDermPath+ Psoriasis Patient education resources Practice Management Center Coding and reimbursement Coding MACRA Fee schedule ... your nails: Some doctors recommend taking a gradual approach to break the habit. Try to stop biting ...

  7. Software workstations; One-stop shopping for utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Yaacov, G. (Electric Power Research Inst. (US)); Hoffman, S.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports that to help electric utilities use their software more efficiently, California's Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been integrating groups of programs related to common engineering functions - for example, system grounding - into single packages. More than a dozen of these packages are already available. Almost a dozen more, in various stages of development in the Palo Alto institute's technical divisions, are scheduled to be ready between now and 1993. What they offer is one-stop shopping for software solutions. Whether a project involves designing a new transmission line, troubleshooting an equipment problem at a power plant, or planning for future generating needs, utilities have for many years used software to get the job done fast while keeping expenses down. More recent advances in computing power and software engineering have even accelerated the development of programs for utility applications.

  8. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning eMa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1 the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2 an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination results in a longer go reaction time (RT, a lower stop error rate, as well as a faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control.

  9. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Yu, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1) the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2) an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian) updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination should result in longer go reaction time (RT), lower stop error rate, as well as faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control.

  10. 20 Aluminum Producers Stop Production in 1stHalf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> In the first half of 2004,the primary aluminumindustry in China had a profit plunge and 20primary aluminum enterprises in the wholecountry have completely stopped productiondue to the power price hikes,small margin ofalumina price reduction,price declining of pri-mary aluminum since May and other factors,making the Chinese producers more and moredifficult to survive.The statistics from theChina Non-Ferrous Metals Industry Associa-tion show that the first six months witnessed

  11. Calculated LET Spectrum from Antiproton Beams Stopping in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. In the plateau region of the simulated...... antiproton beam we observe a dose-averaged unrestricted LET of about 4 keV/μm, which is very different from the expected 0.6 keV/μm of an equivalent primary proton beam. Even though the fluence of secondaries is a magnitude less than the fluence of primary particles, the increased stopping power...

  12. Clamped seismic metamaterials: ultra-low frequency stop bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaoui, Y.; Antonakakis, T.; Brûlé, S.; Craster, R. V.; Enoch, S.; Guenneau, S.

    2017-06-01

    The regularity of earthquakes, their destructive power, and the nuisance of ground vibration in urban environments, all motivate designs of defence structures to lessen the impact of seismic and ground vibration waves on buildings. Low frequency waves, in the range 1-10 Hz for earthquakes and up to a few tens of Hz for vibrations generated by human activities, cause a large amount of damage, or inconvenience; depending on the geological conditions they can travel considerable distances and may match the resonant fundamental frequency of buildings. The ultimate aim of any seismic metamaterial, or any other seismic shield, is to protect over this entire range of frequencies; the long wavelengths involved, and low frequency, have meant this has been unachievable to date. Notably this is scalable and the effects also hold for smaller devices in ultrasonics. There are three approaches to obtaining shielding effects: bragg scattering, locally resonant sub-wavelength inclusions and zero-frequency stop-band media. The former two have been explored, but the latter has not and is examined here. Elastic flexural waves, applicable in the mechanical vibrations of thin elastic plates, can be designed to have a broad zero-frequency stop-band using a periodic array of very small clamped circles. Inspired by this experimental and theoretical observation, all be it in a situation far removed from seismic waves, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve elastic surface (Rayleigh) wave reflectors at very large wavelengths in structured soils modelled as a fully elastic layer periodically clamped to bedrock. We identify zero frequency stop-bands that only exist in the limit of columns of concrete clamped at their base to the bedrock. In a realistic configuration of a sedimentary basin 15 m deep we observe a zero frequency stop-band covering a broad frequency range of 0-30 Hz.

  13. 30 CFR 75.825 - Power centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., de-energizes input to all power transformers. (b) Trailing cable disconnecting device. In addition to... circuit to the power center. (g) Emergency stop switch. The power center must be equipped with an externally accessible emergency stop switch hard-wired into the incoming ground-wire monitor circuit that de...

  14. Comment Fail-Stop Blind Signature Scheme Design Based on Pairings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiaoming; HUANG Shangteng

    2006-01-01

    Fail-stop signature schemes provide security for a signer against forgeries of an enemy with unlimited computational power by enabling the signer to provide a proof of forgery when a forgery happens. Chang et al proposed a robust fail-stop blind signature scheme based on bilinear pairings. However, in this paper, it will be found that there are several mistakes in Chang et al' fail-stop blind signature scheme. Moreover, it will be pointed out that this scheme doesn' meet the property of a fail-stop signature: unconditionally secure for a signer. In Chang et al' scheme, a forger can forge a valid signature that can' be proved by a signer using the "proof of forgery". The scheme also doesn' possess the unlinkability property of a blind signature.

  15. Metallic bond effects on mean excitation energies for stopping powers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    Mean excitation energies for first row metals are evaluated by means of the local plasma approximation. Particle corrections based on Pines' (1953) procedure and the Wigner Seitz (1934) model of the metallic state are included. The agreement with experimental values is remarkably good. In contrast to previous work, the calculations given here estimate shifts in the plasma frequency according to the theory for plane wave states in an extended plasma as calculated by Pines. It is demonstrated that the effects of the metallic bond in lithium and beryllium are quite large and that they appear mainly as a result of collective oscillations in the 'free' electron gas formed from the valence electrons. The usefulness of the plasma frequency shift derived for a degenerate electron gas in predicting the plasma frequency shift within the ion core is considered surprising.

  16. Measurement of the Muon Stopping Power in Lead Tungstate

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00165402; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    A large sample of cosmic ray events collected by the CMS detector is exploited to measure the specific energy loss of muons in the lead tungstate of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The measurement spans a momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The results are consistent with the expectations over the entire range. The calorimeter energy scale, set with 120 GeV/c electrons, is validated down to the sub-GeV region using energy deposits, of order 100 MeV, associated with low-momentum muons. The muon critical energy in lead tungstate is measured to be 160+5/-6 plus or minus 8 GeV, in agreement with expectations. This is the first experimental determination of muon critical energy.

  17. Measurement of the Muon Stopping Power in Lead Tungstate

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    A large sample of cosmic ray events collected by the CMS detector is exploited to measure the specific energy loss of muons in the lead tungstate of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The measurement spans a momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The results are consistent with the expectations over the entire range. The calorimeter energy scale, set with 120 GeV/c electrons, is validated down to the sub-GeV region using energy deposits, of order 100 MeV, associated with low-momentum muons. The muon critical energy in lead tungstate is measured to be 160+5/-6 plus or minus 8 GeV, in agreement with expectations. This is the first experimental determination of muon critical energy.

  18. Hybrid stop schedule of urban rail train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengmin Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to better serve the transport demand of urban area by rail, target at the Ur-ban Rail Train Stop Schedule problem.Design/methodology/approach: Bi-level mathematical programming model and game relation was used.Findings: A 0-1 bi-level mathematical programming model for urban rail transit hybrid Stop Schedule is developed when game relation between train Stop Schedule and passenger transfer choice is considered.Research limitations/implications: The research is still in progress. Practical implications: ChongQing urban rail line 2 was taken as an example, the practical application of the model has proved its feasibility and efficiency.Originality/value: A 0-1 bi-level mathematical programming model for urban rail transit hybrid Stop Schedule is developed. The upper level model is Stop Schedule targeting at the optimal profit from the operators side. The lower level model is passenger routing aims to minimize total travel time. According to its features, the bi-level model is integrated in order to be directly solvable by optimizing software.

  19. Beam Stop for Electron Accelerator Beam Characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Greg; Sharp, Vic; Tickner, James; Uher, Josef

    2009-08-01

    Electron linear accelerator applications involving the generation of hard X-rays frequently require accurate knowledge of the electron beam parameters. We developed a beam stop device which houses a tungsten Bremsstrahlung target and enables the electron beam current, energy and position to be monitored. The beam stop consisted of four plates. The first was a removable aluminium (Al) transmission plate. Then followed the tungsten target. Behind the target there were four Al quadrant plates for beam position measurement. The last plate was a thick Al back-stop block. Currents from the four quadrants and the back-stop were measured and the beam lateral position, energy and current were calculated. The beam stop device was optimised using Monte-Carlo simulation, manufactured (including custom-made electronics and software) in our laboratory and tested at the ARPANSA (Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency) linear accelerator in Melbourne. The electron beam energy was determined with a precision of 60 keV at beam energies between 11 and 21 MeV and the lateral beam position was controlled with a precision of 200 mum. The relative changes of the beam current were monitored as well.

  20. New stopping criteria for segmenting DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W

    2001-01-01

    We propose a solution on the stopping criterion in segmenting inhomogeneous DNA sequences with complex statistical patterns. This new stopping criterion is based on Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) in the model selection framework. When this stopping criterion is applied to a left telomere sequence of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the complete genome sequence of bacterium Escherichia coli, borders of biologically meaningful units were identified (e.g. subtelomeric units, replication origin, and replication terminus), and a more reasonable number of domains was obtained. We also introduce a measure called segmentation strength which can be used to control the delineation of large domains. The relationship between the average domain size and the threshold of segmentation strength is determined for several genome sequences.

  1. Impact of Impulse Stops on Pedestrian Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kwak, Jaeyoung; Luttinen, Tapio; Kosonen, Iisakki

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the impact of impulse stops on pedestrian flow for a straight corridor with multiple attractions. The impulse stop is simulated by the switching behavior model, a function of the social influence strength and the number of attendees near the attraction. When the pedestrian influx is low, one can observe a stable flow where attendees make a complete stop at an attraction and then leave the attraction after a certain amount of time. When the pedestrian influx is high, an unstable flow is observed for strong social influence. In the unstable flow, attendees near the attraction are crowded out from the clusters by others due to the interpersonal repulsion. The expelled pedestrians impede the pedestrian traffic between the left and right boundaries of the corridor. These collective patterns of pedestrian flow are summarized in a schematic phase diagram.

  2. The Extent of the Stop Coannihilation Strip

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Zheng, Jiaming

    2014-01-01

    Many supersymmetric models such as the CMSSM feature a strip in parameter space where the lightest neutralino \\chi is identified as the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), the lighter stop squark \\tilde t_1 is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP), and the relic \\chi cold dark matter density is brought into the range allowed by astrophysics and cosmology by coannihilation with the lighter stop squark \\tilde t_1 NLSP. We calculate the stop coannihilation strip in the CMSSM, incorporating Sommerfeld enhancement effects, and explore the relevant phenomenological constraints and phenomenological signatures. In particular, we show that the \\tilde t_1 may weigh several TeV, and its lifetime may be in the nanosecond range, features that are more general than the specific CMSSM scenarios that we study in this paper.

  3. StopWatcher: A Mobile Application to Improve Stop Sign Awareness for Driving Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Tucker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stop signs are the primary form of traffic control in the United States. However, they have a tendency to be much less effective than other forms of traffic control like traffic lights. This is due to their smaller size, lack of lighting, and the fact that they may become visually obscured from the road. In this paper, we offer a solution to this problem in the form of a mobile application implemented in the Android platform: StopWatcher. It is designed to alert a driver when they are approaching a stop sign using a voice notification system (VNS. A field test was performed in a snowy environment. The test results demonstrate that the application can detect all of the stop signs correctly, even when some of them were obstructed by the snow, which in turn greatly improves the user awareness of stop signs.

  4. Stopping dynamics of ions passing through correlated honeycomb clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Karsten; Schlünzen, Niclas; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-12-01

    A combined nonequilibrium Green functions-Ehrenfest dynamics approach is developed that allows for a time-dependent study of the energy loss of a charged particle penetrating a strongly correlated system at zero and finite temperatures. Numerical results are presented for finite inhomogeneous two-dimensional Fermi-Hubbard models, where the many-electron dynamics in the target are treated fully quantum mechanically and the motion of the projectile is treated classically. The simulations are based on the solution of the two-time Dyson (Keldysh-Kadanoff-Baym) equations using the second-order Born, third-order, and T -matrix approximations of the self-energy. As application, we consider protons and helium nuclei with a kinetic energy between 1 and 500 keV/u passing through planar fragments of the two-dimensional honeycomb lattice and, in particular, examine the influence of electron-electron correlations on the energy exchange between projectile and electron system. We investigate the time dependence of the projectile's kinetic energy (stopping power), the electron density, the double occupancy, and the photoemission spectrum. Finally, we show that, for a suitable choice of the Hubbard model parameters, the results for the stopping power are in fair agreement with ab initio simulations for particle irradiation of single-layer graphene.

  5. Stop consonant discrimination based on human audition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, C L; Jacobson, J Z; Rayment, S G

    1979-03-01

    A system for discrimination of stop consonants has been designed on the basis of studies of auditory physiology and psychophysics. The system consists of a one-third octave filter bank as an approximation to auditory tuning curves, a bank of high speed, wide dynamic range envelope detectors, a logarithmic amplifier, and a digital computer for analysis and display. Features, chosen on the basis of psychophysical experiments, are then abstracted, and fed to a discriminant analysis program which decides on the most probable phomene. Discrimination accuracy of about 77% for stop consonants in initial position has been achieved, with a 15-speaker data set.

  6. Can Global Warming be Stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earlier this year, the CO2 levels exceeded the 400 ppm level and there is no sign that the 1-2 ppm annual increase is going to slow down. Concerns regarding the danger of global warming have been reported in numerous occasions for more than a generation, ever since CO2 levels reached the 350 ppm range in the mid 1980's. Nevertheless, all efforts to slow down the increase have showed little if any effect. Mobile sources, including surface and marine transportation and aviation, consist of 20% of the global CO2 emission. The only realistic way to reduce the mobile sources' CO2 signature is by improved fuel efficiency. However, any progress in this direction is more than compensated by continuous increased demand. Stationary sources, mostly electric power generation, are responsible for the bulk of the global CO2 emission. The measurements have shown, that the effect of an increase in renewable sources, like solar wind and geothermal, combined with conversion from coal to natural gas where possible, conservation and efficiency improvement, did not compensate the increased demand mostly in developing countries. Increased usage of nuclear energy can provide some relief in carbon emission but has the potential of even greater environmental hazard. A major decrease in carbon emission can be obtained by either significant reduction in the cost of non-carbon based energy sources or by of carbon sequestration. The most economical way to make a significant decrease in carbon emission is to apply carbon sequestration technology at large point sources that use coal. Worldwide there are about 10,000 major sources that burn >7 billion metric tons of coal which generate the equivalent of 30 trillion kwh. There is a limited experience in CO2 sequestration of such huge quantities of CO2, however, it is estimated that the cost would be US$ 0.01-0.1 per kwh. The cost of eliminating this quantity can be estimated at an average of 1.5 trillion dollars annually. The major emitters, US

  7. Evaluating the Effects of Traffic on Driver Stopping and Turn Signal Use at a Stop Sign: A Systematic Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebbon, Angela R.; Austin, John; Van Houten, Ron; Malenfant, Louis E.

    2007-01-01

    The current analyses of observational data found that oncoming traffic substantially affected driver stopping patterns and turn signal use at the target stop sign. The percentage of legal stops and turn signal use by drivers in the presence and absence of traffic was analyzed using a multi-element design. The results showed that legal stops were…

  8. Experimental study on the influence of charge exchange on the stopping power in the interaction of chlorine with a gas and a deuterium plasma; Etude experimentale de l`influence des echanges de charges sur le pouvoir d`arret dans l`interaction d`ions chlore avec un gaz et un plasma de deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nectoux, Marie [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1998-01-06

    This thesis is placed in the context of the physics of energy deposition of a multicharged heavy ion beam in matter at intermediate energies. The experiment gave measurements of energy loss as a function of final charge state for chlorine ions at 1.7 MeV/u in deuterium gas or plasma. In this way, we explore the influence of charge state evolution, depending on experimentally measured capture and ionization cross sections and the electron density of the target, on energy loss. The target is cylindrical and enclosed by two fast valves. The plasma is created in the gas by a discharge, which induces a magnetic perturbation of the beam (lens effect). This effect induces a divergent and misaligned outgoing beam. A simulation including charge state and velocity evolution of the projectile in flight in the magnetic field has been made in order to optimize beam analysis, to reach a precision better than 10{sup -3} in energy measurement. This study led to removal of the target to the `Split Pole`, a refocusing magnetic spectrometer. The first results obtained clearly show the dependence of energy loss on exit charge and especially on its evolution in the target. This is explained in terms of the lengths covered by the projectile in its successive charge states in the target, which depends on target electron density and the medium considered. In plasma, we observed an energy distribution with exit charge twice that observed in gas, because of a strong decrease of charge exchange. A comparison of data obtained in gas with stopping power calculated from Bethe-Bloch-Barkas theory leads to the necessity of including spatial extension of the projectile charge in the theory. (author) 81 refs., 62 figs., 5tabs.

  9. End-Stop Exemplar Based Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren I.

    2003-01-01

    An approach to exemplar based recognition of visual shapes is presented. The shape information is described by attributed interest points (keys) detected by an end-stop operator. The attributes describe the statistics of lines and edges local to the interest point, the position of neighboring...

  10. Five Reasons To Stop Saying "Good Job."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Alfie

    2001-01-01

    Offers five reasons to stop use of positive social reinforcement, or praise, with young children. Maintains that praise manipulates children by taking advantage of their need for adult approval and exploits that dependence for adult convenience, creates "praise junkies," steals the child's pride in his or her own accomplishment, reduces interest…

  11. Bystanders Are the Key to Stopping Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Sharon; Notar, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Bullying is the dominance over another. Bullying occurs when there is an audience. Peer bystanders provide an audience 85% of instances of bullying. If you remove the audience bullying should stop. The article is a review of literature (2002-2013) on the role of bystanders; importance of bystanders; why bystanders behave as they do; resources to…

  12. Car Stopping Distance on a Tabletop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Ole Anton

    2013-01-01

    Stopping distances in car braking can be an intriguing topic in physics teaching. It illustrates some basic principles of physics, and sheds valuable light on students' attitude towards aggressive driving. Due to safety considerations, it can be difficult to make experiments with actual car braking. (Contains 2 figures.)

  13. Approximations for stop-loss reinsurance premiums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnen, Rajko; Albers, Willem/Wim; Kallenberg, W.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Various approximations of stop-loss reinsurance premiums are described in literature. For a wide variety of claim size distributions and retention levels, such approximations are compared in this paper to each other, as well as to a quantitative criterion. For the aggregate claims two models are use

  14. Approximations for stop-loss reinsurance premiums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnen, Rajko; Albers, Willem; Kallenberg, Wilbert C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Various approximations of stop-loss reinsurance premiums are described in literature. For a wide variety of claim size distributions and retention levels, such approximations are compared in this paper to each other, as well as to a quantitative criterion. For the aggregate claims two models are use

  15. Approximations for stop-loss reinsurance premiums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnen, R.; Albers, W.; Kallenberg, W.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Various approximations of stop-loss reinsurance premiums are described in literature. For a wide variety of claim size distributions and retention levels, such approximations are compared in this paper to each other, as well as to a quantitative criterion. For the aggregate claims two models are use

  16. Measurements of Ion Stopping around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas (HEDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R.; Nagayama, T.; Mancini, R.; Hernandez, R.; Grabowski, P.; Yu Glebov, V.

    2016-10-01

    Ion stopping around the Bragg peak and its dependence on plasma conditions was recently measured for the first time in HEDP. The data support most stopping-power models for ion velocities (vi) larger than the average velocity of the thermal electrons (vth), but there are some differences at vi vth, which could not be validated. The work described here makes significant advances over the first experimental effort by quantitatively assessing the characteristics of the ion stopping around the Bragg peak while at the same time more accurately characterizing the plasma conditions. This effort represents the most sensitive test of plasma-stopping-power models around the Bragg peak to date, which is an important first step in our efforts of getting a fundamental understanding of DT-alpha stopping in HEDP, a prerequisite for understanding ignition margins in various implosion designs. The work was performed under NLUF and supported by DOE, LLNL and LLE. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  17. Confessions of a Librarian or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Google

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnels, Claire B.; Sisson, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Have you ever stopped to think about life before Google? We will make the argument that Google is the first manifestation of Web 2.0, of the power and promise of social networking and the ubiquitous wiki. We will discuss the positive influence of Google and how Google and other social networking tools afford librarians leading-edge technologies…

  18. Confessions of a Librarian or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Google

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnels, Claire B.; Sisson, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Have you ever stopped to think about life before Google? We will make the argument that Google is the first manifestation of Web 2.0, of the power and promise of social networking and the ubiquitous wiki. We will discuss the positive influence of Google and how Google and other social networking tools afford librarians leading-edge technologies…

  19. Lifespan changes in global and selective stopping and performance adjustments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Van De Laar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined stopping and performance adjustments in four age groups (M ages: 8, 12, 21, and 76 years. All participants performed on three tasks, a standard two-choice task and the same task in which stop-signal trials were inserted requiring either the suppression of the response activated by the choice stimulus (global stop task or the suppression of the response when one stop signal was presented but not when the other stop signal occurred (selective stop task. The results showed that global stopping was faster than selective stopping in all age groups. Global stopping matured more rapidly than selective stopping. The developmental gain in stopping was considerably more pronounced compared to the loss observed during senescence. All age groups slowed the response on trials without a stop signal in the stop task compared to trials in the choice task, the elderly in particular. In addition, all age groups slowed on trials following stop-signal trials, except the elderly who did not slow following successful inhibits. By contrast, the slowing following failed inhibits was disproportionally larger in the elderly compared to young adults. Finally, sequential effects did not alter the pattern of performance adjustments. The results were interpreted in terms of developmental change in the balance between proactive and reactive control.

  20. The light stop quark with small stop-neutralino difference in the MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milstene, C.; Carena, Marcela S.; Freitas, A.; Finch, A.; Sopczak, A.; Kluge, Hannelies

    2005-12-01

    The MSSM can explain electro-weak symmetry breaking if one scalar top quark (stop) is light. In addition, in this framework, the neutralino is a good dark matter candidate and for small stop-neutralino mass differences dm{sub i} = 30 GeV, co-annihilation plays an important role to match the results from WMAP and SDSS for the relic density in the universe. In this scenario, the stops mainly decays into charm and neutralino, making its discovery difficult at hadron colliders due to background and trigger limitations. They present results for the discovery reach of the ILC for a DM candidate as low as 0(5 GeV) based on a realistic experimental simulation. Moreover, the stop parameters could be measured with high precision.

  1. A Note on the Stopping Redundancy of Linear Codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Tao Xia

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study the stopping sets, stopping distance and stopping redundancy for binary linear codes.Stopping redundancy is a new concept proposed by Schwartz and Vardy recently for evaluating the performance of a linear code under iterative decoding over a binary erasure channel (BEC). Since the exact value of stopping redundancy is difficult to obtain in general, good lower and upper bounds are important. We obtain a new general upper bound on the stopping redundancy of binary linear codes which improves the corresponding results of Schwartz and Vardy.

  2. Simulations of the stopping efficiencies of fission ion guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solders, Andreas; Al-Adili, Ali; Gorelov, Dmitry; Jansson, Kaj; Jokinen, Ari; Kolhinen, Veli; Lantz, Mattias; Mattera, Andrea; Moore, Ian; Nilsson, Niklas; Norlin, Martin; Penttilä, Heikki; Pomp, Stephan; Prokofiev, Alexander V.; Rakopoulos, Vasileios; Rinta-Antila, Sami; Simutkin, Vasily

    2017-09-01

    With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility, located at the University of Jyväskylä, products of nuclear reactions are separated by mass. The high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, with full separation of individual nuclides, capacitates the study of nuclides far from the line of stability. For the production of neutron-rich medium-heavy nuclides, fissioning of actinides is a feasible reaction. This can be achieved with protons from an in-house accelerator or, alternatively, with neutrons through the addition of a newly developed Be(p,xn)-converter. The hereby-obtained fission products are used in nuclear data measurements, for example fission yields, nuclear masses, Q-values and decay spectroscopy. Prior to separation, the ionized reaction products are stopped in a helium-filled gas cell, referred to as the ion-guide. In this work we present simulations of the stopping of fission products in an ion guide developed for neutron-induced fission. The production and extraction rates are evaluated and compared against experimental values.

  3. Stopping and storing light pulses within a fiber optic ring resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.H.Suhailin; J.Ali; P.P.Yupapin; Y.Fujii; H.Ahmad; S.W.Harun

    2009-01-01

    A simple all optical system for stopping and storing light pulses is demonstrated.The system consists of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier(EDFA),a semiconductor optical amplifier(SOA),and a fiber ring resonator.The results show that the multisoliton generation with a free spectrum range of 2.4 nm and a pulse spectral width of 0.96 nm is achieved.The memory time of 15 min and the maximum soliton output power of 5.94 dBm are noted,respectively.This means that light pulses can be trapped,i.e.,stopped optically within the fiber ring resonator.

  4. End-Stop Exemplar Based Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren I.

    2003-01-01

    An approach to exemplar based recognition of visual shapes is presented. The shape information is described by attributed interest points (keys) detected by an end-stop operator. The attributes describe the statistics of lines and edges local to the interest point, the position of neighboring int...... interest points, and (in the training phase) a list of recognition names. Recognition is made by a simple voting procedure. Preliminary experiments indicate that the recognition is robust to noise, small deformations, background clutter and partial occlusion.......An approach to exemplar based recognition of visual shapes is presented. The shape information is described by attributed interest points (keys) detected by an end-stop operator. The attributes describe the statistics of lines and edges local to the interest point, the position of neighboring...

  5. Stop codon reassignments in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Natalia N; Schwientek, Patrick; Tripp, H James; Rinke, Christian; Pati, Amrita; Huntemann, Marcel; Visel, Axel; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Rubin, Edward M

    2014-05-23

    The canonical genetic code is assumed to be deeply conserved across all domains of life with very few exceptions. By scanning 5.6 trillion base pairs of metagenomic data for stop codon reassignment events, we detected recoding in a substantial fraction of the >1700 environmental samples examined. We observed extensive opal and amber stop codon reassignments in bacteriophages and of opal in bacteria. Our data indicate that bacteriophages can infect hosts with a different genetic code and demonstrate phage-host antagonism based on code differences. The abundance and diversity of genetic codes present in environmental organisms should be considered in the design of engineered organisms with altered genetic codes in order to preclude the exchange of genetic information with naturally occurring species.

  6. Upgoing stopping muons in Soudan 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kafka, T. [Argonne National Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Tufts University (United States); Oxford University, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-15

    A hitherto untapped sector of Soudan-2 data has been examined, consisting of upgoing stopping muons, originating in neutrino interactions within the rock surrounding the detector, and of one-prong neutrino interactions occuring within the detector that can be ambiguous with upgoing tracks. We observe features of the upgoing data that are compatible with the hypothesis of neutrino oscillations, and we do not observe any such features in the downgoing data.

  7. NEW POLIMER SEALING FLUID STOPS MUD LOSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Stryczek

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a composition of sealing fluid, prepared from acrylic acid salt water solution Solakryl M. Laboratory test results of technological properties of its modifications with mineral agents are shown. A new method of sealing mud loss operations with given sealing liquid is discussed along with comments on effects of its use for stopping mud loss in case of freeze-well drilling is described (the paper is published in Croatian.

  8. Bucket shaking stops bunch dancing in Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burov, A.; Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Bunches in Tevatron are known to be longitudinally unstable: their collective oscillations, also called dancing bunches, persist without any signs of decay. Typically, a damper is used to stop these oscillations, but recently, it was theoretically predicted that the oscillations can be stabilized by means of small bucket shaking. Dedicated measurements in Tevatron have shown that this method does stop the dancing. According to predictions of Refs. [2,3], the flattening of the bunch distribution at low amplitudes should make the bunch more stable against LLD. An experiment has been devised to flatten the distribution by modulating the RF phase at the low-amplitude synchrotron frequency for a few degrees of amplitude. These beam studies show that stabilisation really happens. After several consecutive shakings, the dancing disappears and the resulting bunch profile becomes smoother at the top. Although not shown in this report, sometimes a little divot forms at the centre of the distribution. These experiments confirm that resonant RF shaking flattens the bunch distribution at low amplitudes, and the dancing stops.

  9. The cryogenic gas stopping cell of SHIPTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droese, C., E-mail: christian.droese1@uni-greifswald.de [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität, Felix-Hausdorff-Straße 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Eliseev, S.; Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Block, M.; Herfurth, F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Laatiaoui, M. [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Lautenschläger, F. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Pankratiusstraße 2, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Minaya Ramirez, E. [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schweikhard, L. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität, Felix-Hausdorff-Straße 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Simon, V.V. [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Thirolf, P.G. [Ludwig Maximilians-Universität München, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    The overall efficiency of the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt, employed for high-precision mass measurements of exotic nuclei in the mass region above fermium, is presently mostly limited by the stopping and extraction of fusion-evaporation products in the SHIPTRAP gas cell. To overcome this limitation a second-generation gas cell with increased stopping volume was designed. In addition, its operation at cryogenic temperatures leads to a higher gas density at a given pressure and an improved cleanliness of the helium buffer gas. Here, the results of experiments with a {sup 219}Rn recoil ion source are presented. An extraction efficiency of 74(3)% was obtained, a significant increase compared to the extraction efficiency of 30% of the present gas stopping cell operated at room temperature. The optimization of electric fields and other operating parameters at room as well as cryogenic temperatures is described in detail. Furthermore, the extraction time of {sup 219}Rn ions was determined for several operating parameters.

  10. Stopped-Rotor Cyclocopter for Venus Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husseyin, Sema; Warmbrodt, William G.

    2016-01-01

    The cyclocopter system can use two or more rotating blades to create lift, propulsion and control. This system is explored for its use in a mission to Venus. Cyclocopters are not limited to speed and altitude and can provide 360 degrees of vector thrusting which is favorable for good maneuverability. The novel aspect of this study is that no other cyclocopter configuration has been previously proposed for Venus or any (terrestrial or otherwise) exploration application where the cyclocopters rotating blades are stopped, and act as fixed wings. The design considerations for this unique planetary aerial vehicle are discussed in terms of implementing the use of a cyclorotor blade system combined with a fixed wing and stopped rotor mechanism. This proposed concept avoids many of the disadvantages of conventional-rotor stopped-rotor concepts and accounts for the high temperature, pressure and atmospheric density present on Venus while carrying out the mission objectives. The fundamental goal is to find an ideal design that implements the combined use of cyclorotors and fixed wing surfaces. These design concepts will be analyzed with the computational fluid dynamics tool RotCFD for aerodynamic assessment. Aspects of the vehicle design is 3D printed and tested in a small water tunnel or wind tunnel.

  11. An Optimal Partial Differential Equations-based Stopping Criterion for Medical Image Denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanian, Maryam; Feizi, Awat; Davari, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Improving the quality of medical images at pre- and post-surgery operations are necessary for beginning and speeding up the recovery process. Partial differential equations-based models have become a powerful and well-known tool in different areas of image processing such as denoising, multiscale image analysis, edge detection and other fields of image processing and computer vision. In this paper, an algorithm for medical image denoising using anisotropic diffusion filter with a convenient stopping criterion is presented. In this regard, the current paper introduces two strategies: utilizing the efficient explicit method due to its advantages with presenting impressive software technique to effectively solve the anisotropic diffusion filter which is mathematically unstable, proposing an automatic stopping criterion, that takes into consideration just input image, as opposed to other stopping criteria, besides the quality of denoised image, easiness and time. Various medical images are examined to confirm the claim.

  12. An Optimal Partial Differential Equations-based Stopping Criterion for Medical Image Denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanian, Maryam; Feizi, Awat; Davari, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Improving the quality of medical images at pre- and post-surgery operations are necessary for beginning and speeding up the recovery process. Partial differential equations-based models have become a powerful and well-known tool in different areas of image processing such as denoising, multiscale image analysis, edge detection and other fields of image processing and computer vision. In this paper, an algorithm for medical image denoising using anisotropic diffusion filter with a convenient stopping criterion is presented. In this regard, the current paper introduces two strategies: utilizing the efficient explicit method due to its advantages with presenting impressive software technique to effectively solve the anisotropic diffusion filter which is mathematically unstable, proposing an automatic stopping criterion, that takes into consideration just input image, as opposed to other stopping criteria, besides the quality of denoised image, easiness and time. Various medical images are examined to confirm the claim. PMID:24696809

  13. 49 CFR 37.201 - Intermediate and rest stops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intermediate and rest stops. 37.201 Section 37.201... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.201 Intermediate and rest stops. (a) Whenever an OTRB makes an intermediate or rest stop, a passenger with a disability, including an individual using a...

  14. Moments of random sums and Robbins' problem of optimal stopping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gnedin, A.V.; Iksanov, A.

    2011-01-01

    Robbins' problem of optimal stopping is that of minimising the expected rank of an observation chosen by some nonanticipating stopping rule. We settle a conjecture regarding the value of the stopped variable under the rule that yields the minimal expected rank, by embedding the problem in a much

  15. Stop-loss order, unequal means, and more dangerous distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaas, R.; van Heerwaarden, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    Using a sequence of transformations of subsequent cumulative distribution functions, the connections between the following three relations between risks are established: stop-loss order, stop-loss order with equal means, and being more dangerous. By a related technique, stop-loss order is verified b

  16. 33 CFR 183.528 - Fuel stop valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel stop valves. 183.528 Section...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.528 Fuel stop valves. (a) Each electrically operated fuel stop valve in a fuel line between the fuel tank and the...

  17. Moments of random sums and Robbins' problem of optimal stopping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gnedin, A.V.; Iksanov, A.

    2011-01-01

    Robbins' problem of optimal stopping is that of minimising the expected rank of an observation chosen by some nonanticipating stopping rule. We settle a conjecture regarding the value of the stopped variable under the rule that yields the minimal expected rank, by embedding the problem in a much mor

  18. Stopping Speech Suppresses the Task-Irrelevant Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weidong; Oldenkamp, Caitlin L.; Aron, Adam R.

    2012-01-01

    Some situations require one to quickly stop an initiated response. Recent evidence suggests that rapid stopping engages a mechanism that has diffuse effects on the motor system. For example, stopping the hand dampens the excitability of the task-irrelevant leg. However, it is unclear whether this "global suppression" could apply across wider motor…

  19. Start-Stop Test Procedures on the PEMFC Stack Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitzel, Jens; Nygaard, Frederik; Veltzé, Sune

    The test is addressed to investigate the influence on stack durability of a long stop followed by a restart of a stack. Long stop should be defined as a stop in which the anodic compartment is fully filled by air due to stack leakages. In systems, leakage level of the stack is low and time to fil...

  20. 46 CFR 111.103-9 - Machinery stop stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery stop stations. 111.103-9 Section 111.103-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-9 Machinery stop stations. (a) Each forced...

  1. USABC Development of 12 Volt Battery for Start-Stop Application: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tataria, H.; Gross, O.; Bae, C.; Cunningham, B.; Barnes, J. A.; Deppe, J.; Neubauer, J.

    2015-02-01

    Global automakers are accelerating the development of fuel efficient vehicles, as a part of meeting regional regulatory CO2 emissions requirements. The micro hybrid vehicles with auto start-stop functionality are considered economical solutions for the stringent European regulations. Flooded lead acid batteries were initially considered the most economical solution for idle-stop systems. However, the dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) at lower state-of-charge (SOC) was limiting the life of the batteries. While improved lead-acid batteries with AGM and VRLA features have improved battery longevity, they do not last the life of the vehicle. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (or USABC, a consortium of GM, Ford, and Chrysler) analyzed energy storage needs for a micro hybrid automobile with start-stop capability, and with a single power source. USABC has analyzed the start-stop behaviors of many drivers and has developed the requirements for the start-stop batteries (Table 3). The testing procedures to validate the performance and longevity were standardized and published. The guideline for the cost estimates calculations have also been provided, in order to determine the value of the newly developed modules. The analysis effort resulted in a set of requirements which will help the battery manufacturers to develop a module to meet the automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) micro hybrid vehicle requirements. Battery developers were invited to submit development proposals and two proposals were selected for 50% cost share with USABC/DOE.

  2. Stop feeling: Inhibition of emotional interference following stop-signal trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyal eKalanthroff

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although a great deal of literature has been dedicated to the mutual links between emotion and the selective attention component of executive control, there is very little data regarding the links between emotion and the inhibitory component of executive control. In the current study we employed an emotional stop-signal task in order to examine whether emotion modulates and is modulated by inhibitory control. Results replicated previous findings showing reduced inhibitory control (longer stop-signal reaction time following negative, compared to neutral pictures. Most importantly, results show decreased emotional interference following stop-signal trials. These results show that the inhibitory control component of executive control can serve to decrease emotional effects. We suggest that inhibitory control and emotion have a two-way connection in which emotion disrupts inhibitory control and activation of inhibitory control disrupts emotion.

  3. On the momentum distribution of particles participating in nuclear stopping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mandeep Kaur; Suneel Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear stopping is studied as a function of incident energy and charge of the fragment produced in central heavy-ion collisions (HIC) of $^{197}_{79}$Au+$^{197}_{79}$Au and $^{58}_{28}$Ni+$^{58}_{28}$Ni using stopping parameter VARXZ. Various momentum constraints were imposed to get better insight into the stopping. The comparison of measured and calculated values of stopping for protons reveals the significance of these constraints. Maximum stopping is obtained for the particles lying in the lowest range of the momentum distribution at all incident energies.

  4. Neural - glial circuits : Can Interneurons stop seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Recent progress in neurobiology suggests that astrocytes - through calcium excitability - are active partners to the neurons by integrating their activity and, in turn, regulating synaptic transmission. In a similar fashion neurons and interneurons are the 'Yin and Yang' of the hippocampus. The dichotomy of excitation and inhibition between pyramidal neurons and interneurons plays a crucial role in the function of the neuronal circuit.We consider a model of a pyramidal cell in contact with one synaptic astrocytes. It has been shown that such a circuit - triggered by transient stimulation - can exhibit sustained oscillations ("seizures") for strong coupling. The question we are considering is, under what conditions synaptic inhibition can stop these seizures?

  5. Stop IT Project Failures Through Risk Management

    CERN Document Server

    Remenyi, D

    1999-01-01

    This book is about information systems development failures and how to avoid them. .It considers what goes wrong with information systems development projects and what actions may be taken to avoid potential difficulties.The reduction of the impact,or even the elimination of the problems,is discussed in terms of an information systems risk management programme. Stop I.T.Project failure helps to ensure that IS project managers are successful in helping to deliver application systems. However, IS development risk can never be entirely eliminated and consequently the practitioner needs to bear in

  6. Early Stop Criterion from the Bootstrap Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Larsen, Jan; Fog, Torben L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of generalization error estimation in neural networks. A new early stop criterion based on a Bootstrap estimate of the generalization error is suggested. The estimate does not require the network to be trained to the minimum of the cost function, as required...... by other methods based on asymptotic theory. Moreover, in contrast to methods based on cross-validation which require data left out for testing, and thus biasing the estimate, the Bootstrap technique does not have this disadvantage. The potential of the suggested technique is demonstrated on various time...

  7. Jojoba could stop the desert creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-25

    The Sahara desert is estimated to be expanding at a rate of 5km a year. The Sudanese government is experimenting with jojoba in six different regions as the bush has the potential to stop this ''desert creep''. The plant, a native to Mexico, is long known for its resistance to drought and for the versatile liquid wax that can be extracted from its seeds. It is estimated that one hectare of mature plants could produce 3000 kg of oil, currently selling at $50 per litre, and so earn valuable foreign currency.

  8. Plasmon damping and proton stopping in jellium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schinner, Andreas (Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Abteilung fuer Atom- und Kernphysik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria)); Bachlechner, M.E. (Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, Linz (Austria)); Boehm, H.M. (Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, Linz (Austria))

    1994-07-01

    Two-pair excitations in a homogeneous electron gas are investigated within screened second order perturbation theory. Based on a suggestion by Ichimaru [K. Utsumi and S. Ichimaru, Phys. Rev. B 22 (1980) 5203] an additional method of obtaining the effective interelectron interaction is presented. A closer inspection of the basic equation, rewritten as a self-consistency problem, justifies the use of static screening within this model. Fit formulae for all main results are made available. Finally, an application of these calculations to the problem of proton stopping in aluminium is presented, which is in good agreement with the experiment. ((orig.))

  9. Plasmon damping and proton stopping in jellium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinner, Andreas; Bachlechner, Martina E.; Böhm, Helga M.

    1994-07-01

    Two-pair excitations in a homogeneous electron gas are investigated within screened second order perturbation theory. Based on a suggestion by Ichimaru [K. Utsumi and S. Ichimaru, Phys. Rev. B 22 (1980) 5203] an additional method of obtaining the effective interelectron interaction is presented. A closer inspection of the basic equation, rewritten as a selfconsistency problem, justifies the use of static screening within this model. Fit formulae for all main results are made available. Finally, an application of these calculations to the problem of proton stopping in aluminium is presented, which is in good agreement with the experiment.

  10. Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognese, Jeffrey; Irish, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). A STOP analysis is a multidiscipline analysis, consisting of Structural, Thermal and Optical Performance Analyses, that is performed for all space flight instruments and satellites. This course will explain the different parts of performing this analysis. The student will learn how to effectively interact with each discipline in order to accurately obtain the system analysis results.

  11. Do Stops Slow Down Electroweak Bubble Walls?

    CERN Document Server

    John, P

    2001-01-01

    We compute the wall velocity in the MSSM. We therefore generalize the SMequations of motion for bubble walls moving through a hot plasma at theelectroweak phase transition and calculate the friction terms which describethe viscosity of the plasma. We give the general expressions and apply them toa simple model where stops, tops and W bosons contribute to the friction. In awide range of parameters including those which fulfil the requirements ofbaryogenesis we find a wall velocity of order v = 0.001-0.01 much below the SMvalue.

  12. Frame by frame stop motion non-traditional approaches to stop motion animation

    CERN Document Server

    Gasek, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In a world that is dominated by computer images, alternative stop motion techniques like pixilation, time-lapse photography and down-shooting techniques combined with new technologies offer a new, tangible and exciting approach to animation. With over 25 years professional experience, industry veteran, Tom Gasek presents a comprehensive guide to stop motion animation without the focus on puppetry or model animation. With tips, tricks and hands-on exercises, Frame by Frame will help both experienced and novice filmmakers get the most effective results from this underutilized branch of animation

  13. Optimal Stopping and Policyholder Behaviour in Life Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Kamille Sofie Tågholt

    at the stopping time. First we solve the problem for spectrally negative geometric Lévy process. We derive both static and dynamic solutions which are excess boundary stopping times. Afterwards we solve the problem for a Cramér-Lundberg process with exponential upwards jumps. We derive a statically optimal...... stopping time which is a hitting time of an interval, and we derive a dynamically optimal stopping time which is an excess boundary stopping time. Finally, we derive optimal stopping times to the optimal stopping problem of minimizing the variance conditioned on a lower bound on the mean. In Chapter 4 we...... consider the American put in a Black-Scholes market. We suggest a model for irrational exercises. We model the exercise by a stochastic intensity which depends on the profitability. Our model contains a single parameter which express how strongly the exercise intensity is affected by the profitability...

  14. Optimal Stopping and Policyholder Behaviour in Life Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Kamille Sofie Tågholt

    at the stopping time. First we solve the problem for spectrally negative geometric Lévy process. We derive both static and dynamic solutions which are excess boundary stopping times. Afterwards we solve the problem for a Cramér-Lundberg process with exponential upwards jumps. We derive a statically optimal...... stopping time which is a hitting time of an interval, and we derive a dynamically optimal stopping time which is an excess boundary stopping time. Finally, we derive optimal stopping times to the optimal stopping problem of minimizing the variance conditioned on a lower bound on the mean. In Chapter 4 we....... This parameter we denote the rationality parameter. We give sufficient conditions and a probabilistic proof that when the rationality parameter increases to infinity the corresponding prices converge to to classical arbitrage-free price. We conclude the chapter with partial differential equations for valuation...

  15. Interaction between two stopped light pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi-Hsin, E-mail: yhchen920@gmail.com; Lee, Meng-Jung, E-mail: yhchen920@gmail.com; Hung, Weilun, E-mail: yhchen920@gmail.com; Yu, Ite A., E-mail: yu@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics and Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ying-Cheng [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan and Department of Physics and Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yong-Fan [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-05

    The efficiency of a nonlinear optical process is proportional to the interaction time. We report a scheme of all-optical switching based on two motionless light pulses via the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency. One pulse was stopped as the stationary light pulse (SLP) and the other was stopped as stored light. The time of their interaction via the medium can be prolonged and, hence, the optical nonlinearity is greatly enhanced. Using a large optical density (OD) of 190, we achieved a very long interaction time of 6.9 μs. This can be analogous to the scheme of trapping light pulses by an optical cavity with a Q factor of 8×10{sup 9}. With the approach of using moving light pulses in the best situation, a switch can only be activated at 2 photons per atomic absorption cross section. With the approach of employing a SLP and a stored light pulse, a switch at only 0.56 photons was achieved and the efficiency is significantly improved. Moreover, the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data and show that the efficiency can be further improved by increasing the OD of the medium. Our work advances the technology in quantum information manipulation utilizing photons.

  16. When to stop propranolol for infantile hemangioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lei; Gu, Yifei; Yu, Zhang; Ying, Hanru; Qiu, Yajing; Ma, Gang; Chen, Hui; Jin, Yunbo; Lin, Xiaoxi

    2017-01-01

    There is no definitive conclusion regarding the optimal timing for terminating propranolol treatment for infantile hemangioma (IH). A total of 149 patients who underwent detailed color Doppler ultrasound examination were included in this study. The characteristics and propranolol treatment of all patients were summarized and analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups according to the lesion regression rate. Among the 149 patients, 38 were assigned to the complete regression group, and 111 were assigned to the partial regression group. The age at which propranolol treatment started, duration of follow-up after treatment discontinuation and rate of adverse events were not significantly different between the two groups. The duration of oral propranolol treatment was shorter in the complete regression group. The age at which propranolol was terminated was younger in the complete regression group, and this group had a lower recurrence rate. Propranolol is safe and effective for the treatment of IHs that require intervention, but it should be stopped at an appropriate time, which is determined primarily by the lesion regression rate after propranolol treatment. Ultrasound is helpful in determining when to stop propranolol for IH. PMID:28225076

  17. Intelligent Bus Stops in the Flexible Bus Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Iqbal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to discuss Intelligent Bus Stops in a special Demand Responsive Transit (DRT, the Flexible Bus System. These Intelligent Bus Stops are more efficient and information rich than Traditional Bus Stops. The real time synchronization of the Flexible Bus System makes it unique as compared to Traditional Bus Systems. The Main concern is to make Bus Stops intelligent and information rich. Buses are informed about the no. of passengers waiting at the upcoming Bus Stops. If there are no passengers to ride or get off on upcoming Bus Stop, the Bus can skip that Bus Stop and head towards the next Bus Stop where passenger is waiting, which will decrease the ride time of the passengers on the Bus and also the wait time of the passengers waiting on the upcoming Bus Stops. Providing more information at Bus Stops about the Destination (Time to Destination, Distance to Destination etc. and Buses (Bus Location, Arrival Time of Bus etc. makes it easier for the passengers to decide whether to ride a particular Bus or not.

  18. MeV gold irradiation induced damage in {alpha}-quartz: Competition between nuclear and electronic stopping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toulemonde, M. E-mail: toulemonde@ganil.fr; Ramos, S.M.M.; Bernas, H.; Clerc, C.; Canut, B.; Chaumont, J.; Trautmann, C

    2001-05-01

    Damage creation in crystalline {alpha}-quartz by irradiation is studied using gold ions of energies between 0.5 and 10 MeV. For all ions, the total stopping power (dE/dx){sub tot} has a value of about 4.5 keV/nm, whereas the contribution of the electronic stopping power ranges from 0.93 keV/nm at 0.5 MeV to 3.6 keV/nm at 10 MeV. This variation allows us to test which role the nuclear and the electronic collisions plays for the damage processes. The kinetic of the ion induced damage was determined by channeling RBS and the volume increase by profilometry. Single ion impacts create damage when electronic stopping dominates, while several impacts are necessary to achieve damage in the nuclear stopping regime. A detailed analysis allows us to deduce the damage cross-sections of the two processes. The electronic stopping power of damage creation appears above an electronic dE/dx threshold of 1.4{+-}0.3 keV/nm.

  19. Monte Carlo approach to calculate proton stopping in warm dense matter within particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D.; He, X. T.; Yu, W.; Fritzsche, S.

    2017-02-01

    A Monte Carlo approach to proton stopping in warm dense matter is implemented into an existing particle-in-cell code. This approach is based on multiple electron-electron, electron-ion, and ion-ion binary collision and accounts for both the free and the bound electrons in the plasmas. This approach enables one to calculate the stopping of particles in a more natural manner than existing theoretical treatment. In the low-temperature limit, when "all" electrons are bound to the nucleus, the stopping power coincides with the predictions from the Bethe-Bloch formula and is consistent with the data from the National Institute of Standard and Technology database. At higher temperatures, some of the bound electrons are ionized, and this increases the stopping power in the plasmas, as demonstrated by A. B. Zylstra et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 215002 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.215002. At even higher temperatures, the degree of ionization reaches a maximum and thus decreases the stopping power due to the suppression of collision frequency between projected proton beam and hot plasmas in the target.

  20. Monte-Carlo approach to calculate the proton stopping in warm dense matter within particle-in-cell simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, D; Yu, W; Fritzsche, S

    2016-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo approach to proton stopping in warm dense matter is implemented into an existing particle-in-cell code. The model is based on multiple binary-collisions among electron-electron, electron-ion and ion-ion, taking into account contributions from both free and bound electrons, and allows to calculate particle stopping in much more natural manner. At low temperature limit, when ``all'' electron are bounded at the nucleus, the stopping power converges to the predictions of Bethe-Bloch theory, which shows good consistency with data provided by the NIST. With the rising of temperatures, more and more bound electron are ionized, thus giving rise to an increased stopping power to cold matter, which is consistent with the report of a recently experimental measurement [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 215002 (2015)]. When temperature is further increased, with ionizations reaching the maximum, lowered stopping power is observed, which is due to the suppression of collision frequency between projected proton beam and h...

  1. Scan Quantum Mechanics: Quantum Inertia Stops Superposition

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    A novel interpretation of the quantum mechanical superposition is put forward. Quantum systems scan all possible available states and switch randomly and very rapidly among them. The longer they remain in a given state, the larger the probability of the system to be found in that state during a measurement. A crucial property that we postulate is quantum inertia, that increases whenever a constituent is added, or the system is perturbed with all kinds of interactions. Once the quantum inertia $I_q$ reaches a critical value $I_{cr}$ for an observable, the switching among the different eigenvalues of that observable stops and the corresponding superposition comes to an end. Consequently, increasing the mass, temperature, gravitational force, etc. of a quantum system increases its quantum inertia until the superposition of states disappears for all the observables and the system transmutes into a classical one. The process could be reversible decreasing the size, temperature, gravitational force, etc. leading to...

  2. 20 CFR 662.430 - Under what conditions may One-Stop operators designated to operate in a One-Stop delivery system...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... designated to operate in a One-Stop delivery system established prior to the enactment of WIA be designated... DESCRIPTION OF THE ONE-STOP SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT One-Stop Operators § 662.430 Under what conditions may One-Stop operators designated to operate in a One-Stop delivery system...

  3. Stop Codon Reassignment in the Wild

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Natalia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Schwientek, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Tripp, H. James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Rinke, Christian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Pati, Amrita [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Huntemann, Marcel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Visel, Axel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Woyke, Tanja [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Kyrpides, Nikos [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Rubin, Edward [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Since the discovery of the genetic code and protein translation mechanisms (1), a limited number of variations of the standard assignment between unique base triplets (codons) and their encoded amino acids and translational stop signals have been found in bacteria and phages (2-3). Given the apparent ubiquity of the canonical genetic code, the design of genomically recoded organisms with non-canonical codes has been suggested as a means to prevent horizontal gene transfer between laboratory and environmental organisms (4). It is also predicted that genomically recoded organisms are immune to infection by viruses, under the assumption that phages and their hosts must share a common genetic code (5). This paradigm is supported by the observation of increased resistance of genomically recoded bacteria to phages with a canonical code (4). Despite these assumptions and accompanying lines of evidence, it remains unclear whether differential and non-canonical codon usage represents an absolute barrier to phage infection and genetic exchange between organisms. Our knowledge of the diversity of genetic codes and their use by viruses and their hosts is primarily derived from the analysis of cultivated organisms. Advances in single-cell sequencing and metagenome assembly technologies have enabled the reconstruction of genomes of uncultivated bacterial and archaeal lineages (6). These initial findings suggest that large scale systematic studies of uncultivated microorganisms and viruses may reveal the extent and modes of divergence from the canonical genetic code operating in nature. To explore alternative genetic codes, we carried out a systematic analysis of stop codon reassignments from the canonical TAG amber, TGA opal, and TAA ochre codons in assembled metagenomes from environmental and host-associated samples, single-cell genomes of uncultivated bacteria and archaea, and a collection of phage sequences

  4. Car Delay Model near Bus Stops with Mixed Traffic Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Xiaobao; Huan Mei; Gao Ziyou

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for estimating car delays at bus stops under mixed traffic using probability theory and queuing theory. The roadway is divided to serve motorized and nonmotorized traffic streams. Bus stops are located on the nonmotorized lanes. When buses dwell at the stop, they block the bicycles. Thus, two conflict points between car stream and other traffic stream are identified. The first conflict point occurs as bicycles merge to the motorized lane to avoid waiting behind the...

  5. Stopping Condition for Greedy Block Sparse Signal Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Yu; Xie, Ronggui; Yin, Huarui; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    For greedy block sparse recovery where the sparsity level is unknown, we derive a stopping condition to stop the iteration process. Focused on the block orthogonal matching pursuit (BOMP) algorithm, we model the energy of residual signals at each iteration from a probabilistic perspective. At the iteration when the last supporting block is detected, the resulting energy of residual signals is supposed to suffer an obvious decrease. Based on this, we stop the iteration process when the energy ...

  6. Electronic band structure effects in the stopping of protons in copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quashie, Edwin E.; Saha, Bidhan C.; Correa, Alfredo A.

    2016-10-01

    We present an ab initio study of the electronic stopping power of protons in copper over a wide range of proton velocities v =0.02 -10 a .u . where we take into account nonlinear effects. Time-dependent density functional theory coupled with molecular dynamics is used to study electronic excitations produced by energetic protons. A plane-wave pseudopotential scheme is employed to solve the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations for a moving ion in a periodic crystal. The electronic excitations and the band structure determine the stopping power of the material and alter the interatomic forces for both channeling and off-channeling trajectories. Our off-channeling results are in quantitative agreement with experiments, and at low velocity they unveil a crossover region of superlinear velocity dependence (with a power of ˜1.5 ) in the velocity range v =0.07 -0.3 a .u . , which we associate to the copper crystalline electronic band structure. The results are rationalized by simple band models connecting two separate regimes. We find that the limit of electronic stopping v →0 is not as simple as phenomenological models suggest and it is plagued by band-structure effects.

  7. Stop search in the compressed region via semileptonic decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Gao, Christina; Li, Lingfeng; Neill, Nicolás A.

    2016-05-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the superpartners of the top quark (stops) play the crucial role in addressing the naturalness problem. For direct pair-production of stops with each stop decaying into a top quark plus the lightest neutralino, the standard stop searches have difficulty finding the stop for a compressed spectrum where the mass difference between the stop and the lightest neutralino is close to the top quark mass, because the events look too similar to the large toverline{t} background. With an additional hard ISR jet, the two neutralinos from the stop decays are boosted in the opposite direction and they can give rise to some missing transverse energy. This may be used to distinguish the stop decays from the backgrounds. In this paper we study the semileptonic decay of such signal events for the compressed mass spectrum. Although the neutrino from the W decay also produces some missing transverse energy, its momentum can be reconstructed from the kinematic assumptions and mass-shell conditions. It can then be subtracted from the total missing transverse momentum to obtain the neutralino contribution. Because it suffers from less backgrounds, we show that the semileptonic decay channel has a better discovery reach than the fully hadronic decay channel along the compressed line {m}_{tilde{t}}-{m}_{tilde{χ}}≈ {m}_t . With 300 fb-1, the 13 TeV LHC can discover the stop up to 500 GeV, covering the most natural parameter space region.

  8. Measuring the Stop Mixing Angle at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to determine the stop mixing angle and its CP-violating phase at the LHC. As an observable we use ratios of branching ratios for different decay modes of the light stop ~t_1 to charginos and neutralinos. These observables can have a very strong dependence on the parameters of the stop sector. We discuss in detail the origin of these effects. Using various combinations of the ratios of branching ratios we show that, depending on the scenario, one can achieve accuracies in the range of a few percent for determining the light stop mass, the mixing angle and the CP phase.

  9. Disruptions of Sleep/Wake Patterns in the Stable Tubule Only Polypeptide (STOP) Null Mouse Model of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profitt, Maxine F; Deurveilher, Samuel; Robertson, George S; Rusak, Benjamin; Semba, Kazue

    2016-09-01

    Disruption of sleep/wake cycles is common in patients with schizophrenia and correlates with cognitive and affective abnormalities. Mice deficient in stable tubule only polypeptide (STOP) show cognitive, behavioral, and neurobiological deficits that resemble those seen in patients with schizophrenia, but little is known about their sleep phenotype. We characterized baseline sleep/wake patterns and recovery sleep following sleep deprivation in STOP null mice. Polysomnography was conducted in adult male STOP null and wild-type (WT) mice under a 12:12 hours light:dark cycle before, during, and after 6 hours of sleep deprivation during the light phase. At baseline, STOP null mice spent more time awake and less time in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) over a 24-hour period, with more frequent transitions between wake and NREMS, compared to WT mice, especially during the dark phase. The distributions of wake, NREMS and REMS across the light and the dark phases differed by genotype, and so did features of the electroencephalogram (EEG). Following sleep deprivation, both genotypes showed homeostatic increases in sleep duration, with no significant genotype differences in the initial compensatory increase in sleep intensity (EEG delta power). These results indicate that STOP null mice sleep less overall, and their sleep and wake periods are more fragmented than those of WT mice. These features in STOP null mice are consistent with the sleep patterns observed in patients with schizophrenia.

  10. Driving While Non-White: Exploring Traffic Stops and Post-Stop Activities in North Carolina, 2005-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron D. Lippard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Research has established that Blacks face disproportionate amounts of traffic stops, searches, and arrests by police compared to Whites. However, few studies have ventured past the Black-White dichotomy and considered how Hispanics or other minorities may face the same disparities, especially in places where the Hispanic population has dramatically increased in recent years. Using traffic stop and post-stop data compiled by the North Carolina Department of Justice from 2005 to 2009, this study explored whether Hispanics, Blacks, as well as other racial minorities experienced a higher likelihood of traffic stops, citations, searches, and arrests compared to Whites within sample of city, county, and state law enforcement agencies. We found that generally all racial and ethnic minority groups face higher rates of traffic stops than Whites by almost every law enforcement agency sampled. We also found that rates of post-stop activities including searches, citations, and arrests are higher for all racial and ethnic minority groups examined compared to Whites, especially for Hispanics. Hispanic and non-White disparities in traffic stops also cannot be explained away when controlling for population size, type of law enforcement agency, or the reason stated for the traffic stop (e.g., DWI, speeding, or investigation. More important, however, is that the rate of searches for racial and ethnic minorities did not necessarily match the rates of citations and arrests minorities receive, suggesting that some stops could be racially or ethnically motivated.

  11. Power vacuum tubes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Providing examples of applications, Power Vacuum Tubes Handbook, Third Edition examines the underlying technology of each type of power vacuum tube device in common use today. The author presents basic principles, reports on new development efforts, and discusses implementation and maintenance considerations. Supporting mathematical equations and extensive technical illustrations and schematic diagrams help readers understand the material. Translate Principles into Specific Applications This one-stop reference is a hands-on guide for engineering personnel involved in the design, specification,

  12. Towards the end of the technical stop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    After several weeks of hard work, the short technical stop of the LHC accelerator is coming to an end. Following a very intense campaign to repair and retest many thousand high voltage connectors, the upgraded magnet protection system is being commissioned. During this period, the current in the main dipole and quadrupole magnets is carefully increased up to 6kA, required to collide protons at 7TeV centre-of-mass energy. This has been achieved for most of the sectors.   The parameters of the upgraded magnet protection system are accurately calibrated. This operation is needed in order for the magnet protection system to be triggered only when a real problem occurs. The system is now able to detect a transition from superconducting to normal conducting state of the superconducting cable joints between magnets, a necessary condition to operate the magnet system above 2kA. Highly accurate measurements of the joint resistances have been performed by stepping up the current to 5kA. The magnets and the...

  13. Model Passengers’ Travel Time for Conventional Bus Stop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhao Xin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited number of berths can result in a subsequent bus stopping at the upstream of a bus stop when all berths are occupied. When this traffic phenomenon occurs, passengers waiting on the platform usually prefer walking to the stopped bus, which leads to additional walking time before boarding the bus. Therefore, passengers’ travel time consumed at a bus stop is divided into waiting time, additional walking time, and boarding time. This paper proposed a mathematical model for analyzing passengers’ travel time at conventional bus stop based on theory of stochastic service system. Field-measured and simulated data were designated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model. By analyzing the results, conclusion was conducted that short headway can reduce passengers’ waiting time at bus stop. Meanwhile, the theoretical analysis explained the inefficiency of bus stops with more than three berths from the perspective of passengers’ additional walking time. Additional walking time will increase in a large scale when the number of berths at a bus stop exceedsthe threshold of three.

  14. A stop sign for use in the dark.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, D.J.

    1969-01-01

    The present official stop sign for use at night - a red light or a red light in combination with an illuminated white vat-type sign - are not sufficiently for road users. A new stop sign has accordingly been developed, which in daylight looks the same as the existing one - a white disc with red edge

  15. One-Stop Career Centers. ERIC Digest No. 208.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imel, Susan

    Since the introduction of one-stop employment systems, many states have attempted to merge traditional employment and training services to provide consolidated programs and easier customer access to services. The Workforce Investment Act (WIA), passed in 1998, requires the formation of locally based one-stop service delivery systems to deliver…

  16. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  17. A gas cell for stopping, storing and polarizing radioactive particles

    CERN Document Server

    Sytema, A; Böll, O; Chernowitz, D; Dijck, E A; Grasdijk, J O; Hoekstra, S; Jungmann, K; Mathavan, S C; Meinema, C; Mohanty, A; Müller, S E; Portela, M Nuñez; Onderwater, C J G; Pijpker, C; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

    2016-01-01

    A radioactive beam of 20Na is stopped in a gas cell filled with Ne gas. The stopped particles are polarized by optical pumping. The degree of polarization that can be achieved is studied. A maximum polarization of 50% was found. The dynamic processes in the cell are described with a phenomenological model.

  18. Stop Search in the Compressed Region via Semileptonic Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Li, Lingfeng; Neill, Nicolas A

    2016-01-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the superpartners of the top quark (stops) play the crucial role in addressing the naturalness problem. For direct pair-production of stops with each stop decaying into a top quark plus the lightest neutralino, the standard stop searches have difficulty finding the stop for a compressed spectrum where the mass difference between the stop and the lightest neutralino is close to the top quark mass, because the events look too similar to the large $t\\bar{t}$ background. With an additional hard ISR jet, the two neutralinos from the stop decays are boosted in the opposite direction and they can give rise to some missing transverse energy. This may be used to distinguish the stop decays from the backgrounds. In this paper we study the semileptonic decay of such signal events for the compressed mass spectrum. Although the neutrino from the $W$ decay also produces some missing transverse energy, its momentum can be reconstructed from the kinematic assumptions and ma...

  19. Quality of ‘glottal’ stops in tracheoesophageal speakers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, M.A.; van As-Brooks, C.J.; Hilgers, F.J.M.; Roozen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Glottal stops are conveyed by an abrupt constriction at the level of the glottis. Tracheoesophageal (TE) speakers are known to have poor control over the new voice source (neoglottis), and this might influence the production of 'glottal' stops. This study investigated how TE speakers realized

  20. Nuclear Stopping:. Paving the way from Rhic to Lhc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing

    Nuclear stopping has been measured at a range of different energies in heavy ion experiments. In this contribution proton data from the BRAHMS experiment at RHIC running at √ {SNN} = 62.4\\ GeV are presented. Furthermore data from AGS, SPS and RHIC are used to estimate the stopping, energy loss and multiplicity at LHC.

  1. Stopping Drug Abuse. ERIC Digest Series Number EA32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Amy

    This digest discusses the issue of stopping drug abuse as a national priority. Several aspects of the drug abuse issue are covered in question-and-answer format: (1) Why should educators be concerned about drug abuse by students? (2) What are school districts doing to stop drug abuse? (3) What social issues are involved? (4) How can schools plan…

  2. [Loosening of a Calcaneo-Stop Screw after Trampolining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieb, K; Fingernagel, T; Petershofer, A; Hofstaetter, S G

    2015-06-01

    Flexible flatfoot is a common malalignment in the paediatric population. Arthroereisis with a calcaneo-stop screw is an effective surgical procedure for treating juvenile flexible flatfoot after conservative measures have been fully exploited. In the present report, we describe the case of a loosening of a calcaneo-stop screw in a 12-year-old youth after excessive trampolining.

  3. A gas cell for stopping, storing and polarizing radioactive particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sytema, Auke; van den Berg, Joost; Böll, Oliver; Chernowitz, Daniel; Dijck, Elwin; Grasdijk, Jan; Hoekstra, Steven; Jungmann, Klaus-Peter; Chirayath Mathavan, Sreekanth; Meinema, Jacoba Roelien; Mueller, Stefan E.; Portela, M. N.; Onderwater, Cornelis; Pijpker, Coen; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, H. W.

    2016-01-01

    A radioactive beam of Na-20 is stopped in a gas cell filled with Ne gas. The stopped particles are polarized by optical pumping. The degree of polarization that can be achieved is studied. A maximum polarization of 50% was found. The dynamic processes in the cell are described with a phenomenologica

  4. Stop Consonant Productions of Korean-English Bilingual Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sue Ann S.; Iverson, Gregory K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an acoustic examination of the obstruent stops produced by Korean-English bilingual children in connection with the question of whether bilinguals establish distinct categories of speech sounds across languages. Stop productions were obtained from ninety children in two age ranges, five and ten years:…

  5. 46 CFR 58.01-25 - Means of stopping machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Means of stopping machinery. 58.01-25 Section 58.01-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-25 Means of stopping machinery. Machinery...

  6. New stopping rules for dendrogram classification in TWINSPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Esmailzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to propose a modification of TWINSPAN algorithm with introducing new stopping rules for TWINSPAN. Modified TWINSPAN combines the analysis of heterogeneity of the clusters prior to each division to prevent the imposed divisions of homogeneous clusters and it also solved the limitation of classical TWINSPAN in which the number of clusters increases power of two. For this purpose, ecological groups of Box tree stands in Farim forests were classified with using classical and modified TWINSPAN basis of plant species cover percentage of 60 plots with 400 m2 surface area which were made by releve method (by consideration of indicator stand concept. In this relation, five different heterogeneity measures including Whittaker’s beta diversity and total inertia, Sorensen, Jaccard and Orlo´ci dissimilarity indices which representing diversity and distance indices respectively were involved. Sample plots were also classified from basis of topographical properties using cluster analysis with emphasizing Euclidean distance coefficient and Wards clustering method. Results showed that using of two sets of heterogeneity indices lead to different classification dendrograms. In this relation, results of Whittaker’s beta with total inertia as diversity indices were similar and the other three dissimilarity indices have shown similar behavior. Finally, our results reiterated that modified TWINSPAN did not alter the logic of the TWINSPAN classification, but it increased the flexibility of TWINSPAN dendrogram with changing the hierarchy of divisions in the final classification of ecological groups of Box tree stands in Farim forests.

  7. A New Stopping Judgment Algorithm%一种新的停止判决算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖瀛; 李建平

    2012-01-01

    提出一种可应用于BICM-ID系统的新的停止判决算法,即新LLR停止准则,并将该准则应用于不同的调制、映射及译码方案中,进行大量的Matlab仿真,并对仿真结果进行分析研究。仿真结果发现,应用了新LLR停止准则的各种调制、映射及译码方案的误比特率性能同应用固定迭代次数的fixed方案相比几乎没有性能损失,但是却大大地减少了译码迭代次数,这就减小了BICM-ID系统接收端的译码复杂度,节省了译码时间,降低了译码功耗。%This paper proposes a new stopping judgment algorithm for BICM -ID system, which is named the new LLR stopping criterion. Then, it makes a research with substantial Matlab simulations on different modulations, mappings and decoding algorithms that using the new devised LLR stopping criterion. We can find from the simulation results that there is approximately no BER ( bit - error - rate) perform- ance degradation using LLR stopping criterion compared with the scheme that using fixed iteration num- bers. However, the application of new LLR stopping criterion has greatly reduced the iteration numbers, which leads to the decreased decoding complexity and decreased time delay, and at the same time re- duces the power consumption of the receiver.

  8. Quantum inertia stops superposition: Scan Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz

    2017-08-01

    Scan Quantum Mechanics is a novel interpretation of some aspects of quantum mechanics in which the superposition of states is only an approximate effective concept. Quantum systems scan all possible states in the superposition and switch randomly and very rapidly among them. A crucial property that we postulate is quantum inertia, that increases whenever a constituent is added, or the system is perturbed with all kinds of interactions. Once the quantum inertia Iq reaches a critical value Icr for an observable, the switching among its different eigenvalues stops and the corresponding superposition comes to an end, leaving behind a system with a well defined value of that observable. Consequently, increasing the mass, temperature, gravitational strength, etc. of a quantum system increases its quantum inertia until the superposition of states disappears for all the observables and the system transmutes into a classical one. Moreover, the process could be reversible. Entanglement can only occur between quantum systems because an exact synchronization between the switchings of the systems involved must be established in the first place and classical systems do not have any switchings to start with. Future experiments might determine the critical inertia Icr corresponding to different observables, which translates into a critical mass Mcr for fixed environmental conditions as well as critical temperatures, critical electric and magnetic fields, etc. In addition, this proposal implies a new radiation mechanism from astrophysical objects with strong gravitational fields, giving rise to non-thermal synchrotron emission, that could contribute to neutron star formation. Superconductivity, superfluidity, Bose-Einstein condensates, and any other physical phenomena at very low temperatures must be reanalyzed in the light of this interpretation, as well as mesoscopic systems in general.

  9. The influence of start/stop operation on the water/steam cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soons, Jan; Vos, Frank de; Deelen-Bremer, Marga van [DNV KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2013-04-01

    More and more power plants operate as start/stop units. Some units are even started-up almost every day. These frequent start-ups will influence the water/steam chemistry and therefore the integrity of the systems. During start-up, for most plants not the water chemistry but the temperature will be the guiding parameter. As a consequence, water quality is lacking when systems are started-up and it has to be assured that this period when the water quality is off specification is as short as possible in order to prevent negative effects on the system. It was found that in practice no direct evidence was discovered that start/stop operation has a direct negative effect on the systems. However, the possible effects on the water/steam cycle have not been investigated yet. (orig.)

  10. Free choice task effects in cross-linguistic stop perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetov, Alexei

    2005-04-01

    This paper examines the identification of stop place and secondary articulation using a free choice task. Russian syllable-initial and syllable-final stops /p pj t tj/ in nonsense utterances were presented to Russian and Japanese listeners (N=30). Correct identification rates for place and secondary articulation of the target consonants were determined based on written responses (in Cyrillic or Katakana). Both groups of listeners showed better identification of syllable-initial stops compared to syllable-final stops. Among the consonants, /p/ was identified better, and /pj/ was identified worse than the other stops. Native listeners performed better than non-native listeners. The overall correct identification rates were lower than (yet strongly correlated with) the rates previously obtained with the same stimuli using a forced choice phoneme identification task. The lower identification rates in the current study can be explained in part by the errors involving the segmentation and syllabification of palatalized stops. Thus, the palatal articulation of the syllable-final palatalized /pj/ was often interpreted as independent of the stop (e.g., /tapj api/ rendered as /taj papi/ or /tjap api/). It is concluded that the free choice task can successfully complement the forced choice task, providing additional information about the perception of secondary palatalization. [Supported by SSHRC.

  11. Spot the stop with a b-tag

    CERN Document Server

    Ferretti, Gabriele; Petersson, Christoffer; Torre, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The LHC searches for light compressed stop squarks have resulted in considerable bounds in the case where the stop decays to a neutralino and a charm quark. However, in the case where the stop decays to a neutralino, a bottom quark and two fermions via an off-shell W-boson, there is currently a significant unconstrained region in the stop-neutralino mass plane, still allowing for stop masses in the range 90-140 GeV. In this paper we propose a new monojet-like search for light stops, optimized for the four-body decay mode, in which at least one b-tagged jet is required. We show that, already by using the existing 8 TeV LHC data set, such a search would cover the entire unconstrained region. Moreover, in the process of validating our tools against an ATLAS monojet search, we show that the existing limit can be extended to exclude also stop masses below 100 GeV.

  12. An end to one-stop shopping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, R.; Mohsberg, J.

    1992-10-01

    This article examines how a reduction in the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's authority to license hydroelectric power plants will affect the industry's competitiveness. The topics of the article include licensing today, the Miller amendments to Congress' comprehensive energy policy legislation, and restricting access to energy resources through legislation.

  13. A Phonemic and Acoustic Analysis of Hindko Oral Stops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon Ur RASHID

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hindko is an Indo-Aryan language that is mainly spoken in Khyber Pukhtoonkhaw province of Pakistan. This work aims to identify the oral stops of Hindko and determine the intrinsic acoustic cues for them. The phonemic analysis is done with the help of minimal pairs and phoneme distribution in contrastive environments which reveals that Hindko has twelve oral stops with three way series. The acoustic analysis of these segments shows that intrinsically voice onset time (VOT, closure duration and burst are reliable and distinguishing cues of stops in Hindko.

  14. Design of intelligent bus stop based on GPRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张思远

    2013-01-01

    To provide people waiting on the bus stop the information about the number of passengers on the bus traffic and distance between the site and the running bus. Design a set of intelligent bus stop system. This system counts up the number of the people gets on the bus and the people getting out of the bus to add up the people on the bus by infrared sensor and uses the hall sensor to measure the distance of having driven. Then, send data via GPRS. Finally display on the corresponding bus stop.

  15. Light Stop MSSM versus R-parity violation

    CERN Document Server

    Porod, Werner; Valle, José W F

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the phenomenology of the lightest stops in models where R-parity is broken by bilinear terms. In this class of models we consider scenarios where the R-parity breaking two-body decay stop_1 -> tau + b competes with the leading three-body decays stop_1 -> W^+ + b + neutralino_1, H^+ + b + neutralino_1, b slepton^+_i neutrino_l, b sneutrino_l l^+ (l=e, mu, tau). We demonstrate that the R-parity violating decay can be the dominant one. In particular we focus on the implications for a future electron posistion Linear Collider.

  16. C-stop production by micro injection moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    Hearing loss affects human life emotionally, physically, mentally and spiritually. A hearing aid can dramatically improve personal and professional life of man affected by hearing loss and the newly designed product C-Stop can dramatically improve the life a hearing aid. C-Stop is a master piece...... of engineering micro product which integrate many features like beam snapfit, annular snapfit, hinge connection, filter grid, house, lid etc in a single product. All the features are in micro dimensional scale and manufactured by single step of injection moulding. This presentation will cover industrial...... production of C-Stop from design, tooling and moulding view point....

  17. Pedestrian Crosswalk Law: A study of traffic and trajectory factors that affect non-compliance and stopping distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figliozzi, Miguel A; Tipagornwong, Chawalit

    2016-11-01

    Walking is encouraged by many transportation agencies as a sustainable mode that contributes to livable downtowns. Since pedestrians are the most vulnerable road users, safe and comfortable crosswalks are essential to ensure that pedestrian travel becomes an appealing alternative. In this context, the goal of this research is to study the traffic and vehicle trajectory factors that affect crosswalk law compliance and stopping distance from the crosswalk. The results of this research provide new insights into the relationships between traffic conditions, vehicle trajectory, and compliance rates. Results indicate that vehicle origin, vehicle type, stopping at upstream traffic lights, and changes in vehicle speed and headways are key factors to predict pedestrian crosswalk law compliance and stopping behavior; changes in vehicle speed and headways have the highest explanatory power.

  18. 49 CFR 236.516 - Power supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power supply. 236.516 Section 236.516..., Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.516 Power supply. Automatic cab signal, train stop, or train control device hereafter installed shall operate from a separate or isolated power...

  19. Most Women Stop Drinking After Positive Pregnancy Test, Study Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164006.html Most Women Stop Drinking After Positive Pregnancy Test, Study Finds Researchers 'pleasantly surprised' by fact that most quickly made the healthy choice To use the ...

  20. Vaccines Stop Illness | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Diseases and Vaccinations Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of ... like polio and meningitis will affect their children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  1. FORWARD-BACKWARD STOCHASTIC DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH STOPPING TIME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴臻

    2004-01-01

    The existence and uniqueness results of fully coupled forward-backward stochastic differential equations with stopping time (unbounded) is obtained. One kind of comparison theorem for this kind of equations is also proved.

  2. 48 CFR 42.1303 - Stop-work orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Suspension of Work, Stop-Work Orders, and Government Delay of... advisable to suspend work pending a decision by the Government and a supplemental agreement providing for...

  3. developing a one stop shop model for integrated land information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEPT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology. Kumasi, Ghana ... stop shop concept of managing the activities of land agencies in the ... one place. This is a business model that has .... sions stated above into digital format based on.

  4. Observations of NC stop nets for bottlenose dolphin takes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To observe the NC stop net fishery to document the entanglement of bottlenose dolphins and movement of dolphins around the nets.

  5. Optimal Locations of Bus Stops Connecting Subways near Urban Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsuitable locations of bus stops which provide feeder transportation connecting subways near urban intersections usually lead to the low efficiency of public transport and level of passenger service. A multiobjective optimization model to distribute such stop locations is proposed to attain the shortest total walk distance of passengers and minimum delay time of cars through intersections and travel time of buses. The Pareto frontier and optimal solutions for the proposed model are given by the distance-based and enumerative methods. The Xizhimen bus stop is selected to implement case studies for verifying the validity of the proposed model. The analysis of sensitivity on possible solutions is also carried out in the case studies. The results show that the proposed model is capable of optimizing the locations of bus stops connecting subways near intersections and helpful to improve the level of passengers service and operational efficiency of public transportation.

  6. Stop on Top: SUSY Parameter Regions, Fine-Tuning Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Demir, Durmus Ali

    2014-01-01

    We analyze common supersymmetric models in order to determine in what parameter regions with what amount of fine-tuning they are capable of accomodating the LHC-allowed top-stop degeneracy window. The stops must be light enough to enable Higgs naturalness yet heavy enough to induce a 125 GeV Higgs boson mass. These two constraints require the two stops to have a large mass splitting. We find that, compared to the usual neutralino-LSP CMSSM, the NUHM and gravitino-LSP CMSSM models possess relatively wide regions in which the light stop weighs close to the top quark. The fine-tuning involved lies in 10^3-10^4 range.

  7. Body Cooling Little Help to Kids When Heart Stops: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163215.html Body Cooling Little Help to Kids When Heart Stops: Study ... 2017 TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Body cooling offers no advantage over normal temperature control in ...

  8. Towards measuring the stop mixing angle at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Tattersall, Jamie; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [Durham University, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    We address the question of how to determine the stop mixing angle and its CP-violating phase at the LHC. As an observable we discuss ratios of branching ratios for different decay modes of the light stop t{sub 1} to charginos and neutralinos. These observables can have a very strong dependence on the parameters of the stop sector. We discuss in detail the origin of these effects. Using various combinations of the ratios of branching ratios we argue that, depending on the scenario, the observable may be promising in exposing the light stop mass, the mixing angle and the CP phase. This will, however, require a good knowledge of the supersymmetric spectrum, which is likely to be achievable only in combination with results from a linear collider. (orig.)

  9. An Analysis of Stopping Criteria in Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS THESIS Bruce Kostal Captain, USAF AFIT/GST/ENS/94M 07 D I ELECTE APR...ANALYSIS OF STOPPING CRITERIA IN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS THESIS Bruce Kostal Captain, USAF AFIT/GST/ENS/94M-07 ETIC ELECTE 94-12275 APR2 1994 U Approved...for public release; distributi6 unlimited D94󈧮i •6 AFIT/GST/ENS/94M-07 AN ANALYSIS OF STOPPING CRITERIA IN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

  10. LHC Availability 2017: Restart to Technical Stop 1

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Restart to Technical Stop 1 (TS1) in 2017. This period consisted of recommissioning the LHC following the Extended year End Technical Stop (EYETS 2016-17), and proton physics with a bunch spacing of 25ns. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  11. Landscape Review on Stop and Search in Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Kath

    2016-01-01

    This report presents a landscape review of key findings and themes in the existing academic literature on stop and search, and relates these to the direction of police policy and practice in Scotland. The report was commissioned by the Scottish Police Authority, via the Scottish Institute for Policing Research, and produced with the support of Police Scotland's stop and search Research and Evaluation Operational Review Group (RE-ORG) and partners

  12. Mechanical stop mechanism for overcoming MEMS fabrication tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Hussein; Bourbon, Gilles; Le Moal, Patrice; Haddab, Yassine; Lutz, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    A mechanical stop mechanism is developed in order to compensate MEMS fabrication tolerances in discrete positioning. The mechanical stop mechanism is designed to be implemented on SOI wafers using a common DRIE etching process. The various fabrication tolerances obtained due to the etching process are presented and discussed in the paper. The principle and design of the mechanism are then presented. Finally, experiments on microfabricated positioning prototypes show accurate steps unaffected by the fabrication tolerances.

  13. Assessing Stop-Loss Policy Options through Personnel Flow Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    precipitated the adoption of stop-loss and that can aff ect decisions regarding its replacement. Performance of Base-Case Systems with Stop-Loss 21...SANTA MONICA, CA 90407-2138 OFFICES SANTA MONICA, CA WASHINGTON, DC PITTSBURGH, PA NEW ORLEANS, LA/JACKSON, MS BOSTON, MA DOHA, QA ABU DHABI, AE CAMBRIDGE, UK BRUSSELS, BE REPRESENTATIVE OFFICE MEXICO CITY, MX www.rand.org

  14. Light Stops and Fine-Tuning in MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Cici, Ali; Un, Cem Salih

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the fine-tuning issue within the MSSM framework. Following the idea that the fine-tuning can measure effects of some missing mechanisms we impose non-universal gaugino masses at the GUT scale, and explore the low scale implications. We consider the stop mass with a special importance and consider the mass scales which are excluded by the LHC experiments. We find that the stop mass can be as light as 200 GeV, while the mass scales below this scale are excluded by the experimental constraints imposed in our analyses. After discussing the fine-tuning and its implications, we consider detection of stop quarks at LHC over some benchmark points which yield stop masses in a range 200-700 GeV. Even though the LHC constraints are severe and they exclude this mass scales for the stop quark, we show that the stops can still escape from detection, when the model is restricted from the GUT scale.

  15. Leptonic mono-top from single stop production at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Guang Hua; Wu, Lei; Yang, Jin Min; Zhang, Mengchao

    2016-01-01

    Top squark (stop) can be produced via QCD interaction but also the electroweak interaction at the LHC. In this paper, we investigate the observability of the associated production of stop and chargino, $pp \\to \\tilde{t}_1\\tilde{\\chi}^-_1$, in compressed electroweakino scenario at the 14 TeV LHC. Due to the small mass-splitting between the lightest neutralino ($\\tilde{\\chi}^0_1$) and chargino ($\\tilde{\\chi}^-_1$), such a single stop production can give a mono-top signature through the stop decay $\\tilde{t}_1 \\to t \\tilde{\\chi}^0_1$. Focusing on the leptonic mono-top channel, we propose a lab-frame observable $\\cos\\theta_{b\\ell}$ to reduce the SM backgrounds in virtue of a boosted top quark from the stop decay. We find that the single stop production can be probed at $2\\sigma$ level at the HL-LHC for $m_{\\tilde{t}_1}<760$ GeV and $m_{\\tilde{\\chi}^0_1}<150$ GeV.

  16. Enhanced Stopping of Macro-Particles in Particle-in-Cell Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    May, Josh; Mori, Warren B; Fiúza, Frederico; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luís O; Ren, Chuang

    2014-01-01

    We derive an equation for energy transfer from relativistic charged particles to a cold background plasma appropriate for finite-size particles that are used in particle-in-cell simulation codes. Expressions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional particles are presented, with special attention given to the two-dimensional case. This energy transfer is due to the electric field of the wake set up in the background plasma by the relativistic particle. The enhanced stopping is dependent on the $q^2/m$, where $q$ is the charge and $m$ is the mass of the relativistic particle, and therefore simulation macro-particles with large charge but identical $q/m$ will stop more rapidly. The stopping power also depends on the effective particle shape of the macro-particle. These conclusions are verified in particle-in-cell simulations. We present 2D simulations of test particles, relaxation of high-energy tails, and integrated fast ignition simulations showing that the enhanced drag on macro-particles may adversely affect th...

  17. Dynamic Analysis and Control of an Automatic Transmission for Start-Stop Function and Efficiency Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An electric oil pump (EOP was integrated into the hydraulic system and an automatic transmission (AT mechanical oil pump (MOP was downsized. These processes were performed to combine a start-stop function with the AT and further improve the transmission efficiency. Furthermore, this study established a dynamics model of power loss and leakage of an 8-speed AT; a flow-based control algorithm of the EOP was then developed to realize the start-stop function and support the MOP to meet the flow requirement of the system. Based on a driving simulation method, sizes of the MOP and EOP that ensured optimal fuel economy were selected. A control strategy for the starting clutch was also developed to minimize the starting delay of the test vehicle. A test environment on a rig and prototype vehicle was established to verify the feasibility of the proposed control strategies. The test results indicated that the transmission functioned favorably with the novel two-pump system presented, and a quick and smooth starting performance was achieved when the engine was restarted. The findings in this study are extremely valuable for forward designs of an AT for realizing start-stop function and improving efficiency.

  18. Exploring the nearly degenerate stop region with sbottom decays

    CERN Document Server

    An, Haipeng; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2016-01-01

    A light stop with mass almost degenerate with the lightest neutralino has important connections with both naturalness and dark matter relic abundance. This region is also very hard to probe at colliders. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of searching for such stop particles at the LHC from sbottom decays, focusing on two channels with final states $2\\ell+E^{\\rm miss}_{\\rm T}$ and $1b1\\ell+E^{\\rm miss}_{\\rm T}$. We found that, if the lightest sbottom has mass around or below 1 TeV and has a significant branching ratio to decay to stop and $W$ ($\\tilde{b} \\to \\tilde{t}\\,W$), a stop almost degenerate with neutralino can be excluded up to about 500-600 GeV at the 13 TeV LHC with $300\\,{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ data. The searches we propose are complementary to other SUSY searches at the LHC and could have the best sensitivity to the stop-bino coannihilation region. Since they involve final states which have already been used in LHC searches, a reinterpretation of the search results already has sensitivity. Further...

  19. Perception of the English intrusive stops by Korean listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeong-Im

    2002-05-01

    This paper reports results of an experiment examining Korean listeners' perception of English intrusive stops in nasal-obstruent clusters. The experiment tests (1) how often intrusive stops are perceived; (2) how language-specific syllable structure constraints influence the perception, given the fact that Korean does not allow consonant clusters in syllable onsets and codas; (3) whether even the perception of phonetic variables like intrusive stops, not phonemes, could be improved by learning. Ninety English non-words with a monosyllable structure of CVC1C2 were created, where C1=/m,n,N/, and C2=/p,k,s/. The stimuli including additional 90 filler items were recorded by three native English speakers and one representative data among them was given to three groups of native Korean listeners in terms of their English proficiency. Each was asked to monitor the target sounds [Warner and Weber, J. Phonetics 29, 23-52 (2001)]. The preliminary results show that identification of intrusive stops in English is totally dependent on Korean syllable structure, so even stimuli with strong acoustic cues were misparsed. Nonetheless, there's a high correlation between perception of intrusive stops and listeners' English proficiency, showing the possibility of the improvement of perception by learning.

  20. Car Delay Model near Bus Stops with Mixed Traffic Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiaobao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a model for estimating car delays at bus stops under mixed traffic using probability theory and queuing theory. The roadway is divided to serve motorized and nonmotorized traffic streams. Bus stops are located on the nonmotorized lanes. When buses dwell at the stop, they block the bicycles. Thus, two conflict points between car stream and other traffic stream are identified. The first conflict point occurs as bicycles merge to the motorized lane to avoid waiting behind the stopping buses. The second occurs as buses merge back to the motorized lane. The average car delay is estimated as the sum of the average delay at these two conflict points and the delay resulting from following the slower bicycles that merged into the motorized lane. Data are collected to calibrate and validate the developed model from one site in Beijing. The sensitivity of car delay to various operation conditions is examined. The results show that both bus stream and bicycle stream have significant effects on car delay. At bus volumes above 200 vehicles per hour, the curbside stop design is not appropriate because of the long car delays. It can be replaced by the bus bay design.

  1. STOP2 Activates Transcription of Several Genesfor AI- and Low pH-Tolerance that Are Regulatedby STOP1 in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    The zinc-finger protein STOP1 (sensitive to proton rhizotoxicity 1) regulates transcription of multiple genescritical for tolerance to aluminum (AI) and low pH in Arabidopsis. We evaluated the contributions of genes that are sup-pressed in the stop1 mutant to AI- and low pH-tolerance using T-DNA-inserted disruptants, and transgenic stop1 mutantsexpressing each of the suppressed genes. STOP2, a STOP1 homolog, partially recovered AI- and low pH-tolerance byrecovering the expression of genes regulated by STOP1. Growth and root tip viability under proton stress were partiallyrescued in the STOP2-complemented line. STOP2 localized in the nucleus and regulated transcription of two genes (PGIP1and PGIP2) associated with cell wall stabilization at low pH. GUS assays revealed that STOP1 and STOP2 showed similarcellular expression in the root. However, the expression level of STOP2 was much lower than that of STOP1. In a STOP1promoter::STOP2-complemented line, AI tolerance was slightly recovered, concomitant with the recovery of expressionof ALS3 (aluminum sensitive 3) and AtMATE (Arabidopsis thaliana multidrug and toxic compound extrusion), while theexpression of AtALMT1 (aluminum-activated malate transporter 1) was not recovered. These analyses indicated thatSTOP2 is a physiologically minor isoform of STOP1, but it can activate expression of some genes regulated by STOP1.

  2. Electronic stopping for protons and α particles from first-principles electron dynamics: The case of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Dillon C.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2016-09-01

    We present the first-principles determination of electronic stopping power for protons and α particles in a semiconductor material of great technological interest: silicon carbide. The calculations are based on nonequilibrium simulations of the electronic response to swift ions using real-time, time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). We compare the results from this first-principles approach to those of the widely used linear response formalism and determine the ion velocity regime within which linear response treatments are appropriate. We also use the nonequilibrium electron densities in our simulations to quantitatively address the longstanding question of the velocity-dependent effective charge state of projectile ions in a material, due to its importance in linear response theory. We further examine the validity of the recently proposed centroid path approximation for reducing the computational cost of acquiring stopping power curves from RT-TDDFT simulations.

  3. Stop of magnetic flux movement in levitating superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolyak, B.M., E-mail: b-smolyak@yandex.ru; Zakharov, M.S., E-mail: maksim.s.zakharov@gmail.com

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A direct experimental study of magnetic flux creep in the levitating superconductor. • When a levitating object is in a fixed position, magnetic flux movement is observed. • Levitation stops flux creep process. - Abstract: A phenomenon of magnetic relaxation stopping in a levitating superconductor was studied. It was experimentally shown that magnetic flux creep (diffusion of flux lines to regions with lower vortex density) is absent in magnetic suspension of the superconductor. Magnetic relaxation arises, when a rigid constraint that fixes a position of the superconductor relative to a magnet is imposed on a levitating object. It is assumed that oscillations of magnetic structure, which is due to free oscillations of the levitating superconductor, stop magnetic relaxation.

  4. Measurement of stopping beam distributions in the PIBETA detector

    CERN Document Server

    Frlez, E; Li, W; Pocanic, D

    2006-01-01

    Precise calculation of the geometrical acceptance of a large solid angle detector with an integrated stopping target relies on precise knowledge of the beam geometry. We describe four alternative methods that we used to measure the beam stopping distributions in the PIBETA detector active target: (i) light response of segmented target elements to incident beam particles, (ii) back-tracking of charged particles from pi+ and mu+ decays using multi-wire proportional chambers, (iii) volume distribution of the Dalitz decay (pi0->gamma e+e-) event vertices, and (iv) the opening angle distribution of two pi0 photons originating from the beta decay of pi+ at rest. We demonstrate consistent results obtained by these four independent approaches and show how particular beam stopping distributions affect the detector's geometrical acceptance.

  5. Architecture Research of Non-Stop Computer System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXinsong; QIUYuanjie; YANGFeng; YANGongjun; GUPan; GAOKe

    2004-01-01

    Distributed & parallel server system with distributed & parallel I/O interface has solved the bottleneck between server system and client system, and also has solved the rebuilding problem after system fault. However, the system still has some shortcomings: the switch is the system bottleneck and the system is not adapted to WAN (Wide area network). Therefore, we put forward a new system architecture to overcome these shortcomings and develop the non-stop computer system. The basis of a non-stop system is rebuilt after system fault. The inner architecture of non-stop system must be redundant and the redundancy is the system fault-tolerance redundancy based on distributed mechanism and not backupredundancy. Analysis and test results declare that the system rebuild time after fault is in second scale and its rebuild capability is so strong that the system can be nonstop in the system's lifetime.

  6. Micellar kinetics of a fluorosurfactant through stopped-flow NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István; Stilbs, Peter

    2006-02-28

    19F NMR chemical shifts and transverse relaxation times T2 were measured as a function of time after quick stopped-flow dilution of aqueous solutions of sodium perfluorooctanoate (NaPFO) with water. Different initial concentrations of micellar solution and different proportions of mixing were tested. Previous stopped-flow studies by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (TR-SAXS) detection indicated a slow (approximately 10 s) micellar relaxation kinetics in NaPFO solutions. In contrast, no evidence of any comparable slow (>100 ms) relaxation process was found in our NMR studies. Possible artifacts of stopped-flow experiments are discussed as well as differences between NMR and SAXS detection methods. Upper bounds on the relative weight of a slow relaxation process are given within existing kinetic theories of micellar dissolution.

  7. One-loop corrections to neutralino-stop coannihilation revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harz, J.; Herrmann, B.; Klasen, M.; Kovařík, K.

    2015-02-01

    We discuss the O (αs) supersymmetric QCD corrections to neutralino-stop coannihilation into a top quark and a gluon in the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). This particular channel can be numerically important in wide ranges of the MSSM parameter space with rather light stops. We discuss technical details such as the renormalization scheme and the phase-space slicing method with two cutoffs. We also comment on improvements with respect to earlier works on the given process. Further, we study for the first time the phenomenologically very interesting interplay of neutralino-stop coannihilation with neutralino-pair annihilation into quark pairs taking the full next-to-leading order SUSY-QCD corrections into account. We demonstrate that the numerical impact of these corrections on the total (co)annihilation cross section and finally on the theoretically predicted neutralino relic density is significant.

  8. One-loop corrections to neutralino-stop coannihilation revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Harz, J; Klasen, M; Kovarik, K

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha_s)$ supersymmetric QCD corrections to neutralino-stop coannihilation into a top quark and a gluon in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). This particular channel can be numerically important in wide ranges of the MSSM parameter space with rather light stops. We discuss technical details such as the renormalization scheme and the phase-space slicing method with two cutoffs. We also comment on improvements with respect to earlier works on the given process. Further, we study for the first time the phenomenologically very interesting interplay of neutralino-stop coannihilation with neutralino-pair annihilation into quark pairs taking the full next-to-leading order SUSY-QCD corrections into account. We demonstrate that the numerical impact of these corrections on the total (co)annihilation cross section and finally on the theoretically predicted neutralino relic density is significant.

  9. Companion classroom activities for "stop faking it!" force and motion

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2011-01-01

    Never has it been so easy for educators to learn to teach physical science with confidence. Award-winning author Bill Robertson launched his bestselling Stop Faking It! series in 2002 with Force and Motion--offering elementary and middle school teachers a jargon-free way to learn the background for teaching physical science with confidence. Combining easy-to-understand if irreverent explanations and quirky diagrams, Stop Faking It! Force and Motion helped thousands of teachers, parents, and homeschoolers conquer topics from Newton s laws to the physics of space travel. Now Companion Classroom Activities for Stop Faking It! Force and Motion proves an ideal supplement to the original book or a valuable resource of its own. The hands-on activities and highly readable explanations allow students to first investigate concepts, then discuss learned concepts, and finally apply the concepts to everyday situations. Robertson's wit and humor are sure to keep students and teachers entertained while they tackle topics ...

  10. Realization of an Automated Vertical Warp Stop Motion Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Cloppenburg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The tension in the warp yarns is a critical variable in the weaving process. If the warp tension is too high or too low the weaving process will be interrupted. A parameter that directly affects the warp tension is the vertical warp stop motion position. The position of the warp stop motion must be set for every produced new article. The setting procedure is performed completely manual. In this paper we present a mechatronic modification of an air jet-weaving machine to adjust the vertical warp stop motion position with the help of actuators. The parameters for the automated movement are determined and an open loop control, which uses a PLC, is proposed.

  11. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  12. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  13. Is the stop mass below the top mass?

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Wim; Kazakov, D I

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that a top mass of 174+/-17 GeV, as quoted recently by the CDF Collaboration, constrains the mixing angle between the Higgs doublets in the Minimal Supersymmmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) to: 1.2stop sector and the lightest stop is likely to be below the top mass. In this case the stop production in pp_bar collisions would contribute to the top signature, thus providing a possible explanation for the large effective tt_bar cross section observed by CDF.

  14. Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream? (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream? Print A A A Can I stop myself from having a wet dream? – Tom* You really can't stop wet dreams, ...

  15. Number-conserving linear response study of low-velocity ion stopping in a collisional magnetized classical plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nersisyan Hrachya B.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The low-velocity stopping power of ions in a magnetized collisional plasma is studied through the linear response theory. The collisions are taken into account through a number-conserving relaxation time approximation. One of the major objectives of this study is to compare and contrast our theoretical results with those obtained through a diffusion coefficient formulation based on Dufty-Berkovsky relation.

  16. A Conceptual Approach for Optimising Bus Stop Spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Amita; Jain, S. S.; Garg, P. k.

    2017-06-01

    An efficient public transportation system is essential of any country. The growth, development and shape of the urban areas are mainly due to availability of good transportation (Shah et al. in Inst Town Plan India J 5(3):50-59, 1). In developing countries, like India, travel by local bus in a city is very common. The accidents, congestion, pollution and appropriate location of bus stops are the major problems arising in metropolitan cities. Among all the metropolitan cities in India, Delhi has highest percentage of growth of population and vehicles. Therefore, it is important to adopt efficient and effective ways to improve mobility in different metropolitan cities in order to overcome the problem and to reduce the number of private vehicles on the road. The primary objective of this paper is to present a methodology for developing a model for optimum bus stop spacing (OBSS). It describes the evaluation of existing urban bus route, data collection, development of model for optimizing urban bus route and application of model. In this work, the bus passenger generalized cost method is used to optimize the spacing between bus stops. For the development of model, a computer program is required to be written. The applicability of the model has been evaluated by taking the data of urban bus route of Delhi Transport Corporation (DTC) in Excel sheet in first phase. Later on, it is proposed to develop a programming in C++ language. The developed model is expected to be useful to transport planner for rational design of the spacing of bus stops to save travel time and to generalize operating cost. After analysis it is found that spacing between the bus stop comes out to be between 250 and 500 m. The Proposed Spacing of bus stops is done considering the points that they don't come nearer to metro/rail station, entry or exit of flyover and near traffic signal.

  17. Why do People Stop Playing On-Line Games?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek; Razmerita, Liana

    2012-01-01

    The recent initial public offering of shares of Zynga, probably the most important on-line game provider, drew interest of potential investors but also of general public to their business model. What the most interested people learned so far is that if Zynga had not changed their accounting...... practice, they would be in red numbers for several months already. This is most likely caused by people stopping to play their games. This paper provides an estimate of what proportion of people, who played on-line games, already stopped playing them. Additionally, it analyzed the reasons why people...

  18. Anatomy of maximal stop mixing in the MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Felix [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kraml, Sabine; Kulkarni, Suchita [CNRS/IN2P3, INPG, Grenoble (France). Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie

    2012-05-15

    A Standard Model-like Higgs near 125 GeV in the MSSM requires multi-TeV stop masses, or a near-maximal contribution to its mass from stop mixing. We investigate the maximal mixing scenario, and in particular its prospects for being realized it in potentially realistic GUT models. We work out constraints on the possible GUT-scale soft terms, which we compare with what can be obtained from some well-known mechanisms of SUSY breaking mediation. Finally, we analyze two promising scenarios in detail, namely gaugino mediation and gravity mediation with non-universal Higgs masses.

  19. Bottom-Fill Method for Stopping Leaking Oil Wells

    CERN Document Server

    Bloomfield, Louis A

    2010-01-01

    Hardware failure at the top of a deep underwater oil well can result in a catastrophic oil leak. The enormous pressure lifting the column of oil in that well makes it nearly impossible to stop from the top with seals or pressurization. We propose to fill the bottom of the well with dense and possibly streamlined objects that can descend through the rising oil. As they accumulate, those objects couple to the oil via viscous and drag forces and increase the oil's effective density. When its effective density exceeds that of the earth's crust, the oil will have essentially stopped flowing.

  20. Stimulus-response mappings shape inhibition processes: a combined EEG-fMRI study of contextual stopping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina F Lavallee

    Full Text Available Humans are rarely faced with one simple task, but are typically confronted with complex stimulus constellations and varying stimulus-relevance in a given situation. Through modifying the prototypical stop-signal task and by combined recording and analysis of electroencephalography (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we studied the effects of stimulus relevance for the generation of a response or its inhibition. Stimulus response mappings were modified by contextual cues, indicating which of two different stimuli following a go stimulus was relevant for stopping. Overall, response inhibition, that is comparing successful stopping to a stop-signal against go-signal related processes, was associated with increased activity in right inferior and left midfrontal regions, as well as increased EEG delta and theta power; however, stimulus-response conditions in which the most infrequent stop-signal was relevant for inhibition, were associated with decreased activity in regions typically involved in response inhibition, as well as decreased activity in the delta and theta bands as compared to conditions wherein the relevant stop-signal frequency was higher. Behaviorally, this (aforementioned condition, which demanded inhibition only from the most infrequent stimulus, was also associated with reduced reaction times and lower error rates. This pattern of results does not align with typical stimulus frequency-driven findings and suggests interplay between task relevance and stimulus frequency of the stop-signal. Moreover, with a multimodal EEG-fMRI analysis, we demonstrated significant parameterization for response inhibition with delta, theta and beta time-frequency values, which may be interpreted as reflecting conflict monitoring, evaluative and/or motor processes as suggested by previous work (Huster et al., 2013; Aron, 2011. Further multimodal results suggest a possible neurophysiological and behavioral benefit under conditions

  1. Relationship between electron density and effective densities of body tissues for stopping, scattering and nuclear interaction of proton and ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    In treatment planning of charged-particle radiotherapy, patient heterogeneity is normally modeled as variable-density water to best reproduce the stopping power. This water-based model would cause substantial errors in multiple scattering and nuclear interaction as body tissues may deviate from water in elemental compositions. In this study, we physically defined distinctive effective densities for stopping, scattering, and nuclear interactions of proton and ions and constructed their conversion functions to correct the water-based model, using the standard elemental composition data for body tissues. As we took the electron density for the reference in the formulation, these conversion functions are generally valid for treatment planning systems that normally have a function to convert CT number to electron density or stopping-power ratio. The proposed extension in heterogeneity correction will enable accurate beam dose calculation without seriously sacrificing simplicity or efficiency of the water-based mod...

  2. No Slackers in Tourniquet Use to Stop Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    tation injury just proximal to the knee was selected as the testing apparatus .13 The medial hip–pelvic area had an embedded computer interface that...Use to Stop Bleeding 19 COL (Ret) Kragh is currently a hemorrhage control re- searcher at the USAISR. He is an orthopedic surgeon who previously

  3. A stop sign for use in the dark.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1968-01-01

    The present official stop signs for use at night (a red light or a red light in combination with an illuminated white bat- type sign) are not sufficiently for road- users. For the present type of sign to meet the requirements in this respect it would have to be made far too large and heavy for a man

  4. Thought Stopping And Covert Assertion In The Treatment Of Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimm, David C.

    1973-01-01

    The present paper describes a method combining thought stopping and covert assertion and reports its application in six case histories the majority of which would usually be classified as phobic rather than obsessional. The paper reports successful followups. (Author/LA)

  5. Continuing versus Stopping Prestroke Antihypertensive Therapy in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnan, Kailash; Scutt, Polly; Woodhouse, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: More than 50% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are taking antihypertensive drugs before ictus. Although antihypertensive therapy should be given long term for secondary prevention, whether to continue or stop such treatment during the acute phase of ICH...

  6. Answers to Science Questions from the "Stop Faking It!" Guy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, William C.

    2009-01-01

    This valuable and entertaining compendium of Bill Robertson's popular "Science 101" columns, from NSTA member journal "Science and Children," proves you don't have to be a science geek to understand basic scientific concepts. The author of the best-selling "Stop Faking It!" series explains everything from quarks to photosynthesis, telescopes to…

  7. Inferring Stop-Locations from WiFi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kofoed Wind

    Full Text Available Human mobility patterns are inherently complex. In terms of understanding these patterns, the process of converting raw data into series of stop-locations and transitions is an important first step which greatly reduces the volume of data, thus simplifying the subsequent analyses. Previous research into the mobility of individuals has focused on inferring 'stop locations' (places of stationarity from GPS or CDR data, or on detection of state (static/active. In this paper we bridge the gap between the two approaches: we introduce methods for detecting both mobility state and stop-locations. In addition, our methods are based exclusively on WiFi data. We study two months of WiFi data collected every two minutes by a smartphone, and infer stop-locations in the form of labelled time-intervals. For this purpose, we investigate two algorithms, both of which scale to large datasets: a greedy approach to select the most important routers and one which uses a density-based clustering algorithm to detect router fingerprints. We validate our results using participants' GPS data as well as ground truth data collected during a two month period.

  8. Reasons for Starting and Stopping Electronic Cigarette Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K. Pepper

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to explore reasons for starting and then stopping electronic cigarette (e-cigarette use. Among a national sample of 3878 U.S. adults who reported ever trying e-cigarettes, the most common reasons for trying were curiosity (53%; because a friend or family member used, gave, or offered e-cigarettes (34%; and quitting or reducing smoking (30%. Nearly two-thirds (65% of people who started using e-cigarettes later stopped using them. Discontinuation was more common among those whose main reason for trying was not goal-oriented (e.g., curiosity than goal-oriented (e.g., quitting smoking (81% vs. 45%, p < 0.001. The most common reasons for stopping e-cigarette use were that respondents were just experimenting (49%, using e-cigarettes did not feel like smoking cigarettes (15%, and users did not like the taste (14%. Our results suggest there are two categories of e-cigarette users: those who try for goal-oriented reasons and typically continue using and those who try for non-goal-oriented reasons and then typically stop using. Research should distinguish e-cigarette experimenters from motivated users whose decisions to discontinue relate to the utility or experience of use. Depending on whether e-cigarettes prove to be effective smoking cessation tools or whether they deter cessation, public health programs may need distinct strategies to reach and influence different types of users.

  9. Inferring Stop-Locations from WiFi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, David Kofoed; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Furman, Magdalena Anna; Lehmann, Sune

    2016-01-01

    Human mobility patterns are inherently complex. In terms of understanding these patterns, the process of converting raw data into series of stop-locations and transitions is an important first step which greatly reduces the volume of data, thus simplifying the subsequent analyses. Previous research into the mobility of individuals has focused on inferring 'stop locations' (places of stationarity) from GPS or CDR data, or on detection of state (static/active). In this paper we bridge the gap between the two approaches: we introduce methods for detecting both mobility state and stop-locations. In addition, our methods are based exclusively on WiFi data. We study two months of WiFi data collected every two minutes by a smartphone, and infer stop-locations in the form of labelled time-intervals. For this purpose, we investigate two algorithms, both of which scale to large datasets: a greedy approach to select the most important routers and one which uses a density-based clustering algorithm to detect router fingerprints. We validate our results using participants' GPS data as well as ground truth data collected during a two month period.

  10. Impact-parameter-dependent electronic stopping of swift ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinner, A.; Sigmund, P.

    2010-01-01

    A computational scheme has been developed to estimate the mean electronic energy loss of an incident swift ion on an atomic target as a function of the impact parameter between the moving nuclei. The theoretical basis is binary stopping theory. In order to extract impact-parameter dependencies it wa

  11. Tactical Checkpoint: Hail/Warn Suppress/Stop (Poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    distractor , optical suppression , human behavior, checkpoint, ambient light, driver suppression , human experimentation, light, paintball, obscuration...HAIL/WARN AND - SUPPRESS /STOP Poster Presented at the 2010 Directed Energies Professional Society Meeting, 15-19 November 2010. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...warning to a driver that is approaching a checkpoint. The laser, MCNC light, and the windshield obscuration were evaluated for their suppression

  12. On a rational stopping rule for facilities location algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    1984-01-01

    In the multifacility location problem, a number of new facilities are to be located so as to minimize a sum of weighted distances. Love and Yeong (1981) developed a lower bound on the optimal value for use in deciding when to stop an iterative solution procedure. The authors develop a stronger...

  13. 75 FR 19878 - Retroactive Stop Loss Special Pay Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... final rule was published October 23, 2009, with an effective date of October 21, 2009 (74 FR 54751... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 279 Retroactive Stop Loss Special Pay Compensation AGENCY: Office of the... COMPENSATION Sec. 279.1 Purpose. 279.2 Eligibility. 279.3 Payment. 279.4 Claims process. 279.5...

  14. Stop Tobacco in Restaurants: Fifth Grade Students STIR City Hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ronald Vaughan

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a campaign called STIR: Stop Tobacco in Restaurants, that was started by fourth and fifth grade students. The goal was to end smoking in public places, including restaurants, bowling alleys, sports bars, and pool halls. For two years they motivated their peers, coordinated an information campaign to urge kids and adults to…

  15. What Actually Makes Bullying Stop? Reports from Former Victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisen, Ann; Hasselblad, Tove; Holmqvist, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    School bullying is a serious, worldwide problem which is not easily counteracted. The present study focuses on the perspective of former victims, asking them what it was that made the bullying stop in their case. Participants were 273 18-year-old former victims in Sweden, a country in which schools are doing extensive work against bullying and the…

  16. Filling the void - enriching the feature space of successful stopping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huster, René J.; Schneider, Signe; Lavallee, Christina F.; Enriquez-Geppert, Stefanie; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to inhibit behavior is crucial for adaptation in a fast changing environment and is commonly studied with the stop signal task. Current EEG research mainly focuses on the N200 and P300 ERPs and corresponding activity in the theta and delta frequency range, thereby leaving us with a

  17. On a rational stopping rule for facilities location algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    1984-01-01

    In the multifacility location problem, a number of new facilities are to be located so as to minimize a sum of weighted distances. Love and Yeong (1981) developed a lower bound on the optimal value for use in deciding when to stop an iterative solution procedure. The authors develop a stronger...

  18. "STOP the Violence": FCCLA Program Tackles School Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "STOP the Violence--Students Taking on Prevention" is a program designed to involve students and address school violence at its core from the peer-to- peer perspective. Developed by members of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), the program empowers young persons to recognize, report, and reduce the potential for youth…

  19. Stop the Tears of Drug and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimon, Jane; Gibson, Terry-Ann; Spear, Caile

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: By participating in this Stop the Tears teaching strategy, students will be able to: (1) analyze how alcohol and drug abuse could affect their lives as well as the lives of their friends and family and, (2) create a media message, such as a poster, pamphlet, poem, or song, in which alcohol and drug prevention is advocated specific to…

  20. Study of RPV stop signals in paired dijet signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Venckauskaite, Monika

    2016-01-01

    In supersymmetry models squark is the superpartner of the top quark and stop is usually the lightest squark. Trigger Level Analysis (TLA) is a type of analysis that is performed using information from the trigger level which allows for higher event recording rate. TLA is needed, because all events coming from resonances with low masses cannot be recorded due to the large backgrounds. The goal of this project was to determine whether it is possible to use TLA for identifying stop pair production with four-jet final state. We investigated the possibility of separating all of the four jets at the trigger level. Three different cases with stop masses of 80 GeV, 150 GeV and 200 GeV were examined. We found that only a small fraction of generated events (less than 1% for each mass) can be identified as having four jets. Therefore, we need to investigate the scenario where the products of the stop decay merge into one jet because of the Lorentz boost.

  1. EU’s one-stop-shop mechanism : Thinking transnational

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giurgiu, Andra; Boulet, Gertjan; de Hert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    One of the means of strengthening EU data protection law for consumers and for businesses is through the so- called “One-Stop-Shop”. This mechanism sets up a single contact point whereby companies doing business in more than one EU member state will have to deal with only one DPA, namely that of the

  2. Car accidents determined by stopped cars and traffic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xian-qing; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2002-12-01

    The product of traffic flow and the fraction of stopped cars is proposed to determine the probability Pac for car accidents in the Fukui-Ishibashi model by analysing the necessary conditions of the occurrence of car accidents. Qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the probability Pac can well be explained. A strategy for avoiding car accidents is suggested.

  3. The NOAA OneStop Data Discovery and Access Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, K. S.; Ritchey, N. A.; Relph, J.; Fischman, D.; Neufeld, D.

    2016-12-01

    In accordance with Federal Open Data policies, the NOAA OneStop Project has been created in order to improve discovery of, access to, and increased usability of NOAA data. OneStop is led by the NOAA/NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), and is seen as a NESDIS contribution to NOAA's open data and data stewardship efforts. Data are being made accessible to users through the new OneStop web user interface and also through interoperable web services at NCEI. These interoperable services map directly to the services highlighted in the USGEO Common Framework for Earth Observation Data and include open source technologies like the THREDDS Data Server and OPeNDAP Hyrax Server. Collaborations involving federal, academic, and community partnerships have proven essential to the progress of this major effort in NOAA. The OneStop web user interface is following modern web standards and those identified for US Government web sites at standards.usa.gov. A key aspect of the OneStop project, however, is that it focuses on improving not just the web interface, but also on all of the layers of the data discovery and access framework including the underlying catalog services, metadata, data visualization and subsetting services, and data formats and standards. In each of these areas, partnerships have proven essential in leveraging the best of existing capabilities and for infusing specific innovations. Progress on this major initiative within NOAA will be presented along with specific examples of how collaborations and partnerships have proven essential to improving NOAA's data stewardship services.

  4. Coherent resonance stop bands in alternating gradient beam transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, K.; Okamoto, H.; Tokashiki, Y.; Fukushima, K.

    2017-06-01

    An extensive experimental study is performed to confirm fundamental resonance bands of an intense hadron beam propagating through an alternating gradient linear transport channel. The present work focuses on the most common lattice geometry called "FODO" or "doublet" that consists of two quadrupoles of opposite polarities. The tabletop ion-trap system "S-POD" (Simulator of Particle Orbit Dynamics) developed at Hiroshima University is employed to clarify the parameter-dependence of coherent beam instability. S-POD can provide a non-neutral plasma physically equivalent to a charged-particle beam in a periodic focusing potential. In contrast with conventional experimental approaches relying on large-scale machines, it is straightforward in S-POD to control the doublet geometry characterized by the quadrupole filling factor and drift-space ratio. We verify that the resonance feature does not essentially change depending on these geometric factors. A few clear stop bands of low-order resonances always appear in the same pattern as previously found with the sinusoidal focusing model. All stop bands become widened and shift to the higher-tune side as the beam density is increased. In the space-charge-dominated regime, the most dangerous stop band is located at the bare betatron phase advance slightly above 90 degrees. Experimental data from S-POD suggest that this severe resonance is driven mainly by the linear self-field potential rather than by nonlinear external imperfections and, therefore, unavoidable at high beam density. The instability of the third-order coherent mode generates relatively weak but noticeable stop bands near the phase advances of 60 and 120 degrees. The latter sextupole stop band is considerably enhanced by lattice imperfections. In a strongly asymmetric focusing channel, extra attention may have to be paid to some coupling resonance lines induced by the Coulomb potential. Our interpretations of experimental data are supported by theoretical

  5. Quantifying the bias in the estimated treatment effect in randomized trials having interim analyses and a rule for early stopping for futility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, S D; Han, H; Briel, M; Guyatt, G H

    2017-04-30

    In this paper, we consider the potential bias in the estimated treatment effect obtained from clinical trials, the protocols of which include the possibility of interim analyses and an early termination of the study for reasons of futility. In particular, by considering the conditional power at an interim analysis, we derive analytic expressions for various parameters of interest: (i) the underestimation or overestimation of the treatment effect in studies that stop for futility; (ii) the impact of the interim analyses on the estimation of treatment effect in studies that are completed, i.e. that do not stop for futility; (iii) the overall estimation bias in the estimated treatment effect in a single study with such a stopping rule; and (iv) the probability of stopping at an interim analysis. We evaluate these general expressions numerically for typical trial scenarios. Results show that the parameters of interest depend on a number of factors, including the true underlying treatment effect, the difference that the trial is designed to detect, the study power, the number of planned interim analyses and what assumption is made about future data to be observed after an interim analysis. Because the probability of stopping early is small for many practical situations, the overall bias is often small, but a more serious issue is the potential for substantial underestimation of the treatment effect in studies that actually stop for futility. We also consider these ideas using data from an illustrative trial that did stop for futility at an interim analysis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. A New Exactly Solvable Inflation Model and its Power Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新洲; 刘道军; 郝建纲

    2003-01-01

    We present a new exactly solvable inflation model in which inflation can stop automatically, and in the approximately de Sitter limit, we give its power spectrum which can be tested in the future observations of cosmic microwave background anisotropy.

  7. On the Origin of Post-Aspirated Stops: Production and Perception of /s/ + Voiceless Stop Sequences in Andalusian Spanish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Ruch

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the role of articulatory and perceptual factors in the change from pre- to post-aspiration in two varieties of Andalusian Spanish. In an acoustic study, the influence of stop type, speaker age, and variety on the production of pre- and post-aspiration was analyzed in isolated words produced by 24 speakers of a Western and 24 of an Eastern variety, both divided into two age groups. The results confirmed previous findings of a sound change from pre- to post-aspiration in both varieties. Velar stops showed the longest, bilabials the shortest, and dental stops intermediate pre- and post-aspiration durations. The observed universal VOT-pattern was not found for younger Western Andalusian speakers who showed a particularly long VOT in /st/-sequences. A perception experiment with the same subjects as listeners showed that post-aspiration was used as a cue for distinguishing the minimal pair /pata/-/pasta/ by almost all listeners. Production-perception comparisons suggested a relationship between production and perception: subjects who produced long post-aspiration were also more sensitive to this cue. In sum, the results suggest that the sound change has first been actuated in the dental context, possibly due to a higher perceptual prominence of post-aspiration in this context, and that post-aspirated stops in Andalusian Spanish are on their way to being phonologized.

  8. Effects of the projectile electronic structure on Bethe-Bloch stopping parameters for Ag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussa, D., E-mail: djamelmoussa@gmail.co [USTHB, Faculte de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Damache, S. [Division de Physique, CRNA, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-gare, Algiers (Algeria); Ouichaoui, S., E-mail: souichaoui@gmail.co [USTHB, Faculte de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2010-06-15

    Energy losses of protons and alpha particles in silver have been accurately measured under the same experimental conditions over the velocity range E{sub lab}=(0.192-2.595) MeV/amu using the transmission method. Deduced S(E) stopping powers are compared to most accurate ones from the literature, to values generated by the SRIM-2008 computer code and to ICRU-49 compilation. They were analyzed in the framework of modified Bethe-Bloch theory for extracting Ag target mean excitation and ionization potential, I, and Barkas effect parameter, b. Values of (466{+-}5) eV and 1.20{+-}0.01 for these two parameters were inferred from the proton S(E) data while the alpha particle data yielded values of (438{+-}4) eV and 1.38{+-}0.01, respectively. The (I, b) stopping parameters thus exhibit opposite variations as the projectile charge increases, similarly as we have found previously for nickel . This can be ascribed only to an effect of the projectile electronic structure at low velocities. The obtained results are discussed in comparison to previous ones reported in the literature.

  9. Improved Reproduction of Stops in Noise Reduction Systems with Adaptive Windows and Nonstationarity Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Mauler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new block-based noise reduction system is proposed which focuses on the preservation of transient sounds like stops or speech onsets. The power level of consonants has been shown to be important for speech intelligibility. In single-channel noise reduction systems, however, these sounds are frequently severely attenuated. The main reasons for this are an insufficient temporal resolution of transient sounds and a delayed tracking of important control parameters. The key idea of the proposed system is the detection of non-stationary input data. Depending on that decision, a pair of spectral analysis-synthesis windows is selected which either provides high temporal or high spectral resolution. Furthermore, the decision-directed approach for the estimation of the a priori SNR is modified so that speech onsets are tracked more quickly without sacrificing performance in stationary signal regions. The proposed solution shows significant improvements in the preservation of stops with an overall system delay (input-output, excluding group delay of noise reduction filter of only 10 milliseconds.

  10. Atomic capture and transfer of negative pions stopped in binary mixtures of hydrogen with polyatomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilyev, V.A.; Levay, B.; Minkova, A.; Petrukhin, V.I.; Horvath, D.

    1985-12-01

    The atomic capture and transfer of stopped negative pions have been studied in binary gas mixtures of H/sub 2/+M, where M is CCl/sub 2/F/sub 2/, CClF/sub 3/, CBrF/sub 3/ or SF/sub 6/. The ..pi../sup 0/ yield, versus relative atomic concentration Csub(A) of M, goes through a maximum at Csub(A)proportional0.1 and levels off at zero at high concentrations. This phenomenon together with other observed characteristics of the atomic capture and transfer of pions in these systems is interpreted in the frame of a phenomenological model. The average transfer coefficients anti ..lambda..sub(Z) exhibit a weak concentration dependence. The estimated average atomic capture ratios anti A(Z/H) are lower than those found for noble gases, probably because of the mutual screening of the constituent atoms in the molecules. The probability of pion capture in an atomic orbit is not proportional to the stopping power of the components of the mixture. (orig.).

  11. Scattering and stopping of hadrons in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    It was observed, in the 180 litre xenon bubble chamber, that when hadrons with kinetic energy higher than the pion production threshold fall on a layer of nuclear matter - on an atomic nucleus in other words - in many cases they can pass through it without causing particles production but they are deflected through some deflection angles; if the energy is lower than a few GeV and the nuclear matter layer is thick enough, the hadrons can be stopped in it. The amount of the deflection at a given incident hadron energy varies with the way the hadron strikes the atomic nucleus; the probability of the occurrence of stopping depends on the incident hadron identity and energy, and on the way the hadron passed through the nucleus, as well.

  12. Nonlinear scale space with spatially varying stopping time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Guy

    2008-12-01

    A general scale space algorithm is presented for denoising signals and images with spatially varying dominant scales. The process is formulated as a partial differential equation with spatially varying time. The proposed adaptivity is semi-local and is in conjunction with the classical gradient-based diffusion coefficient, designed to preserve edges. The new algorithm aims at maximizing a local SNR measure of the denoised image. It is based on a generalization of a global stopping time criterion presented recently by the author and colleagues. Most notably, the method works well also for partially textured images and outperforms any selection of a global stopping time. Given an estimate of the noise variance, the procedure is automatic and can be applied well to most natural images.

  13. Multiview coding mode decision with hybrid optimal stopping model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tiesong; Kwong, Sam; Wang, Hanli; Wang, Zhou; Pan, Zhaoqing; Kuo, C-C Jay

    2013-04-01

    In a generic decision process, optimal stopping theory aims to achieve a good tradeoff between decision performance and time consumed, with the advantages of theoretical decision-making and predictable decision performance. In this paper, optimal stopping theory is employed to develop an effective hybrid model for the mode decision problem, which aims to theoretically achieve a good tradeoff between the two interrelated measurements in mode decision, as computational complexity reduction and rate-distortion degradation. The proposed hybrid model is implemented and examined with a multiview encoder. To support the model and further promote coding performance, the multiview coding mode characteristics, including predicted mode probability and estimated coding time, are jointly investigated with inter-view correlations. Exhaustive experimental results with a wide range of video resolutions reveal the efficiency and robustness of our method, with high decision accuracy, negligible computational overhead, and almost intact rate-distortion performance compared to the original encoder.

  14. Search for Heavy Stops with Merged Top-Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Yang; Osborne, James; Stefanek, Ben A

    2016-01-01

    We study an interesting region of phase space at the LHC for pair-produced stops decaying into hadronic top quarks and light neutralinos. After imposing a sizeable cut on the missing transverse energy, which is the key variable for reducing backgrounds, we have found that the two hadronic tops are likely to merge into a single fat jet. We develop a jet-substructure-based strategy to tag the two merged top-jets and utilize the MT2 variable to further reduce the backgrounds. We obtain about a 50% increase to the ratio of the signal over background and a mild increase on the signal discovery significance, based on a signal with a 1.2 TeV stop and a 100 GeV neutralino, for the 13 TeV LHC with 100 fb$^{-1}$. The general event kinematics could also occur and be explored for other new physics signatures with large missing transverse energy.

  15. Elucidating the stop bands of structurally colored systems through recursion

    CERN Document Server

    Amir, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Interference phenomena are the source of some of the spectacular colors of animals and plants in nature. In some of these systems, the physical structure consists of an ordered array of layers with alternating high and low refractive indices. This periodicity leads to an optical band structure that is analogous to the electronic band structure encountered in semiconductor physics; namely, specific bands of wavelengths (the stop bands) are perfectly reflected. Here, we present a minimal model for optical band structure in a periodic multilayer and solve it using recursion relations. We present experimental data for various beetles, whose optical structure resembles the proposed model. The stop bands emerge in the limit of an infinite number of layers by finding the fixed point of the recursive relations. In order for these to converge, an infinitesimal amount of absorption needs to be present, reminiscent of the regularization procedures commonly used in physics calculations. Thus, using only the phenomenon of...

  16. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  17. Inferring Stop-Locations from WiFi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, David Kofoed; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Furman, Magdalena Anna

    2016-01-01

    Human mobility patterns are inherently complex. In terms of understanding these patterns, the process of converting raw data into series of stop-locations and transitions is an important first step which greatly reduces the volume of data, thus simplifying the subsequent analyses. Previous resear...... the most important routers and one which uses a density-based clustering algorithm to detect router fingerprints. We validate our results using participants' GPS data as well as ground truth data collected during a two month period....

  18. We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-08-28

    As part of the We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time campaign, this 30 second PSA encourages Hispanics/Latinos to talk openly about HIV and AIDS with their families, friends, partners, and communities.  Created: 8/28/2014 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 8/28/2014.

  19. LHC Availability 2016: Restart to Technical Stop 1

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Restart to Technical Stop 1 (TS1) in 2016. This period was dedicated to restart of the LHC for proton physics with a bunch spacing of 25ns. This note has been produced and ratified by the LHC Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  20. Stopping pions in high-energy nuclear cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. V.; Johnson, D. P.; Thompson, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Results of Monte Carlo calculations for the number and energy spectra of charged pions from nuclear-electromagnetic cascades developing in rock are presented for primary hadron energies ranging from 3 to 3000 GeV. These spectra are given as functions of the longitudinal depth in the absorber and the lateral distance from the cascade axis. The number of charged pions which stop in the absorber increases with the primary energy of the hadron initiating the cascade.

  1. Stylistic Analysis of Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查琳琳

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes the poem Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost from stylistic perspective.Based on the analysis of stylistic features in terms of phonological,lexical,syntactic and semantic levels,it is revealed that regular rhythm and rhyme,colloquial lexicon, pithy syntax,vivid image and lots of symbols make this poem melodious,easy to understand but filled with deep connotative meaning.

  2. English Stop-Smoking Services: One-Year Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauld, Linda; Hiscock, Rosemary; Dobbie, Fiona; Aveyard, Paul; Coleman, Tim; Leonardi-Bee, Jo; McRobbie, Hayden; McEwen, Andy

    2016-01-01

    The UK is a global leader in stop-smoking support—providing free behavioral support and cessation medication via stop smoking services (SSS) without charge to smokers. This study aimed to explore the client and service characteristics associated with abstinence 52 weeks after quitting. A prospective cohort study of 3057 SSS clients in nine different areas of England who began their quit attempt between March 2012 and March 2013 was conducted. Important determinants of long-term quitting were assessed through quit rates and multivariable logistic regression. Our results showed that the overall weighted carbon monoxide validated quit rate for clients at 52 weeks was 7.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 6.6–9.0). The clients of advisors, whose main role was providing stop-smoking support, were more likely to quit long-term than advisors who had a generalist role in pharmacies or general practices (odds ratio (OR) 2.3 (95% CI 1.2–4.6)). Clients were more likely to achieve abstinence through group support than one-to-one support (OR 3.4 (95% CI 1.7–6.7)). Overall, one in thirteen people who set a quit date with the National Health Service (NHS) Stop-Smoking Service maintain abstinence for a year. Improving abstinence is likely to require a greater emphasis on providing specialist smoking cessation support. Results from this study suggest that over 18,000 premature deaths were prevented through longer-term smoking cessation achieved by smokers who accessed SSS in England from March 2012 to April 2013, but outcomes varied by client characteristic and the type of support provided. PMID:27886140

  3. Adaptive weak approximation of reflected and stopped diffusions

    KAUST Repository

    Bayer, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We study the weak approximation problem of diffusions, which are reflected at a subset of the boundary of a domain and stopped at the remaining boundary. First, we derive an error representation for the projected Euler method of Costantini, Pacchiarotti and Sartoretto [Costantini et al., SIAM J. Appl. Math., 58(1):73-102, 1998], based on which we introduce two new algorithms. The first one uses a correction term from the representation in order to obtain a higher order of convergence, but the computation of the correction term is, in general, not feasible in dimensions d > 1. The second algorithm is adaptive in the sense of Moon, Szepessy, Tempone and Zouraris [Moon et al., Stoch. Anal. Appl., 23:511-558, 2005], using stochastic refinement of the time grid based on a computable error expansion derived from the representation. Regarding the stopped diffusion, it is based in the adaptive algorithm for purely stopped diffusions presented in Dzougoutov, Moon, von Schwerin, Szepessy and Tempone [Dzougoutov et al., Lect. Notes Comput. Sci. Eng., 44, 59-88, 2005]. We give numerical examples underlining the theoretical results. © de Gruyter 2010.

  4. New therapeutic perspectives in HBV: when to stop NAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cameo, Cristina; Pons, Mònica; Esteban, Rafael

    2014-02-01

    The goal of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) treatment is to achieve seroclearance of HBsAg. Nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) are one of the first-line treatments for CHB. NAs produce a potent suppression of viral replication but are associated with a low rate of HBsAg seroclearance and a high risk of virological relapse after discontinuation. Because of these reasons, long-term treatment is needed. They are well-tolerated oral drugs, and it seems they do not produce important side-effects in long-term administration. The duration of NA treatment remains unclear, nevertheless, in some patients NAs can be stopped with a low rate of relapse. HBeAg-positive patients could discontinue NA therapy if they achieved HBeAg seroclearance and maintain undetectable HBV DNA. For HBeAg-negative patients, to stop NA treatment is not recommended. In addition to other factors, serum HBsAg titres during treatment have recently been proposed to guide NA-based therapy duration in selected patients. All patients could be stopped from taking treatment if they achieve HBsAg loss.

  5. Effective Listings of Function Stop words for Twitter

    CERN Document Server

    Choy, Murphy

    2012-01-01

    Many words in documents recur very frequently but are essentially meaningless as they are used to join words together in a sentence. It is commonly understood that stop words do not contribute to the context or content of textual documents. Due to their high frequency of occurrence, their presence in text mining presents an obstacle to the understanding of the content in the documents. To eliminate the bias effects, most text mining software or approaches make use of stop words list to identify and remove those words. However, the development of such top words list is difficult and inconsistent between textual sources. This problem is further aggravated by sources such as Twitter which are highly repetitive or similar in nature. In this paper, we will be examining the original work using term frequency, inverse document frequency and term adjacency for developing a stop words list for the Twitter data source. We propose a new technique using combinatorial values as an alternative measure to effectively list o...

  6. Neutrino-induced upward stopping muons in Super-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kasuga, S; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Earl, M; Habig, A; Kearns, E; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Price, L R; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Stenger, V J; Takemori, D; Ishii, T; Ishino, H; Kobayashi, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakai, A; Sakuda, M; Sasaki, O; Echigo, S; Kohama, M; Suzuki, A T; Inagaki, T; Nishikawa, K; Haines, T J; Blaufuss, E; Kim, B K; Sanford, R; Svoboda, R; Chen, M L; Goodman, J A; Sullivan, G W; Hill, J; Jung, C K; Martens, K; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sharkey, E; Viren, B; Yanagisawa, C; Doki, W; Kirisawa, M; Inaba, S; Miyano, K; Okazawa, H; Saji, C; Takahashi, M; Takahata, M; Higuchi, K; Nagashima, Y; Takita, M; Yamaguchi, T; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Etoh, M; Hasegawa, A; Hasegawa, T; Hatakeyama, S; Inoue, K; Iwamoto, T; Koga, M; Maruyama, T; Ogawa, H; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Tsushima, F; Koshiba, M; Hatakeyama, Y; Koike, M; Nemoto, M; Nishijima, K; Fujiyasu, H; Futagami, T; Hayato, Y; Kanaya, Y; Kaneyuki, K; Watanabe, Y; Kielczewska, D; George, J S; Stachyra, A L; Wilkes, R J; Young, K K

    1999-01-01

    A total of 137 upward stopping muons of minimum energy 1.6 GeV are observed by Super-Kamiokande during 516 detector live days. The measured muon flux is 0.39+/-0.04(stat.)+/-0.02(syst.)x10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}sr^{-1} compared to an expected flux of 0.73+/-0.16(theo.)x10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}sr^{-1}. Using our previously-published measurement of the upward through-going muon flux, we calculate the stopping/through-going flux ratio R}, which has less theoretical uncertainty. The measured value of R=0.22+/-0.02(stat.)+/-0.01(syst.) is significantly smaller than the value 0.37^{+0.05}_{-0.04}(theo.) expected using the best theoretical information (the probability that the measured R is a statistical fluctuation below the expected value is 0.39%). A simultaneous fitting to zenith angle distributions of upward stopping and through-going muons gives a result which is consistent with the hypothesis of neutrino oscillations with the parameters sin^2 2\\theta >0.7 and 1.5x10^{-3} < \\Delta m^2 < 1.5x10^{-2} eV^2 at 90% ...

  7. Helping people stop smoking in workplaces: an alternative path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Osman

    2016-03-01

    Initiated by Prof Bertrand Dautzenberg 10 years ago "OFT" and then "OFT Conseil" have been developing different plans to address those smokers where they are working and encourage them to stop. The fact is that many medium and large size companies want their staff to stop smoking to keep people in good health, to protect the image of the company or for any other reason. We are generally commissioned by the Occupational Health Doctors or by Human Resources Managers to intervene. Each year OFT tobaccologists are working in some 75 to 100 companies. OFT and later OFT Conseil have developed a 3 steps programme especially addressed to workplaces. The 3 steps are complementary although not mandatory: 1. Group meeting with smokers to raise awareness of well-being after stopping 2. Individual interview to provide a diagnosis and build up an individual cessation programme 3. A smoking cessation protocol based on 6 to 10 consultations over 6 to 8 months. This plan is financed by the companies and followed only by graduated tobaccologists. The success rate in average is more or less 50% to 60% in the best cases.

  8. Stashing the stops in multijet events at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Diglio, Sara; Moultaka, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    While the presence of a light stop is increasingly disfavored by the experimental limits set on R-parity conserving scenarios, the naturalness of supersymmetry could still be safely concealed in the more challenging final states predicted by the existence of non-null R-parity violating couplings. Although R-parity violating signatures are extensively looked for at the Large Hadron Collider, these searches always assume 100\\% branching ratios for the direct decays of supersymmetric particles into Standard Model ones. In this paper we scrutinize the implications of relaxing this assumption by focusing on one motivated scenario where the lightest stop is heavier than a chargino and a neutralino. Considering a class of R-parity baryon number violating couplings, we show on general grounds that while the direct decay of the stop into Standard Model particles is dominant for large values of these couplings, smaller values give rise, instead, to the dominance of a plethora of longer decay chains and richer final sta...

  9. Portable semiconductor laser system to stop internal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rediker, Robert H.; Durville, Frederic M.; Cho, George; Boll, James H.

    1995-03-01

    One significant cause of death during a sever trauma (gun wound or stab wound) is internal bleeding. A semiconductor diode laser system has been used in in vitro studies of cauterizing veins and arteries to stop bleeding. The conditions of laparoscopic surgery, including bleeding conditions (blood flow and pressure), are simulated. Results have been obtained both with and without using a hemostat (e.g., forceps) to temporarily stop the bleeding prior to the cautery. With the hemostat and a fiber-coupled 810-nm laser, blood vessels of up to 5 mm diameter were cauterized with an 8 W output from the fiber. Great cautions must be used in extrapolating from these in vitro results, since the exact conditions of bleeding in a living being are impossible to exactly reproduce in a laboratory in-vitro experiment. In a living being, when blood flow stops the cessation of nourishment to the vessels results in irreversible physiological changes. Also, the blood itself is different from blood in a living being because an anti-clotting agent (heparin) was added in order to inhibit the blood's natural tendency to coagulate.

  10. Stop and Fricative Devoicing in European Portuguese, Italian and German.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Daniel; Jesus, Luis M T

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a cross-linguistic production study of devoicing for European Portuguese (EP), Italian, and German. We recorded all stops and fricatives in four vowel contexts and two word positions. We computed the devoicing of the time-varying patterns throughout the stop and fricative duration. Our results show that regarding devoicing behaviour, EP is more similar to German than Italian. While Italian shows almost no devoicing of all phonologically voiced consonants, both EP and German show strong and consistent devoicing through the entire consonant. Differences in consonant position showed no effect for EP and Italian, but were significantly different for German. The height of the vowel context had an effect for German and EP. For EP, we showed that a more posterior place of articulation and low vowel context lead to significantly more devoicing. However, in contrast to German, we could not find an influence of consonant position on devoicing. The high devoicing for all phonologically voiced stops and fricatives and the vowel context influence are a surprising new result. With respect to voicing maintenance, EP is more like German than other Romance languages.

  11. Effect of retroflex sounds on the recognition of Hindi stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Amita; Agrawal, S. S.; Choudhary, D. Roy

    2004-05-01

    As development of the speech recognition system entirely depends upon the spoken language used for its development and the very fact that speech technology is highly language dependent and reverse engineering is not possible, there is an utmost need to develop such systems for Indian languages. In this paper we present the implementation of a time-delay neural network system (TDNN) in a modular fashion by exploiting the hidden structure of previously phonetic subcategory network for the recognition of Hindi consonants. For the present study we have selected all the Hindi phonemes for the recognition. A vocabulary of 207 Hindi words was designed for the task-specific environment and used as a database. For the recognition of phonemes a three-layered network was constructed and the network was trained using the backpropagation learning algorithm. Experiments were conducted to categorize the Hindi voiced and unvoiced stops, semivowels, vowels, nasals, and fricatives. A close observation of the confusion matrix of Hindi stops revealed maximum confusion of retroflex stops with their nonretroflex counterparts.

  12. Vitamin D Levels May Fall When Women Stop Taking Birth Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160259.html Vitamin D Levels May Fall When Women Stop Taking ... 4, 2016 THURSDAY, Aug. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D levels may drop after women stop using ...

  13. A Novel High Stop Band All Complementary MOSFET Switched-Capacitor Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Abdallah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Filters are widely used in various applications including communications, electronics and biomedical engineering. The performance and size of the filter is of interest especially in chip implementation. A switched-capacitor low-pass filter was designed and simulated using a 0.18 µm 1P6M CMOS technology. Approach: This circuit design offered obvious advantages in increasing the stopband attenuation, reducing passband ripple and achieving accurate frequency response. Results: This circuit achieved 53 dB stop band attenuation, less than 0.1 dB passband ripple, a 5 KHz cut-off frequency, a 100 KHz stopband frequency and consumes 6 mW from a 2 V power supply. Conclusion: The proposed design is very suitable for the realization of analog signal processing blocks in complementary MOSFET integrated circuits.

  14. Gluon saturation and baryon stopping in the SPS,RHIC, and LHC energy regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuang; FENG Sheng-Qin

    2012-01-01

    A new geometrical scaling method with a gluon saturation rapidity limit is proposed to study the gluon saturation feature of the central rapidity region of relativistic nuclear collisions.The net-baryon number is essentially transported by valence quarks that probe the saturation regime in the target by multiple scattering.We take advantage of the gluon saturation model with geometric scaling of the rapidity limit to investigate net baryon distributions,nuclear stopping power and gluon saturation features in the SPS and RHIC energy regions.Predictions for net-baryon rapidity distributions,mean rapidity loss and gluon saturation feature in central Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC are made in this paper.

  15. On NonAsymptotic Optimal Stopping Criteria in Monte Carlo Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Bayer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We consider the setting of estimating the mean of a random variable by a sequential stopping rule Monte Carlo (MC) method. The performance of a typical second moment based sequential stopping rule MC method is shown to be unreliable in such settings both by numerical examples and through analysis. By analysis and approximations, we construct a higher moment based stopping rule which is shown in numerical examples to perform more reliably and only slightly less efficiently than the second moment based stopping rule.

  16. Proton stopping in C+C, d+C, C+Ta and d+Ta collisions at 4.2A GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Simic, L; Simic, Lj.

    1998-01-01

    The shape of proton rapidity distributions is analysed in terms of their Gaussian components, and the average rapidity loss is determined in order to estimate the amount of stopping in C+C, d+C, C+Ta and d+Ta collisions at 4.2A GeV/c. Three Gaussians correspond to the nuclear transparency and describe well all peripheral and also C+C central collisions. Two-component shape is obtained in case of d+C and C+Ta central collisions. Finally one Gaussian, found in d+Ta central collisions, corresponds to the full stopping. The calculated values of the average rapidity loss support the qualitative relationship between the number of Gaussian components and the corresponding stopping power. It is also observed, in central collisions, that the average rapidity loss increases with the ratio of the number of target and the number of projectile participants.

  17. Post-Stop-Signal Slowing: Strategies Dominate Reflexes and Implicit Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Patrick G.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    Control adjustments are necessary to balance competing cognitive demands. One task that is well-suited to explore control adjustments is the stop-signal paradigm, in which subjects must balance initiation and inhibition. One common adjustment in the stop-signal paradigm is post-stop-signal slowing. Existing models of sequential adjustments in the…

  18. 49 CFR 236.335 - Dogs, stops and trunnions of mechanical locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dogs, stops and trunnions of mechanical locking..., AND APPLIANCES Interlocking Rules and Instructions § 236.335 Dogs, stops and trunnions of mechanical locking. Driving pieces, dogs, stops and trunnions shall be rigidly secured to locking bars. Swing...

  19. Human haptic perception is interrupted by explorative stops of milliseconds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Martin; Muniyandi, Manivannan; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Jung; Krause, Frank; Mueller, Stephanie; Srinivasan, Mandayam A

    2014-01-01

    The explorative scanning movements of the hands have been compared to those of the eyes. The visual process is known to be composed of alternating phases of saccadic eye movements and fixation pauses. Descriptive results suggest that during the haptic exploration of objects short movement pauses occur as well. The goal of the present study was to detect these "explorative stops" (ES) during one-handed and two-handed haptic explorations of various objects and patterns, and to measure their duration. Additionally, the associations between the following variables were analyzed: (a) between mean exploration time and duration of ES, (b) between certain stimulus features and ES frequency, and (c) the duration of ES during the course of exploration. Five different Experiments were used. The first two Experiments were classical recognition tasks of unknown haptic stimuli (A) and of common objects (B). In Experiment C space-position information of angle legs had to be perceived and reproduced. For Experiments D and E the PHANToM haptic device was used for the exploration of virtual (D) and real (E) sunken reliefs. In each Experiment we observed explorative stops of different average durations. For Experiment A: 329.50 ms, Experiment B: 67.47 ms, Experiment C: 189.92 ms, Experiment D: 186.17 ms and Experiment E: 140.02 ms. Significant correlations were observed between exploration time and the duration of the ES. Also, ES occurred more frequently, but not exclusively, at defined stimulus features like corners, curves and the endpoints of lines. However, explorative stops do not occur every time a stimulus feature is explored. We assume that ES are a general aspect of human haptic exploration processes. We have tried to interpret the occurrence and duration of ES with respect to the Hypotheses-Rebuild-Model and the Limited Capacity Control System theory.

  20. Human haptic perception is interrupted by explorative stops of milliseconds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eGrunwald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The explorative scanning movements of the hands have been compared to those of the eyes. The visual process is known to be composed of alternating phases of saccadic eye movements and fixation pauses. Descriptive results suggest that during the haptic exploration of objects short movement pauses occur as well. The goal of the present study was to detect these explorative stops (ES during one-handed and two-handed haptic explorations of various objects and patterns, and to measure their duration. Additionally, the associations between the following variables were analyzed: a between mean exploration time and duration of ES, b between certain stimulus features and ES frequency, and c the duration of ES during the course of exploration. Methods: Five different experiments were used. The first two experiments were classical recognition tasks of unknown haptic stimuli (A and of common objects (B. In experiment C space-position information of angle legs had to be perceived and reproduced. For experiments D and E the PHANToM haptic device was used for the exploration of virtual (D and real (E sunken reliefs. Results: In each experiment we observed explorative stops of different average durations. For experiment A: 329.50 ms, experiment B: 67.47 ms, experiment C: 189.92 ms, experiment D: 186.17 ms and experiment E: 140.02 ms. Significant correlations were observed between exploration time and the duration of the ES. Also, ES occurred more frequently, but not exclusively, at defined stimulus features like corners, curves and the endpoints of lines. However, explorative stops do not occur every time a stimulus feature is explored. Conclusions: We assume that ES are a general aspect of human haptic exploration processes. We have tried to interpret the occurrence and duration of ES with respect to the Hypotheses-Rebuild-Model and the Limited Capacity Control System theory.