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Sample records for water-oil interface radiatsionno-indutsirovannye

  1. Infrared Spectroscopy of Bilberry Extract Water-in-Oil Emulsions: Sensing the Water-Oil Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Kiefer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Water-in-oil (w/o emulsions are of great interest in many areas of the life sciences, including food technology, bioprocess engineering, and pharmaceuticals. Such emulsions are complex multi-component systems and the molecular mechanisms which lead to a stable emulsion are yet to be fully understood. In this work, attenuated total reflection (ATR infrared (IR spectroscopy is applied to a series of w/o emulsions of an aqueous anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract dispersed in a medium chain triglyceride (MCT oil phase. The content of the emulsifier polyglycerin-polyricinoleat (PGPR has been varied systematically in order to investigate whether or not its concentration has an impact on the molecular stabilization mechanisms. The molecular stabilization is accessed by a careful analysis of the IR spectrum, where changes in the vibrational frequencies and signal strengths indicate alterations of the molecular environment at the water/oil interface. The results suggest that adding emulsifier in excess of 1% by weight does not lead to an enhanced stabilization of the emulsion.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy of Bilberry Extract Water-in-Oil Emulsions: Sensing the Water-Oil Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Johannes; Frank, Kerstin; Zehentbauer, Florian M.; Schuchmann, Heike P.

    2016-01-01

    Water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions are of great interest in many areas of the life sciences, including food technology, bioprocess engineering, and pharmaceuticals. Such emulsions are complex multi-component systems and the molecular mechanisms which lead to a stable emulsion are yet to be fully understood. In this work, attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy is applied to a series of w/o emulsions of an aqueous anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract dispersed in a medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil phase. The content of the emulsifier polyglycerin-polyricinoleat (PGPR) has been varied systematically in order to investigate whether or not its concentration has an impact on the molecular stabilization mechanisms. The molecular stabilization is accessed by a careful analysis of the IR spectrum, where changes in the vibrational frequencies and signal strengths indicate alterations of the molecular environment at the water/oil interface. The results suggest that adding emulsifier in excess of 1% by weight does not lead to an enhanced stabilization of the emulsion. PMID:27089376

  3. Appearance of instabilities and fingering from interface in water-oil systems; Surgimento de instabilidades e digitacao a partir da interface em sistemas agua-oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quadri, Marintho B.; Machado, Ricardo A.F.; Nogueira, Andre L.; Lopes, Toni J. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Baptista, Renan M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2003-07-01

    Many operations and procedures in the petroleum industry are related to the immiscible displacement of a fluid by another one, as the secondary recovery of petroleum and pumping operation through pipelines of high viscosity oils. In this context, an stability analysis of the water-oil interface as well as of the factors that leads to the appearance of the viscous fingering phenomenon, represented by the viscous flowing of one phase that penetrates inside of the other one in the form of one or more fingers, is of major importance for the forecast, simulation and control of operations involving this kind of system. From the theories of perturbation and unstable immiscible displacement of fluids, initially conceived for cells of parallel slabs (Hele-Shaw), the authors intend to extend the concepts and adapt the criteria for the three-dimensional geometry in macroscopic scale. (author)

  4. Interface Condition for the Darcy Velocity at the Water-oil Flood Front in the Porous Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Xiaolong; Liang, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Flood front is the jump interface where fluids distribute discontinuously, whose interface condition is the theoretical basis of a mathematical model of the multiphase flow in porous medium. The conventional interface condition at the jump interface is expressed as the continuous Darcy velocity and fluid pressure (named CVCM ). Our study has inspected this conclusions. First, it is revealed that the principle of mass conservation has no direct relation to the velocity conservation, and the former is not the true foundation of the later, because the former only reflects the kinetic characteristic of the fluid particles at one position(the interface), but not the neighborhood of the interface which required by the later. Then the reasonableness of CVCM is queried from the following three aspects:(1)Using Mukat's two phase seepage equation and the mathematical method of apagoge, we have disproved the continuity of each fluid velocity;(2)Since the analytical solution of the equation of Buckley-Leveret equations i...

  5. Hydrophobic zeolites for biofuel upgrading reactions at the liquid-liquid interface in water/oil emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Paula A; Faria, Jimmy; Ruiz, M Pilar; Jentoft, Rolf E; Resasco, Daniel E

    2012-05-23

    HY zeolites hydrophobized by functionalization with organosilanes are much more stable in hot liquid water than the corresponding untreated zeolites. Silylation of the zeolite increases hydrophobicity without significantly reducing the density of acid sites. This hydrophobization with organosilanes makes the zeolites able to stabilize water/oil emulsions and catalyze reactions of importance in biofuel upgrading, i.e., alcohol dehydration and alkylation of m-cresol and 2-propanol in the liquid phase, at high temperatures. While at 200 °C the crystalline structure of an untreated HY zeolite collapses in a few hours in contact with a liquid medium, the functionalized hydrophobic zeolites keep their structure practically unaltered. Detailed XRD, SEM, HRTEM, and BET analyses indicate that even after reaction under severe conditions, the hydrophobic zeolites retain their crystallinity, surface area, microporosity, and acid density. It is proposed that by preferentially anchoring hydrophobic functionalities on the external surface, the direct contact of bulk liquid water and the zeolite is hindered, thus preventing the collapse of the framework during the reaction in liquid hot water.

  6. Polymer squeeze cuts water/oil ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, D.R.

    1973-01-01

    Polymer squeeze techniques have reduced water/oil ratios by 60 to 90% in the Bemis Shutts field of Ellis County, Kans. More than 100 wells have been treated and the success ratio has been extremely high. Not only have W/O ratios been drastically reduced, but a high percentage of the wells has shown a significant increase in oil production. The Bemis Shutts field is divided into 4 sectors: (1) Bemis Shutts with 522 wells; (2) Burnett Sector with 309 wells; (3) Brunnett Southwest Sector with 57 wells; and (4) Walters Sector with 105 wells. Seventy companies or individuals operate these producing wells. Polymer techniques and treatments have progressed at a very rapid pace in the past year. The general stratigraphy including a description of the Arbuckle group, is described. Analyses of water samples will indicate the type, or types, of gypsum deposits and corrosion that are contributing to production problems. Hydrogen sulfide gas in these waters (probably from bacteria) may be causing corrosion.

  7. Naphthenic acids hydrates of gases: influence of the water/oil interface on the dispersing properties of an acidic crude oil; Acides naphteniques hydrates de gaz de l'interface eau/huile sur les proprietes dispersantes d'un brut acide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arla, D.

    2006-01-15

    Nowadays, the development of offshore oil production under increasing water depths (high pressures and low temperatures) has led oil companies to focus on gas hydrates risks. Hydrates are crystals containing gas and water molecules which can plug offshore pipelines. It has been shown that some asphaltenic crude oils stabilize water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) during several months and exhibit very good anti-agglomerant properties avoiding hydrate plugs formation. In this work, we have studied the 'anti-hydrate' properties of a West African acidic crude oil called crude AH. This oil contains naphthenic acids, RCOOH hydrocarbons which are sensitive to both the pH and the salinity of the water phase.The emulsifying properties of the crude AH have firstly been explored. It has been shown that heavy resins and asphaltenes are the main compounds of the crude AH responsible for the long term stability of the W/O emulsions whereas the napthenates RCOO{sup -} lead to less stable W/O emulsions. Dealing with hydrates, the crude AH exhibits moderate anti-agglomerant properties due to the presence of heavy resins and asphaltenes. However, the naphthenates RCOO{sup -} drastically increase the formation of hydrate plugs. Moreover, it has been pointed out that hydrate particles agglomeration accelerates the kinetics of hydrate formation and enhances the water/oil separation. In order to explain these behaviours, a mechanism of agglomeration by 'sticking' between a hydrate particle and a water droplet has been proposed. Finally, we have developed a model which describes the physico-chemical equilibria of the naphthenic acids in the binary system water/crude AH, in order to transpose the results obtained in the laboratory to the real oil field conditions. (author)

  8. Analytical Estimation of Water-Oil Relative Permeabilities through Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saboorian-Jooybari Hadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Modeling multiphase flow through fractures is a key issue for understanding flow mechanism and performance prediction of fractured petroleum reservoirs, geothermal reservoirs, underground aquifers and carbon-dioxide sequestration. One of the most challenging subjects in modeling of fractured petroleum reservoirs is quantifying fluids competition for flow in fracture network (relative permeability curves. Unfortunately, there is no standard technique for experimental measurement of relative permeabilities through fractures and the existing methods are very expensive, time consuming and erroneous. Although, several formulations were presented to calculate fracture relative permeability curves in the form of linear and power functions of flowing fluids saturation, it is still unclear what form of relative permeability curves must be used for proper modeling of flow through fractures and consequently accurate reservoir simulation. Basically, the classic linear relative permeability (X-type curves are used in almost all of reservoir simulators. In this work, basic fluid flow equations are combined to develop a new simple analytical model for water-oil two phase flow in a single fracture. The model gives rise to simple analytic formulations for fracture relative permeabilities. The model explicitly proves that water-oil relative permeabilities in fracture network are functions of fluids saturation, viscosity ratio, fluids density, inclination of fracture plane from horizon, pressure gradient along fracture and rock matrix wettability, however they were considered to be only functions of saturations in the classic X-type and power (Corey [35] and Honarpour et al. [28, 29] models. Eventually, validity of the proposed formulations is checked against literature experimental data. The proposed fracture relative permeability functions have several advantages over the existing ones. Firstly, they are explicit functions of the parameters which are known for

  9. the Stability of Its Associated Water/Oil Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bazaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two steps synthetic method for the preparation of a novel emulsion stabilizer called poly(ricineoleic acid-b-ethyleneglycol-b-ricineoleic acid with average mass molecular weight of 7000 Daltons is investigated. In the first step, oligoricineoleic acid with average mass molecular weight of 1800 Daltons is synthesized (yield 70%. In the second step, the desired copolymer is  synthesized from the reaction of two moles of oligomer with one mole of polyethylene glycol and its stabilizing effect on an water/oil emulsion is investigated. For the formulation of the emulsion, the synthesized copolymer is first dissolved at 45oC in diesel oil while stirring, and then this solution is added dropwise to the solution of saline water (1M. Then the mixture is stressed under ultrasonic waves for 5 s to afford smaller drops, after which the emulsion shows good stability. A thin layer film of emulsion- produced from injection of emulsion (0.1 μL is studied by light microscope equipment. In this study the number of oil droplets and the average diameter of droplets are determined. Also the mole fractions (φ = 0.32 are calculated. This copolymer can be used as a stabilizer in invert emulsion muds, which are used in perforating industry and as a thickener in food and cosmetic industries.

  10. Topology changes in a water-oil swirling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Luis; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reveals the flow topology hidden in the experimental study by Fujimoto and Takeda ["Topology changes of the interface between two immiscible liquid layers by a rotating lid," Phys. Rev. E 80, 015304(R) (2009)]. Water and silicone oil fill a sealed vertical cylindrical container. The rotating top disk induces the meridional circulation and swirl of both fluids. As the rotation strength Reo increases, the interface takes shapes named, by the authors, hump, cusp, Mt. Fuji, and bell. Our numerical study reproduces the interface geometry and discloses complicated flow patterns. For example at Reo = 752, where the interface has the "Mt. Fuji" shape, the water motion has three bulk cells and the oil motion has two bulk cells. This topology helps explain the interface geometry. In addition, our study finds that the steady axisymmetric flow suffers from the shear-layer instability for Reo > 324, i.e., before the interface becomes remarkably deformed. The disturbance energy is concentrated in the water depth. This explains why the instability does not significantly affect the interface shape in the experiment.

  11. Facile Preparation of Nanostructured, Superhydrophobic Filter Paper for Efficient Water/Oil Separation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Wang

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a facile and cost-effective method to obtain superhydrophobic filter paper and demonstrate its application for efficient water/oil separation. By coupling structurally distinct organosilane precursors (e.g., octadecyltrichlorosilane and methyltrichlorosilane to paper fibers under controlled reaction conditions, we have formulated a simple, inexpensive, and efficient protocol to achieve a desirable superhydrophobic and superoleophilic surface on conventional filter paper. The silanized superhydrophobic filter paper showed nanostructured morphology and demonstrated great separation efficiency (up to 99.4% for water/oil mixtures. The modified filter paper is stable in both aqueous solutions and organic solvents, and can be reused multiple times. The present study shows that our newly developed binary silanization is a promising method of modifying cellulose-based materials for practical applications, in particular the treatment of industrial waste water and ecosystem recovery.

  12. Films of bacteria at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, Liana; Molaei, Mehdi; Niepa, Tagbo H R; Lee, Daeyeon; Leheny, Robert L; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2017-09-01

    Bacteria are often discussed as active colloids, self-propelled organisms whose collective motion can be studied in the context of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. In such studies, the behavior of bacteria confined to interfaces or in the proximity of an interface plays an important role. For instance, many studies have probed collective behavior of bacteria in quasi two-dimensional systems such as soap films. Since fluid interfaces can adsorb surfactants and other materials, the stress and velocity boundary conditions at interfaces can alter bacteria motion; hydrodynamic studies of interfaces with differing boundary conditions are reviewed. Also, bacteria in bulk can become trapped at or near fluid interfaces, where they colonize and form structures comprising secretions like exopolysaccharides, surfactants, living and dead bacteria, thereby creating Films of Bacteria at Interfaces (FBI). The formation of FBI is discussed at air-water, oil-water, and water-water interfaces, with an emphasis on film mechanics, and with some allusion to genetic functions guiding bacteria to restructure fluid interfaces. At air-water interfaces, bacteria form pellicles or interfacial biofilms. Studies are reviewed that reveal that pellicle material properties differ for different strains of bacteria, and that pellicle physicochemistry can act as a feedback mechanism to regulate film formation. At oil-water interfaces, a range of FBI form, depending on bacteria strain. Some bacteria-laden interfaces age from an initial active film, with dynamics dominated by motile bacteria, through viscoelastic states, to form an elastic film. Others remain active with no evidence of elastic film formation even at significant interface ages. Finally, bacteria can adhere to and colonize ultra-low surface tension interfaces such as aqueous-aqueous systems common in food industries. Relevant literature is reviewed, and areas of interest for potential application are discussed, ranging from health

  13. Macromolecular sensing at the liquid-liquid interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Gregoire; Flynn, Shane [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, University College, Cork (Ireland); Arrigan, Damien W M, E-mail: gregoire.herzog@tyndall.ie [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, Perth (Australia)

    2011-08-17

    We report here the electrochemical sensing of macromolecules, such as polyLysine dendrimers, at the polarised liquid | liquid interface. Electrochemistry at the liquid | liquid interface is a powerful analytical technique which allows the detection of non-redox active molecules via ion transfer reactions at a polarised water - oil interface. We demonstrate here that different parameters of the polyLysine dendrimers (charge number, molecular weight) have a strong influence on the sensitivity and limit of detection of these macromolecules. This work will help to the development of sensors based on charge transfer at the liquid | liquid interface.

  14. Water/oil repellent property of polyester fabrics after supercritical carbon dioxide finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yan-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong permeability and driving force of supercritical carbon dioxide renders it an ideal medium for fabrics finishing. This paper is to use supercritical carbon dioxide medium with a solution of organic fluorine to fabricate water/oil repellent polyester fabrics. A series of characterization methods including Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, energy dispersive spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy were carried out to evaluate the fabrics finishing. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry showed that the transmittance peak appeared at 1202.4 and 1147.4 cm-1, indicating the presence of -CF2- group on the surface of polyester fabrics. The results of energy dispersive spectrometer and scanning electron microscopy showed that the fluorine was evenly distributed on the fibers surface. In addition, a series of physical properties were detected, including contact angel, air permeability, breaking strength, and wearing resistance. The average water and hexadecane contact angles were 147.58° and 143.78°, respectively. Compared with the initial fabrics, the treated one has little change in air permeability, while its strength increased greatly. The treated fabrics gained good water/oil repellent properties while keeping good air permeability and improving mechanical property.

  15. Water-oil core-shell droplets for electrowetting-based digital microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Daniel; Malic, Lidija; Normandin, François; Tabrizian, Maryam; Veres, Teodor

    2008-08-01

    Digital microfluidics based on electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) has recently emerged as one of the most promising technologies to realize integrated and highly flexible lab-on-a-chip systems. In such EWOD-based digital microfluidic devices, the aqueous droplets have traditionally been manipulated either directly in air or in an immiscible fluid such as silicone oil. However, both transporting mediums have important limitations and neither offers the flexibility required to fulfil the needs of several applications. In this paper, we report on an alternative mode of operation for EWOD-based devices in which droplets enclosed in a thin layer of oil are manipulated in air. We demonstrate the possibility to perform on-chip the fundamental fluidic operations by using such water-oil core-shell droplets and compare systematically the results with the traditional approach where the aqueous droplets are manipulated directly in air or oil. We show that the core-shell configuration combines several advantages of both the air and oil mediums. In particular, this configuration not only reduces the operation voltage of EWOD-based devices but also leads to higher transport velocities when compared with the manipulation of droplets directly in air or oil.

  16. A Computational Study of Internal Flows in a Heated Water-Oil Emulsion Droplet

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-01-05

    The vaporization characteristics of water-oil emulsion droplets are investigated by high fidelity computational simulations. One of the key objectives is to identify the physical mechanism for the experimentally observed behavior that the component in the dispersed micro-droplets always vaporizes first, for both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsion droplets. The mechanism of this phenomenon has not been clearly understood. In this study, an Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement in order to effectively capture the thermo-capillary effect of a micro-droplet in an emulsion droplet efficiently. It is found that the temperature difference in an emulsion droplet creates a surface tension gradient along the micro-droplet surface, inducing surface movement. Subsequently, the outer shear flow and internal flow circulation inside the droplet, referred to as the Marangoni convection, are created. The present study confirms that the Marangoni effect can be sufficiently large to drive the micro-droplets to the emulsion droplet surface at higher temperature, for both water-in-oil and oil-and-water emulsion droplets. A further parametric study with different micro-droplet sizes and temperature gradients demonstrates that larger micro-droplets move faster with larger temperature gradient. The oil micro-droplet in oil-in-water emulsion droplets moves faster due to large temperature gradients by smaller thermal conductivity.

  17. Nonlinear analysis of gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of multi-phase flows has been a challenge in the fields of nonlinear dynamics and fluid mechanics. This chapter reviews our work on two-phase flow dynamics in combination with complex network theory. We systematically carried out gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow experiments for measuring the time series of flow signals which is studied in terms of the mapping from time series to complex networks. Three network mapping methods were proposed for the analysis and identification of flow patterns, i.e. Flow Pattern Complex Network (FPCN), Fluid Dynamic Complex Network (FDCN) and Fluid Structure Complex Network (FSCN). Through detecting the community structure of FPCN based on K-means clustering, distinct flow patterns can be successfully distinguished and identified. A number of FDCN’s under different flow conditions were constructed in order to reveal the dynamical characteristics of two-phase flows. The FDCNs exhibit universal power-law degree distributions. The power-law exponent ...

  18. Role of resins, asphaltenes and aromatics on water-oil emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.; Sermon, P.A.; Skidmore, P.G.; Collins, I.R. [Surrey Univ., Sunbury (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Following primary and secondary oil recovery, the remaining oil within the reservoir can be trapped by capillary forces within a network of rock pores. Tertiary oil recovery can then be based upon carbon dioxide flooding, alkaline flooding, steam injection and chemical flooding-with polymers or surfactants. However, surfactants can only be useful if they are soluble in the aqueous phase at reservoir temperature, salinity and pH. Surfactants are only modestly adsorbed on the reservoir rock and are responsible for oil-water emulsions, phase equilibria, surface tensions and viscosities. Maximum additional oil-phase displacement can be achieved when the correct surfactant blend is selected. This presentation included a table demonstrating the composition of middle phase emulsions formed with brine. GC-HPLC, phase equilibria, conductivity, optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to determine how the asphaltene-resinous-aromatic content of crude oils affect the ease of formation of water-oil emulsions. The study showed that the ratio of water to oil in the emulsions formed depends on the proportion of asphaltenes and resins in the oil. This information can be used to ensure that the ratio reaches a plateau in production, thus optimizing oil production.

  19. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  20. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...

  1. Interface Realisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2005-01-01

    This article argues for seeing the interface as an important representational and aesthetic form with implications for postmodern culture and digital aesthetics. The interface emphasizes realism due in part to the desire for transparency in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and partly to the devel......This article argues for seeing the interface as an important representational and aesthetic form with implications for postmodern culture and digital aesthetics. The interface emphasizes realism due in part to the desire for transparency in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and partly...

  2. Three-phase flow (water, oil and gas in a vertical circular cylindrical duct with leaks: A theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Santos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the fluid dynamic behavior of a three-phase flow (water-oil-natural gas in a vertical pipe with or without leakage. The studied pipe has 8 meters in length, circular cross-section with 25 cm in diameter and a leak, which hole has a circular shape with 10mm diameter located in the center of pipe. The conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for each phase (continuous phase - oil, dispersed phases - gas and water were numerically solved using ANSYS CFX software, in which the Eulerian-Eulerian model and the RNG - turbulence model were applied. Results of the pressure, velocity, temperature and volume fraction distributions of the involved phases are present and analyzed.

  3. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two...

  4. Organic interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, W.A.; Tempelman, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the consequences for product designers resulting from the replacement of traditional interfaces by responsive materials. Part 1 presents a theoretical framework regarding a new paradigm for man-machine interfacing. Part 2 provides an analysis of the opportunities offered by new

  5. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  6. Microprocessor interfacing

    CERN Document Server

    Vears, R E

    2014-01-01

    Microprocessor Interfacing provides the coverage of the Business and Technician Education Council level NIII unit in Microprocessor Interfacing (syllabus U86/335). Composed of seven chapters, the book explains the foundation in microprocessor interfacing techniques in hardware and software that can be used for problem identification and solving. The book focuses on the 6502, Z80, and 6800/02 microprocessor families. The technique starts with signal conditioning, filtering, and cleaning before the signal can be processed. The signal conversion, from analog to digital or vice versa, is expl

  7. Manufacturing Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper identifies the changing needs and requirements with respect to the interfacing of manufacturing functions. It considers the manufacturing system, its components and their relationships from the technological and logistic point of view, against the background of concurrent engineering.

  8. Designing Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tidwell, Jenifer

    2010-01-01

    Despite all of the UI toolkits available today, it's still not easy to design good application interfaces. This bestselling book is one of the few reliable sources to help you navigate through the maze of design options. By capturing UI best practices and reusable ideas as design patterns, Designing Interfaces provides solutions to common design problems that you can tailor to the situation at hand. This updated edition includes patterns for mobile apps and social media, as well as web applications and desktop software. Each pattern contains full-color examples and practical design advice th

  9. Dependence of the Internal Structure on Water/Particle Volume Ratio in an Amphiphilic Janus Particle-Water-Oil Ternary System: From Micelle-like Clusters to Emulsions of Spherical Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Tomohiro G; Iwashita, Yasutaka; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-31

    particles are adsorbed at the water-oil interface; i.e., the particles show ideal surface activity.

  10. Membranes obtained from alumina from separation water/oil; Membranas obtidas a partir do residuo de alumina para separacao de agua/oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosas Neto, M.I.; Lira, H.L; Guimaraes, I.O; Franca, K.B., E-mail: moisesnetu@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB, (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate by flow test emulsion water/oil a membrane obtained from a crude residue of the alumina industry and see if this membrane is able to filter this emulsion within the limits specified by CONAMA. In this work, tubular membranes composed of the alumina and the residue bentonite clay were produced by extrusion and were sintered at 900, 1000 and 1100 ° C. tangential flow tests were conducted with deionized water and subsequently with an emulsion of water / oil, all done with a pressure of 1.5 bar. The results showed that membranes produced from the crude residue the alumina industry were quite efficient the emulsion's oil removal, reducing the concentration of about 100 ppm in the feed, to below 5ppm and flow rates of around 30L/h.m{sup 2}. (author)

  11. Testing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Henriksen, Mogens; Nilson, Jesper K.

    1999-01-01

    The wide use of solid insulating materials combinations in combinations has introduced problems in the interfaces between components. The most common insulating materials are cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), silicone rubber (SIR) and ethylene-propylene rubbers (EPR). Assemblies of these materials...

  12. Interface learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorhauge, Sally

    2014-01-01

    "Interface learning - New goals for museum and upper secondary school collaboration" investigates and analyzes the learning that takes place when museums and upper secondary schools in Denmark work together in local partnerships to develop and carry out school-related, museum-based coursework...... for students. The research focuses on the learning that the students experience in the interface of the two learning environments: The formal learning environment of the upper secondary school and the informal learning environment of the museum. Focus is also on the learning that the teachers and museum...... professionals experience as a result of their collaboration. The dissertation demonstrates how a given partnership’s collaboration affects the students’ learning experiences when they are doing the coursework. The dissertation presents findings that museum-school partnerships can use in order to develop...

  13. Study of the interface solid/solutions containing PEO-PPO block copolymers and asphaltenes by FTIR/ATR; Estudo de solucoes de copolimeros em bloco de PEO-PPO contendo asfaltenos por FTIR/DTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Janaina I.S.; Neto, Jessica S.G.; Mansur, Claudia R.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Macromoleculas, Laboratorio de Macromoleculas e Coloides na Industria de Petroleo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mails: janaina_333@hotmail.com, kinha_dac_dm@hotmail.com; celias@ima.ufrj.br

    2011-07-01

    The formation of water/oil emulsions can cause problems in various stages of production, processing and refining of petroleum. In this study, the technique of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) using the method of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) was applied to study the solid-solutions of block copolymers based on poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) (PEO-PPO) interface and its interaction in this interface with asphaltenic fractions of petroleum. The solid is the crystal of the ATR. Initially, we determined the critical micelle concentration values of the copolymers, which were consistent those obtained by a tensiometer. Bottle Test was also performed to correlate the efficiency of PEO-PPO copolymers in the breaking of water/oil emulsions with its adsorption at the interfaces solutions. (author)

  14. 'Interfaces' 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Borsa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Issue No. 4 is the first open issue of Interfaces: A Journal of Medieval European Literatures. It contains contributions by Henry Bainton (12th-century historiography, Lucie Doležalová (parabiblical texts and the canon, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh (Irish literary culture in Latin and Irish, Isabel Varillas Sánchez (legends of composition of canonical texts, Septuaginta, Wim Verbaal (letter collections, Bernard of Clairvaux, and Jonas Wellendorf (canons of skaldic poets in the 12th/13th century, preceded by a brief Introduction by the editors.

  15. Self-Assembled Biosensors on a Solid Interface for Rapid Detection and Growth Monitoring of Bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Kinnunen, Paivo; Craig, Elizabeth; Brahmasandra, Sundu; McNaughton, Brandon H

    2012-01-01

    Developing rapid methods for pathogen detection and growth monitoring at low cell and analyte concentrations is an important goal, which numerous technologies are working towards solving. Rapid biosensors have already made a dramatic impact on improving patient outcomes and with continued development, these technologies may also help limit the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and reduce the ever expanding risk of foodborne illnesses. One technology that is being developed with these goals in mind is asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) biosensors. Self-assembled AMBR biosensors have been demonstrated at water/air and water/oil interfaces, and here, for the first time, we report on self-assembled AMBR biosensors used at a solid interface. The solid interface configuration was used to measure the growth of Escherichia coli with two distinct phenomena at low cell concentrations: firstly, the AMBR rotational period decreased and secondly, the rotational period increased after several division times. Ta...

  16. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE SOLUBILIZATION CAPACITY OF WATER/OIL MICROEMULSIONS / FACTEURS INFLUENÇANT LA CAPACITÉ DE SOLUBILISATION DES MICROÉMULSIONS EAU/HUILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDU PERETZ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The solubilization capacity of water / oil / AOT (sodium bis(2 ethylhexylsulfosuccinate microemulsions was studied as a function of a fourth component added in the system. Addition of cosurfactant modifies the water solubility and the properties of the system. The influence of some alcohols with linear and branched hydrocarbon chains and a cationic hydrosoluble dye, methylene blue (MB, on the solubilization of water in water/oil microemulsions was studied. The value of the molar ratio of water to surfactant, R, increases in the alcohols presence as the volume of solubilized water was increased. The increasing of R leads also to a significant increase of the radius of water-core of the droplets in microemulsion. A separation of water in w/o microemulsion appears when concentration of alcohol is 9×10-4 M and the volume of water increases, becoming 1.2 to 2.5 times higher if the concentration of alcohol rises to 1.2×10-3 M. Addition of MB into microemulsion leads to the doubling of the volume of separated water. The partition of MB between microemulsion and water phases shows that the dye migrates preferentially in the microemulsion phase in the presence of alcohols.

  17. Interface mobility from interface random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautt, Zachary; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Karma, Alain

    2007-03-01

    Computational studies aimed at extracting interface mobilities require driving forces orders of magnitude higher than those occurring experimentally. We present a computational methodology that extracts the absolute interface mobility in the zero driving force limit by monitoring the one-dimensional random walk of the mean interface position along the interface normal. The method exploits a fluctuation-dissipation relation similar to the Stokes-Einstein relation, which relates the diffusion coefficient of this Brownian-like random walk to the interface mobility. Atomic-scale simulations of grain boundaries in model crystalline systems validate the theoretical predictions, and also highlight the profound effect of impurities. The generality of this technique combined with its inherent spatial-temporal efficiency should allow computational studies to effectively complement experiments in understanding interface kinetics in diverse material systems.

  18. Interface solutions for interface side effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoffregen Thomas A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Human-computer interfaces often give rise to a variety of side effects, including eyestrain, headache, fatigue, and motion sickness (aka cybersickness, simulator sickness. We might hope that improvements in interface design would tend to reduce these side effects. Unfortunately, history reveals just the opposite: The incidence and severity of motion sickness (for example is positively related to the progressive sophistication of display technology and systems. In this presentation, I enquire about the future of interface technologies in relation to side effects. I review the types of side effects that occur and what is known about the causes of interface side effects. I suggest new ways of understanding relations between interface technologies and side effects, and new ways to approach the problem of interface side effects.

  19. Interface Simulation Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Černý

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical (boolean notion of refinement for behavioral interfaces of system components is the alternating refinement preorder. In this paper, we define a distance for interfaces, called interface simulation distance. It makes the alternating refinement preorder quantitative by, intuitively, tolerating errors (while counting them in the alternating simulation game. We show that the interface simulation distance satisfies the triangle inequality, that the distance between two interfaces does not increase under parallel composition with a third interface, and that the distance between two interfaces can be bounded from above and below by distances between abstractions of the two interfaces. We illustrate the framework, and the properties of the distances under composition of interfaces, with two case studies.

  20. Integration of the CDOG Deep Water Oil and Gas Blowout Model with the NOAA GNOME Trajectory Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yapa, P.D.; Chen, F. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Beegle-Krause, C.J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The Minerals Management Services of the United States Department of the Interior, in cooperation with 22 oil companies, has developed the Clarkson Deepwater Oil and Gas (CDOG) computer model which can simulate oil and gas behaviour from a deepwater blowout. In particular, the model simulates the behaviour of oil and gas released from deepwater and integrates the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the jet/plume, the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrate formation and decomposition, and gas dissolution. It can also compute buoyant velocity of gases or hydrates and can simulate the behaviour of oil in strong cross flow conditions where gases many separate from the main plume. CDOG only simulates oil and gas behaviour until it reaches the water surface. It does not include weathering processes once oil starts floating on the water surface. For that reason, the integration of CDOG with the General NOAA Oil Modelling Environment (GNOME) spill trajectory model offers several advantages. With GNOME, the user can input a weather forecast or wind model to drive the oil on the water's surface. Users can run CDOG and with a GUI interface can easily transition to GNOME to run complete spill scenarios from deepwater blowouts, including subsurface spills and oil slick transport once the oil reaches the water surface. A comparison of model simulations with the Deepspill field experiments off the coast of Norway indicates that such complete scenarios are extremely useful for contingency planning. 17 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  1. Instantaneous Liquid Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Willard, Adam P.; Chandler, David

    2009-01-01

    We describe and illustrate a simple procedure for identifying a liquid interface from atomic coordinates. In particular, a coarse grained density field is constructed, and the interface is defined as a constant density surface for this coarse grained field. In applications to a molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water, it is shown that this procedure provides instructive and useful pictures of liquid-vapor interfaces and of liquid-protein interfaces.

  2. Microcomputer interfacing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, M A

    1990-01-01

    This is the applications guide to interfacing microcomputers. It offers practical non-mathematical solutions to interfacing problems in many applications including data acquisition and control. Emphasis is given to the definition of the objectives of the interface, then comparing possible solutions and producing the best interface for every situation. Dr Mustafa A Mustafa is a senior designer of control equipment and has written many technical articles and papers on the subject of computers and their application to control engineering.

  3. Water at Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Hodgson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives...

  4. Quantization of interface currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotani, Motoko [AIMR, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Schulz-Baldes, Hermann [Department Mathematik, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Villegas-Blas, Carlos [Instituto de Matematicas, Cuernavaca, UNAM, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    At the interface of two two-dimensional quantum systems, there may exist interface currents similar to edge currents in quantum Hall systems. It is proved that these interface currents are macroscopically quantized by an integer that is given by the difference of the Chern numbers of the two systems. It is also argued that at the interface between two time-reversal invariant systems with half-integer spin, one of which is trivial and the other non-trivial, there are dissipationless spin-polarized interface currents.

  5. Modeling and Analysis of Magnetic Nanoparticles Injection in Water-Oil Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media under Magnetic Field Effect

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2017-08-28

    In this paper, the magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a water-oil, two-phase system under the influence of an external permanent magnetic field. We lay down the mathematical model and provide a set of numerical exercises of hypothetical cases to show how an external magnetic field can influence the transport of nanoparticles in the proposed two-phase system in porous media. We treat the water-nanoparticles suspension as a miscible mixture, whereas it is immiscible with the oil phase. The magnetization properties, the density, and the viscosity of the ferrofluids are obtained based on mixture theory relationships. In the mathematical model, the phase pressure contains additional term to account for the extra pressures due to fluid magnetization effect and the magnetostrictive effect. As a proof of concept, the proposed model is applied on a countercurrent imbibition flow system in which both the displacing and the displaced fluids move in opposite directions. Physical variables, including waternanoparticles suspension saturation, nanoparticles concentration, and pore wall/throat concentrations of deposited nanoparticles, are investigated under the influence of the magnetic field. Two different locations of the magnet are studied numerically, and variations in permeability and porosity are considered.

  6. Modeling and Analysis of Magnetic Nanoparticles Injection in Water-Oil Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media under Magnetic Field Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. El-Amin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a water-oil, two-phase system under the influence of an external permanent magnetic field. We lay down the mathematical model and provide a set of numerical exercises of hypothetical cases to show how an external magnetic field can influence the transport of nanoparticles in the proposed two-phase system in porous media. We treat the water-nanoparticles suspension as a miscible mixture, whereas it is immiscible with the oil phase. The magnetization properties, the density, and the viscosity of the ferrofluids are obtained based on mixture theory relationships. In the mathematical model, the phase pressure contains additional term to account for the extra pressures due to fluid magnetization effect and the magnetostrictive effect. As a proof of concept, the proposed model is applied on a countercurrent imbibition flow system in which both the displacing and the displaced fluids move in opposite directions. Physical variables, including water-nanoparticles suspension saturation, nanoparticles concentration, and pore wall/throat concentrations of deposited nanoparticles, are investigated under the influence of the magnetic field. Two different locations of the magnet are studied numerically, and variations in permeability and porosity are considered.

  7. Advanced aerosense display interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Darrel G.; Meyer, Frederick M.

    1998-09-01

    High-resolution display technologies are being developed to meet the ever-increasing demand for realistic detail. The requirement for evermore visual information exceeds the capacity of fielded aerospace display interfaces. In this paper we begin an exploration of display interfaces and evolving aerospace requirements. Current and evolving standards for avionics, commercial, and flat panel displays are summarized and compared to near term goals for military and aerospace applications. Aerospace and military applications prior to 2005 up to UXGA and digital HDTV resolution can be met by using commercial interface standard developments. Advanced aerospace requirements require yet higher resolutions (2560 X 2048 color pixels, 5120 X 4096 color pixels at 85 Hz, etc.) and necessitate the initiation of discussion herein of an 'ultra digital interface standard (UDIS)' which includes 'smart interface' features such as large memory and blazingly fast resizing microcomputer. Interface capacity, IT, increased about 105 from 1973 to 1998; 102 more is needed for UDIS.

  8. Universal computer interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  9. Popeye Project: ROV interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scates, C.R.; Hernandez, D.A.; Hickok, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) interface with the Popeye Project Subsea System. It describes the ROV-related plans, design philosophies, intervention tasks, tooling/equipment requirements, testing activities, and offshore installation experiences. Early identification and continuous consideration of the ROV interfaces significantly improved the overall efficiency of equipment designs and offshore operations. The Popeye Project helped advance the technology and standardization of ROV interfaces for deep water subsea production systems.

  10. Electromagnetic Interface Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electromagnetic Interface Testing facilitysupports such testing asEmissions, Field Strength, Mode Stirring, EMP Pulser, 4 Probe Monitoring/Leveling System, and...

  11. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  12. Interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öner, S.Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with material interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics. Interface properties between the absorbing semiconductor and other employed materials are crucial for an efficient solar cell. While the optical properties are largely unaffected by a few nanometer thin layer, the electronic

  13. Designing the Instructional Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Designing the instructional interface is a challenging endeavor requiring knowledge and skills in instructional and visual design, psychology, human-factors, ergonomic research, computer science, and editorial design. This paper describes the instructional interface, the challenges of its development, and an instructional systems approach to its…

  14. User Interface Technology Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    Interface can be manufactured. The user Interface bulder may be provided with tools to enhance the building block set, e.g.. icon and font editor to add...ity and easy extensiblity of the command set. t supports command history , execu- tion of previous commands, and editing of commands. Through the

  15. Interface, a dispersed architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    Past and current specification techniques use timing diagrams and written text to describe the phenomenology of an interface. This paper treats an interface as the architecture of a number of processes, which are dispersed over the related system parts and the message path. This approach yields a

  16. Fluorinated monolayers at liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongjian

    Microscopic structure of several fluorinated monolayers at water-vapor and water-oil interfaces were examined using x-ray specular reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction (GID) techniques. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements of monolayers of perfluoro-n-eicosane (F(CFsb2)sb{20}F) and F(CFsb2)sb{m}(CHsb2)sb{n}H (denoted as Fsb{m}Hsb{n}) supported at the air-water interface demonstrated that even without the conventional polar head group, the surfactant molecules are capable of forming ordered in-plane structures defined by hexagonal close packing of the fluorinated blocks of adsorbed molecules due to the stronger chain-chain interaction between fluorocarbon chains than the corresponding hydrocarbons. The specular reflectivity data reveals a hydrocarbon-down, fluorocarbon-up orientation for Fsb{12}Hsb{18}. In contrast to the conventional expectation that soluble surfactants form disordered monolayers at the liquid-liquid interface, the studies on a fluoroalcohol (F(CFsb2)sb{10}(CHsb2)sb2OH) monolayer at water-hexane interface indicate that the surfactants are in a close packed hexagonal phase, similar to the in-plane structure of other fluorocarbon molecules at water-air interface. Above a transition temperature the monolayer is in a low density gas phase. Preliminary study shows that hysteresis effect occurs around the transition temperature. The first measurements of microscopic structure at common high interfacial tension liquid-liquid interfaces such as a simple oil-water (hexane-water) interface is also reported. Thermal expansion coefficient measurements indicate subtle structural differences in these monolayers.

  17. Entanglement and topological interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brehm, E.; Brunner, I.; Jaud, D.; Schmidt-Colinet, C. [Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper we consider entanglement entropies in two-dimensional conformal field theories in the presence of topological interfaces. Tracing over one side of the interface, the leading term of the entropy remains unchanged. The interface however adds a subleading contribution, which can be interpreted as a relative (Kullback-Leibler) entropy with respect to the situation with no defect inserted. Reinterpreting boundaries as topological interfaces of a chiral half of the full theory, we rederive the left/right entanglement entropy in analogy with the interface case. We discuss WZW models and toroidal bosonic theories as examples. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms; Myers, Brad A

    2008-01-01

    User Interfaces have been around as long as computers have existed, even well before the field of Human-Computer Interaction was established. Over the years, some papers on the history of Human-Computer Interaction and User Interfaces have appeared, primarily focusing on the graphical interface era...... and early visionaries such as Bush, Engelbart and Kay. With the User Interface being a decisive factor in the proliferation of computers in society and since it has become a cultural phenomenon, it is time to paint a more comprehensive picture of its history. This SIG will investigate the possibilities...... of  launching a concerted effort towards creating a History of User Interfaces. ...

  19. After Rigid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troiano, Giovanni Maria

    Deformable and shape-changing interfaces are rapidly emerging in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). Deformable interfaces provide users with newer input possibilities such as bending, squeezing, or stretching, which were impossible to achieve with rigid interfaces. Shape...... sensors in the five preferred objects and programmed them for controlling sounds with computer software. Finally, we ran a performance study where six musicians performed music with deformable interfaces at their studios. Results from the performance study show that musicians systematically map......, Transformation, Adaptation and Physicalization. In synthesis, the work presented in this thesis shows (1) implications of usefulness for deformable interfaces and how their new input modalities can redefine the way users interact with computers, and (2) how a systematic understanding of conventional design...

  20. Bubble separation at the interface between a liquid metal and a liquid slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrier, Vincent F.

    Due to more specific consumer demand, most steel manufacturers are developing techniques to produce quality steels by limiting the number of defects in the final product. There are several aspects to be considered when producing "clean steels", and this research project will focus on one of them: inclusion and bubble separation. Large inclusions (solid or liquid) and gas bubbles have to be removed from the liquid metal before casting, and separation occurs mostly at the slag-metal interface. The objective of this study to develop a fundamental understanding of bubble separation at the slag-metal interface by looking at the chemical engineering literature on separation and coalescence, and by studying experimentally bubble separation at a liquid-liquid interface, first using a water-oil system and then with a metal-slag system. The literature review and the water modeling experiments have shown that four separate steps need to be considered when studying the removal of a buoyant phase particle at a liquid-liquid interface: the transport to the interface, the separation at the interface (film drainage), the film rupture and the removal from the interface. The major factors influencing the rest-time of an argon bubble at an oil-water interface are determined experimentally. The high temperature apparatus permits direct visualization of bubble behavior in metal and slag. The separation of argon bubbles at the slag-metal interface exhibits a behavior similar to what is observed in water modeling: the bubbles impact the interface and rest there for some time before coalescing. A methodology of studying the separation of solid and liquid inclusions is also established using two complementary techniques: x-ray fluoroscopy and confocal scanning electron microscopy. This experimental study showed that inclusions and bubbles do not separate immediately upon reaching the slag-metal interface but can rest in the metal phase for long periods of time before separating. Enhancing

  1. Operator interface for vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissontz, Jay E

    2015-03-10

    A control interface for drivetrain braking provided by a regenerative brake and a non-regenerative brake is implemented using a combination of switches and graphic interface elements. The control interface comprises a control system for allocating drivetrain braking effort between the regenerative brake and the non-regenerative brake, a first operator actuated control for enabling operation of the drivetrain braking, and a second operator actuated control for selecting a target braking effort for drivetrain braking. A graphic display displays to an operator the selected target braking effort and can be used to further display actual braking effort achieved by drivetrain braking.

  2. Ecological Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Rasmussen, Jens

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical framework for designing interfaces for complex human-machine systems is proposed. The framework, called ecological interface design (EID), is based on the skills, rules, knowledge taxonomy of cognitive control. The basic goal of EID is twofold: first, not to force processing...... of other approaches to interface design indicates that EID has a unique and significant contribution to make. Third, the results of an initial empirical evaluation also provide some preliminary support for the EID framework. Some issues for future research are outlined....

  3. The computer graphics interface

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbrugge Chauveau, Karla; Niles Reed, Theodore; Shepherd, B

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Graphics Interface provides a concise discussion of computer graphics interface (CGI) standards. The title is comprised of seven chapters that cover the concepts of the CGI standard. Figures and examples are also included. The first chapter provides a general overview of CGI; this chapter covers graphics standards, functional specifications, and syntactic interfaces. Next, the book discusses the basic concepts of CGI, such as inquiry, profiles, and registration. The third chapter covers the CGI concepts and functions, while the fourth chapter deals with the concept of graphic obje

  4. The interface effect

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, Alexander R

    2013-01-01

    Interfaces are back, or perhaps they never left. The familiar Socratic conceit from the Phaedrus, of communication as the process of writing directly on the soul of the other, has returned to center stage in today's discussions of culture and media. Indeed Western thought has long construed media as a grand choice between two kinds of interfaces. Following the optimistic path, media seamlessly interface self and other in a transparent and immediate connection. But, following the pessimistic path, media are the obstacles to direct communion, disintegrating self and other into misunderstanding

  5. The Java Legacy Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    The Java Legacy Interface is designed to use Java for encapsulating native legacy code on small embedded platforms. We discuss why existing technologies for encapsulating legacy code (JNI) is not sufficient for an important range of small embedded platforms, and we show how the Java Legacy...... Interface offers this previously missing functionality. We describe an implementation of the Java Legacy Interface for a particular virtual machine, and how we have used this virtual machine to integrate Java with an existing, commercial, soft real-time, C/C++ legacy platform....

  6. Introduction to interfaces 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lars Boje; Høgel, Christian; Borsa, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The Editors introduce Issue No. 3 of Interfaces: A Journal of Medieval European Literatures, dedicated to "Rediscovery and Canonization: The Roman Classics in the Middle Ages," and offer a general overview of the matter and contents of the contributions....

  7. Pattern formation at interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Giulio; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Applying modern nonlinear stability theory to problems of continuous media mechanics in the presence of interfaces, this text is relevant to materials science, chemical engineering, and heat transfer technologies, as well as to reaction-diffusion systems.

  8. Natural gesture interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubtsev, Illya

    2017-09-01

    The paper describes the implementation of the system of interaction with virtual objects based on gestures. The paper describes the common problems of interaction with virtual objects, specific requirements for the interfaces for virtual and augmented reality.

  9. User interface development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggrawal, Bharat

    1994-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the development of user interfaces for OS/2 versions of computer codes for the analysis of seals. Current status, new features, work in progress, and future plans are discussed.

  10. Interface Anywhere Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To illustrate the viability of this technology, a prototype Natural User Interface (NUI) was developed as a proof-of-concept for system control.  Gesture and...

  11. Lectures on random interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Funaki, Tadahisa

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces are created to separate two distinct phases in a situation in which phase coexistence occurs. This book discusses randomly fluctuating interfaces in several different settings and from several points of view: discrete/continuum, microscopic/macroscopic, and static/dynamic theories. The following four topics in particular are dealt with in the book. Assuming that the interface is represented as a height function measured from a fixed-reference discretized hyperplane, the system is governed by the Hamiltonian of gradient of the height functions. This is a kind of effective interface model called ∇φ-interface model. The scaling limits are studied for Gaussian (or non-Gaussian) random fields with a pinning effect under a situation in which the rate functional of the corresponding large deviation principle has non-unique minimizers. Young diagrams determine decreasing interfaces, and their dynamics are introduced. The large-scale behavior of such dynamics is studied from the points of view of the hyd...

  12. Machine Learning in Proof General: Interfacing Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Komendantskaya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present ML4PG - a machine learning extension for Proof General. It allows users to gather proof statistics related to shapes of goals, sequences of applied tactics, and proof tree structures from the libraries of interactive higher-order proofs written in Coq and SSReflect. The gathered data is clustered using the state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms available in MATLAB and Weka. ML4PG provides automated interfacing between Proof General and MATLAB/Weka. The results of clustering are used by ML4PG to provide proof hints in the process of interactive proof development.

  13. Interfacing Sensors To Micro Controllers

    KAUST Repository

    Norain, Mohamed

    2018-01-15

    This lecture will cover the most common interface and interface techniques between sensors and microcontrollers. The presentation will introduce the pros and cons of each interface type including analogue, digital and serial output sensors. It will also cover the basic required electronics knowledge to help you in selecting and designing your next sensor to microcontroller interface.

  14. High-bandwidth memory interface

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chulwoo; Song, Junyoung

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an overview of recent advances in memory interface design at both the architecture and circuit levels. Coverage includes signal integrity and testing, TSV interface, high-speed serial interface including equalization, ODT, pre-emphasis, wide I/O interface including crosstalk, skew cancellation, and clock generation and distribution. Trends for further bandwidth enhancement are also covered.   • Enables readers with minimal background in memory design to understand the basics of high-bandwidth memory interface design; • Presents state-of-the-art techniques for memory interface design; • Covers memory interface design at both the circuit level and system architecture level.

  15. Workshop on Interface Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the first Workshop on Interface Phenomena, organized jointly by the surface science groups at Dalhousie University and the University of Maine. It was our intention to concentrate on just three topics related to the kinetics of interface reactions which, in our opinion, were frequently obscured unnecessarily in the literature and whose fundamental nature warranted an extensive discussion to help clarify the issues, very much in the spirit of the Discussions of the Faraday Society. Each session (day) saw two principal speakers expounding the different views; the session chairmen were asked to summarize the ensuing discussions. To understand the complexity of interface reactions, paradigms must be formulated to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimen­ tal data and for the construction of theoretical models. Phenomenological approaches have been based on a small number of rate equations for the concentrations or mole numbers of the various species involved i...

  16. Portraying User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    2008-01-01

    The user interface is coming of age. Papers adressing UI history have appeared in fair amounts in the last 25 years. Most of them address particular aspects such as an in­novative interface paradigm or the contribution of a visionary or a research lab. Contrasting this, papers addres­sing UI...... history at large have been sparse. However, a small spate of publications appeared recently, so a reasonable number of papers are available. Hence this work-in-progress paints a portrait of the current history of user interfaces at large. The paper first describes a theoretical framework recruited from...... in that they largely address prevailing UI techno­logies, and thirdly history from above in that they focus on the great deeds of the visionaries. The paper then compares this state-of-art in UI history to the much more mature fields history of computing and history of technology. Based hereon, some speculations...

  17. Interface or Interlace?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed; Wamberg, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    Departing from an analysis of the computer's indeterminate location between medium and machine, this paper problematises the idea of a clear-cut interface in complex computing, especially Augmented Reality. The idea and pratice of the interface is derived from the medium as a representational...... surface and thus demands the overview of an autonomous consciouness. Instead we introduce the term interlace, a mingling of representational and physical levels, thus describing the computer's ambiguous blending of imaginary and real. The proposition is demonstrated through analysis of different recent...

  18. UIL -User Interface Language

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, J; CERN. Geneva

    1990-01-01

    Some widget examples, widget categories, the push button widget, menus, the FORM widget, using UIL for an application program, the MOTIF Resource Manager (MRM), execution thread of an application using UIL and MRM, opening hierarchies, binding UIL names to application addresses, fetching widget hierarchies and managing them, changing widget resources using UIL and MRM, fetching literal values from the UID file. Introduction to the User Interface Language, defining a user interface, advantages of using UIL, accessing UID files from the application, UIL Syntax, the UIL module structure, defining a widget instance hierarchy, declaration of literals colors, icons, fonts

  19. Politics at the interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannabiran, Gobinaath; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2010-01-01

    the process of design and into how users interact with the designed product on a day-to-day basis. This paper is an attempt to call to attention the need for a new set of methods, attitudes and approaches, along with the existing, to discuss, analyze and reflect upon the politics at the interface....... By presenting a critical analysis of two design cases, we elicit the importance of such an agenda and the implications for design in doing so. We use the Foucauldian notion of power to analyze the power relationships in these two cases and to articulate the politics at the interface. We conclude by emphasizing...

  20. Structure and functions of simple membrane-water interfaces. [Abstract only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The structure and functions of the earliest ancestors of contemporary cells are focal points in studies of the origin of life. Probably the first cell-like structures were vesicles - closed, spheroidal structures with aqueous medium trapped inside. The membranous walls of vesicles were most likely bilayers composed of simple amphiphilic material available on early earth. The membrane studied was composed of glycerol 1-monooleate (GMO). Glycerol forms the polar head group and the oily tail contains 18 carbon atoms. All head groups have been found to be located in two narrow regions at the interfaces with water. The membrane interior, formed by the hydrophobic tails, is quite fluid with chain disorder increasing towards the center of the bilayer. These results are in agreement with x-ray and neutron scattering data from related bilayers. The width of the membrane is not constant, but fluctuates in time and space. Occasional thinning defects in the membrane, observed during the course of the simulations, may have a significant influence on rates of passive transport of small molecules across membranes. It has been found that water penetrates the head group region but not the oily interior of the membrane. Water molecules near the interface are oriented by dipoles of the head groups. The resulting electrostatic potential across the interface, determined in our simulations, has been found to be markedly larger than across the water-oil interface. This quantity has been implicated as the source of selectivity, with respect to the sign of the charge, as an ion approaches the interface and during transport of hydrophobic ions across membranes.

  1. Excess chemical potential of small solutes across water--membrane and water--hexane interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The excess chemical potentials of five small, structurally related solutes, CH4, CH3F, CH2F2, CHF3, and CF4, across the water-glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer and water-hexane interfaces were calculated at 300, 310, and 340 K using the particle insertion method. The excess chemical potentials of nonpolar molecules (CH4 and CF4) decrease monotonically or nearly monotonically from water to a nonpolar phase. In contrast, for molecules that possess permanent dipole moments (CH3F, CH2F, and CHF3), the excess chemical potentials exhibit an interfacial minimum that arises from superposition of two monotonically and oppositely changing contributions: electrostatic and nonelectrostatic. The nonelectrostatic term, dominated by the reversible work of creating a cavity that accommodates the solute, decreases, whereas the electrostatic term increases across the interface from water to the membrane interior. In water, the dependence of this term on the dipole moment is accurately described by second order perturbation theory. To achieve the same accuracy at the interface, third order terms must also be included. In the interfacial region, the molecular structure of the solvent influences both the excess chemical potential and solute orientations. The excess chemical potential across the interface increases with temperature, but this effect is rather small. Our analysis indicates that a broad range of small, moderately polar molecules should be surface active at the water-membrane and water-oil interfaces. The biological and medical significance of this result, especially in relation to the mechanism of anesthetic action, is discussed.

  2. Photochemistry at Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenthal, Kenneth B [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-02-24

    We have advanced our capabilities to investigate ultrafast excited state dynamics at a liquid interface using a pump to excite molecules to higher electronic states and then probe the subsequent time evolution of the interfacial molecules with femtosecond time delayed vibrational SFG.

  3. The Liquid Vapour Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1985-01-01

    In this short review we are concerned with the density variation across the liquid-vapour interface, i.e. from the bulk density of the liquid to the essentially zero density of the vapour phase. This density variation can in principle be determined from the deviation of the reflectivity from...

  4. Source interface for ALICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    This interface is part of the ALICE detector data link (DDL), which transmits data at 100 Mbytes/sec from the detectors to a host computer. A total of 400 DDLs will be installed on ALICE. These silicon devices have been developed especially for use in the high radiation levels produced in detector environments.

  5. Urban Sound Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live...

  6. A Thermistor Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamin, Gary D.; Dowden, Edward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the use of a precalibrated stainless steel thermistor, interfaced with an Apple computer, in chemistry experiments. Discusses the advantages of "instant" temperature readings in experiments requiring that readings be taken at certain intervals. Outlines such an experiment which investigates freezing point depressions. (TW)

  7. Interface transfer of equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashton, I.J.

    1989-04-01

    This article details the interface transfer of heavy-duty face equipment from 5's to 6's face in the Great Row Seam at Silverdale Colliery, British Coal, Western Area. The salvaged face was roofbolted using leg-mounted Wombat drilling rigs. All heavy-duty equipment was transported by FSV's. 5 figs.

  8. Introduction to 'Interfaces' 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Borsa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Editors introduce Issue No. 3 of Interfaces: A Journal of Medieval European Literatures, dedicated to "Rediscovery and Canonization: The Roman Classics in the Middle Ages," and offer a general overview of the matter and contents of the contributions.

  9. Is the interface OK?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.

    When a peripheral device fails, software methods can be initially resorted to before the usual hardware test procedures are used. A test program is presented here that allows various peripherals, inter-faced to a Norsk Data computer, to be tested...

  10. Workflow User Interfaces Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Vanderdonckt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta una colección de patrones de diseño de interfaces de usuario para sistemas de información para el flujo de trabajo; la colección incluye cuarenta y tres patrones clasificados en siete categorías identificados a partir de la lógica del ciclo de vida de la tarea sobre la base de la oferta y la asignación de tareas a los responsables de realizarlas (i. e. recursos humanos durante el flujo de trabajo. Cada patrón de la interfaz de usuario de flujo de trabajo (WUIP, por sus siglas en inglés se caracteriza por las propiedades expresadas en el lenguaje PLML para expresar patrones y complementado por otros atributos y modelos que se adjuntan a dicho modelo: la interfaz de usuario abstracta y el modelo de tareas correspondiente. Estos modelos se especifican en un lenguaje de descripción de interfaces de usuario. Todos los WUIPs se almacenan en una biblioteca y se pueden recuperar a través de un editor de flujo de trabajo que vincula a cada patrón de asignación de trabajo a su WUIP correspondiente.A collection of user interface design patterns for workflow information systems is presented that contains forty three resource patterns classified in seven categories. These categories and their corresponding patterns have been logically identified from the task life cycle based on offering and allocation operations. Each Workflow User Interface Pattern (WUIP is characterized by properties expressed in the PLML markup language for expressing patterns and augmented by additional attributes and models attached to the pattern: the abstract user interface and the corresponding task model. These models are specified in a User Interface Description Language. All WUIPs are stored in a library and can be retrieved within a workflow editor that links each workflow pattern to its corresponding WUIP, thus giving rise to a user interface for each workflow pattern.

  11. User interface design considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Engedal; Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    When designing a user interface for a simulation model there are several important issues to consider: Who is the target user group, and which a priori information can be expected. What questions do the users want answers to and what questions are answered using a specific model?When developing...... and output variables. This feature requires special attention when designing the user interface and a special approach for controlling the user selection of input and output variables are developed. To obtain a consistent system description the different input variables are grouped corresponding...... the consequence that the user does not have to specify any start guesses, etc.The design approach developed have resulted in a number of simulation tools which allow users with limited theoretical knowledge about refrigeration systems, mathematical models and simulation to use them while the expert users still...

  12. Popeye Project: ROV interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scates, C.R. [Shell Oil Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States); Hickok, D.D. [Dvaerner FSSL Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Hernandez, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    The Popeye Project in the Gulf of Mexico helped advance the technology and standardization of ROV interfaces for deepwater subsea production systems. Some of the many successful ROV operations during installation and completion were {open_quotes}first-of-it`s-kind{close_quotes} activities-enabled by many technical advances. The use and reliance upon ROV systems for support of deepwater drilling and installation operations significantly increased in the past 10 years. Shell Offshore Inc.`s (SOI) confidence in this increased capability was an important factor in many of the design decisions which characterized the innovative system. Technology advancements, which depended on effective ROV intervention, were implemented with no significant difficulties. These advancements, in particular the flying leads and seabed position methods, are available to the industry for other deepwater subsea systems. In addition, several Popeye ROV interfaces have helped advance the subsea standardization initiative; e.g., hot stabs, torque-tool end effectors, and paint color.

  13. Embodiment and Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Andreas Lindegaard; Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2008-01-01

    The article discusses – based on neurological and phenomenological theory - how the human embodiment supports and constrains the interaction between players and video games. It analyses embodied interaction with the specific hardware/software configuration of the Nintendo Wii and Wii Tennis as well...... of the player as patient, i.e. being the object of another agent’s actions.  Keywords: Video games, embodiment, interface, agency, action, control, cognition  ...

  14. Noise at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The notion of noise occupies a contested territory, in which it is framed as pollution and detritus even as it makes its opposite a possibility - noise is always defined in opposition to something else, even if this ‘other’ is not quite clear. This paper explores noise in the context of ‘the...... interface’ asking what its affordances as an idea may contribute to our understanding of interface. I draw historically on information theory in particular to initiate this exploration....

  15. SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Angel; Raines, Matthew; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Mata, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have very limited diagnostic and no prognostic capabilities, while current smart sensor designs do not have the capability to communicate over Fieldbus networks. The aim is to interface smart sensors with PLCs so that health and status information, such as failure mode identification and measurement tolerance, can be communicated via an industrial Fieldbus such as ControlNet. The SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface (SIFI) is an embedded device that acts as a communication module in a networked smart sensor. The purpose is to enable a smart sensor to communicate health and status information to other devices, such as PLCs, via an industrial Fieldbus networking protocol. The SNE (Smart Network Element) is attached to a commercial off-the-shelf Any bus-S interface module through the SIFI. Numerous Anybus-S modules are available, each one designed to interface with a specific Fieldbus. Development of the SIFI focused on communications using the ControlNet protocol, but any of the Anybus-S modules can be used. The SIFI communicates with the Any-bus module via a data buffer and mailbox system on the Anybus module, and supplies power to the module. The Anybus module transmits and receives data on the Fieldbus using the proper protocol. The SIFI is intended to be connected to other existing SNE modules in order to monitor the health and status of a transducer. The SIFI can also monitor aspects of its own health using an onboard watchdog timer and voltage monitors. The SIFI also has the hardware to drive a touchscreen LCD (liquid crystal display) unit for manual configuration and status monitoring.

  16. Standard interface file handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.; Huria, H.C. (Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States))

    1992-10-01

    This handbook documents many of the standard interface file formats that have been adopted by the US Department of Energy to facilitate communications between and portability of, various large reactor physics and radiation transport software packages. The emphasis is on those files needed for use of the VENTURE/PC diffusion-depletion code system. File structures, contents and some practical advice on use of the various files are provided.

  17. Metaphors for Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    00 00 METAPHORS FOR INTERFACE DESIGN Edwin Hutchins April 1987 ICS Report 8703 COGNITIVE SCIENCE IZET INTTT FOR CONTV SCINC UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA...systems. Schneiderman (1982, 1983) coined the term " direct manipulation" to refer to these sys- tems. The technology on which these s)stems are based has...Weitsma., IA press) a reidr nlavigtiom tralnlng yam and a ’ direct manmpulatlon statistical analysis tuftt (Owam 1966) Until ncmady. bewevr we have

  18. Interfaces of Propylene Carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    You, Xinli; Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Pesika, Noshir; Aritakula, Kalika M.; Rick, Steven W.

    2012-01-01

    Propylene carbonate (PC) wets graphite with a contact angle of 31 deg at ambient conditions. Molecular dynamics simulations agree with this contact angle after 40% reduction of the strength of graphite-C atom Lennard-Jones interactions with the solvent, relative to the models used initially. A simulated nano-scale PC droplet on graphite displays a pronounced layering tendency and an Aztex pyramid structure for the droplet. Extrapolation of the computed tensions of PC liquid-vapor interface es...

  19. Interface Microstructures in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puertas, Francisca

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper constitutes a compilation as well as an interpretation of the present state of knowledge about the different microstructures developed in the interface areas of concrete, that is, the cement paste-aggregates, the cement paste-reinforcement, the cement paste-fiber, etc. The Chemical reactions taking place in interface areas, the development and morphology of such areas and their strength ^since interfaces are taken as the weakest points of concrete are the aspects dealt with in some detail in this work.

    El presente trabajo constituye un resumen y también una interpretación del estado actual del conocimiento respecto de las diferentes microestructuras que se desarrollan en las zonas interfaciales de los hormigones, es decir: pasta de cemento-áridos, pasta de cemento-armaduras, pasta de cemento-fibras, etc. Las reacciones químicas que tienen lugar en la zona interfacial, el desarrollo y morfología de dicha zona y su resistencia (las interfases se consideran como uno de los puntos débiles del hormigón son los aspectos que con cierto detalle se tratan en el trabajo.

  20. Thesaurus-Enhanced Search Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Ali Asghar; Revie, Crawford; Chowdhury, Gobinda

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of user interfaces to information retrieval systems focuses on interfaces that incorporate thesauri as part of their searching and browsing facilities. Discusses research literature related to information searching behavior, information retrieval interface evaluation, search term selection, and query expansion; and compares thesaurus…

  1. Asphaltene-laden interfaces form soft glassy layers in contraction experiments: a mechanism for coalescence blocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchard, Vincent; Rane, Jayant P; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2014-11-04

    In previous studies, the adsorption kinetics of asphaltenes at the water-oil interface were interpreted utilizing a Langmuir equation of state (EOS) based on droplet expansion experiments.1-3 Long-term adsorption kinetics followed random sequential adsorption (RSA) theory predictions, asymptotically reaching ∼85% limiting surface coverage, which is similar to limiting random 2D close packing of disks. To extend this work beyond this slow adsorption process, we performed rapid contractions and contraction-expansions of asphaltene-laden interfaces using the pendant drop experiment to emulate a Langmuir trough. This simulates the rapid increase in interfacial asphaltene concentration that occurs during coalescence events. For the contraction of droplets aged in asphaltene solutions, deviation from the EOS consistently occurs at a surface pressure value ∼21 mN/m corresponding to a surface coverage ∼80%. At this point droplets lose the shape required for validity of the Laplace-Young equation, indicating solidlike surface behavior. On further contraction wrinkles appear, which disappear when the droplet is held at constant volume. Surface pressure also decreases down to an equilibrium value near that measured for slow adsorption experiments. This behavior appears to be due to a transition to a glassy interface on contraction past the packing limit, followed by relaxation toward equilibrium by desorption at constant volume. This hypothesis is supported by cycling experiments around the close-packed limit where the transition to and from a solidlike state appears to be both fast and reversible, with little hysteresis. Also, the soft glass rheology model of Sollich is shown to capture previously reported shear behavior during adsorption. The results suggest that the mechanism by which asphaltenes stabilize water-in-oil emulsions is by blocking coalescence due to rapid formation of a glassy interface, in turn caused by interfacial asphaltenes rapidly increasing in

  2. Productivity issues at organizational interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    The need for close interdependence between large numbers of diverse and specialized work groups makes the Space Program extremely vulnerable to loss of productivity at organizational interfaces. Trends within the program also suggest that the number and diversity of interfaces will grow in the near term. Continued maintenance of R&D excellence will require that interface performance issues be included in any future productivity improvement effort. The types and characteristics of organizational interfaces are briefly presented, followed by a review of factors which impact their productivity. Approaches to assessing and improving interface effectiveness are also discussed.

  3. Transport processes at fluidic interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Reusken, Arnold

    2017-01-01

    There are several physico-chemical processes that determine the behavior of multiphase fluid systems – e.g., the fluid dynamics in the different phases and the dynamics of the interface(s), mass transport between the fluids, adsorption effects at the interface, and transport of surfactants on the interface – and result in heterogeneous interface properties. In general, these processes are strongly coupled and local properties of the interface play a crucial role. A thorough understanding of the behavior of such complex flow problems must be based on physically sound mathematical models, which especially account for the local processes at the interface. This book presents recent findings on the rigorous derivation and mathematical analysis of such models and on the development of numerical methods for direct numerical simulations. Validation results are based on specifically designed experiments using high-resolution experimental techniques. A special feature of this book is its focus on an interdisciplina...

  4. Matched Interface and Boundary Method for Elasticity Interface Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Elasticity theory is an important component of continuum mechanics and has had widely spread applications in science and engineering. Material interfaces are ubiquity in nature and man-made devices, and often give rise to discontinuous coefficients in the governing elasticity equations. In this work, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method is developed to address elasticity interface problems. Linear elasticity theory for both isotropic homogeneous and inhomogeneous media is employed. In our approach, Lamé’s parameters can have jumps across the interface and are allowed to be position dependent in modeling isotropic inhomogeneous material. Both strong discontinuity, i.e., discontinuous solution, and weak discontinuity, namely, discontinuous derivatives of the solution, are considered in the present study. In the proposed method, fictitious values are utilized so that the standard central finite different schemes can be employed regardless of the interface. Interface jump conditions are enforced on the interface, which in turn, accurately determines fictitious values. We design new MIB schemes to account for complex interface geometries. In particular, the cross derivatives in the elasticity equations are difficult to handle for complex interface geometries. We propose secondary fictitious values and construct geometry based interpolation schemes to overcome this difficulty. Numerous analytical examples are used to validate the accuracy, convergence and robustness of the present MIB method for elasticity interface problems with both small and large curvatures, strong and weak discontinuities, and constant and variable coefficients. Numerical tests indicate second order accuracy in both L∞ and L2 norms. PMID:25914439

  5. SOFC interface studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse; West, Keld

    performance and inductive hysteresis phenomena often observed in SOFC kinetic studies (\\ref{TJ01}). Fig.\\,\\ref{cath_laser} shows the YSZ surface developed below a Pt point electrode polarised at -0.10\\, V at $1000^\\circ$C for a period of 85 days. The structural as well as the compositional changes...... the anode (\\ref{Tine}) as well as the very high capacity contribution at low freqencies \\ref{Lasse97}. Considering the rough surface structure formed on the YSZ-cathode interface it is most likely that the reaction zone is not confined to the perimeter of the contact area. A significant contribution may...

  6. Interfacing with the Night

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, Alex; Parkinson, Adam

    2014-01-01

    In  this  paper,  the  authors  consider  the  interfaces  between academia and dance music. Dance music and club culture are, we argue, important to computer music and the live performance of electronic music, but there are many different difficulties encountered when trying to present electronic dance music within academic contexts. The authors draw upon their experiences as promoters, performers, researchers and audience members to discuss these difficulties and how and why we might negoti...

  7. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  8. Space as interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    , social and cultural aspects towards space. As these dimensions are tied to the humans who experience the space, the designer can not directly influence and form the creation of place. This division puts attention to two gaps necessary to bridge. The first is the gap between physical and digital space...... multiple projects spanning over fields such as tangible user interfaces, augmented reality, and mobile computing, a conceptual framework characterizing camera-based mixed interaction spaces is developed. To show the applicability of the framework, it is deployed on one of the presented cases and discussed...

  9. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  10. Craft Physics Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    This is a masters thesis (20p) in computer science at the University of Linköping. This thesis will give an introduction to what a physics engine is and what it consist of. It will put some engines under the magnifying glass and test them in a couple of runtime tests. Two cutting edge commercial physics engines have been examined, trying to predict the future of physics engines. From the research and test results, an interface for physics engine independency has been implemented for a company...

  11. Brain-computer interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A computer-implemented method of providing an interface between a user and a processing unit, the method comprising : presenting one or more stimuli to a user, each stimulus varying at a respective stimulation frequency, each stimulation frequency being associated with a respective user......-selectable input; receiving at least one signal indicative of brain activity of the user; and determining, from the received signal, which of the one or more stimuli the user attends to and selecting the user-selectable input associated with the stimulation frequency of the determined stimuli as being a user...

  12. Multiple network interface core apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Keith D [Albuquerque, NM; Hemmert, Karl Scott [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-26

    A network interface controller and network interface control method comprising providing a single integrated circuit as a network interface controller and employing a plurality of network interface cores on the single integrated circuit.

  13. WAVES VHDL interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, James P.

    1994-06-01

    The Waveform and Vector Exchange Specification (WAVES) is the Industry standard representation for digital stimulus and response for both the design and test communities. The VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) is the Industry standard language for the design, modeling, and simulation of digital electronics. Together VHDL and WAVES provide powerful support for top-down design and test methodologies and concurrent engineering practices. Although the syntax of WAVES is a subset of VHDL, no special support for using WAVES in a VHDL environment is defined within the language. This report will introduce and describe a VHDL package that was developed at Rome Laboratory to provide a software interface to support the use of WAVES in a VHDL environment. This VHDL package is referred to as the WAVES VHDL interface and has been proposed as a standard practice for a top-down design and test methodology using WAVES and VHDL. This report is not intended to provide a tutorial on VHDL or WAVES. It is assumed that the reader has an adequate understanding of the VHDL language and some modeling techniques. Further, it is assumed that the reader has an understanding of the WAVES language and can follow a simple Level 1 dataset description.

  14. Mercury Shopping Cart Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Mercury Shopping Cart Interface (MSCI) is a reusable component of the Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) program described in another article. MSCI is a means of encapsulating the logic and information needed to describe an orderable item consistent with Mercury Shopping Cart service protocol. Designed to be used with Web-browser software, MSCI generates Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) pages on which ordering information can be entered. MSCI comprises two types of Practical Extraction and Report Language (PERL) modules: template modules and shopping-cart logic modules. Template modules generate HTML pages for entering the required ordering details and enable submission of the order via a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) post. Shopping cart modules encapsulate the logic and data needed to describe an individual orderable item to the Mercury Shopping Cart service. These modules evaluate information entered by the user to determine whether it is sufficient for the Shopping Cart service to process the order. Once an order has been passed from MSCI to a deployed Mercury Shopping Cart server, there is no further interaction with the user.

  15. Interface Biology of Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebe, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Implants are widely used in various clinical disciplines to replace or stabilize organs. The challenge for the future is to apply implant materials to specifically control the biology of the surrounding tissue for repair and regeneration. This field of research is highly interdisciplinary and combines scientists from technical and life sciences disciplines. To successfully apply materials for regenerative processes in the body, the understanding of the mechanisms at the interface between cells or tissues and the artificial material is of critical importance. The research focuses on stem cells, design of material surfaces, and mechanisms of cell adhesion. For the third time around 200 scientists met in Rostock, Germany for the international symposium “Interface Biology of Implants.” The aim of the symposium is to promote the interdisciplinary dialogue between the scientists from the different disciplines to develop smart implants for medical use. In addition, researchers from basic sciences, notably cell biology presented new findings concerning mechanisms of cell adhesion to stimulate research in the applied field of implant technology. PMID:19690468

  16. Mysteries at Ice Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Samuel C., Jr.

    1996-03-01

    Michael Faraday noted that ``two pieces of thawing ice, if put together, adhere and become one...the effect will take place in air, or in water, or in vacuo." Why? He proposed that ``a particle of water, which could retain the liquid state whilst touching ice only on one side, could not retain the liquid state if it were touched by ice on both sides."footnote M. Faraday, Proc. Roy. Soc. London 10, 440 (1860) The existence of special properties at interfaces of ice is generally agreed and has important environmental consequences.(J. G. Dash, H. Fu, and J. S. Wettlaufer, Rep. Prog. Phys. 58), 115 (1995) Why do different experiments infer different properties for this layer? Impurities and electric fields at the interfaces may be responsible for some of the variations in experimental results.footnote V. F. Petrenko, U. S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory Report 94-22 (1994) Some background on the physical properties of ice will be discussed, including recent force microscopy measurements done at the University of Washington.footnote C.R. Slaughterbeck, E.W. Kukes, B. Pittenger, D.J. Cook, P.C. Williams, V.L. Eden, S.C. Fain, Jr., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. (in press) Supported by NSF Grant DMR-91-19701.

  17. Oscars and Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony Unwin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Graphical user interfaces (GUIs are gradually becoming more powerful and more accepted. They are the standard way of interacting with the web and play an increasing role in many software applications. Nevertheless, they have not been generally adopted, and critics point to particular weaknesses and disadvantages. Many of these are due more to flaws in design and implementation than to the basic concepts of GUIs. More attention could be paid to what users want to do and how a GUI might be developed to support these goals. Using a dataset about Oscar nominees and winners, this paper considers what analyses statisticians might carry out and what kind of GUI would be appropriate for these tasks. (It also offers some insights into the Oscars dataset.

  18. Nuclear data interface retrospective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Mark G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The Nuclear Data Interface (NDI) code library and data formats are the standards for multigroup nuclear data at Los Alamos National Laboratory. NDI's analysis, design, implementation, testing, integration, and maintenance required a ten person-year and ongoing effort by the Nuclear Data Team. Their efforts provide a unique, contemporary experience in producing a standard component library. In reflection upon that experience at NDI's decennial, we have identified several factors critical to NDI's success: it addressed real problems with appropriate simplicity, it fully supported all users, it added extra value through the code to the raw nuclear data, and its team went the distance from analysis through maintenance. In this report we review these critical success factors and discuss their implications for future standardization projects.

  19. Human-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-12-21

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing. Force feedback allows intuitive navigation and control near a boundary between regions in a computer-represented space. For example, the method allows a user to interact with a virtual craft, then push through the windshield of the craft to interact with the virtual world surrounding the craft. As another example, the method allows a user to feel transitions between different control domains of a computer representation of a space. The method can provide for force feedback that increases as a user's locus of interaction moves near a boundary, then perceptibly changes (e.g., abruptly drops or changes direction) when the boundary is traversed.

  20. Porphyrins at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auwärter, Willi; Écija, David; Klappenberger, Florian; Barth, Johannes V.

    2015-02-01

    Porphyrins and other tetrapyrrole macrocycles possess an impressive variety of functional properties that have been exploited in natural and artificial systems. Different metal centres incorporated within the tetradentate ligand are key for achieving and regulating vital processes, including reversible axial ligation of adducts, electron transfer, light-harvesting and catalytic transformations. Tailored substituents optimize their performance, dictating their arrangement in specific environments and mediating the assembly of molecular nanoarchitectures. Here we review the current understanding of these species at well-defined interfaces, disclosing exquisite insights into their structural and chemical properties, and also discussing methods by which to manipulate their intramolecular and organizational features. The distinct characteristics arising from the interfacial confinement offer intriguing prospects for molecular science and advanced materials. We assess the role of surface interactions with respect to electronic and physicochemical characteristics, and describe in situ metallation pathways, molecular magnetism, rotation and switching. The engineering of nanostructures, organized layers, interfacial hybrid and bio-inspired systems is also addressed.

  1. Interfacing Ada and other languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffes, Paul; West, Brian

    1986-01-01

    Interfacing two separately developed compilers is a complex task. The complexity arises because few design standards exist for compiler development. This, coupled with the many complicated design decisions inherent in compiler construction, usually guarantees noncompatibility. The interface subroutine which would link the two different run time environments would resolve as many of the dissimilarities as possible. The differences that could not be resolved would be responsible for the restrictions placed on the interface. Albeit restrictions would exist, the resulting interface may be well worthwhile.

  2. mREST Interface Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Patrick; MacLean, John

    2012-01-01

    mREST is an implementation of the REST architecture specific to the management and sharing of data in a system of logical elements. The purpose of this document is to clearly define the mREST interface protocol. The interface protocol covers all of the interaction between mREST clients and mREST servers. System-level requirements are not specifically addressed. In an mREST system, there are typically some backend interfaces between a Logical System Element (LSE) and the associated hardware/software system. For example, a network camera LSE would have a backend interface to the camera itself. These interfaces are specific to each type of LSE and are not covered in this document. There are also frontend interfaces that may exist in certain mREST manager applications. For example, an electronic procedure execution application may have a specialized interface for configuring the procedures. This interface would be application specific and outside of this document scope. mREST is intended to be a generic protocol which can be used in a wide variety of applications. A few scenarios are discussed to provide additional clarity but, in general, application-specific implementations of mREST are not specifically addressed. In short, this document is intended to provide all of the information necessary for an application developer to create mREST interface agents. This includes both mREST clients (mREST manager applications) and mREST servers (logical system elements, or LSEs).

  3. Playful User Interfaces. Interfaces that Invite Social and Physical Interaction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Unknown, [Unknown

    2014-01-01

    This book is about user interfaces to applications that can be considered as ‘playful’. The interfaces to such applications should be ‘playful’ as well. The application should be fun, and interacting with such an application should, of course, be fun as well. Maybe more. Why not expect that the

  4. Multimodal human-machine interface based on a brain-computer interface and an electrooculography interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iáñez, Eduardo; Ùbeda, Andrés; Azorín, José M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a multimodal interface that combines a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) with an electrooculography (EOG) interface. The non-invasive spontaneous BCI registers the electrical brain activity through surface electrodes. The EOG interface detects the eye movements through electrodes placed on the face around the eyes. Both kind of signals are registered together and processed to obtain the mental task that the user is thinking and the eye movement performed by the user. Both commands (mental task and eye movement) are combined in order to move a dot in a graphic user interface (GUI). Several experimental tests have been made where the users perform a trajectory to get closer to some targets. To perform the trajectory the user moves the dot in a plane with the EOG interface and using the BCI the dot changes its height.

  5. Playful Interfaces: Introduction and History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Nijholt, Antinus; Nijholt, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this short survey we have some historical notes about human-computer interface development with an emphasis on interface technology that has allowed us to design playful interactions with applications. The applications do not necessarily have to be entertainment applications. We can have playful

  6. GRAPHIC INTERFACES FOR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion PANA,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using effective the method of calculating Fitness for Service requires the achievement of graphical interfaces. This paper presents an example of such interfaces, made with Visual Basic program and used in the evaluation of pipelines in a research contract [4

  7. Smart Material Interfaces for Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minuto, A.; Pittarello, Fabio; Nijholt, Antinus

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an experience, held with a class of primary school children, aimed to introduce a novel educational topic, the smart materials, and the interfaces built with them (Smart Material Interfaces). The pupils were guided along a multi-disciplinary path in which traditional and

  8. Preface (to Playful User Interfaces)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Nijholt, A.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2014-01-01

    This book is about user interfaces to applications that can be considered as ‘playful’. The interfaces to such applications should be ‘playful’ as well. The application should be fun, and interacting with such an application should, of course, be fun as well. Maybe more. Why not expect that the

  9. Interface Input/Output Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Nyman, Ulrik; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Building on the theory of interface automata by de Alfaro and Henzinger we design an interface language for Lynch’s I/O, a popular formalism used in the development of distributed asynchronous systems, not addressed by previous interface research. We introduce an explicit separation of assumptions...... from guarantees not yet seen in other behavioral interface theories. Moreover we derive the composition operator systematically and formally, guaranteeing that the resulting compositions are always the weakest in the sense of assumptions, and the strongest in the sense of guarantees. We also present...... a method for solving systems of relativized behavioral inequalities as used in our setup and draw a formal correspondence between our work and interface automata....

  10. Next Generation Search Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, W.; Wu, X.; Ly, L.; Goldina, T.

    2015-09-01

    Astronomers are constantly looking for easier ways to access multiple data sets. While much effort is spent on VO, little thought is given to the types of User Interfaces we need to effectively search this sort of data. For instance, an astronomer might need to search Spitzer, WISE, and 2MASS catalogs and images then see the results presented together in one UI. Moving seamlessly between data sets is key to presenting integrated results. Results need to be viewed using first class, web based, integrated FITS viewers, XY Plots, and advanced table display tools. These components should be able to handle very large datasets. To make a powerful Web based UI that can manage and present multiple searches to the user requires taking advantage of many HTML5 features. AJAX is used to start searches and present results. Push notifications (Server Sent Events) monitor background jobs. Canvas is required for advanced result displays. Lesser known CSS3 technologies makes it all flow seamlessly together. At IPAC, we have been developing our Firefly toolkit for several years. We are now using it to solve this multiple data set, multiple queries, and integrated presentation problem to create a powerful research experience. Firefly was created in IRSA, the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu). Firefly is the core for applications serving many project archives, including Spitzer, Planck, WISE, PTF, LSST and others. It is also used in IRSA's new Finder Chart and catalog and image displays.

  11. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  12. Power User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) is a system of middleware, written for expert users in the Earth-science community, PUI enables expedited ordering of data granules on the basis of specific granule-identifying information that the users already know or can assemble. PUI also enables expert users to perform quick searches for orderablegranule information for use in preparing orders. PUI 5.0 is available in two versions (note: PUI 6.0 has command-line mode only): a Web-based application program and a UNIX command-line- mode client program. Both versions include modules that perform data-granule-ordering functions in conjunction with external systems. The Web-based version works with Earth Observing System Clearing House (ECHO) metadata catalog and order-entry services and with an open-source order-service broker server component, called the Mercury Shopping Cart, that is provided separately by Oak Ridge National Laboratory through the Department of Energy. The command-line version works with the ECHO metadata and order-entry process service. Both versions of PUI ultimately use ECHO to process an order to be sent to a data provider. Ordered data are provided through means outside the PUI software system.

  13. Interfaces of propylene carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xinli; Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Pesika, Noshir; Aritakula, Kalika M.; Rick, Steven W.

    2013-03-01

    Propylene carbonate (PC) wets graphite with a contact angle of 31° at ambient conditions. Molecular dynamics simulations agree with this contact angle after 40% reduction of the strength of graphite-C atom Lennard-Jones interactions with the solvent, relative to the models used initially. A simulated nano-scale PC droplet on graphite displays a pronounced layering tendency and an Aztex pyramid structure for the droplet. Extrapolation of the computed tensions of PC liquid-vapor interface estimates the critical temperature of PC accurately to about 3%. PC molecules lie flat on the PC liquid-vapor surface and tend to project the propyl carbon toward the vapor phase. For close PC neighbors in liquid PC, an important packing motif stacks carbonate planes with the outer oxygen of one molecule snuggled into the positively charged propyl end of another molecule so that neighboring molecule dipole moments are approximately antiparallel. The calculated thermal expansion coefficient and the dielectric constants for liquid PC agree well with experiment. The distribution of PC molecule binding energies is closely Gaussian. Evaluation of the density of the coexisting vapor then permits estimation of the packing contribution to the PC chemical potential and that contribution is about two thirds of the magnitude of the contributions due to attractive interactions, with opposite sign.

  14. Interface roughening and pinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Stéphane; Hansen, Alex

    1994-04-01

    We study a simple model for thé pinning of an interface by impurities with random strengths, and thé depinning due to thé applied pressure, in a quasi-static propagation lirait. The model is very close to thé so called "Robin Hood" model introduced by Zaitsev. It is designed to describe e.g. thé invasion of a wetting fluid (imbibition) in a heterogeneous porous medium containing a second immiscible fluid. The relation between this model and other previously proposed approaches is discussed. The front of thé invaded domain is shown to develop a self-affine structure with an increase of thé roughness as a power-law of thé injected volume. The value of thé apparent roughness exponent can be favorably compared to some experimental measurements although we argue that thé true roughness exponent is out of reach of commonly used methods. We show that thé distribution f(d, Δ t) of distances d between discrete local invasions at a time interval Δ t can be described by a scaling law f(d, Δ t) = d^{-1}\\varphi(d/sqrt{Δ t}). This form can be obtained from thé identification of a hierarchical structure of "bursts" in thé pressure signal. Those "bursts" are quahtatively similar to those observed in quasistatic drainage, (i.e. invasion percolation), although characterized by différent scaling indices. Nous étudions un modèle simple pour analyser l'accrochage d'une interface sur des impuretés et le décrochage sous l'effet d'une pression appliquée, dans une limite quasi-statique. Ce modèle est très voisin du modèle "Robin Hood" introduit par Zaitsev. Il s'applique en particulier à l'invasion d'un fluide mouillant (imbibition) dans un milieu poreux hétérogène contenant un fluide immiscible. Nous discutons les relations entre ce modèle et d'autres approches proposées pour décrire ce phénomène. Le front d'invasion acquiert une structure auto-affine, avec un développement de la rugosité selon une loi de puissance du volume injecté. La valeur de l

  15. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Thomas P. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  16. Intelligent virtual interfaces for telerobotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Georges G.; Maybury, Mark T.; Mitchell, Richard B.

    1992-11-01

    One promise of telerobotics is the ability to interact in environments that are distant (e.g., deep sea or deep space), dangerous (e.g., nuclear, chemical, or biological environments), or inaccessible by humans for political or legal reasons. A key component to such interactions are sophisticated human-computer interfaces that can replicate sufficient information about a local environment to permit remote navigation and manipulation. This environment replication can, in part, be provided by technologies such as virtual reality. In addition, however, telerobotic interfaces may need to enhance human-machine interaction to assist users in task performance, for example, governing motion or manipulation controls to avoid obstacles or to restrict interaction with certain objects (e.g., avoiding contact with a live mine or a deep sea treasure). Thus, effective interactions within remote environments require intelligent virtual interfaces to telerobotic devices. In part to address this problem, MITRE is investigating virtual reality architectures that will enable enhanced interaction within virtual environments. Key components to intelligent virtual interfaces include spoken language processing, gesture recognition algorithms, and more generally, task recognition. In addition, these interfaces will eventually have to take into account properties of the user, the task, and discourse context to be more adaptive to the current situation at hand. While our work has not yet investigated the connection of virtual interfaces to external robotic devices, we have begun developing the key components for intelligent virtual interfaces for information and training systems.

  17. Polymers at Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsige, Mesfin

    2015-03-01

    Interfaces between solids, liquids, and gases play an important role in a wide range of practical applications and have been a subject of scientific interest since Poisson showed in 1831 that the order parameter of liquids near interfaces must deviate considerably from its bulk value. In particular, polymers at surfaces and interfaces have been a subject of extensive theoretical, experimental and computational studies for a long time due to their use in many diverse applications ranging from antifouling coatings to flexible electronic devices. Understanding the structure and thermodynamic properties of polymers at surfaces and interfaces is thus an area of fundamental and current technological interest. Although encouraging experimental progress has been made over the years in understanding the molecular structure of polymers in contact with various environments, selectively probing their structure and dynamics at surfaces and interfaces has been extremely difficult. Computer simulations, especially molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have proven over the years to be an invaluable tool in providing molecular details at interfaces that are usually lacking in the experimental data. In this talk, I'll give an overview of some previous simulation efforts to understand the structure and dynamics of polymers at surfaces and buried interfaces. I will conclude by presenting our current and ongoing work on combining ab initio calculations and MD simulations with Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) Spectroscopy to study polymer surfaces. This approach demonstrates the future role of MD in surface science. Work supported by NSF (DMR0847580 and DMR1410290) and Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society.

  18. Playful user interfaces interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The book is about user interfaces to applications that have been designed for social and physical interaction. The interfaces are ‘playful’, that is, users feel challenged to engage in social and physical interaction because that will be fun. The topics that will be present in this book are interactive playgrounds, urban games using mobiles, sensor-equipped environments for playing, child-computer interaction, tangible game interfaces, interactive tabletop technology and applications, full-body interaction, exertion games, persuasion, engagement, evaluation, and user experience. Readers of the book will not only get a survey of state-of-the-art research in these areas, but the chapters in this book will also provide a vision of the future where playful interfaces will be ubiquitous, that is, present and integrated in home, office, recreational, sports and urban environments, emphasizing that in the future in these environments game elements will be integrated and welcomed.

  19. The molecule-metal interface

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Norbert; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2013-01-01

    Reviewing recent progress in the fundamental understanding of the molecule-metal interface, this useful addition to the literature focuses on experimental studies and introduces the latest analytical techniques as applied to this interface.The first part covers basic theory and initial principle studies, while the second part introduces readers to photoemission, STM, and synchrotron techniques to examine the atomic structure of the interfaces. The third part presents photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution UV photoelectron spectroscopy and electron spin resonance to study the electroni

  20. Designing end-user interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Heaton, N

    1988-01-01

    Designing End-User Interfaces: State of the Art Report focuses on the field of human/computer interaction (HCI) that reviews the design of end-user interfaces.This compilation is divided into two parts. Part I examines specific aspects of the problem in HCI that range from basic definitions of the problem, evaluation of how to look at the problem domain, and fundamental work aimed at introducing human factors into all aspects of the design cycle. Part II consists of six main topics-definition of the problem, psychological and social factors, principles of interface design, computer intelligenc

  1. Search-User Interface Design

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Max

    2011-01-01

    Search User Interfaces (SUIs) represent the gateway between people who have a task to complete, and the repositories of information and data stored around the world. Not surprisingly, therefore, there are many communities who have a vested interest in the way SUIs are designed. There are people who study how humans search for information, and people who study how humans use computers. There are people who study good user interface design, and people who design aesthetically pleasing user interfaces. There are also people who curate and manage valuable information resources, and people who desi

  2. Practical speech user interface design

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, James R

    2010-01-01

    Although speech is the most natural form of communication between humans, most people find using speech to communicate with machines anything but natural. Drawing from psychology, human-computer interaction, linguistics, and communication theory, Practical Speech User Interface Design provides a comprehensive yet concise survey of practical speech user interface (SUI) design. It offers practice-based and research-based guidance on how to design effective, efficient, and pleasant speech applications that people can really use. Focusing on the design of speech user interfaces for IVR application

  3. Magnetosheath-cusp interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We advance the achievements of Interball-1 and other contemporary missions in exploration of the magnetosheath-cusp interface. Extensive discussion of published results is accompanied by presentation of new data from a case study and a comparison of those data within the broader context of three-year magnetopause (MP crossings by Interball-1. Multi-spacecraft boundary layer studies reveal that in ∼80% of the cases the interaction of the magnetosheath (MSH flow with the high latitude MP produces a layer containing strong nonlinear turbulence, called the turbulent boundary layer (TBL. The TBL contains wave trains with flows at approximately the Alfvén speed along field lines and "diamagnetic bubbles" with small magnetic fields inside. A comparison of the multi-point measurements obtained on 29 May 1996 with a global MHD model indicates that three types of populating processes should be operative: large-scale (∼few RE anti-parallel merging at sites remote from the cusp; medium-scale (few thousandkm local TBL-merging of fields that are anti-parallel on average; small-scale (few hundredkm bursty reconnection of fluctuating magnetic fields, representing a continuous mechanism for MSH plasma inflow into the magnetosphere, which could dominate in quasi-steady cases. The lowest frequency (∼1–2mHz TBL fluctuations are traced throughout the magnetosheath from the post-bow shock region up to the inner magnetopause border. The resonance of these fluctuations with dayside flux tubes might provide an effective correlative link for the entire dayside region of the solar wind interaction with the magnetopause and cusp ionosphere. The TBL disturbances are characterized by kinked, double-sloped wave power spectra and, most probably, three-wave cascading. Both elliptical polarization and nearly Alfvénic phase velocities with characteristic dispersion indicate the kinetic Alfvénic nature of the TBL waves. The three-wave phase coupling could effectively

  4. The HEASARC graphical user interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, N.; Barrett, P.; Jacobs, P.; Oneel, B.

    1992-01-01

    An OSF/Motif-based graphical user interface has been developed to facilitate the use of the database and data analysis software packages available from the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC). It can also be used as an interface to other, similar, routines. A small number of tables are constructed to specify the possible commands and command parameters for a given set of analysis routines. These tables can be modified by a designer to affect the appearance of the interface screens. They can also be dynamically changed in response to parameter adjustments made while the underlying program is running. Additionally, a communication protocol has been designed so that the interface can operate locally or across a network. It is intended that this software be able to run on a variety of workstations and X terminals.

  5. Optoelectronics Interfaces for Power Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Neamtu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The most important issue interface is galvanicseparation between the signal part and the power board.Standards in the field have increased continuouslyelectro-security requirements on the rigidity of thedielectric and insulation resistance. Recommendations forclassical solutions require the use of galvanic separationoptoelectronics devices. Interfacing with a PC or DSP -controller is a target of interposition optical signals viathe power hardware commands.

  6. User interface for personal accounting

    OpenAIRE

    Femec, Vasilij

    2008-01-01

    This diploma work describes a method for user interface development for an application Bilanca that is intended for a review of personal financial flows. It is a simple application that subtracts outcome from income and shows the current financial state. The work begins with a detailed analysis of the best possible user interface options that give the most comfortable user experience. This is followed by the implementation in a Delphi environment. The results show that even a simple applicati...

  7. Mining Software Repositories for Automatic Interface Recommendation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Xiaobing; Li, Bin; Duan, Yucong; Shi, Wei; Liu, Xiangyue

    2016-01-01

    .... To help developers better take advantage of the available interfaces used in software repositories, we previously proposed an approach to automatically recommend interfaces by mining existing open...

  8. Delamination and deflection at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmigiani, John P.

    Cohesive-zone models have been used to study the effects of strength and toughness on the delamination and crack deflection/penetration behavior in beam-like geometries. It has been determined that the LEFM phase angle provides an excellent description of the partitioning of mode-I and mode-II energy-release rates. In particular, the nominal phase angle can be a useful parameter, even when the fracture-length scale is so large that the interface stresses do not exhibit the expected inverse-square-root dependence. The analysis has also shown that nominal phase angles greater than 90° can have physical significance, provided the interface layer is thick enough to accommodate compression without crack-surface contact. The role of modulus mismatch has been studied. A length scale introduced by the cohesive strength allows a crack-tip phase angle to be established, when LEFM predicts oscillating stress fields at the crack tip. This crack-tip phase angle is shifted from the nominal phase angle based on a characteristic geometrical length by an amount that depends on the cohesive parameters of the interface and the modulus mismatch. It has been shown that both modulus mismatch parameters can influence the interface strength. The cohesive-zone model used here reveals a number of interesting results when applied to crack deflection/penetration behavior. Of particular note is the apparent absence of any lower bound for the ratio of the substrate to interface toughness to guarantee crack penetration. It appears that, no matter how tough an interface is, crack deflection can be induced if the interface strength is low enough compared to the substrate strength. Conversely, it appears that there is a lower bound for the ratio of the substrate strength to interfacial strength, below which penetration is guaranteed no matter how brittle the interface. The effect of modulus mismatch on crack deflection is very sensitive to the mixed-mode failure criterion for the interface

  9. XML Translator for Interface Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroson, Elizabeth R.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program defines an XML schema for specifying the interface to a generic FPGA from the perspective of software that will interact with the device. This XML interface description is then translated into header files for C, Verilog, and VHDL. User interface definition input is checked via both the provided XML schema and the translator module to ensure consistency and accuracy. Currently, programming used on both sides of an interface is inconsistent. This makes it hard to find and fix errors. By using a common schema, both sides are forced to use the same structure by using the same framework and toolset. This makes for easy identification of problems, which leads to the ability to formulate a solution. The toolset contains constants that allow a programmer to use each register, and to access each field in the register. Once programming is complete, the translator is run as part of the make process, which ensures that whenever an interface is changed, all of the code that uses the header files describing it is recompiled.

  10. Interface dynamics of competing tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podewitz, Nils; Jülicher, Frank; Gompper, Gerhard; Elgeti, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Tissues can be characterized by their homeostatic stress, i.e. the value of stress for which cell division and cell death balance. When two different tissues grow in competition, a difference of their homeostatic stresses determines which tissue grows at the expense of the second. This then leads to the propagation of the interface separating the tissues. Here, we study structural and dynamical properties of this interface by combining continuum theory with mesoscopic simulations of a cell-based model. Using a simulation box that moves with the interface, we find that a stationary state exists in which the interface has a finite width and propagates with a constant velocity. The propagation velocity in the simulations depends linearly on the homeostatic stress difference, in excellent agreement with the analytical predictions. This agreement is also seen for the stress and velocity profiles. Finally, we analyzed the interface growth and roughness as a function of time and system size. We estimated growth and roughness exponents, which differ from those previously obtained for simple tissue growth.

  11. Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain Machine Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-22

    Brain - Machine Interface Eduardo Chichilnisky Leland Stanford Junior...Oct 2016 – 30 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain - Machine Interface 5b...Stanford Artificial Retina 15. SUBJECT TERMS Artificial retina, Retinal prosthesis, Brain - machine interface , Brain -computer interface ,

  12. Multi-robot control interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Walton, Miles C [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-06

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  13. PinBus Interface Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2009-12-30

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins’ functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

  14. Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ibach, Harald

    2006-01-01

    This graduate-level textbook covers the major developments in surface sciences of recent decades, from experimental tricks and basic techniques to the latest experimental methods and theoretical understanding. It is unique in its attempt to treat the physics of surfaces, thin films and interfaces, surface chemistry, thermodynamics, statistical physics and the physics of the solid/electrolyte interface in an integral manner, rather than in separate compartments. The Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces is designed as a handbook for the researcher as well as a study-text for graduate students in physics or chemistry with special interest in the surface sciences, material science, or the nanosciences. The experienced researcher, professional or academic teacher will appreciate the opportunity to share many insights and ideas that have grown out of the author's long experience. Readers will likewise appreciate the wide range of topics treated, each supported by extensive references. Graduate students will benefit f...

  15. Coordinating user interfaces for consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Jakob

    2001-01-01

    In the years since Jakob Nielsen's classic collection on interface consistency first appeared, much has changed, and much has stayed the same. On the one hand, there's been exponential growth in the opportunities for following or disregarding the principles of interface consistency-more computers, more applications, more users, and of course the vast expanse of the Web. On the other, there are the principles themselves, as persistent and as valuable as ever. In these contributed chapters, you'll find details on many methods for seeking and enforcing consistency, along with bottom-line analys

  16. Polymers and biopolymers at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A. R.; Geoghegan, M.

    2018-03-01

    This review updates recent progress in the understanding of the behaviour of polymers at surfaces and interfaces, highlighting examples in the areas of wetting, dewetting, crystallization, and ‘smart’ materials. Recent developments in analysis tools have yielded a large increase in the study of biological systems, and some of these will also be discussed, focussing on areas where surfaces are important. These areas include molecular binding events and protein adsorption as well as the mapping of the surfaces of cells. Important techniques commonly used for the analysis of surfaces and interfaces are discussed separately to aid the understanding of their application.

  17. Compound Semiconductor Surfaces and Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    correct. 10. In conjunction with 0. Krivanek and S. Liliental the thermal oxide/InP and SiO 2/InP was investigated with high resolution TEM. This...Press. 30. A Combined HREM , XPS and Electrical Properties Study of the InP-SiO2 Interface, 0. L. Krivanek , Z. Liliental, J. F. Wager, R. G. Gann, S. M...Goodnick and C. W. Wilmsen. 3. Vac. Sci. Technol. to be published. 31. HREM Investigation of the InP-SiO Interface, Z. Liliental, 0. L. Krivanek , 2 J

  18. Interface design for digital courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, H.; Kester, L.; Hummel, H.; Nadolski, R.; Jochems, W.; Merriënboer, J.; Koper, R.

    2003-01-01

    An important question in web-based education is how to deal with the design of the interface. What will the actual screen look like? Two main issues that are especially relevant for educational purposes are discussed, both from a Human-Computer Interaction and an Educational Psychology perspective.

  19. Spelling Correction in User Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-20

    we have concluded that there are considerable benefits and few obstacles to providing a spelling corrector in almost any interactie user interface. Key...the ACAI 23, 12 (December 1980), 676-687. 8. John F. Reiser (ed.). SAIL Manual. Stanford University Computer Science Department, 1976. 9. Warren

  20. Emotional Brain-Computer Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Molina, Gary; Tsoneva, Tsvetomira; Cohn, J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    Research in Brain-computer interface (BCI) has significantly increased during the last few years. In addition to their initial role as assisting devices for the physically challenged, BCIs are now proposed for a wider range of applications. As in any HCI application, BCIs can also benefit from

  1. Usability of Nomadic User Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dees, W.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, a number of research activities have been performed to enable user interfaces and the underlying user activities to be migrated from one device to another. We call this “Nomadic User Interfaces”. The primary goal of these research activities has been to develop the

  2. The steel–concrete interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angst, Ueli M.; Geiker, Mette Rica; Michel, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Although the steel–concrete interface (SCI) is widely recognized to influence the durability of reinforced concrete, a systematic overview and detailed documentation of the various aspects of the SCI are lacking. In this paper, we compiled a comprehensive list of possible local characteristics at...

  3. Wheel/rail interface optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shevtsov, I.Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, wheel/rail interface optimisation, and particularly the problems of wheel and rail profile design are considered. The research task pursued by this thesis engenders investigation of a range of problems. First, geometric properties of contact between wheel and rail are investigated.

  4. Emotional Brain-Computer Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Molina, G.; Nijholt, A.; Nijholt, Antinus; Tsoneva, T.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Heylen, D.K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Research in brain-computer interface (BCI) has significantly increased during the last few years. Additionally to their initial role as assisting devices for the physically challenged, BCIs are now proposed for a wider range of applications. As any human-machine interaction system, BCIs can benefit

  5. Robust Brain-Computer Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuderink, B.

    2011-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) enables direct communication from the brain to devices, bypassing the traditional pathway of peripheral nerves and muscles. Current BCIs aimed at patients require that the user invests weeks, or even months, to learn the skill to intentionally modify their brain

  6. Smart Material Interfaces: A vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minuto, A.; Vyas, Dhaval; Poelman, Wim; Nijholt, Antinus; Camurri, Antonio; Costa, Cristine

    In this paper, we introduce a vision called Smart Material Interfaces (SMIs), which takes advantage of the latest generation of engineered materials that has a special property defined “smart‿. They are capable of changing their physical properties, such as shape, size and color, and can be

  7. Embodied agents in de interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, M.J.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2001-01-01

    Steeds meer zien we het gebruik van mensachtige, geanimeerde figuren in interfaces en andere software applicaties, niet alleen in onderzoeksprojecten maar ook in commerciële software. Een voorbeeld dat bijna iedereen wel kent (en waar velen wel wat op aan te merken hebben) is de ‘office assistant’

  8. Artificial photosynthesis at soft interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaming, Delphine; Hatay, Imren; Cortez, Fernando; Olaya, Astrid; Méendez, Manuel A; Ge, Pei Yu; Deng, Haiqiang; Voyame, Patrick; Nazemi, Zahra; Girault, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    The concept of artificial photosynthesis at a polarised liquid membrane is presented. It includes two photosystems, one at each interface for the hydrogen and oxygen evolution respectively. Both reactions involve proton coupled electron transfer reactions, and some ultrafast steps at the photosensitization stage.

  9. Det æstetiske interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    forbundne dele – en kulturhistorisk, diakron undersøgelse af computerspillet og en teoretisk, synkron analyse af det æstetiske interface i computerspillet. Med afsæt i bl.a. en overvejelse af forholdet mellem medie-teknologi og sansning – byggende på Walter Benjamin – og en analyse af computerspillet...

  10. Interfacing DNA nanodevices with biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Mathias; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    in biology and biomedicine acting as a molecular ‘nanorobot’ or smart drug interacting with the cellular machinery. In this review, we will explore and examine the perspective of DNA nanotechnology for such use. We summarize which requirements DNA nanostructures must fulfil to function in cellular...... environments and inside living organisms. In addition, we highlight recent advances in interfacing DNA nanostructures with biology....

  11. Control system oriented human interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barale, P.; Jacobson, V.; Kilgore, R.; Rondeau, D.

    1976-11-01

    The on-line control system interface for magnet beam steering and focusing in the Bevalac is described. An Aydin model 5205B display generator was chosen. This display generator will allow the computer to completely rewrite a monitor screen in less than 50 ms and is also capable of controlling a color monitor. (PMA)

  12. A sharp interface method for SPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingyu; Deng, Xiao-Long

    2015-12-01

    A sharp interface method (SIM) for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has been developed to simulate two-phase flows with clear interfaces. The level set function is introduced to capture the interface implicitly. The interface velocity is used to evolve the level set function. The smoothness of the level set function helps to improve the accuracy of the interface curvature. Material discontinuity across the interface is dealt with by the ghost fluid method. The interface states are calculated by applying the jump conditions and are extended to the corresponding ghost fluid particles. The ghost fluid method helps to get smooth and stable calculation near the interface. The performance of the developed method is validated by benchmark tests. The developed SIM for SPH can be applied to simulate low speed two-phase flows of high density ratios with clear interface accurately and stably.

  13. MIB Galerkin method for elliptic interface problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhan, Meng; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-12-15

    Material interfaces are omnipresent in the real-world structures and devices. Mathematical modeling of material interfaces often leads to elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) with discontinuous coefficients and singular sources, which are commonly called elliptic interface problems. The development of high-order numerical schemes for elliptic interface problems has become a well defined field in applied and computational mathematics and attracted much attention in the past decades. Despite of significant advances, challenges remain in the construction of high-order schemes for nonsmooth interfaces, i.e., interfaces with geometric singularities, such as tips, cusps and sharp edges. The challenge of geometric singularities is amplified when they are associated with low solution regularities, e.g., tip-geometry effects in many fields. The present work introduces a matched interface and boundary (MIB) Galerkin method for solving two-dimensional (2D) elliptic PDEs with complex interfaces, geometric singularities and low solution regularities. The Cartesian grid based triangular elements are employed to avoid the time consuming mesh generation procedure. Consequently, the interface cuts through elements. To ensure the continuity of classic basis functions across the interface, two sets of overlapping elements, called MIB elements, are defined near the interface. As a result, differentiation can be computed near the interface as if there is no interface. Interpolation functions are constructed on MIB element spaces to smoothly extend function values across the interface. A set of lowest order interface jump conditions is enforced on the interface, which in turn, determines the interpolation functions. The performance of the proposed MIB Galerkin finite element method is validated by numerical experiments with a wide range of interface geometries, geometric singularities, low regularity solutions and grid resolutions. Extensive numerical studies confirm the

  14. UNIVERSAL INTERFACE TO MULTIPLE OPERATIONS SYSTEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1986-01-01

    Alternative ways to provide access to operations systems that maintain, test, and configure complex telephone networks are being explored. It is suggested that a universal interface that provides simultaneous access to multiple operations systems that execute in different hardware and software...... environments, can be provided by an architecture that is based on the separation of presentation issues from application issues and on a modular interface management system that consists of a virtual user interface, physical user interface, and interface agent. The interface functionality that is needed...

  15. Through the Interface - a human activity approach to user interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne

    In providing a theoretical framework for understanding human- computer interaction as well as design of user interfaces, this book combines elements of anthropology, psychology, cognitive science, software engineering, and computer science. The framework examines the everyday work practices...... of users when analyzing and designing computer applications. The text advocates the unique theory that computer application design is fundamentally a collective activity in which the various practices of the participants meet in a process of mutual learning....

  16. ACPYPE - AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa da Silva, Alan W; Vranken, Wim F

    2012-07-23

    ACPYPE (or AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE) is a wrapper script around the ANTECHAMBER software that simplifies the generation of small molecule topologies and parameters for a variety of molecular dynamics programmes like GROMACS, CHARMM and CNS. It is written in the Python programming language and was developed as a tool for interfacing with other Python based applications such as the CCPN software suite (for NMR data analysis) and ARIA (for structure calculations from NMR data). ACPYPE is open source code, under GNU GPL v3, and is available as a stand-alone application at http://www.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype and as a web portal application at http://webapps.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype. We verified the topologies generated by ACPYPE in three ways: by comparing with default AMBER topologies for standard amino acids; by generating and verifying topologies for a large set of ligands from the PDB; and by recalculating the structures for 5 protein-ligand complexes from the PDB. ACPYPE is a tool that simplifies the automatic generation of topology and parameters in different formats for different molecular mechanics programmes, including calculation of partial charges, while being object oriented for integration with other applications.

  17. ACPYPE - AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa da Silva Alan W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ACPYPE (or AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE is a wrapper script around the ANTECHAMBER software that simplifies the generation of small molecule topologies and parameters for a variety of molecular dynamics programmes like GROMACS, CHARMM and CNS. It is written in the Python programming language and was developed as a tool for interfacing with other Python based applications such as the CCPN software suite (for NMR data analysis and ARIA (for structure calculations from NMR data. ACPYPE is open source code, under GNU GPL v3, and is available as a stand-alone application at http://www.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype and as a web portal application at http://webapps.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype. Findings We verified the topologies generated by ACPYPE in three ways: by comparing with default AMBER topologies for standard amino acids; by generating and verifying topologies for a large set of ligands from the PDB; and by recalculating the structures for 5 protein–ligand complexes from the PDB. Conclusions ACPYPE is a tool that simplifies the automatic generation of topology and parameters in different formats for different molecular mechanics programmes, including calculation of partial charges, while being object oriented for integration with other applications.

  18. ACPYPE - AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background ACPYPE (or AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE) is a wrapper script around the ANTECHAMBER software that simplifies the generation of small molecule topologies and parameters for a variety of molecular dynamics programmes like GROMACS, CHARMM and CNS. It is written in the Python programming language and was developed as a tool for interfacing with other Python based applications such as the CCPN software suite (for NMR data analysis) and ARIA (for structure calculations from NMR data). ACPYPE is open source code, under GNU GPL v3, and is available as a stand-alone application at http://www.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype and as a web portal application at http://webapps.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype. Findings We verified the topologies generated by ACPYPE in three ways: by comparing with default AMBER topologies for standard amino acids; by generating and verifying topologies for a large set of ligands from the PDB; and by recalculating the structures for 5 protein–ligand complexes from the PDB. Conclusions ACPYPE is a tool that simplifies the automatic generation of topology and parameters in different formats for different molecular mechanics programmes, including calculation of partial charges, while being object oriented for integration with other applications. PMID:22824207

  19. The Integrated Mode Management Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    1996-01-01

    Mode management is the processes of understanding the character and consequences of autoflight modes, planning and selecting the engagement, disengagement and transitions between modes, and anticipating automatic mode transitions made by the autoflight system itself. The state of the art is represented by the latest designs produced by each of the major airframe manufacturers, the Boeing 747-400, the Boeing 777, the McDonnell Douglas MD-11, and the Airbus A320/A340 family of airplanes. In these airplanes autoflight modes are selected by manipulating switches on the control panel. The state of the autoflight system is displayed on the flight mode annunciators. The integrated mode management interface (IMMI) is a graphical interface to autoflight mode management systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The interface consists of a vertical mode manager and a lateral mode manager. Autoflight modes are depicted by icons on a graphical display. Mode selection is accomplished by touching (or mousing) the appropriate icon. The IMMI provides flight crews with an integrated interface to autoflight systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The current version is modeled on the Boeing glass-cockpit airplanes (747-400, 757/767). It runs on the SGI Indigo workstation. A working prototype of this graphics-based crew interface to the autoflight mode management tasks of glass cockpit airplanes has been installed in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator of the CSSRF of NASA Ames Research Center. This IMMI replaces the devices in FMCS equipped airplanes currently known as mode control panel (Boeing), flight guidance control panel (McDonnell Douglas), and flight control unit (Airbus). It also augments the functions of the flight mode annunciators. All glass cockpit airplanes are sufficiently similar that the IMMI could be tailored to the mode management system of any modern cockpit. The IMMI does not replace the

  20. The Ni-YSZ interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karin Vels

    the samples with impure nickel electrodes showed an initial increase toward a high constant polarisation resistance, whereas the samples with pure nickel electrodes showed a considerable decrease to a low constant polarisation resistance with time. For both types of nickel the polarisation resistance dropped......The anode/electrolyte interface in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is known to cause electrical losses. Geometrically simple Ni/yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) interfaces were examined to gain information on the structural and chemical changes occurring during experiments at 1000°C in an atmosphere...... of 97% H2/3% H2O. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at open circuit voltage (OCV) and at anodic and cathodic polarisations (100 mV) was performed. A correlation of the electrical data with the structure development and the chemical composition was attempted. Nickel wires with different impurity...

  1. Soft matter at aqueous interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the science of interfaces between an aqueous phase and a solid, another liquid or a gaseous phase, starting from the basic physical chemistry all the way to state-of-the-art research developments. Both experimental and theoretical methods are treated thanks to the contributions of a distinguished list of authors who are all active researchers in their respective fields. The properties of these interfaces are crucial for a wide variety of processes, products and biological systems and functions, such as the formulation of personal care and food products, paints and coatings, microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip applications, cell membranes, and lung surfactants. Accordingly, research and expertise on the subject are spread over a broad range of academic disciplines and industrial laboratories. This book brings together knowledge from these different places with the aim of fostering education, collaborations and research progress.

  2. The interface at the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2011-01-01

    In the development of and discourses around interfaces there has always been a strong urge to bypass representation and ‘jack’ directly in to the human brain, consciousness, perceptions and feelings. In her article ”The interface at the skin” Lone Koefoed Hansen looks at how two contemporary...... experimental dresses made by Philips within the field of wearable computing subscribe to the concept of ‘ideal communication’. In her article, she explains how this particular type of communication is linked to the paranormal phenomena of mind reading and telepathy, and argues that sensor-based wearable...... computing is the newest example of a technological development implicitly or explicitly aiming at manifesting two utopian parameters of communication: immediacy and instantaneity. Though utopian, this manifestation has served as a way to brand Philips “as a highly innovative and remarkable company”....

  3. Metadata Extraction and Search Interfaces - Specification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demidova, Elena; Zenz, Gideon; Olmedilla, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The Metadata Extraction and Search Interfaces offer a framework which allows for crawling specific knowledge resources and extraction their metadata. Furthermore, extracted metadata can be made persistently available for search using Metadata Extraction Listener and Search Interfaces of the

  4. Formal specification of human-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auernheimer, Brent

    1990-01-01

    A high-level formal specification of a human computer interface is described. Previous work is reviewed and the ASLAN specification language is described. Top-level specifications written in ASLAN for a library and a multiwindow interface are discussed.

  5. Visual grouping in menu interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Brumby, D. P.; Zhuang, S

    2015-01-01

    Menu interfaces often arrange options into semantic groups. This semantic structure is then usually conveyed to the user by supplementary visual grouping cues. We investigate whether these visual grouping cues actually help users locate items in menus faster, and whether there is potential for these powerful grouping cues to impede search when used inappropriately. Thirty-six participants performed known-item searches of word menus. These menus differed along three dimensions: (1) whether vis...

  6. Verified OS Interface Code Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0015 Verified OS Interface Code Synthesis Gerwin Klein NATIONAL ICT AUSTRALIA LIMITED Final Report 02/14/2017 DISTRIBUTION A...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) NATIONAL ICT AUSTRALIA LIMITED L 5 13 GARDEN ST EVELEIGH, 2015 AU 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9...public release: distribution unlimited. 1 Introduction The central question of this project was how to ensure the correctness of Operating System (OS

  7. Interface between Context and Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Cong; Wang, Daojuan; Zhang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explores how to consider contextual factors in the development of paradigm theory by focusing on the application and development of agency theory in a cross context. Specifically, the interface between agency theory and context is established from two aspects. On one hand...... and PPC, which shows that the two forms of conflict co-exist in the Chinese context and that the primary or secondary status of either conflict is sensitive to the context....

  8. Applications for Packetized Memory Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Myles Glen

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the memory subsystem has a large impact on the performance of modern computer systems. Many important applications are memory bound and others are expected to become memory bound in the future. The importance of memory performance makes it imperative to understand and optimize the interactions between applications and the system architecture. Prototyping and exploring various configurations of memory systems can give important insights, but current memory interfaces are lim...

  9. Surface Waves on Metamaterials Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee

    2016-01-01

    We analyze surface electromagnetic waves supported at the interface between isotropic medium and effective anisotropic material that can be realized by alternating conductive and dielectrics layers. This configuration can host various types of surface waves and therefore can serve as a rich...... platform for applications of surface photonics. Most of these surface waves are directional and as such their propagation can be effectively controlled by changing wavelength or material parameters tuning....

  10. User acquaintance with mobile interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, Frederic; Walesa, Magali; Sarrey, Evelyne; Wipfli, Rolf; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Handheld technology finds slowly its place in the healthcare world. Some clinicians already use intensively dedicated mobile applications to consult clinical references. However, handheld technology hasn't still broadly embraced to the core of the healthcare business, the hospitals. The weak penetration of handheld technology in the hospitals can be partly explained by the caution of stakeholders that must be convinced about the efficiency of these tools before going forward. In a domain where temporal constraints are increasingly strong, caregivers cannot loose time on playing with gadgets. All users are not comfortable with tactile manipulations and the lack of dedicated peripheral complicates entering data for novices. Stakeholders must be convinced that caregivers will be able to master handheld devices. In this paper, we make the assumption that the proper design of an interface may influence users' performances to record information. We are also interested to find out whether users increase their efficiency when using handheld tools repeatedly. To answer these questions, we have set up a field study to compare users' performances on three different user interfaces while recording vital signs. Some user interfaces were familiar to users, and others were totally innovative. Results showed that users' familiarity with smartphone influences their performances and that users improve their performances by repeating a task.

  11. MEDIA : MEDoc Interface for AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alingery, P.; Soubrié, E.; Auchère, F.; Bocchialini, K.; Boignard, J. P.; Buchlin, E.; Malappert, J. C.; Parenti, S.

    2013-03-01

    MEDOC, the space solar data center at Orsay (http://www.ias.u-psud.fr/medoc) is now providing a new web access to the AIA/SDO level 1 images. This interface has the advantage of being simple, intuitive, very stable and fast. The full resolution 4k x 4k AIA level 1 images archived at MEDOC are downloaded from upstream DRMS nodes with a 1 minute cadence at all wavelengths. The dataset will be kept online on a redundant archive for the whole SDO mission duration. The FITS files are accessible via an user friendly web interface (http://medoc-sdo.ias.u-psud.fr) that allows users to request data by selecting a date range, the desired wavelengths and a sampling rate (choosing a cadence from 1 minute to 1 day). For each file, users can preview the image (using the Helioviewer tool) or display the header information before downloading the FITS files (with or without Rice-compression). This web interface was built using Sitools2, a tool developed by CNES, the French space agency, and supports most browsers. For more advanced users, a Search/Get Python module is also available at http://sdo.ias.u-psud.fr/python. The users can use it to build more complex yet more powerful queries. We encourage everyone in Europe and beyond to use these new services!

  12. An Automation Interface for Kappa PC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvig, Susanne C

    1999-01-01

    The reports documents an automation interface for Kappa PC. The automation interface can be used to embed Kappa applications in 32-bit Windowsapplications.The interface includes functions for initialising Kappa, for loading an application, for settingvalues, for getting values, and for stopping...

  13. Interfaces for instructional use of simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoog, Robert; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; de Vries, Frits

    1991-01-01

    The learner interface is the component of an instructional system that mediates between a learner and the system. Two fundamentally different approaches for interfaces can be distinguished: conversational methapor and direct manipulation metaphor. Interfaces in both metaphors can be scaled on a

  14. Mining Software Repositories for Automatic Interface Recommendation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobing Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a large number of open source projects in software repositories for developers to reuse. During software development and maintenance, developers can leverage good interfaces in these open source projects and establish the framework of the new project quickly when reusing interfaces in these open source projects. However, if developers want to reuse them, they need to read a lot of code files and learn which interfaces can be reused. To help developers better take advantage of the available interfaces used in software repositories, we previously proposed an approach to automatically recommend interfaces by mining existing open source projects in the software repositories. We mainly used the LDA (Latent Dirichlet Allocation topic model to construct the Feature-Interface Graph for each software project and recommended the interfaces based on the Feature-Interface Graph. In this paper, we improve our previous approach by clustering the recommending interfaces on the Feature-Interface Graph, which can recommend more accurate interfaces for developers to reuse. We evaluate the effectiveness of the improved approach and the results show that the improved approach can be more efficient to recommend more accurate interfaces for reuse over our previous work.

  15. Conformal interfaces between free boson orbifold theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Melanie; Cabrera, Yaniel; Robbins, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    We construct a large class of conformal interfaces between two-dimensional c = 1 conformal field theories describing compact free bosons and their Z_2 orbifolds. The interfaces are obtained by constructing boundary states in the corresponding c = 2 product theories and applying the unfolding procedure. We compute the fusion products for all of these defects, and identify the invertible topological interfaces associated to global symmetries, the interfaces corresponding to marginal deformations, and the interfaces which map the untwisted sector of an orbifold to the invariant states of the parent theory.

  16. Surface and interface effects in VLSI

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1985-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 10: Surface and Interface Effects in VLSI provides the advances made in the science of semiconductor surface and interface as they relate to electronics. This volume aims to provide a better understanding and control of surface and interface related properties. The book begins with an introductory chapter on the intimate link between interfaces and devices. The book is then divided into two parts. The first part covers the chemical and geometric structures of prototypical VLSI interfaces. Subjects detailed include, the technologically most import

  17. Design and Realization of Universal Data Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Woo; Seo, Suk-Bae; Kim, Kyung-Tae

    2005-03-01

    KARI studied data interface of Space Applications for developing Space Experimental Instrument in International Space Station, designed, and manufactured the UDIS (International Sapce Station Universal Data Interface simulator) according to requirements of the data interface. This paper explains the design and implementation of UDIS for space application. UDIS is the instrument which simulate to interface the data from ISS to experiment module, payload and habitation module and use the development of a experiment system in the space. This simulator will be used to the GSE (Ground Support Equipment) for test of experiment system. By realization of the simulator, we ensure data interface skills for a manned-space data communication system.

  18. Experiments showing dynamics of materials interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, R.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Dynamic Experimentation Div.

    1997-02-01

    The discipline of materials science and engineering often involves understanding and controlling properties of interfaces. The authors address the challenge of educating students about properties of interfaces, particularly dynamic properties and effects of unstable interfaces. A series of simple, inexpensive, hands-on activities about fluid interfaces provides students with a testbed to develop intuition about interface dynamics. The experiments highlight the essential role of initial interfacial perturbations in determining the dynamic response of the interface. The experiments produce dramatic, unexpected effects when initial perturbations are controlled and inhibited. These activities help students to develop insight about unstable interfaces that can be applied to analogous problems in materials science and engineering. The lessons examine ``Rayleigh-Taylor instability,`` an interfacial instability that occurs when a higher-density fluid is above a lower-density fluid.

  19. The conversational interface talking to smart devices

    CERN Document Server

    McTear, Michael; Griol, David

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the conversational interface, which is becoming the main mode of interaction with virtual personal assistants, smart devices, various types of wearables, and social robots. The book consists of four parts: Part I presents the background to conversational interfaces, examining past and present work on spoken language interaction with computers; Part II covers the various technologies that are required to build a conversational interface along with practical chapters and exercises using open source tools; Part III looks at interactions with smart devices, wearables, and robots, and then goes on to discusses the role of emotion and personality in the conversational interface; Part IV examines methods for evaluating conversational interfaces and discusses future directions. · Presents a comprehensive overview of the various technologies that underlie conversational user interfaces; · Combines descriptions of conversational user interface technologies with a gui...

  20. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk

  1. Some Economics of User Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hal R. Varian

    1994-01-01

    I examine the incentives for software providers to design appropriate user interfaces. There are two sorts of costs involved when one uses software: the fixed cost of learning to use a piece of software and the the variable cost of operating the software. For example menu driven software is easy to learn, but tedious to operate. I show that a monopoly provider of software generally invests the ``right'' amount of resources in making the software easy to learn, but too little in making it easy...

  2. Metawidgets in the multimodal interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, M.M. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States) Anderson (M.D.) Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)); Glinert, E.P.; Jorge, J.A.; Ormsby, G.R. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    We analyze two intertwined and fundamental issues concerning computer-to-human communication in the multimodal interfaces: the interplay between sound and graphics, and the role of object persistence. Our observations lead us to introduce metawidgets as abstract entities capable of manifesting themselves to users as image, as sound, or as various combinations and/or sequences of the two media. We show examples of metawidgets in action, and discuss mechanisms for choosing among alternative media for metawidget instantiation. Finally, we describe a couple of experimental microworlds we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Electronic Properties of Semiconductor Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    AD-A130 745 ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF SEMICONDUCTOR INTERFACES(U) /; UNIVERSIDAD AUfONOMA DE MADRID (SPAIN) DEPT DE FISICA DEL ESTADO SOLIDO F FLORES...Estado Solido 6.11.02A Universidad Autonoma Cantoblanco, Madrid 34. Spain 1T161102BH57-03 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE...different supe4layeru formed by the superlayers (0,1), (2,3), (4,5),... and so on. Note that the number of super - layers defined inside each 6upettayer

  4. Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis Fernando; Gomez-Gil, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices. PMID:22438708

  5. Interface-based software integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Ahmad Rais

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Enterprise architecture frameworks define the goals of enterprise architecture in order to make business processes and IT operations more effective, and to reduce the risk of future investments. These enterprise architecture frameworks offer different architecture development methods that help in building enterprise architecture. In practice, the larger organizations become, the larger their enterprise architecture and IT become. This leads to an increasingly complex system of enterprise architecture development and maintenance. Application software architecture is one type of architecture that, along with business architecture, data architecture and technology architecture, composes enterprise architecture. From the perspective of integration, enterprise architecture can be considered a system of interaction between multiple examples of application software. Therefore, effective software integration is a very important basis for the future success of the enterprise architecture in question. This article will provide interface-based integration practice in order to help simplify the process of building such a software integration system. The main goal of interface-based software integration is to solve problems that may arise with software integration requirements and developing software integration architecture.

  6. Brain computer interfaces, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis Fernando; Gomez-Gil, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or 'locked in' by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices.

  7. Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Nicolas-Alonso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices.

  8. Development of skin interfacing cannula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C W; Adams, L M; Ghidoni, J J

    1975-01-01

    The skin interfacing potential of various velours, felts, foams and rough cast surfaces of some polymers was investigated by bonding these substances to solid core silastic rods using Dow-Corning Medical Adhesive Type A. These dummy cannulae were implanted as skin penetrating rods onto the dorsum of canines, goats, and swine. Vitreous carbon buttons were also investigated as to their potential. Over 200 individual implants were made and some retained in place for 2 yrs. Only the nylon and dacron velours held much promise as a long-term interfacing material. A "growth phenomenon" was observed using the velour material and this, we feel, is related to a permanent marriage between basal cells and adjacent monofilament fibers. Subsequent maturation of these cells carries the monofilament fibers to the surface causing the entire cannula to "grow". Since the maturation rate is apparently slower in humans, it does not detract from their potential application. The maturation rate is also much more rapid on the dorsum than on the ventral surfaces.

  9. Tailoring thermal interfaces with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Indira

    Thermal interfaces are key to ensure the reliable performance of many semiconductor, energy and electronic systems. High thermal conductivity (k), low elastic modulus (E) interface materials are required to dissipate heat and relieve thermo-mechanical stresses. The aim of this thesis is to develop compliant, high k nanocomposite materials for thermal interface applications utilizing nanostructured networks. Realizing high k nanocomposites is a challenge because of difficulties in incorporating high fractions of uniformly dispersed nanofillers and countering low filler-matrix interfacial conductance, while retaining a low elastic modulus. In this thesis, it is demonstrated that these issues are obviated by using cold welded gold nanowire fillers to obtain an unprecedented 30-fold increase in polydimethylsiloxane thermal conductivity that is 6-fold higher than previously reported nanocomposites at low nanofiller loadings and exceeds theoretical predictions. The nanowire diameter and aspect ratio are key to obtain cold-welded networks that enhance k at low filler fractions, while fostering low E. Along with high k, tailoring high thermal contact conductance G c is crucial for many applications. This thesis reveals a critical correlation between the rheological behavior of a high k gold-nanowire-filled polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposite and its thermal contact conductance with copper. At a critical filler fraction, an abrupt increase in the nanocomposite k is accompanied by a liquid-solid transition and a multifold decrease in Gc. These concurrent changes are attributed to nanowire percolation network formation and pre-cure polymer gelation that inhibits the formation of conformal void-free interfaces. These findings will be important for designing processing sequences to realize heterointerfaces with nanowire filled high k nanocomposite materials. Another important finding of this thesis is that nanowire networks can result in mechanical softening of polymer matrices

  10. Interactive displays natural human-interface technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Achintya K

    2014-01-01

    One of the first books to provide an in-depth discussion of the technologies, applications and trends in the rapidly emerging field of interactive displays (touch, gesture & voice) The book will cover the technologies, applications and trends in the field of interactive displays, namely interfaces based on touch, gesture and voice and those using a combination of these technologies. The book will be split into 4 main parts with each being dedicated to a specific user interface. Part 1 ''Touch Interfaces'' will provide a review of the currently deployed touch-screen technologies and applications. It will also cover the recent developments towards achieving thinner, lightweight and cost-reduced touch screen panels in the future via integration of touch functionalities. Part 2 ''Gesture Interfaces'' will examine techniques and applications in stereoscopic 3D computer vision, structured-light 3D computer vision and time-of-flight 3D computer vision in gesture interfaces. Part 3 ''Voice Interfaces'' will revie...

  11. Flexible feature interface for multimedia sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffland, Douglas R [Livermore, CA

    2009-06-09

    A flexible feature interface for multimedia sources system that includes a single interface for the addition of features and functions to multimedia sources and for accessing those features and functions from remote hosts. The interface utilizes the export statement: export "C" D11Export void FunctionName(int argc, char ** argv,char * result, SecureSession *ctrl) or the binary equivalent of the export statement.

  12. Recent work on material interface reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosso, S.J.; Swartz, B.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    For the last 15 years, many Eulerian codes have relied on a series of piecewise linear interface reconstruction algorithms developed by David Youngs. In a typical Youngs` method, the material interfaces were reconstructed based upon nearly cell values of volume fractions of each material. The interfaces were locally represented by linear segments in two dimensions and by pieces of planes in three dimensions. The first step in such reconstruction was to locally approximate an interface normal. In Youngs` 3D method, a local gradient of a cell-volume-fraction function was estimated and taken to be the local interface normal. A linear interface was moved perpendicular to the now known normal until the mass behind it matched the material volume fraction for the cell in question. But for distorted or nonorthogonal meshes, the gradient normal estimate didn`t accurately match that of linear material interfaces. Moreover, curved material interfaces were also poorly represented. The authors will present some recent work in the computation of more accurate interface normals, without necessarily increasing stencil size. Their estimate of the normal is made using an iterative process that, given mass fractions for nearby cells of known but arbitrary variable density, converges in 3 or 4 passes in practice (and quadratically--like Newton`s method--in principle). The method reproduces a linear interface in both orthogonal and nonorthogonal meshes. The local linear approximation is generally 2nd-order accurate, with a 1st-order accurate normal for curved interfaces in both two and three dimensional polyhedral meshes. Recent work demonstrating the interface reconstruction for curved surfaces will /be discussed.

  13. Surfaces and interfaces of electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brillson, Leonard J

    2012-01-01

    An advanced level textbook covering geometric, chemical, and electronic structure of electronic materials, and their applications to devices based on semiconductor surfaces, metal-semiconductor interfaces, and semiconductor heterojunctions. Starting with the fundamentals of electrical measurements on semiconductor interfaces, it then describes the importance of controlling macroscopic electrical properties by atomic-scale techniques. Subsequent chapters present the wide range of surface and interface techniques available to characterize electronic, optical, chemical, and structural propertie

  14. Topology Optimization using an Explicit Interface Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Asger Nyman; Nobel-Jørgensen, Morten; Bærentzen, J. Andreas

    Current methods for topology optimization primarily represent the interface between solid and void implicitly on fixed grids. In contrast, shape optimization methods represent the interface explicitly, but do not allow for any topological changes to the structure. Using an explicit interface repr...... seconds on an ordinary laptop utilizing a single thread. In addition, a coarse solution to the same problem has been obtained in approximately 10 seconds....

  15. Small computer interface to a stepper motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Fred A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A Commodore VIC-20 computer has been interfaced with a stepper motor to provide an inexpensive stepper motor controller. Only eight transistors and two integrated circuits compose the interface. The software controls the parallel interface of the computer and provides the four phase drive signals for the motor. Optical sensors control the zeroing of the 12-inch turntable positioned by the controller. The computer calculates the position information and movement of the table and may be programmed in BASIC to execute automatic sequences.

  16. Interface Evaluation for Open System Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    information protection level ( IPL ) required for connected systems. Utilization of an open interface implies that a willingness to share information about...the interface exists. An inverse relationship between the IPL and the value of an open interface exists. As the IPL of connected systems increases...unclassified IPL . The minimum value is associated with a compartmentalized top secret IPL . The IPL scale is shown in Table 10. Information

  17. At the Interface of Disciplines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    with language instruction, whose features have endured and diffused throughout the business school, ends the presentation set. Symposium discussion will be designed to invite participants, from within the EU and beyond, to join in collaborative practitioner research for the EHEA future."......This Symposium presents curriculum design and content issues in a Scandinavian business school at its Centenary. The aim is an exploration of an educational institution at the interface of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) within the historical trends of the European Union. We hope...... of interdisciplinarity, use of text production as a tool in support of project and thesis writing, and the use of plurilingual content based teaching in a cooperative learning model for European studies. The history of one curriculum model initiated to educate better citizens, combining interdisciplinary methods...

  18. On Building a Search Interface Discovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakov, Denis

    A huge portion of the Web known as the deep Web is accessible via search interfaces to myriads of databases on the Web. While relatively good approaches for querying the contents of web databases have been recently proposed, one cannot fully utilize them having most search interfaces unlocated. Thus, the automatic recognition of search interfaces to online databases is crucial for any application accessing the deep Web. This paper describes the architecture of the I-Crawler, a system for finding and classifying search interfaces. The I-Crawler is intentionally designed to be used in the deep web characterization surveys and for constructing directories of deep web resources.

  19. User Interface Cultures of Mobile Knowledge Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Mannonen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication tools (ICTs have become a major influencer of how modern work is carried out. Methods of user-centered design do not however take into account the full complexity of technology and the user interface context the users live in. User interface culture analysis aims providing to designers new ways and strategies to better take into account the current user interface environment when designing new products. This paper describes the reasons behind user interface culture analysis and shows examples of its usage when studying mobile and distributed knowledge workers.

  20. Ceramic-Metal Interfaces in Multilayer Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell, John; Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Andersen, Bjørn

    1996-01-01

    on the quality and strength of this interface. In the case of a weak ceramic-metal interface, delaminations will occur under severe working conditions.Work has been carried out on a commercial PZT type ceramic and various types of Pt electrode paste. The present study involves characterization of the interface......Multilayer actuators consist of a number of piezoelectric or electrostrictive ceramic layers, separated by thin metal electrodes. Thus, the ceramic-metal interface plays an even more important role than for bulk piezoceramics. The performance and durability of the actuator depends closely...

  1. A Theoretical Framework for Ecological Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Rasmussen, Jens

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical framework for designing interfaces for complex systems is de-scribed. The framework, called ecological interface design (EID), suggests a set of principles for designing interfaces in a way that supports the funda-mental properties of human cognition. The basis of EID is the skills...... of the task require. The EID approach extends the concept of direct manipulation inter-faces by taking into account the added complications introduced by complex systems. In this paper, we describe the development of the framework, its theoretical foundations, and examples of its application to various work...

  2. Polymer surfaces, interfaces and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamm, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Mainz (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Neutron reflectometry can be used in various ways to investigate surfaces, interfaces and thin films of polymers. Its potential comes mostly from the possibilities offered by selective deuteration, where a particular component can be made visible with respect to its activity at the interface. In addition the depth resolution is much better than with most other direct techniques, and details of the profiles may be resolved. Several examples will be discussed including the segment diffusion at the interface between two polymer films, the determination of the narrow interfaces between incompatible polymer blends and the development of order in thin diblock copolymer films. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 38 refs.

  3. Effects of Buoyancy Forces on Immiscible Water/Oil Displacements in a Vertically Oriented Porous Medium Effets des facteurs de flottabilité sur les déplacements non-miscibles eau/huile dans un milieu poreux vertical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirunavu S. R.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of buoyancy forces on liquid-liquid displacement processes occurring in porous media are important in a variety of practical situations, in particular during the displacement of oil from partially-depleted underground reservoirs by means of aqueous solutions. Most previous studies involving the visualization of water/oil displacements in porous media have been undertaken in horizontal two-dimensional porous medium cells. The objective of the present work was to determine the effects of buoyancy forces; on the fingering pattern and oil recovery by conducting immiscible displacement experiments in two-dimensional consolidated porous medium cells aligned in the vertical plane. In order to obtain a clear understanding of the favourable and unfavourable effects of buoyancy forces, experiments were carried out in three different flow modes, namely horizontal, vertical upward, and vertical downward. As the effects of buoyancy forces are negligible for two-dimensional porous media in the horizontal flow mode, the recoveries obtained in this mode were used as a reference for comparison with those obtained in the two vertical modes. Displacements using five different density ratios were studied. The breakthrough time and percentage oil recovery were measured in each case. The effects of buoyancy forces, viscous forces, and capillary forces, as well as the injection flow rate, were also recorded. The results obtained indicate that the effects of buoyancy forces are very pronounced at low flow rates and low oil/water density ratios, and that even a slight increase in the flow rate causes the buoyancy forces to rapidly become less significant. Les facteurs de flottabilité exercent un effet important sur les déplacements liquide/liquide en milieu poreux dans toute une gamme de situations pratiques, en particulier lorsqu'on veut déplacer l'huile de roches réservoirs partiellement épuisées à l'aide de solutions aqueuses. La plupart des

  4. Interface information transfer between non-matching, nonconforming interfaces using radial basis function interpolation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bogaers, Alfred EJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available , transferring information across a non-matching interface presents itself as a nontrivial problem. RBF interpolation, which requires no global connectivity information, provides an elegant means by which to negate any geometric discrepancies along the interface...

  5. Interface Everywhere: Further Development of a Gesture and Voice Commanding Interface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Natural User Interface (NUI) is a term used to describe a number of technologies such as speech recognition, multi-touch, and kinetic interfaces. Gesture and voice...

  6. Variational Implicit Solvation with Solute Molecular Mechanics: From Diffuse-Interface to Sharp-Interface Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Zhao, Yanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Central in a variational implicit-solvent description of biomolecular solvation is an effective free-energy functional of the solute atomic positions and the solute-solvent interface (i.e., the dielectric boundary). The free-energy functional couples together the solute molecular mechanical interaction energy, the solute-solvent interfacial energy, the solute-solvent van der Waals interaction energy, and the electrostatic energy. In recent years, the sharp-interface version of the variational implicit-solvent model has been developed and used for numerical computations of molecular solvation. In this work, we propose a diffuse-interface version of the variational implicit-solvent model with solute molecular mechanics. We also analyze both the sharp-interface and diffuse-interface models. We prove the existence of free-energy minimizers and obtain their bounds. We also prove the convergence of the diffuse-interface model to the sharp-interface model in the sense of Γ-convergence. We further discuss properties of sharp-interface free-energy minimizers, the boundary conditions and the coupling of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation in the diffuse-interface model, and the convergence of forces from diffuse-interface to sharp-interface descriptions. Our analysis relies on the previous works on the problem of minimizing surface areas and on our observations on the coupling between solute molecular mechanical interactions with the continuum solvent. Our studies justify rigorously the self consistency of the proposed diffuse-interface variational models of implicit solvation.

  7. EDITORIAL: Sensors based on interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camassel, Jean; Soukiassian, Patrick G.

    2007-12-01

    Sensors are specific analog devices that convert a physical quantity, like the temperature or external pressure or concentration of carbon monoxide in a confined atmosphere, into an electrical signal. Considered in this way, every sensor is then a part of the artificial interface, which connects the human world to the world of machines. The other side of the interface is represented by actuators. Most often, after processing the data they are used to convert the out-coming electrical power into counteracting physical action. In the last few years, thanks to inexpensive silicon technology, enormous capability for data processing has been developed and the world of machines has become increasingly invasive. The world of sensors has become increasingly complex too. Applications range from classical measurements of the temperature, vibrations, shocks and acceleration to more recent chemical and bio-sensing technologies. Chemical sensors are used to detect the presence of specific, generally toxic, chemical species. To measure their concentration, one uses some specific property, generally a physical one, like the intensity of infrared absorption bands. Bio-sensors are new, more complex, devices that combine a bio-receptor with a physical transducer. The bio-receptor is a molecule (for instance, an enzyme like glucose oxidase) that can recognize a specific target (glucose molecules in the case of glucose oxidase). The enzyme must be fixed on the transducer and, as a consequence of recognition, the transducer must convert the event into a measurable analytical signal. A common feature of many chemical and bio-sensors is that they require a large surface of interaction with the outside world. For that reason and in order to increase efficiency, either nanoparticles or pores or a combination of both, made from various materials including (but not limited to) porous silicon, are often used as the functional transducer interface. The reviews in this Cluster Issue of Journal

  8. Interface Yang-Mills, supersymmetry, and Janus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Hoker, Eric [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Estes, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gutperle, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)]. E-mail: gutperle@physics.ucla.edu

    2006-10-02

    We consider theories consisting of a planar interface with N=4 super-Yang-Mills on either side and varying gauge coupling across the interface. The interface does not carry any independent degrees of freedom, but is allowed to support local gauge invariant operators, included with independent interface couplings. In general, both conformal symmetry and supersymmetry will be broken, but for special arrangements of the interface couplings, these symmetries may be restored. We provide a systematic classification of all allowed interface supersymmetries. We find new theories preserving eight and four Poincare supersymmetries, which get extended to sixteen and eight supersymmetries in the conformal limit, respectively with SU(2)xSU(2), SO(2)xSU(2) internal symmetry. The Lagrangians for these theories are explicitly constructed. We also recover the theory with two Poincare supersymmetries and SU(3) internal symmetry proposed earlier as a candidate CFT dual to super-Janus. Since our new interface theories have only operators from the supergravity multiplet turned on, dual supergravity solutions are expected to exist. We speculate on the possible relation between the interface theory with maximal supersymmetry and the near-horizon limit of the D3-D5 system.

  9. Hypertext Interface Design and Structural Knowledge Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneman, Philip A.; Jonassen, David H.

    Hypertext is well-suited for educational applications where open learning and knowledge exploration is desired. In such applications, principles of good hypertext interface design should be employed to avoid navigational problems so as to maximize learning. Interface design, however, may also directly enhance acquisition of a particular knowledge…

  10. Model driven development of user interface prototypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Many approaches to interface development apply only to isolated aspects of the development of user interfaces (UIs), e.g., exploration during the early phases, design of visual appearance, or implementation in some technology. In this paper we explore an _integrated_ approach to incorporate the w...

  11. On the shear instability of fluid interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Alexakis, A.; Young, Y.; Rosner, R.

    2001-01-01

    We examine the linear stability of fluid interfaces subjected to a shear flow. Our main object is to generalize previous work to arbitrary Atwood number, and to allow for surface tension and weak compressibility. The motivation derives from instances in astrophysical systems where mixing across material interfaces driven by shear flows may significantly affect the dynamical evolution of these systems.

  12. Shear instability of fluid interfaces: Stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, A.; Young, Y.; Rosner, R.

    2002-02-01

    We examine the linear stability of fluid interfaces subjected to a shear flow. Our main object is to generalize previous work to an arbitrary Atwood number, and to allow for surface tension and weak compressibility. The motivation derives from instances in astrophysical systems where mixing across material interfaces driven by shear flows may significantly affect the dynamical evolution of these systems.

  13. Properties of Molecular organized assemblies at interfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dr.AURNA

    The chemistry of surfaces and interfaces is of great interest in academic and industrial research. ➢ The behavior of ... Amphiphiles have unusual properties and makes them very important both in industry and in science. .... the head group influences the organization, orientation and aggregation of metal clusters at interface ...

  14. An introduction to the COLIN optimization interface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, William Eugene

    2003-03-01

    We describe COLIN, a Common Optimization Library INterface for C++. COLIN provides C++ template classes that define a generic interface for both optimization problems and optimization solvers. COLIN is specifically designed to facilitate the development of hybrid optimizers, for which one optimizer calls another to solve an optimization subproblem. We illustrate the capabilities of COLIN with an example of a memetic genetic programming solver.

  15. Core-shell particles at fluid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchcic, C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of particles as stabilizers for foams and emulsions. Applying hard particles for stabilization of fluid interface is referred to as Pickering stabilization. By using hard particles instead of surfactants and polymers, fluid interfaces can be effectively

  16. Energy-Efficient Capacitive-Sensor Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Z.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the theory, design and realization of energy-efficient capacitive-sensor interfaces that are dedicated to energy-constrained applications. The goal of this work is to explore energy-efficient capacitive-sensor interface design techniques both at the system and the circuit

  17. Gender Interest Differences with Multimedia Learning Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passig, David; Levin, Haya

    1999-01-01

    This study of 90 kindergarten children examined gender differences in learning interest from different designs of multimedia interfaces. Results indicate a significant difference between boys and girls in the influence of the design of interactive multimedia stories on time on task and on level of satisfaction with the interfaces. (Author/LRW)

  18. User Interface Design for Dynamic Geometry Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, Ulrich; Dohrmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe long-standing user interface issues with Dynamic Geometry Software and common approaches to address them. We describe first prototypes of multi-touch-capable DGS. We also give some hints on the educational benefits of proper user interface design.

  19. Peptide segments in protein-protein interfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-09-06

    Sep 6, 2006 ... In 1000 Å2 of the interface area, contributed by a polypeptide chain, there would be 3.4 segments in homodimers, 5.6 in complexes and 6.3 in crystal contacts. Concomitantly, the segments are the longest (with 8.7 interface residues) in homodimers. Core segments (likely to contribute more towards binding) ...

  20. KNOWBOT; An adaptive data base interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heger, A.S.; Koen, B.U. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1991-02-01

    This paper reports on an adaptive interface KNOWBOT designed to solve some of the problems that face the users of large centralized data bases. The interface applies the neural network approach to information retrieval from a data base. The data base is a subset of the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System. The interface KNOWBOT preempts an existing data base interface and works in conjunction with it. By design, KNOWBOT starts as a tabula rasa but acquires knowledge through its interactions with the user and the data base. The interface uses its gained knowledge to personalize the data base retrieval process and to induce new queries. The interface also forgets the information that is no longer needed by the user. These self-organizing features of the interface reduce the scope of the data base to the subsets that are highly relevant to the user needs. A proof-of-principal version of this interface has been implemented in Common LISP on a Texas Instruments Explorer I workstation. Experiments with KNOWBOT have been successful in demonstrating the robustness of the model especially with induction and self-organization. This paper describes the design of KNOWBOT and presents some of the experimental results.

  1. Advanced Stellar Compass, CHAMP, Interface Control Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Betto, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    The German government research establishment "GeoForschungsZentrum" developed under a contract to the German government a microsatellite named "Champ". The Space Instrumentation Group has made a Interface Control Document for the CHAMP, witch describes the Star Imager, the electrical interface...

  2. Particles Dispersion on Fluid-Liquid Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pushpendra; Gurupatham, Sathish; Dalal, Bhavin; Hossain, M.; Fischer, Ian; Joseph, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    In a previous study we have shown that when small particles, e.g., flour, pollen, etc., come in contact with an air-liquid interface, they disperse in a manner that appears explosive. This is due to the fact that the capillary force pulls particles into the interface causing them to accelerate to a relatively large velocity. The motion of particles in the direction normal to the interface is inertia dominated, and so they oscillate vertically about the equilibrium position before coming to a stop under viscous drag. This vertical motion of a particle causes a radially outward lateral (secondary) flow on the interface that causes nearby particles to move away. The dispersion on a liquid-liquid interface was relatively weaker than on an air-liquid interface, and occurred over a longer period of time. This was a consequence of the fact that particles became separated while sedimenting through the upper liquid and reached the interface over a time interval that lasted for several seconds. The rate of dispersion depended on the size of particles, the particle and liquids densities, the viscosities of the liquids involved, and the contact angle. The frequency of oscillation of particles about their floating equilibrium increased with decreasing particle size on both air-water and liquid-liquid interfaces, and the time taken to reach equilibrium decreased with decreasing particle size.

  3. Graphic Interface for LCP2 Optimization Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolae, Taropa Laurentiu; Gaunholt, Hans

    1998-01-01

    This report provides information about the software interface that is programmed for the Optimization Program LCP2. The first part is about the general description of the program followed by a guide for using the interface. The last chapters contain a discussion about problems or futute extension...

  4. IVOA Support Interfaces Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Matthew; Rixon, Guy; Grid andWeb Services Working Group; Graham, Matthew; Rixon, Guy

    2011-05-01

    This document describes the minimum interface that a (SOAP- or REST-based) web service requires to participate in the IVOA. Note that this is not required of standard VO services developed prior to this specification, although uptake is strongly encouraged on any subsequent revision. All new standard VO services, however, must feature a VOSI-compliant interface.

  5. Interfacing for Economical Data Gathering and Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, Tom

    1981-01-01

    By interfacing a Biotran II counting device with an Apple II computer, biologists in a biomedical laboratory increased accuracy and speed over manual logging of Biotran readings. Suggests that others interface small computers to computer readable devices as a cost-effective approach. Outlines necessary steps. (DC)

  6. Visually Designing the Computer-Learner Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Leslie

    1991-01-01

    Discusses elements involved in the visual design of the computer-learner interface. Topics discussed include the need for consistency in screen layout; information representation, including accuracy in images and visual cuing strategies; and menu selection interfaces, or command representations, including their placement on the screen. (11…

  7. Coded Schemes for Asymmetric Wireless Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, André; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2015-01-01

    system with full duplex interfaces. Our second goal is to understand the practical implications of these results by designing a protocol for file transmissions, implement it in Android smart phones, and measure its performance when combining various interfaces, including, Bluetooth, WiFi, and 3G cellular...

  8. A sharp interface Cartesian grid hydrocode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar

    Dynamic response of materials to high-speed and high-intensity loading conditions is important in several applications including high-speed flows with droplets, bubbles and particles, and hyper-velocity impact and penetration processes. In such high-pressure physics problems, simulations encounter challenges associated with the treatment of material interfaces, particularly when strong nonlinear waves like shock and detonation waves impinge upon them. To simulate such complicated interfacial dynamics problems, a fixed Cartesian grid approach in conjunction with levelset interface tracking is attractive. In this regard, a sharp interface Cartesian grid-based, Ghost Fluid Method (GFM) is developed for resolving embedded fluid, elasto-plastic solid and rigid (solid) objects in hyper-velocity impact and high-intensity shock loaded environment. The embedded boundaries are tracked and represented by virtue of the level set interface tracking technique. The evolving multimaterial interface and the flow are coupled by meticulously enforcing the boundary conditions and jump relations at the interface. In addition, a tree-based Local Mesh Refinement scheme is employed to efficiently resolve the desired physics. The framework developed is generic and is applicable to interfaces separating a wide range of materials and for a broad spectrum of speeds of interaction (O(km/s)). The wide repertoire of problems solved in this work demonstrates the flexibility, stability and robustness of the method in accurately capturing the dynamics of the embedded interface. Shocks interacting with large ensembles of particles are also computed.

  9. Learning Analytics for Natural User Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Maldonado, Roberto; Shum, Simon Buckingham; Schneider, Bertrand; Charleer, Sven; Klerkx, Joris; Duval, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The continuous advancement of natural user interfaces (NUIs) allows for the development\tof novel and creative ways to support collocated collaborative work in a wide range of areas, including teaching and learning. The use of NUIs, such as those based on interactive multi-touch surfaces and tangible user interfaces (TUIs), can offer unique…

  10. Gestures in an Intelligent User Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkert, F.W.; van der Vet, P.E.; Nijholt, Antinus; Shao, Ling; Shan, Caifeng; Luo, Jiebo; Etoh, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we investigated which hand gestures are intuitive to control a large display multimedia interface from a user’s perspective. Over the course of two sequential user evaluations we defined a simple gesture set that allows users to fully control a large display multimedia interface,

  11. XML Interfaces to the Internet of Things

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Pemberton (Steven); C Foster

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractThe internet of things is predicated on tiny, cheap, lower power computers being embedded in devices everywhere. However such tiny devices by definition have very little memory and computing power available to support user interfaces or extended servers, and so the user interface

  12. A Smart Material Interfaces Learning Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minuto, A.; Pittarello, Fabio; Nijholt, Antinus

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a learning experience held with a class of primary school children who were introduced to a novel class of resources, named smart materials, and the interfaces built with them (Smart Material Interfaces). The pupils were guided along a multidisciplinary educational path in which

  13. Colloids at liquid interfaces: dynamics and organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ershov, D.S.

    2014-01-01

      This thesis deals with spherical microparticles trapped at liquid interfaces. It focuses on two aspects of their behavior: firstly, the effect of the curvature of a liquid interface on interparticle interactions and their organization; secondly, the mobility of particles at visco-elastic

  14. An Architectural Experience for Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Susan P.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of human-computer interface design was brought to the foreground with the emergence of the personal computer, the increasing complexity of electronic systems, and the need to accommodate the human operator in these systems. With each new technological generation discovering the interface design problems of its own technologies, initial…

  15. Multiphase Microfluidics The Diffuse Interface Model

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Multiphase flows are typically described assuming that the different phases are separated by a sharp interface, with appropriate boundary conditions. This approach breaks down whenever the lengthscale of the phenomenon that is being studied is comparable with the real interface thickness, as it happens, for example, in the coalescence and breakup of bubbles and drops, the wetting and dewetting of solid surfaces and, in general, im micro-devices. The diffuse interface model resolves these probems by assuming that all quantities can vary continuously, so that interfaces have a non-zero thickness, i.e. they are "diffuse". The contributions in this book review the theory and describe some relevant applications of the diffuse interface model for one-component, two-phase fluids and for liquid binary mixtures, to model multiphase flows in confined geometries.

  16. Interface mechanics of adhesiveless microtransfer printing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Lee, H.-J.; Carlson, A.; Grierson, D. S.; Rogers, J. A.; Turner, K. T.

    2014-04-01

    Microtransfer printing is a versatile process for retrieving, transferring, and placing nanomembranes of various materials on a diverse set of substrates. The process relies on the ability to preferentially propagate a crack along specific interfaces at different stages in the process. Here, we report a mechanics-based model that examines the factors that determine which interface a crack will propagate along in microtransfer printing with a soft elastomer stamp. The model is described and validated through comparison to experimental measurements. The effects of various factors, including interface toughness, stamp geometry, flaw sizes at the interfaces, and nanomembrane thickness, on the effectiveness of transfer printing are investigated using a fracture-mechanics framework and finite element modeling. The modeling results agree with experimental measurements in which the effects of interface toughness and nanomembranes thickness on the transfer printing yield were examined. The models presented can be used to guide the design of transfer printing processes.

  17. IVOA Registry Interfaces Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Kevin; Plante, Ray; Auden, Elizabeth; Graham, Matthew; Greene, Gretchen; Hill, Martin; Linde, Tony; Morris, Dave; O`Mullane, Wil; Rixon, Guy; Stébé, Aurélien; Andrews, Kona; Benson, Kevin; Plante, Ray

    2009-11-01

    Registries provide a mechanism with which VO applications can discover and select resources--e.g. data and services--that are relevant for a particular scientific problem. This specification defines the interfaces that support interactions between applications and registries as well as between the registries themselves. It is based on a general, distributed model composed of so-called searchable and publishing registries. The specification has two main components: an interface for searching and an interface for harvesting. All interfaces are defined by a standard Web Service Description Language (WSDL) document; however, harvesting is also supported through the existing Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting, defined as an HTTP REST interface. Finally, this specification details the metadata used to describe registries themselves as resources using an extension of the VOResource metadata schema.

  18. Gestures in an Intelligent User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikkert, Wim; van der Vet, Paul; Nijholt, Anton

    In this chapter we investigated which hand gestures are intuitive to control a large display multimedia interface from a user's perspective. Over the course of two sequential user evaluations, we defined a simple gesture set that allows users to fully control a large display multimedia interface, intuitively. First, we evaluated numerous gesture possibilities for a set of commands that can be issued to the interface. These gestures were selected from literature, science fiction movies, and a previous exploratory study. Second, we implemented a working prototype with which the users could interact with both hands and the preferred hand gestures with 2D and 3D visualizations of biochemical structures. We found that the gestures are influenced to significant extent by the fast paced developments in multimedia interfaces such as the Apple iPhone and the Nintendo Wii and to no lesser degree by decades of experience with the more traditional WIMP-based interfaces.

  19. Defining Interactions and Interfaces in Engineering Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parslov, Jakob Filippson

    that they have different conceptual viewpoints on the product and use different ‘technical languages’ to communicate. Some terms like an interface, is used frequently in engineering however with no commonly declared meaning and is thus subject to much interpretation across engineering disciplines. It is well....... The case example showed that interfaces that reside at the boundary between engineering disciplines are vulnerable to misinterpretation and rework. Based on this understanding, this thesis presents a first principles, physics-­based Interaction and Interface Framework, which provides a ‘common language......’ across any engineering discipline for describing and communicating about interactions and interfaces in engineering design. The framework contains classifications of three key terms; interaction, interaction mechanism, and interface. Due to the first principles, physics-­based approach to deriving...

  20. Vision as a user interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenderink, Jan

    2011-03-01

    The egg-rolling behavior of the graylag goose is an often quoted example of a fixed-action pattern. The bird will even attempt to roll a brick back to its nest! Despite excellent visual acuity it apparently takes a brick for an egg." Evolution optimizes utility, not veridicality. Yet textbooks take it for a fact that human vision evolved so as to approach veridical perception. How do humans manage to dodge the laws of evolution? I will show that they don't, but that human vision is an idiosyncratic user interface. By way of an example I consider the case of pictorial perception. Gleaning information from still images is an important human ability and is likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. I will discuss a number of instances of extreme non-veridicality and huge inter-observer variability. Despite their importance in applications (information dissemination, personnel selection,...) such huge effects have remained undocumented in the literature, although they can be traced to artistic conventions. The reason appears to be that conventional psychophysics-by design-fails to address the qualitative, that is the meaningful, aspects of visual awareness whereas this is the very target of the visual arts.

  1. Self-healing gold mirrors and filters at liquid-liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Evgeny; Peljo, Pekka; Scanlon, Micheál D.; Gumy, Frederic; Girault, Hubert H.

    2016-03-01

    The optical and morphological properties of lustrous metal self-healing liquid-like nanofilms were systematically studied for different applications (e.g., optical mirrors or filters). These nanofilms were formed by a one-step self-assembly methodology of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at immiscible water-oil interfaces, previously reported by our group. We investigated a host of experimental variables and herein report their influence on the optical properties of nanofilms: AuNP mean diameter, interfacial AuNP surface coverage, nature of the organic solvent, and nature of the lipophilic organic molecule that caps the AuNPs in the interfacial nanofilm. To probe the interfacial gold nanofilms we used in situ (UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy) as well as ex situ (SEM and TEM of interfacial gold nanofilms transferred to silicon substrates) techniques. The interfacial AuNP surface coverage strongly influenced the morphology of the interfacial nanofilms, and in turn their maximum reflectance and absorbance. We observed three distinct morphological regimes; (i) smooth 2D monolayers of ``floating islands'' of AuNPs at low surface coverages, (ii) a mixed 2D/3D regime with the beginnings of 3D nanostructures consisting of small piles of adsorbed AuNPs even under sub-full-monolayer conditions and, finally, (iii) a 3D regime characterised by the 2D full-monolayer being covered in significant piles of adsorbed AuNPs. A maximal value of reflectance reached 58% in comparison with a solid gold mirror, when 38 nm mean diameter AuNPs were used at a water-nitrobenzene interface. Meanwhile, interfacial gold nanofilms prepared with 12 nm mean diameter AuNPs exhibited the highest extinction intensities at ca. 690 nm and absorbance around 90% of the incident light, making them an attractive candidate for filtering applications. Furthermore, the interparticle spacing, and resulting interparticle plasmon coupling derived optical properties, varied significantly on replacing

  2. Thermal transport across metal silicide-silicon interfaces: An experimental comparison between epitaxial and nonepitaxial interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ning; Feser, Joseph P.; Sadasivam, Sridhar; Fisher, Timothy S.; Wang, Tianshi; Ni, Chaoying; Janotti, Anderson

    2017-02-01

    Silicides are used extensively in nano- and microdevices due to their low electrical resistivity, low contact resistance to silicon, and their process compatibility. In this work, the thermal interface conductance of TiSi2, CoSi2, NiSi, and PtSi are studied using time-domain thermoreflectance. Exploiting the fact that most silicides formed on Si(111) substrates grow epitaxially, while most silicides on Si(100) do not, we study the effect of epitaxy, and show that for a wide variety of interfaces there is no dependence of interface conductance on the detailed structure of the interface. In particular, there is no difference in the thermal interface conductance between epitaxial and nonepitaxial silicide/silicon interfaces, nor between epitaxial interfaces with different interface orientations. While these silicide-based interfaces yield the highest reported interface conductances of any known interface with silicon, none of the interfaces studied are found to operate close to the phonon radiation limit, indicating that phonon transmission coefficients are nonunity in all cases and yet remain insensitive to interfacial structure. In the case of CoSi2, a comparison is made with detailed computational models using (1) full-dispersion diffuse mismatch modeling (DMM) including the effect of near-interfacial strain, and (2) an atomistic Green' function (AGF) approach that integrates near-interface changes in the interatomic force constants obtained through density functional perturbation theory. Above 100 K, the AGF approach significantly underpredicts interface conductance suggesting that energy transport does not occur purely by coherent transmission of phonons, even for epitaxial interfaces. The full-dispersion DMM closely predicts the experimentally observed interface conductances for CoSi2, NiSi, and TiSi2 interfaces, while it remains an open question whether inelastic scattering, cross-interfacial electron-phonon coupling, or other mechanisms could also account for

  3. Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-02-16

    spin operator changes sign with T-operation. (iii) Gauge symmetry (G), which is associated with a change in the phase of the wave-function as {Psi} {yields} e{sup i{theta}}{Psi}. Gauge symmetry is connected to the law of charge conservation, and broken G-symmetry corresponds to superconductivity/superfluidity. To summarize, the interplay among these electronic degrees of freedom produces various forms of symmetry breaking patterns of I, T, and G, leading to novel emergent phenomena, which can appear only by the collective behavior of electrons and cannot be expected from individual electrons. Figure 1 shows this schematically by means of several representative phenomena. From this viewpoint, the interfaces of TMOs offer a unique and important laboratory because I is already broken by the structure itself, and the detailed form of broken I-symmetry can often be designed. Also, two-dimensionality usually enhances the effects of electron correlations by reducing their kinetic energy. These two features of oxide interfaces produce many novel effects and functions that cannot be attained in bulk form. Given that the electromagnetic responses are a major source of the physical properties of solids, and new gauge structures often appear in correlated electronic systems, we put 'emergent electromagnetism' at the center of Fig. 1.

  4. High Integrity Can Design Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaber, E.L.

    1998-08-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is chartered with facilitating the disposition of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel to allow disposal at a geologic repository. This is done through coordination with the repository program and by assisting DOE Site owners of SNF with needed information, standardized requirements, packaging approaches, etc. The High Integrity Can (HIC) will be manufactured to provide a substitute or barrier enhancement for normal fuel geometry and cladding. The can would be nested inside the DOE standardized canister which is designed to interface with the repository waste package. The HIC approach may provide the following benefits over typical canning approaches for DOE SNF. (a) It allows ready calculation and management of criticality issues for miscellaneous. (b) It segments and further isolates damaged or otherwise problem materials from normal SNF in the repository package. (c) It provides a very long term corrosion barrier. (d) It provides an extra internal pressure barrier for particulates, gaseous fission products, hydrogen, and water vapor. (e) It delays any potential release of fission products to the repository environment. (f) It maintains an additional level of fuel geometry control during design basis accidents, rock-fall, and seismic events. (g) When seal welded, it could provide the additional containment required for shipments involving plutonium content in excess of 20 Ci. (10 CFR 71.63.b) if integrated with an appropriate cask design. Long term corrosion protection is central to the HIC concept. The material selected for the HIC (Hastelloy C-22) has undergone extensive testing for repository service. The most severe theoretical interactions between iron, repository water containing chlorides and other repository construction materials have been tested. These expected chemical species have not been shown capable of corroding the selected HIC material. Therefore, the HIC should provide a significant barrier to DOE SNF dispersal

  5. Apple cuticle: the perfect interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Eric; Arey, Bruce

    2010-06-01

    The domestic apple might well be called an 'extreme' fruit. In the arid Northwest United States, the fruit often tolerates surface temperatures ranging from -2 °C in the early spring to 50 °C in the heat of summer, and again to -2 °C during controlled postharvest storage for up to 12 months. During its 18-month existence, the apple maintains a cuticle that is dynamic and environmentally responsive to protect against 1) cellular water loss during desiccation stress and 2) excessive uptake of standing surface moisture. Physiological disorders of the peel such as russeting, cracking, splitting, flecking and lenticel marking, develop as epidermal cells respond to rapid changes in ambient conditions at specific developmental stages during the growing season. Resultant market losses underlie research investigating the nature of apple cuticle growth and development. Ultrastructural analysis of the pro-cuticle using scanning electron microscopy indicates an overlapping network of lipid-based distally-elongating microtubules--produced by and connected to epidermal cells--which co-polymerize to form an organic solvent-insoluble semi-permeable cutin matrix. Microtubule elongation, aggregation, and polymerization function together as long as the fruit continues to enlarge. The nature of lipid transport from the epidermal cells through the cell wall to become part of the cuticular matrix was explored using an FEI Helios NanoLabTM DualBeamTM focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope on chemically- and cryo-fixed peel tissue from mature or freshly harvested apples. Based on microtubule dimensions, regular projections found at the cell/cuticle interface suggest an array of microtubule-like structures associated with the epidermal cell.

  6. Innovative interfaces for Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marco

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The tangible interaction approach has, in recent years, become a promising alternative to tactile interaction for very young children. Children playing with Tangible User Interfaces (TUI are motivated by the novel and digital environment and benefit from the same values as conventional physical playing. Young children build their mental image of the world through action and motor responses and, with physical handling, they become conscious of reality. Within TUIs, digitally augmented surfaces (interactive blackboards and tabletops are becoming popular in educative environments. Tabletop devices are horizontal surfaces capable of supporting interaction and image feedback on their surface, and are especially interesting for reinforcing face-to-face social relations and group activities. However, most of current children-oriented applications for tabletops are based on tactile interaction, thus losing the benefits of physical playing. The paper describes our experiences building tangible tabletops, and designing tangible games and toys. In particular, we present NIKVision, a tabletop device intended to give leisure and fun while reinforcing physical manipulation and colocated gaming for 3-6 year old children. Several hybrid (physical/digital games based on the manipulation of passive and active toys have been developed for NIKVision. From our experience several useful lessons can be extracted. Among them, the necessity of bridging the gap between designers and developers making it easier the prototyping of tabletop games stands out. To tackle this difficulty a toolkit for the prototyping of tabletop games called ToyVision has been created. The toolkit supports designers to fully explore the physical feasibilities of the manipulation of physical playing pieces, while minimizing the technical difficulties of implementing tabletop games based on physical manipulation. This way, NIKVision and ToyVision are becoming powerful tools to develop innovative

  7. Single reaction interface in flow analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marta F T; Santos, João L M; Lima, José L F C; Dias, Ana C B; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2005-12-15

    The dual or multiple reaction interface concept, commonly associated to the distinct flow techniques, was replaced by a single interface concept, which do not no rely on the utilisation of a well-defined and compelling sample volume but only on mutual penetration of sample and reagent zones at a single reaction interface where both sample and reagent met together prior to detection. In the proposed approach basic principles of flow analysis, such as controlled dispersion and reaction zone formation, are not influenced by sample and reagent volumes but determined exclusively by the extension of the overlap of two adjoining quasi-infinite zones enhanced by multiple flow reversals and the pulsed nature of the flowing streams. The detector is positioned at the core of the flow manifold (not in the conventional terminal position), and repetitive flow reversals enable interface manipulations, including multi-detection of the entire reaction interface or the monitoring of the evolution of a pre-selected interface zone by using suitable reversal cycle times. The implementation of the developed approach was facilitated due to the configuration simplicity and operational versatility of multi-pumping flow systems. Its performance was evaluated by monitoring processes involving two or four-solution reaction interfaces.

  8. Osteochondral Interface Stiffening in Mandibular Condylar Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Liao, L; Zhu, J; Wan, X; Xie, M; Zhang, H; Zhang, M; Lu, L; Yang, H; Jing, D; Liu, X; Yu, S; Lu, X L; Chen, C; Shan, Z; Wang, M

    2017-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is associated with dental biomechanics. A major change during OA progression is the ossification of the osteochondral interface. This study investigated the formation, radiological detectability, and mechanical property of the osteochondral interface at an early stage, the pathogenesis significance of which in OA progression is of clinical interest and remains elusive for the TMJ. Unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) was performed on 6-wk-old rats as we previously reported. TMJs were harvested at 4, 12, and 20 wk. The progression of TMJ OA was evaluated using a modified Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) score system. Osteochondral interface was investigated by quantifying the thickness via von Kossa staining of histological slices and in vivo calcium deposition by calcein injection. Tissue ossification was imaged by micro-computed tomography (CT). Mechanical properties were measured at nanoscale using dynamic indentation. Time-dependent TMJ cartilage lesions were elicited by UAC treatment. Geometric change of the condyle head and increased value of the OARSI score were evident in UAC TMJs. At the osteochondral interface, there was not only enhanced deep-zone cartilage calcification but also calcium deposition at the osseous boundary. The thickness, density, and stiffness of the osteochondral interface were all significantly increased. The enhanced ossification of the osteochondral interface is a joint outcome of the aberrant deeper cartilage calcification at the superior region and promoted formation of subchondral cortical bone at the inferior region. The micro-CT detectable ossification from an early stage thus is of diagnostic significance. Although the environment of the cartilage and subchondral bone could be changed due to the stiffness of the interface, whether or not the stiffened interface would accelerate OA progress remains to be confirmed. With that evidence, the osteochondral

  9. Interface controlled electronic variations in correlated heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, K.; Moshnyaga, V.; Samwer, K.; Lebedev, O. I.; Verbeeck, J.; Kirilenko, D.; van Tendeloo, G.

    2010-09-01

    An interface modification of (LaCa)MnO3-BaTiO3 superlattices was found to massively influence magnetic and magnetotransport properties. Moreover it determines the crystal structure of the manganite layers, changing it from orthorhombic (Pnma) for the conventional superlattice (cSL), to rhombohedral (R3¯c) for the modified one (mSL). While the cSL shows extremely nonlinear ac transport, the mSL is an electrically homogeneous material. The observations go beyond an oversimplified picture of dead interface layers and evidence the importance of electronic correlations at perovskite interfaces.

  10. Diffuse-Interface Methods in Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. M.; McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review the development of diffuse-interface models of hydrodynamics and their application to a wide variety of interfacial phenomena. The authors discuss the issues involved in formulating diffuse-interface models for single-component and binary fluids. Recent applications and computations using these models are discussed in each case. Further, the authors address issues including sharp-interface analyses that relate these models to the classical free-boundary problem, related computational approaches to describe interfacial phenomena, and related approaches describing fully-miscible fluids.

  11. Micro- and Nanotechnologies for Optical Neural Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Sileo, Leonardo; De Vittorio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In last decade, the possibility to optically interface with the mammalian brain in vivo has allowed unprecedented investigation of functional connectivity of neural circuitry. Together with new genetic and molecular techniques to optically trigger and monitor neural activity, a new generation of optical neural interfaces is being developed, mainly thanks to the exploitation of both bottom-up and top-down nanofabrication approaches. This review highlights the role of nanotechnologies for optical neural interfaces, with particular emphasis on new devices and methodologies for optogenetic control of neural activity and unconventional methods for detection and triggering of action potentials using optically-active colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:27013939

  12. iPhone User Interface Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Banga, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Written in a cookbook style, this book offers solutions using a recipe based approach. Each recipe contains step-by-step instructions followed by an analysis of what was done in each task and other useful information. The cookbook approach means you can dive into whatever recipes you want in no particular order. The iPhone Interface Cookbook is written from the ground up for people who are new to iOS or application interface design in general. Each chapter discusses the reasoning and design strategy behind critical interface components, as well as how to best integrate each into any iPhone or

  13. Ludic interfaces. Driver and product of gamification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Fuchs

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of non-standard and playful interface devices like Wii Remote, Move, and Kinect is an indicator of a process that demonstrates that ludic interfaces might be the core driver for a transformation in the sector of video games cultures and beyond. Yet, ludic interfaces are drivers—as well as driven by social developments known as the ludification (Raessens, 2006; Fuchs & Strouhal, 2008, or the gamification of society (Schell, 2010; Bogost, 2010; Ionifides, 2011; Deterding, Khaled, Nacke, & Dixon, 2011.

  14. LTE-advanced air interface technology

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xincheng

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities are at hand for professionals eager to learn and apply the latest theories and practices in air interface technologies. Written by experienced researchers and professionals, LTE-Advanced Air Interface Technology thoroughly covers the performance targets and technology components studied by 3GPP for LTE-Advanced. Besides being an explanatory text about LTE-Advanced air interface technology, this book exploits the technical details in the 3GPP specification, and explains the motivation and implication behind the specifications.After a general description of wireless cellular techno

  15. Interface Effects in Perovskite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Marie-Bernadette; Mercey, Bernard; Simon, Charles

    2012-02-01

    The control of matter properties (transport, magnetic, dielectric,…) using synthesis as thin films is strongly hindered by the lack of reliable theories, able to guide the design of new systems, through the understanding of the interface effects and of the way the substrate constraints are imposed on the material. The present Letter analyzes the energetic contributions at the interfaces, and proposes a model describing the microscopic mechanisms governing the interactions at an epitaxial interface between a manganite and another transition metal oxide in perovskite structure (as for instance SrTiO3). The model is checked against experimental results and literature analysis.

  16. Hetero-Interfaces For Extreme Electronic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-23

    between two perovskite insulators (i.e., LaAlO3 on SrTiO3) was first reported in 2004.[1] This unexpected result was related to internal polarization...INTERFACES FOR EXTREME ELECTRONIC ENVIRONMENTS Quasi-two-dimensional electron gas (Q-2D-EG) forms at the interface between two perovskite band...orientation provides AO – BO2 stacking in perovskite phase (Fig. 1) [2]. For example, a SrTiO3/LaAlO3 interface normal to > produces a charge

  17. Haptic interface for vehicular touch screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Once the domain of purely physical controls such as knobs, : levers, buttons, and sliders, the vehicle dash is rapidly : transforming into a computer interface. This presents a : challenge for drivers, because the physics-based cues which : make trad...

  18. Human-machine Interface for Presentation Robot

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejsa, Jiří; Ondroušek, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2012), s. 17-21 ISSN 1897-8649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : human- robot interface * mobile robot * presentation robot Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robot ics

  19. Interface modification in LCMO-BTO superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, Kai; Moshnyaga, Vasily; Samwer, Konrad [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    At perovskite interfaces, electric, magnetic and multiferroic (MF) properties can be different from those in bulk. Especially in manganite thin films and superlattices (SL) it is well known that breakage of symmetry at interfaces lead to orbital, charge and spin reconstructions. Moreover, interfacial stress, which leads to lattice distortions, greatly influences ferromagnetic as well as ferroelectric polarizations. (LaCa)MnO{sub 3}-BaTiO{sub 3} SL have been grown by a metalorganic aerosol deposition technique on MgO and STO substrates. Besides the magnetic properties, Magnetocapacitance as well as third harmonic Voltages have been measured to clarify the influence of the interfaces and their relation to the formation of correlated polarons. We show that compositional grading of the (LaCa)MnO{sub 3} at the interfaces modifies the magnetic, electric and MF properties in a positive way. The magnetisation is increased, the manganite resistance is strongly reduced and third harmonic voltages are depressed.

  20. The reliable multicast protocol application programming interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery , Todd; Whetten, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The Application Programming Interface for the Berkeley/WVU implementation of the Reliable Multicast Protocol is described. This transport layer protocol is implemented as a user library that applications and software buses link against.

  1. On user behaviour adaptation under interface change

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rosman, Benjamin S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Edinburgh, UK Pushmeet Kohli Machine Learning and Perception Microsoft Research Cambridge, UK Abstract Different interfaces allow a user to achieve the same end goal through different action sequences, e.g., command lines vs. drop down menus...

  2. Effects of interface geometry on spin injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. C.

    2017-11-01

    Spin-injection efficiency may be affected by interface geometry and it was investigated theoretically by considering a nonmagnetic (NM) sphere embedded in a ferromagnetic (FM) host. When spin-polarized current is injected into the NM sphere from the FM host, it is found that spinsplitting of the electrochemical potential is enhanced at the interface while the spin polarization of the electrical current is reduced compared with the flat interface. In the Co/Cu and the Py/Cu systems, the values are different from those of the flat interface even when the sphere radius is 3 μm. Attachment of another NM electrode to the NM sphere changes the spin-splitting of the electrochemical potential, which may be critical for the nonlocal spin signal in the lateral spin valve.

  3. Interface stress in Au/Ni multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweitz, K.O.; Böttiger, J.; Chevallier, J.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of intermixing on the apparent interface stress is studied in -textured dc-magnetron sputtered Au/Ni multilayers by use of two methods commonly used for determining interface stress. The method using profilometry and in-plane x-ray diffraction does not take intermixing...... into account and yields an apparent interface stress of -8.46 +/- 0.99 J m(-2). However, observed discrepancies between model calculations and measured high-angle x-ray diffractograms indicate intermixing, and by use of the profilometry and sin(2) psi method the real interface stress value of -2.69 +/- 0.43 J...... m(-2) is found. This method also reveals a significant and systematic change of the stress-free lattice parameter of both constituents as a function of modulation period which is shown to account for the difference between the two findings. The method using in-plane diffraction is thus shown...

  4. Transfer Learning to Accelerate Interface Structure Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hiromi; Kiyohara, Shin; Tsuda, Koji; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2017-12-01

    Interfaces have atomic structures that are significantly different from those in the bulk, and play crucial roles in material properties. The central structures at the interfaces that provide properties have been extensively investigated. However, determination of even one interface structure requires searching for the stable configuration among many thousands of candidates. Here, a powerful combination of machine learning techniques based on kriging and transfer learning (TL) is proposed as a method for unveiling the interface structures. Using the kriging+TL method, thirty-three grain boundaries were systematically determined from 1,650,660 candidates in only 462 calculations, representing an increase in efficiency over conventional all-candidate calculation methods, by a factor of approximately 3,600.

  5. Probing Interfaces in Metals Using Neutron Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Demkowicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state interfaces play a major role in a variety of material properties. They are especially important in determining the behavior of nano-structured materials, such as metallic multilayers. However, interface structure and properties remain poorly understood, in part because the experimental toolbox for characterizing them is limited. Neutron reflectometry (NR offers unique opportunities for studying interfaces in metals due to the high penetration depth of neutrons and the non-monotonic dependence of their scattering cross-sections on atomic numbers. We review the basic physics of NR and outline the advantages that this method offers for investigating interface behavior in metals, especially under extreme environments. We then present several example NR studies to illustrate these advantages and discuss avenues for expanding the use of NR within the metals community.

  6. Soft particles at a fluid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Hadi; Harting, Jens; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2015-11-01

    Particles added to a fluid interface can be used as a surface stabilizer in the food, oil and cosmetic industries. As an alternative to rigid particles, it is promising to consider highly deformable particles that can adapt their conformation at the interface. In this study, we compute the shapes of soft elastic particles using molecular dynamics simulations of a cross-linked polymer gel, complemented by continuum calculations based on the linear elasticity. It is shown that the particle shape is not only affected by the Young's modulus of the particle, but also strongly depends on whether the gel is partially or completely wetting the fluid interface. We find that the molecular simulations for the partially wetting case are very accurately described by the continuum theory. By contrast, when the gel is completely wetting the fluid interface the linear theory breaks down and we reveal that molecular details have a strong influence on the equilibrium shape.

  7. Modelling the tribology of thin film interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Zugic, R

    2000-01-01

    substrate). Within each group of simulations, three lubricant film thicknesses are studied to examine the effect of varying lubricant thickness. Statistical data are collected from each simulation and presented in this work. Via these data, together with the evolution, of atomic and molecular configurations, a very detailed picture of the properties of this thin film interface is presented. In particular, we conclude that perfluoropolyether lubricant forms distinct molecular layers when confined between two substrates, the rate of heat generation under shearing conditions typical of those in a head-disk interface is insufficient for thermal mechanisms to result directly in lubricant degradation, and mechanical stresses attained in the head-disk interface are unlikely to result in any significant degree of lubricant degradation. This thesis examines the tribology of a head-disk interface in an operating hard disk drive via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics computer simulations. The aim of this work is to deri...

  8. Interface control of bulk ferroelectric polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, P [University of California, Berkeley; Luo, Weidong [ORNL; Yi, D. [University of California, Berkeley; Zhang, J.-X. [University of California, Berkeley; Rossell, M.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Yang, C.-H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; You, L. [University of California, Berkeley; Singh-Bhalla, G. B. [University of California, Berkeley & LBNL; Yang, S.Y [University of California, Berkeley; He, Q [University of California, Berkeley; Ramasse, Q. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Erni, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Martin, L. W. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Chu, Y. H. [University of California, Berkeley; Pantelides, Sokrates T [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Ramesh, R. [University of California, Berkeley

    2012-01-01

    The control of material interfaces at the atomic level has led to no- vel interfacial properties and functionalities. In particular, the study of polar discontinuities at interfaces between complex oxides lies at the frontier of modern condensed matter research. Here we em- ploy a combination of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations to demonstrate the control of a bulk property, namely ferroelectric polarization, of a heteroepitaxial bilayer by precise atomic-scale interface engineering. More specifically, the control is achieved by exploiting the interfacial valence mismatch to influence the electrostatic potential step across the interface, which manifests itself as the biased-voltage in ferroelectric hysteresis loops and determines the ferroelectric state. A broad study of diverse systems comprising different ferroelectrics and conducting perovskite un- derlayers extends the generality of this phenomenon.

  9. Synchronization Interfaces for Improving Moodle Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GM Arya Sasmita

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Many universities have applied e-learning on more than one LMS (Learning Management System platforms such as Wordpress and Moodle. In addition, difficulties implementations in developing countries have occurred. Those are mainly caused by limitations and expensive of Internet infrastructure. Therefore to increase Moodle application as an e-learning system, the paper proposed two synchronization interfaces. The first interface is for Moodle and Wordpress. This assists teachers to migrate their learning material in their blog in Wordpress into Moodle. Second interface is for Moodle portable performing offline LMS and Moodle performing online LMS. Moodle portable was installed in teachers and students notebooks. Moodle itself was installed and run in e-learning server. The aim is to improve Moodle utilization in the class. The results showed satisfied outcomes. Students and teachers could employ the interfaces easily and secure as they have to login using student/teacher ID, course ID, username and password.

  10. Navigation with a passive brain based interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Werkhoven, P.J.; Thurlings, M.E.; Brouwer, A.-M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a Brain Computer Interface (BCI) for navigation. The system is based on detecting brain signals that are elicited by tactile stimulation on the torso indicating the desired direction.

  11. Flexible and Organic Neural Interfaces: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò Lago

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Neural interfaces are a fundamental tool to interact with neurons and to study neural networks by transducing cellular signals into electronics signals and vice versa. State-of-the-art technologies allow both in vivo and in vitro recording of neural activity. However, they are mainly made of stiff inorganic materials that can limit the long-term stability of the implant due to infection and/or glial scars formation. In the last decade, organic electronics is digging its way in the field of bioelectronics and researchers started to develop neural interfaces based on organic semiconductors, creating more flexible and conformable neural interfaces that can be intrinsically biocompatible. In this manuscript, we are going to review the latest achievements in flexible and organic neural interfaces for the recording of neuronal activity.

  12. Stereo vision based 3D game interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng; Chen, Yisong; Dong, Chao

    2009-10-01

    Currently, keyboards, mice, wands and joysticks are still the most popular interactive devices. While these devices are mostly adequate, they are so unnatural that they are unable to give players the feeling of immersiveness. Researchers have begun investigation into natural interfaces that are intuitively simple and unobtrusive to the user. Recent advances in various signal-processing technologies, coupled with an explosion in the available computing power, have given rise to a number of natural human computer interface (HCI) modalities: speech, vision-based gesture recognition, etc. In this paper we propose a natural three dimensional (3D) game interface, which uses the motion of the player fists in 3D space to achieve the control of sixd egree of freedom (DOFs). And we also propose a real-time 3D fist tracking algorithm, which is based on stereo vision and Bayesian network. Finally, a flying game is used to test our interface.

  13. Applying Cognitive Psychology to User Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Sabeen; Durrani, Qaiser S.

    This paper explores some key aspects of cognitive psychology that may be mapped onto user interfaces. Major focus in existing user interface guidelines is on consistency, simplicity, feedback, system messages, display issues, navigation, colors, graphics, visibility and error prevention [8-10]. These guidelines are effective indesigning user interfaces. However, these guidelines do not handle the issues that may arise due to the innate structure of human brain and human limitations. For example, where to place graphics on the screen so that user can easily process them and what kind of background should be given on the screen according to the limitation of human motor system. In this paper we have collected some available guidelines from the area of cognitive psychology [1, 5, 7]. In addition, we have extracted few guidelines from theories and studies of cognitive psychology [3, 11] which may be mapped to user interfaces.

  14. Mode III effects on interface delamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Hutchinson, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    For crack growth along an interface between dissimilar materials the effect of combined modes I, II and III at the crack-tip is investigated. First, in order to highlight situations where crack growth is affected by a mode III contribution, examples of material configurations are discussed where...... mode III has an effect. Subsequently, the focus is on crack growth along an interface between an elastic-plastic solid and an elastic substrate. The analyses are carried out for conditions of small-scale yielding, with the fracture process at the interface represented by a cohesive zone model. Due...... to the mismatch of elastic properties across the interface the corresponding elastic solution has an oscillating stress singularity, and this solution is applied as boundary conditions on the outer edge of the region analyzed. For several combinations of modes I, II and III crack growth resistance curves...

  15. A human activity approach to User Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne

    1989-01-01

    the work situations in which computer-based artifacts are used: The framework deals with the role of the user interface in purposeful human work. Human activity theory is used in this analysis. The purpose of this article is to make the reader curious and hopefully open his or her eyes to a somewhat...... different way of thinking about the user interface. The article applies examples of real-life interfaces to support this process, but it does not include a systematic presentation of empirical results. I focus on the role of the computer application in use. Thus, it is necessary to consider human-computer...... interaction and other related work conditions. I deal with human experience and competence as being rooted in the practice of the group that conducts the specific work activity. The main conclusions are: The user interface cannot be seen independently of the use activity (i.e., the professional, socially...

  16. High Performance Human-Computer Interfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Despain, a

    1997-01-01

    Human interfaces to the computer have remained fairly crude since the use of teletypes despite the fact that computer, storage and communication performance have continued to improve by many orders of magnitude...

  17. Liquid-liquid interface motion of a capsule motor powered by the interlayer Marangoni effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2012-09-06

    A novel thin capsule motor has been described in this report. It utilizes the Marangoni effect for the solid capsule to run at a water-oil interlayer, which has not been reported previously. Intrinsic and environment factors influencing the motion were investigated. It is also possible for the velocity, direction, and start/stop of the motion of the capsule to be manipulated.

  18. Embedded silicon nanocrystal interface structure and strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Bhamy Maithry; Hegde, G. M.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2018-01-01

    The structure of nanocrystal-matrix interface and strain in embedded nanocrystals are studied using large-scale atomistic simulations, with the examples of Si nanocrystal embedded in amorphous matrix of SiO2. Photoluminescence from silicon nanocrystals embedded in a dielectric matrix like SiO2 and Si3N4 are promising for Si-based optical devices. The nanocrystal-matrix interface plays a crucial role in understanding its optical and electrical properties. Nanocrystals with diameters varying from 2.17 to 4.56 nm are studied. A detailed quantitative analysis of the variation of Si/SiO2 interface structure and strain distribution with nanocrystal diameter is reported. A linear variation of the interface width with nanocrystal diameter is observed with thinner interfaces for larger nanocrystals. Local deformation analysis reveals that the smaller nanocrystals are highly strained, whereas the strain in the larger ones shifts to the interface. This is in accordance with observed increase in total percentage of defect states in the interface from 39 to 70 % for diameter increasing from 2.17 to 4.56 nm. Moreover, based on the atomic arrangements at the interface, optically active defects like Pb centres, E centres and non-bridging oxygen centres are identified and a dominance of Pb centres is observed for all the nanocrystals. The detailed structural characterization-related investigations using the proposed simulation approach will find useful application in designing system-level response of embedded nanocrystals and also to correlate various experimental observations.

  19. Heat-Exchanger/Heat-Pipe Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, H. J.; Van Hagan, T. H.

    1987-01-01

    Monolithic assembly reliable and light in weight. Heat exchanger and evaporator ends of heat pipes integrated in monolithic halves welded together. Interface assembly connects heat exchanger of furnace, reactor, or other power source with heat pipes carrying heat to radiator or power-consuming system. One of several concepts proposed for nuclear power supplies aboard spacecraft, interface useful on Earth in solar thermal power systems, heat engines, and lightweight cooling systems.

  20. Distributed user interfaces usability and collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, María D; Tesoriero, Ricardo; Penichet, Victor MR

    2013-01-01

    Written by international researchers in the field of Distributed User Interfaces (DUIs), this book brings together important contributions regarding collaboration and usability in Distributed User Interface settings. Throughout the thirteen chapters authors address key questions concerning how collaboration can be improved by using DUIs, including: in which situations a DUI is suitable to ease the collaboration among users; how usability standards can be used to evaluate the usability of systems based on DUIs; and accurately describe case studies and prototypes implementing these concerns

  1. Building a dynamic Web/database interface

    OpenAIRE

    Cornell, Julie.

    1996-01-01

    Computer Science This thesis examines methods for accessing information stored in a relational database from a Web Page. The stateless and connectionless nature of the Web's Hypertext Transport Protocol as well as the open nature of the Internet Protocol pose problems in the areas of database concurrency, security, speed, and performance. We examined the Common Gateway Interface, Server API, Oracle's Web/database architecture, and the Java Database Connectivity interface in terms of p...

  2. Systems Engineering Interfaces: A Model Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, Elyse; Delp, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Currently: Ops Rev developed and maintains a framework that includes interface-specific language, patterns, and Viewpoints. Ops Rev implements the framework to design MOS 2.0 and its 5 Mission Services. Implementation de-couples interfaces and instances of interaction Future: A Mission MOSE implements the approach and uses the model based artifacts for reviews. The framework extends further into the ground data layers and provides a unified methodology.

  3. Designing Gestural Interfaces Touchscreens and Interactive Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Saffer, Dan

    2008-01-01

    If you want to get started in new era of interaction design, this is the reference you need. Packed with informative illustrations and photos, Designing Gestural Interfaces provides you with essential information about kinesiology, sensors, ergonomics, physical computing, touchscreen technology, and new interface patterns -- information you need to augment your existing skills in traditional" websites, software, or product development. This book will help you enter this new world of possibilities."

  4. Hybridization at superconductor-semiconductor interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Mikkelsen, August E. G.; Kotetes, Panagiotis; Krogstrup, Peter; Flensberg, Karsten

    2018-01-01

    Hybrid superconductor-semiconductor devices are currently one of the most promising platforms for realizing Majorana zero modes. We address the role of band bending and superconductor-semiconductor hybridization in such devices by analyzing a gated single Al-InAs interface using a self-consistent Schroedinger-Poisson approach. Our numerical analysis shows that the band bending leads to an interface quantum well, which localizes the charge in the system near the superconductor-semiconductor in...

  5. Design and Construction of Strain Gauge Interface Pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and Construction of Strain Gauge Interface Pressure Transducer for Measurement of Static and Dynamic Interface Pressure Applied by Pressure Garments and its Relationship to Deep Vein Thrombosis.

  6. The net charge at interfaces between insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, N. C.; Littlewood, P. B.; Artacho, Emilio

    2011-03-01

    The issue of the net charge at insulating oxide interfaces is briefly reviewed with the ambition of dispelling myths of such charges being affected by covalency and related charge density effects. For electrostatic analysis purposes, the net charge at such interfaces is defined by the counting of discrete electrons and core ion charges, and by the definition of the reference polarization of the separate, unperturbed bulk materials. The arguments are illustrated for the case of a thin film of LaAlO3 over SrTiO3 in the absence of free carriers, for which the net charge is exactly 0.5e per interface formula unit, if the polarization response in both materials is referred to zero bulk values. Further consequences of the argument are extracted for structural and chemical alterations of such interfaces, in which internal rearrangements are distinguished from extrinsic alterations (changes of stoichiometry, redox processes), only the latter affecting the interfacial net charge. The arguments are reviewed alongside the proposal of Stengel and Vanderbilt (2009 Phys. Rev. B 80 241103) of using formal polarization values instead of net interfacial charges, based on the interface theorem of Vanderbilt and King-Smith (1993 Phys. Rev. B 48 4442-55). Implications for non-centrosymmetric materials are discussed, as well as for interfaces for which the charge mismatch is an integer number of polarization quanta.

  7. Opto-hydrodynamic instability of fluid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delville, Jean-Pierre; Issenmann, Bruno; Wunenburger, Regis; Casner, Alexis

    2005-08-01

    The bending of fluid interfaces by the optical radiation pressure is now recognized as an appealing contactless tool to probe microscopic surface properties of soft materials. However, as the radiation pressure is intrinsically weak (typically of the order of a few Pascal), investigations are often limited to the regime of weak deformations. Non-linear behaviors can nevertheless be investigated using very soft fluid interfaces. Either a large stable tether is formed, or else a break-up of the interface occurs above a well-defined beam power threshold, depending on the direction of the beam propagation. This asymmetry originates from the occurrence of total reflection condition of light at deformed interface. Interface instability results in the formation of a stationary beam-centered liquid micro-jet that emits droplets. Radiation-induced jetting can also lead to giant tunable liquid columns with aspect ratio up to 100, i.e. well beyond the fundamental Rayleigh-Plateau limitation. Consequently, the applications range of the opto-hydrodynamic interface instability is wide, going from adaptative micro-optics (lensing and light guiding by the induced columns) to micro-fluidics and microspraying, as fluid transfer is optically monitored and directed in three dimensions.

  8. Nonlinear fractional waves at elastic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, Julian; Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F.; Netz, Roland R.

    2017-11-01

    We derive the nonlinear fractional surface wave equation that governs compression waves at an elastic interface that is coupled to a viscous bulk medium. The fractional character of the differential equation comes from the fact that the effective thickness of the bulk layer that is coupled to the interface is frequency dependent. The nonlinearity arises from the nonlinear dependence of the interface compressibility on the local compression, which is obtained from experimental measurements and reflects a phase transition at the interface. Numerical solutions of our nonlinear fractional theory reproduce several experimental key features of surface waves in phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface without freely adjustable fitting parameters. In particular, the propagation distance of the surface wave abruptly increases at a threshold excitation amplitude. The wave velocity is found to be of the order of 40 cm/s in both experiments and theory and slightly increases as a function of the excitation amplitude. Nonlinear acoustic switching effects in membranes are thus shown to arise purely based on intrinsic membrane properties, namely, the presence of compressibility nonlinearities that accompany phase transitions at the interface.

  9. The Mineral–Collagen Interface in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The interface between collagen and the mineral reinforcement phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite (cAp), is essential for bone’s remarkable functionality as a biological composite material. The very small dimensions of the cAp phase and the disparate natures of the reinforcement and matrix are essential to the material’s performance but also complicate study of this interface. This article summarizes what is known about the cAp-collagen interface in bone and begins with descriptions of the matrix and reinforcement roles in composites, of the phases bounding the interface, of growth of cAp growing within the collagen matrix, and of the effect of intra- and extrafibrilar mineral on determinations of interfacial properties. Different observed interfacial interactions with cAp (collagen, water, non-collagenous proteins) are reviewed; experimental results on interface interactions during loading are reported as are their influence on macroscopic mechanical properties; conclusions of numerical modeling of interfacial interactions are also presented. The data suggest interfacial interlocking (bending of collagen molecules around cAp nanoplatelets) and water-mediated bonding between collagen and cAp are essential to load transfer. The review concludes with descriptions of areas where new research is needed to improve understanding of how the interface functions. PMID:25824581

  10. The net charge at interfaces between insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bristowe, N C; Littlewood, P B [Theory of Condensed Matter Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Artacho, Emilio, E-mail: ncb30@cam.ac.uk [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-02

    The issue of the net charge at insulating oxide interfaces is briefly reviewed with the ambition of dispelling myths of such charges being affected by covalency and related charge density effects. For electrostatic analysis purposes, the net charge at such interfaces is defined by the counting of discrete electrons and core ion charges, and by the definition of the reference polarization of the separate, unperturbed bulk materials. The arguments are illustrated for the case of a thin film of LaAlO{sub 3} over SrTiO{sub 3} in the absence of free carriers, for which the net charge is exactly 0.5e per interface formula unit, if the polarization response in both materials is referred to zero bulk values. Further consequences of the argument are extracted for structural and chemical alterations of such interfaces, in which internal rearrangements are distinguished from extrinsic alterations (changes of stoichiometry, redox processes), only the latter affecting the interfacial net charge. The arguments are reviewed alongside the proposal of Stengel and Vanderbilt (2009 Phys. Rev. B 80 241103) of using formal polarization values instead of net interfacial charges, based on the interface theorem of Vanderbilt and King-Smith (1993 Phys. Rev. B 48 4442-55). Implications for non-centrosymmetric materials are discussed, as well as for interfaces for which the charge mismatch is an integer number of polarization quanta. (viewpoint)

  11. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Brian J; Dennis, Robert V; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-04-07

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  12. Simulation of Magnetic Phenomena at Realistic Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Grytsyuk, Sergiy

    2016-02-04

    In modern technology exciting developments are related to the ability to understand and control interfaces. Particularly, magnetic interfaces revealing spindependent electron transport are of great interest for modern spintronic devices, such as random access memories and logic devices. From the technological point of view, spintronic devices based on magnetic interfaces enable manipulation of the magnetism via an electric field. Such ability is a result of the different quantum effects arising from the magnetic interfaces (for example, spin transfer torque or spin-orbit torque) and it can reduce the energy consumption as compared to the traditional semiconductor electronic devices. Despite many appealing characteristics of these materials, fundamental understanding of their microscopic properties and related phenomena needs to be established by thorough investigation. In this work we implement first principles calculations in order to study the structural, electric, and magnetic properties as well as related phenomena of two types of interfaces with large potential in spintronic applications: 1) interfaces between antiferromagnetic 3d-metal-oxides and ferromagnetic 3d-metals and 2) interfaces between non-magnetic 5d(4d)- and ferromagnetic 3d-metals. A major difficulty in studying such interfaces theoretically is the typically large lattice mismatch. By employing supercells with Moir e patterns, we eliminate the artificial strain that leads to doubtful results and are able to describe the dependence of the atomic density at the interfaces on the component materials and their thicknesses. After establishing understanding about the interface structures, we investigate the electronic and magnetic properties. A Moir e supercell with transition layer is found to reproduce the main experimental findings and thus turns out to be the appropriate model for simulating magnetic misfit interfaces. In addition, we systematically study the magnetic anisotropy and Rashba band

  13. An interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2013-09-01

    This report describes an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop an interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence. Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. microfluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. A transient aqueous bridge forms between approaching drops prior to pinch-off. This observation applies to many types of fluids, but neither theory nor experiments have been able to offer a satisfactory explanation. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. This is a computationally challenging problem that involves tracking a moving interface and solving complex multi-physics and multi-scale dynamics, which are beyond the capabilities of most state-of-the-art simulations. An interface-tracking model for electro-coalescence can provide a new perspective to a variety of applications in which interfacial physics are coupled with electrodynamics, including electro-osmosis, fabrication of microelectronics, fuel atomization, oil dehydration, nuclear waste reprocessing and solution separation for chemical detectors. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for the electrohydrodynamics of two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface.

  14. Language workbench user interfaces for data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Victoria M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological data analysis is frequently performed with command line software. While this practice provides considerable flexibility for computationally savy individuals, such as investigators trained in bioinformatics, this also creates a barrier to the widespread use of data analysis software by investigators trained as biologists and/or clinicians. Workflow systems such as Galaxy and Taverna have been developed to try and provide generic user interfaces that can wrap command line analysis software. These solutions are useful for problems that can be solved with workflows, and that do not require specialized user interfaces. However, some types of analyses can benefit from custom user interfaces. For instance, developing biomarker models from high-throughput data is a type of analysis that can be expressed more succinctly with specialized user interfaces. Here, we show how Language Workbench (LW) technology can be used to model the biomarker development and validation process. We developed a language that models the concepts of Dataset, Endpoint, Feature Selection Method and Classifier. These high-level language concepts map directly to abstractions that analysts who develop biomarker models are familiar with. We found that user interfaces developed in the Meta-Programming System (MPS) LW provide convenient means to configure a biomarker development project, to train models and view the validation statistics. We discuss several advantages of developing user interfaces for data analysis with a LW, including increased interface consistency, portability and extension by language composition. The language developed during this experiment is distributed as an MPS plugin (available at http://campagnelab.org/software/bdval-for-mps/). PMID:25755929

  15. User Interface Technology for Formal Specification Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael; Philpot, Andrew; Pressburger, Thomas; Underwood, Ian; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Formal specification development and modification are an essential component of the knowledge-based software life cycle. User interface technology is needed to empower end-users to create their own formal specifications. This paper describes the advanced user interface for AMPHION1 a knowledge-based software engineering system that targets scientific subroutine libraries. AMPHION is a generic, domain-independent architecture that is specialized to an application domain through a declarative domain theory. Formal specification development and reuse is made accessible to end-users through an intuitive graphical interface that provides semantic guidance in creating diagrams denoting formal specifications in an application domain. The diagrams also serve to document the specifications. Automatic deductive program synthesis ensures that end-user specifications are correctly implemented. The tables that drive AMPHION's user interface are automatically compiled from a domain theory; portions of the interface can be customized by the end-user. The user interface facilitates formal specification development by hiding syntactic details, such as logical notation. It also turns some of the barriers for end-user specification development associated with strongly typed formal languages into active sources of guidance, without restricting advanced users. The interface is especially suited for specification modification. AMPHION has been applied to the domain of solar system kinematics through the development of a declarative domain theory. Testing over six months with planetary scientists indicates that AMPHION's interactive specification acquisition paradigm enables users to develop, modify, and reuse specifications at least an order of magnitude more rapidly than manual program development.

  16. Understanding and Design of Polymer Device Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Antoine [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-10-26

    The research performed under grant DE-FG02-04ER46165 between May 2008 and April 2011 focused on the understanding and control of interfaces of organic semiconductors in general, and polymer interfaces more specifically. This work was a joined effort by three experimentalists and a theoretician. Emphasis was placed on the determination of the electronic structure of these interfaces, i.e. the relative energy position of molecular levels across these interfaces. From these electronic structures depend the injection, extraction and transport of charge carriers into, from and across, respectively, all (opto)electronic devices made of these semiconductors. A significant fraction of our work focused on ways to modify and optimize interfaces, for example via chemical doping of the semiconductors to reduce interface energy barriers or via deposition of ultra-thin work function-reducing polymer or self-assembled monolayers of dipolar molecules. Another significant fraction of our work was devoted to exploring alternate and unconventional interface formation methods, in particular the soft-contact lamination of both metal contacts and polymer overlayers on top of polymer films. These methods allowed us to better understand the impact of hot metal atom evaporation on a soft organic surface, as well as the key mechanisms that control the energetics of polymer/polymer heterojunctions. Finally, a significant fraction of the research was directed to understanding the electronic structure of buried polymer heterojunctions, in particular within donor/acceptor blends of interest in organic photovoltaic applications. The work supported by this grant resulted in 17 publications in some of the best peer-reviewed journals of the field, as well as numerous presentations at US and international conferences.

  17. From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galenko, P. K.; Alexandrov, D. V.

    2018-01-01

    Transport processes around phase interfaces, together with thermodynamic properties and kinetic phenomena, control the formation of dendritic patterns. Using the thermodynamic and kinetic data of phase interfaces obtained on the atomic scale, one can analyse the formation of a single dendrite and the growth of a dendritic ensemble. This is the result of recent progress in theoretical methods and computational algorithms calculated using powerful computer clusters. Great benefits can be attained from the development of micro-, meso- and macro-levels of analysis when investigating the dynamics of interfaces, interpreting experimental data and designing the macrostructure of samples. The review and research articles in this theme issue cover the spectrum of scales (from nano- to macro-length scales) in order to exhibit recently developing trends in the theoretical analysis and computational modelling of dendrite pattern formation. Atomistic modelling, the flow effect on interface dynamics, the transition from diffusion-limited to thermally controlled growth existing at a considerable driving force, two-phase (mushy) layer formation, the growth of eutectic dendrites, the formation of a secondary dendritic network due to coalescence, computational methods, including boundary integral and phase-field methods, and experimental tests for theoretical models-all these themes are highlighted in the present issue. This article is part of the theme issue `From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'.

  18. Interface dynamics and banding in rapid solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karma, A.; Sarkissian, A. (Physics Department, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Rapid-solidification experiments on metallic alloys in the last decade have provided widespread observations of a novel banded structure.'' We report the results of numerical and analytical studies of the interface dynamics underlying the formation of this structure in a model of directional solidification which includes both solute and heat diffusion and nonequilibrium effects. The thrust of these studies is on the unsteady dynamics of the planar interface and thermal effects. The main conclusion is that the origin of banding can be related to relaxation oscillations of the solidification front, characterized by large variations of the interface velocity, which are dramatically affected by latent-heat diffusion. Without the latter, the oscillations are found to be reasonably well approximated by the phenomenological model of Carrard [ital et] [ital al]. [Acta Metall. 40, 983 (1992)], and the band spacing is inversely proportional to the temperature gradient. In contrast, with latent-heat diffusion the band spacing is insensitive to the temperature gradient, but is controlled instead by the interplay of solute and heat diffusion. The smallness of the solutal diffusivity to thermal diffusivity ratio is exploited to explain analytically this effect and to derive considerably simpler equations of interface motion that provide an efficient numerical means to study the nonplanar interface dynamics expected to cause dark bands. A reasonable agreement with experiment is found for the spacing of banded structures dominated by light-band microsegregation-free regions in Al-Fe alloys.

  19. Interface-induced phenomena in magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Frances; Hoffmann, Axel; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Leighton, Chris; MacDonald, Allan H.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Arena, Dario A.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Fischer, Peter; Grollier, Julie; Heremans, Joseph P.; Jungwirth, Tomas; Kimel, Alexey V.; Koopmans, Bert; Krivorotov, Ilya N.; May, Steven J.; Petford-Long, Amanda K.; Rondinelli, James M.; Samarth, Nitin; Schuller, Ivan K.; Slavin, Andrei N.; Stiles, Mark D.; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Thiaville, André; Zink, Barry L.

    2017-04-01

    This article reviews static and dynamic interfacial effects in magnetism, focusing on interfacially driven magnetic effects and phenomena associated with spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic symmetry breaking at interfaces. It provides a historical background and literature survey, but focuses on recent progress, identifying the most exciting new scientific results and pointing to promising future research directions. It starts with an introduction and overview of how basic magnetic properties are affected by interfaces, then turns to a discussion of charge and spin transport through and near interfaces and how these can be used to control the properties of the magnetic layer. Important concepts include spin accumulation, spin currents, spin-transfer torque, and spin pumping. An overview is provided to the current state of knowledge and existing review literature on interfacial effects such as exchange bias, exchange-spring magnets, the spin Hall effect, oxide heterostructures, and topological insulators. The article highlights recent discoveries of interface-induced magnetism and noncollinear spin textures, nonlinear dynamics including spin-transfer torque and magnetization reversal induced by interfaces, and interfacial effects in ultrafast magnetization processes.

  20. Anchored design of protein-protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Lewis

    Full Text Available Few existing protein-protein interface design methods allow for extensive backbone rearrangements during the design process. There is also a dichotomy between redesign methods, which take advantage of the native interface, and de novo methods, which produce novel binders.Here, we propose a new method for designing novel protein reagents that combines advantages of redesign and de novo methods and allows for extensive backbone motion. This method requires a bound structure of a target and one of its natural binding partners. A key interaction in this interface, the anchor, is computationally grafted out of the partner and into a surface loop on the design scaffold. The design scaffold's surface is then redesigned with backbone flexibility to create a new binding partner for the target. Careful choice of a scaffold will bring experimentally desirable characteristics into the new complex. The use of an anchor both expedites the design process and ensures that binding proceeds against a known location on the target. The use of surface loops on the scaffold allows for flexible-backbone redesign to properly search conformational space.This protocol was implemented within the Rosetta3 software suite. To demonstrate and evaluate this protocol, we have developed a benchmarking set of structures from the PDB with loop-mediated interfaces. This protocol can recover the correct loop-mediated interface in 15 out of 16 tested structures, using only a single residue as an anchor.

  1. The Python Interface to Antelope and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, K. G.; Clemesha, A.; Newman, R. L.; Vernon, F. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Antelope Environmental Monitoring System from Boulder Real-Time Technologies, Inc. (http://www.brtt.com) is widely used for acquiring, processing, distributing, and archiving near-real-time monitoring data, especially in seismological networks. We have contributed a new Python interface to the Antelope toolkit, paralleling other commercial and open-source language interfaces in Matlab, PHP, TCL/Tk, and C. The Python programming language (http://www.python.org) is well suited both to scientific computing applications and to interactive web-based applications. In the latter, Python serves as the programming interface through which to connect to standardized open-source frameworks. Community development of these frameworks has advanced in parallel with cross-browser standardization and increasing broadband data transfer rates, making web-based applications the defacto standard for platform-agnostic access to large, heterogeneous datasets. These web-based solutions are starting to mirror some of the capabilities of standard desktop-based applications. We describe the functionality of the new Python interface to Antelope, applications of the interface to the interactive exploration of time-series data on the web using the Twisted open-source framework, and web-based prototype tools developed for the Earthscope Array Network Facility to provide community access to network monitoring and seismic event datasets.

  2. Interface-Induced Phenomena in Magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Frances; Hoffmann, Axel; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Beach, Geoffrey S D; Fullerton, Eric E; Leighton, Chris; MacDonald, Allan H; Ralph, Daniel C; Arena, Dario A; Dürr, Hermann A; Fischer, Peter; Grollier, Julie; Heremans, Joseph P; Jungwirth, Tomas; Kimel, Alexey V; Koopmans, Bert; Krivorotov, Ilya N; May, Steven J; Petford-Long, Amanda K; Rondinelli, James M; Samarth, Nitin; Schuller, Ivan K; Slavin, Andrei N; Stiles, Mark D; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Thiaville, André; Zink, Barry L

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews static and dynamic interfacial effects in magnetism, focusing on interfacially-driven magnetic effects and phenomena associated with spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic symmetry breaking at interfaces. It provides a historical background and literature survey, but focuses on recent progress, identifying the most exciting new scientific results and pointing to promising future research directions. It starts with an introduction and overview of how basic magnetic properties are affected by interfaces, then turns to a discussion of charge and spin transport through and near interfaces and how these can be used to control the properties of the magnetic layer. Important concepts include spin accumulation, spin currents, spin transfer torque, and spin pumping. An overview is provided to the current state of knowledge and existing review literature on interfacial effects such as exchange bias, exchange spring magnets, spin Hall effect, oxide heterostructures, and topological insulators. The article highlights recent discoveries of interface-induced magnetism and non-collinear spin textures, non-linear dynamics including spin torque transfer and magnetization reversal induced by interfaces, and interfacial effects in ultrafast magnetization processes.

  3. Human computer interface guide, revision A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Human Computer Interface Guide, SSP 30540, is a reference document for the information systems within the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP). The Human Computer Interface Guide (HCIG) provides guidelines for the design of computer software that affects human performance, specifically, the human-computer interface. This document contains an introduction and subparagraphs on SSFP computer systems, users, and tasks; guidelines for interactions between users and the SSFP computer systems; human factors evaluation and testing of the user interface system; and example specifications. The contents of this document are intended to be consistent with the tasks and products to be prepared by NASA Work Package Centers and SSFP participants as defined in SSP 30000, Space Station Program Definition and Requirements Document. The Human Computer Interface Guide shall be implemented on all new SSFP contractual and internal activities and shall be included in any existing contracts through contract changes. This document is under the control of the Space Station Control Board, and any changes or revisions will be approved by the deputy director.

  4. Interface Metaphors for Interactive Machine Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasper, Robert J.; Blaha, Leslie M.

    2017-07-14

    To promote more interactive and dynamic machine learn- ing, we revisit the notion of user-interface metaphors. User-interface metaphors provide intuitive constructs for supporting user needs through interface design elements. A user-interface metaphor provides a visual or action pattern that leverages a user’s knowledge of another domain. Metaphors suggest both the visual representations that should be used in a display as well as the interactions that should be afforded to the user. We argue that user-interface metaphors can also offer a method of extracting interaction-based user feedback for use in machine learning. Metaphors offer indirect, context-based information that can be used in addition to explicit user inputs, such as user-provided labels. Implicit information from user interactions with metaphors can augment explicit user input for active learning paradigms. Or it might be leveraged in systems where explicit user inputs are more challenging to obtain. Each interaction with the metaphor provides an opportunity to gather data and learn. We argue this approach is especially important in streaming applications, where we desire machine learning systems that can adapt to dynamic, changing data.

  5. Exploring Dynamic User–Interface in Achieving Software Application ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-09-01

    Sep 1, 2013 ... Software applications are explored for any desired operation through their various interfaces. User-interface is a term synonymous with computer ergonomics which is concerned with the human-computer interface. Dynamic user-interface ensures an evolving technology that harmonizes and aligns the links ...

  6. More playful user interfaces: interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Unknown, [Unknown

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest advances in playful user interfacesinterfaces that invite social and physical interaction. These new developments include the use of audio, visual, tactile and physiological sensors to monitor, provide feedback and anticipate the behavior of human users. The decreasing

  7. A framework of interface improvements for designing new user interfaces for the MANUS robot arm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsma, H.A.; Liefhebber, F.; Herder, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Users of the MANUS robot arm experience a high cognitive and physical load when performing activities of daily living with the arm. These high loads originate from user interface problems and limitations. To reduce these high loads the user interface of the MANUS needs to be improved. Because large

  8. SWMM5 Application Programming Interface and PySWMM: A Python Interfacing Wrapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    In support of the OpenWaterAnalytics open source initiative, the PySWMM project encompasses the development of a Python interfacing wrapper to SWMM5 with parallel ongoing development of the USEPA Stormwater Management Model (SWMM5) application programming interface (API). ...

  9. Connecting Interface Structure to Energy Level Alignment at Aqueous Semiconductor Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybertsen, Mark

    Understanding structure-function relationships at aqueous semiconductor interfaces presents fundamental challenges, including the discovery of the key interface structure motifs themselves. Important examples include the alignment of electrochemical redox levels with the semiconductor band edges and the identification of catalytic active sites. We have developed a multistep approach, initially demonstrated for GaN, ZnO and their alloys, motivated by measured high efficiency for photocatalytic water oxidation. The interface structure is simulated using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD). The calculated, average interface dipole is combined with the GW approach from many-body perturbation theory to calculate the energy level alignment between the semiconductor band edges and the centroid of the occupied 1b1 energy level of water and thus, the electrochemical levels. Cluster models are used to study reaction pathways. The emergent interface motif is the full (GaN) or partial (ZnO) dissociated interface water layer. Here I will focus on the aqueous interfaces to the stable TiO2 anatase (101) and rutile (110) facets. The AIMD calculations reveal interface water dissociation and reassociation processes through distinct pathways: one direct at the interface and the other via a spectator water molecule from the hydration layer. Comparisons between the two interfaces shows that the energy landscape for these pathways depends on the local hydrogen bonding patterns and the interplay with the interface template. Combined results from different initial conditions and AIMD temperatures demonstrate a partially dissociated interface water layer in both cases. Specifically for rutile, structure and the GW-based analysis of the interface energy level alignment agree with experiment. Finally, hole localization at different interface structure motifs will be discussed. Work performed in collaboration with J. Lyons, N. Kharche, M. Ertem and J. Muckerman, done in part at the CFN, which

  10. Workshop on surface and interface science at the ESRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, C.; Stierle, A.; Kasper, N.; Dosch, H.; Schmidt, S.; Hufner, S.; Moritz, W.; Fedley, Ch.S.; Rossi, G.; Durr Hermann, A.; Rohlsberger, R.; Dalmas, J.; Oughaddou, H.; Leandri, Ch.; Gay, J.M.; Treglia, G.; Le Lay, G.; Aufray, B.; Bunk, O.; Johnson, R.L.; Frenken, J.W.M.; Lucas, C.A.; Bauer, G.; Zhong, Z.; Springholz, G.; Lechner, R.; Stang, J.; Schulli, T.; Metzger, T.H.; Holy, V.; Woodruff, D.P.; Dellera, C.; Zegenhagen, J.; Robinson, I.; Malachias, A.; Schulli, T.U.; Magalhaes-Paniago, R.; Stoffel, M.; Schmidt, O.G.; Boragno, C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.; Valbusa, U.; Felici, R.; Yacoby, Y.; Bedzyk, M.J.; Van der Veen, J.F

    2004-07-01

    The main aim of the workshop is to reflect the future of surface and interface research at the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source ESRF taking into account experimental facilities which are becoming available at new synchrotron radiation facilities in Europe. 6 sessions have been organized: 1) surface and interface research and synchrotron radiation - today and tomorrow -, 2) aspects of surface and interface research, 3) real surfaces and interfaces, 4) synchrotron techniques in surface and interface research, 5) new directions in surface and interface research, and 6) surface and interface science at ESRF. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  11. Marketing-sales interface and organizational competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J. Avlonitis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the effectiveness of marketing-sales interfaces in B2B firms. As the body of knowledge on this domain is scarce, there is a greater need to investigate the specific aspects of marketing-sales configurations in such firms. The objective of this paper is to expand existing knowledge regarding marketing-sales interfaces in B2B firms, in order to identify the effectiveness of each configuration. Based on quantitative data collected from marketing or sales managers of 98 B2B firms, the study identifies the most effective marketing-sales interface in terms of smooth relationships and enhanced performance. The implications of the study are discussed.

  12. Interface matrix method in AFEN framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogosbekyan, Leonid; Cho, Jin Young; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    In this study, we extend the application of the interface-matrix(IM) method for reflector modeling to Analytic Flux Expansion Nodal (AFEN) method. This include the modifications of the surface-averaged net current continuity and the net leakage balance conditions for IM method in accordance with AFEN formula. AFEN-interface matrix (AFEN-IM) method has been tested against ZION-1 benchmark problem. The numerical result of AFEN-IM method shows 1.24% of maximum error and 0.42% of root-mean square error in assembly power distribution, and 0.006% {Delta} k of neutron multiplication factor. This result proves that the interface-matrix method for reflector modeling can be useful in AFEN method. 3 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  13. Cellular nanotechnology: making biological interfaces smarter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Paula M

    2013-12-21

    Recently, there has been an outburst of research on engineered cell-material interfaces driven by nanotechnology and its tools and techniques. This tutorial review begins by providing a brief introduction to nanostructured materials, followed by an overview of the wealth of nanoscale fabrication and analysis tools available for their development. This background serves as the basis for a discussion of early breakthroughs and recent key developments in the endeavour to develop nanostructured materials as smart interfaces for fundamental cellular studies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The review covers three major aspects of nanostructured interfaces - nanotopographical control, dynamic behaviour and intracellular manipulation and sensing - where efforts are continuously being made to further understand cell function and provide new ways to control cell behaviour. A critical reflection of the current status and future challenges are discussed as a conclusion to the review.

  14. Evaluation of Explanation Interfaces in Recommender Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cleger-Tamayo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Explaining interfaces become a useful tool in systems that have a lot of content to evaluate by users. The different interfaces represent a help for the undecided users or those who consider systems as boxed black smart. These systems present recommendations to users based on different learning models. In this paper, we present the different objectives of the explanation interfaces and some of the criteria that you can evaluate, as well as a proposal of metrics to obtain results in the experiments. Finally, we showed the main results of a study with real users and their interaction with e-commerce systems. Among the main results, highlight the positive impact in relation to the time of interaction with the applications and acceptance of the recommendations received.

  15. Solid surfaces, interfaces and thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Lüth, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This book emphasises both experimental and theoretical aspects of surface, interface and thin-film physics. As in previous editions the preparation of surfaces and thin films, their atomic and morphological structure, their vibronic and electronic properties as well as fundamentals of adsorption are treated. Because of their importance in modern information technology and nanostructure research, particular emphasis is paid to electronic surface and interface states, semiconductor space charge layers and heterostructures. A special chapter of the book is devoted to collective phenomena at interfaces and in thin films such as superconductivity and magnetism. The latter topic includes the meanwhile important issues giant magnetoresistance and spin-transfer torque mechanism, both effects being of high interest in information technology. In this new edition, for the first time, the effect of spin-orbit coupling on surface states is treated. In this context the class of the recently detected topological insulators,...

  16. Tengi Interfaces for Tracing between Heterogeneous Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Rolf-Helge; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    , typically general programming languages, provide an interface description mechanism able to specify software com- ponent boundaries. Unfortunately, these interface mechanisms can not express relations for components containing heterogeneous artifacts. We introduce Tengi, a tool that allows......Contemporary software systems comprise many heteroge- neous artifacts; some expressed in general programming languages, some in visual and textual domain-specific languages and some in ad hoc textual formats. During construction of a system diverse artifacts are interrelated. Only few formats...... for the definition of software components containing heterogeneous artifacts. Tengi interfaces link components containing different textual and visual software development artifacts ranging from high-level specification documents to low-level implementation documents. We formally define and implement Tengi...

  17. Spin-Orbitronics at Transition Metal Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-11-09

    The presence of large spin–orbit interaction at transition metal interfaces enables the emergence of a variety of fascinating phenomena that have been at the forefront of spintronics research in the past 10 years. The objective of the present chapter is to offer a review of these various effects from a theoretical perspective, with a particular focus on spin transport, chiral magnetism, and their interplay. After a brief description of the orbital hybridization scheme at transition metal interfaces, we address the impact of spin–orbit coupling on the interfacial magnetic configuration, through the celebrated Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction. We then discuss the physics of spin transport and subsequent torques occurring at these interfaces. We particularly address the spin Hall, spin swapping, and inverse spin-galvanic effects. Finally, the interplay between flowing charges and chiral magnetic textures and their induced dynamics are presented. We conclude this chapter by proposing some perspectives on promising research directions.

  18. Natural Language Interfaces to Databases An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Androutsopoulos, I; Thanisch, P

    1995-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to natural language interfaces to databases (NLIDBs). A brief overview of the history of NLIDBs is first given. Some advantages and disadvantages of NLIDBs are then discussed, comparing NLIDBs to formal query languages, form-based interfaces, and graphical interfaces. An introduction to some of the linguistic problems NLIDBs have to confront follows, for the benefit of readers less familiar with computational linguistics. The discussion then moves on to NLIDB architectures, portability issues, restricted natural language input systems (including menu-based NLIDBs), and NLIDBs with reasoning capabilities. Some less explored areas of NLIDB research are then presented, namely database updates, meta-knowledge questions, temporal questions, and multi-modal NLIDBs. The paper ends with reflections on the current state of the art.

  19. Photonics surface waves on metamaterials interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Bogdanov, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2017-01-01

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. The research on surface waves has been flourishing in last few decades thanks...... variety of surface waves has been investigated in numerous material and structure settings. This paper reviews the recent progress and development in the physics of SWs localized at metamaterial interfaces, as well as bulk media in order to provide broader perspectives on optical surface waves in general....... For each type of the surface waves, we discuss material and structural platforms. We mainly focus on experimental realizations in the visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges. We also address existing and potential application of SWs in chemical and biological sensing, and experimental excitation...

  20. On Standards for Application Level Interfaces in SDN

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef Ibrahim Daradkeh; Mujahed Aldhaifallah; Dmitry Namiot; Manfred Sneps-Sneppe

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, authors discuss application level interfaces for Software Defined Networks. While the Application Programming Interfaces for the interaction with the hardware are widely described in Software Defined Networks, the software interfaces for applications received far less attention. However, it is obvious that interfaces to software applications are very important. Actually, application level interfaces should be one of the main elements in Software Defined Networks. It is a core f...

  1. Interdisciplinarity at the Human-Environment Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kjeld; Arler, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Current environmental problems increasingly call for research - as well as education - which crosses the traditional divides between well-established scientific disciplines and between natural science, technical sciences, social sciences and the humanities. This paper addresses the issue of what...... interdisciplinarity, at the interface between the natural and human sciences, entails and the theoretical problems and obstacles interdisciplinarity encounters. A number of attempts to institutionalize interdisciplinarity, at the Human-Environment interface, in 'fields of study' or even 'disciplines', are briefly...... discussed, including Geography, Human Ecology, Environmental Studies, Environmental Management, Ecological Economics, Sustainability Science and Earth System Science. Key problems of carrying out interdisciplinary research are identified, including differences of both ontological, epistemological...

  2. The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayachit, Utkarsh [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Whitlock, Brad [Intelligent Light, Rutherford, NJ (United States); Wolf, Matthew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Loring, Burlen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Geveci, Berk [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Lonie, David [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    The SENSEI generic in situ interface is an API that promotes code portability and reusability. From the simulation view, a developer can instrument their code with the SENSEI API and then make make use of any number of in situ infrastructures. From the method view, a developer can write an in situ method using the SENSEI API, then expect it to run in any number of in situ infrastructures, or be invoked directly from a simulation code, with little or no modification. This paper presents the design principles underlying the SENSEI generic interface, along with some simplified coding examples.

  3. The Gigabit Link Interface Board (GLIB) ecosystem

    CERN Document Server

    Vichoudis, P; Baron, S; Barros Marin, M; Bobillier, V; Chramowitz, J; Haas, S; Hansen, M; Joos, M; Lobato Pardavila, L; Petit, P; Prosser, A; Vasey, F

    2013-01-01

    The Gigabit Link Interface Board (GLIB) project is an FPGA-based platform for users of high-speed optical links in high energy physics experiments. The major hardware component of the platform is the GLIB Advanced Mezzanine Card (AMC). Additionally to the AMC, auxiliary components are developed that enhance GLIB platform's I/O bandwidth and compatibility with legacy and future triggering and/or data acquisition interfaces. This article focuses on the development of the auxiliary components that together with the GLIB AMC offer a complete solution for beam/irradiation tests of detector modules and evaluation of optical links.

  4. Liferay 6.2 user interface development

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xinsheng

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step tutorial, targeting the Liferay 6.2 version. This book takes a step-by-step approach to customizing the look and feel of your website, and shows you how to build a great looking user interface as well.""Liferay 6.2 User Interface Development"" is for anyone who is interested in the Liferay Portal. It contains text that explicitly introduces you to the Liferay Portal. You will benefit most from this book if you have Java programming experience and have coded servlets or JavaServer Pages before. Experienced Liferay portal developers will also find this book useful because it expla

  5. Programming Graphical User Interfaces in R

    CERN Document Server

    Verzani, John

    2012-01-01

    Programming Graphical User Interfaces with R introduces each of the major R packages for GUI programming: RGtk2, qtbase, Tcl/Tk, and gWidgets. With examples woven through the text as well as stand-alone demonstrations of simple yet reasonably complete applications, the book features topics especially relevant to statisticians who aim to provide a practical interface to functionality implemented in R. The book offers: A how-to guide for developing GUIs within R The fundamentals for users with limited knowledge of programming within R and other languages GUI design for specific functions or as l

  6. GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Terry L [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL; Tadinada, Sashi [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL

    2013-06-01

    As part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the objective of the GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface project is to create the capability to apply GRIZZLY 3-D finite element (thermal and stress) analysis results as input to FAVOR probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analyses. The one benefit of FAVOR to Grizzly is the PROBABILISTIC capability. This document describes the implementation of the GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface, the preliminary verification and tests results and a user guide that provides detailed step-by-step instructions to run the program.

  7. VISAGE: A Query Interface for Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Siegler, Trish; Saxman, Paul; Sandberg, Neil; Mueller, Remo; Johnson, Nathan; Hunscher, Dale; Arabandi, Sivaram

    2010-03-01

    We present the design and implementation of VISAGE (VISual AGgregator and Explorer), a query interface for clinical research. We follow a user-centered development approach and incorporate visual, ontological, searchable and explorative features in three interrelated components: Query Builder, Query Manager and Query Explorer. The Query Explorer provides novel on-line data mining capabilities for purposes such as hypothesis generation or cohort identification. The VISAGE query interface has been implemented as a significant component of Physio-MIMI, an NCRR-funded, multi-CTSA-site pilot project. Preliminary evaluation results show that VISAGE is more efficient for query construction than the i2b2 web-client.

  8. Interface design in the process industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaverstock, M. C.; Stassen, H. G.; Williamson, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Every operator runs his plant in accord with his own mental model of the process. In this sense, one characteristic of an ideal man-machine interface is that it be in harmony with that model. With this theme in mind, the paper first reviews the functions of the process operator and compares them with human operators involved in control situations previously studied outside the industrial environment (pilots, air traffic controllers, helmsmen, etc.). A brief history of the operator interface in the process industry and the traditional methodology employed in its design is then presented. Finally, a much more fundamental approach utilizing a model definition of the human operator's behavior is presented.

  9. User interface design of electronic appliances

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Konrad

    2002-01-01

    Foreword by Brenda Laurel. Part One: Introduction 1. Background, Bruce Thomas 2. Introduction, Konrad Baumann 3. The Interaction Design Process, Georg Rakers Part Two: User Interface Design 4. Creativity Techniques, Irene Mavrommati 5. Design Principals, Irene Mavrommati and Adrian Martel 6. Design of On-Screen Interfaces, Irene Mavrommati Part Three: Input Devices 7. Controls, Konrad Baumann 8. Keyboards, Konrad Baumann 9. Advanced Interaction Techniques, Christopher Baber and Konrad Baumann 10. Speech Control, Christopher Baber and Jan Noyes 11. Wearable Computers, Christopher Baber Part Fou

  10. Improved haptic interface for colonoscopy simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hyun Soo; Kim, Woo Seok; Ahn, Woojin; Lee, Doo Yong; Yi, Sun Young

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an improved haptic interface of the KAIST-Ewha colonoscopy simulator II. The haptic interface enables the distal portion of the colonoscope to be freely bent while guaranteeing enough workspace and reflective forces for colonoscopy simulation. Its force-torque sensor measures profiles of the user. Manipulation of the colonoscope tip is monitored by four deflection sensors, and triggers computation to render accurate graphic images corresponding to the angle knob rotation. Tack switches are attached on the valve-actuation buttons of the colonoscope to simulate air-injection or suction, and the corresponding deformation of the colon.

  11. Surface activity evaluation of an arabinose ester as water/oil demulsifier at severe conditions of temperature, salinity and pH; Avaliacao da atividade superficial de um ester de arabinose, como desemulsificante agua/oleo, em condicoes severas de temperatura, salinidade e pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Mauricio Rodrigues; Garcia, Rosangela Balaban; Santos, Jaciara Alves dos; Vieira, Mariane; Silva, Luciana Carvalho; Campos, Viviane de Oliveira; Silva, Rayane Araujo da; Santos, Telma Pitanga dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work had for objective to compare the superficial properties of an arabinose ester, no-ionic, nontoxic, biodegradable, with two commercial products: the first one based on sodium dodecyl sulfate and the second one based on poly-oxy alkylene phenol formaldehyde. The arabinose ester was synthesized on the Petroleum Research Laboratory - UFRN, through enzymatic catalysis by protease from Bacillus subtilis, using arabinose and vegetable oil, in organic medium. In previous work [1], this sugar ester was evaluated as a possible water/oil demulsifier and the results were compared with the results of the commercial product based on poly-oxy alkylene phenol formaldehyde, showing that, for certain reaction conditions, the sugar ester presented better acting (71%) that the commercial product (33%) as demulsifier. In this work, the stability of this arabinose ester was evaluated in severe conditions of temperature, salinity and pH, through superficial tests in a tensiometer, using Wilhelmy plate method and the results were compared with the results obtained for two commercial products above mentioned. (author)

  12. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for quantitative interface state characterization of planar and nanostructured semiconductor-dielectric interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Andrew C.; Tang, Kechao; Braun, Michael R.; Zhang, Liangliang; McIntyre, Paul C.

    2017-10-01

    The performance of nanostructured semiconductors is frequently limited by interface defects that trap electronic carriers. In particular, high aspect ratio geometries dramatically increase the difficulty of using typical solid-state electrical measurements (multifrequency capacitance- and conductance-voltage testing) to quantify interface trap densities (D it). We report on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to characterize the energy distribution of interface traps at metal oxide/semiconductor interfaces. This method takes advantage of liquid electrolytes, which provide conformal electrical contacts. Planar Al2O3/p-Si and Al2O3/p-Si0.55Ge0.45 interfaces are used to benchmark the EIS data against results obtained from standard electrical testing methods. We find that the solid state and EIS data agree very well, leading to the extraction of consistent D it energy distributions. Measurements carried out on pyramid-nanostructured p-Si obtained by KOH etching followed by deposition of a 10 nm ALD-Al2O3 demonstrate the application of EIS to trap characterization of a nanostructured dielectric/semiconductor interface. These results show the promise of this methodology to measure interface state densities for a broad range of semiconductor nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofins, and porous structures.

  13. Surface and interface sciences of Li-ion batteries. -Research progress in electrode-electrolyte interface-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Abe, Takeshi

    2017-12-01

    The application potential of Li-ion batteries is growing as demand increases in different fields at various stages in energy systems, in addition to their conventional role as power sources for portable devices. In particular, applications in electric vehicles and renewable energy storage are increasing for Li-ion batteries. For these applications, improvements in battery performance are necessary. The Li-ion battery produces and stores electric power from the electrochemical redox reactions between the electrode materials. The interface between the electrodes and electrolyte strongly affects the battery performance because the charge transfer causing the electrode redox reaction begins at this interface. Understanding of the surface structure, electronic structure, and chemical reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface is necessary to improve battery performance. However, the interface is located between the electrode and electrolyte materials, hindering the experimental analysis of the interface; thus, the physical properties and chemical processes have remained poorly understood until recently. Investigations of the physical properties and chemical processes at the interface have been performed using advanced surface science techniques. In this review, current knowledge and future research prospects regarding the electrode-electrolyte interface are described for the further development of Li-ion batteries.

  14. Demonstrator 1: User Interface and User Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Describes the user interface and its functionality in a prototype system used for a virtual seminar session. The functionality is restricted to what is needed for a distributed seminar discussion among not too many people. The system is designed to work with the participants distributed at several...

  15. Sensators : Active multisensory tangible user interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Willemse, C.J.A.M.; Janssen, J.B.; Toet, A.

    2014-01-01

    Although Tangible User Interfaces are considered an intuitive means of human-computer interaction, they oftentimes lack the option to provide active feedback. We developed ‘Sensators’: generic shaped active tangibles to be used on a multi-touch table. Sensators can represent digital information by

  16. New Year, new interface for EDMS!

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Some of you may already have made the leap to the new EDMS6 interface and be benefitting from the additional functionality and new design it has to offer. But for those who haven’t, you will be able to do so as of Wednesday 28 January when EDMS6 becomes the default interface.    EDMS is the de facto interface for all engineering related data and more. There are currently more than 1.5 million documents and over 2 million files stored there. What’s new in EDMS6? While we have kept the key concepts, we have introduced more functionality and improved navigation within the interface, allowing for better performance to help you in your daily work. We have also added a personal slant to EDMS6 so that you can now customise your list of favourite objects. Modifying data in EDMS is much simpler, allowing you to view all object data in a single window. For example, files can be added to documents with a simple drag and drop and you can now request access to documents...

  17. A computational method for sharp interface advection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roenby, Johan; Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volu...

  18. Switchable bioelectronics on graphene interface (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Onur; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Turner, Anthony P. F.

    2015-08-01

    Smart and flexible bioelectronics on graphene have emerged as a new frontier in the field of biosensors and bioelectronics. Graphene has begun to be seen as an ideal signal transducer and a promising alternative for the production of low-cost bioelectronic devices.1-2 However, biological systems used in these devices suffer from a lack of control and regulation. There is an obvious need to develop "switchable" and "smart" interfaces for both fundamental and applied studies. Here, we report the fabrication of a stimuli-responsive graphene interface, which is used to regulate biomolecular reactions. The present study aims to address the design and development of a novel auto-switchable graphene bio-interface that is capable of positively responding, by creating smart nanoarchitectures. By changing the external conditions such as temperature, light and pH of the medium, we acheived control of the biochemical interactions. In the negative mode, access of an associated enzyme to its substrate is largely restricted, resulting in a decrease in the diffusion of reactants and the consequent activity of the system. In contrast, the biosubstrate could freely access the enzyme facilitating bioelectrocatalysis in a positive response. Using electrochemical techniques, we demonstrated that interfacial bio-electrochemical properties can be tuned by modest changes in conditions. Such an ability to independently regulate the behaviour of the interface has important implications for the design of novel bioreactors, biofuel cells and biosensors with inbuilt self-control features.

  19. Interface Concepts for Command & Control Tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H. van; Passenier, P.O.

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses new interface concepts for information visualisation and manipulation in Command and Control. These concepts focus on the use of multiple views on the tactical situation to enhance situational awareness and to improve situation assessment. Topics covered include the application

  20. Adaptive interface for personalizing information seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S; Koppaka, Lavanya; Edala, Narasimha; Loritz, Don; Daley, Raymond

    2004-12-01

    An adaptive interface autonomously adjusts its display and available actions to current goals and abilities of the user by assessing user status, system task, and the context. Knowledge content adaptability is needed for knowledge acquisition and refinement tasks. In the case of knowledge content adaptability, the requirements of interface design focus on the elicitation of information from the user and the refinement of information based on patterns of interaction. In such cases, the emphasis on adaptability is on facilitating information search and knowledge discovery. In this article, we present research on adaptive interfaces that facilitates personalized information seeking from a large data warehouse. The resulting proof-of-concept system, called source recommendation system (SRS), assists users in locating and navigating data sources in the repository. Based on the initial user query and an analysis of the content of the search results, the SRS system generates a profile of the user tailored to the individual's context during information seeking. The user profiles are refined successively and are used in progressively guiding the user to the appropriate set of sources within the knowledge base. The SRS system is implemented as an Internet browser plug-in to provide a seamless and unobtrusive, personalized experience to the users during the information search process. The rationale behind our approach, system design, empirical evaluation, and implications for research on adaptive interfaces are described in this paper.

  1. Interfaces Visualize Data for Airline Safety, Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    As the A-Train Constellation orbits Earth to gather data, NASA scientists and partners visualize, analyze, and communicate the information. To this end, Langley Research Center awarded SBIR funding to Fairfax, Virginia-based WxAnalyst Ltd. to refine the company's existing user interface for Google Earth to visualize data. Hawaiian Airlines is now using the technology to help manage its flights.

  2. An architecture for human-network interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the issues (and their consequences) that arise when human-network interfaces (HNIs) are viewed from the perspective of people who use and develop them are examined. Target attributes of HNI architecture are presented. A high-level architecture model that supports the attributes is discussed...

  3. Surface and interface dynamics in multilayered systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsarfati, Tim

    2009-01-01

    In the broad scientific field of thin films, applications have rapidly expanded since the second half of the 20th century, as has been described in the valorization chapter. This thesis describes research at the interface between surface chemistry and physics. The characterization of d-metal surface

  4. Dynamics of Complex Fluid-Fluid Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of recent progress in modelling the behaviour of complex fluid–fluid interfaces with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. We will limit ourselves to frameworks employing the Gibbs dividing surface model, and start with a general discussion of the surface excess

  5. Experiencing Brain-Computer Interface Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, B.L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are systems that extract information from the user’s brain activity and employ it in some way in an interactive system. While historically BCIs were mainly catered towards paralyzed or otherwise physically handicapped users, the last couple of years applications with

  6. Augmented Reality Interfaces for Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar; Pedersen, David Bue; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores potential use cases for using augmented reality (AR) as a tool to operate industrial machines. As a baseline we use an additive manufacturing system, more commonly known as a 3D printer. We implement novel augmented interfaces and controls using readily available open source...

  7. Language Testing--SLA Research Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Lyle F.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three research/testing interfaces in second-language (L2) testing: the covariance structure analysis of ex post facto correlational data, the qualitative investigation of test-taking processes, and the development of L2 assessment instruments based on developmental sequences in L2 acquisition. (61 references) (GLR)

  8. Nested Dissection Interface Reconstruction in Pececillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jibben, Zechariah Joel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    A nested dissection method for interface reconstruction in a volume tracking framework has been implemented in Pececillo. This method provides a significant improvement over the traditional onion-skin method, which does not appropriately handle T-shaped multimaterial intersections and dynamic contact lines present in additive manufacturing simulations. The resulting implementation lays the groundwork for further re- search in numerical contact angle estimates.

  9. Electrostatics with Computer-Interfaced Charge Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Computer interfaced electrostatic charge sensors allow both qualitative and quantitative measurements of electrostatic charge but are quite sensitive to charges accumulating on modern synthetic materials. They need to be used with care so that students can correctly interpret their measurements. This paper describes the operation of the sensors,…

  10. A logical interface description language for components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Arbab (Farhad); M.M. Bonsangue (Marcello); F.S. de Boer (Frank)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractMotivated by our earlier work on the IWIM model and the Manifold language, in this paper, we attend to some of the basic issues in component-based software. We present a formal model for such systems, a formal-logic-based component interface description language that

  11. Flash Builder customizing the user interface

    CERN Document Server

    Rocchi, Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Personalize user interface components of your projects. Example projects are grouped together in an AIR application and the appearance is totally customized. Learn how to change visual properties by means of style directives or create brand new skins by knowing and exploiting their internal architecture.

  12. TOCAR: a code to interface FOURACES - CARNAVAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panini, G.C.; Vaccari, M.

    1981-08-01

    The TOCAR code, written in FORTRAN-IV for IBM-370 computers, is an interface between the output of the FOURACES code and the CARNAVAL binary format for the multigroup neutron cross-sections, scattering matrices and related quantities. Besides the description of the code and the how to use, the report contains the code listing.

  13. A computational method for sharp interface advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volume of fluid (VOF) idea of calculating the volume of one of the fluids transported across the mesh faces during a time step. The novelty of the isoAdvector concept consists of two parts. First, we exploit an isosurface concept for modelling the interface inside cells in a geometric surface reconstruction step. Second, from the reconstructed surface, we model the motion of the face–interface intersection line for a general polygonal face to obtain the time evolution within a time step of the submerged face area. Integrating this submerged area over the time step leads to an accurate estimate for the total volume of fluid transported across the face. The method was tested on simple two-dimensional and three-dimensional interface advection problems on both structured and unstructured meshes. The results are very satisfactory in terms of volume conservation, boundedness, surface sharpness and efficiency. The isoAdvector method was implemented as an OpenFOAM® extension and is published as open source. PMID:28018619

  14. Robust semantic analysis for adaptive speech interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Cheadle, Maria; Gambäck, Björn

    2003-01-01

    The DUMAS project develops speech-based applications that are adaptable to different users and domains. The paper describes the project's robust semantic analysis strategy, used both in the generic framework for the development of multilingual speech-based dialogue systems which is the main project goal, and in the initial test application, a mobile phone-based e-mail interface.

  15. Brain-computer interfaces for arts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkök, Hayrettin; Nijholt, Antinus; D' Mello, S.; Pantic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    We experience positive emotions when our hedonic needs, such as virtuosity or relatedness, are satisfied. Creating art is one way of satisfying these needs, so artistic computer applications can be considered as ‘affective’. Artistic braincomputer interfaces (BCIs), which allow people to create art

  16. Alternate Interface Devices for the Physically Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Monte B.

    Six interface devices which students with physical impairments may use when operating the Apple II computer are described along with advantages and disadvantages, and source (when appropriate). These are: the Time Delay Keyboard, Keyguard, Magic Keyboard, Presfax-100 Touch Key-Pad, Switches (single and multiple), and Optical Strip Printer. (MC)

  17. An ADC Interface for the Apple II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiker, P. Steven

    1990-01-01

    Described is the construction of a simple analog-to-digital convertor circuit to interface an Apple II+ microcomputer to a light sensor used in conjunction with a holographic gear inspector. A list of parts, circuit diagram, and a simple BASIC program for the convertor are provided. (CW)

  18. Environmental Interfaces in Teaching Economic Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Celso; Wodewotzki, Maria Lucia; Jacobini, Otavio; Ferrira, Denise

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is, based on the Critical Statistics Education assumptions, to value some environmental interfaces in teaching Statistics by modeling projects. Due to this, we present a practical case, one in which we address an environmental issue, placed in the context of the teaching of index numbers, within the Statistics…

  19. In Between Matters : Interfaces in Complex Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zalk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Complex oxides are emerging as a versatile class of materials, exhibiting a wide variety of properties. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that the properties of complex-oxide interfaces can differ considerably from those of the bulk. This opens up the possibility of tuning and

  20. In between matters, interfaces in complex oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zalk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Complex oxides are emerging as a versatile class of materials, exhibiting a wide variety of properties. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that the properties of complex-oxide interfaces can differ considerably from those of the bulk. This opens up the possibility of tuning and

  1. Service Robot SCORPIO with Robust Speech Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Ondas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The SCORPIO is a small-size mini-teleoperator mobile service robot for booby-trap disposal. It can be manually controlled by an operator through a portable briefcase remote control device using joystick, keyboard and buttons. In this paper, the speech interface is described. As an auxiliary function, the remote interface allows a human operator to concentrate sight and/or hands on other operation activities that are more important. The developed speech interface is based on HMM-based acoustic models trained using the SpeechDatE-SK database, a small-vocabulary language model based on fixed connected words, grammar, and the speech recognition setup adapted for low-resource devices. To improve the robustness of the speech interface in an outdoor environment, which is the working area of the SCORPIO service robot, a speech enhancement based on the spectral subtraction method, as well as a unique combination of an iterative approach and a modified LIMA framework, were researched, developed and tested on simulated and real outdoor recordings.

  2. Electron refraction at lateral atomic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Fattah, Z. M.; Kher-Elden, M. A.; Yassin, O.; El-Okr, M. M.; Ortega, J. E.; García de Abajo, F. J.

    2017-11-01

    We present theoretical simulations of electron refraction at the lateral atomic interface between a "homogeneous" Cu(111) surface and the "nanostructured" one-monolayer (ML) Ag/Cu(111) dislocation lattice. Calculations are performed for electron binding energies barely below the 1 ML Ag/Cu(111) M ¯ -point gap (binding energy EB = 53 meV, below the Fermi level) and slightly above its Γ ¯ -point energy (EB = 160 meV), both characterized by isotropic/circular constant energy surfaces. Using plane-wave-expansion and boundary-element methods, we show that electron refraction occurs at the interface, the Snell law is obeyed, and a total internal reflection occurs beyond the critical angle. Additionally, a weak negative refraction is observed for EB = 53 meV electron energy at beam incidence higher than the critical angle. Such an interesting observation stems from the interface phase-matching and momentum conservation with the umklapp bands at the second Brillouin zone of the dislocation lattice. The present analysis is not restricted to our Cu-Ag/Cu model system but can be readily extended to technologically relevant interfaces with spin-polarized, highly featured, and anisotropic constant energy contours, such as those characteristic for Rashba systems and topological insulators.

  3. Designing interfaces patterns for effective interaction design

    CERN Document Server

    Tidwell, Jenifer

    2005-01-01

    This convenient resource offers advice on creating user-friendly interface designs--whether they're delivered on the Web, a CD, or a smart" devices like a cell phone. Solutions to common UI design problems are expressed as a collection of patterns--each one containing concrete examples, recommendations, and warnings. Intended for designers with basic UI design knowledge

  4. A Computational Method for Sharp Interface Advection

    CERN Document Server

    Roenby, Johan; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volume of fluid (VOF) idea of calculating the volume of one of the fluids transported across the mesh faces during a time step. The novelty of the isoAdvector concept consists in two parts: First, we exploit an isosurface concept for modelling the interface inside cells in a geometric surface reconstruction step. Second, from the reconstructed surface, we model the motion of the face-interface intersection line for a general polygonal face to obtain the time evolution within a time step of the submerged face area. Integrating this submerged area over the time step leads to an accurate estimate for the total volume of fluid transported across the face. The method was tested on simple 2D and 3D interface advection problems ...

  5. The Promise of Zoomable User Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bederson, Benjamin B.

    2011-01-01

    Zoomable user interfaces (ZUIs) have received a significant amount of attention in the 18 years since they were introduced. They have enjoyed some success, and elements of ZUIs are widely used in computers today, although the grand vision of a zoomable desktop has not materialised. This paper describes the premise and promise of ZUIs along with…

  6. Total energy calculations and bonding at interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, S.G.

    1984-08-01

    Some of the concepts and theoretical techniques employed in recent ab initio studies of the electronic and structural properties of surfaces and interfaces are discussed. Results of total energy calculations for the 2 x 1 reconstructed diamond (111) surface and for stacking faults in Si are reviewed. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Digital forestry in the wildland urban interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael C. Wimberly; Yangjian Zhang; John A. Stanturf

    2006-01-01

    Growing human populations have led to the expansion of the Wildland-Urban interface (WUI) across the southeastern United States. The juxtaposition of buildings, infrastructure, and forests in the WUI creates challenges for natural resource managers. The presence of flammable vegetation, high rates of human-caused ignitions and high building densities combine to...

  8. Configuring Semantic Web Interfaces by Data Mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hildebrand (Michiel); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractWe demonstrate how to develop Web-based user interfaces for Semantic Web applications using commonly available, off-the-shelf Web widget libraries. By formally defining the underlying data model that is assumed by these widgets, Semantic Web application developers can use familiar

  9. Normative Language Policy: Interface and Interfences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Yael

    2014-01-01

    The emerging interdisciplinary work in language politics and language policy and planning studies demonstrates a rising interest among researchers in the interface between sociolinguistics, political science and philosophy. Much of the resulting cross-disciplinary work, however, tends to focus on the subject matters (politics, language) themselves…

  10. ASC-PROBA Interface Control Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Jørgensen, Finn E

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) and defines the interfaces between the instrument and the PROBA satellite. The ASC is a highly advanced and autonomous Stellar Reference Unit designed, developed and produced by the Space Instrumentation Group of the Department of Automat...

  11. Persistence of randomly coupled fluctuating interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Satya N; Das, Dibyendu

    2005-03-01

    We study the persistence properties in a simple model of two coupled interfaces characterized by heights h(1) and h(2) , respectively, each growing over a d -dimensional substrate. The first interface evolves independently of the second and can correspond to any generic growing interface, e.g., of the Edwards-Wilkinson or of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang variety. The evolution of h(2) , however, is coupled to h(1) via a quenched random velocity field. In the limit d-->0 , our model reduces to the Matheron-de Marsily model in two dimensions. For d=1, our model describes a Rouse polymer chain in two dimensions advected by a transverse velocity field. We show analytically that after a long waiting time t(0) -->infinity , the stochastic process h(2) , at a fixed point in space but as a function of time, becomes a fractional Brownian motion with a Hurst exponent, H2 =1- beta(1) /2 , where beta(1) is the growth exponent characterizing the first interface. The associated persistence exponent is shown to be theta(2)(s) =1- H2 = beta(1) /2 . These analytical results are verified by numerical simulations.

  12. Interface definitions in literature: A reality check

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parslov, Jakob Filippson; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2015-01-01

    interfaces during the design phase leading to unintended product behavior. In an effort to reduce the lead time and increase quality, companies may apply a modular product architecture, thus enabling parallel development and maturing of modules. Achieving a successful integration of the modules at the end...

  13. More playful user interfaces: an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Nijholt, A.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we embed recent research advances in creating playful user interfaces in a historical context. We have observations on spending leisure time, in particular predictions from previous decades and views expressed in Science Fiction novels. We confront these views and predictions with

  14. Computers that smile: Humor in the interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blythe, M.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2002-01-01

    It is certainly not the case that wen we consider research on the role of human characteristics in the user interface of computers that no attention has been paid to the role of humor. However, when we compare efforts in this area with efforts and experiments that attempt to demonstrate the positive

  15. A natural language interface to databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a Natural Language Interface which is semantic-based and uses Conceptual Dependency representation is presented. The system was developed using Lisp and currently runs on a Symbolics Lisp machine. A key point is that the parser handles morphological analysis, which expands its capabilities of understanding more words.

  16. Embodied Conversational Interfaces for the Elderly User

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrotra, S.; Motti, V. G.; Frijns, H.; Akkoc, T.; Yengeç, S. B.; Calik, O.; Peeters, M.M.M.; Neerincx, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and development of an embodied conversational agent (ECA) that provides a social interface for older adults. Following a user-centred design approach, we implemented a multimodal agent consisting of a virtual character and a robot. This so-called "bi-bodied

  17. The Brain-Computer Interface Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerven, Marcel; Farquhar, Jason; Schaefer, Rebecca; Vlek, Rutger; Geuze, Jeroen; Nijholt, Antinus; Ramsay, Nick; Haselager, Pim; Vuurpijl, Louis; Gielen, Stan; Desain, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) have attracted much attention recently, triggered by new scientific progress in understanding brain function and by impressive applications. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the various steps in the BCI cycle, i.e., the loop from the measurement of

  18. UPPER LIMB FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT USING HAPTIC INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Bardorfer

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the assessment of the upper limb (UL functional state, using a haptic interface is presented. A haptic interface is used as a measuring device, capable of providing objective, repeatable and quantitative data of the UL motion. A patient is presented with a virtual environment, both graphically via a computer screen and haptically via the Phantom Premium 1.5 haptic interface. The setup allows the patient to explore and feel the virtual environment with three of his/her senses; sight, hearing, and most important, touch. Specially designed virtual environments are used to assess the patient’s UL movement capabilities. The tests range from tracking tasks – to assess the accuracy of movement – tracking tasks with added disturbances in a form of random forces – to assess the patient’s control abilities, a labyrinth test – to assess both speed and accuracy, to the last test for measuring the maximal force capacity of the UL.A new method for the assessment of the upper limb (UL functional state, using a haptic interface is presented. A haptic interface is used as a measuring device, capable of providing objective, repeatable and quantitative data of the UL motion. A patient is presented with a virtual environment, both graphically via a computer screen and haptically via the Phantom Premium 1.5 haptic interface. The setup allows the patient to explore and feel the virtual environment with three of his/her senses; sight, hearing, and most important, touch. Specially designed virtual environments are used to assess the patient’s UL movement capabilities. The tests range from tracking tasks–to assess the accuracy of movement-tracking tasks with added disturbances in a form of random forces-to assess the patient’s control abilities, a labyrinth test-to assess both speed and accuracy, to the last test for measuring the maximal force capacity of the UL.A comprehensive study, using the developed measurement setup within the

  19. Brain-Computer Interfaces in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jerry J.; Krusienski, Dean J.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) acquire brain signals, analyze them, and translate them into commands that are relayed to output devices that carry out desired actions. BCIs do not use normal neuromuscular output pathways. The main goal of BCI is to replace or restore useful function to people disabled by neuromuscular disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebral palsy, stroke, or spinal cord injury. From initial demonstrations of electroencephalography-based spelling and single-neuron-based device control, researchers have gone on to use electroencephalographic, intracortical, electrocorticographic, and other brain signals for increasingly complex control of cursors, robotic arms, prostheses, wheelchairs, and other devices. Brain-computer interfaces may also prove useful for rehabilitation after stroke and for other disorders. In the future, they might augment the performance of surgeons or other medical professionals. Brain-computer interface technology is the focus of a rapidly growing research and development enterprise that is greatly exciting scientists, engineers, clinicians, and the public in general. Its future achievements will depend on advances in 3 crucial areas. Brain-computer interfaces need signal-acquisition hardware that is convenient, portable, safe, and able to function in all environments. Brain-computer interface systems need to be validated in long-term studies of real-world use by people with severe disabilities, and effective and viable models for their widespread dissemination must be implemented. Finally, the day-to-day and moment-to-moment reliability of BCI performance must be improved so that it approaches the reliability of natural muscle-based function. PMID:22325364

  20. Brain-computer interfaces in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jerry J; Krusienski, Dean J; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2012-03-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) acquire brain signals, analyze them, and translate them into commands that are relayed to output devices that carry out desired actions. BCIs do not use normal neuromuscular output pathways. The main goal of BCI is to replace or restore useful function to people disabled by neuromuscular disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebral palsy, stroke, or spinal cord injury. From initial demonstrations of electroencephalography-based spelling and single-neuron-based device control, researchers have gone on to use electroencephalographic, intracortical, electrocorticographic, and other brain signals for increasingly complex control of cursors, robotic arms, prostheses, wheelchairs, and other devices. Brain-computer interfaces may also prove useful for rehabilitation after stroke and for other disorders. In the future, they might augment the performance of surgeons or other medical professionals. Brain-computer interface technology is the focus of a rapidly growing research and development enterprise that is greatly exciting scientists, engineers, clinicians, and the public in general. Its future achievements will depend on advances in 3 crucial areas. Brain-computer interfaces need signal-acquisition hardware that is convenient, portable, safe, and able to function in all environments. Brain-computer interface systems need to be validated in long-term studies of real-world use by people with severe disabilities, and effective and viable models for their widespread dissemination must be implemented. Finally, the day-to-day and moment-to-moment reliability of BCI performance must be improved so that it approaches the reliability of natural muscle-based function. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Universal Library for Building Radar Operator Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Karankevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the results of the development of a software library, used for building software interfaces for radars being developed in BMSTU Radioelectronic Technics Scientific and Research Institute. The library is a software application library written in C++ using Qt and OpenGL libraries.The article describes the requirements, that the library is supposed to meet, in particular — cross-platform capabilities and versatility of the solution. The data types, that library uses, are described. The description of theinterface elements developed is shown, and some pictures of their operation are given.The article shows the main interface elements used. They are: «Matrix» that shows twodimensional data, «Waterfall», that is used for time scanning of the parameter specified, and «Plan Position Indicator» that shows circular scan from surveillance radar without geometric distortions.The part «Library implementation» shows the example of radiolocation station interface, that was based on this library, used in the working model of ultrashortpulse radar. Some results of the operation of this interface are also shown. The experiment shows the system working with two people in the field. As people start to move, the system becomes capable of distinguishing moving targets and stationary surface. The article shows the system operation the same way as the system operator can see it through his interface.The conclusion contains brief results of the development, the sphere of application of the software, and the prospects of the further development of the library.

  2. Characterization of rough interfaces obtained by boriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos-Silva, I. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, SEPI-ESIME, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico)], E-mail: icampos@ipn.mx; Balankin, A.S. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, SEPI-ESIME, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Sierra, A.H. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, UPIICSA, Av. Te 950, Col Granjas, Mexico D.F. 08400 (Mexico); Lopez-Perrusquia, N. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, SEPI-ESIME, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Escobar-Galindo, R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Cantoblanco, Madrid E-28049 (Spain); Morales-Matamoros, D. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Lazaro Cardenas Norte, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico)

    2008-12-30

    This study evaluates the morphology of borided interfaces by means of the fractal theory. The boride layers were formed in the AISI M2 steel by applying the paste boriding treatment at temperatures of 1253 and 1273 K and treatment times of 2 and 6 h, while a boron carbide paste thickness of 4 or 5 mm covered the samples surface in order to produce the boron diffusion. The morphology of interfaces formed between FeB and Fe{sub 2}B layers and between Fe{sub 2}B layer and steel substrate was analyzed by the rescaled-range (R/S), root-mean-square (RMS), and Fourier power spectrum (FPS) methods. Moreover, the multi-affine spectra of roughness exponent were obtained by calculating the q-order height-height correlation functions. We found that both interfaces are multi-affine, rather than self-affine. The multi-affine spectra of roughness exponents are found to be different for FeB/Fe{sub 2}B and Fe{sub 2}B/substrate interfaces, but independent on the treatment parameters (boron carbide paste thickness, temperature, and boriding time). Furthermore, we found that the multi-affine spectra of both interfaces behave as it is expected for 'universal multi-fractals' with the Levy index {gamma} = 1, associated with the multiplicative cascades with a log-Cauchy distribution. Furthermore, our data suggest a great homogeneity of the boron diffusion field, characterized by universal fractal dimension D{sub diff} = 2.90 {+-} 0.01. These findings provide a novel insight into the nature of phase formation during the boriding treatment.

  3. EDITORIAL: Focus on the neural interface Focus on the neural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of an effective connection between neural tissue and computers has inspired scientists and engineers to develop new ways of controlling and obtaining information from the nervous system. These applications range from `brain hacking' to neural control of artificial limbs with brain signals. Notwithstanding the significant advances in neural prosthetics in the last few decades and the success of some stimulation devices such as cochlear prosthesis, neurotechnology remains below its potential for restoring neural function in patients with nervous system disorders. One of the reasons for this limited impact can be found at the neural interface and close attention to the integration between electrodes and tissue should improve the possibility of successful outcomes. The neural interfaces research community consists of investigators working in areas such as deep brain stimulation, functional neuromuscular/electrical stimulation, auditory prostheses, cortical prostheses, neuromodulation, microelectrode array technology, brain-computer/machine interfaces. Following the success of previous neuroprostheses and neural interfaces workshops, funding (from NIH) was obtained to establish a biennial conference in the area of neural interfaces. The first Neural Interfaces Conference took place in Cleveland, OH in 2008 and several topics from this conference have been selected for publication in this special section of the Journal of Neural Engineering. Three `perspectives' review the areas of neural regeneration (Corredor and Goldberg), cochlear implants (O'Leary et al) and neural prostheses (Anderson). Seven articles focus on various aspects of neural interfacing. One of the most popular of these areas is the field of brain-computer interfaces. Fraser et al, report on a method to generate robust control with simple signal processing algorithms of signals obtained with electrodes implanted in the brain. One problem with implanted electrode arrays, however, is that

  4. Ge Interface Engineering with Ozone-oxidation for Low Interface State Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzum, Duygu; /Stanford U., CIS; Krishnamohan, T.; Pethe, Abhijit J.; /Intel, Santa Clara; Okyay, Ali, K.; /Stanford U., CIS; Oshima, Yasuhiro; Sun, Yun; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; McVittie, Jim P.; Pianetta, Piero A.; /Stanford U., CIS; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Saraswat, Krishna C.; /Stanford U., CIS

    2008-06-02

    Passivation of Ge has been a critical issue for Ge MOS applications in future technology nodes. In this letter, we introduce ozone-oxidation to engineer Ge/insulator interface. Interface states (D{sub it}) values across the bandgap and close to conduction bandedge were extracted using conductance technique at low temperatures. D{sub it} dependency on growth conditions was studied. Minimum D{sub it} of 3 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} V{sup -1} was demonstrated. Physical quality of the interface was investigated through Ge 3d spectra measurements. We found that the interface and D{sub it} is strongly affected by the distribution of oxidation states and quality of the suboxide.

  5. Turbulence Interface Simulation by Lagrangian Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, V. H.

    2015-12-01

    Most computational fluid-dynamics codes are developed using the Eulerian description. To find the numerical solution, fluxes are estimated on the surface of the finite volume using a truncation series. Spurious numerical oscillations and artificial numerical diffusion are consequences, particularly in regions across flow discontinuities. Diffusion often is introduced synthetically in many schemes to gain computational stability. Occasional switching to a diffusive upwind scheme, for example, is one classic strategy to manage the numerical oscillations [see e.g., Ghannadi & Chu 2015]. Lagrangian-block simulation offers an alternative that could minimize the spurious oscillations and false diffusive error. The blocks move in the direction of the flow. The squares of the block widths expand in proportion to the diffusivities. The block simulation procedure consists of (i) Lagrangian advection and diffusion, (ii) division into portions, and (iii) reassembly of the portions into new blocks. The blocks are renewed in each time increment to prevent excessive distortion. Details of the Lagrangian-block simulations method have been given in a series of papers by Tan & Chu (2012), Chu & Altai (2012, 2015}. In this paper, the exchanges across turbulence interfaces are considered for two problems. The first series of the simulations are conducted to find the mass and momentum exchanges across a shallow flow of two different depth. In the simulations, the advection and diffusion of three separated systems of blocks that contain the mass, momentum and potential vorticity are carried out using the Lagrangian-block simulation method. The simulation results are compared with data obtained from a previous laboratory investigation and related to the shear instability problem in rotating shear flow previously considered by Chu (2014). The second problem involves the turbulence generation across the interface of an internal waves. The simulation shows the development of gravitational

  6. Light Duty Utility Arm interface control document plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstrom, J.W.

    1994-12-27

    This document describes the interface control documents that will be used to identify and control interface features throughout all phases of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) development and design. After the system is built, delivered and installed in the Cold Test Facility and later at the tank farm, the Interface Control Documents can be used in maintaining the configuration control process. The Interface Control Document will consist of Interface Control Drawings and a data base directly tied to the Interface Control Drawings. The data base can be used as an index to conveniently find interface information. Design drawings and other text documents that contain interface information will appear in the database. The Interface Control Drawings will be used to document and control the data and information that define the interface boundaries between systems, subsystems and equipment. Also, the interface boundaries will define the areas of responsibility for systems and subsystems. The drawing will delineate and identify all the physical and functional interfaces that required coordination to establish and maintain compatibility between the co-functioning equipment, computer software, and the tank farm facilities. An appendix contains the Engineering interface control database system riser manual.

  7. ISS Interface Mechanisms and their Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, John G.; Aksamentov, Valery; Hoffman, Thomas; Bruner, Wes

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station, by nurturing technological development of a variety of pressurized and unpressurized interface mechanisms fosters "competition at the technology level". Such redundancy and diversity allows for the development and testing of mechanisms that might be used for future exploration efforts. The International Space Station, as a test-bed for exploration, has 4 types of pressurized interfaces between elements and 6 unpressurized attachment mechanisms. Lessons learned from the design, test and operations of these mechanisms will help inform the design for a new international standard pressurized docking mechanism for the NASA Docking System. This paper will examine the attachment mechanisms on the ISS and their attributes. It will also look ahead at the new NASA docking system and trace its lineage to heritage mechanisms.

  8. Prototyping of user interfaces for mobile applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bähr, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    This book investigates processes for the prototyping of user interfaces for mobile apps, and describes the development of new concepts and tools that can improve the prototype driven app development in the early stages. It presents the development and evaluation of a new requirements catalogue for prototyping mobile app tools that identifies the most important criteria such tools should meet at different prototype-development stages. This catalogue is not just a good point of orientation for designing new prototyping approaches, but also provides a set of metrics for a comparing the performance of alternative prototyping tools. In addition, the book discusses the development of Blended Prototyping, a new approach for prototyping user interfaces for mobile applications in the early and middle development stages, and presents the results of an evaluation of its performance, showing that it provides a tool for teamwork-oriented, creative prototyping of mobile apps in the early design stages.

  9. Transport mechanism through metal-cobaltite interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acha, C.; Schulman, A.; Boudard, M.; Daoudi, K.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2016-07-01

    The resistive switching (RS) properties as a function of temperature were studied for Ag/La1-xSrxCoO3 (LSCO) interfaces. The LSCO is a fully relaxed 100 nm film grown by metal organic deposition on a LaAlO3 substrate. Both low and a high resistance states were set at room temperature, and the temperature dependence of their current-voltage (IV) characteristics was measured taking care to avoid a significant change of the resistance state. The obtained non-trivial IV curves of each state were well reproduced by a circuit model which includes a Poole-Frenkel element and two ohmic resistances. A microscopic description of the changes produced by the RS is given, which enables to envision a picture of the interface as an area where conductive and insulating phases are mixed, producing Maxwell-Wagner contributions to the dielectric properties.

  10. Surface Tension and Fingering of Miscible Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abib, Mohammed; Liu, Jian-Bang; Ronney, Paul D.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments on miscible, buoyantly unstable reaction-diffusion fronts and non-reacting displacement fronts in Hele-Shaw cells show a fingering-type instability whose wavelengths (lambda*) are consistent with an interfacial tension (sigma) at the front caused by the change in chemical composition, even though the solutions are miscible in all proportions. In conjunction with the Saffman-Taylor model, the relation sigma = K/tau, where tau is the interface thickness and K approximately equal 4 +/- 2 x 10(exp -6) dyne, enables prediction of our measured values of lambda* as well as results from prior experiments on miscible interfaces. These results indicate that even for miscible fluids, surface tension is generally a more significant factor than diffusion in interfacial stability and flow characteristics.

  11. Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2007-01-01

    Two methods for the prediction of crack propagation through the interface of adhesively bonded shells are discussed. One is based on a fracture mechanics approach; the other is based on a cohesive zone approach. Attention is focussed on predicting the shape of the crack front and the critical...... stress required to propagate the crack under quasi-static conditions. The fracture mechanical model is theoretically sound and it is accurate and numerically stable. The cohesive zone model has some advantages over the fracture mechanics based model. It is easier to generalise the cohesive zone model...... to take into account effects such as plastic deformation in the adhering shells, and to take into account effects of large local curvatures of the interface crack front. The comparison shows a convergence of the results based on the cohesive zone model towards the results based on a fracture mechanics...

  12. High-speed dynamic-clamp interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Adowski, Timothy; Ramamurthy, Bina; Neef, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic-clamp technique is highly useful for mimicking synaptic or voltage-gated conductances. However, its use remains rare in part because there are few systems, and they can be expensive and difficult for less-experienced programmers to implement. Furthermore, some conductances (such as sodium channels) can be quite rapid or may have complex voltage sensitivity, so high speeds are necessary. To address these issues, we have developed a new interface that uses a common personal computer platform with National Instruments data acquisition and WaveMetrics IGOR to provide a simple user interface. This dynamic clamp implements leak and linear synaptic conductances as well as a voltage-dependent synaptic conductance and kinetic channel conductances based on Hodgkin-Huxley or Markov models. The speed of the system can be assayed using a testing mode, and currently speeds of >100 kHz (10 μs per cycle) are achievable with short latency and little jitter. PMID:25632075

  13. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  14. Modelling heterogeneous interfaces for solar water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Ping, Yuan; Galli, Giulia

    2017-04-01

    The generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight offers a promising approach for producing scalable and sustainable carbon-free energy. The key of a successful solar-to-fuel technology is the design of efficient, long-lasting and low-cost photoelectrochemical cells, which are responsible for absorbing sunlight and driving water splitting reactions. To this end, a detailed understanding and control of heterogeneous interfaces between photoabsorbers, electrolytes and catalysts present in photoelectrochemical cells is essential. Here we review recent progress and open challenges in predicting physicochemical properties of heterogeneous interfaces for solar water splitting applications using first-principles-based approaches, and highlights the key role of these calculations in interpreting increasingly complex experiments.

  15. Interfaces between a fibre and its matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2017-01-01

    The interface between a fibre and its matrix represents an important element in the characterization and exploitation of composite materials. Both theoretical models and analyses of experimental data have been presented in the literature since modern composite were developed and many experiments......, the interfacial energy [J/m2], the interfacial frictional shear stress [MPa] and the mismatch strain [-] between fibre and matrix. The model has been used for the different modes of fibre pull-out and fibre fragmentation. In this paper it is demonstrated that the governing equations for the experimental...... parameters (applied load, debond length and relative fibre/matrix displacement) are rather similar for these test modes. A simplified analysis allows the direct determination of the three interface parameters from two plots for the experimental data. The complete analysis is demonstrated for steel fibres...

  16. Garden Banks 388 ROV interface systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granhaug, O.; Brewster, D.; Soliah, J.; Dubea, C.

    1995-12-31

    ROV systems integration has become an important part of the planning and implementation of deep water field development. This paper provides an overview of the GB 388 subsea development project and describes the ROV interface systems in use on the various subsea production components. The paper continues with an account of the purpose-built ROV system developed for the project. Finally, the paper describes in some detail the specialized ROV tooling and intervention systems that have been developed to assist in the installation, operation and maintenance of the subsea production equipment. The subsea intervention solutions developed for the GB 388 development project have direct application to all deep water field development projects. ROV interface systems are an integral part of current and future subsea completion technology.

  17. Fiber-Coupled Diamond Quantum Nanophotonic Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek, Michael J.; Meuwly, Charles; Evans, Ruffin E.; Bhaskar, Mihir K.; Sipahigil, Alp; Meesala, Srujan; Machielse, Bartholomeus; Sukachev, Denis D.; Nguyen, Christian T.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Lončar, Marko

    2017-08-01

    Color centers in diamond provide a promising platform for quantum optics in the solid state, with coherent optical transitions and long-lived electron and nuclear spins. Building upon recent demonstrations of nanophotonic waveguides and optical cavities in single-crystal diamond, we now demonstrate on-chip diamond nanophotonics with a high-efficiency fiber-optical interface achieving >90 % power coupling at visible wavelengths. We use this approach to demonstrate a bright source of narrow-band single photons based on a silicon-vacancy color center embedded within a waveguide-coupled diamond photonic crystal cavity. Our fiber-coupled diamond quantum nanophotonic interface results in a high flux (approximately 38 kHz) of coherent single photons (near Fourier limited at chip and separated by long distances.

  18. Electronic properties of organic/metal interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, N

    2000-01-01

    Conjugated organic materials are the promising class of materials for the application in new electronic and opto-electronic devices. The successful realization of highly efficient organic light emitting devices with oligomers and polymers as active electroluminescent layers has lead to a large number of investigations on such systems, the key point being to find means of increasing efficiency and performance of the devices. Intrinsically present in light emitting devices are interfaces, and it appears that the structural and electronic properties of those are of uttermost importance for the device quality. In the present work, ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, plus related surface sensitive experimental methods, were used to investigate the electronic properties of interfaces between conjugated organic materials (based on para-phenylene) and various metals. The observed interactions between the two different kinds of materials ranged from physisorption (aluminum and samarium), to the formation...

  19. Interface areas complexity characterization of echographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capri, Arnaud [LVR, Orleans University, IUT de Bourges, 63 avenue de Lattre de Tassigny, 18020 Bourges (France); SINTERS GROUP SAS, 5 rue Paul Mesple, BP 1311, 31106 ToulouseCedex 01 (France)]. E-mail: Arnaud.Capri@bourges.univ-orleans.fr; Vincent, Nicole [CRIP5-SIP, Rene Descartes University-Paris 5, 45 rue des Saints-Peres, 75270 Paris Cedex 06 (France); Vieyres, Pierre [LVR, Orleans University, IUT de Bourges, 63 avenue de Lattre de Tassigny, 18020 Bourges (France); Poisson, Gerard [LVR, Orleans University, IUT de Bourges, 63 avenue de Lattre de Tassigny, 18020 Bourges (France); Makris, Pascal [LI, University Francois Rabelais of Tours, 64 avenue Jean Portalis, 37200 Tours (France)

    2006-12-20

    The telemedicine concept integrates images, video acquisition and video transfer which are usually managed by using a standard videoconference system. Very often, the initial blur of echography pictures makes it difficult to use standard segmentation techniques such as snakes or Sobel filters which aid the doctor in making his decision. In medical echography practice, contour properties of an organ are often more relevant to decipher the presence of pathologies than the exact lineout of the contour itself. The processing, via the fuzzy approach, enables us to subdivide an image in different classes: one gathering the homogeneous zones (pixels belonging to a medium) and the other gathering more heterogeneous zones (e.g. transition between two media). Complexity measurement of each region can be approximated by the calculation of a fractal dimension. Thus, we can obtain interface complexity without having to extract the interfaces themselves. Finally, the link between fractal dimension and fuzzy rate is carried out.

  20. Decoding Local Field Potentials for Neural Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew; Hall, Thomas M

    2017-10-01

    The stability and frequency content of local field potentials (LFPs) offer key advantages for long-term, low-power neural interfaces. However, interpreting LFPs may require new signal processing techniques which should be informed by a scientific understanding of how these recordings arise from the coordinated activity of underlying neuronal populations. We review current approaches to decoding LFPs for brain-machine interface (BMI) applications, and suggest several directions for future research. To facilitate an improved understanding of the relationship between LFPs and spike activity, we share a dataset of multielectrode recordings from monkey motor cortex, and describe two unsupervised analysis methods we have explored for extracting a low-dimensional feature space that is amenable to biomimetic decoding and biofeedback training.

  1. Interfaces at equilibrium: A guide to fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmur, Abraham

    2017-06-01

    The fundamentals of the thermodynamics of interfaces are reviewed and concisely presented. The discussion starts with a short review of the elements of bulk thermodynamics that are also relevant to interfaces. It continues with the interfacial thermodynamics of two-phase systems, including the definition of interfacial tension and adsorption. Finally, the interfacial thermodynamics of three-phase (wetting) systems is discussed, including the topic of non-wettable surfaces. A clear distinction is made between equilibrium conditions, in terms of minimizing energies (internal, Gibbs or Helmholtz), and equilibrium indicators, in terms of measurable, intrinsic properties (temperature, chemical potential, pressure). It is emphasized that the equilibrium indicators are the same whatever energy is minimized, if the boundary conditions are properly chosen. Also, to avoid a common confusion, a distinction is made between systems of constant volume and systems with drops of constant volume. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Christian Doppler Laboratory on Contextual Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Thomas; Reitberger, Wolfgang; Obrist, Marianna; Meschtscherjakov, Alexander; Tscheligi, Manfred

    Contextual interfaces gain more and more importance within the last years. Numerous research programs that address the term context have been established, each focusing on context from their own point of view. The Christian Doppler Laboratory on Contextual Interfaces has been founded with different goals in mind. The first goal is to elaborate on the definitions and foundations of the term context to achieve a common understanding on how to use context and the terms related to context. Further we elaborate on the relation between context and user experience to tackle the complexity of the interrelations between both areas. The second goal is to apply the findings of the basic context research with two different context laboratories, each addressing a different application area. This allows to build a robust research basis that is applied to application oriented research.

  3. Development of a wearable haptic game interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Foottit

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the ongoing development of a wearable haptic game interface, in this case for controlling a flight simulator. The device differs from many traditional haptic feedback implementations in that it combines vibrotactile feedback with gesture based input, thus becoming a two-way conduit between the user and the virtual environment. The device is intended to challenge what is considered an “interface” and sets out to purposefully blur the boundary between man and machine. This allows for a more immersive experience, and a user evaluation shows that the intuitive interface allows the user to become the aircraft that is controlled by the movements of the user's hand.

  4. Magnetic exchange at realistic CoO/Ni interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytsyuk, S.; Cossu, F.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2012-08-01

    We study the CoO/Ni interface by first principles calculations. Because the lattice mismatch is large, a realistic description requires a huge supercell. We investigate two interface configurations: in interface 1 the coupling between the Ni and Co atoms is mediated by O, whereas in interface 2 the Ni and Co atoms are in direct contact. We find that the magnetization (including the orbital moment) in interface 1 has a similar value as in bulk Ni but opposite sign, while in interface 2 it grows by 164%. The obtained magnetic moments can be explained by the local atomic environments. In addition, we find effects of charge transfer between the interface atoms. The Co 3 d local density of states of interface 2 exhibits surprisingly small deviations from the corresponding bulk result, although the first coordination sphere is no longer octahedral.

  5. Fiber composite materials: A survey of fiber matrix interface mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Report is described which discusses mechanism of load transfer from matrix to fiber through interface and effects of interface on composite structural integrity. Theoretical considerations are supplemented with experimental data. General trends and significant points are illustrated graphically.

  6. Magnetic exchange at realistic CoO/Ni interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Grytsiuk, Sergii

    2012-07-30

    We study the CoO/Ni interface by first principles calculations. Because the lattice mismatch is large, a realistic description requires a huge supercell. We investigate two interface configurations: in interface 1 the coupling between the Ni and Co atoms is mediated by O, whereas in interface 2 the Ni and Co atoms are in direct contact. We find that the magnetization (including the orbital moment) in interface 1 has a similar value as in bulk Ni but opposite sign, while in interface 2 it grows by 164%. The obtained magnetic moments can be explained by the local atomic environments. In addition, we find effects of charge transfer between the interface atoms. The Co 3d local density of states of interface 2 exhibits surprisingly small deviations from the corresponding bulk result, although the first coordination sphere is no longer octahedral. © Springer-Verlag 2012.

  7. First Principle simulations of electrochemical interfaces - a DFT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Rizwan

    to both, the experimentalists, and the theorists. Energetics of charge transfer reactions over the electrochemical interface, determines, to a great extent, the efficiency of energy conversion. Therefore, gaining an atomic-level understanding of the interface, have utmost importance. Experimentalists...

  8. Systems and methods for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Nathan G; Lewis, Monte A.; Clark, Roger F

    2013-06-11

    Systems and methods are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface during a casting process. The systems and methods enable determination of the location of a solid-liquid interface during the casting process.

  9. Computer Interfacing: An Undergraduate Course for Scientists and Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Philip B.; Settle, Frank A.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an undergraduate course of computer interfacing for scientists and engineers which incorporates the use of digital computers and associated interfacing elements with experiments and special projects performed in an on-line environment in the laboratory. (SL)

  10. Design Patterns for User Interfaces on Mobile Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Erik G.

    The objective of this tutorial is to enhance the participants’ skills in designing user interfaces for mobile equipment, including adaptive and context sensitive user interfaces and multimodal interaction. Through a combination of lectures and practical exercises, a collection of patterns addressing issues regarding designing user interfaces on mobile devices is presented. The patterns address typical challenges and opportunities when designing user interfaces that are to run on PDAs and SmartPhones - both challenges connected to characteristics of the equipment and connected to tasks to which designing suitable user interfaces is challenging. The tutorial is intended for user interface designer, systems developers, and project leaders that work with or plan to work on development of applications on mobile devices. The tutorial requires basic knowledge of user interface design in general, and basic understanding of challenges connected to designing user interfaces on mobile devices.

  11. Hands in space: gesture interaction with augmented-reality interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinghurst, Mark; Piumsomboon, Tham; Huidong Bai

    2014-01-01

    Researchers at the Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand (HIT Lab NZ) are investigating free-hand gestures for natural interaction with augmented-reality interfaces. They've applied the results to systems for desktop computers and mobile devices.

  12. Moebius: An interface to web map services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Procházka

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Our article presents a concept of a geospatial search engine based on a Web Map Service (WMS compliant virtual mapserver. This virtual mapserver is able to index mapservers based on the WMS standard and create an unified interface to all shared map layers. Our presented approach also allows to search the map layers within the virtual mapserver and process the results directly in GIS tools.

  13. Interfacing Clojure with Pogamut 3 platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołuński, Marcel; WÄ siewicz, Piotr

    In this paper we present an interface between Pogamut 3 platform and Clojure programming language. Clojure is a state of the art functional language with roots in Lisp. Pogamut 3 is a framework that simplifies creation of embodied agents. Our goal was to introduce Clojure code in our agents logic. Simple emergent behavior of a group of agents was implemented using Clojure code. Performance of execution of Clojure code called from Pogamut platform was measured.

  14. A Les Houches Interface for BSM Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwall, J.; /SLAC; Boos, E.; Dudko, L.; /SINP, Moscow; Gigg, M.; /Durham U., IPPP; Herquet, M.; /Louvain U., CP3; Pukhov, A.; /Moscow State U.; Richardson, P.; /Durham U., IPPP /CERN; Sherstnev, A.; /Cambridge U. /SINP, Moscow; Skands, P.; /CERN /Fermilab

    2008-01-23

    We propose to combine and slightly extend two existing 'Les Houches Accords' to provide a simple generic interface between beyond-the-standard-model parton-level and event-level generators. All relevant information--particle content, quantum numbers of new states, masses, cross sections, parton-level events, etc.--is collected in one single file, which adheres to the Les Houches Event File (LHEF) standard.

  15. A Les Houches Interface for BSM Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwall, J.; /SLAC; Boos, E.; Dudko, L.; /SINP, Moscow; Gigg, M.; /Durham U., IPPP; Herquet, M.; /Louvain U., CP3; Pukhov, A.; /Moscow State U.; Richardson, P.; /Durham U., IPPP /CERN; Sherstnev, A.; /Cambridge U. /SINP, Moscow; Skands, P.; /CERN /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    We propose to combine and slightly extend two existing 'Les Houches Accords' to provide a simple generic interface between beyond-the-standard-model parton-level and event-level generators. All relevant information--particle content, quantum numbers of new states, masses, cross sections, parton-level events, etc.--is collected in one single file, which adheres to the Les Houches Event File (LHEF) standard.

  16. Designing the user interface for Wizard Wars

    OpenAIRE

    Yli-Kiikka, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to design a high-quality, functioning and implementation-ready user interface (UI) for the tablet strategy game Wizard Wars. UI design is traditionally a discipline where visuals take a backseat in favor of usability and functionality. In games, however, visual impressiveness is valued highly, and it is the only medium where it is deemed acceptable to sacrifice some amount of usability to create a more elaborate design to support the theme and atmosphere. Therefore...

  17. A Python interface with Narcisse graphics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motteler, Z.C.

    1996-04-15

    Narcisse is a graphics package developed by our French colleagues at Centre d`Etudes de Limeil Valenton of the Commissariat d`Energie Atomique. Narcisse is quite comprehensive; it can do two-, three-, and four-dimensional plots (the latter meaning that the surface is colored according to the values of an arbitrary function). One can open and send plots to a Narcisse window on a distant machine. Narcisse has a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) which, once a graph has appeared, allows the user to change its characteristics interactively. This enables one to find the best appearance for a particular plot without having to graph it repeatedly from the user program. Previously created files in various formats can also be imported directly into the Narcisse GUI and manipulated from there. Narcisse runs independently, as a graphics server. The user program communicates with Narcisse via Unix sockets. This communication is quite low level and very complex. The appearance of a plot is controlled by nearly 150 parameters for determining such things as the color palette, type of shading, axis scales, curve and surface labels, titles, angle and distance of view (for three- and four-dimensional graphs), hidden line removal, etc. Most end users do not wish to spend time learning the tedious details of such interfaces; they would just like to specify data and ask to have it plotted. This paper describes a high level, easy to use graphics interface which hides (as much as possible) the low level details of whatever graphics system is actually being used, so that the low level can be essentially ``plug-and-play.`` Then, whenever a better system becomes available, it should only be necessary to change low level interface routines not normally accessed by ordinary users. Python, with its easy extendability, was ideally suited for this job.

  18. COMPARISON OF NEW GRAPHICS APPLICATION PROGRAMMING INTERFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa TÜRKSEVER

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Application Programming Interfaces (API which are used for graphics software development are classified and introduced briefly. Properties of 2D and 3D API's are specified. Programs which are implemented in this study (Kup3B Java2D version, Kup3B Java3D version are compared by number of lines of code written. Charts are constructed by using values obtained and interpreted.

  19. Copyright, Interfaces, and a Possible Atlantic Divide

    OpenAIRE

    Vezzoso, Simonetta

    2012-01-01

    Recent copyright cases on both sides of the Atlantic focused on important interoperability issues. While the decision by the Court of Justice of the European Union in SAS Institute, Inc.v. World Programming Ltd. assessed data formats under the EU Software Directive, the ruling by the Northern District of California Court in Oracle America, Inc. v. Google Inc. dealt with application programming interfaces. The European decision is rightly celebrated as a further important step in the promotion...

  20. Flexible neural interfaces with integrated stiffening shank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tooker, Angela C.; Felix, Sarah H.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.; Shah, Kedar G.; Sheth, Heeral; Tolosa, Vanessa

    2017-10-17

    A neural interface includes a first dielectric material having at least one first opening for a first electrical conducting material, a first electrical conducting material in the first opening, and at least one first interconnection trace electrical conducting material connected to the first electrical conducting material. A stiffening shank material is located adjacent the first dielectric material, the first electrical conducting material, and the first interconnection trace electrical conducting material.

  1. A Les Houches Interface for BSM Generators

    CERN Document Server

    Alwall, Johan; Dudko, L.; Gigg, M.; Herquet, M.; Pukhov, A.; Richardson, P.; Sherstnev, A.; Skands, Peter Z.

    2007-01-01

    We propose to combine and slightly extend two existing 'Les Houches Accords' to provide a simple generic interface between beyond-the-standard-model parton-level and event-level generators. All relevant information - particle content, quantum numbers of new states, masses, cross sections, parton-level events, etc - is collected in one single file, which adheres to the Les Houches Event File (LHEF) standard.

  2. Nested Dissection Interface Reconstruction in Pececillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jibben, Zechariah Joel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division; Carlson, Neil N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division; Francois, Marianne M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division

    2016-09-13

    A nested dissection method for interface reconstruction in a volume tracking framework has been implemented in Pececillo, a mini-app for Truchas, which is the ASC code for casting and additive manufacturing. This method provides a significant improvement over the traditional onion-skin method, which does not appropriately handle T-shaped multimaterial intersections and dynamic contact lines present in additive manufacturing simulations. The resulting implementation lays the groundwork for further research in contact angle estimates and surface tension calculations.

  3. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  4. Interface magnetism of 3d transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niklasson, A. M. N.; Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1999-01-01

    The layered resolved magnetic spin moments of the magnetic 3d bilayer interfaces Fe/V bcc, Fe/Co bcc, Fe/Cu bcc, Co/V bcc, Co/Ni fee, Co/Cu fee, Ni/V fee, Ni/Cr fcc, Ni/Cu fee and the magnetic surfaces Fe bcc, Co bcc, Co fee, and Ni fee are calculated for the (001), (011), and (111) orientations ...

  5. Augmented Reality Interfaces for Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar; Pedersen, David Bue; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Skovmand, Linda; Heun, Valentin; Maes, Pattie; Aanæs, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores potential use cases for using augmented reality (AR) as a tool to operate industrial machines. As a baseline we use an additive manufacturing system, more commonly known as a 3D printer. We implement novel augmented interfaces and controls using readily available open source frameworks and low cost hardware. Our results show that the technology enables richer and more intuitive printer control and performance monitoring than currently available on the market. Therefore, th...

  6. Electronic control/display interface technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, R. V.; Busquets, A. M.; Murray, R. F.; Hatfield, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    An effort to produce a representative workstation for the Space Station Data Management Test Bed that provides man/machine interface design options for consolidating, automating, and integrating the space station work station, and hardware/software technology demonstrations of space station applications is discussed. The workstation will emphasize the technologies of advanced graphics engines, advanced display/control medias, image management techniques, multifunction controls, and video disk utilizations.

  7. Language workbench user interfaces for data analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria M. Benson; Fabien Campagne

    2015-01-01

    Biological data analysis is frequently performed with command line software. While this practice provides considerable flexibility for computationally savy individuals, such as investigators trained in bioinformatics, this also creates a barrier to the widespread use of data analysis software by investigators trained as biologists and/or clinicians. Workflow systems such as Galaxy and Taverna have been developed to try and provide generic user interfaces that can wrap command line analysis so...

  8. Photonic surface waves on metamaterial interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, O; Bogdanov, A A; Lavrinenko, A V

    2017-10-20

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. Research on surface waves has been flourishing in the last few decades due to their unique properties of surface sensitivity and field localization. These features have resulted in applications in nano-guiding, sensing, light-trapping and imaging based on near-field techniques, contributing to the establishment of nanophotonics as a field of research. Up to now, a wide variety of surface waves has been investigated in numerous material and structure settings. This article reviews the recent progress and development in the physics of SWs localized at metamaterial interfaces, as well as bulk media in order to provide broader perspectives on optical surface waves in general. For each type of surface wave, we discuss the material and structural platforms. We mainly focus on experimental realizations in the visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges. We also address existing and potential application of SWs in chemical and biological sensing, and experimental excitation and characterization methods.

  9. Focal Conic Flower Textures at Curved Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Beller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Focal conic domains (FCDs in smectic-A liquid crystals have drawn much attention, both for their exquisitely structured internal form and for their ability to direct the assembly of micromaterials and nanomaterials in a variety of patterns. A key to directing FCD assembly is control over the eccentricity of the domain. Here, we demonstrate a new paradigm for creating spatially varying FCD eccentricity by confining a hybrid-aligned smectic with curved interfaces. In particular, we manipulate interface behavior with colloidal particles in order to experimentally produce two examples of what has recently been dubbed the flower texture [C. Meyer et al., Focal Conic Stacking in Smectic A Liquid Crystals: Smectic Flower and Apollonius Tiling, Materials 2, 499, 2009MATEG91996-194410.3390/ma2020499], where the focal hyperbolæ diverge radially outward from the center of the texture, rather than inward as in the canonical éventail or fan texture. We explain how this unconventional assembly can arise from appropriately curved interfaces. Finally, we present a model for this system that applies the law of corresponding cones, showing how FCDs may be embedded smoothly within a “background texture” of large FCDs and concentric spherical layers, in a manner consistent with the qualitative features of the smectic flower. Such understanding could potentially lead to disruptive liquid-crystal technologies beyond displays, including patterning, smart surfaces, microlens arrays, sensors, and nanomanufacturing.

  10. Connecting interface for modularization of digital microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hanping; Fan, Shih-Kang; Hsu, Wensyang

    2008-02-01

    Here, interconnection technique to link digital microfluidic chips is proposed. Three kinds of digital microfluidic modules with connecting interface, including flexible module and two types of connector modules, are designed and fabricated. Since these modules are fabricated on a compliant polymer-based substrate (ITO PET), chip-to-chip droplet transportation even at different planes can be achieved by the proposed technique. A low-temperature fabrication process is developed for the polymer substrates, where the SU-8 acts as the insulator. Droplet transportation through electrowetting on curved surface is confirmed by testing on the bended flexible modules with different curvatures from 0 to 0.06 mm -1 at around 70 V AC. Then the droplet transportations between flexible and connector modules are investigated. It is found that the gap size between two modules and the sidewall profiles at interface affect the droplet transportation directly. For the gap size around 50μm with a smooth perpendicular sidewall profile, 80 V AC is shown to actuate droplet of 1.5 μl, 2.5 μl, or 3.5 μl to cross over the interface successfully.

  11. Managing the livestock– Wildlife interface on rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Johan T.; Cross, Paul C.; Valeix, Marion

    2017-01-01

    On rangelands the livestock–wildlife interface is mostly characterized by management actions aimed at controlling problems associated with competition, disease, and depredation. Wildlife communities (especially the large vertebrate species) are typically incompatible with agricultural development because the opportunity costs of wildlife conservation are unaffordable except in arid and semi-arid regions. Ecological factors including the provision of supplementary food and water for livestock, together with the persecution of large predators, result in livestock replacing wildlife at biomass densities far exceeding those of indigenous ungulates. Diseases are difficult to eradicate from free-ranging wildlife populations and so veterinary controls usually focus on separating commercial livestock herds from wildlife. Persecution of large carnivores due to their depredation of livestock has caused the virtual eradication of apex predators from most rangelands. However, recent research points to a broad range of solutions to reduce conflict at the livestock–wildlife interface. Conserving wildlife bolsters the adaptive capacity of a rangeland by providing stakeholders with options for dealing with environmental change. This is contingent upon local communities being empowered to benefit directly from their wildlife resources within a management framework that integrates land-use sectors at the landscape scale. As rangelands undergo irreversible changes caused by species invasions and climate forcings, the future perspective favors a proactive shift in attitude towards the livestock–wildlife interface, from problem control to asset management.

  12. A novel interface circuit for triboelectric nanogenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wuqi; Ma, Jiahao; Zhang, Zhaohua; Ren, Tianling

    2017-10-01

    For most triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs), the electric output should be a short AC pulse, which has the common characteristic of high voltage but low current. Thus it is necessary to convert the AC to DC and store the electric energy before driving conventional electronics. The traditional AC voltage regulator circuit which commonly consists of transformer, rectifier bridge, filter capacitor, and voltage regulator diode is not suitable for the TENG because the transformer’s consumption of power is appreciable if the TENG output is small. This article describes an innovative design of an interface circuit for a triboelectric nanogenerator that is transformerless and easily integrated. The circuit consists of large-capacity electrolytic capacitors that can realize to intermittently charge lithium-ion batteries and the control section contains the charging chip, the rectifying circuit, a comparator chip and switch chip. More important, the whole interface circuit is completely self-powered and self-controlled. Meanwhile, the chip is widely used in the circuit, so it is convenient to integrate into PCB. In short, this work presents a novel interface circuit for TENGs and makes progress to the practical application and industrialization of nanogenerators. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61434001) and the ‘Thousands Talents’ Program for Pioneer Researchers and Its Innovation Team, China.

  13. Nanobubbles at Hydrophilic Particle-Water Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Gang; He, Guangzhi; Zhang, Meiyi; Zhou, Qin; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Tai, Renzhong; Guo, Jinghua; Bi, Lei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Honggang

    2016-11-01

    The puzzling persistence of nanobubbles breaks Laplace's law for bubbles, which is of great interest for promising applications in surface processing, H 2 and CO 2 storage, water treatment, and drug delivery. So far, nanobubbles have mostly been reported on hydrophobic planar substrates with atomic flatness. It remains a challenge to quantify nanobubbles on rough and irregular surfaces because of the lack of a characterization technique that can detect both the nanobubble morphology and chemical composition inside individual nanobubble-like objects. Here, by using synchrotron-based scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy (STXM) with nanometer resolution, we discern nanoscopic gas bubbles of >25 nm with direct in situ proof of O 2 inside the nanobubbles at a hydrophilic particle-water interface under ambient conditions. We find a stable cloud of O 2 nanobubbles at the diatomite particle-water interface hours after oxygen aeration and temperature variation. The in situ technique may be useful for many surface nanobubble-related studies such as material preparation and property manipulation, phase equilibrium, nucleation kinetics, and relationships with chemical composition within the confined nanoscale space. The oxygen nanobubble clouds may be important in modifying particle-water interfaces and offering breakthrough technologies for oxygen delivery in sediment and/or deep water environments.

  14. Photonic surface waves on metamaterial interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, O.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Lavrinenko, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. Research on surface waves has been flourishing in the last few decades due to their unique properties of surface sensitivity and field localization. These features have resulted in applications in nano-guiding, sensing, light-trapping and imaging based on near-field techniques, contributing to the establishment of nanophotonics as a field of research. Up to now, a wide variety of surface waves has been investigated in numerous material and structure settings. This article reviews the recent progress and development in the physics of SWs localized at metamaterial interfaces, as well as bulk media in order to provide broader perspectives on optical surface waves in general. For each type of surface wave, we discuss the material and structural platforms. We mainly focus on experimental realizations in the visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges. We also address existing and potential application of SWs in chemical and biological sensing, and experimental excitation and characterization methods.

  15. Magnetoelectricity at The Antiperovskite/Perovskite Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ding-Fu; Paudel, Tula; Tsymbal, Evgeny

    Complex perovskite oxide materials (ABO3) are known for their interesting macroscopic physical properties. Much less explored are the antiperovskite compounds (AXM3) where the atomic positions of cations and anions are inverted creating unique, wide-ranging properties different from perovskites. Due to the structural similarity, interfaces combining perovskite and antiperovskite compounds can be fabricated to create unexplored fundamental opportunities for materials design. Here, based on first-principles density-functional calculations, we explore the magnetoelectric effect at the (001) interface between antiperovskite GaNMn3 and perovskite ATiO3 (A=Sr, Ba). Unlike the Γ5g non-collinear magnetism of the bulk GaNMn3, strong magnetic moment variation and reorientation emerge at the interface of GaNMn3/ATiO3 (A=Sr,Ba), resulting in the sizable net magnetization pointing along the [110] direction. Moreover, the switching of the ferroelectric polarization of BaTiO3 drives the reversal of the net magnetization of GaNMn3. The present phenomenon occurs due to the effect of ferroelectric polarization on the interfacial antiferromagnetic coupling, which paves a new route to achieve voltage-controlled spintronics.

  16. Photonics surface waves on metamaterials interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Osamu; Bogdanov, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2017-09-12

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. The research on surface waves has been flourishing in last few decades thanks to their unique properties of surface sensitivity and field localization. These features have resulted in applications in nano-guiding, sensing, light-trapping and imaging based on the near-field techniques, contributing to the establishment of the nanophotonics as a field of research. Up to present, a wide variety of surface waves has been investigated in numerous material and structure settings. This paper reviews the recent progress and development in the physics of SWs localized at metamaterial interfaces, as well as bulk media in order to provide broader perspectives on optical surface waves in general. For each type of the surface waves, we discuss material and structural platforms. We mainly focus on experimental realizations in the visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges. We also address existing and potential application of SWs in chemical and biological sensing, and experimental excitation and characterization methods. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. Heat transfer through metal-graphene interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Wejrzanowski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of Molecular Dynamics (MD studies of the thermal properties of Cu and Ag composites with single- (SLG and multi-layered (MLG graphene. We show that the thermal boundary conductance (TBC of the metal-graphene interface drops significantly for the systems containing more than one layer of graphene. It is also concluded that the TBC for a single graphene layer is significantly higher for silver than for copper. For both systems, however, we found that the interface is a barrier for heat transfer with the thermal conductance being at least two orders of magnitude lower than for metal. Moreover, we found that the TBC decreases with an increase in the number of graphene layers. The interfacial effect becomes negligible for a thickness bigger than two graphene layers. Above this thickness the thermal conductivity of the region of multilayered graphene is not influenced by the interface and becomes similar to that of graphite. The results are compared with available experimental data and discussed in terms of the rules for designing composites of a high thermal conductivity.

  18. Revealing the interface in polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammarano, Mauro; Maupin, Paul H; Sung, Li-Piin; Gilman, Jeffrey W; McCarthy, Edward D; Kim, Yeon S; Fox, Douglas M

    2011-04-26

    The morphological characterization of polymer nanocomposites over multiple length scales is a fundamental challenge. Here, we report a technique for high-throughput monitoring of interface and dispersion in polymer nanocomposites based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), fluorescently labeled with 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl)-aminofluorescein (FL) and dispersed into polyethylene (PE) doped with Coumarin 30 (C30), is used as a model system to assess the ability of FRET to evaluate the effect of processing on NFC dispersion in PE. The level of energy transfer and its standard deviation, measured by fluorescence spectroscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), are exploited to monitor the extent of interface formation and composite homogeneity, respectively. FRET algorithms are used to generate color-coded images for a real-space observation of energy transfer efficiency. These images reveal interface formation at a nanoscale while probing a macroscale area that is large enough to be representative of the entire sample. The unique ability of this technique to simultaneously provide orientation/spatial information at a macroscale and nanoscale features, encoded in the FRET signal, provides a new powerful tool for structure-property-processing investigation in polymer nanocomposites.

  19. Haptic interfaces: Hardware, software and human performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Mandayam A.

    1995-01-01

    Virtual environments are computer-generated synthetic environments with which a human user can interact to perform a wide variety of perceptual and motor tasks. At present, most of the virtual environment systems engage only the visual and auditory senses, and not the haptic sensorimotor system that conveys the sense of touch and feel of objects in the environment. Computer keyboards, mice, and trackballs constitute relatively simple haptic interfaces. Gloves and exoskeletons that track hand postures have more interaction capabilities and are available in the market. Although desktop and wearable force-reflecting devices have been built and implemented in research laboratories, the current capabilities of such devices are quite limited. To realize the full promise of virtual environments and teleoperation of remote systems, further developments of haptic interfaces are critical. In this paper, the status and research needs in human haptics, technology development and interactions between the two are described. In particular, the excellent performance characteristics of Phantom, a haptic interface recently developed at MIT, are highlighted. Realistic sensations of single point of contact interactions with objects of variable geometry (e.g., smooth, textured, polyhedral) and material properties (e.g., friction, impedance) in the context of a variety of tasks (e.g., needle biopsy, switch panels) achieved through this device are described and the associated issues in haptic rendering are discussed.

  20. Microscopic control of semiconductor interface reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosi, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years a number of metal overlayers on silicon have been shown to yield an increase in silicon oxidation rate when the surface is exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere. Metals as diverse as Au, AG, Cu, Pd all give rise to promotion effects, with the production of Si-oxide phases of variable stoichiometry. In the case of Au and Cr, the Si-oxide appears to nucleate on top of the metal overlayer. To the extent that the metal atoms increase the surface reaction kinetics and do not appear directly involved in the reaction product, i.e., the surface silicon oxide, they play the role of a catalyst. Since the magnitude of the effect depends on the overlayer-silicon interface morphology, in the absence of a more precise denomination we refer to such phenomena as interface catalytic effects. The main goal of our program is to investigate the microscopic mechanisms which determine these effects, characterize the electronic and structural modifications that accompany the surface reactions, determine the stoichiometry of the reaction products and/or the interface composition profile, and ultimately obtain and enhanced control of the kinetics of surface reactions with gaseous species and metals. Long term practical aplications include the synthesis of new insulating and metallic epitaxial layers on Si and GaAs and enhanced control of interdiffusion and contact stability.

  1. Mesh-based parallel code coupling interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, K.; Steckel, B. (eds.) [GMD - Forschungszentrum Informationstechnik GmbH, St. Augustin (DE). Inst. fuer Algorithmen und Wissenschaftliches Rechnen (SCAI)

    2001-04-01

    MpCCI (mesh-based parallel code coupling interface) is an interface for multidisciplinary simulations. It provides industrial end-users as well as commercial code-owners with the facility to combine different simulation tools in one environment. Thereby new solutions for multidisciplinary problems will be created. This opens new application dimensions for existent simulation tools. This Book of Abstracts gives a short overview about ongoing activities in industry and research - all presented at the 2{sup nd} MpCCI User Forum in February 2001 at GMD Sankt Augustin. (orig.) [German] MpCCI (mesh-based parallel code coupling interface) definiert eine Schnittstelle fuer multidisziplinaere Simulationsanwendungen. Sowohl industriellen Anwender als auch kommerziellen Softwarehersteller wird mit MpCCI die Moeglichkeit gegeben, Simulationswerkzeuge unterschiedlicher Disziplinen miteinander zu koppeln. Dadurch entstehen neue Loesungen fuer multidisziplinaere Problemstellungen und fuer etablierte Simulationswerkzeuge ergeben sich neue Anwendungsfelder. Dieses Book of Abstracts bietet einen Ueberblick ueber zur Zeit laufende Arbeiten in der Industrie und in der Forschung, praesentiert auf dem 2{sup nd} MpCCI User Forum im Februar 2001 an der GMD Sankt Augustin. (orig.)

  2. Man-machine interface for the MFTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speckert, G.C.

    1979-11-09

    In any complex system, the interesting problems occur at the interface of dissimilar subsystems. Control of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) begins with the US Congress, which controls the dollars, which control the people, who control the nine top-level minicomputers, which control the 65 microprocessors, which control the hardware that controls the physics experiment. There are many interesting boundaries across which control must pass, and the one that this paper addresses is the man-machine one. For the MFTF, the man-machine interface consists of a system of seven control consoles, each allowing one operator to communicate with one minicomputer. These consoles are arranged in a hierarchical manner, and both hardware and software were designed in a top-down fashion. This paper describes the requirements and the design of the console system as a whole, as well as the design and operation of the hardware and software of each console, and examines the possible form of a future man-machine interface.

  3. Quantum Confinement at Polar Oxide Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariglio, Stefano; Li, Danfeng; Wu, Zhenping; Liu, Wei; Fete, Alexandre; Boselli, Margherita; Lemal, Sebastien; Bristowe, Nicholas; Ghosez, Philippe; Gabay, Marc; Triscone, Jean-Marc

    The discovery of a two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL), confined at the interface between the two band insulators LaAlO3 (LAO) and SrTiO3 (STO) has generated tremendous research interest. The 2DEL confinement lifts the degeneracy of Ti t2 g orbitals and promotes exotic physical properties. A previous study has demonstrated that a 2DEL is also observed when LAO is alloyed with STO (La,Al)1-x(Sr,Ti)xO3 (LASTO: x). The threshold thickness required for the onset of conductivity scales with x. We present here a study of superconductivity at the (LASTO:0.5)/STO interface. The thickness of the 2DEL, measured using perpendicular and parallel critical fields, is larger than the one at the LAO/STO interface. This change is due to a modification on the confining potential linked to a reduced charge transfer that is scaling as 1 / x . This scenario is also confirmed by a self-consistent Poisson-Schrödinger model and ab initio calculations. These compelling evidences support an intrinsic origin to the formation of the 2DEL in the LAO/STO system.

  4. Utilization of Large Cohesive Interface Elements for Delamination Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Brian Lau Verndal; Lund, Erik

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the difficulties of utilizing large interface elements in delamination simulation. Solutions to increase the size of applicable interface elements are described and cover numerical integration of the element and modifications of the cohesive law.......This paper describes the difficulties of utilizing large interface elements in delamination simulation. Solutions to increase the size of applicable interface elements are described and cover numerical integration of the element and modifications of the cohesive law....

  5. Advanced Stellar Compass, Electrical Interface Control Document for Grace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, Finn E; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    The Space Instrumentation Group has made an Electrical Interface Control Document for the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Mission) satellite, witch describes the electrical interface between the Star Imager and the Computer (IPU) on the GRACE Satellite.......The Space Instrumentation Group has made an Electrical Interface Control Document for the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Mission) satellite, witch describes the electrical interface between the Star Imager and the Computer (IPU) on the GRACE Satellite....

  6. An Interface Theory for Input/Output Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Nyman, Ulrik; Wasowski, Andrzej

    Building on the theory of interface automata by de~Alfaro and Henzinger we design an interface language for Lynch's Input/Output Automata, a popular formalism used in the development of distributed asynchronous systems, not addressed by previous interface research. We introduce an explicit....... We also present a method for solving systems of relativized behavioral inequalities as used in our setup and draw a formal correspondence between our work and interface automata. Proofs are provided in an appendix....

  7. User interface inspection methods a user-centered design method

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Chauncey

    2014-01-01

    User Interface Inspection Methods succinctly covers five inspection methods: heuristic evaluation, perspective-based user interface inspection, cognitive walkthrough, pluralistic walkthrough, and formal usability inspections. Heuristic evaluation is perhaps the best-known inspection method, requiring a group of evaluators to review a product against a set of general principles. The perspective-based user interface inspection is based on the principle that different perspectives will find different problems in a user interface. In the related persona-based inspection, colleagues assume the

  8. Influence of interface properties on fracture behaviour of concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hardened concrete is a three-phase composite consisting of cement paste, aggregate and interface between cement paste and aggregate. The interface in concrete plays a key role on the overall performance of concrete. The interface properties such as deformation, strength, fracture energy, stress intensity and its ...

  9. User Interface Improvements in Computer-Assisted Instruction, the Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Identifies user interface problems as they relate to computer-assisted instruction (CAI); reviews the learning theories and instructional theories related to CAI user interface; and presents potential CAI user interface improvements for research and development based on learning and instructional theory. Focuses on screen design improvements.…

  10. Primer3Plus, an enhanced web interface to Primer3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Untergasser, A.; Nijveen, H.; Rao, X.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.; Leunissen, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Here we present Primer3Plus, a new web interface to the popular Primer3 primer design program as an enhanced alternative for the CGI- scripts that come with Primer3. Primer3 consists of a command line program and a web interface. The web interface is one large form showing all of the possible

  11. Structural and functional analysis of multi-interface domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhao

    Full Text Available A multi-interface domain is a domain that can shape multiple and distinctive binding sites to contact with many other domains, forming a hub in domain-domain interaction networks. The functions played by the multiple interfaces are usually different, but there is no strict bijection between the functions and interfaces as some subsets of the interfaces play the same function. This work applies graph theory and algorithms to discover fingerprints for the multiple interfaces of a domain and to establish associations between the interfaces and functions, based on a huge set of multi-interface proteins from PDB. We found that about 40% of proteins have the multi-interface property, however the involved multi-interface domains account for only a tiny fraction (1.8% of the total number of domains. The interfaces of these domains are distinguishable in terms of their fingerprints, indicating the functional specificity of the multiple interfaces in a domain. Furthermore, we observed that both cooperative and distinctive structural patterns, which will be useful for protein engineering, exist in the multiple interfaces of a domain.

  12. Poled-glass devices: Influence of surfaces and interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage-Pedersen, Jacob; Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Kristensen, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Devices in periodically poled glass must have a large periodic variation of the built-in field. We show that the periodic variation can be severely degraded by charge dynamics taking place at the external (glass–air) interface or at internal (glass–glass) interfaces if the interfaces have imperfe...

  13. Nano- and microparticles at fluid and biological interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, S.; Auth, T.; Gompper, G.

    2017-09-01

    Systems with interfaces are abundant in both technological applications and biology. While a fluid interface separates two fluids, membranes separate the inside of vesicles from the outside, the interior of biological cells from the environment, and compartmentalize cells into organelles. The physical properties of interfaces are characterized by interface tension, those of membranes are characterized by bending and stretching elasticity. Amphiphilic molecules like surfactants that are added to a system with two immiscible fluids decrease the interface tension and induce a bending rigidity. Lipid bilayer membranes of vesicles can be stretched or compressed by osmotic pressure; in biological cells, also the presence of a cytoskeleton can induce membrane tension. If the thickness of the interface or the membrane is small compared with its lateral extension, both can be described using two-dimensional mathematical surfaces embedded in three-dimensional space. We review recent work on the interaction of particles with interfaces and membranes. This can be micrometer-sized particles at interfaces that stabilise emulsions or form colloidosomes, as well as typically nanometer-sized particles at membranes, such as viruses, parasites, and engineered drug delivery systems. In both cases, we first discuss the interaction of single particles with interfaces and membranes, e.g. particles in external fields, non-spherical particles, and particles at curved interfaces, followed by interface-mediated interaction between two particles, many-particle interactions, interface and membrane curvature-induced phenomena, and applications.

  14. Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces (aBCI 2011)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühl, C.; Nijholt, Antinus; Allison, Brandan; Dunne, Stephen; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; D' Mello, Sidney; Graesser, Arthur; Schuller, Björn; Martin, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    Recently, many groups (see Zander and Kothe. Towards passive brain–computer interfaces: applying brain–computer interface technology to human–machine systems in general. J. Neural Eng., 8, 2011) have worked toward expanding brain-computer interface (BCI) systems to include not only active control,

  15. The Impact of Interface Usability on Trust in Web Retailers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Marie Christine; Dewitt, Olivier; Aubert, Benoit A.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a study where 66 subjects were asked to perform some predefined book purchasing task in a series of Web sites with varying interface quality. A strong relationship between interface quality and trust was found and some components of user interface quality were more important than others. Discusses implications for Web site design.…

  16. Federating resources of information systems: browsing interface (FRISBI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchanau, A.V.; van der Vet, P.E.; Roosendaal, Hans E.; de Bra, P.M.E.

    2003-01-01

    Designing the user interface of a federated system (what we call a browsing interface) must consider the knowledge gap that exists between desires of the users and the needs the systems are built to support. The concept of Habitable Interfaces aims to bridge the knowledge gap by providing kinds of

  17. Psychological Dimensions of User-Computer Interfaces. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionini, Gary

    This digest highlights several psychological dimensions of user-computer interfaces. First, the psychological theory behind interface design and the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) are discussed. Two psychological models, the information processing model of cognition and the mental model--both of which contribute to interface design--are…

  18. Toward High-Performance Communications Interfaces for Science Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviatt, Sharon L.; Cohen, Adrienne O.

    2010-12-01

    From a theoretical viewpoint, educational interfaces that facilitate communicative actions involving representations central to a domain can maximize students' effort associated with constructing new schemas. In addition, interfaces that minimize working memory demands due to the interface per se, for example by mimicking existing non-digital work practice, can preserve students' attentional focus on their learning task. In this research, we asked the question: What type of interface input capabilities provide best support for science problem solving in both low- and high- performing students? High school students' ability to solve a diverse range of biology problems was compared over longitudinal sessions while they used: (1) hardcopy paper and pencil (2) a digital paper and pen interface (3) pen tablet interface, and (4) graphical tablet interface. Post-test evaluations revealed that time to solve problems, meta-cognitive control, solution correctness, and memory all were significantly enhanced when using the digital pen and paper interface, compared with tablet interfaces. The tangible pen and paper interface also was the only alternative that significantly facilitated skill acquisition in low-performing students. Paradoxically, all students nonetheless believed that the tablet interfaces provided best support for their performance, revealing a lack of self-awareness about how to use computational tools to best advantage. Implications are discussed for how pen interfaces can be optimized for future educational purposes, and for establishing technology fluency curricula to improve students' awareness of the impact of digital tools on their performance.

  19. Rapid Prototyping Human Interfaces Using Stretchable Strain Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiya Yamaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern society with a variety of information electronic devices, human interfaces increase their importance in a boundary of a human and a device. In general, the human is required to get used to the device. Even if the device is designed as a universal device or a high-usability device, the device is not suitable for all users. The usability of the device depends on the individual user. Therefore, personalized and customized human interfaces are effective for the user. To create customized interfaces, we propose rapid prototyping human interfaces using stretchable strain sensors. The human interfaces comprise parts formed by a three-dimensional printer and the four strain sensors. The three-dimensional printer easily makes customized human interfaces. The outputs of the interface are calculated based on the sensor’s lengths. Experiments evaluate three human interfaces: a sheet-shaped interface, a sliding lever interface, and a tilting lever interface. We confirm that the three human interfaces obtain input operations with a high accuracy.

  20. Large potential steps at weakly interacting metal-insulator interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokdam, Menno; Brocks, G.; Kelly, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Potential steps exceeding 1 eV are regularly formed at metal|insulator interfaces, even when the interaction between the materials at the interface is weak physisorption. From first-principles calculations on metal|h−BN interfaces we show that these potential steps are only indirectly sensitive to

  1. Statistical Mechanics of Polymers at AN Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Pearl Elsie

    1995-01-01

    In this dissertation we investigate theoretically the structure and the thermodynamic properties of linear and flexible polymeric brush adsorbed at the solid-fluid interface. A particular model system considered in this dissertation is the water-soluble poly-ethylen-oxide brushes (hereafter termed PEO brush) with hydrophobic groups at both ends, which is adsorbed at the polystyrene latex particle's surface. The main thrust of this work is first to develop a simple yet tractable theoretical model that may capture the essence of PEO brushes, and second, to make nontrivial predictions based on such a simple model, and search for experiments that may confirm our predictions. The starting point of our investigation is the observation made previously by several investigators that the key to peculiar properties exhibited by PEO in water, such as the anomalous temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient, is the formation of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and the PEO. We put such an observation into a rigorous mathematical form by introducing the density dependent excluded volume parameter in the free energy. We then employ the self-consistent field method advocated by Milner, Witten and Cates and make a nontrival prediction, independently reached by de Gennes and his collaborators, that PEO brushes form a very dense state near the interface if the free energy functional possesses a local minimum. Such a dense state occurs via a first order phase transition, with and without an attractive interaction between the interface and PEO backbone. Recent experimental observation by Kim and Cao (Euro. Phys. Lett., 24, 229 (1993)) of a dense state of PEO monolayers at the air-water interface appears to be a strong confirmation of the prediction of our model. Next, we make an attempt to relate the phenomenological parameters introduced in our model system of PEO to experimentally measurable quantities such as enthalpy and temperature. By recognizing that the

  2. Phase field approach with anisotropic interface energy and interface stresses: Large strain formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Warren, James A.

    2016-06-01

    A thermodynamically consistent, large-strain, multi-phase field approach (with consequent interface stresses) is generalized for the case with anisotropic interface (gradient) energy (e.g. an energy density that depends both on the magnitude and direction of the gradients in the phase fields). Such a generalization, if done in the "usual" manner, yields a theory that can be shown to be manifestly unphysical. These theories consider the gradient energy as anisotropic in the deformed configuration, and, due to this supposition, several fundamental contradictions arise. First, the Cauchy stress tensor is non-symmetric and, consequently, violates the moment of momentum principle, in essence the Herring (thermodynamic) torque is imparting an unphysical angular momentum to the system. In addition, this non-symmetric stress implies a violation of the principle of material objectivity. These problems in the formulation can be resolved by insisting that the gradient energy is an isotropic function of the gradient of the order parameters in the deformed configuration, but depends on the direction of the gradient of the order parameters (is anisotropic) in the undeformed configuration. We find that for a propagating nonequilibrium interface, the structural part of the interfacial Cauchy stress is symmetric and reduces to a biaxial tension with the magnitude equal to the temperature- and orientation-dependent interface energy. Ginzburg-Landau equations for the evolution of the order parameters and temperature evolution equation, as well as the boundary conditions for the order parameters are derived. Small strain simplifications are presented. Remarkably, this anisotropy yields a first order correction in the Ginzburg-Landau equation for small strains, which has been neglected in prior works. The next strain-related term is third order. For concreteness, specific orientation dependencies of the gradient energy coefficients are examined, using published molecular dynamics

  3. LabVIEW Interface for PCI-SpaceWire Interface Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, James; Loya, Frank; Bachmann, Alex

    2005-01-01

    This software provides a LabView interface to the NT drivers for the PCISpaceWire card, which is a peripheral component interface (PCI) bus interface that conforms to the IEEE-1355/ SpaceWire standard. As SpaceWire grows in popularity, the ability to use SpaceWire links within LabVIEW will be important to electronic ground support equipment vendors. In addition, there is a need for a high-level LabVIEW interface to the low-level device- driver software supplied with the card. The LabVIEW virtual instrument (VI) provides graphical interfaces to support all (1) SpaceWire link functions, including message handling and routing; (2) monitoring as a passive tap using specialized hardware; and (3) low-level access to satellite mission-control subsystem functions. The software is supplied in a zip file that contains LabVIEW VI files, which provide various functions of the PCI-SpaceWire card, as well as higher-link-level functions. The VIs are suitably named according to the matching function names in the driver manual. A number of test programs also are provided to exercise various functions.

  4. The excess proton at the air-water interface: The role of instantaneous liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giberti, Federico; Hassanali, Ali A.

    2017-06-01

    The magnitude of the pH of the surface of water continues to be a contentious topic in the physical chemistry of aqueous interfaces. Recent theoretical studies have shown little or no preference for the proton to be at the surface compared to the bulk. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we revisit the propensity of the excess proton for the air-water interface with a particular focus on the role of instantaneous liquid interfaces. We find a more pronounced presence for the proton to be at the air-water interface. The enhanced water structuring around the proton results in the presence of proton wires that run parallel to the surface as well as a hydrophobic environment made up of under-coordinated topological defect water molecules, both of which create favorable conditions for proton confinement at the surface. The Grotthuss mechanism within the structured water layer involves a mixture of both concerted and closely spaced stepwise proton hops. The proton makes excursions within the first solvation layer either in proximity to or along the instantaneous interface.

  5. A protein domain interaction interface database: InterPare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Sungsam; Park, Changbum; Choi, Hansol; Ko, Junsu; Jang, Insoo; Lee, Jungsul; Bolser, Dan M; Oh, Donghoon; Kim, Deok-Soo; Bhak, Jong

    2005-08-25

    Most proteins function by interacting with other molecules. Their interaction interfaces are highly conserved throughout evolution to avoid undesirable interactions that lead to fatal disorders in cells. Rational drug discovery includes computational methods to identify the interaction sites of lead compounds to the target molecules. Identifying and classifying protein interaction interfaces on a large scale can help researchers discover drug targets more efficiently. We introduce a large-scale protein domain interaction interface database called InterPare http://interpare.net. It contains both inter-chain (between chains) interfaces and intra-chain (within chain) interfaces. InterPare uses three methods to detect interfaces: 1) the geometric distance method for checking the distance between atoms that belong to different domains, 2) Accessible Surface Area (ASA), a method for detecting the buried region of a protein that is detached from a solvent when forming multimers or complexes, and 3) the Voronoi diagram, a computational geometry method that uses a mathematical definition of interface regions. InterPare includes visualization tools to display protein interior, surface, and interaction interfaces. It also provides statistics such as the amino acid propensities of queried protein according to its interior, surface, and interface region. The atom coordinates that belong to interface, surface, and interior regions can be downloaded from the website. InterPare is an open and public database server for protein interaction interface information. It contains the large-scale interface data for proteins whose 3D-structures are known. As of November 2004, there were 10,583 (Geometric distance), 10,431 (ASA), and 11,010 (Voronoi diagram) entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) containing interfaces, according to the above three methods. In the case of the geometric distance method, there are 31,620 inter-chain domain-domain interaction interfaces and 12,758 intra

  6. A protein domain interaction interface database: InterPare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jungsul

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most proteins function by interacting with other molecules. Their interaction interfaces are highly conserved throughout evolution to avoid undesirable interactions that lead to fatal disorders in cells. Rational drug discovery includes computational methods to identify the interaction sites of lead compounds to the target molecules. Identifying and classifying protein interaction interfaces on a large scale can help researchers discover drug targets more efficiently. Description We introduce a large-scale protein domain interaction interface database called InterPare http://interpare.net. It contains both inter-chain (between chains interfaces and intra-chain (within chain interfaces. InterPare uses three methods to detect interfaces: 1 the geometric distance method for checking the distance between atoms that belong to different domains, 2 Accessible Surface Area (ASA, a method for detecting the buried region of a protein that is detached from a solvent when forming multimers or complexes, and 3 the Voronoi diagram, a computational geometry method that uses a mathematical definition of interface regions. InterPare includes visualization tools to display protein interior, surface, and interaction interfaces. It also provides statistics such as the amino acid propensities of queried protein according to its interior, surface, and interface region. The atom coordinates that belong to interface, surface, and interior regions can be downloaded from the website. Conclusion InterPare is an open and public database server for protein interaction interface information. It contains the large-scale interface data for proteins whose 3D-structures are known. As of November 2004, there were 10,583 (Geometric distance, 10,431 (ASA, and 11,010 (Voronoi diagram entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB containing interfaces, according to the above three methods. In the case of the geometric distance method, there are 31,620 inter-chain domain

  7. Review of up-to date digital cameras interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkemann, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 15 years, various interfaces on digital industrial cameras have been available on the market. This tutorial will give an overview of interfaces such as LVDS (RS644), Channel Link and Camera Link. In addition, other interfaces such as FireWire, Gigabit Ethernet, and now USB 3.0 have become more popular. Owing to their ease of use, these interfaces cover most of the market. Nevertheless, for certain applications and especially for higher bandwidths, Camera Link and CoaXPress are very useful. This tutorial will give a description of the advantages and disadvantages, comment on bandwidths, and provide recommendations on when to use which interface.

  8. Theory of Solid-Liquid Interface and Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Shigeo; Yoshida, Uichi; Nakano, Huzio

    1981-07-01

    The equilibrium properties of solid-liquid interface are investigated based on multi-level model (MLM) by Temkin. The simple expression is derived to the shape of the interface. The surface tension is obtained, giving rise to the lattice resistance to the motion of the interface. Simple kinetic theory for the propagation of the interface in nonequilibrium state is introduced. The propagating velocity of the interface is derived within linear approximation. The result is in agreement with that of the computer experiment qualitatively.

  9. An operator interface design for a telerobotic inspection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won S.; Tso, Kam S.; Hayati, Samad

    1993-01-01

    The operator interface has recently emerged as an important element for efficient and safe interactions between human operators and telerobotics. Advances in graphical user interface and graphics technologies enable us to produce very efficient operator interface designs. This paper describes an efficient graphical operator interface design newly developed for remote surface inspection at NASA-JPL. The interface, designed so that remote surface inspection can be performed by a single operator with an integrated robot control and image inspection capability, supports three inspection strategies of teleoperated human visual inspection, human visual inspection with automated scanning, and machine-vision-based automated inspection.

  10. Novel Interface for Simulation of Assembly Operations in Virtual Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRACIUN, E.-G.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose a new interface based on human gestures for simulation of assembly operation inside virtual environments. Using as a guide the current context for assembly simulation, we have analyzed the existing techniques used in developing gesture-based interface and extracted the constituent elements for an assembly gesture interface. The interface we propose offers support for assembly/disassembly operation, replace or delete components inside a virtual scene. To improve the current practice in virtual assembly simulation, our interface is an efficient method for assembly operations and a competitive approach for the current assembly simulation techniques.

  11. Earthdata User Interface Patterns: Building Usable Web Interfaces Through a Shared UI Pattern Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siarto, J.

    2014-12-01

    As more Earth science software tools and services move to the web--the design and usability of those tools become ever more important. A good user interface is becoming expected and users are becoming increasingly intolerant of websites and web applications that work against them. The Earthdata UI Pattern Library attempts to give these scientists and developers the design tools they need to make usable, compelling user interfaces without the associated overhead of using a full design team. Patterns are tested and functional user interface elements targeted specifically at the Earth science community and will include web layouts, buttons, tables, typography, iconography, mapping and visualization/graphing widgets. These UI elements have emerged as the result of extensive user testing, research and software development within the NASA Earthdata team over the past year.

  12. Thermal transport across solid-solid interfaces enhanced by pre-interface isotope-phonon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eungkyu; Luo, Tengfei

    2018-01-01

    Thermal transport across solid interfaces can play critical roles in the thermal management of electronics. In this letter, we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the isotope effect on the thermal transport across SiC/GaN interfaces. It is found that engineered isotopes (e.g., 10% 15N or 71Ga) in the GaN layer can increase the interfacial thermal conductance compared to the isotopically pure case by as much as 23%. Different isotope doping features, such as the isotope concentration, skin depth of the isotope region, and its distance from the interface, are investigated, and all of them lead to increases in thermal conductance. Studies of spectral temperatures of phonon modes indicate that interfacial thermal transport due to low-frequency phonons (modes to favor a better overall interfacial thermal transport. This work may provide insights into interfacial thermal transport and useful guidance to practical material design.

  13. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourasseau, E; Malfreyt, P; Ghoufi, A

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  14. Project Interface Requirements Process Including Shuttle Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Garland T.

    2010-01-01

    Most failures occur at interfaces between organizations and hardware. Processing interface requirements at the start of a project life cycle will reduce the likelihood of costly interface changes/failures later. This can be done by adding Interface Control Documents (ICDs) to the Project top level drawing tree, providing technical direction to the Projects for interface requirements, and by funding the interface requirements function directly from the Project Manager's office. The interface requirements function within the Project Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) Office would work in-line with the project element design engineers early in the life cycle to enhance communications and negotiate technical issues between the elements. This function would work as the technical arm of the Project Manager to help ensure that the Project cost, schedule, and risk objectives can be met during the Life Cycle. Some ICD Lessons Learned during the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Life Cycle will include the use of hardware interface photos in the ICD, progressive life cycle design certification by analysis, test, & operations experience, assigning interface design engineers to Element Interface (EI) and Project technical panels, and linking interface design drawings with project build drawings

  15. Physical modelling of interactions between interfaces and turbulence; Modelisation physique des interactions entre interfaces et turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toutant, A

    2006-12-15

    The complex interactions between interfaces and turbulence strongly impact the flow properties. Unfortunately, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) have to entail a number of degrees of freedom proportional to the third power of the Reynolds number to correctly describe the flow behaviour. This extremely hard constraint makes it impossible to use DNS for industrial applications. Our strategy consists in using and improving DNS method in order to develop the Interfaces and Sub-grid Scales concept. ISS is a two-phase equivalent to the single-phase Large Eddy Simulation (LES) concept. The challenge of ISS is to integrate the two-way coupling phenomenon into sub-grid models. Applying a space filter, we have exhibited correlations or sub-grid terms that require closures. We have shown that, in two-phase flows, the presence of a discontinuity leads to specific sub-grid terms. Comparing the maximum of the norm of the sub-grid terms with the maximum of the norm of the advection tensor, we have found that sub-grid terms related to interfacial forces and viscous effect are negligible. Consequently, in the momentum balance, only the sub-grid terms related to inertia have to be closed. Thanks to a priori tests performed on several DNS data, we demonstrate that the scale similarity hypothesis, reinterpreted near discontinuity, provides sub-grid models that take into account the two-way coupling phenomenon. These models correspond to the first step of our work. Indeed, in this step, interfaces are smooth and, interactions between interfaces and turbulence occur in a transition zone where each physical variable varies sharply but continuously. The next challenge has been to determine the jump conditions across the sharp equivalent interface corresponding to the sub-grid models of the transition zone. We have used the matched asymptotic expansion method to obtain the jump conditions. The first tests on the velocity of the sharp equivalent interface are very promising (author)

  16. Revisiting the Voronoi description of protein-protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazals, Frédéric; Proust, Flavien; Bahadur, Ranjit P; Janin, Joël

    2006-09-01

    We developed a model of macromolecular interfaces based on the Voronoi diagram and the related alpha-complex, and we tested its properties on a set of 96 protein-protein complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank. The Voronoi model provides a natural definition of the interfaces, and it yields values of the number of interface atoms and of the interface area that have excellent correlation coefficients with those of the classical model based on solvent accessibility. Nevertheless, some atoms that do not lose solvent accessibility are part of the interface defined by the Voronoi model. The Voronoi model provides robust definitions of the curvature and of the connectivity of the interfaces, and leads to estimates of these features that generally agree with other approaches. Our implementation of the model allows an analysis of protein-water contacts that highlights the role of structural water molecules at protein-protein interfaces.

  17. Development of an adaptive interface for nuclear data bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heger, A.S.; Koen, B.V. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an adaptive interface, KNOWBOT, for retrieval from large data bases. A proof-of-principle version of the interface has been implemented in LISP on a Texas Instruments Explorer I workstation with the design objective of solving some of the problems that face the users of large centralized data bases. The interface starts as a tabula rasa but acquires knowledge through its interaction with the user and the data base. These combined sources of knowledge enable the interface of self-organize itself in order to meet the specific demands of the user. In addition, the interface is designed to preempt the existing interfaces and not to replace them. Experiments on a test data base have demonstrated the robustness of induction, personalization, and fault tolerance features of the interface.

  18. Interface study of fiber reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacios, A.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available In a composite material that uses fibers as reinforcement, the breakage of the matrix is produced jointly with the separation of the fiber from the matrix. The mechanical behavior of the interface describes how fibers can work stabilizing the cracking process. The interface is the medium that puts the fiber on load, being the mechanical behavior of the interface and the strength of the fiber two important parameters to consider to characterize the general behavior of the composite. The present work studies the effect of several parameters on the behavior of the interface. Those parameters are the type of fiber, its geometry and dimension and the modified matrix and loading rate. An experimental technique was designed to allow testing the same set-up for pull-out tests in a quasistatic machine and Charpy pendulum. Modifications of the matrix by adding a mineral admixture improve the behavior of the interface as much as a 100%. It has been observed that combining the two actions, an improved matrix with crimped fibers, the type of failure can be modified. In this new type of failure, the fiber breaks consequently toughness decreases. Other parameters, as the loading rate and inclination of the fiber also affect the behavior of the interface.

    En un material compuesto que utiliza fibras como refuerzo, la rotura de la matriz se produce conjuntamente con la separación de la fibra de la matriz, por lo que el comportamiento mecánico de la interfase describe hasta que punto las fibras pueden trabajar como estabilizadores en el proceso defisuración. La interfase es el medio que pone en carga a la fibra y, por ello, la resistencia mecánica de la interfase y de la fibra son dos parámetros importantes a considerar para caracterizar el comportamiento general del composite. Este trabajo investiga el efecto de la variación del tipo de fibra, geometría y dimensión de las mismas y las modificaciones de la matriz y la velocidad de desplazamiento

  19. Evaluation of navigation interfaces in virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Daniel R.

    2014-02-01

    When users are immersed in cave-like virtual reality systems, navigational interfaces have to be used when the size of the virtual environment becomes larger than the physical extent of the cave floor. However, using navigation interfaces, physically static users experience self-motion (visually-induced vection). As a consequence, sensorial incoherence between vision (indicating self-motion) and other proprioceptive inputs (indicating immobility) can make them feel dizzy and disoriented. We tested, in two experimental studies, different locomotion interfaces. The objective was twofold: testing spatial learning and cybersickness. In a first experiment, using first-person navigation with a flystick ®, we tested the effect of sensorial aids, a spatialized sound or guiding arrows on the ground, attracting the user toward the goal of the navigation task. Results revealed that sensorial aids tended to impact negatively spatial learning. Moreover, subjects reported significant levels of cybersickness. In a second experiment, we tested whether such negative effects could be due to poorly controlled rotational motion during simulated self-motion. Subjects used a gamepad, in which rotational and translational displacements were independently controlled by two joysticks. Furthermore, we tested first- versus third-person navigation. No significant difference was observed between these two conditions. Overall, cybersickness tended to be lower, as compared to experiment 1, but the difference was not significant. Future research should evaluate further the hypothesis of the role of passively perceived optical flow in cybersickness, but manipulating the virtual environment'sperrot structure. It also seems that video-gaming experience might be involved in the user's sensitivity to cybersickness.

  20. High speed UNIBUS-VME interface; Interface de alta velocidad VME-UNIBUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmos, P.

    1987-07-01

    An interface between VME an the UNIBUS of PDP or VAX computer is presented. The system supports high speed parallel communication (up to 1MB/S) and is composed of two modules. One of these is a commercial DR11M board which performs DMA transfers between UNIBUS and the external word. The other is a VME module specifically developed for this application. The interface has been tested under VMS operating system in VAX and VALET-PLUS system for the VME Bus. We describe in detail the VME module and its connection with the DR11M. Software, both in WMS and VALET, is also described. (Author) 7 refs.