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Sample records for water-gas shift catalyst

  1. Enhancement of water-gas shift reaction efficiency: catalysts and the catalyst bed arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baronskaya, Natal' ya A; Minyukova, Tat' yana P; Khassin, Aleksandr A; Yurieva, Tamara M; Parmon, Valentin N [G.K. Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-29

    The results of studies devoted to the search for catalysts of water-gas shift (WGS) reaction that are highly active in a wide temperature interval are generalized. New compositions based on traditional and alternative, as regards the chemical composition, catalysts of high- and low-temperature WGS reaction are considered in detail. The single-stage arrangement of WGS reaction ensuring small temperature gradients in the radial direction of the catalyst bed are discussed.

  2. Water-gas shift on gold catalysts: catalyst systems and fundamental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Ma, Zhen

    2013-10-07

    Since the pioneering finding by Haruta et al. that small gold nanoparticles on reducible supports can be highly active for low-temperature CO oxidation, the synthesis, characterization, and application of supported gold catalysts have attracted much attention. The water-gas shift reaction (WGSR: CO + H2O = CO2 + H2) is important for removing CO and upgrading the purity of H2 for fuel cell applications, ammonia synthesis, and selective hydrogenation processes. In recent years, much attention has been paid to exploration the possibility of using supported gold nanocatalysts for WGSR and understanding the fundamental aspects related to catalyst deactivation mechanisms, nature of active sites, and reaction mechanisms. Here we summarize recent advances in the development of supported gold catalysts for this reaction and fundamental insights that can be gained, and furnish our assessment on the status of research progress.

  3. WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl R.F. Lund

    2002-08-02

    The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

  4. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanenchuk, C.A.; Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

    1990-01-01

    A Co/MgO/SiO[sub 2] Fischer-Tropsch catalyst was operated simultaneously with a Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] water-gas-shift catalyst in a slurry reactor for over 400 hours. The process conditions were held constant at a temperature of 240[degrees]C, a pressure of 0.79 MPa, and a 1.1 H[sub 2]/CO feed of 0.065 Nl/min-g.cat. The Fischer-Tropsch activity remained constant at the level predicted by the operation of the Co/MgO/SiO[sub 2] catalyst alone. The water-gas-shift reaction was near equilibrium. The hydrocarbon product distribution of the combined catalyst system was stable and matched that of the CO/MgO/SiO[sub 2] operating alone under similar conditions. The combined catalyst system exhibited a high selectivity to n-alkanes. Neither catalysts's operation appeared to have a detrimental effect on that of the other, showing promise for future option.

  5. Water gas shift reaction over Cu catalyst supported by mixed oxide materials for fuel cell application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tepamatr Pannipa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The water gas shift activities of Cu on ceria and Gd doped ceria have been studied for the further enhancement of hydrogen purity [1] after the steam reforming of ethanol. The catalytic properties of commercial catalysts were also studied to compare with the as-prepared catalysts. Copper-containing cerium oxide materials are shown in this work to be suitable for the high temperature. Copper-ceria is a stable high-temperature shift catalyst, unlike iron-chrome catalysts that deactivate severely in CO2-rich gases. We found that 5%Cu/10%GDC(D has much higher activity than other copper ceria based catalysts. The finely dispersed CuO species is favorable to the higher activity, which explained the activity enhancement of this catalyst. The kinetics of the WGS reaction over Cu catalysts supported by mixed oxide materials were measured in the temperature range 200-400 °C. An independence of the CO conversion rate on CO2 and H2 was found.

  6. Reverse water gas shift reaction over Co-precipitated Ni-CeO2 catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Luhui; ZHANG Shaoxing; LIU Yuan

    2008-01-01

    The Ni-CeO2 catalysts with different Ni contents were prepared by a co-precipitation method and used for Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) reaction. 2wt.%Ni-CeO2 showed excellent catalytic performance in terms of activity, selectivity, and stability for RWGS reaction. Characterizations of the catalyst samples were conducted by XRD and TPR. The results indicated that, in Ni-CeO2 catalysts, there were three kinds of nickel, nickel ions in ceria lattice, highly dispersed NiO and bulk NiO. Oxygen vacancies were formed in CeO2 lattice due to the incorporation of Ni2+ ions into ceria lattice. Oxygen vacancies formed in ceda lattice and highly dispersed Ni were key active components for RWGS, and bulk Ni was key active component for methanation of CO2.

  7. PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol Steam Reforming, and Reverse-Water-Gas-Shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, Robert A.; Platon, Alexandru; Datye, Abhaya K.; Vohs, John M.; Wang, Yong; Palo, Daniel R.

    2008-03-07

    Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts were studied for water-gas-shift (WGS), methanol steam reforming, and reverse-water-gas-shift (RWGS) reactions. WGS activity was found to be dependent on the Pd:Zn ratio with a maximum activity obtained at approximately 0.50, which was comparable to that of a commercial Pt-based catalyst. The catalyst stability was demonstrated for 100 hours time-on-stream at a temperature of 3600C without evidence of metal sintering. WGS reaction rates were approximately 1st order with respect to CO concentration, and kinetic parameters were determined to be Ea = 58.3 kJ mol-1 and k0 = 6.1x107 min-1. During methanol steam reforming, the CO selectivities were observed to be lower than the calculated equilibrium values over a range of temperatures and steam/carbon ratios studied while the reaction rate constants were approximately of the same magnitude for both WGS and methanol steam reforming. These results indicate that although Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 are active WGS catalysts, WGS is not involved in methanol steam reforming. RWGS rate constants are on the order of about 20 times lower than that of methanol steam reforming, suggesting that RWGS reaction could be one of the sources for small amount of CO formation in methanol steam reforming.

  8. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a

  9. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a

  10. Study of activity and effectiveness factor of noble metal catalysts for water-gas shift reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sungkwang; Bae, Joongmyeon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 373-1, Guseong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea); Kim, Kihyun [POSCO 1, Goedong-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-785 (Korea)

    2009-01-15

    Platinum on ceria-zirconia (CZO) catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction were prepared with various platinum loadings. In addition, the activity of Pt/CZO catalysts was tested preliminarily at gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 5000 h{sup -1}. Activity tests were also conducted at GHSV of 200,000 h{sup -1} with limited conversions, and activation energies and pre-exponential factors for rate equations were obtained by fitting the data. The effectiveness factors were estimated on the basis of the intra-particle mass transfer. Moreover, with this estimation, an attempt was made to calculate the utilization of the Pt loading with an eggshell morphology. (author)

  11. Plasmon-enhanced reverse water gas shift reaction over oxide supported Au catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhye, AA; Ro, I; Zeng, X; Kim, HJ; Tejedor, I; Anderson, MA; Dumesic, JA; Huber, GW

    2015-01-01

    We show that localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the catalytic activities of different oxide-supported Au catalysts for the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Oxide-supported Au catalysts showed 30 to 1300% higher activity for RWGS under visible light compared to dark conditions. Au/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the deposition-precipitation (DP) method with 3.5 nm average Au particle size showed the highest activity for the RWGS reaction. Visible light is converted into chemical energy for this reaction with up to a 5% overall efficiency. A shift in the apparent activation energy (from 47 kJ mol(-1) in dark to 35 kJ mol(-1) in light) and apparent reaction order with respect to CO2 (from 0.5 in dark to 1.0 in light) occurs due to the LSPR. Our kinetic results indicate that the LSPR increases the rate of either the hydroxyl hydrogenation or carboxyl decomposition more than any other steps in the reaction network.

  12. An innovative catalyst system for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas-shift catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satterfield, C.N.; Yates, I.C.; Chanenchuk, C.

    1991-07-01

    The feasibility of using a mechanical mixture of a Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} water-gas-shift (WGS) catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis in a slurry reactor has been established. Such a mixture can combine the superior product distribution from cobalt with the high activity for the WGS reaction characteristic of iron. Weight ratios of Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} to Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of 0.27 and 0.51 for the two catalysts were studied at 240{degrees}C, 0.79 MPa, and in situ H{sub 2}/CO ratios between 0.8 and 3.0. Each catalyst mixture showed stable Fischer-Tropsch activity for about 400 hours-on-stream at a level comparable to the cobalt catalyst operating alone. The Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst exhibited a very slow loss of activity under these conditions, but when operated alone it was stable in a slurry reactor at 200--220{degrees}C, 0.79--1.48 MPa, and H{sub 2}/CO in situ ratios between 1.0 and 2.0. The presence of the water-gas-shift catalyst did not affect the long-term stability of the primary Fischer-Tropsch selectivity, but did increase the extent of secondary reactions, such as l-alkene hydrogenation and isomerization.

  13. Raney copper catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction - II. Initial catalyst optimisation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mellor, JR

    1997-12-23

    Full Text Available -Zn-A1 catalyst. During the controlled passivation Table 2 Crystalline phase of alloys B, C and D and their product Raney copper catalysts before and after reaction Alloy Precursor alloy phases Cat. phases before reaction a Cat. phases after reaction a... L; dry gas composition=10% CO/90% N2; CO : H20=I : 22.5; catalyst volume=2i0.1 ml): (O)=Cat. A Cu(69.3)Zn(6.9)Al( 19.5); (~)=cat. B Cu(73.6)Zn(10.9)AI(14.8); (W1)=cat. C Cu(72.4)Zn(13.3)Al(12.9); ({))=cat. D Cu(61.5)Zn(15.1)AI(19.1). It can...

  14. Influence of Gas Components on the Formation of Carbonyl Sulfide over Water-Gas Shift Catalyst B303Q

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Water-gas shift reaction catalyst at lower temperature (200-400 ℃) may improve the conversion of carbon monoxide. But carbonyl sulfide was found to be present over the sulfided cobaltmolybdenum/alumina catalyst for water-gas shift reaction. The influences of temperature, space velocity,and gas components on the formation of carbonyl sulfide over sulfided cobalt-molybdenum/alumina catalyst B303Q at 200-400 ℃ were studied in a tubular fixed-bed quartz-glass reactor under simulated water-gas shift conditions. The experimental results showed that the yield of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst reached a maximum at 220 ℃ with the increase in temperature, sharply decreased with the increase in space velocity and the content of water vapor, increased with the increase in the content of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, and its yield increased and then reached a stable value with the increase in the content of hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The formation mechanism of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst at 200-400 ℃ was discussed on the basis of how these factors influence the formation of COS. The yield of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst at 200-400 ℃ was the combined result of two reactions, that is, COS was first produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen sulfide,and then the as-produced COS was converted to hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide by hydrolysis. The mechanism of COS formation is assumed as follows: sulfur atoms in the Co9Ss-MoS2/Al2O3 crystal lattice were easily removed and formed carbonyl sulfide with CO, and then hydrogen sulfide in the water-gas shift gas reacted with the crystal lattice oxygen atoms in CoO-MoO3/Al2O3 to form Co9Ss-MoS2/Al2O3.This mechanism for the formation of COS over water-gas shift catalyst B303Q is in accordance with the Mars-Van Krevelen's redox mechanism over metal sulfide.

  15. Kinetic and spectroscopic study of catalysts for water-gas shift and nitrogen oxide removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kispersky, Vincent Frederick

    Hy variants modeled on Cu. The redox nature of the Cu active site was further investigated in a follow up study isolating the reducing portion of the SCR by removing O 2 from the reaction feed. Cutting off O2 drove the catalyst into a highly reduced state dominated by Cu(I) while removing a reductant drove the Cu into the fully oxidized state. Our research shows that not only is redox a vital part of the SCR reaction on Cu/zeolites, but that the oxidation state of the active site is highly sensitive to the gas environment. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction is an industrially important step in H2 generation from steam reforming. I have had the opportunity to contribute to a number of studies in WGS by studying the catalysts in FTIR. We studied numerous catalytic formulations including Fe promoted Pd/Al 2O3 and Au/TiO2. We found that the Fe promoted the WGS rate of the catalyst by a factor of 160 compared to the Fe free Pd/Al 2O3. The reduced Fe promoter efficiently split H2O, typically the role performed by reducible supports, and the nearby noble metal particles provided spillover H2 to maintain the reduced Fe phase necessary to split H2O. Our study of Au/TiO2 involved the development of a modified operando transmission IR cell with ultra-low dead volume allowing for fast switching isotope experiments over the catalyst. The isotope switching experiments showed that only CO adsorbed on Au0 sites was an active surface intermediate at 120°C. Counting the amount of active surface Au atoms for the reaction ruled out the Au particle surface and perimeter atoms as the dominant active sites and confirmed our previous finding that the active site was composed mostly of low coordinated corner Au atoms.

  16. Preparation and characterization of Cu-Ce-La mixed oxide as water-gas shift catalyst for fuel cells application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Keduan; LIU Quansheng; ZHAO Ruigang; HE Runxia; ZHANG Lifeng

    2008-01-01

    Cu-Ce-La mixed oxides were prepared by three precipitation methods (coprecipitation, homogeneous precipitation, and deposition precipitation) with variable precipitators and characterized using X-ray diffraction, BET, temperature-programmed reduction, and catalytic reaction for the water-gas shift. The Cu-Ce-La mixed oxide prepared by coprecipitation method with NaOH as precipitator presented the highest activity and thermal stability. Copper ion substituted quadrevalent ceria entered CeO2 (111) framework was in favor of activity and thermal stability of catalyst. The crystallinity of fresh catalysts increased with the reduction process. La3+ or Ce4+ substituted copper ion entered the CeO2 framework during reduction process. The coexistence of surface copper oxide (crystalline) and pure bulk crystalline copper oxide both contributed to the high activity and thermal stability of Cu-Ce-La mixes oxide catalyst.

  17. Three-dimensionally ordered macro-porous Pt/TiO2 catalyst used for water-gas shift reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Liang; Yuan Zhang; Yuan Liu

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensionally ordered macro-porous (3DOM) Pt/TiO2 catalysts were prepared by template and impregna-tion methods, and the resultant samples were characterized by using TG-DTA, XRD, SEM, TEM, and TPR techniques. The catalytic performance for water-gas shift (WGS) reaction was tested, and the influences of some conditions, such as reduction temperature of catalysts, the amount of Pt loadings and space velocity on catalytic performance were investigated. It was shown that Pt particles were homogeneously dispersed on 3DOM TiO2. The reduction of TiO2 surface was important for the catalyticperformance. The activity test results showed that the 3DOM Pt/TiO2 catalysts exhibited very good catalytic performance for WGS reaction even at high space velocity, which was owing to the better mass transfer of 3DOM porous structure besides the high intrinsic activity of Pt/TiO2.

  18. A Novelγ-Alumina Supported Fe-Mo Bimetallic Catalyst for Reverse Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abolfazl Gharibi Kharaji; Ahmad Shariati; Mohammad Ali Takassi

    2013-01-01

    In reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction CO2 is converted to CO which in turn can be used to pro-duce beneficial chemicals such as methanol. In the present study, Mo/Al2O3, Fe/Al2O3 and Fe-Mo/Al2O3 catalysts were synthesised using impregnation method. The structures of catalysts were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), CO chemisorption, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Kinetic properties of all catalysts were investigated in a batch re-actor for RWGS reaction. The results indicated that Mo existence in structure of Fe-Mo/Al2O3 catalyst enhances its activity as compared to Fe/Al2O3. This enhancement is probably due to better Fe dispersion and smaller particle size of Fe species. Stability test of Fe-Mo/Al2O3 catalyst was carried out in a fixed bed reactor and a high CO yield for 60 h of time on stream was demonstrated. Fe2(MoO4)3 phase was found in the structures of fresh and used catalysts. TPR results also indicate that Fe2(MoO4)3 phase has low reducibility, therefore the Fe2(MoO4)3 phase significantly inhibits the reduction of the remaining Fe oxides in the catalyst, resulted in high stability of Fe-Mo/Al2O3 catalyst. Overall, this study introduces Fe-Mo/Al2O3 as a novel catalyst with high CO yield, almost no by-products and fairly stable for RWGS reaction.

  19. Potassium-decorated active carbon supported Co-Mo-based catalyst for water-gas shift reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yixin Lian; RuiFen Xiao; Weiping Fang; Yiquan Yang

    2011-01-01

    The effect of potassium-decoration was studied on the activity of water-gas shift(WGS)reaction over the Co-Mo-based catalysts supported on active carbon(AC),which was prepared by incipient wetness co-impregnation method.The decoration of potassium on active carbon in advance enhances the activities of the CoMo-K/AC catalysts for WGS reaction.Highest activity(about 92% conversion)was obtained at250 ℃ for the catalyst with an optimum K2O/AC weight ratio in the range from 0.12 to 0.15.The catalysts were characterized by TPR and EPR,and the results show that activated carbon decorated with potassium makes Co-Mo species highly dispersed,and thus easily reduced and sulfurized.XRD results show that an appropriate content of potassium-decoration on active carbon supports may favors the formation of highly dispersed Co9Ss-type structures which are situated on the edge or a site in contact with MoS2,K-Mo-O-S,Mo-S-K phase.Those active species are responsible for the high activity of CoMo-K/AC catalysts.

  20. Atomic level study of water-gas shift catalysts via transmission electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatay, Mehmed Cem

    Water-gas shift (WGS), CO + H2O ⇆ CO2 + H2 (DeltaH° = -41 kJ mol -1), is an industrially important reaction for the production of high purity hydrogen. Commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts are employed to accelerate this reaction, yet these catalysts suffer from certain drawbacks, including costly regeneration processes and sulfur poisoning. Extensive research is focused on developing new catalysts to replace the current technology. Supported noble metals stand out as promising candidates, yet comprise intricate nanostructures complicating the understanding of their working mechanism. In this study, the structure of the supported Pt catalysts is explored by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of the supporting phase and the use of secondary metals on the reaction kinetics is investigated. Structural heterogeneities are quantified and correlated with the kinetic descriptors of the catalysts to develop a fundamental understanding of the catalytic mechanism. The effect of the reaction environment on catalyst structure is examined by in-situ techniques. This study benefitted greatly from the use of model catalysts that provide a convenient medium for the atomic level characterization of nanostructures. Based on these studies, Pt supported on iron oxide nano islands deposited on inert spherical alumina exhibited 48 times higher WGS turnover rate (normalized by the total Pt surface area) than Pt supported on bulk iron oxide. The rate of aqueous phase glycerol reforming reaction of Pt supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) is promoted by co-impregnating with cobalt. The synthesis resulted in a variety of nanostructures among which Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles are found to be responsible for the observed promotion. The unprecedented WGS rate of Pt supported on Mo2C is explored by forming Mo 2C patches on top of MWCNTs and the rate promotion is found to be caused by the Pt-Mo bimetallic entities.

  1. Supported Copper, Nickel and Copper-Nickel Nanoparticle Catalysts for Low Temperature Water-Gas-Shift Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiann-Horng

    Hydrogen is being considered worldwide as a future replacement for gasoline, diesel fuel, natural gas in both the transportation and non-transportation sectors. Hydrogen is a versatile energy carrier that can be produced from a variety of widely available primary energy sources, including coal, natural gas, biomass, solar, wind, and nuclear power. Coal, the most abundant fossil fuel on the planet, is being looked at as the possible future major source of H2, due to the development of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell technologies (IGFC). The gasification of coal produces syngas consisting of predominately carbon monoxide and hydrogen with some remaining hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and water. Then, the water-gas shift reaction is used to convert CO to CO2 and additional hydrogen. The present work describes the synthesis of model Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni catalysts prepared from metal colloids, and compares their behavior in the WGS reaction to that of traditional impregnation catalysts. Initially, we systematically explored the performance of traditional Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni WGS catalysts made by impregnation methods. Various bimetallic Cu-Ni catalysts were prepared by supported impregnation and compared to monometallic Cu and Ni catalysts. The presence of Cu in bimetallic catalysts suppressed undesirable methanation side reaction, while the Ni component was important for high WGS activity. Colloidal Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticles obtained by chemical reduction were deposited onto alumina to prepare supported catalysts. The resulting Cu and Ni nanoparticle catalysts were found to be 2.5 times more active in the WGS reaction per unit mass of active metal as compared to catalysts prepared by the conventional impregnation technique. The powder XRD and HAADF-STEM provided evidence supporting the formation of Cu-Ni particles containing the Cu core and Cu-Ni alloy shell. The XPS data indicated surface segregation of Cu in

  2. The effect of preparation factors on the structural and catalytic properties of mesoporous nanocrystalline iron-based catalysts for high temperature water gas shift reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkani, Fereshteh; Rezaei, Mehran [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A systematic study was done on the effect of preparation factors on the structural and catalytic properties of mesoporous nanocrystalline iron-based catalysts in high temperature water gas shift reaction. The catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation method, and the effect of the main preparation factors (pH, refluxing temperature, refluxing time, concentration of the precursors solution) was studied. The catalysts were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption (BET), Temperature programmed reduction (TPR), transmission and scanning electron microscopies (TEM, SEM) techniques. The results revealed that the preparation factors affected the textural and catalytic properties of the Fe-Cr-Cu catalyst. The results showed that the prepared catalyst with the highest activity showed higher specific surface area compared to commercial catalyst and consequently exhibited higher activity in high temperature water gas shift reaction. The TEM analysis showed a nanostructure for this sample with crystallite size less than 20 nm.

  3. Morphology-Dependent Properties of Cu/CeO2 Catalysts for the Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibo Ren

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available CeO2 nanooctahedrons, nanorods, and nanocubes were prepared by the hydrothermal method and were then used as supports of Cu-based catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS reaction. The chemical and physical properties of these catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, N2 adsorption/desorption, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR and in situ diffuse reflectance infra-red fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS techniques. Characterization results indicate that the morphology of the CeO2 supports, originating from the selective exposure of different crystal planes, has a distinct impact on the dispersion of Cu and the catalytic properties. The nanooctahedron CeO2 catalyst (Cu-CeO2-O showed the best dispersion of Cu, the largest amount of moderate copper oxide, and the strongest Cu-support interaction. Consequently, the Cu-CeO2-O catalyst exhibited the highest CO conversion at the temperature range of 150–250 °C when compared with the nanocube and nanorod Cu-CeO2 catalysts. The optimized Cu content of the Cu-CeO2-O catalysts is 10 wt % and the CO conversion reaches 91.3% at 300 °C. A distinctive profile assigned to the evolution of different types of carbonate species was observed in the 1000–1800 cm−1 region of the in situ DRIFTS spectra and a particular type of carbonate species was identified as a potential key reaction intermediate at low temperature.

  4. Structure Sensitivity of the Low-temperature Water-gas Shift Reaction on Cu–CeO2 catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, R.; Zhang, L.; Raitano, J.; Yi, N.; Chan, S.-W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    2012-01-17

    We have investigated the structure sensitivity of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction on Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts prepared at the nanoscale by different techniques. On the surface of ceria, different CuO{sub x} structures exist. We show here that only the strongly bound Cu-[O{sub x}]-Ce species, probably associated with the surface oxygen vacancies of ceria, are active for catalyzing the low-temperature WGS reaction. Weakly bound CuO{sub x} clusters and CuO nanoparticles are spectator species in the reaction. Isolated Cu{sup 2+} ions doping the ceria surface are not active themselves, but they are important in that they create oxygen vacancies and can be used as a reservoir of copper to replenish surface Cu removed by leaching or sintering. Accordingly, synthesis techniques such as coprecipitation that allow for extensive solubility of Cu in ceria should be preferred over impregnation, deposition-precipitation, ion exchange or another two-step method whereby the copper precursor is added to already made ceria nanocrystals. For the synthesis of different structures, we have used two methods: a homogeneous coprecipitation (CP), involving hexamethylenetetramine as the precipitating agent and the pH buffer; and a deposition-precipitation (DP) technique. In the latter case, the ceria supports were first synthesized at the nanoscale with different shapes (rods, cubes) to investigate any potential shape effect on the reaction. Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts with different copper contents up to ca. 20 at.% were prepared. An indirect shape effect of CeO{sub 2}, manifested by the propensity to form oxygen vacancies and strongly bind copper in the active form, was established; i.e. the water-gas shift reaction is not structure-sensitive. The apparent activation energy of the reaction on all samples was similar, 50 {+-} 10 kJ/mol, in a product-free (2% CO-10% H{sub 2}O) gas mixture.

  5. Effect of yttrium addition on water-gas shift reaction over CuO/CeO2 catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHE Yusheng; LI Lei; ZHAN Yingying; LIN Xingyi; ZHENG Qi; WEI Kemei

    2009-01-01

    This paper presented a study on the role of yttrium addition to CuO/CeO2 catalyst for water-gas shift reaction. A single-step co-precipitation method was used for preparation of a series of yttrium doped CuO/CeO2 catalysts with yttrium content in the range of 0-5wt.%. Properties of the obtained samples were characterized and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, H2-TPR, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the BET method. The results revealed that catalytic activity was increased with the yttrium content at first, but then decreased with the further increase of yttrium content. Herein, CuO/CeO2 catalyst doped with 2wt.% of yttrium showed the highest catalytic activity (CO conversion reaches 93.4% at 250℃) and thermal stability for WGS reaction. The catalytic activity was correlated with the surface area, the area of peak y of H2-TPR profile (I.e., the reduction of surface copper oxide (crystalline forms) interacted with surface oxygen vacancies on ceria), and the area of peak C2 and A1 (Cu0→Cu2+ in cyclic voltammetry process), respectively. Besides, Raman spectra provided evidences for a synergistic Cu-Ovacancy interaction, and it was indicated that doping yttrium may facilitate the formation of oxygen vacancies on ceria.

  6. In-situ Characterization of Water-Gas Shift Catalysts using Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.; Hanson, J; Wen, W; Wang, X; Brito, J; Martnez-Arias, A; Fernandez-Garca, M

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) has emerged as a powerful technique for studying the behavior of heterogeneous catalysts (metal oxides, sulfides, carbides, phosphides, zeolites, etc.) in-situ during reaction conditions. The technique can identify the active phase of a heterogeneous catalyst and how its structure changes after interacting with the reactants and products (80 K < T < 1200 K; P < 50 atm). In this article, we review a series of recent works that use in-situ time-resolved XRD for studying the water-gas shift reaction (WGS, CO + H2O ? H2 + CO2) over several mixed-metal oxides: CuMoO4, NiMoO4, Ce1-xCuxO2-d and CuFe2O4. Under reaction conditions the oxides undergo partial reduction. Neutral Cu0 (i.e. no Cu1+ or Cu2+ cations) and Ni0 are the active species in the catalysts, but interactions with the oxide support are necessary in order to obtain high catalytic activity. These studies illustrate the important role played by O vacancies in the mechanism for the WGS. In the case of Ce1-xCuxO2-d, Rietveld refinement shows expansions/contractions in the oxide lattice which track steps within the WGS process: CO(gas) + O(oxi) ? CO2(gas) + O(vac); H2O(gas) + O(vac) ? O(oxi) + H2(gas).

  7. Ethanol synthesis and water gas shift over bifunctional sulfide catalysts. Final technical progress report, September 12, 1991--December 11, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Deemer, M.; Richards-Babb, M.; Carr, T.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate sulfur-resistant catalysts for the conversion of synthesis gas having H{sub 2}/CO {le} 1 into C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohols, especially ethanol, by a highly selective and efficient pathway, while also promoting the water gas shift reaction (WGSR). The catalysts chosen are bifunctional, base-hydrogenation, sulfur-tolerant transition metal sulfides with heavy alkali, e.g. Cs{sup +}, promoter dispersed on their surfaces. The modes of activation of H{sub 2} and CO on MoS{sub 2} and alkali-doped MoS{sub 2} were considered, and computational analyses of the thermodynamic stability of transition metal sulfides and of the electronic structure of these sulfide catalysts were carried out. In the preparation of the cesium-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts, a variety of preparation methods using CsOOCH were examined. In all cases, doping with CsOOCH led to a lost of surface area. The undoped molybdenum disulfide catalyst only produced hydrocarbons. Cs-doped MoS{sub 2} catalysts all produced linear alcohols, along with smaller amounts of hydrocarbons. With a 20 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, temperature, pressure, and flow rate dependences of the synthesis reactions were investigated in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}/CO = 1/1 synthesis gas during short term testing experiments. It was shown that with a carefully prepared 10 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, reproducible and high alcohol synthesis activity could be obtained. For example, at 295 C with H{sub 2}/CO = 1 synthesis gas at 8.3 MPa and with GHSV = 7,760 l/kg cat/hr, the total alcohol space time yield was ca 300 g/kg cat/hr (accompanied with a hydrocarbon space time yield of ca 60 g/kg cat/hr). Over a testing period of ca 130 hr, no net deactivation of the catalyst was observed. 90 refs., 82 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. An innovative catalyst system for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas-shift catalyst. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satterfield, C.N.; Yates, I.C.; Chanenchuk, C.

    1991-07-01

    The feasibility of using a mechanical mixture of a Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} water-gas-shift (WGS) catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis in a slurry reactor has been established. Such a mixture can combine the superior product distribution from cobalt with the high activity for the WGS reaction characteristic of iron. Weight ratios of Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} to Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of 0.27 and 0.51 for the two catalysts were studied at 240{degrees}C, 0.79 MPa, and in situ H{sub 2}/CO ratios between 0.8 and 3.0. Each catalyst mixture showed stable Fischer-Tropsch activity for about 400 hours-on-stream at a level comparable to the cobalt catalyst operating alone. The Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst exhibited a very slow loss of activity under these conditions, but when operated alone it was stable in a slurry reactor at 200--220{degrees}C, 0.79--1.48 MPa, and H{sub 2}/CO in situ ratios between 1.0 and 2.0. The presence of the water-gas-shift catalyst did not affect the long-term stability of the primary Fischer-Tropsch selectivity, but did increase the extent of secondary reactions, such as l-alkene hydrogenation and isomerization.

  9. Raney copper catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction: I. Preparation, activity and stability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mellor, JR

    1997-12-23

    Full Text Available at the stated conditions compared favourably to the co-precipitated and industrial catalyst alternatives due to a similar active phase composition and high metallic copper surface areas. Raney copper catalyst deactivation in a poison-free environment...

  10. Role of Re in Pt–Re/TiO2 catalyst for water gas shift reaction: A mechanistic and kinetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azzam, K.G.; Babich, I.V.; Seshan, K.; Lefferts, L.

    2008-01-01

    Transient kinetic studies and in situ FTIR spectroscopy were used to follow the reaction sequences that occur during water gas shift (WGS) reaction over Pt–Re/TiO2 catalyst. Results pointed to contributions of an associative formate route with redox regeneration and two classical redox routes involv

  11. Computational Chemistry-Based Identification of Ultra-Low Temperature Water-Gas-Shift Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis

    2008-08-31

    The current work seeks to identify novel, catalytically-active, stable, poison-resistant LWGS catalysts that retain the superior activity typical of conventional Cu catalysts but can be operated at similar or lower temperatures. A database for the Binding Energies (BEs) of the LWGS relevant species, namely CO, O and OH on the most-stable, close-packed facets of a set of 17 catalytically relevant transition metals was established. This BE data and a database of previously established segregation energies was utilized to predict the stability of bimetallic NSAs that could be synthesized by combinations of the 17 parent transition metals. NSAs that were potentially stable both in vacuo and under the influence of strong-binding WGS intermediates were then selected for adsorption studies. A set of 40 NSAs were identified that satisfied all three screener criteria and the binding energies of CO, O and OH were calculated on a set of 66, 43 and 79 NSA candidates respectively. Several NSAs were found that bound intermediates weaker than the monometallic catalysts and were thus potentially poison-resistant. Finally, kinetic studies were performed and resulted in the discovery of a specific NSA-based bimetallic catalyst Cu/Pt that is potentially a promising LWGS catalyst. This stable Cu/Pt subsurface alloy is expected to provide facile H{sub 2}O activation and remain relatively resistant from the poisoning by CO, S and formate intermediates.

  12. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

    1989-01-01

    The rate of synthesis gas consumption over a cobalt FischerTropsch catalyst was measured in a well-mixed, continuous-flow, slurry reactor at 220 to 240[degrees]C, 0.5 to 1.5 MPa, H[sub 2]/CO feed ratios of 1.5 to 3.5 and conversions of 7 to 68% of hydrogen and 11 to 73% of carbon monoxide. The inhibiting effect of carbon monoxide was determined quantitatively and a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type equation of the following form was found to best represent the results: -R[sub H[sub 2+Co

  13. Effect of doping rare earth oxide on performance of copper-manganese catalysts for water-gas shift reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何润霞; 姜浩强; 武芳; 智科端; 王娜; 周晨亮; 刘全生

    2014-01-01

    Rare earth-doped copper-manganese mixed oxide catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation and mechanical mixing using copper sulfate, manganese sulfate, and rare-earth oxides REO (REO indicates La2O3, CeO2, Y2O3, or Pr6O11) as raw materials. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), temperature-programmed reduc-tion of oxidized surfaces (s-TPR), and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Catalytic activities were tested for a water-gas shift reaction. Doping rare earth oxides did not alter the crystal structure of the original copper-manganese mixed oxides but changed the interplanar spacing, adsorption performance and reaction performance. Doping with La2O3 enhanced the activity and stability of Cu-Mn mixed oxides because of high copper distribution and fine reduction. Doping with CeO2 and Y2O3 also decreased the reduc-tion temperatures of the samples to different degrees while improving the dispersion of Cu on the surface, thus, catalytic activity was better than that of undoped Cu-Mn sample. The Pr6O11-doped sample was difficult to reduce, the dispersion of surface coppers was lowered, resulting in poor activity.

  14. Probing the Reaction Intermediates for the Water-Gas Shift over Inverse CeOx/Au(111) Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Senanayake, S.D.; Stacchiola, D.; Evans, J.; Estrella, M.; Barrio-Pliego, L.; Pérez, M.; Hrbek, J.

    2010-05-04

    The water-gas shift (WGS) is an important reaction for the production of molecular H{sub 2} from CO and H{sub 2}O. An inverse CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) catalyst exhibits a very good WGS activity, better than that of copper surfaces or Cu nanoparticles dispersed on a ZnO(0 0 0 {bar 1}) substrate which model current WGS industrial catalysts. In this work we report on intermediates likely to arise during the CO + H{sub 2}O reaction over CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) using soft X-ray photoemission (sXPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Several potential intermediates including formates (HCOO), carbonates (CO{sub 3}) and carboxylates (HOCO) are considered. Adsorption of HCOOH and CO{sub 2} is used to create both HCOO and CO{sub 3} on the CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) surface, respectively. HCOO appears to have greater stability with desorption temperatures up to 600 K while CO{sub 3} only survives on the surface up to 300 K. On the CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) catalysts, the presence of Ce{sup 3+} leads to the dissociation of H{sub 2}O to give OH groups. We demonstrate experimentally that the OH species are stable on the surface up to 600 K and interact with CO to yield weakly bound intermediates. When there is an abundance of Ce{sup 4+}, the OH concentration is diminished and the likely intermediates are carbonates. As the surface defects are increased and the Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ratio grows, the OH concentration also grows and both carbonate and formate species are observed on the surface after dosing CO to H{sub 2}O/CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1). The addition of ceria nanoparticles to Au(1 1 1) is essential to generate an active WGS catalyst and to increase the production and stability of key reaction intermediates (OH, HCOO and CO{sub 3}).

  15. Synthesis of CuNi/C and CuNi/γ-Al2O3 Catalysts for the Reverse Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Lortie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new polyol synthesis method is described in which CuNi nanoparticles of different Cu/Ni atomic ratios were supported on both carbon and gamma-alumina and compared with Pt catalysts using the reverse water gas shift, RWGS, reaction. All catalysts were highly selective for CO formation. The concentration of CH4 was less than the detection limit. Cu was the most abundant metal on the CuNi alloy surfaces, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, measurements. Only one CuNi alloy catalyst, Cu50Ni50/C, appeared to be as thermally stable as the Pt/C catalysts. After three temperature cycles, from 400 to 700°C, the CO yield at 700°C obtained using the Cu50Ni50/C catalyst was comparable to that obtained using a Pt/C catalyst.

  16. Water-Gas Shift and CO Methanation Reactions over Ni-CeO2(111) Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Senanayake; J Evans; S Agnoli; L Barrio; T Chen; J Hrbek; J Rodriguez

    2011-12-31

    X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies were used to study the interaction of Ni atoms with CeO{sub 2}(111) surfaces. Upon adsorption on CeO{sub 2}(111) at 300 K, nickel remains in a metallic state. Heating to elevated temperatures (500-800 K) leads to partial reduction of the ceria substrate with the formation of Ni{sup 2+} species that exists as NiO and/or Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y}. Interactions of nickel with the oxide substrate significantly reduce the density of occupied Ni 3d states near the Fermi level. The results of core-level photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure point to weakly bound CO species on CeO{sub 2}(111) which are clearly distinguishable from the formation of chemisorbed carbonates. In the presence of Ni, a stronger interaction is observed with chemisorption of CO on the admetal. When the Ni is in contact with Ce{sup +3} cations, CO dissociates on the surface at 300 K forming NiC{sub x} compounds that may be involved in the formation of CH{sub 4} at higher temperatures. At medium and large Ni coverages (>0.3 ML), the Ni/CeO{sub 2}(111) surfaces are able to catalyze the production of methane from CO and H{sub 2}, with an activity slightly higher than that of Ni(100) or Ni(111). On the other hand, at small coverages of Ni (<0.3 ML), the Ni/CeO{sub 2}(111) surfaces exhibit a very low activity for CO methanation but are very good catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction.

  17. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst. [Quarterly] report, July 1, 1990--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanenchuk, C.A.; Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

    1990-12-31

    A Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} Fischer-Tropsch catalyst was operated simultaneously with a Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} water-gas-shift catalyst in a slurry reactor for over 400 hours. The process conditions were held constant at a temperature of 240{degrees}C, a pressure of 0.79 MPa, and a 1.1 H{sub 2}/CO feed of 0.065 Nl/min-g.cat. The Fischer-Tropsch activity remained constant at the level predicted by the operation of the Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} catalyst alone. The water-gas-shift reaction was near equilibrium. The hydrocarbon product distribution of the combined catalyst system was stable and matched that of the CO/MgO/SiO{sub 2} operating alone under similar conditions. The combined catalyst system exhibited a high selectivity to n-alkanes. Neither catalysts`s operation appeared to have a detrimental effect on that of the other, showing promise for future option.

  18. Performance Comparison of Two Newly Developed Bimetallic (X-Mo/Al2O3, X=Fe or Co) Catalysts for Reverse Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abolfazl Gharibi Kharaji; Ahmad Shariati

    2016-01-01

    The performance of the two newly developed bimetallic catalysts based on the precursor, Mo/Al2O3, was com-pared for reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. The structures of the precursor and the catalysts were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spec-trometry (ICP-AES), CO chemisorption, temperature programmed reduction of hydrogen (H2-TPR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The activity of Fe-Mo and Co-Mo catalysts was compared in a ifxed bed reactor at different temperatures. It is shown that the Co-Mo catalyst has higher CO2 conversion at all temperature level. The time-on-stream (TOS) analysis of the activity of catalysts for the RWGS reaction was carried out over a continuous period of 60 h for both catalysts. The Fe-Mo/Al2O3 catalyst exhibits good stability within a period of 60 h, however, the Co-Mo/Al2O3 is gradually deactivated after 50 h of reaction time. Existence of Fe2(MoO4)3 phase in Fe-Mo/Al2O3 catalyst makes this catalyst more stable for RWGS reaction.

  19. Effects of CeO2 on structure and properties of Ni-Mn-K/bauxite catalysts for water-gas shift reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lilong; YE Binghuo; WEI Kemei

    2008-01-01

    Multiple-metal catalysts (Ni-Mn-Ce-K/bauxite) for Water-Gas Shift (WGS) reaction were prepared by impregnation, and the catalytic structure and properties were investigated by N2 physical, XRD, H2-TPR, and CO-TPD. The results indicated that the addition of 7.5% CeO2 improved the activity of the WGS reaction obviously, and also increased the specific surface area and pore volume of the catalysts. The addition of CeO2 decreases the reduction temperature, enhanced the adsorption and activation of H2O, and improved the adsorption content of CO. Besides, active sites were not changed and the number of active sites on catalysts did not increase obviously.

  20. Water-gas shift reaction on CuO-ZnO catalysts: I. Structure and catalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalchev, M.G.; Andreev, A.A. [Institute of Catalysis, Sofia (Bulgaria); Zotov, N.S. [Institute of Applied Mineralogy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-11-01

    The physicochemical properties of CuO-ZnO samples with different CuO contents were investgated by a complex of physical methods: DSC, XPS, EPR, TPR, and XRD. The samples containing {approximately}25 wt % CuO exhibited a maximum catalytic activity in the water-gas shift reaction. The catalytic activity was attributed to copper ions aggregated on the highly dispersed and defective CuO surface and to an anion-modified ZnO surface. Aggregates of copper ions, formed on metal species and probably modified with hydroxyl and carbonate groups, were shown to play a decisive role in the catalytic activity of the samples containing more than 15 wt % CuO.

  1. Synthesis of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-based catalysts for the high-temperature water gas shift reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martos, C.; Dufour, J.; Ruiz, A. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The water gas shift reaction is an essential process to adjust the CO/H{sub 2} ratio in the industrial production of hydrogen. FeCr catalysts have been widely used in this reaction at high temperature but have environmental and safety concerns related to chromium content. In this work, the replacement of chromium by molybdenum in magnetite-based catalysts is studied. The materials were prepared by oxidation-precipitation and wet impregnation and they were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and temperature programmed reduction. Specific surface areas of samples were also measured. The results obtained indicate that molybdenum increases thermal stability of the magnetite active phase and prevents metallic iron formation during the reaction. The oxidation-precipitation method allows obtaining the material directly in the active phase and molybdenum is incorporated into magnetite lattice. (author)

  2. Ceria modified three-dimensionally ordered macro-porous Pt/TiO2 catalysts for water-gas shift reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Hao; ZHANG Yuan; LIU Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensionally ordered macro-porous(3DOM) TiO2 and ceria-modified 3DOM TiO2 supported platinum catalysts were pre-pared with template and impregnation methods, and the resultant samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy(SEM), X-ray dif-fractometer(XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM) and texture programmed reduction(TPR) techniques. The catalytic performances over the platinum-based catalysts were investigated for water-gas shift (WGS) reaction in a wide temperature range macro-porous catalyst, owing to the macro-porous structure favoring mass uansfer. Addition of ceria into 3DOM Pt/TiO2 led to improvement of catalytic activity. TPR and HRTEM results showed that the interaction existed between ceria and titanium oxide and addition of ceria promoted the reducibility of platinum oxide and TiO2 on the interface of platinum and TiO2 particles, which contributed to high activity of the ceria modi-fied catalysts. The results indicated that ceria-modified 3DOM Pt/TiO2 was a promising candidate of fuel cell oriented WGS catalyst.

  3. Effects of ZrO2 Content on Structure and Performance of Cu/CeO2-ZrO2 Catalysts for Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Cu/CeO2-ZrO2 catalysts for water-gas shift (WGS) reaction were prepared with co-precipitation method, and the influence of ZrO2 content on the catalytic structure and properties was investigated by the techniques of N2 physical adsorption analysis, XRD and H2-TPR. The results indicate that the BET surface areas of the catalysts are increased in varying degrees due to the presence of ZrO2. With increasing ZrO2 content, the pore size distribution is centered on 1.9 nm. ZrO2can efficiently restrain the growth of Cu crystal particles. The appropriate amount of ZrO2 in the Cu/CeO2 catalysts can help the catalyst keep better copper dispersion in the WGS reaction, which can lead to both higher catalytic activity and better thermal stability. When ZrO2 content is 10% (atom fraction), Cu/CeO2-ZrO2 catalyst reaches a CO conversion rate of 73.7 % at the reaction temperature of 200 ℃.

  4. Effect of precipitants on Ni-CeO2 catalysts prepared by a co-precipitation method for the reverse water-gas shift reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王路辉; 刘辉; 刘源; 陈英; 杨淑清

    2013-01-01

    A series of Ni-CeO2 catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation method with Na2CO3, NaOH, and mixed precipitant (Na2CO3:NaOH;1:1 ratio) as precipitant, respectively. The effect of the precipitants on the catalytic performance, physical and chemical properties of Ni-CeO2 catalysts was investigated with the aid of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brumauer-Emmett-Teller method (BET), Fou-rier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetry (TG), and H2-TPR characterizations. The Ni-CeO2 catalysts were exam-ined with respect to their catalytic performance for the reverse water-gas shift reaction, and their catalytic activities were ranked as:Ni-CeO2-CP (Na2CO3:NaOH=1:1)>Ni-CeO2-CP(Na2CO3)>Ni-CeO2-CP(NaOH). Correlating to the characteristic results, it was found that the catalyst prepared by co-precipitation with mixed precipitant (Na2CO3:NaOH; 1:1 ratio) as precipitant had the most amount of oxygen vacancies accompanied with highly dispersed Ni particles, which made the corresponding Ni-CeO2-CP(Na2CO3:NaOH=1:1) catalyst exhibit the highest catalytic activity. While the precipitant of Na2CO3 or NaOH resulted in less or no oxygen vacancies in Ni-CeO2 catalysts. As a result, Ni-CeO2-CP(Na2CO3) and Ni-CeO2-CP(NaOH) catalysts presented poor catalytic performance.

  5. Pre-Reduction of Au/Iron Oxide Catalyst for Low-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Reaction Below 150 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Fukuda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature water-gas shift reaction (WGS using gold catalyst is expected to be an attractive technique to realize an efficient on-site hydrogen production process. In this paper, Au/Fe3O4 catalysts for promoting the WGS below 150 °C were developed by a preliminary reduction of Au/iron oxide (Fe3+ catalyst utilizing high reactivity of Au nano-particles. The reduction was conducted under a CO, H2, or CO/H2O stream at either 140 or 200 °C, and the effect of reduction conditions on the characteristics of the Au/Fe3O4 catalyst and on the catalytic activity in WGS at 80 °C was investigated. The reaction progress during the pre-reduction treatment was qualitatively analyzed, and it was found that the iron oxide in Au/Fe2O3 calcined at 200 °C was easily reduced to Fe3O4 phase in all reduction conditions. The reduction conditions affected the characteristics of both Au and iron oxide, but all of the reduced catalysts had small Fe3O4 particles of less than 20 nm with Au particles on the surface. The surface area and content of cationic Au were high in the order of CO, H2, CO/H2O, and 140, 200 °C. In the WGS test at 80 °C using the developed catalysts, the activities of the catalysts pre-reduced by CO at 140 or 200 °C and by H2 at 140 °C were very high with 100% CO conversion even at such a low temperature. These results indicated that factors such as higher surface area, crystallized Fe3O4, and cationic Au content contributed to the catalytic activity.

  6. In Situ Characterization of CuFe2O4 and Cu/Fe3O4 Water-Gas Shift Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrella, M.; Barrio, L; Zhou, G; Wang, X; Wang, Q; Wen, W; Hanson, J; Frenkel, A; Rodriguez, J

    2009-01-01

    Mixtures of copper and iron oxides are used as industrial catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS, CO + H2O f H2 + CO2). In-situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure, and atomic pair distribution function analysis were used to study the reduction of CuFe2O4 with CO and the behavior of CuFe2O4 and Cu/Fe2O3 catalysts under WGS reaction conditions. MetalToxygenTmetal interactions enhance the stability of Cu 2+ and Fe 3+ in the CuFe2O4 lattice, and the mixed-metal oxide is much more difficult to reduce than CuO or Fe2O3. Furthermore, after heating mixtures of CuFe2O4/CuO in the presence of CO or CO/H2O, the cations of CuO migrate into octahedral sites of the CuFe2O4 lattice at temperatures (200-250 C) in which CuO is not stable. Above 250 C, copper leaves the oxide, the occupancy of the octahedral sites in CuFe2O4 decreases, and diffraction lines for metallic Cu appear. From 350 to 450 C, there is a massive reduction of CuFe2O4 with the formation of metallic Cu and Fe3O4. At this point, the sample becomes catalytically active for the production of H2 from the reaction of H2O with CO. Neutral Cu 0 (i.e., no Cu 1+ or Cu 2+ cations) is the active species in the catalysts, but interactions with the oxide support cannot be neglected. These studies illustrate the importance of in situ characterization when dealing with mixed-metal oxide WGS catalysts.

  7. In-situ Characterization of CuFe2O4 and Cu/Fe3O4 Water-Gas Shift Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez,J.A.; Estrella, M.; Barrio, L.; Zhou, G.; Wang, X.; Wang, Q.; Wen, W.; Hanson, J.C.; Frenkel, A.

    2009-08-13

    Mixtures of copper and iron oxides are used as industrial catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS, CO + H2O → H2 + CO2). In-situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure, and atomic pair distribution function analysis were used to study the reduction of CuFe2O4 with CO and the behavior of CuFe2O4 and Cu/Fe2O3 catalysts under WGS reaction conditions. Metal↔oxygen↔metal interactions enhance the stability of Cu2+ and Fe3+ in the CuFe2O4 lattice, and the mixed-metal oxide is much more difficult to reduce than CuO or Fe2O3. Furthermore, after heating mixtures of CuFe2O4/CuO in the presence of CO or CO/H2O, the cations of CuO migrate into octahedral sites of the CuFe2O4 lattice at temperatures (200-250 oC) in which CuO is not stable. Above 250 oC, copper leaves the oxide, the occupancy of the octahedral sites in CuFe2O4 decreases, and diffraction lines for metallic Cu appear. From 350 to 450 oC, there is a massive reduction of CuFe2O4 with the formation of metallic Cu and Fe3O4. At this point, the sample becomes catalytically active for the production of H2 from the reaction of H2O with CO. Neutral Cu0 (i.e. no Cu+1 or Cu+2 cations) is the active species in the catalysts, but interactions with the oxide support are necessary in order to obtain high catalytic activity. These studies illustrate the importance of in-situ characterization when dealing with mixed-metal oxide WGS catalysts.

  8. Impact of Contaminants Present in Coal-Biomass Derived Synthesis Gas on Water-gas Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gokhan [TDA Research, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Co-gasification of biomass and coal in large-scale, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants increases the efficiency and reduces the environmental impact of making synthesis gas ("syngas") that can be used in Coal-Biomass-to-Liquids (CBTL) processes for producing transportation fuels. However, the water-gas shift (WGS) and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts used in these processes may be poisoned by multiple contaminants found in coal-biomass derived syngas; sulfur species, trace toxic metals, halides, nitrogen species, the vapors of alkali metals and their salts (e.g., KCl and NaCl), ammonia, and phosphorous. Thus, it is essential to develop a fundamental understanding of poisoning/inhibition mechanisms before investing in the development of any costly mitigation technologies. We therefore investigated the impact of potential contaminants (H2S, NH3, HCN, AsH3, PH3, HCl, NaCl, KCl, AS3, NH4NO3, NH4OH, KNO3, HBr, HF, and HNO3) on the performance and lifetime of commercially available and generic (prepared in-house) WGS and FT catalysts.

  9. Zirconia modified monolithic macroporous Pt/CeO2/Al2O3 catalyst used for water-gas shift reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Hao; YUAN Honggang; WEI Feng; ZHANG Xiwen; LIU Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Monolithic macroporous Pt/CeO2/Al2O3 and zirconia modified Pt/f eO2/Al2O3 catalysts Were prepared by using concentrated emulsions synthesis route.The catalytic performances over the platinum-based catalysts were investigated by water-gas shift (WGS) reaction in a wide temperature range (180-300 ℃).The samples were characterized with thermogravimetry (TG),X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) techniques as well.The SEM and HRTEM results indicated that the monoliths possessed macroporosity,in size of 5-50 μm,and platinum particles were homogeneously dispersed on macroporous materials.XRD and TPR results showed that the interaction between ceria and zirconia oxide was formed and the addition of zirconia could promote the reducibility of platinum oxide on the interface of ceria and zirconia particles,which led to an improvement of catalytic activity in WGS reaction.The results indicated that zirconia modified monolithic macroporous Pt/CeO2/Al2O3 could be fabricated in small size (from millimeter lever to centimeter) and had good reaction activity,which was a potential new route for miniaturization of the WGS reactor.

  10. Synthesis of Hydrocarbons from H2-Deficient Syngas in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Co-Based Catalyst Coupled with Fe-Based Catalyst as Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of metal species in an Fe-based catalyst on structural properties were investigated through the synthesis of Fe-based catalysts containing various metal species such, as Mn, Zr, and Ce. The addition of the metal species to the Fe-based catalyst resulted in high dispersions of the Fe species and high surface areas due to the formation of mesoporous voids about 2–4 nm surrounded by the catalyst particles. The metal-added Fe-based catalysts were employed together with Co-loaded beta zeolite for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from syngas with a lower H2/CO ratio of 1 than the stoichiometric H2/CO ratio of 2 for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS. Among the catalysts, the Mn-added Fe-based catalyst exhibited a high activity for the water-gas shift (WGS reaction with a comparative durability, leading to the enhancement of the CO hydrogenation in the FTS in comparison with Co-loaded beta zeolite alone. Furthermore, the loading of Pd on the Mn-added Fe-based catalyst enhanced the catalytic durability due to the hydrogenation of carbonaceous species by the hydrogen activated over Pd.

  11. Determination of the Effect of Coal/Biomass-Derived Syngas Contaminants on the Performance of Fischer-Tropsch and Water-Gas-Shift Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trembly, Jason; Cooper, Matthew; Farmer, Justin; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

    2010-12-31

    Today, nearly all liquid fuels and commodity chemicals are produced from non-renewable resources such as crude oil and natural gas. Because of increasing scrutiny of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions produced using traditional fossil-fuel resources, the utilization of alternative feedstocks for the production of power, hydrogen, value-added chemicals, and high-quality hydrocarbon fuels such as diesel and substitute natural gas (SNG) is critical to meeting the rapidly growing energy needs of modern society. Coal and biomass are particularly attractive as alternative feedstocks because of the abundant reserves of these resources worldwide. The strategy of co-gasification of coal/biomass (CB) mixtures to produce syngas for synthesis of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels offers distinct advantages over gasification of either coal or biomass alone. Co-feeding coal with biomass offers the opportunity to exploit economies of scale that are difficult to achieve in biomass gasification, while the addition of biomass to the coal gasifier feed leverages proven coal gasification technology and allows CO{sub 2} credit benefits. Syngas generated from CB mixtures will have a unique contaminant composition because coal and biomass possess different concentrations and types of contaminants, and the final syngas composition is also strongly influenced by the gasification technology used. Syngas cleanup for gasification of CB mixtures will need to address this unique contaminant composition to support downstream processing and equipment. To investigate the impact of CB gasification on the production of transportation fuels by FT synthesis, RTI International conducted thermodynamic studies to identify trace contaminants that will react with water-gas-shift and FT catalysts and built several automated microreactor systems to investigate the effect of single components and the synergistic effects of multiple contaminants on water-gas-shift and FT catalyst performance. The contaminants

  12. Stabilization and regeneration of CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} based Pt catalyst for the water gas shift reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggblad, R.M.S.; Hulteberg, P.C.; Brandin, J.G.M. [Catator AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    In this study a water gas shift catalyst consisting of a cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) based carrier and a platinum (Pt)-metal active phase was investigated. Issues concerning the stabilization and regeneration of CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2} and zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) subject to high initial deactivation were presented. The influence of reaction gas species on catalyst deactivation were investigated by hydrogen (H{sub 2}) Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR). It was noted that the activity measurements enabled different promoters, which will require further investigation. The catalysts were characterized by BET and carbon monoxide-TPR. Deactivated catalyst activity was restored by using various regeneration methods. Of the selected carriers, the CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} based Pt catalyst showed the highest resilience to deactivation. Tungsten and rhenium were the best promoters when the catalyst was subject to deactivation. Experiments with H{sub 2}-TPR indicated a rapid initial change in the platinum oxides concentration and composition. The carbon monoxide (CO)-TPR was then used to draw conclusions about the various regeneration effects of water and oxygen on the catalyst. Dominant mechanisms were dependent on the catalyst and the reaction gas composition. It was concluded that it is possible to stabilize the ceria-based water gas shift catalyst by promotion, but primarily by doping. Addition of zirconia to the carrier has an effect on catalyst stability, and future research should be focused in this area. Results of the CO-TPR performed on the regenerated catalysts indicated that steam does not affect the Pt oxides but has a regenerative effect. It was suggested that experiments with regeneration by both steam and oxygen simultaneously may result in more complete regeneration of the catalyst. It was determined that deactivation of the catalyst does not originate from a single mechanism. The results indicated that no other species present has any higher

  13. Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Dennis Sparks; Khalid Azzam; Janet Chakkamadathil Mohandas; Wilson Shafer; Venkat Ramana Rao Pendyala

    2011-09-30

    There has been a recent shift in interest in converting not only natural gas and coal derived syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products, but also converting biomass-derived syngas, as well as syngas derived from coal and biomass mixtures. As such, conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt may not be suitable without proper development. This is because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier gasification gasification) than solely from coal, other compounds may actually be increased. Of particular concern are compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the first year, University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) researchers completed a number of tasks aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts and a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to alkali halides. This included the preparation of large batches of 0.5%Pt-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100Fe: 5.1Si: 3.0K: 2.0Cu (high alpha) catalysts that were split up among the four different entities participating in the overall project; the testing of the catalysts under clean FT and WGS conditions; the testing of the Fe-Cr WGS catalyst under conditions of co-feeding NaCl and KCl; and the construction and start-up of the continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for poisoning investigations. In the second and third years, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H

  14. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jerry Y.S. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  15. Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalystes to Poisons form High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Khalid Azzam; Janet ChakkamadathilMohandas; Wilson Shafer

    2009-09-30

    There has been a recent shift in interest in converting not only natural gas and coal derived syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products, but also converting biomass-derived syngas, as well as syngas derived from coal and biomass mixtures. As such, conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt may not be suitable without proper development. This is because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier gasification gasification) than solely from coal, other compounds may actually be increased. Of particular concern are compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the first year, University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) researchers completed a number of tasks aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts and a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to alkali halides. This included the preparation of large batches of 0.5%Pt-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100Fe: 5.1Si: 3.0K: 2.0Cu (high alpha) catalysts that were split up among the four different entities participating in the overall project; the testing of the catalysts under clean FT and WGS conditions; the testing of the Fe-Cr WGS catalyst under conditions of co-feeding NaCl and KCl; and the construction and start-up of the continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for poisoning investigations.

  16. Unraveling the Active Site in Copper-ceria Systems for the Water Gas Shift Reaction: In-situ Characterization of an Inverse Powder CeO2-x/CuO-Cu Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Barrio, L.; Estrella, M.; Zhou, G.; Wen, W.; Hanson, J.C.; Hungría, A.B.; Hornés, A.; Fernández-García, M.; Arturo Martínez-Arias, A.

    2010-03-04

    An inverse powder system composed of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles dispersed over a CuO-Cu matrix is proposed as a novel catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction. This inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst exhibits a higher activity than standard Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. In situ synchrotron characterization techniques were employed to follow the structural changes of CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu under reaction conditions. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments showed the transformation of CuO to metallic Cu via a Cu{sub 2}O intermediate. Short-order structural changes were followed by pair distribution function analysis and corroborated the results obtained by diffraction. Moreover, X-ray absorption spectroscopy also revealed oxidation state changes from Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup 0} and the partial reduction of CeOx nanoparticles. The activity data obtained by mass spectrometry revealed that hydrogen production starts once the copper has been fully reduced. The strong interaction of ceria and copper boosted the catalytic performance of the sample. The inverse catalyst was active at low temperatures, stable to several reaction runs and to redox cycles. These characteristics are highly valuable for mobile fuel cell applications. The active phases of the inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst are partially reduced ceria nanoparticles strongly interacting with metallic copper. The nature and structure of the ceria nanoparticles are of critical importance because they are involved in processes related to water dissociation over the catalyst surface.

  17. Unraveling the Active Site in Copper-Ceria Systems for the Water-Gas Shift Reaction: In Situ Characterization of an Inverse Powder CeO2-x/CuO-Cu Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, L.; Estrella, M; Zhou, G; Wen, W; Hanson, J; Hungria, A; Hornes, A; Fernandez-Garcia, M; Martinez-Arias, A; Rodriguez, J

    2010-01-01

    An inverse powder system composed of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles dispersed over a CuO-Cu matrix is proposed as a novel catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction. This inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst exhibits a higher activity than standard Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. In situ synchrotron characterization techniques were employed to follow the structural changes of CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu under reaction conditions. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments showed the transformation of CuO to metallic Cu via a Cu{sub 2}O intermediate. Short-order structural changes were followed by pair distribution function analysis and corroborated the results obtained by diffraction. Moreover, X-ray absorption spectroscopy also revealed oxidation state changes from Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup 0} and the partial reduction of CeO{sub x} nanoparticles. The activity data obtained by mass spectrometry revealed that hydrogen production starts once the copper has been fully reduced. The strong interaction of ceria and copper boosted the catalytic performance of the sample. The inverse catalyst was active at low temperatures, stable to several reaction runs and to redox cycles. These characteristics are highly valuable for mobile fuel cell applications. The active phases of the inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst are partially reduced ceria nanoparticles strongly interacting with metallic copper. The nature and structure of the ceria nanoparticles are of critical importance because they are involved in processes related to water dissociation over the catalyst surface.

  18. Ru4+ ion in CeO2 (Ce0.95Ru0.05O2−): A non-deactivating, non-platinum catalyst for water gas shift reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Preetam Singh; N Mahadevaiah; Sanjit K Parida; M S Hegde

    2011-09-01

    Hydrogen is a clean energy carrier and highest energy density fuel. Water gas shift (WGS) reaction is an important reaction to generate hydrogen from steam reforming of CO. A new WGS catalyst, Ce1−RuO2− (0 ≤ ≤ 0.1) was prepared by hydrothermal method using melamine as a complexing agent. The Catalyst does not require any pre-treatment. Among the several compositions prepared and tested, Ce0.95Ru0.05O2− (5% Ru4+ ion substituted in CeO2) showed very high WGS activity in terms of high conversion rate (20.5 mol.g-1.s-1 at 275°C) and low activation energy (12.1 kcal/mol). Over 99% conversion of CO to CO2 by H2O is observed with 100% H2 selectivity at ≥ 275°C. In presence of externally fed CO2 and H2 also, complete conversion of CO to CO2 was observed with 100% H2 selectivity in the temperature range of 305-385°C. Catalyst does not deactivate in long duration on/off WGS reaction cycle due to absence of surface carbon and carbonate formation and sintering of Ru. Due to highly acidic nature of Ru4+ ion, surface carbonate formation is also inhibited. Sintering of noble metal (Ru) is avoided in this catalyst because Ru remains in Ru4+ ionic state in the Ce1−RuO2− catalyst.

  19. Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtron Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Khalid Azzam; Dennis Sparks; Wilson Shafer

    2010-09-30

    The successful adaptation of conventional cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts for use in converting biomass-derived syngas hinges in part on understanding their susceptibility to byproducts produced during the biomass gasification process. With the possibility that oil production will peak in the near future, and due to concerns in maintaining energy security, the conversion of biomass-derived syngas and syngas derived from coal/biomass blends to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products to liquid fuels may provide a sustainable path forward, especially considering if carbon sequestration can be successfully demonstrated. However, one current drawback is that it is unknown whether conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt will be suitable without proper development because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using an entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier) than solely from coal, other byproducts may be present in higher concentrations. The current project examines the impact of a number of potential byproducts of concern from the gasification of biomass process, including compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the second year, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities.

  20. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst. [Quarterly] report, October 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

    1989-12-31

    The rate of synthesis gas consumption over a cobalt FischerTropsch catalyst was measured in a well-mixed, continuous-flow, slurry reactor at 220 to 240{degrees}C, 0.5 to 1.5 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO feed ratios of 1.5 to 3.5 and conversions of 7 to 68% of hydrogen and 11 to 73% of carbon monoxide. The inhibiting effect of carbon monoxide was determined quantitatively and a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type equation of the following form was found to best represent the results: -R{sub H{sub 2+Co}} = (a P{sub CO}P{sub H{sub 2}})/(1 + b P{sub CO}){sup 2}. The apparent activation energy was 93 to 95 kJ/mol. Data from previous studies on cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts are also well correlated with this rate expression.

  1. Hydrogen production from a combination of the water-gas shift and redox cycle process of methane partial oxidation via lattice oxygen over LaFeO3 perovskite catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiao Ping; Wu, Qiong; Li, Ran Jia; Yu, Chang Chun; Hao, Zheng Ping

    2006-12-28

    A redox cycle process, in which CH4 and air are periodically brought into contact with a solid oxide packed in a fixed-bed reactor, combined with the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, is proposed for hydrogen production. The sole oxidant for partial oxidation of methane (POM) is found to be lattice oxygen instead of gaseous oxygen. A perovskite-type LaFeO3 oxide was prepared by a sol-gel method and employed as an oxygen storage material in this process. The results indicate that, under appropriate reaction conditions, methane can be oxidized to CO and H2 by the lattice oxygen of LaFeO3 perovskite oxide with a selectivity higher than 95% and the consumed lattice oxygen can be replenished in a reoxidation procedure by a redox operation. It is suggested that the POM to H2/CO by using the lattice oxygen of the oxygen storage materials instead of gaseous oxygen should be possibly applicable. The LaFeO3 perovskite oxide maintained relatively high catalytic activity and structural stability, while the carbonaceous deposits, which come from the dissociation of CH4 in the pulse reaction, occurred due to the low migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. A new dissociation-oxidation mechanism for this POM without gaseous oxygen is proposed based on the transient responses of the products checked at different surface states via both pulse reaction and switch reaction over the LaFeO3 catalyst. In the absence of gaseous-phase oxygen, the rate-determining step of methane conversion is the migration rate of lattice oxygen, but the process can be carried out in optimized cycles. The product distribution for POM over LaFeO3 catalyst in the absence of gaseous oxygen was determined by the concentration of surface oxygen, which is relevant with the migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. This process of hydrogen production via selective oxidation of methane by lattice oxygen is better in avoiding the deep oxidation (to CO2) and

  2. Development of Novel Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, W. S. Winston

    2004-12-29

    This report summarizes the objectives, technical barrier, approach, and accomplishments for the development of a novel water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor for hydrogen enhancement and CO reduction. We have synthesized novel CO{sub 2}-selective membranes with high CO{sub 2} permeabilities and high CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/CO selectivities by incorporating amino groups in polymer networks. We have also developed a one-dimensional non-isothermal model for the countercurrent WGS membrane reactor. The modeling results have shown that H{sub 2} enhancement (>99.6% H{sub 2} for the steam reforming of methane and >54% H{sub 2} for the autothermal reforming of gasoline with air on a dry basis) via CO{sub 2} removal and CO reduction to 10 ppm or lower are achievable for synthesis gases. With this model, we have elucidated the effects of system parameters, including CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} selectivity, CO{sub 2} permeability, sweep/feed flow rate ratio, feed temperature, sweep temperature, feed pressure, catalyst activity, and feed CO concentration, on the membrane reactor performance. Based on the modeling study using the membrane data obtained, we showed the feasibility of achieving H{sub 2} enhancement via CO{sub 2} removal, CO reduction to {le} 10 ppm, and high H{sub 2} recovery. Using the membrane synthesized, we have obtained <10 ppm CO in the H{sub 2} product in WGS membrane reactor experiments. From the experiments, we verified the model developed. In addition, we removed CO{sub 2} from a syngas containing 17% CO{sub 2} to about 30 ppm. The CO{sub 2} removal data agreed well with the model developed. The syngas with about 0.1% CO{sub 2} and 1% CO was processed to convert the carbon oxides to methane via methanation to obtain <5 ppm CO in the H{sub 2} product.

  3. Simulation of Water Gas Shift Zeolite Membrane Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertiharta, I. G. B. N.; Rizki, Z.; Zunita, Megawati; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    The search of alternative energy sources keeps growing from time to time. Various alternatives have been introduced to reduce the use of fossil fuel, including hydrogen. Many pathways can be used to produce hydrogen. Among all of those, the Water Gas Shift (WGS) reaction is the most common pathway to produce high purity hydrogen. The WGS technique faces a downstream processing challenge due to the removal hydrogen from the product stream itself since it contains a mixture of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and also the excess reactants. An integrated process using zeolite membrane reactor has been introduced to improve the performance of the process by selectively separate the hydrogen whilst boosting the conversion. Furthermore, the zeolite membrane reactor can be further improved via optimizing the process condition. This paper discusses the simulation of Zeolite Membrane Water Gas Shift Reactor (ZMWGSR) with variation of process condition to achieve an optimum performance. The simulation can be simulated into two consecutive mechanisms, the reaction prior to the permeation of gases through the zeolite membrane. This paper is focused on the optimization of the process parameters (e.g. temperature, initial concentration) and also membrane properties (e.g. pore size) to achieve an optimum product specification (concentration, purity).

  4. Advances of zeolite based membrane for hydrogen production via water gas shift reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a promising energy vector which can be obtained from various renewable sources. However, an efficient hydrogen production technology is still challenging. One technology to produce hydrogen with very high capacity with low cost is through water gas shift (WGS) reaction. Water gas shift reaction is an equilibrium reaction that produces hydrogen from syngas mixture by the introduction of steam. Conventional WGS reaction employs two or more reactors in series with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given volume of catalyst. Membrane reactor as new technology can cope several drawbacks of conventional reactor by removing reaction product and the reaction will favour towards product formation. Zeolite has properties namely high temperature, chemical resistant, and low price makes it suitable for membrane reactor applications. Moreover, it has been employed for years as hydrogen selective layer. This review paper is focusing on the development of membrane reactor for efficient water gas shift reaction to produce high purity hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Development of membrane reactor is discussed further related to its modification towards efficient reaction and separation from WGS reaction mixture. Moreover, zeolite framework suitable for WGS membrane reactor will be discussed more deeply.

  5. High-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciocco, M.V.; Iyoha, O.; Enick, R.M.; Killmeyer, R.P.

    2007-06-01

    NETL’s Office of Research and Development is exploring the integration of membrane reactors into coal gasification plants as a way of increasing efficiency and reducing costs. Water-Gas Shift Reaction experiments were conducted in membrane reactors at conditions similar to those encountered at the outlet of a coal gasifier. The changes in reactant conversion and product selectivity due to the removal of hydrogen via the membrane reactor were quantified. Research was conducted to determine the influence of residence time and H2S on CO conversion in both Pd and Pd80wt%Cu membrane reactors. Effects of the hydrogen sulfide-to-hydrogen ratio on palladium and a palladium-copper alloy at high-temperature were also investigated. These results were compared to thermodynamic calculations for the stability of palladium sulfides.

  6. Qualification of the ALKASORB sorbent for the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Selow, E.R.; Cobden, P.D.; Dijk, Van H.A.J.; Walspurger, S.; Verbraeken, P.A.; Jansen, D.

    2013-07-01

    For the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift (SEWGS) process, a new sorbent material has been qualified in a reactor of 2 m length under conditions close to industrial designs. The sorbent ALKASORB is a potassium-carbonate promoted hydrotalcite-based compound. ALKASORB is shown to have many favourable properties in comparison to the reference sorbent, in particular with respect to mechanical stability. The cyclic capacity of the new compound is substantially higher than the cyclic capacity of the reference sorbent, and it allows a reduction of the steam requirement of 50%. The sorbent has demonstrated catalytic activity for the water-gas shift reaction that is sufficient to omit a separate catalyst. It is demonstrated that the sorbent remains chemically and mechanically stable during operation of at least 2000 adsorption-desorption cycles, even in the presence of H2S in the feed. H2S is shown not to influence CO2 adsorption capacity and is co-captured with the CO2. In contrast to the reference material that showed mechanical degradation during extended adsorption-desorption cycles, the new material is stable and allows to obtain carbon capture levels exceeding 95% more efficiently and more economically since the required size of the vessels will be smaller.

  7. Advanced gasifier and water gas shift technologies for low cost coal conversion to high hydrogen syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Andrew Kramer [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and team members RTI International (RTI), Coanda Research and Development, and Nexant, are developing and maturing a portfolio of technologies to meet the United States Department of Energy (DOE) goals for lowering the cost of producing high hydrogen syngas from coal for use in carbon capture power and coal-to-liquids/chemicals. This project matured an advanced pilot-scale gasifier, with scalable and commercially traceable components, to readiness for use in a first-of-a-kind commercially-relevant demonstration plant on the scale of 500-1,000 tons per day (TPD). This was accomplished through cold flow simulation of the gasifier quench zone transition region at Coanda and through an extensive hotfire gasifier test program on highly reactive coal and high ash/high ash fusion temperature coals at GTI. RTI matured an advanced water gas shift process and catalyst to readiness for testing at pilot plant scale through catalyst development and testing, and development of a preliminary design basis for a pilot scale reactor demonstrating the catalyst. A techno-economic analysis was performed by Nexant to assess the potential benefits of the gasifier and catalyst technologies in the context of power production and methanol production. This analysis showed an 18%reduction in cost of power and a 19%reduction in cost of methanol relative to DOE reference baseline cases.

  8. 净化黄磷尾气中铁基高温水汽变换催化剂中毒机理%Poisoning Mechanism of Iron-Based High Temperature Catalyst in Water-Gas Shift Reaction of Purified Yellow Phosphorous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田森林; 杨玲菲; 宁平

    2011-01-01

    根据非均相反应体系的热力学有关理论,分析了高温水汽变换温度范围(623~803 K)内B112型铁基水汽变换催化剂在净化黄磷尾气气氛下受磷化氢、砷化氢、氟化氢和硫化氢作用而中毒可能发生的化学反应及产物,讨论了铁基高温变换催化剂的中毒机理.结果表明:磷酸盐、砷酸盐、硫酸盐、单质硫和积炭主要造成催化剂的暂时性中毒;磷铁化合物、砷铁化合物、氟铁化合物和硫铁化合物主要造成催化剂的永久性中毒.在一氧化碳变换气氛下,氮气不参与中毒反应,一氧化碳、二氧化碳、水蒸气和氧气都参与催化剂毒物与活性组分间的中毒反应,从而为催化剂中毒提供了条件,其中氧气会明显加快催化剂中毒.由热力学分析催化剂的中毒程度由强至弱为PH3,H2S,AsH3,HF.%The possible chemical reactions and products in the process of the iron-based high temperature water-gas shift catalyst B112 poisoned by PH3, AsH3, HF and H2S in the water-gas shift reaction of purified yellow phosphorous at 623-803 K was analyzed by the thermodynamics of heterogeneous reactions and the poisoning mechanisms were discussed. The results showed that the phosphate, arsenate, sulfate, sulfur and carbon deposit led to the catalyst temporary poisoning, FeP, FeP2, Fe2P, Fe3P, FeAs, FeAs2, FeF3, FeF2, Fe2S3, FeS2, Fe7Sg and FeS led to the catalyst permanent poisoning. In the water-gas shift process, N2 did not participate in toxic reactions, while CO, CO2, H2O and O2 participated poisoning reactions and provided conditions for catalyst poisoning, especially, O2 could speed up the catalyst poisoning. Based on the thermodynamic analysis, the toxicities for the water-gas shift catalyst from strong to weak was as follows:PH3, H2S, AsH3, HF.

  9. Support effects and catalytic trends for water gas shift activity of transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Astrid; Janssens, T.V.W.; Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii

    2010-01-01

    Water gas shift activity measurements for 12 transition metals (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Re, Ir, Pt, Au) supported on inert MgAl2O4 and Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 are presented, to elucidate the influence of the active metal and the support. The activity is related to the adsorption energy of molecular...... CO and atomic oxygen on the metal; the latter is a good measure for the reactivity of the metal towards H2O. Generally, the activity of the catalysts with the Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 support is higher, compared to the corresponding MgAl2O4-supported catalysts. Exceptions are Cu and Au, which have a higher...... around −2.5 eV. No clear correlation exists with the adsorption energy of CO. In contrast, the activity for the Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 support increases with increasing adsorption strength for CO, and based on a relatively low activity of Cu the activity does not seem to depend on the adsorption energy of oxygen...

  10. Simulation and control of water-gas shift packed bed reactor with inter-stage cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. Z.; Nandong, J.

    2016-03-01

    Water-Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR) has become one of the well-known pathways for H2 production in industries. The issue with WGSR is that it is kinetically favored at high temperatures but thermodynamically favored at low temperatures, thus requiring careful consideration in the control design in order to ensure that the temperature used does not deactivate the catalyst. This paper studies the effect of a reactor arrangement with an inter-stage cooling implemented in the packed bed reactor to look at its effect on outlet temperature. A mathematical model is developed based on one-dimensional heat and mass transfers which incorporate the intra-particle effects. It is shown that the placement of the inter-stage cooling and the outlet temperature exiting the inter-stage cooling have strong influence on the reaction conversion. Several control strategies are explored for the process. It is shown that a feedback- feedforward control strategy using Multi-scale Control (MSC) is effective to regulate the reactor temperature profile which is critical to maintaining the catalysts activity.

  11. Single-stage temperature-controllable water gas shift reactor with catalytic nickel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Lee, Sung-Wook; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo; Lee, Dong-Wook; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Soo; Ryi, Shin-Kun

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a microstructured reactor with catalytic nickel plates is newly designed and developed for proper heat management in an exothermic water gas shift WGS reaction. The reactor is designed to increase the reactor capacity simply by numbering-up a set of a catalyst layers and heat exchanger layers. The WGS reactor is built up with two sets of a catalyst layers and heat exchanger layers. The performance of the reactor is verified by WGS testing with the variation of the furnace temperatures, gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) and coolant (N2) flow rate. At a GHSV of 10,000 h-1, CO conversion reaches the equilibrium value with a CH4 selectivity of ≤0.5% at the furnace temperature of ≥375 °C. At high GHSV (40,000 h-1), CO conversion decreases considerably because of the heat from the exothermic WGS reaction at a large reactants mass. By increasing the coolant flow rate, the heat from the WGS reaction is properly managed, leading an increase of the CO conversion to the equilibrium value at GHSV of 40,000 h-1.

  12. Hydrogen production by absorption enhanced water gas shift (AEWGS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo Bretado, Miguel A. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Juarez del Estado de Durango, Ave. Veterinaria s/n, Circuito Universitario, Durango 34120 (Mexico); Departamento de Quimica de Materiales, Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Chihuahua, Chih. 31109 (Mexico); Delgado Vigil, Manuel D.; Gutierrez, Jesus Salinas; Lopez Ortiz, Alejandro; Collins-Martinez, Virginia [Departamento de Quimica de Materiales, Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Chihuahua, Chih. 31109 (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    AEWGS is a reaction that combines the WGS reaction and CO{sub 2} capture by a solid absorbent to produce high purity H{sub 2} from synthesis gas in one single step at 600-800 C. This reactor system, if homogeneous, would not require a catalyst. However, previous research on this concept was not conclusive, since a steel reactor was used and reactor walls were suspected to act as catalyst. Therefore, there is a need to address this issue and to select and evaluate suitable CO{sub 2} absorbents for this concept. AEWGS was studied using a quartz-made fixed-bed reactor at; SV = 3000 h{sup -1}, feed; 5% CO, 15% H{sub 2}O, balance He-N{sub 2} at 600 C, 1 atm. CO{sub 2} absorbents tested were CaO*MgO, and Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Empty quartz-reactor tests leaded to conclude that a catalyst is needed for the WGS at temperatures of interest. A 97% H{sub 2} product was obtained with calcined dolomite suggesting this last to act as a WGS catalyst. (author)

  13. Pilot Scale Water Gas Shift - Membrane Device for Hydrogen from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Tom

    2013-06-30

    The objectives of the project were to build pilot scale hydrogen separation systems for use in a gasification product stream. This device would demonstrate fabrication and manufacturing techniques for producing commercially ready facilities. The design was a 2 lb/day hydrogen device which included composite hydrogen separation membranes, a water gas shift monolith catalyst, and stainless steel structural components. Synkera Technologies was to prepare hydrogen separation membranes with metallic rims, and to adjust the alloy composition in their membranes to a palladium-gold composition which is sulfur resistant. Chart was to confirm their brazing technology for bonding the metallic rims of the composite membranes to their structural components and design and build the 2 lbs/day device incorporating membranes and catalysts. WRI prepared the catalysts and completed the testing of the membranes and devices on coal derived syngas. The reactor incorporated eighteen 2'' by 7'' composite palladium alloy membranes. These membranes were assembled with three stacks of three paired membranes. Initial vacuum testing and visual inspection indicated that some membranes were cracked, either in transportation or in testing. During replacement of the failed membranes, while pulling a vacuum on the back side of the membranes, folds were formed in the flexible composite membranes. In some instances these folds led to cracks, primarily at the interface between the alumina and the aluminum rim. The design of the 2 lb/day device was compromised by the lack of any membrane isolation. A leak in any membrane failed the entire device. A large number of tests were undertaken to bring the full 2 lb per day hydrogen capacity on line, but no single test lasted more than 48 hours. Subsequent tests to replace the mechanical seals with brazing have been promising, but the technology remains promising but not proven.

  14. Effect of promoters on Cr/SiO2 catalysts for coupling of reversed water-gas shift reaction with dehydrogenation of ethane to ethene%逆水煤气变换耦合乙烷脱氢反应中助剂对Cr/SiO2催化剂性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛欣

    2013-01-01

    The coupling reaction of ethane dehydrogenation with reversed water-gas shift reaction over Cr/SiO2 catalysts was studied. The Cr/SiO2 catalyst promoted by Mn oxide has already been found to be active and selective in the reaction at around 740 ℃, with the selectivity to ethylene of about 99.7% at 47.7% ethane conversion. XPS results showed that Cr6+, Cr3+ and Mn4+ occupied on the surface of the catalysts. The addition of Mn benefited the redox cycle between reactants and catalyst and enhanced reaction activity.%分别制备了以Mn、Ce、Cu、Zn、K等为助剂的Cr/SiO2催化剂,考察了助剂在逆水煤气变换耦合乙烷脱氢制乙烯反应中对Cr/SiO2催化剂反应性能的影响.结果表明,高温下Mn的加入有利于催化活性的提高,Cr-Mn/SiO2催化剂显示了较好的催化活性.在740℃、n(CO2)/n(C2H6)=7的条件下,乙烷转化率为47%,乙烯选择性为99%.XRD、XPS、UV-DRS和TPR技术的表征表明催化剂表面存在Cr3+、Cr6+、Mn4+物种,Mn的加入使得催化剂还原性能增强,有助于反应过程中氧化还原循环的进行,提高了反应活性.

  15. Operation, Modeling and Analysis of the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Jonathan E.

    2001-01-01

    The Reverse Water Gas Shift process is a candidate technology for water and oxygen production on Mars under the In-Situ Propellant Production project. This report focuses on the operation and analysis of the Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) process, which has been constructed at Kennedy Space Center. A summary of results from the initial operation of the RWGS, process along with an analysis of these results is included in this report. In addition an evaluation of a material balance model developed from the work performed previously under the summer program is included along with recommendations for further experimental work.

  16. Density functional theory study on water-gas-shift reaction over molybdenum disulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, X. R.; Wang, Shengguang; Hu, J.

    2009-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been carried out to investigate the adsorption of reaction intermediates appearing during water-gas-shift reaction at the sulfur covered MoS2 (1 0 0)surfaces, Mo-termination with 37.5% S coverage and S-termination with 50% S coverage using periodic slabs....... The pathway for water-gas-shift reaction on both terminations has been carefully studied where the most favorable reaction path precedes the redox mechanism, namely the reaction takes place as follows: CO + H2O --> CO + OH + H --> CO + O + 2H --> CO2 + H-2. The most likely reaction candidates for the formate...

  17. High temperature water gas shift reaction over Fe-Cr-Cu nanocatalyst fabricated by a novel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latifi, Seyed Mahdi; Salehirad, Alireza [Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology (IROST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Fe-Cr-Cu nanocatalyst was synthesized through an inorganic-precursor thermolysis approach and exploited for high temperature water gas shift reaction. The results demonstrated that the method used for the nanocatalyst fabrication led to smaller crystallite size (32.9 nm) and higher BET surface area (127.3m{sup 2}/g) compared to those of a reference sample (65.5 nm, 78.6m{sup 2}/g) prepared by co-precipitation conventional method. Furthermore, the obtained data for catalytic activity showed that the catalyst prepared via inorganic precursor has better activity than the reference sample in all studied temperatures (350-500 .deg. C) and also exhibited higher catalytic activity than a commercial Fe-Cr- Cu catalyst in higher temperatures (more than 450 .deg. C).

  18. CHRISGAS Project. WP13: Ancillary and Novel Processes. Final Report: Separation of Hydrogen with Membranes Combined with Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Hervas, J. M.; Marono, M.; Barreiro, M. M.

    2011-05-13

    Oxygen pressurized gasification of biomass out stands as a very promising approach to obtain energy or hydrogen from renewable sources. The technical feasibility of this technology has been investigated under the scope of the VI FP CHRISGAS project, which started in September 2004 and had a duration of five and a half years. The Division of Combustion and Gasification of CIEMAT participated in this project in Work Package 13: Ancillary and novel processes, studying innovative gas separation and gas upgrading systems. Such systems include novel or available high temperature water gas shift catalysts and commercially available membranes not yet tried in this type of atmosphere. This report describes the activities carried out during the project regarding the performance of high temperature water gas shift catalysts for upgrading of synthesis gas obtained from biomass gasification, the separation of H2 with selective membranes and the combination of both processes in one by means of a catalytic membrane reactor. (Author) 20 refs.

  19. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  20. Nano-Scale Au Supported on Carbon Materials for the Low Temperature Water Gas Shift (WGS Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Sánchez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Au-based catalysts supported on carbon materials with different structures such as graphite (G and fishbone type carbon nanofibers (CNF-F were prepared using two different methods (impregnation and gold-sol to be tested in the water gas shift (WGS reaction. Atomic absorption spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, elemental analyses (CNH, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR and temperature-programmed decomposition were employed to characterize both the supports and catalysts. Both the crystalline nature of the carbon supports and the method of gold incorporation had a strong influence on the way in which Au particles were deposited on the carbon surface. The higher crystallinity and the smaller and well dispersed Au particle size were, the higher activity of the catalysts in the WGS reaction was noted. Finally, catalytic activity showed an important dependence on the reaction temperature and steam-to-CO molar ratio.

  1. Model-Based Design of Energy Efficient Palladium Membrane Water Gas Shift Fuel Processors for PEM Fuel Cell Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummalla, Mallika; Vanderspurt, Thomas Henry; Emerson, Sean; She, Ying; Dardas, Zissis; Olsommer, Benoît

    An integrated, palladium alloy membrane Water-Gas Shift (WGS) reactor can significantly reduce the size, cost and complexity of a fuel processor for a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane fuel cell power system.

  2. The energies of formation and mobilities of Cu surface species on Cu and ZnO in methanol and water gas shift atmospheres studied by DFT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dominik Bjørn; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Temel, Burcin;

    2012-01-01

    ) species are investigated in relevant synthesis gas compositions. The CuCO and Cu2HCOO species are identified to be predominant for metal transport on Cu particles, which may contribute to sintering of Cu by particle migration and coalescence. Furthermore, transport of Cu on ZnO is found mostly to occur......Catalysts based on copper, such as the Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 system are widely used for industrial scale methanol synthesis and the low temperature water gas shift reaction. A common characteristic of these catalysts is that they deactivate quite rapidly during operation and therefore understanding...... through CuCO species, which indicates that CuCO is an important species for Ostwald ripening in a Cu/ZnO catalyst. These results provide atomistic perspective on the diffusion of the species that may contribute to catalyst sintering, therefore lending a valuable foundation for future investigations...

  3. Electrochemical Synthesis of Mo2C Catalytical Coatings for the Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Sergey A.; Dubrovskiy, Anton R.; Rebrov, Evgeny V.; Schouten, Jaap C.

    2007-11-01

    The electroreduction of CO32- ions on a molybdenum cathode in a NaCl-KCl-Li2CO3 melt was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical synthesis of Mo2C on molybdenum substrates has been performed at 1123 K for 7 h with a cathodic current density of 5 mA cm-2. If molybdenum carbide is present as a thin (ca. 500 nm) film on a molybdenum substrate (Mo2C/Mo), its catalytic activity in the water gas-shift reaction is enhanced by at least an order of magnitude compared to that of the bulk Mo2C phase.

  4. Theoretical study of water-gas shift reaction on the silver nanocluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Ali; Sharafie, Darioush; Fazli, Mostafa

    2017-10-01

    The kinetics of water gas shift reaction (WGSR) on the silver nanocluster was investigated using density functional theory according to the carboxyl associative mechanism. The hybrid B3PW91 functional along with the 6-31+G* and LANL2DZ basis sets were used throughout the calculations. It was observed that CO and H2O molecules adsorb physically on the Ag5 cluster without energy barrier as the initial steps of WGSR. The next three steps including H2Oads dissociation, carboxyl (OCOHads) formation, and CO2(ads) formation were accompanied by activation barrier. Transition states, as well as energy profiles of these three steps, were determined and analyzed. Our results revealed that the carboxyl and CO2(ads) formation were fast steps whereas H2Oads dissociation was the slowest step of WGSR.

  5. Harnessing the Power of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction for Organic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Andrea; Denmark, Scott E

    2016-09-26

    Since its original discovery over a century ago, the water-gas shift reaction (WGSR) has played a crucial role in industrial chemistry, providing a source of H2 to feed fundamental industrial transformations such as the Haber-Bosch synthesis of ammonia. Although the production of hydrogen remains nowadays the major application of the WGSR, the advent of homogeneous catalysis in the 1970s marked the beginning of a synergy between WGSR and organic chemistry. Thus, the reducing power provided by the CO/H2 O couple has been exploited in the synthesis of fine chemicals; not only hydrogenation-type reactions, but also catalytic processes that require a reductive step for the turnover of the catalytic cycle. Despite the potential and unique features of the WGSR, its applications in organic synthesis remain largely underdeveloped. The topic will be critically reviewed herein, with the expectation that an increased awareness may stimulate new, creative work in the area.

  6. Water-gas shift (WGS) Operation of Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Pilot Plant at the Buggenum IGCC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, H.A.J.; Damen, K.; Makkee, M.; Trapp, C.

    2014-01-01

    In the Nuon/Vattenfall CO2 Catch-up project, a pre-combustion CO2 capture pilot plant was built and operated at the Buggenum IGCC power plant, the Netherlands. The pilot consist of sweet water-gas shift, physical CO2 absorption and CO2 compression. The technology performance was verified and validat

  7. Water-gas shift (WGS) Operation of Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Pilot Plant at the Buggenum IGCC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, H.A.J.; Damen, K.; Makkee, M.; Trapp, C.

    2014-01-01

    In the Nuon/Vattenfall CO2 Catch-up project, a pre-combustion CO2 capture pilot plant was built and operated at the Buggenum IGCC power plant, the Netherlands. The pilot consist of sweet water-gas shift, physical CO2 absorption and CO2 compression. The technology performance was verified and

  8. Water-gas shift (WGS) Operation of Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Pilot Plant at the Buggenum IGCC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, H.A.J.; Damen, K.; Makkee, M.; Trapp, C.

    2014-01-01

    In the Nuon/Vattenfall CO2 Catch-up project, a pre-combustion CO2 capture pilot plant was built and operated at the Buggenum IGCC power plant, the Netherlands. The pilot consist of sweet water-gas shift, physical CO2 absorption and CO2 compression. The technology performance was verified and validat

  9. Modeling and Analysis of the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process for In-Situ Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Jonathan E.

    2000-01-01

    This report focuses on the development of mathematical models and simulation tools developed for the Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) process. This process is a candidate technology for oxygen production on Mars under the In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) project. An analysis of the RWGS process was performed using a material balance for the system. The material balance is very complex due to the downstream separations and subsequent recycle inherent with the process. A numerical simulation was developed for the RWGS process to provide a tool for analysis and optimization of experimental hardware, which will be constructed later this year at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Attempts to solve the material balance for the system, which can be defined by 27 nonlinear equations, initially failed. A convergence scheme was developed which led to successful solution of the material balance, however the simplified equations used for the gas separation membrane were found insufficient. Additional more rigorous models were successfully developed and solved for the membrane separation. Sample results from these models are included in this report, with recommendations for experimental work needed for model validation.

  10. LYAPUNOV-Based Sensor Failure Detection and Recovery for the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralambous, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    Livingstone, a model-based AI software system, is planned for use in the autonomous fault diagnosis, reconfiguration, and control of the oxygen-producing reverse water gas shift (RWGS) process test-bed located in the Applied Chemistry Laboratory at KSC. In this report the RWGS process is first briefly described and an overview of Livingstone is given. Next, a Lyapunov-based approach for detecting and recovering from sensor failures, differing significantly from that used by Livingstone, is presented. In this new method, models used are in t e m of the defining differential equations of system components, thus differing from the qualitative, static models used by Livingstone. An easily computed scalar inequality constraint, expressed in terms of sensed system variables, is used to determine the existence of sensor failures. In the event of sensor failure, an observer/estimator is used for determining which sensors have failed. The theory underlying the new approach is developed. Finally, a recommendation is made to use the Lyapunov-based approach to complement the capability of Livingstone and to use this combination in the RWGS process.

  11. LYAPUNOV-Based Sensor Failure Detection and Recovery for the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralambous, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    Livingstone, a model-based AI software system, is planned for use in the autonomous fault diagnosis, reconfiguration, and control of the oxygen-producing reverse water gas shift (RWGS) process test-bed located in the Applied Chemistry Laboratory at KSC. In this report the RWGS process is first briefly described and an overview of Livingstone is given. Next, a Lyapunov-based approach for detecting and recovering from sensor failures, differing significantly from that used by Livingstone, is presented. In this new method, models used are in t e m of the defining differential equations of system components, thus differing from the qualitative, static models used by Livingstone. An easily computed scalar inequality constraint, expressed in terms of sensed system variables, is used to determine the existence of sensor failures. In the event of sensor failure, an observer/estimator is used for determining which sensors have failed. The theory underlying the new approach is developed. Finally, a recommendation is made to use the Lyapunov-based approach to complement the capability of Livingstone and to use this combination in the RWGS process.

  12. A mini review on the chemistry and catalysis of the water gas shift reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zhun

    2014-01-01

    Water gas shift (WGS) reaction is a chemical reaction in which carbon monoxide reacts with water vapor to form carbon dioxide and hydrogen. It is an important reaction industrially used in conjunction with steam reforming of hydrocarbons for the production of high purity hydrogen. Grenoble et al examined the roles of both active metals and metal oxide support on the kinetics of the WGS reaction. They found out that the turn over numbers of various Al2O3 supported transition metals decreased in the trend of Cu, Re, Co, Ru, Ni, Pt, Os, Au, Fe, Pd, Rh, and Ir, which corresponds nicely to the observed volcano shaped correlation between catalytic activities and respective CO adsorption heat. This is a strong indication that CO gets activated on the metal surface during the reaction and different metals have different activation energies. The authors also observed that the turn over number of Pt/Al2O3 was one order of magnitude higher than that of Pt/SiO2, indicating a strong support effect, which the authors ascri...

  13. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-09-19

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H₂ to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H₂, CO and CO₂. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H₂O, CO₂ and H₂. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H₂ and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H₂ and compressed CO₂ ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H₂ permeance and purity, high CH₄ conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  14. Hydrogen production by the high temperature combination of the water gas shift and CO{sub 2} absorption reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretado, M.A.E.; Vigil, M.D.D.; Gutierrez, J.S.; Ortiz, A.L.; Collins-Martinez, V. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Chihuahua, Chih (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica de Materiales

    2009-01-15

    Hydrogen is an important raw material for the chemical and petroleum industry. An important research field has surfaced, dealing with the production of high purity hydrogen for power generation purposes through fuel cells. Industrial technologies for hydrogen production are based on the use of fossil fuels, with catalytic steam methane reforming being the most important process together with partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and the integrated combined coal gasification cycle. Hydrogen production through the water gas shift (WGS) reaction requires two consecutive catalytic steps followed by carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) separation. However, combination of the WGS reaction and CO{sub 2} capture by a solid absorbent opens the opportunity to produce high purity hydrogen in one single step called absorption enhanced WGS or AEWGS. In theory, this process would not require a catalyst. This paper presented an experimental study of AEWGS using a quartz-made fixed bed reactor. The CO{sub 2} absorbents tested in this study were calcined dolomite, (CaOMgO) and sodium zirconate (Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}). The paper described the experimental study, with particular reference to the thermodynamic analysis that determined the equilibrium conditions of the systems CO/H{sub 2}O (WGS) and CO/absorbent/H{sub 2} (AEWGS); synthesis and characterization; and the fixed bed reaction system. Results were determined by X-ray diffraction, BET surface area and crystallite size, and reaction evaluation. It was concluded that at reaction conditions, dolomite can efficiently remove CO{sub 2} at partial pressures three times lower than with the use of Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} as absorbent. 24 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  15. Preparation and High-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Catalytic Features of La1-xCexFeO3 Perovskite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马红钦; 朱慧铭; 谭欣; 张继炎; 张鎏

    2004-01-01

    Based on water-gas shift reaction mechanism and perovskite compounds characteristics, La1-xCexFeO3 (.K) perovskite were designed and prepared as shift catalysts. DTA and XRD results reveal that La1-xCexFeO3 can be formed at 730~760 ℃ by mechanic-mix thermal decomposition method. Activity and heat-resisting tests show that La1-xCexFeO3 (.K) possess high thermal stability if x is less than or equals to 0.5. But when x is greater than 0.5, La1-xCexFeO3 (.K) will be converted into ceria and magnetite partially or completely under shift reaction conditions. In the case of x=0.5, the conversion of CO is about 68% at 530 ℃. Potassium can greatly improve the low temperature activity, but slightly reduces the high temperature activity, and has little impact on the thermal stability. La0.5Ce0.5FeO3 (.K) is a promising chromium-free high temperature shift catalyst.

  16. Integrated Water Gas Shift Membrane Reactors Utilizing Novel, Non Precious Metal Mixed Matrix Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, John

    2013-09-30

    Nanoparticles of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks and other related hybrid materials were prepared by modifying published synthesis procedures by introducing bases, changing stoichiometric ratios, or adjusting reaction conditions. These materials were stable at temperatures >300 °C and were compatible with the polymer matrices used to prepare mixed- matrix membranes (MMMs). MMMs tested at 300 °C exhibited a >30 fold increase in permeability, compared to those measured at 35 °C, while maintaining H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity. Measurements at high pressure (up to 30 atm) and high temperature (up to 300 °C) resulted in an increase in gas flux across the membrane with retention of selectivity. No variations in permeability were observed at high pressures at either 35 or 300 °C. CO{sub 2}-induced plasticization was not observed for Matrimid®, VTEC, and PBI polymers or their MMMs at 30 atm and 300 °C. Membrane surface modification by cross-linking with ethanol diamine resulted in an increase in H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity at 35 °C. Spectrometric analysis showed that the cross-linking was effective to temperatures <150 °C. At higher temperatures, the cross-linked membranes exhibit a H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity similar to the uncross-linked polymer. Performance of the polybenzimidazole (PBI) hollow fibers prepared at Santa Fe Science and Technology (SFST, Inc.) showed increased flux o to a flat PBI membrane. A water-gas shift reactor has been built and currently being optimized for testing under DOE conditions.

  17. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2001-10-16

    This technical report summarizes our activities conducted in Yr II. In Yr I we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing the hydrogen selective SiC membrane with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. In addition, a SiC macroporous membrane was fabricated as a substrate candidate for the proposed SiC membrane. In Yr II we have focused on the development of a microporous SiC membrane as an intermediate layer between the substrate and the final membrane layer prepared from CVD. Powders and supported thin silicon carbide films (membranes) were prepared by a sol-gel technique using silica sol precursors as the source of silicon, and phenolic resin as the source of carbon. The powders and films were prepared by the carbothermal reduction reaction between the silica and the carbon source. The XRD analysis indicates that the powders and films consist of SiC, while the surface area measurement indicates that they contain micropores. SEM and AFM studies of the same films also validate this observation. The powders and membranes were also stable under different corrosive and harsh environments. The effects of these different treatments on the internal surface area, pore size distribution, and transport properties, were studied for both the powders and the membranes using the aforementioned techniques and XPS. Finally the SiC membrane materials are shown to have satisfactory hydrothermal stability for the proposed application. In Yr III, we will focus on the demonstration of the potential benefit using the SiC membrane developed from Yr I and II for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility as a direct measure of oxidation state in LiFePO4 batteries and cyclic water gas shift reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyk, Thomas; Eikerling, Michael

    2015-08-14

    The possibility of correlating the magnetic susceptibility to the oxidation state of the porous active mass in a chemical or electrochemical reactor was analyzed. The magnetic permeability was calculated using a hierarchical model of the reactor. This model was applied to two practical examples: LiFePO4 batteries, in which the oxidation state corresponds with the state-of-charge, and cyclic water gas shift reactors, in which the oxidation state corresponds to the depletion of the catalyst. In LiFePO4 batteries phase separation of the lithiated and delithiated phases in the LiFePO4 particles in the positive electrode gives rise to a hysteresis effect, i.e. the magnetic permeability depends on the history of the electrode. During fast charge or discharge, non-uniform lithium distributionin the electrode decreases the hysteresis effect. However, the overall sensitivity of the magnetic response to the state-of-charge lies in the range of 0.03%, which makes practical measurement challenging. In cyclic water gas shift reactors, the sensitivity is 4 orders of magnitude higher and without phase separation, no hysteresis occurs. This shows that the method is suitable for such reactors, in which large changes of the magnetic permeability of the active material occurs.

  19. Preparation and Water-Gas Shift Catalytic Activities of the Perovskite Type Complex Oxide La1-x CexFeO3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马红钦; 谭欣; 朱慧铭; 张继炎; 张鎏

    2003-01-01

    The perovskite type rare-earth iron complex (REIC) oxide La1-xCexFeO3 is designed and prepared as water-gas shift catalyst. Activity evaluation and heat-resisting test show that the perovskite type compounds La1-xCexFeO3 (· K) has a good thermal stability if x is less than or equal to 0. 5. But when x is greater than 0. 5, La1-x Cex FeO3 ( · K) will turn out to be ceria and magnetite partially or completely at high temperature in the shift reaction atmosphere. In the case of x = 0. 5, the conversion of carbon monoxide is about 68% at 530℃. Potassium can greatly improve the low temperature activity, but slightly lower the high temperature activity,and has little impact on the thermal stability. La0.5 Ce0.5 FeO3 ( · K) is a promising chromium-free high-temperature shift catalyst.

  20. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P.; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G.; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K.; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H2 to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H2, CO and CO2. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H2O, CO2 and H2. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H2 and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H2 and compressed CO2 ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H2 permeance and purity, high CH4 conversion levels and reduced CO yields. PMID:27657143

  1. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Castro-Dominguez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs effectively remove H2 to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS. Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H2, CO and CO2. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H2O, CO2 and H2. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H2 and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H2 and compressed CO2 ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR for MSR, (ii a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H2 permeance and purity, high CH4 conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  2. Influence of the monoclinic and tetragonal zirconia phases on the water gas shift reaction. A theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón, María Luisa; Herrera, Barbara; Araya, Paulo; Gracia, Francisco; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2013-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of the water gas shift reaction taking place on zirconia surfaces modeled by monoclinic and tetragonal clusters. In order to understand the charge transfer between the active species, in this work we analyze the influence of the geometry of monoclinic and tetragonal zirconia using reactivity descriptors such as electronic chemical potential (μ), charge transfer (ΔN) and molecular hardness (η). We have found that the most preferred surface is tetragonal zirconia (tZrO2) indicating also that low charge transfer systems will generate less stable intermediates, that will allow to facilitate desorption process.

  3. Computation and comparison of Pd-based membrane reactor performances for water gas shift reaction and isotope swamping in view of highly tritiated water decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santucci, Alessia, E-mail: alessia.santucci@enea.it [Associazione ENEA-Euratom sulla Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Rizzello, Claudio [Tesi Sas, Via Bolzano 28, Roma (Italy); Tosti, Silvano [Associazione ENEA-Euratom sulla Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, RM (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A dedicated detritiation process for highly tritiated water (HTW) has to be identified. • Water gas shift and isotopic swamping via Pd–Ag membrane reactor are possible processes. • A parametric analysis through two simulation codes is performed. • A comparison in terms of the decontamination factor is provided. -- Abstract: In a D–T fusion machine, due to the possible reaction between tritium and oxygen, some potential sources of highly tritiated water (HTW) can be identified. Therefore, a dedicated detritiation process has to be assessed either for economic and safety reasons. In this view, the use of a Pd-based membrane reactor performing isotopic exchange reactions can be considered since hydrogen isotopes exclusively permeate the Pd–Ag membrane and their exchange over the catalyst realizes the water detritiation. In this activity, the treatment of highly tritiated water, generated by an ITER-like machine (i.e. 2 kg of stoichiometric HTO containing up to 300 g of tritium), via a Pd-membrane reactor is studied in terms of decontamination capability. Especially, a parametric analysis of two processes (water gas shift and isotopic swamping) performed in a Pd-based membrane reactor is carried out by using two mathematical models previously developed and experimentally verified. Particularly, the effect of the reactor temperature, the membrane thickness, the reaction pressure and the protium sweep flow-rate is investigated. Moreover, a comparison in terms of the decontamination factor and the number of reactors necessary to detritiate the HTW are provided. Generally, the results reveal a higher decontamination capability of the WGS reaction respect with the IS (maximum DF values of about 120 and 1.6 in the case of WGS and IS, respectively). However some drawbacks, mainly related with the formation of tritiated species, can occur by performing the WGS.

  4. La2-xCexCu1-yZnyO4 perovskites for high temperature water-gas shift reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.S.Maluf; E.M. Assaf

    2009-01-01

    The performance of La2-xCexCu1-yZnyO4 perovskites as catalysts for the high temperature water-gas shift reaction (HT-WGSR) was inves-tigated. The catalysts were characterized by EDS, XRD, BET surface area, TPR, and XANES. The results showed that all the perovskites exhibited the La2CuO4 orthorhombic structure, so the Pechini method is suitable for the preparation of pure perovskite. However, the La1.90Ce0.10CuO4 perovskite alone, when calcined at 350/700℃, also showed a (La0.935Ce0.065)2CuO4 perovskite with tetragonal struc-ture, which produced a surface area higher than the other perovskites. The perovskites that exhibited the best catalytic performance were those calcined at 350/700 ℃ and, among these, La1.90Ce0.10CuO4 was outstanding, probably because of the high surface area associated with the presence of the (La0.935Ce0.065) 2CuO4 perovskite with tetragonal structure and orthorhombic La2CuO4 phase.

  5. Water-gas shift reaction over gold nanoparticles dispersed on nanostructured CeOx-TiO2(110) surfaces: Effects of high ceria coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinter, D. C.; Park, J. B.; Agnoli, S.; Evans, J.; Hrbek, J.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy has been used to study the morphology of an overlayer of ceria in contact with a TiO2(110) substrate. Two types of domains were observed after ceria deposition. An ordered ceria film covered half of the surface and high-resolution imaging suggested a near-c(6 × 2) relationship to the underlying TiO2(110)-(1 × 1). The other half of the surface comprised CeOx nanoparticles and reconstructed TiOx supported on TiO2(110)-(1 × 1). Exposure to a small amount of gold resulted in the formation of isolated gold atoms and small clusters on the ordered ceria film and TiO2(110)-(1 × 1) areas, which exhibited significant sintering at 500 K and showed strong interaction between the sintered gold clusters and the domain boundaries of the ceria film. The Au/CeOx/TiO2(110) model system proved to be a good catalyst for the water-gas shift (WGS) exhibiting much higher turnover frequencies (TOFs) than Cu(111) and Pt(111) benchmarks, or the individual Au/TiO2(110) and Au/CeO2(111) systems. For Au/CeOx/TiO2(110) catalysts, there was a decrease in catalytic activity with increasing ceria coverage that correlates with a reduction in the concentration of Ce3 + formed during WGS reaction conditions.

  6. Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

    2010-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

  7. Synthesis of Dimethyl Ether from CO Hydrogenation: a Thermodynamic Analysis of the Influence of Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangxin Jia; Yisheng Tan; Yizhuo Han

    2005-01-01

    Three reactions involved in dimethyl ether (DME) synthesis from CO hydrogenation: methanol synthesis reaction (MSR), methanol dehydration reaction (MDR) and water gas shift reaction (WGSR) are studied by thermodynamic calculation. For demonstrating this process in detail, three models, MSR,MSR+MDR, MSR+MDR+WGSR, are used. Their basic characteristics can be obtained by varying widely the ratios of H2 to CO in the feed (no CO2). Through thermodynamic analysis a chemical synergic effect obviously exists in the second and third models. By comparison between two models it is found that WGSR plays a special role in dimethyl ether synthesis. It is possible for the two models to shift one to the other by regulating CO2 concentration in feed. For Model 2, the selectivity for DME in oxygenates (DME+methanol) does not change with the ratio of H2 to CO.

  8. Renewable synthesis-gas-production. Do hydrocarbons in the reactant flow of the reverse water-gas shift reaction cause coke formation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.; Kern, C.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In a two-step synthetic fuel production process based on carbon dioxide and renewable hydrogen, the best possible selectivity towards liquid hydrocarbons (Hc) shall be implemented. The process consists of a combination of the Reverse Water-Gas Shift reaction and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. To achieve this goal, gaseous short-chained Hc from the FTS reactor are recycled in the RWGS unit. In this paper, challenges coming up with the implementation of a recycle loop are discussed. First of all, it has to be examined whether Hc are converted under conditions present in the RWGS reactor. The coking caused by the recycle of Hc is regarded, including thermal coking in the heating zone of the reactor and catalytic coking in the catalyst bed. Coking of course is unwanted, as it deactivates the catalyst. The scope of this work is to find out to which extent and under which conditions gaseous Hc can be recycled. Therefore, experiments were carried out in both, a quartz glass reactor using a commercial Ni-catalyst at ambient pressure and in a pressurized steel reactor (without catalyst) to examine coking during the thermal decomposition of Hc. The catalytic experiments at atmospheric pressure showed that a recycle of CH{sub 4} did not cause coking up to a ratio of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} below one. For these conditions, long term stability was proved. The reaction rates of the CH{sub 4} conversion were below those of the RWGS reaction. However, replacing CH{sub 4} by C{sub 3}H{sub 8} leads to thermal and catalytic coking. Catalytic coking hits the maximum level at about 700 C and decreases for higher temperatures and, thus is not regarded as a problem for the RWGS reactor. In contrast to that, thermal coking raises with higher temperatures, but it can be supressed efficiently with additional injection of H{sub 2}O, which of course shifts the equilibrium towards the undesired reactant side. (orig.)

  9. CO{sub 2} SELECTIVE CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECOVERY OF CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul K. T. Liu

    2005-01-31

    Our CO{sub 2}-affinity material synthesis activities thus far have offered two base materials suitable for hydrogen production via low temperature water gas shift reaction (LTS-WGS) with concomitant removal of CO{sub 2} for sequestration. They include (i) a nanoporous CO{sub 2}-affinity membrane and (ii) a hydrotalcite based CO-affinity adsorbent. These two materials offer a commercially viable opportunity for implementing an innovative process concept termed the hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor (HAMR) for LTS-WGS, proposed by us in a previous quarterly report. A complete mathematical model has been developed in this quarter to describe the HAMR system, which offers process flexibility to incorporate both catalysts and adsorbents in the reactor as well as permeate sides. In comparison with the preliminary mathematical model we reported previously, this improved model incorporates ''time'' as an independent variable to realistically simulate the unsteady state nature of the adsorptive portion of the process. In the next quarterly report, we will complete the simulation to demonstrate the potential benefit of the proposed process based upon the performance parameters experimentally obtained from the CO{sub 2}-affinity adsorbent and membrane developed from this project.

  10. Water-gas shift reaction on metal nanoclusters encapsulated in mesoporous ceria studied with ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Cun; Zhu, Yuan; Ye, Yingchun; Zhang, Shiran; Cheng, Fang; Liu, Yi; Wang, Paul; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2012-10-23

    Metal nanoclusters (Au, Pt, Pd, Cu) encapsulated in channels of mesoporous ceria (mp-CeO(2)) were synthesized. The activation energies of water-gas shift (WGS) reaction performed at oxide-metal interfaces of metal nanoclusters encapsulated in mp-CeO(2) (M@mp-CeO(2)) are lower than those of metal nanoclusters impregnated on ceria nanorods (M/rod-CeO(2)). In situ studies using ambient-pressure XPS (AP-XPS) suggested that the surface chemistry of the internal concave surface of CeO(2) pores of M@mp-CeO(2) is different from that of external surfaces of CeO(2) of M/rod-CeO(2) under reaction conditions. AP-XPS identified the metallic state of the metal nanoclusters of these WGS catalysts (M@mp-CeO(2) and M/rod-CeO(2)) under a WGS reaction condition. The lower activation energy of M@mp-CeO(2) in contrast to M/rod-CeO(2) is related to the different surface chemistry of the two types of CeO(2) under the same reaction condition.

  11. Magnetic Ni-Co alloys induced by water gas shift reaction, Ni-Co oxides by CO oxidation and their supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon; Kang, Jung-Soo; Leung, Kam Tong; Kim, Seog K.; Sohn, Youngku

    2016-11-01

    Ni-Co alloys and oxides have attracted considerable attention in diverse fields, such as magnetic materials, energy storage and environmental/energy producing catalysts. Herein, the formation of magnetic Ni-Co alloys was induced by the water-gas shift reaction (WGSR) and the oxides were prepared by post-annealing and a CO oxidation reaction. The materials were characterized using a range of techniques. The annealed and post-CO oxidation Ni and Co-rich samples showed the crystal structures of NiCo2O4(Co3O4)/NiO and NiCo2O4/Co3O4, respectively. The Ni-Co oxides showed better supercapacitor performance than the corresponding Ni-Co alloys. The Co-rich samples exhibited better supercapacitor performance and CO oxidation activity than the Ni-rich sample. In addition, the Co-rich alloy showed a magnetization of 114 emu/g, which was approximately 2× larger than that of the Ni-rich alloy. The WGS reaction and the wide application tests are useful for designing new materials applicable to a wide range of areas.

  12. 催化水煤气变换反应的计算模拟进展%Progress of theoretical simulation of catalytic water-gas-shift reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玉; 张福丽; 姚辉超; 刘植昌; 崔佳; 徐春明

    2012-01-01

    The progress of theoretical simulation of catalytic water-gas-shift(WGS) reaction is reviewed,by focusing on the reaction mechanism.As to traditional Cu-Zn-,Fe-Cr-,and Co-Mo-based heterogeneous catalysts,carboxyl and redox mechanisms dominate.Promoters and supports also affect the entire reaction process,and may take part in the reaction process directly.Improved or novel catalysts,such as gold or gold-loaded catalyst have also been explored theoretically,and there is also no end to apprehending respective catalytic reaction mechanism.For those homogeneous catalytic reactions like WGS catalyzed by carbonyls of iron group,the understanding of the reaction mechanism is getting deeper.Theoretical studies are expected to expand from those simple model systems to more complex and real WGS model systems.Theoretical studies will show their advantages,such as convenience and low cost,in comparison with experimental investigation,and also provide successful examples for the design of catalysts.%综述了对具有广泛工业应用的水煤气变换(WGS)反应进行理论模拟所取得的进展,重点讨论反应机理方面获得的成果。对于传统的铜锌、铁铬和钴钼等非均相催化剂而言,羧基机理和氧化还原机理占统治地位,而助剂和载体对反应机理也有影响,有时甚至直接参与反应过程。对改进型、新型催化剂如金或负载金等催化WGS反应机理的认识过程尚未结束。对铁族羰基络合均相催化WGS反应机理的理解逐步深入。理论模拟研究将从少数简单的WGS模型体系扩展到更多复杂的真实体系;在预言新的催化体系反应机理上,与实验研究相比,有望体现出费用低和非常便利的优势,并能为催化剂的设计提供理论依据和成功案例。

  13. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. During Year I, we have successfully fabricated SiC macro porous membranes via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder, which were then deposited with thin, micro-porous (6 to 40{angstrom} in pore size) films via sol-gel technique as intermediate layers. Finally, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was deposited on this substrate via our CVD/I technique. The composite membrane thus prepared demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers. Building upon the positive progress made in the Year I preliminary study, we will conduct an optimization study in Year II to develop an optimized H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment.

  14. SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2003-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. SiC macro-porous membranes have been successfully fabricated via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder. Also, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was prepared via our CVD/I technique. This composite membrane demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers and sol-gel techniques. Building upon the positive progress made in the membrane development study, we conducted an optimization study to develop an H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment. In addition, mathematical simulation has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed reactor for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the

  15. The Role of the Coprecipitation Sequence of Salt Precursors on the Genesis of Cu-ZnO-Al2O3 Catalysts: Synthesis, Characterization and Activity for Low Temperature Shift Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.T. Figueiredo

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Cu-ZnO-Al2O3 catalysts for the low-temperature water-gas shift reaction were prepared using methods of direct and reverse coprecipitation. The catalysts obtained were characterized by DRX, TPR, XPS, N2O chemisorption, Hg-Porosimetry and BET surface area. It was observed that the precipitation sequence of the precursors led to significant differences in values of copper dispersion and consequently in the activity of the catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction.

  16. A General Overview of Scientific Production in China, Japan and Korea of the Water-Gas Shift (WGS Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Magnone

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In today’s economy, one of the most important national indicators of economic growth performance is the country’s ability to produce new technology—and use it responsibly and efficiently—for environmental protection or energy conservation, production and consumption in agreement with international standards. The purpose of this study is to identify the Research and Development (R&D capability in the area of environmentally friendly technologies in China, Japan and Korea over the last twenty years. As the field is very wide, Water-Gas Shift (WGS reaction technologies were taken as a case study for the purpose of this article. During 1990–2011 a total of 788 papers in the field of WGS technologies were published by scientists in China, Japan and Korea. China was the top producing country with 394 papers (50% followed by Japan with 250 papers (32%, and Korea with 144 papers (18%. The growth of the literature in the field was found to be exponential in nature for China. The R&D capabilities were found to correlate directly with the Gross Domestic Expenditures on R&D (GERD, Researchers in Full-time equivalents (FTE, and other economic parameters.

  17. Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Pressure Hydrogen Production. A comprehensive project report (FY2010 - FY2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaehn, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Peterson, Eric [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Orme, Christopher [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bhandari, Dhaval [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Miller, Scott [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Ku, Anthony [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Polishchuk, Kimberly [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Narang, Kristi [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Singh, Surinder [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Wei, Wei [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Shisler, Roger [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Wickersham, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); McEvoy, Kevin [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Alberts, William [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Howson, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Barton, Thomas [Western Research inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Sethi, Vijay [Western Research inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL), GE Global Research (GEGR), and Western Research Institute (WRI) have successfully produced hydrogen-selective membranes for water-gas-shift (WGS) modules that enable high-pressure hydrogen product streams. Several high performance (HP) polymer membranes were investigated for their gas separation performance under simulated (mixed gas) and actual syngas conditions. To enable optimal module performance, membranes with high hydrogen (H2) selectivity, permeance, and stability under WGS conditions are required. The team determined that the VTEC PI 80-051 and VTEC PI 1388 (polyimide from Richard Blaine International, Inc.) are prime candidates for the H2 gas separations at operating temperatures (~200°C). VTEC PI 80-051 was thoroughly analyzed for its H2 separations under syngas processing conditions using more-complex membrane configurations, such as tube modules and hollow fibers. These membrane formats have demonstrated that the selected VTEC membrane is capable of providing highly selective H2/CO2 separation (α = 7-9) and H2/CO separation (α = 40-80) in humidified syngas streams. In addition, the VTEC polymer membranes are resilient within the syngas environment (WRI coal gasification) at 200°C for over 1000 hours. The information within this report conveys current developments of VTEC PI 80-051 as an effective H2 gas separations membrane for high-temperature syngas streams.

  18. The production of hydrogen through the use of a 77 wt% Pd 23 wt% Ag membrane water gas shift reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberty N. Baloyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen as an energy carrier has the potential to decarbonize the energy sector. This work presents the application of a palladium-silver (Pd–Ag membrane-based reactor. The membrane reactor which is made from Pd–Ag film supported by porous stainless steel (PSS is evaluated for the production of hydrogen and the potential replacement of the current two-stage Water-Gas Shift (WGS reaction by a single stage reaction. The permeability of a 20 μm Pd–Ag membrane reactor was examined at 320 °C, 380 °C and 430 °C. The effect of continuous hydrogen exposure on the Pd–Ag membrane at high temperature and low temperature was examined to investigate the thermal stability and durability of the membrane. During continuous operation to determine thermal stability, the membrane reactor exhibited stable hydrogen permeation at 320 °C for 120 h and unstable hydrogen permeation at 430 °C was observed. For the WGS reaction, the reactor was loaded with Ferrochrome catalyst. The membrane showed the ability to produce high purity hydrogen, with a CO conversion and an H2 recovery of 84% and 88%, respectively. The membrane suffered from hydrogen embrittlement due to desorption and adsorption of hydrogen on the membrane surface. SEM analysis revealed cracks that occurred on the surface of the membrane after hydrogen exposure. XRD analysis revealed lattice expansion after hydrogen loading which suggests the occurrence of phase change from α-phase to the more brittle β-phase.

  19. Unusual Physical and Chemical Properties of Ni in Ce1-xNixO2-y Oxides: Structural Characterization and Catalytic Activity for the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, L.; Kubacka, A; Zhou, G; Estrella, M; Martinez-Arias, A; Hanson, J; Fernandez-Garcia, M; Rodriguez, J

    2010-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} nanosystems prepared by a reverse microemulsion method were characterized with synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional calculations. The Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} systems adopt a lattice with a fluorite-type structure with an acute local order where Ni displays a strongly distorted (oxygen) nearest-neighbor coordination and the presence of Ni atoms as first cation distances, pointing to the existence of Ni-O-Ni entities embedded into the ceria lattice. A Ni {leftrightarrow} Ce exchange within the CeO{sub 2} leads to a charge redistribution and the appearance of O vacancies. The Ni-O bonds in Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} are more difficult to reduce than the bonds in pure NiO. The specific structural configuration of Ni inside the mixed-metal oxide leads to a unique catalyst with a high activity for the water gas shift (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) reaction and a simultaneous reduction of the methanation activity of nickel. Characterization results indicate that small particles of metallic Ni at the interface position of a ceria network may be the key for high WGS activity and that the formate-carbonate route is operative for the production of hydrogen.

  20. Unusual Physical and Chemical Properties of Ni in Ce1-xNixO2-y Oxides: Structural Characterization and Catalytic Activity for the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Barrio, L.; Kubacka, A.; Zhou, G.; Estrella, M.; Mart& #305; nez-Arias, A.; Hanson, J.C.; Fernandez-Garc& #305; a, M.

    2010-07-29

    The structural and electronic properties of Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} nanosystems prepared by a reverse microemulsion method were characterized with synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional calculations. The Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} systems adopt a lattice with a fluorite-type structure with an acute local order where Ni displays a strongly distorted (oxygen) nearest-neighbor coordination and the presence of Ni atoms as first cation distances, pointing to the existence of Ni-O-Ni entities embedded into the ceria lattice. A Ni {leftrightarrow} Ce exchange within the CeO{sub 2} leads to a charge redistribution and the appearance of O vacancies. The Ni?O bonds in Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} are more difficult to reduce than the bonds in pure NiO. The specific structural configuration of Ni inside the mixed-metal oxide leads to a unique catalyst with a high activity for the water gas shift (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) reaction and a simultaneous reduction of the methanation activity of nickel. Characterization results indicate that small particles of metallic Ni at the interface position of a ceria network may be the key for high WGS activity and that the formate?carbonate route is operative for the production of hydrogen.

  1. CO2 SELECTIVE CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECOVERY OF CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2005-07-15

    A high temperature membrane reactor (MR) has been developed to enhance the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction efficiency with concomitant CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This improved WGS-MR with CO{sub 2} recovery capability is ideally suitable for integration into the Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power generation system. Two different CO{sub 2}-affinity materials were selected in this study. The Mg-Al-CO{sub 3}-layered double hydroxide (LDH) was investigated as an adsorbent or a membrane for CO{sub 2} separation. The adsorption isotherm and intraparticle diffusivity for the LDH-based adsorbent were experimentally determined, and suitable for low temperature shift (LTS) of WGS. The LDH-based membranes were synthesized using our commercial ceramic membranes as substrate. These experimental membranes were characterized comprehensively in terms of their morphology, and CO{sub 2} permeance and selectivity to demonstrate the technical feasibility. In parallel, an alternative material-base membrane, carbonaceous membrane developed by us, was characterized, which also demonstrated enhanced CO{sub 2} selectivity at the LTS-WGS condition. With optimization on membrane defect reduction, these two types of membrane could be used commercially as CO{sub 2}-affinity membranes for the proposed application. Based upon the unique CO{sub 2} affinity of the LDHs at the LTS/WGS environment, we developed an innovative membrane reactor, Hybrid Adsorption and Membrane Reactor (HAMR), to achieve {approx}100% CO conversion, produce a high purity hydrogen product and deliver a concentrated CO{sub 2} stream for disposal. A mathematical model was developed to simulate this unique one -step process. Finally a benchtop reactor was employed to generate experimental data, which were consistent with the prediction from the HAMR mathematical model. In summary, the project objective, enhancing WGS efficiency for hydrogen production with concomitant CO{sub 2} removal for

  2. Water–gas shift catalyst development for energy efficient applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hakeem, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The water–gas shift (WGS) is a reversible, moderately exothermic reaction (1) and is used for the production of hydrogen from CO rich gas streams (synthesis gas). CO + H2O ⇆ CO2 + H2 ΔH°= –41 kJ mol−1 (1) This research has focused on the catalyst

  3. Testing of hydrotalcite based sorbents for CO2 and H2S capture for use in sorption enhanced water gas shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dijk, H.A.J.; Walspurger, S.; Cobden, P.D.; Van den Brink, R.W. [ECN Hydrogen and Clean Fossil Fuels, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    The feasibility of the sorption enhanced water gas shift (SEWGS) process under sour conditions is shown. The sour-SEWGS process constitutes a second generation pre-combustion carbon capture technology for the application in an IGCC. As a first critical step, the suitability of a K2CO3 promoted hydrotalcite-based CO2 sorbent is demonstrated by means of adsorption and regeneration experiments in the presence of 2000 ppm H2S. In multiple cycle experiments at 400C and 5 bar, the sorbent displays reversible co-adsorption of CO2 and H2S. The CO2 sorption capacity is not significantly affected compared to sulphur-free conditions. A mechanistic model assuming two different sites for H2S interaction explains qualitatively the interactions of CO2 and H2S with the sorbent. On the type A sites, CO2 and H2S display competitive sorption where CO2 is favoured. The type B sites only allow H2S uptake and may involve the formation of metal sulphides. This material behaviour means that the sour-SEWGS process likely eliminates CO2 and H2S simultaneously from the syngas and that an almost CO2 and H2S-free H2 stream and a CO2 + H2S stream can be produced.

  4. Effects of Cerium on Reduction of Non-Chromium Iron Based CO Shift Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏运来; 胡捷; 马卓娜; 杜宝石; 郭益群

    2001-01-01

    The effects of Ce on reduction of non-chromium iron based CO shift catalyst were studied by XRD, TPR, SEM and XPS. The results show that Ce refines Fe2O3 grains and riches on the surface of catalyst in the process of reduction, which leads to decrease of the initial reductive temperature and increase of the final reductive temperature.

  5. Noble metal ions incorporated in lattice points of perovskites - water gas shift activity of BaCe1-xPtxO3-d

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jijil, C. P.; Rajarajan, A. K.; Devi, R. Nandini

    2012-06-01

    Recently precious metals supported on oxides were reported to be very promising catalysts for the lower-temperature WGS reaction. Here we report the synthesis of platinum doped barium cerate and its use as catalysts for WGS reaction. It has been found that maximum CO conversion was obtained at 3500C which enhanced after the first cycle. XPS analysis shows that after the first cycle more ionic Platinum species are present on the surface of the catalyst. Neutron diffraction at room temperature shows that the oxygen vacancies are in the O2 position and increases with increasing Pt substitution.

  6. Reform of Energy Saving Technology for Sulfur Resistant Shift Conversion with Low Water-Gas Ratio%耐硫变换低水气比节能技术改造

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张绍延

    2012-01-01

    Type QDB catalyst is used for the reform of energy saving technology with low water-gas ratio, thereby solving the problems of high CO content in the feed gas leading to methanation side reaction and deactivation of the catalyst due to high temperature in the catalyst bed. After the reform the unit runs smoothly, the comprehensive energy consumption for a ton of ammonia lowers by 4.775 GJ, steam consumption falls by 1. 17 t, and so the energy saving effect is remarkable.%应用QDB系列催化剂进行低水气比变换节能技术改造,解决了由于原料气中CO含量高引起的甲烷化副反应和催化剂床层温度高而使催化剂失活快等问题.改造后,装置运行平稳,吨氨综合能耗下降4.775GJ、蒸汽消耗降低1.17t,节能效果显著.

  7. Probing the Reaction Intermediates for the Water–gas Shift over Inverse CeOx / Au(1 1 1) Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senanayake, S.; Stacchiola, D; Evans, J; Estrella, M; Barrio, L; Perez, M; Hrbek, J; Rodriguez, J

    2010-01-01

    The water-gas shift (WGS) is an important reaction for the production of molecular H{sub 2} from CO and H{sub 2}O. An inverse CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) catalyst exhibits a very good WGS activity, better than that of copper surfaces or Cu nanoparticles dispersed on a ZnO(0 0 0 {bar 1}) substrate which model current WGS industrial catalysts. In this work we report on intermediates likely to arise during the CO + H{sub 2}O reaction over CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) using soft X-ray photoemission (sXPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Several potential intermediates including formates (HCOO), carbonates (CO{sub 3}) and carboxylates (HOCO) are considered. Adsorption of HCOOH and CO{sub 2} is used to create both HCOO and CO{sub 3} on the CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) surface, respectively. HCOO appears to have greater stability with desorption temperatures up to 600 K while CO{sub 3} only survives on the surface up to 300 K. On the CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) catalysts, the presence of Ce{sup 3+} leads to the dissociation of H{sub 2}O to give OH groups. We demonstrate experimentally that the OH species are stable on the surface up to 600 K and interact with CO to yield weakly bound intermediates. When there is an abundance of Ce{sup 4+}, the OH concentration is diminished and the likely intermediates are carbonates. As the surface defects are increased and the Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ratio grows, the OH concentration also grows and both carbonate and formate species are observed on the surface after dosing CO to H{sub 2}O/CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1). The addition of ceria nanoparticles to Au(1 1 1) is essential to generate an active WGS catalyst and to increase the production and stability of key reaction intermediates (OH, HCOO and CO{sub 3}).

  8. Effect of Addition Sequence during Neutralization and Precipitation on Iron-based Catalysts for High Temperature Shift Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wei; Zhu Jianhua; Mou Zhanjun

    2007-01-01

    The preparation of the iron-based catalysts promoted by cobalt with a small amount of copper and aluminum for the high temperature shift reaction (HTS) with different sequences of adding catalyst raw materials during neutralization and precipitation was investigated. XRD,BET and particle size distribution (PSD) were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. It was found that the catalyst crystals were all γ-Fe2O3,and the intermediate of the catalyst after aging was Fe3O4. The crystallographic form of the catalyst and its intermediate was not affected by the addition sequence in the neutralization and precipitation process. The results showed that the specific surface area and the particle size of the catalysts depended on the addition sequence to the mother liquor. Cobalt with a small amount of copper and aluminum could increase the specific surface area and decrease the particle size of catalysts.

  9. Production of hydrogen using the combination of water-gas shift and carbonatation reaction of a CO{sub 2} absorbent; Produccion de hidrogeno mediante la combinacion de las reacciones de desplazamiento de agua y carbonatacion de un absorbente de CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo-Bretado, M. A.; Ponce-Pena, P. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, UJED, Durango, Durango (Mexico)]. E-mail: miguel.escobedo@ujed.mx; Delgado-Vigil, M. D.; Salinas-Gutierrez, J. M.; Lopez Ortiz, A.; Collins-Martinez, V.H. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The production of hydrogen by the water-gas shift (WGS) normally requires multiple catalytic reactions followed by the separation of CO{sub 2} to obtain highly pure H{sub 2}. Nevertheless, using the combination of the WGS reaction and the solid-gas reaction between CO{sub 2} and an absorbent, the production of H{sub 2} and the separation of CO{sub 2} can be accomplished in a single step AEWGS (Absorption Enhanced Water Gas Shift). This combination of reactions was studied at the laboratory scale using a quartz fixed-bed reactor. The absorbents tested were calcined dolomite (CaO*MgO) and sodium zirconate (Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}) in catalyst/absorbent mixtures (cat/abs) with weight ratios of 1/1, 1/2 and 2/1, using a high-temperature catalyst from the WGS reaction, synthesized in the laboratory (Fe-Cr). All the tests used 3cm{sup 3} of cat/abs, composed of 5% CO, 15% H{sub 2}O, 10.5% He and 69.5% N{sub 2}, with a spatial velocity (SV) of 1500h-1, 600 degrees Celsius and atmospheric pressure. The catalyst presented 100% conversion of CO to CO{sub 2}, maintaining its surface area after the reaction (12 m{sup 2}/g). The results with a dry base using the cat/abs mixture of 1/2 and CaO*MgO generated 95% H{sub 2} with 5% CO-free CO{sub 2}, while with Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, the maximum concentration of H{sub 2} was 70%, with 29% CO{sub 2} and 1% of CO without reacting. The results using only CaO*MgO (as a bifunctional material) presented a maximum H{sub 2} concentration of 96% and a minimum of 4% CO{sub 2}, as well as 7% CO without reaction, which was attributed to kinetic effects. [Spanish] La produccion de hidrogeno mediante la reaccion de desplazamiento de agua WGS (Water Gas Shift), normalmente requiere de multiples reacciones cataliticas seguidas por la separacion de CO{sub 2} para obtener H{sub 2} de alta pureza. Sin embargo mediante la combinacion de la reaccion WGS con la reaccion solido-gas entre el CO{sub 2} y un absorbente provee la oportunidad de producir H2 y

  10. Recent Technological Developments in Cobalt Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junling Zhang; Jiangang Chen; Yongwang Li; Yuhan Sun

    2002-01-01

    Co-based catalysts are often utilized due to their high Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) activity,C+5 hydrocarbon selectivity, low water-gas shift reaction (WGS) activity and relatively low cost. Selective control of C5+ hydrocarbons and the catalyst longevity are critical in the design of cobalt catalysts.Thus, various methods to improve the performance of Co catalysts have been suggested. The progress in cobalt catalysts reviewed in the last few decades, mainly involved the support, promoter, preparation and deactivation of Co-based catalysts.

  11. Flame Synthesis of Nanosized Cu-Ce-O, Ni-Ce-O, and Fe-Ce-O Catalysts for the Water-Gas Shift (WGS) Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-04

    by the flame synthesis method using cerium acetate dissolved in a mixture of acetic acid, 2-butanol, and isooctane (40). In this process, the...below 10 nm are formed via precursor evaporation, ceria nucleation, and sintering of the particles. The use of isooctane in this process increased the

  12. Elucidating the Link between NMR Chemical Shifts and Electronic Structure in d(0) Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Stéphanie; Copéret, Christophe; Raynaud, Christophe; Eisenstein, Odile

    2016-02-24

    The nucleophilic carbon of d(0) Schrock alkylidene metathesis catalysts, [M] = CHR, display surprisingly low downfield chemical shift (δ(iso)) and large chemical shift anisotropy. State-of-the-art four-component relativistic calculations of the chemical shift tensors combined with a two-component analysis in terms of localized orbitals allow a molecular-level understanding of their orientations, the magnitude of their principal components (δ11 > δ22 > δ33) and associated δ(iso). This analysis reveals the dominating influence of the paramagnetic contribution yielding a highly deshielded alkylidene carbon. The largest paramagnetic contribution, which originates from the coupling of alkylidene σ(MC) and π*(MC) orbitals under the action of the magnetic field, is analogous to that resulting from coupling σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene; thus, δ11 is in the MCH plane and is perpendicular to the MC internuclear direction. The higher value of carbon-13 δ(iso) in alkylidene complexes relative to ethylene is thus due to the smaller energy gap between σ(MC) and π*(MC) vs this between σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene. This effect also explains why the highest value of δ(iso) is observed for Mo and the lowest for Ta, the values for W and Re being in between. In the presence of agostic interaction, the chemical shift tensor principal components orientation (δ22 or δ33 parallel or perpendicular to π(MX)) is influenced by the MCH angle because it determines the orientation of the alkylidene CHR fragment relative to the MC internuclear axis. The orbital analysis shows how the paramagnetic terms, understood with a localized bond model, determine the chemical shift tensor and thereby δ(iso).

  13. Use of Intraparticle Mass Transfer Parameters as a Design Tool for Catalyst Pellets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. PETROV; M. DAOUS; Y. ALHAMED; A. AL-ZAHRANI; Kh. MAXIMOV

    2012-01-01

    A chromatographic method and a dynamic Wicke-Kallenbach method (DMWK) were used to determine the diffusion characteristics of two industrial copper containing catalysts.The first catalyst was used in nitrobenzene hydrogenation to aniline and the second was used in a low temperature water-gas shift reaction.Experimental results show that application of these two methods leads to similar results.Experimental data obtained allow for monitoring changes in the texture of the catalyst grains and intraparticle diffusivity of gaseous reagents at different states of the catalyst activity and use,which can be used as criteria for designing optimal industrial catalyst pellets.

  14. Optimisation of Shift Reactor Operating Conditions to Maximise Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J. M.; Marano, M.; Ruiz, E.

    2011-07-28

    This report compiles the results of the work conducted by CIEMAT for Task 6.5 Shift reaction of the FLEXGAS project Near Zero Emission Advanced Fluidized Bed Gasification, which has been carried out with financial support from the Research Fund for Coal and Steel, RFCR-CT-2007-00005. The activity of an iron-chromium-based catalyst for the water gas shift reaction is studied. Results about WGS experiments conducted by CIEMAT on laboratory scale under different operating conditions are presented. The influence on the activity of the catalyst of main operating parameters- temperature, pressure, excess steam, and space velocity and gas composition - is evaluated and discussed. (Author) 19 refs.

  15. Microcalorimetric Adsorption of Alumina Oxide Catalysts for Combination of Ethylbenzene dehydrogenation and carbon Dioxide Shift-reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Xin; SHEN Jian-yi

    2004-01-01

    Styrene (STY) is now produced industrially in fairly large quantities by the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB) using promoted iron oxide catalyst with superheated steam.In this case, small amount of carbon dioxide formed as a by-product was known to inhibit the catalytic activity of commercial catalyst. Recently, there have been some reports which carbon dioxide showed positive effects to promote catalytic activities on the reaction over several catalysts.In this study, we attempted to combine the dehydrogenation of EB to STY with the carbon dioxide shift-reaction. The combine reaction (EB + CO2 → STY + H2O + CO) can be considered as one of the ways of using CO2 resources and can yield simultaneously STY and Carbon oxide.Alumina oxide catalysts such as Al2O3, Na2O/Al2O3 and K2O/Al2O3 were prepared by the usual impregnation method with an aqueous solution of NaNO3 and KNO3, and then calcined at 650℃ for 5 h in a stream of air. The reaction condition is 600℃, flow of CO2 38ml/mon and space velocity (EB) 1.28h-1.

  16. Enhanced gasification of wood in the presence of mixed catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S. L.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, Jr., L. J.; Robertus, R. J.; Mitchell, D. E.

    Experimental results obtained in laboratory investigations of steam gasification of wood in the presence of mixed catalysts are presented. These studies are designed to test the technical feasibility of producing specific gaseous products from wood by enhancing its reactivity and product specificity through the use of combined catalysts. The desired products include substitute natural gas, hydrocarbon synthesis gas and ammonia synthesis gas. The gasification reactions are controlled through the use of specific catalyst combinations and operating parameters. A primary alkali carbonate gasification catalyst impregnated into the wood combined with specific commercially available secondary catalysts produced the desired products. A yield of 50 vol % methane was obtained with a randomly mixed combination of a commercial nickel methanation catalyst and silica-alumina cracking catalyst at a weight ratio of 3:1 respectively. Steam gasification of wood in the presence of a commercial Si-Al cracking catalyst produced the desired hydrocarbon synthesis gas. Hydrogen-to-carbon monoxide ratios needed for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons were obtained with this catalyst system. A hydrogen-to-nitrogen ratio of 3:1 for ammonia synthesis gas was achieved with steam-air gasification of wood in the presence of catalysts. The most effective secondary catalyst system employed to produce the ammonia synthesis gas included two commercially prepared catalysts formulated to promote the water-gas shift reaction.

  17. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, A.H.

    1994-05-31

    The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

  18. Low Temperature Water–gas Shift: Differences in Oxidation States Observed with Partially Reduced Pt/MnOX and Pt/CeOX Catalysts Yield Differences in OH Group Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, M.; Jacobs, G; Graham, U; Azzam, K; Linganiso, L; Davis, B

    2010-01-01

    The Pt-ceria synergy may be described as the dehydrogenation of formate formed on the surface of the partially reducible oxide (PRO), ceria, by Pt across the interface, with H{sub 2}O participating in the transition state. However, due to the rising costs of rare earth oxides like ceria, replacement by a less expensive partially reducible oxide, like manganese oxide, is desirable. In this contribution, a comparison between Pt/ceria and Pt/manganese oxide catalysts possessing comparable Pt dispersions reveals that there are significant differences and certain similarities in the nature of the two Pt/PRO catalysts. With ceria, partial reduction involves reduction of the oxide surface shell, with Ce{sup 3+} at the surface and Ce{sup 4+} in the bulk. In the case of manganese oxide, partial reduction results in a mixture of Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+}, with Mn{sup 2+} located at the surface. With Pt/CeO{sub X}, a high density of defect-associated bridging OH groups react with CO to yield a high density of the formate intermediate. With Pt/MnO{sub X}, the fraction of reactive OH groups is low and much lower formate band intensities result upon CO adsorption; moreover, there is a greater fraction of OH groups that are essentially unreactive. Thus, much lower CO conversion rates are observed with Pt/MnO{sub X} during low temperature water-gas shift. As with ceria, increasing the Pt loading facilitates partial reduction of MnO{sub X} to lower temperature, indicating metal-oxide interactions should be taken into account.

  19. Performance of HT-WGS Catalysts for Upgrading of Syngas Obtained from Biomass Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano Bujan, M.; Sanchez Hervas, J. M.

    2009-05-21

    Oxygen pressurized gasification of biomass out stands as a very promising approach to obtain energy or hydrogen from renewable sources. The technical feasibility of this technology is being investigated under the scope of the VI FP CHRISGAS project, which has started in September 2004 and has a duration of five years. The Division of Combustion and Gasification of CIEMAT participates in this project in Work Package 13: Ancillary and novel processes, studying innovative gas separation and gas upgrading systems. Such systems include novel or available high temperature water gas shift catalysts and commercially available membranes not yet tried in this type of atmosphere. This report describes the activities carried out during the period 2005-2007 regarding the performance of high temperature water gas shift catalysts for upgrading of synthesis gas obtained from biomass gasification. (Author) 28 refs.

  20. Catalysis by Single Atoms: Water Gas Shift and Ethylene Hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-20

    This adsorbed oxygen reacts with methane leading to combustion or partial oxidation to syngas at lower temperatures than in the existing commercial...600 Energy (eV) 28 To test the accuracy of reported ZrB2 atomic composition, we analyzed a hot-pressed ZrB2 sample supplied by Ceradyne. Fig. 26(a...specimens. 50um Electron Imaae 1 (a) (b) Figure 26. Analysis of boron-enriched ZrB2 sample supplied by Ceradyne: (a) SEM image (b) EDS counts (c

  1. In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of methanol steam reforming on Cu/ZnO catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Cu/ZnO (alumina) catalysts have found industrial use for the low-temperature methanol synthesis, for the low-temperature water-gas shift reaction, and for the steam reforming of methanol. An important application could be the onboard production of hydrogen for fuel cell application. It is the proposed synergistic effect in the binary copper/zinc oxide that makes this system interesting for investigation. The knowledge of the relationship between the catalytic activity, surface structure, a...

  2. Design of slurry bubble column reactors: novel technique for optimum catalyst size selection contractual origin of the invention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamwo, Isaac K [Murrysville, PA; Gidaspow, Dimitri [Northbrook, IL; Jung, Jonghwun [Naperville, IL

    2009-11-17

    A method for determining optimum catalyst particle size for a gas-solid, liquid-solid, or gas-liquid-solid fluidized bed reactor such as a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) for converting synthesis gas into liquid fuels considers the complete granular temperature balance based on the kinetic theory of granular flow, the effect of a volumetric mass transfer coefficient between the liquid and the gas, and the water gas shift reaction. The granular temperature of the catalyst particles representing the kinetic energy of the catalyst particles is measured and the volumetric mass transfer coefficient between the gas and liquid phases is calculated using the granular temperature. Catalyst particle size is varied from 20 .mu.m to 120 .mu.m and a maximum mass transfer coefficient corresponding to optimum liquid hydrocarbon fuel production is determined. Optimum catalyst particle size for maximum methanol production in a SBCR was determined to be in the range of 60-70 .mu.m.

  3. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Jothimurugesan; James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Santosh K. Gangwal

    1999-10-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to convert syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) derived from natural gas or coal to liquid fuels and wax is a well-established technology. For low H{sub 2} to CO ratio syngas produced from CO{sub 2} reforming of natural gas or from gasification of coal, the use of Fe catalysts is attractive because of their high water gas shift activity in addition to their high FT activity. Fe catalysts are also attractive due to their low cost and low methane selectivity. Because of the highly exothermic nature of the FT reaction, there has been a recent move away from fixed-bed reactors toward the development of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) that employ 30 to 90 {micro}m catalyst particles suspended in a waxy liquid for efficient heat removal. However, the use of FeFT catalysts in an SBCR has been problematic due to severe catalyst attrition resulting in fines that plug the filter employed to separate the catalyst from the waxy product. Fe catalysts can undergo attrition in SBCRs not only due to vigorous movement and collisions but also due to phase changes that occur during activation and reaction.

  4. Biomass gasification in supercritical water: II. Effect of catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanik, Jale; Ebale, Steve; Kruse, Andrea; Saglam, Mehmet; Yueksel, Mithat [Institue for Technical Chemistry, Division of Chemical-Physical Processing, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    In this study, the effect of the type of catalyst on hydrothermal gasification of three specifically chosen samples of natural biomass was investigated. Biomass feedstocks, including lignocellulosic materials (cotton stalk and corncob) and the tannery waste, were gasified in supercritical water by the addition of catalyst. The catalysts used were K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Trona (NaHCO{sub 3}.Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.2H{sub 2}O), red mud (Fe-oxide containing residue from Al-production) and Raney-Ni. The gasification experiments were performed in a batch autoclave at 500 C. The amounts and compositions of the gases and the amounts of water soluble compounds from gasification were determined. The effect of catalysts on gasification varied with the type of biomass. The catalysts significantly increased the hydrogen yield by supporting the water-gas shift reaction and the methane reformation. The gasification activity of Trona was similar to that of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The results indicate that iron based catalysts can also be effective in gasification of biomass. In conclusion, the supercritical water gasification of biomass by addition of red mud and Trona is said to be promising method to produce H{sub 2} from biomass efficiently similar to gasification with commercial alkali catalysts. (author)

  5. Supercritical water gasification of microalga Nannochloropsis over supported Ni and Ru catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijenayake, A. G. B. S. P.; Hassan, M.; Komiyama, M.

    2016-11-01

    Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of a marine microalga Nannochloropsis was performed in the presence and the absence of supported Ru and Ni catalysts at 385 °C and 26 MPa using a batch reactor. The product gas of the non-catalytic reaction mainly comprised of CO2 while that of catalytic reaction produced CH4, CO2, H2 and some C2-C4 compounds. The addition of catalysts enhanced the decomposition and conversion (water-gas shift and methanation) reactions, consequently increasing the total gasification efficiency up to 92% for 60 min reaction time. Between the supported Ru and Ni catalysts, Ru resulted in higher gasification efficiency than Ni. Catalyst deactivation during SCWG of Nannochloropsis was also examined.

  6. Parametric study of the partial oxidation of propane over nickel and platinum based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukka, Mayuri

    Hydrogen production though the partial oxidation of propane over 1%Pt/CeO 2 and 1%Ni/CeO2 catalysts was studied in a fixed-bed reactor. The purpose of the experiments was to study the pathways, priority and the sequence of reactions which occur over each catalyst system. A temperature of 600°C and O2/C3H8 ratio of 1.78 was used for all the runs. The space velocity was varied by varying the flowrates (100, 200, 300, 400 sccm), and also the catalyst loadings. Seven species were found at the outlet of the reactor (C3H8, O2, H2, CO, CO2, H2O and C3H 6). All the species except H2O were analyzed quantitatively by the gas chromatograph. The following reactions can occur during the process at 600°C: total oxidation, partial oxidation, steam reforming, dry reforming, water gas shift, dehydrogenation and water formation. Of these, a Gaussian elimination process yields four independent reactions. This results in ten sets of possible independent reactions. For each set, a material balance on the six outlet compositions allows the calculation of rates of each of the four reactions in the set. Sets containing negative rates for irreversible reactions are discarded. To confirm the validity of sets containing dry reforming, steam reforming and water gas shift, these reactions were carried out over the catalysts at the experimentally determined outlet conditions for the propane partial oxidation process. For the 1%Ni/CeO2 catalyst, both dry and steam reforming reactions were favorable, but the water gas shift reaction was not favorable. The activities of the 1%Pt/CeO2 catalyst for dry reforming and steam reforming were insignificant. The water gas shift reaction was not conducted over the 1%Pt/CeO2 catalyst as no feasible set contained this reaction. These results, coupled with the effect of weight hourly space velocity, allows us to evaluate the relative importance of each reaction in each allowable set as a function of contact time. The results indicate that the pathways

  7. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukur, D.B.; Mukesh, D.; Patel, S.A.; Zimmerman, W.H.; Rosynek, M.P. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Kellogg, L.J. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1990-04-01

    This report describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating improved catalysts for a slurry Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process for converting synthesis gas to high quality transportation fuels (gasoline and distillate). The improvements in catalyst performance were sought by studying effects of pretreatment conditions, promoters and binders/supports. A total of 20 different, iron based, catalysts were evaluated in 58 fixed bed reactor tests and 10 slurry reactor tests. The major accomplishments and conclusions are summarized below. The pretreatment conditions (temperature, duration and the nature of reducing gas) have significant effect on catalyst performance (activity, selectivity and stability) during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. One of precipitated unsupported catalysts had hydrocarbon selectivity similar to Mobil`s I-B catalyst in high wax mode operation, and had not experienced any loss in activity during 460 hours of testing under variable process conditions in a slurry reactor. The effect of promoters (copper and potassium) on catalyst performance during FT synthesis has been studied in a systematic way. It was found that potassium promotion increases activities of the FT and water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions, the average molecular weight of hydrocarbon products, and suppresses the olefin hydrogenation and isomerization reactions. The addition of binders/supports (silica or alumina) to precipitated Fe/Cu/K catalysts, decreased their activity but improved their stability and hydrocarbon selectivity. The performance of catalysts of this type was very promising and additional studies are recommended to evaluate their potential for use in commercial slurry reactors.

  8. Methanol and methyl fuel catalysts. Final technical report, September 1980-August 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Simmons, G.W.

    1983-12-01

    Copper-based catalysts for alcohol synthesis were prepared, tested for catalytic activity and selectivity, and characterized. These catalysts include Cu/ZnO, Cu/Co/ZnO, Cu/Co/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Cu/Co/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3//K/sub 2/O, and Cu/ZnO/KOH. The chromia-containing catalysts exhibited a low activity and selectivity, while the Cu/ZnO catalyst was verified to be a very active and selective methanol synthesis catalyst. Cobalt imparted a methanation function to the catalysts, while potassium suppressed the activity and the selectivity. Over the quaternary catalyst, higher pressure and lower GHSV enhanced the selectivity to higher alcohols. Low concentrations of carbon dioxide in H/sub 2//CO synthesis gas over Cu/ZnO catalysts promote methanol synthesis, while at high concentrations it behaves as a retardant of the synthesis. The water gas shift reaction readily proceeds over the Cu/ZnO catalyst. Analogous to the CO/sub 2/ effect, the presence of water in the synthesis gas has a profound effect on the synthesis of methanol. The Cu/ZnO catalyst is a good hydrogenation catalyst. Olefins, aldehydes, and acids are hydrogenated at a faster rate than CO is hydrogenated to methanol, but aromatics are hydrogenated at slower rates. Chemical trapping of the intermediates on these surface sites with amines demonstrates that a kinetically significant intermediate in methanol synthesis is a surface formyl or hydroxycarbene species. These species can be formed from synthesis gas or by alcohols in the reactant stream, and they readily alkylate amines in the reactant gas stream. Over an Fe/Cu/ZnO catalyst, amines inhibit the production of alcohols by trapping the precursor intermediates, while changing the hydrocarbon selectivity from paraffins to predominantly olefins. 68 references, 9 figures, 25 tables.

  9. SCALEUP OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE CATALYST FOR PILOT PLANT LPDMEtm RUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew W. Wang

    2002-01-01

    The Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) process converts synthesis gas to dimethyl ether in a single slurry bubble column reactor. A mixed slurry of methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst in a neutral mineral oil simultaneously synthesizes methanol from syngas and converts some of it to dimethyl ether and water. The reaction scheme is shown below: 2H{sub 2} + CO = CH{sub 3}OH; 2CH{sub 3}OH = CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O; H{sub 2}O + CO = CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. Most of the water produced in this reaction is converted to hydrogen by reduction with carbon monoxide (water gas shift reaction). This synergy permits higher per pass conversion than methanol synthesis alone. The enhancement in conversion occurs because dehydration of the methanol circumvents the equilibrium constraint of the syngas-to-methanol step. The slurry bubble column reactor provides the necessary heat transfer capacity to handle the greater heat duty associated with high conversion. In order to improve the stability of the catalyst system, non-stoichiometric aluminum phosphate was proposed as the dehydration catalyst for the LPDME{trademark} process. This aluminum phosphate material is a proprietary catalyst. This catalyst system of a standard methanol catalyst and the aluminum phosphate provided stable process performance that met the program targets under our standard test process conditions in the laboratory. These targets are (1) an initial methanol equivalent productivity of 28 gmol/kg/hr, (2) a CO{sub 2}-free, carbon selectivity of 80% to dimethyl ether and (3) stability of both catalysts equivalent to that of the methanol catalyst in the absence of the aluminum phosphate. A pilot plant trial of the LPDME{trademark} process using the aluminum phosphate catalyst was originally planned for March 1998 at the DOE-owned, Air Products (APCI)-operated facility at LaPorte, Texas. Because the aluminum phosphate catalyst is not commercially available, we initiated a

  10. SCALEUP OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE CATALYST FOR PILOT PLANT LPDMEtm RUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew W. Wang

    2002-05-15

    The Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) process converts synthesis gas to dimethyl ether in a single slurry bubble column reactor. A mixed slurry of methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst in a neutral mineral oil simultaneously synthesizes methanol from syngas and converts some of it to dimethyl ether and water. The reaction scheme is: 2H{sub 2} + CO = CH{sub 3}OH 2CH{sub 3}OH = CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}O + CO = CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. Most of the water produced in this reaction is converted to hydrogen by reduction with carbon monoxide (water gas shift reaction). This synergy permits higher per pass conversion than methanol synthesis alone. The enhancement in conversion occurs because dehydration of the methanol circumvents the equilibrium constraint of the syngas-to-methanol step. The slurry bubble column reactor provides the necessary heat transfer capacity to handle the greater heat duty associated with high conversion. In order to improve the stability of the catalyst system, non-stoichiometric aluminum phosphate was proposed as the dehydration catalyst for the LPDME{trademark} process. This aluminum phosphate material is a proprietary catalyst. This catalyst system of a standard methanol catalyst and the aluminum phosphate provided stable process performance that met the program targets under our standard test process conditions in the laboratory. These targets are (1) an initial methanol equivalent productivity of 28 gmol/kg/hr, (2) a CO{sub 2}-free, carbon selectivity of 80% to dimethyl ether and (3) stability of both catalysts equivalent to that of the methanol catalyst in the absence of the aluminum phosphate. A pilot plant trial of the LPDME{trademark} process using the aluminum phosphate catalyst was originally planned for March 1998 at the DOE-owned, Air Products (APCI)-operated facility at LaPorte, Texas. Because the aluminum phosphate catalyst is not commercially available, we initiated a scaleup project

  11. Surface Structure and Catalytic Performance of Ni-Fe Catalyst for Low-Temperature CO Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanhui Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalysts 16NixFe/Al2O3 (x is 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method and the catalytic performance for the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG from CO hydrogenation in slurry-bed reactor were studied. The catalysts were characterized by BET, XRD, UV-Vis DRS, H2-TPR, CO-TPD, and XPS, and the results showed that the introduction of iron improved the dispersion of Ni species, weakened the interaction between Ni species and support and decreased the reduction temperature and that catalyst formed Ni-Fe alloy when the content of iron exceeded 2%. Experimental results revealed that the addition of iron to the catalyst can effectively improve the catalytic performance of low-temperature CO methanation. Catalyst 16Ni4Fe/Al2O3 with the iron content of 4% exhibited the best catalytic performance, the conversion of CO and the yield of CH4 reached 97.2% and 84.9%, respectively, and the high catalytic performance of Ni-Fe catalyst was related to the property of formed Ni-Fe alloy. Further increase of iron content led to enhancing the water gas shift reaction.

  12. DIRECT DECOMPOSITION OF METHANE TO HYDROGEN ON METAL LOADED ZEOLITE CATALYST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; Harry W. Rollins

    2005-08-01

    The manufacture of hydrogen from natural gas is essential for the production of ultra clean transportation fuels. Not only is hydrogen necessary to upgrade low quality crude oils to high-quality, low sulfur ultra clean transportation fuels, hydrogen could eventually replace gasoline and diesel as the ultra clean transportation fuel of the future. Currently, refinery hydrogen is produced through the steam reforming of natural gas. Although efficient, the process is responsible for a significant portion of refinery CO2 emissions. This project is examining the direct catalytic decomposition of methane as an alternative to steam reforming. The energy required to produce one mole of hydrogen is slightly lower and the process does not require water-gas-shift or pressure-swing adsorption units. The decomposition process does not produce CO2 emissions and the product is not contaminated with CO -- a poison for PEM fuel cells. In this work we examined the direct catalytic decomposition of methane over a metal modified zeolite catalyst and the recovery of catalyst activity by calcination. A favorable production of hydrogen was obtained, when compared with previously reported nickel-zeolite supported catalysts. Reaction temperature had a strong influence on catalyst activity and on the type of carbon deposits. The catalyst utilized at 873 and 973 K could be regenerated without any significant loss of activity, however the catalyst utilized at 1073 K showed some loss of activity after regeneration.

  13. Synthesis of Ethanol from Syngas over Rh/MCM-41 Catalyst: Effect of Water on Product Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Lopez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The thermochemical processing of biomass is an alternative route for the manufacture of fuel-grade ethanol, in which the catalytic conversion of syngas to ethanol is a key step. The search for novel catalyst formulations, active sites and types of support is of current interest. In this work, the catalytic performance of an Rh/MCM-41 catalyst has been evaluated and compared with a typical Rh/SiO2 catalyst. They have been compared at identical reaction conditions (280 °C and 20 bar, at low syngas conversion (2.8% and at same metal dispersion (H/Rh = 22%. Under these conditions, the catalysts showed different product selectivities. The differences have been attributed to the concentration of water vapor in the pores of Rh/MCM-41. The concentration of water vapor could promote the water-gas-shift-reaction generating some extra carbon dioxide and hydrogen, which in turn can induce side reactions and change the product selectivity. The extra hydrogen generated could facilitate the hydrogenation of a C2-oxygenated intermediate to ethanol, thus resulting in a higher ethanol selectivity over the Rh/MCM-41 catalyst as compared to the typical Rh/SiO2 catalyst; 24% and 8%, respectively. The catalysts have been characterized, before and after reaction, by N2-physisorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, H2-chemisorption, transmission electron microscopy and temperature programmed reduction.

  14. Nanosized CuO and ZnO Catalyst Supported on Honeycomb-Typed Monolith for Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Methyl Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul-Min; Ahn, Won-Ju; Jo, Woong-Kyu; Song, Jin-Hun; Oh, Chang-Yeop; Jeong, Young-Shin; Chung, Min-Chul; Park, Kwon-Pil; Kim, Ki-Joong; Jeong, Woon-Jo; Sohn, Bo-Kyun; Jung, Sang-Chul; Lee, Do-Jin; Ahn, Byeong-Kwon; Ahn, Ho-Geun

    2015-01-01

    The greenhouse effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most serious problems in the world. Conversion of CO2 to methyl alcohol (CH3OH) was studied using catalytic chemical methods. Honeycomb-typed monolith used as catalyst support was 400 cell/inch2. Pretreatment of the monolith surface was carried out by thermal treatment and acid treatment. Monolith-supported nanosized CuO-ZnO catalysts were prepared by wash-coat method. The prepared catalysts were characterized by using SEM, TEM, and XRD. The catalytic activity for CO2 hydrogenation to CH3OH was investigated using a flow-type reactor with varying reaction temperature, reaction pressure and contact time. Conversion of CO2 was increased with increasing reaction temperature, but selectivity to CH3OH was decreased. Optimum reaction temperature was about 250 degrees C under 20 atm. Because of the reverse water gas shift reaction.

  15. The role of Pt and Pd in enhancing the conversion of sorbitol to hydrogen over supported Ni-Pt and Ni-Pd catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanksale, A.; Lu, G.Q. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane (Australia); Beltramini, J.N. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane (Australia). ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the enhanced activity of bimetallic nickel-platinum (Ni-Pt) and nickel-palladium (Ni-Pd) catalysts for the production of hydrogen from reformed biomass-based products. The catalysts were prepared on an aluminum oxide (Al203) nanofibre. Mesoporous zirconia and composite silica-zirconia-ceria were used to determine the role of noble metals and supports. Desorption, oxidation, and temperature programmed reduction studies were conducted to investigate metal-metal and metal-support interactions. The study showed that Pt and Pd additions increased the reducibility of Ni catalysts. The bimetallic catalysts exhibited rates of hydrogen production 6 times higher than rates observed in pure metal catalysts. Sorbitol conversion increased from 35 per cent for the Ni catalyst to 62 per cent for the Ni-Pt catalyst. It was concluded that the alloying effect of the Ni-Pt and Ni-Pd systems lowered the carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption heat, and facilitated removal of the adsorbed CO by the water gas shift reaction.

  16. Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst for Aviation Fuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaRee, Ana B.; Best, Lauren M.; Bradford, Robyn L.; Gonzalez-Arroyo, Richard; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    As the oil supply declines, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to nonpetroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. The Fischer-Tropsch process uses a gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen which is converted into various liquid hydrocarbons; this versatile gas-to-liquid technology produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fischer-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur and aromatic compounds. It is most commonly catalyzed by cobalt supported on alumina, silica, or titania or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Cobalt is typically used more often than iron, in that cobalt is a longer-active catalyst, has lower water-gas shift activity, and lower yield of modified products. Promoters are valuable in improving Fischer-Tropsch catalyst as they can increase cobalt oxide dispersion, enhance the reduction of cobalt oxide to the active metal phase, stabilize a high metal surface area, and improve mechanical properties. Our goal is to build up the specificity of the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst while adding less-costly transition metals as promoters; the more common promoters used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are rhenium, platinum, and ruthenium. In this report we will describe our preliminary efforts to design and produce catalyst materials to achieve our goal of preferentially producing C8 to C18 paraffin compounds in the NASA Glenn Research Center Gas-To-Liquid processing plant. Efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center for producing green fuels using non-petroleum feedstocks support both the Sub-sonic Fixed Wing program of Fundamental Aeronautics and the In Situ Resource Utilization program of the Exploration Technology Development and Demonstration program.

  17. Steam effects over Pd/Ce0.67Zr0.33O2 three-way catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jianqiang; SHEN Meiqing; WANG Jun; Wang Wulin

    2011-01-01

    In the purification process of automobile exhaust, existing water plays an important role as an oxidant, which converts CO and hydrocarbons (HCs) by the water-gas shift (WGS) and the steam reforming (SR) reactions, respectively, especially at high temperatures. Meanwhile it is major component of the exhaust which can affect significantly the thermal stability of the three-way catalyst. Activity experiments were carried out close to the real operation conditions (GHSV, concentration, etc.) with a Pd/Ce0.67Zr0.33O2 catalyst supplying information on the CO and C3H8 oxidation reactions in feedstream formed by different reactant combinations. The obtained results showed that the activity of the CO and C3Hs oxidation was promoted by the addition of steam due to the WGS and SR reactions. The WGS and SR reaction were competitive under oxygen-lean conditions. The kinetic analysis was considered for WGS and SR reactions.

  18. Session 4: Atr catalyst for natural gas conversion to hydrogen: performance, simulation, and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, F.; Duisberg, M.; Sextl, G.; Wieland, S. [Umicore AG and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany); Deutschmann, O. [Karlsruhe Univ., Institute for Chemical Technology (Germany); Maier, L. [Heidelberg Univ., IWR (Germany); Schmidt, L.D. [Minnesota Univ., Chem. Engineering and Mat. Sciences Minneapolis (United States)

    2004-07-01

    A non-pyrophoric precious metal based auto-thermal reforming catalyst was developed and, the performance of the catalyst at different operational conditions was measured. Additionally, the physical properties of the catalytic layer such as precious metal loading, the BET surface, and the dispersion were determined. A profound knowledge of the ATR process is required to improve the performance of the catalyst. Therefore, a detailed reaction mechanism consisting of 42 reactions among six stable gas-phase and further 23 adsorbed species was developed for the simultaneous description of the partial oxidation, heated steam reforming, water-gas shift reactions and the undesired methanation. A variety of numerical simulations of the ATR process at various conditions were performed using the CFD code DETCHEM(CHANNEL), which models the flow field in monolithic channels and the chemical processes in the gas phase and on the surface including diffusion and reactions in the wash coat structure. The results demonstrate the applicability of the developed mechanism for Umicore's ATR catalyst. The simulation offers an insight into the processes occurring in the catalytic reactor. The figure, for instance, reveals the surface coverage of the reacting species along the catalytic channel wall. In the first centimetre of the catalyst the concentrations vary drastically. The initially high oxygen coverage, leading to total oxidation and heat release, decreases rapidly. Farther downstream the processes on the catalyst are predominated by steam reforming; oxygen on the surface now comes from re-adsorbed water. Thus, the verified model allows the localization of different reaction zones. This information can be generated for different operation conditions such as start up or load alternation. Thus the model is a valuable tool for further improvement of the catalyst performance by 'designing' new formulations. (authors)

  19. Effect of Potassium Addition on Coprecipitated Iron Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Using Bio-oil-syngas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-xiang Wang; Ting Dong; Tao Kan; Quan-xin Li

    2008-01-01

    The effects of potassium addition and the potassium content on the activity and selectivity of coprecipitated iron catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) were studied in a fixed bed reactor at 1.5 MPa,300℃, and contact time (W/F) of 12.5 gcath/mol using the model bio-oil-syngas of H2/CO/CO2/N2 (62/8/25/5, vol%).It was found that potassium addition increases the catalyst activity for FTS and the reverse water gas shift reaction.Moreover,potassium increases the average molecular weight (chain length) of the hydrocarbon products.With the increase of potassium content,it was found that CH4 selectivity decreases and the selectivity of liquid phase products (C5+) increases.The characteristics of FTS catalysts with different potassium content were also investigated by various characterization measurements including X-ray diffraction,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area.Based on experimental results,100Fe/6Cu/16Al/6K (weight ratio) was selected as the optimal catalyst for FTS from bio-oil-syngas. The results indicate that the 100Fe/6Cu/16Al/6K catalyst is one of the most promising candidates to directly synthesize liquid bio-fuel using bio-oil-syngas.

  20. Development of biogas reforming Ni-La-Al catalysts for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, M.; García, S.; Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Serrano, L. García; Daza, L.

    In this work, the results obtained for Ni-La-Al catalysts developed in our laboratory for biogas reforming are presented. The catalyst 5% Ni/5% La 2O 3-γ-Al 2O 3 has operated under kinetic control conditions for more than 40 h at 700 °C and feeding CH 4/CO 2 ratio 1/1, similar to the composition presented in biogas streams, being observed a stable behaviour. Reaction parameters studied to evaluate the catalyst activity were H 2/CO and CH 4/CO 2 conversion ratio obtained. On the basis of a CH 4 conversion of 6.5%, CH 4/CO 2 conversion ratio achieved 0.48 and H 2/CO ratio obtained was 0.43. By comparison of experimental results to equilibrium prediction for such conditions, is detectable a lower progress of reverse water gas shift reaction. This fact increases the H 2/CO ratio obtained and therefore the hydrogen production. The higher H 2/CO and a CH 4/CO 2 conversion ratio in comparison to CH 4 one close to equilibrium is due to the carbon deposits gasification which avoids catalyst deactivation. A thermodynamic analysis about the application of dry and combined methane reforming to hydrogen production for fuel cells application is presented. Data obtained by process simulation considering a Peng-Robinson thermodynamic model, allows optimizing process conditions depending on biogas composition.

  1. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide by hybrid catalysts, direct synthesis of aromatic from carbon dioxide and hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuei Chikung; Lee Mindar (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan))

    1991-02-01

    To improve climatic conditions and to solve the carbon resource problem, it is desirable to develop techniques whereby carbon dioxide can be converted to valuable liquid hydrocarbons which can be used either as fuels or industrial raw materials. Direct synthesis of aromatics from carbon dioxide hydrogenation was investigated in a single stage reactor using hybrid catalysts composed of iron catalysts and HZSM-5 zeolite. Carbon dioxide was first converted to CO by the reverse water gas shift reaction, followed by the hydrogenation of CO to hydrocarbons on iron catalyst, and finally the hydrocarbons were converted to aromatics in HZSM-5. Under the operating conditions of 350{degree}C, 2100 kilopascals and CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}={1/2} the maximum aromatic selectivity obtained was 22% with a CO{sub 2} conversion of 38% using fused iron catalyst combined with the zeolite. Together with the kinetic studies, thermodynamic analysis of the CO{sub 2} hydrogenation was also conducted. It was found that unlike Fischer Tropsch synthesis, the formation of hydrocarbons from CO{sub 2} may not be thermodynamically favored at higher temperature. However, the sufficiently high yields of aromatics possible with this process provides a route for the direct synthesis of high-octane gasoline from carbon dioxide. 24 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Manganese oxide as catalyst for tar cleaning of biomass-derived gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Fredrik; Israelsson, Mikael; Seemann, Martin; Thunman, Henrik [Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Energy Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    The possibilities to upgrade raw gas with the use of a manganese oxide have been investigated in an application for secondary tar cleaning of biomass-derived gas. Experiments were conducted in a reactor system where a novel technique that combines tar cleaning with catalyst regeneration is applied. Raw gas from the Chalmers non-catalytic steam biomass gasifier - containing roughly 32 g{sub tar}/Nm{sub gas} {sup 3} - was fed to the tar cleaning reactor. The tar reforming qualities of the manganese oxide were evaluated in the reactor system using a mixture of 23 wt.% catalysts in silica sand at the temperatures 700 and 800 C. Experiments showed that the catalyst was continuously regenerated from carbon deposits and that the total amount of tars was decreased by as much as 44.5 % at a gas residence time of 0.4 s in the bed. The catalyst showed activity in water-gas shift reaction and the H{sub 2}/CO ratio increased from 0.6 in the raw gas to a peak value of 1 in the reformed gas at 800 C. Only a slight decrease in methane and acetylene content was observed for both operating temperatures. (orig.)

  3. Producer gas cleaning in a dual fluidized bed reformer - a comparative study of performance with ilmenite and a manganese oxide as catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berguerand, Nicolas; Lind, Fredrik; Seemann, Martin; Thunman, Henrik [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    Secondary catalytic gas conditioning is one strategy to eliminate tars formed in a producer gas during biomass gasification. However, most catalysts tend to lose their tar reforming activity after a short period of operation due to carbon formation. A novel technique for catalytic gas cleaning based on two interconnected fluidized beds has been investigated; this technique can be applied to all types of gasifiers. The idea is to reform the tar components into useful molecules - even at high tar contents - by means of a circulating catalyst. More precisely, the producer gas is cleaned with catalyst in one of the reactors, referred to as the fuel reactor, while the catalyst is continuously regenerated in another reactor, the air reactor (AR). The system described here is coupled with the Chalmers 2-4 MW{sub th} biomass gasifier while the AR is fed with nitrogen-diluted air. The effect of different catalysts on both the tar content and the gas composition was investigated. Some of the tested materials do not only reform tars, they also influence the H{sub 2}/CO ratio in a beneficial manner; in particular, ratios closer to 3 in the reformed gas are favorable if subsequent methanation is implemented. In this paper, comparative results based on testing with manganese- and iron-based catalysts are presented. The former is a manufactured catalyst while the latter is a natural ore. Results suggest that both show satisfying ability for regeneration from carbon deposits. Higher temperature enhances tar decomposition during the experiment with both catalysts. Moreover, the iron-based catalyst enhances the water-gas shift activity, which in turn impacts the total amount of produced gas. On the other hand, the manganese-based catalyst seems to display a higher propensity for tar conversion. (orig.)

  4. Effect of the kind of fuel in the synthesis of the catalyzer NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} to displacement reaction of water gas (WGRS); Efeito do tipo de combustivel na sintese do catalisador NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} para reacao de deslocamento do gas agua (WGRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, P.T.A.; Barros, B.S.; Costa, A.C.F.M.; Gama, L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais], e-mail: anacristina@dema.ufcg.edu.br; Jesus, A.A.; Andrade, H.M.C. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2006-07-01

    This work has as objective synthesizes and to characterize the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} catalyst by combustion reaction using different fuels: urea and glycine seeking your application in the water gas shift reaction (WGSR), promoting the purification of the methane for the elimination of the carbon monoxide. The powders were prepared in agreement with the chemistry of the propellants using as recipient a vitreous silica crucible; the maximum temperature and the medium time of flame were verified. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (DRX), Scanning electronic microscopy and catalytic tests. The results show that the catalysts presented inverse spinel structure as majority phase for the two types of fuels. However, it was observed that using the urea, there was the presence of a second phase of NiO and when the glycine was used, there was the presence of lines of Ni. The catalyst NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} using urea as fuel, presented better catalytic acting. (author)

  5. CATALYSIS SCIENCE INITIATIVE: From First Principles Design to Realization of Bimetallic Catalysts for Enhanced Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAVRIKAKIS, MANOS

    2007-05-03

    In this project, we have integrated state-of-the-art Density Functional Theory (DFT) models of heterogeneous catalytic processes with high-throughput screening of bimetallic catalytic candidates for important industrial problems. We have studied a new class of alloys characterized by a surface composition different from the bulk composition, and investigated their stability and activity for the water-gas shift reaction and the oxygen reduction reaction. The former reaction is an essential part of hydrogen production; the latter is the rate-limiting step in low temperature H2 fuel cells. We have identified alloys that have remarkable stability and activity, while having a much lower material cost for both of these reactions. Using this knowledge of bimetallic interactions, we have also made progress in the industrially relevant areas of carbohydrate reforming and conversion of biomass to liquid alkanes. One aspect of this work is the conversion of glycerol (a byproduct of biodiesel production) to synthesis gas. We have developed a bifunctional supported Pt catalyst that can cleave the carbon-carbon bond while also performing the water-gas shift reaction, which allows us to better control the H2:CO ratio. Knowledge gained from the theoretical metal-metal interactions was used to develop bimetallic catalysts that perform this reaction at low temperature, allowing for an efficient coupling of this endothermic reaction with other reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch or methanol synthesis. In our work on liquid alkane production from biomass, we have studied deactivation and selectivity in these areas as a function of metal-support interactions and reaction conditions, with an emphasis on the bifunctionality of the catalysts studied. We have identified a stable, active catalyst for this process, where the selectivity and yield can be controlled by the reaction conditions. While complete rational design of catalysts is still elusive, this work demonstrates the power of

  6. Dehydrogenation of propane in the presence of CO{sub 2} over polyacid chromium oxide catalysts modified by Mo, W and Mn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V.; Davydov, P.E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2013-11-01

    Effective chromium oxide catalysts without additions and with addition of Mo, W and Mn were prepared and tested in long-duration experiments for propane dehydrogenation in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The optimal concentrations of metals were found. It was shown that the best combination of acid-base and redox properties necessary for a decrease of aggregation of chromium-oxide particles was observed over the following catalyst: (3.0 wt.%Cr-1.5 wt.% Mn)/SiO{sub 2}. This catalyst worked stably in durable tests (500 h). Mechanism of propane oxidative dehydrogenation was studied using unstationary response method. It was shown that the process mechanism was similar over all studied catalysts but the catalysts were differed by the adsorption capacity of the reaction components: CO{sub 2} was tied more firmly than C{sub 3}H{sub 6} over Cr and Cr-Mn, C{sub 3}H{sub 6} was tied more strongly than CO{sub 2} over Cr-W. The reverse water-gas shift reaction proceeded in more extent over chromium-oxide catalysts without additions. (orig.)

  7. Distinguishing between chemical and physical promotion mechanisms by CeO{sub 2} in Pt, Rh three-way automotive catalysts under practical industrial conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robota, H.J.; Nunan, J.G. [Allied-Signal Research and Technology, Des Plains, IL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Under practical industrial conditions, aged, rather than fresh, catalyst performances is required to meet various regulatory emissions levels. While CeO{sub 2} is recognized as critical in allowing practically aged Pt, Rh catalysts to meet these performance targets, debate continues concerning the physicochemical mechanisms responsible for the performance enhancement. Suppressed precious metal sintering and stabilization of support {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} against surface area loss and structural phase changes are the principle physical mechanisms suggested. Chemical promotion by CeO2 has been attributed to oxygen storage, enhanced water gas shift activity, and enhanced CO oxidation activity through a precious metal-CeO2 coupling mechanisms. The authors have attempted to distinguish the relative contributions of these physical and chemical mechanisms to the performance of practical Pt, Rh catalysts. Two catalysts were aged in tandem using standard dynamometer methods. One was a fully formulated reference catalyst and the other was a CeO{sub 2}-free catalyst. Several potential chemical promotional mechanisms of CO oxidation via a more facile reaction pathway involving coupling between the precious metals and CeO{sub 2}.

  8. Design of Multiple Metal Doped Ni Based Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Bio-oil Reforming at Mild-temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-xia Yuan; Fang Ding; Jian-ming Yao; Xiang-song Chen; Wei-wei Liu; Jin-yong Wu; Fei-yan Gong

    2013-01-01

    A new kind of multiple metal (Cu,Mg,Ce) doped Ni based mixed oxide catalyst,synthesized by the co-precipitation method,was used for efficient production of hydrogen from bio-oil reforming at 250-500 ℃.Two reforming processes,the conventional steam reforming (CSR) and the electrochemical catalytic reforming (ECR),were performed for the bio-oil reforming.The catalyst with an atomic mol ratio of Ni∶Cu∶Mg∶Ce∶Al=5.6∶1.1∶1.9∶1.0∶9.9 exhibited very high reforming activity both in CSR and ECR processes,reaching 82.8% hydrogen yield at 500 ℃ in the CSR,yield of 91.1% at 400 ℃ and 3.1 A in the ECR,respectively.The influences of reforming temperature and the current through the catalyst in the ECR were investigated.It was observed that the reforming and decomposition of the bio-oil were significantly enhanced by the current.The promoting effects of current on the decomposition and reforming processes of bio-oil were further studied by using the model compounds of biooil (acetic acid and ethanol) under 101 kPa or low pressure (0.1 Pa) through the time of flight analysis.The catalyst also shows high water gas shift activity in the range of 300-600 ℃.The catalyst features and alterations in the bio-oil reforming were characterized by the ICP,XRD,XPS and BET measurements.The mechanism of bio-oil reforming was discussed based on the study of the elemental reactions and catalyst characterizations.The research catalyst,potentially,may be a practical catalyst for high efficient production of hydrogen from reforning of bio-oil at mild-temperature.

  9. Characterization of Ni and W co-loaded SBA-15 catalyst and its hydrogen production catalytic ability on ethanol steam reforming reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongjin; Kwak, Byeong Sub; Min, Bong-Ki; Kang, Misook

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the application of advanced bimetallic catalytic species of Ni and W to effectively produce hydrogen gases from ethanol steam reforming. The highest reactivity was achieved using the Ni0.95W0.05/SBA-15 catalyst. The maximum H2 production and ethanol conversion of 90% and 85%, respectively, were obtained for 0.4 g catalyst at 600 °C after 10 h with a EtOH:H2O ratio of 1:3 and a gas hourly space velocity of 6000 h-1. This highlights a synergy between the Ni and W loading on SBA-15 during ethanol steam reforming that occurs through the inhibition of Ni particle agglomeration and consequent decrease in catalytic deactivation. Additionally, the supplied W ingredients promoted CO2 selectivity, which was generated from the CO-water gas shift reaction.

  10. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  11. Physical Chemistry Properties of Fe3O4 @ Cyclodextrin@ (12, 12 Swcnts as a Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Abbasi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fe3O4 is used in the water gas shift reaction as a catalyst in the “Haber process”. In this work, the physical and chemical properties of Fe3O4 @ -Cyclodextrin @ (12, 12 SWCNTs has been investigated. Our calculations have been done in point of chemical phenomenon and electronic properties. The Magnetic behavior , Electron densities and electrical properties such as NMR Shielding, potential energies densities, energy density , ellipticity for electron densities , ELF, LOL, index of eta and finally ECP for Fe3O4 @ -Cyclodextrin@ (12, 12 SWCNTs have been calculated and simulated in our system. Our Calculation indicate that the Fe3O4 @ -Cyclodextrin@ (12, 12 SWCNTs are suitable surfaces for Fe3O4 such silica surfaces.

  12. Evaluation of nickel and copper catalysts in biogas reforming for hydrogen production in SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Leonardo Alves; Martins, Andre Rosa; Rangel, Maria do Carmo, E-mail: mcarmov@ufba.br [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos em Cinetica e Catalise; Ballarini, Adriana; Maina, Silvia [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis Y Petroquimica Ing. Jose Miguel Parera (INCAPE), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2017-01-15

    The solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) enable the efficient generation of clean energy, fitting the current requirements of the growing demand for electricity and for the environment preservation. When powered with biogas (from digesters of municipal wastes), the SOFCs also contribute to reduce the environmental impact of these wastes. The most suitable route to produce hydrogen inside SOFC from biogas is through dry reforming but the catalyst is easily deactivated by coke, because of the high amounts of carbon in the stream. A promising way to overcome this drawback is by adding a second metal to nickel-based catalysts. Aiming to obtain active, selective and stable catalysts for biogas dry reforming, solids based on nickel (15%) and copper (5%) supported on aluminum and magnesium oxide were studied in this work. Samples were prepared by impregnating the support with nickel and copper nitrate, followed by calcination at 500, 600 and 800 deg C. It was noted that all solids were made of nickel oxide, nickel aluminate and magnesium aluminate but no copper compound was found. The specific surface areas did not changed with calcination temperature but the nickel oxide average particles size increased. The solids reducibility decreased with increasing temperature. All catalysts were active in methane dry reforming, leading to similar conversions but different selectivities to hydrogen and different activities in water gas shift reaction (WGSR). This behavior was assigned to different interactions between nickel and copper, at different calcination temperatures. All catalysts were active in WGSR, decreasing the hydrogen to carbon monoxide molar ratio and producing water. The catalyst calcined at 500 deg C was the most promising one, leading to the highest hydrogen yield, besides the advantage of being produced at the lowest calcination temperature, requiring less energy in its preparation. (author)

  13. Water Gas Shift Reaction with A Single Stage Low Temperature Membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciora, Richard J [Media and Process Technology Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Liu, Paul KT [Media and Process Technology Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Palladium membrane and Palladium membrane reactor were developed under this project for hydrogen separation and purification for fuel cell applications. A full-scale membrane reactor was designed, constructed and evaluated for the reformate produced from a commercial scale methanol reformer. In addition, the Pd membrane and module developed from this project was successfully evaluated in the field for hydrogen purification for commercial fuel cell applications.

  14. Sulfur Poisoning of the Water Gas Shift Reaction on Anode Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of fuels containing sulfur impurities is important regarding durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) because they are present in various potential fuels for SOFC applications. The effect of H2S in the ppm range on the performance of state-of-the-art anode supported SOFC at 850...... and 750°C is evaluated in either hydrogen/steam or hydrogen/steam/CO fuel. It was found that the poisoning effect is more severe in H2/H2O/CO vs. H2/H2O fuel. Only ∼8 ppm H2S can be allowed in the CO containing fuel without risking damage to the anode, whereas 90 ppm (or even more) is possible in H2/H2O...

  15. Hydrogen production by partial oxidation of methanol over gold catalysts supported on TiO{sub 2}-MO{sub x} (M=Fe, Co, Zn) composite oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Feg-Wen; Yu, Hsin-Yin; Roselin, L. Selva; Yang, Hsien-Chang; Ou, Ti-Cheng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Chungli 32001 (Taiwan)

    2006-04-11

    methanol decomposition and/or by reverse water gas shift is subsequently transformed into CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} by the water gas shift and/or CO oxidation. (author)

  16. Effect of Al2O3 Binder on the Precipitated Iron-Based Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Jun Wan; Bao-Shan Wu; Xia An; Ting-Zhen Li; Zhi-Chao Tao; Hong-Wei Xiang; Yong-Wang Li

    2007-01-01

    A series of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts incorporated with Al2O3 binder were prepared by the combination of co-precipitation and spray drying technology. The catalyst samples were characterized by using N2 physical adsorption, temperature-programmed reduction/desorption (TPR/TPD) and M(o)ssbauer effect spectroscopy (MES) methods. The characterization results indicated that the BET surface area increases with increasing Al2O3 content and passes through a maximum at the Al2O3/Fe ratio of 10/100 (weight basis). After the point, it decreases with further increase in Al2O3 content. The incorporation of Al2O3 binder was found to weaken the surface basicity and suppress the reduction and carburization of iron-based catalysts probably due to the strong K-Al2O3 and Fe-Al2O3 interactions. Furthermore, the H2 adsorption ability of the catalysts is enhanced with increasing Al2O3 content. The FTS performances of the catalysts were tested in a slurry-phase continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under the reaction conditions of 260 ℃, 1.5 MPa, 1000 h-1 and molar ratio of H2/CO 0.67 for 200 h. The results showed that the addition of small amounts of Al2O3 affects the activity of iron-based catalysts to a little extent. However, with further increase of Al2O3 content, the FTS activity and water gas shift reaction (WGS) activity are decreased severely. The addition of appropriate Al2O3 do not affect the product selectivity, but the catalysts incorporated with large amounts of Al2O3 have higher selectivity for light hydrocarbons and lower selectivity for heavy hydrocarbons.

  17. In situ Characterization of Pt Catalysts Supported on Ceria Modified TiO(2) for the WGS reaction: Influence of Ceria Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez J. A.; Barrio, L.; Zhou, G.; Gonzalez, I.D.; Estrella, M.; Hanson, J.; Navarro, R.M.; Fierro, J.L.G.

    2012-01-01

    This work analyzes the influence of cerium content (6-15 wt%) on a TiO{sub 2} support over the structure and water gas shift (WGS) activity of Pt catalysts. The structural properties of these Pt/Ce-TiO{sub 2} catalysts were characterized by XRD, TEM and XANES. Physicochemical characterization of the catalysts showed differences in the structure and dispersion of Ce entities on the support with Ce loading. For the samples with low ceria content (6 wt%), cerium is deposited on the support in the form of CeO{sub x} clusters in a highly dispersed state in close interaction with the Ti atoms. The formation of CeO{sub x} clusters at low Ce-loading on the support facilitates the dispersion of small particles of Pt and improves the reducibility of ceria component at low temperatures. The changes in platinum dispersion and support reducibility with Ce-loading on the TiO{sub 2} support lead to significant differences in the WGS activity. Pt supported on the sample with lower Ce content (6 wt%) shows better activity than those corresponding to catalysts with higher Ce content (15 wt%). Activity measurements coupled with catalysts characterization suggest that the improvement in the reducibility of the support with lower Ce content was associated with the presence of CeO{sub x} clusters of high reducibility that improve the chemical activity of the oxide-metal interfaces at which the WGS reaction takes place.

  18. Catalytic activity and effect of modifiers on Ni-based catalysts for the dry reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barroso-Quiroga, Maria Martha; Castro-Luna, Adolfo Eduardo [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico-Sociales INTEQUI-CONICET-UNSL, Av. 25 de Mayo 384 (5730) Villa Mercedes (S.L.) (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    Ni catalysts supported on different ceramic oxides (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}) were prepared by wet impregnation. The catalytic behavior toward hydrogen production through the dry reforming of methane using a fixed-bed reactor was evaluated under certain experimental conditions, and the catalyst supported on ZrO{sub 2} showed the highest stable activity during the period of time studied. The catalyst supported on CeO{sub 2} has a relatively good activity, but shows signs of deactivation after a certain time during the reaction. This catalyst was chosen to be studied after the addition of 0.5 wt% Li and K as activity modifiers. The introduction of the alkaline metals produces a reduction of the catalytic activity but a better stability over the reactant conversion time. The reverse water-gas shift reaction influences the global system of reactions, and as the results indicate, should be considered near equilibrium. (author)

  19. Novel windows for "solar commodities": a device for CO2 reduction using plasmonic catalyst activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Alexander; Muñoz, Sergio; Sanz-Moral, Luis M; Brandner, Juergen J; Pfeifer, Peter; Martín, Ángel; Dittmeyer, Roland; Cocero, María J

    2015-01-01

    A novel plasmonic reactor concept is proposed and tested to work as a visible energy harvesting device while allowing reactions to transform CO2 to be carried out. Particularly the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction has been tested as a means to introduce renewable energy into the economy. The development of the new reactor concept involved the synthesis of a new composite capable of plasmonic activation with light, the development of an impregnation method to create a single catalyst reactor entity, and finally the assembly of a reaction system to test the reaction. The composite developed was based on a Cu/ZnO catalyst dispersed into transparent aerogels. This allows efficient light transmission and a high surface area for the catalyst. An effective yet simple impregnation method was developed that allowed introduction of the composites into glass microchannels. The activation of the reaction was made using LEDs that covered all the sides of the reactor allowing a high power delivery. The results of the reaction show a stable process capable of low temperature transformations.

  20. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Catalysts For F-T SBCRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2006-01-31

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+ H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-(FE) based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H{sub 2}/CO ratios. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment; makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult, if not impossible; and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. Under a previous Department of Energy (DOE)/University Research Grant (UCR) grant, Hampton University reported, for the first time, the development of demonstrably attrition-resistant Fe F-T synthesis catalysts having good activity, selectivity, and attrition resistance. These catalysts were prepared by spray drying Fe catalysts with potassium (K), copper (Cu), and silica (SiO{sub 2}) as promoters. SiO{sub 2} was also used as a binder for spray drying. These catalysts were tested for activity and selectivity in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor. Fundamental understanding of attrition is being addressed by incorporating suitable binders into the catalyst recipe. This has resulted in the preparation of a spray dried HPR-43 catalyst having average particle size (aps) of 70 {micro}m with high attrition resistance. This HPR-43 attrition resistant, active and selective catalyst gave 95% CO conversion through 125 hours of testing in a fixed-bed at 270 C, 1.48 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO=0.67 and 2.0 NL/g-cat/h with C{sub 5+} selectivity of >78% and methane selectivity of less than 5% at an

  1. Fundamental Studies of the Reforming of Oxygenated Compounds over Supported Metal Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumesic, James A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-01-04

    microcopy (STEM) to measure size and structure, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to measure atomic composition, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to measure oxidation state and metal coordination, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to study adsorbed species, laser Raman spectroscopy to probe metal oxide promoters, and temperature programmed reaction/desorption to study the energetics of adsorption and desorption processes. We have studied our bimetallic catalysts for the selective cleavage of carbon-oxygen bonds, and we have studied the effects of adding metal oxide promoters to supported platinum and gold catalysts for water-gas shift (i.e., the production of hydrogen by reaction of carbon monoxide with water). We anticipate that the knowledge obtained from our studies will allow us to identify promising directions for new catalysts that show high activity, selectivity, and stability for important reactions, such as the conversion of biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons to fuels and chemicals.

  2. The Effect of Rain on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David T.; Bliven, Larry F.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Schlosser, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between gas transfer velocity and rain rate was investigated at NASA's Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) using several SF, evasion experiments. During each experiment, a water tank below the rain simulator was supersaturated with SF6, a synthetic gas, and the gas transfer velocities were calculated from the measured decrease in SF6 concentration with time. The results from experiments with IS different rain rates (7 to 10 mm/h) and 1 of 2 drop sizes (2.8 or 4.2 mm diameter) confirm a significant and systematic enhancement of air-water gas exchange by rainfall. The gas transfer velocities derived from our experiment were related to the kinetic energy flux calculated from the rain rate and drop size. The relationship obtained for mono-dropsize rain at the RSIF was extrapolated to natural rain using the kinetic energy flux of natural rain calculated from the Marshall-Palmer raindrop size distribution. Results of laboratory experiments at RSIF were compared to field observations made during a tropical rainstorm in Miami, Florida and show good agreement between laboratory and field data.

  3. Surface Reaction Kinetics of Steam- and CO2-Reforming as Well as Oxidation of Methane over Nickel-Based Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Herrera Delgado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and kinetic modeling study on the Ni-catalyzed conversion of methane under oxidative and reforming conditions is presented. The numerical model is based on a surface reaction mechanism consisting of 52 elementary-step like reactions with 14 surface and six gas-phase species. Reactions for the conversion of methane with oxygen, steam, and CO2 as well as methanation, water-gas shift reaction and carbon formation via Boudouard reaction are included. The mechanism is implemented in a one-dimensional flow field description of a fixed bed reactor. The model is evaluated by comparison of numerical simulations with data derived from isothermal experiments in a flow reactor over a powdered nickel-based catalyst using varying inlet gas compositions and operating temperatures. Furthermore, the influence of hydrogen and water as co-feed on methane dry reforming with CO2 is also investigated.

  4. Development of a Catalyst/Sorbent for Methane Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.H. Shans; T.D. Wheelock; Justinus Satrio; Karl Albrecht; Tanya Harris Janine Keeley; Ben Silva; Aaron Shell; Molly Lohry; Zachary Beversdorf

    2008-12-31

    conditions tested, the CH{sub 4} conversion was large (>80%) and nearly equal to the predicted thermodynamic equilibrium level as long as CO{sub 2} was being rapidly absorbed. Similar results were obtained with both shell material additives. Limited lifecycle tests of the pellets also produced similar results that were not affected by the choice of additive. However, during each lifecycle test the period during which CO{sub 2} was rapidly absorbed declined from cycle to cycle which directly affected the corresponding period when CH{sub 4} was reformed rapidly. Therefore, the results showed a continuing need for improving the lifecycle performance of the sorbent. Core-in-shell pellets with the improved shell materials were also utilized for conducting the water gas shift reaction in a single step. Three different catalyst formulations were tested. The best results were achieved with a Ni catalyst, which proved capable of catalyzing the reaction whether CO{sub 2} was being absorbed or not. The calcined alumina shell material by itself also proved to be a very good catalyst for the reaction as long as CO{sub 2} was being fully absorbed by the core material. However, neither the alumina nor a third formulation containing Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were good catalysts for the reaction when CO{sub 2} was not absorbed by the core material. Furthermore, the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-containing catalyst was not as good as the other two catalysts when CO{sub 2} was being absorbed.

  5. Effects of MgO promoter on properties of Ni/Al2O3 catalysts for partial oxidation of methane to syngas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Yejun; CHEN Jixiang; ZHANG Jiyan

    2007-01-01

    The effects of MgO promoter on the physicochemical properties and catalytic performance of Ni/Al2O3 catalysts for the partial oxidation of methane to syngas were studied by means of BET,XRD,H2-TPR,TEM and performance evaluation.It was found that the MgO promoter benefited from the uniformity of nickel species in the catalysts,inhibited the formation of NiAl2O4 spinel and improved the interaction between nickel species and support.These results were related to the formation of NiO-MgO solid solution and MgAl2O4 spinel.Moreover,for the catalysts with a proper amount of MgO promoter,the nickel dispersiveness was enhanced,therefore making their catalytic performance in methane partial oxidation improved.However,the excessive MgO promoter exerted a negative effect on the catalytic performance.Meanwhile,the basicity of MgO promoted the reversed water-gas shift reaction,which led to an increase in CO selectivity and a decrease in H2 selectivity.The suitable content of MgO promoter in Ni/Al2O3 catalyst was~7 wt-%.

  6. Hydrogen-Rich Gas Production by Sorption Enhanced Steam Reforming of Woodgas Containing TAR over a Commercial Ni Catalyst and Calcined Dolomite as CO2 Sorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Naso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the evaluation of the catalytic steam reforming of a gaseous fuel obtained by steam biomass gasification to convert topping atmosphere residue (TAR and CH4 and to produce pure H2 by means of a CO2 sorbent. This experimental work deals with the demonstration of the practical feasibility of such concepts, using a real woodgas obtained from fluidized bed steam gasification of hazelnut shells. This study evaluates the use of a commercial Ni catalyst and calcined dolomite (CaO/MgO. The bed material simultaneously acts as reforming catalyst and CO2 sorbent. The experimental investigations have been carried out in a fixed bed micro-reactor rig using a slipstream from the gasifier to evaluate gas cleaning and upgrading options. The reforming/sorption tests were carried out at 650 °C while regeneration of the sorbent was carried out at 850 °C in a nitrogen environment. Both combinations of catalyst and sorbent are very effective in TAR and CH4 removal, with conversions near 100%, while the simultaneous CO2 sorption effectively enhances the water gas shift reaction producing a gas with a hydrogen volume fraction of over 90%. Multicycle tests of reforming/CO2 capture and regeneration were performed to verify the stability of the catalysts and sorbents to remove TAR and capture CO2 during the duty cycle.

  7. Kinetic studies of the oxidative coupling of methane over the Mn/Na2WO4/SiO2 catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Mehdi Kamali Shahri; Seyed Mehdi Alavi

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative coupling of methane is a direct way to obtain C2 hydrocarbon,and Mn-Na-W/SiO2 catalyst is the most promising among all the catalysts.The 2%Mn/5%Na2WO4/SiO2 catalyst was prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method.A 7-step heterogeneous reaction model of the oxidative coupling of methane to C2 hydrocarbons was conducted by co-feeding methane and oxygen at a total pressure of 1 bar over the catalyst.The kinetic measurements were carried out in a micro-catalytic fixed bed reactor.The kinetic data were obtained at the appropriate range of reaction conditions (4 kPa<Po2 <20 kPa,20 kPa<PCZH4 <80 kPa,800℃<T<900℃).The proposed reaction kinetic scheme consists of three primary and four consecutive reaction steps.The conversions of hydrocarbons and carbon oxides were evaluated by applying Langrnuir-Hinshelwood type rate equations.Power-law rate equation was applied only for the water-gas shift reaction.In addition,the effects of operating conditions on the reaction rate were studied.The proposed kinetic model can predict the conversion of methane and oxygen as well as the yield of C2 hydrocarbons and carbon oxides with an average accuracy of ±15%.

  8. Operation summary of QDB-03 type sulfur tolerant shift catalys%QDB-03型耐硫变换催化剂运行总结

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    娄伦武; 胡云凯

    2014-01-01

    简述了QDB-03是一种以镁铝尖晶石为载体,不含碱金属助剂的催化剂,在高压、高空速和高水/气的条件下使用时,具有较好的活性和结构稳定性。并结合QDB-03型耐硫变换催化剂的运行数据,从几个方面分析了第一变换炉出口CO含量上升较快的原因以及催化剂运行过程中所采取的措施。%The paper briefly introduces QDB-03 is a kind of catalyst with magnesium aluminate spinel as a carrier, without alkalis auxiliaries, while under high-pressure, high-altitude and high-speed water/gas ratio conditions, there is good activity and stable structure. It also combines operating data of QDB-03 sulfur tolerant shift catalyst, it analyzes reasons of content of CO rising fast at the first temperature shift furnace outlet, and adopting measures in catalyst operation process.

  9. Studies on ethylbenzene dehydrogenation with CO2 as soft oxidant over Co3O4/COK-12 catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramudu Pochamoni; Anand Narani; Mohan Varkolu; Murali Dhar Gudimella; S Sai Prasad Potharaju; David Raju Burri; Seetha Rama Rao Kamaraju

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene has been studied over Co3O4 supported on mesoporous silica (COK-12) with CO2 as soft oxidant in a fixed bed reactor at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range of 723 to 923K. While COK-12 has been prepared by self-assembly method using long chain ionic surfactant i.e., P123 as template, cobalt oxide supported on COK-12 catalysts with variable Co content have been synthesised by simple wet impregnation technique. All the catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption - desorption, XRD, FT-IR, TPR, UV-Vis and XPS techniques. XRD and pore size distribution studies indicate the intactness of mesoporous structure of SiO2 even after incorporation of Co3O4. Presence of Co3O4 crystallites were observed beyond 5 wt% Co loading. High ethylbenzene conversion and stable styrene yields have been observed over 3% Co3O4/COK-12 catalyst due to the presence of large number of active Co3O4 catalytic sites. Enhancement in the activity has been observed with CO2 as soft oxidant than with N2 as diluent. This is because of the fact that the liberated H2 reacts with CO2 in the form of reverse water gas shift reaction.

  10. Variability of Data in High Throughput Experimentation for Catalyst Studies in Fuel Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels T.J. Luchters

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of high throughout and combinatorial experimentation is becoming commonplace in catalytic research. The benefits of parallel experiments are not only limited to reducing the time-to-market, but also give an opportunity to study processes in more depth, by generating more data. To investigate the complete parameter space, multiple experiments must be performed and the variability between these experiments must be quantifiable. In this project, the reproducibility and variance in high throughput catalyst preparation and parallel testing were determined. High-performance equipment was used in a catalyst development program for fuel processing, the production of fuel cell-grade hydrogen from hydrocarbon fuels. Four studies, involving water-gas shift conversion and high-temperature steam methane reforming, were performed to determine the reproducibility of the workflow from automated catalyst preparation to parallel activity testing. Statistical analyses showed the standard deviation in catalytic activities as determined by conversion, to be less than 6% of the average value. Copyright © 2017 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 23rd September 2016; Revised: 18th November 2016; Accepted: 22nd November 2016 How to Cite: Luchters, N.T.J., Fletcher, J.V., Roberts, S.J., Fletcher, J.C.Q. (2017. Variability of Data in High Throughput Experimentation for Catalyst Studies in Fuel Processing.  Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (1: 106-112 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.1.708.106-112 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.1.708.106-112

  11. Development of biogas reforming Ni-La-Al catalysts for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito, M.; Garcia, S.; Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Serrano, L. Garcia; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/ Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-06-10

    In this work, the results obtained for Ni-La-Al catalysts developed in our laboratory for biogas reforming are presented. The catalyst 5% Ni/5% La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has operated under kinetic control conditions for more than 40 h at 700 C and feeding CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} ratio 1/1, similar to the composition presented in biogas streams, being observed a stable behaviour. Reaction parameters studied to evaluate the catalyst activity were H{sub 2}/CO and CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} conversion ratio obtained. On the basis of a CH{sub 4} conversion of 6.5%, CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} conversion ratio achieved 0.48 and H{sub 2}/CO ratio obtained was 0.43. By comparison of experimental results to equilibrium prediction for such conditions, is detectable a lower progress of reverse water gas shift reaction. This fact increases the H{sub 2}/CO ratio obtained and therefore the hydrogen production. The higher H{sub 2}/CO and a CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} conversion ratio in comparison to CH{sub 4} one close to equilibrium is due to the carbon deposits gasification which avoids catalyst deactivation. A thermodynamic analysis about the application of dry and combined methane reforming to hydrogen production for fuel cells application is presented. Data obtained by process simulation considering a Peng-Robinson thermodynamic model, allows optimizing process conditions depending on biogas composition. (author)

  12. Study of Pt-Rh/CeO2-ZrO2-MxOy (M = Y, La)/Al2O3 three-way catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiaxiu, Guo; Zhonghua, Shi; Dongdong, Wu; Huaqiang, Yin; Maochu, Gong; Yaoqiang, Chen

    2013-05-01

    CeO2-ZrO2-MxOy (M = Y; La) mixed oxides, prepared by co-precipitation method and characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra (RM) and oxygen pulse reaction, were comparatively investigated to elucidate the combinational effects of Y and/or La oxide promoters on the catalytic activity and anti-aging performance of monolithic cordierite honeycomb catalysts with low Pt and Rh content. The catalytic activities, water-gas shift (WGS) and steam reforming reaction (SR) were studied under a simulated gas mixture. The catalysts were also characterized by H2-temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and O2-temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD). The results showed that the prepared CeO2-ZrO2-MxOy oxides have a face-centered cubic fluorite structure and are nanosize. La3+ ions can significantly improve thermal stability and efficiently retard CeO2-ZrO2 crystal sintering and growth. Doped CeO2-ZrO2 with Y3+ and La3+ has 105 and 60 m2/g surface area and 460 and 390 μmol/g OSC before and after aging. The T50 of fresh Pt-Rh/CZYL/LA is 170 °C for CO, 222 °C for C3H8 and 189 °C for NO, and shift to 205, 262 and 228 °C after hydrothermal aging, which are better than those of Pt-Rh/CZY/LA or Pt-Rh/CZL/LA. WGS and SR are relate to the OSC of oxygen storage materials and absorbed oxygen species on the catalyst surface and affect the three-way catalytic activities of catalysts. The reductive property of noble metals and the dissociatively adsorbed O2 on the surface of catalysts are closely related to the catalytic activities.

  13. Reforming of Ethanol to Produce Hydrogen over PtRuMg/ZrO2 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Y. Z. Chiou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified PtRu/ZrO2 catalyst with Mg is evaluated for the oxidative steam reforming of ethanol (OSRE and the steam reforming of ethanol (SRE. In order to understand the variation in the reaction mechanism on OSRE and SRE, further analysis of both fresh and used catalyst is concentrated on for TEM, TG, Raman, and TPR characterization. The results show that the OSRE reaction requires a higher temperature (∼390°C to achieve 100% ethanol conversion than the SRE reaction (∼2500°C. The distribution of CO is minor for both reactions (< 5% for OSRE, < 1% for SRE. This demonstrates that the water gas shift (WGS reaction is an important side-reaction in the reforming of ethanol to produce H2 and CO2. A comparison of the temperature of WGS (WGS shows it is lower for the SRE reaction (WGS∼250°C for SRE, ~340°C for OSRE.

  14. Redox behavior of gold supported on ceria and ceria-zirconia based catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michela Vicario; Jordi Llorca; Marta Boaro; Carla de Leitenburg; Alessandro Trovarelli

    2009-01-01

    A series of gold-based catalysts were prepared by deposition precipitation or incipient wetness impregnation on CexZ1-xO2 solid solutions (0.28≤x≤1.00). The morphological and structural characterization of these catalysts were carried out with X-ray diffraction, trans-mission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis and physical adsorption technique, and their redox properties were studied by temperature pro-grammed reduction using both H2 and CO as probe molecules. Two cycles of oxidation/reduction were carried out in order to evaluate the effects of redox aging and gold sintering on the oxygen exchange capability. As observed with other noble metals, gold enhanced and pro-moted the ceria reduction at lower temperatures. Reduction by CO was shown to be dependent on the fine dispersion of gold and to be nega-tively affected by the ageing process more than reduction with hydrogen. This might have implications in reactions like water gas shift and CO-PROX which involve CO as a main reactant.

  15. Homogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, John C; Freixa, Zoraida; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2011-01-01

    This first book to illuminate this important aspect of chemical synthesis improves the lifetime of catalysts, thus reducing material and saving energy, costs and waste.The international panel of expert authors describes the studies that have been conducted concerning the way homogeneous catalysts decompose, and the differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. The result is a ready reference for organic, catalytic, polymer and complex chemists, as well as those working in industry and with/on organometallics.

  16. Nanostructured carbide catalysts for the hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram Seshadri, Susannah Scott, Juergen Eckert

    2008-07-21

    The above quote, taken from the executive summary of the Report from the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences Workshop held August 6–8, 2007,[1] places in context the research carried out at the University of California, Santa Barbara, which is reported in this document. The enormous impact of heterogeneous catalysis is exemplified by the Haber process for the synthesis of ammonia, which consumes a few % of the world’s energy supply and natural gas, and feeds as many as a third of the world’s population. While there have been numerous advances in understanding the process,[2] culminating in the awarding of the Nobel Prize to Gerhard Ertl in 2007, it is interesting to note that the catalysts themselves have changed very little since they were discovered heuristically in the the early part of the 20th century. The thesis of this report is that modern materials chemistry, with all the empirical knowledge of solid state chemistry, combined with cutting edge structural tools, can help develop and better heterogeneous catalysis. The first part of this report describes research in the area of early transition metal carbides (notably of Mo and W), potentially useful catalysts for water gas shift (WGS) and related reactions of use to the hydrogen economy. Although these carbides have been known to be catalytically useful since the 1970s,[3] further use of these relatively inexpensive materials have been plagued by issues of low surface areas and ill-defined, and often unreactive surfaces, in conjunction with deactivation. We have employed for the first time, a combination of constant-wavelength and time-of-flight neutron scattering, including a total scattering analysis of the latter data, to better understand what happens in these materials, in a manner that for the first time, reveals surface graphitic carbon in these materials in a quantitative manner. Problems of preparation, surface stability, and irreversible reactivity have become manifest in this class of materials

  17. Optimization of pyrochlore catalysts for the dry reforming of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo Garzon, Felipe

    . Computational analysis of one of the RDSs (the CHO dehydrogenation step) suggested Pd as an effective co-dopant to reduce the activation barrier of this step. This bimetallic Rh-Pd-substituted lanthanum zirconate pyrochlore (Rh-Pd-LZ) was synthesized, characterized and tested. The Rh-Pd-LZ catalyst successfully increased conversions at high temperatures while providing H 2 to CO ratios close to unity; thus fostering DRM and inhibiting the competing reaction, the reverse water gas shift reaction (RWGS, CO2 + H2 [special character omitted] CO + H2O). The Rh-Pd-LZ catalyst outperformed the initial catalyst, the LRhZ, at high temperatures.

  18. Ethanol steam reforming over Rh/Ce{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} catalysts. Impact of the CO-CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} interconversion reactions on the H{sub 2} production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birot, Anne; Epron, Florence; Duprez, Daniel [Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique (LACCO), UMR 6503 CNRS and University of Poitiers, 40 Avenue du Recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers Cedex (France); Descorme, Claude [IRCELYON, UMR 5256 CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2008-02-21

    Ce{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} mixed oxide-supported 1 wt.% Rh catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation using Rh nitrate as a precursor and calcined at 900 C. They were characterized by BET surface area, XRD, CO{sub 2} chemisorption and H{sub 2} chemisorption at -85 C and tested in the ethanol steam reforming at 600 C under atmospheric pressure, with water to ethanol molar ratio equal to 4, without carrier gas. The best performances, i.e. the highest hydrogen yield and the lowest coke deposition, were obtained over Rh/Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.5}O{sub 2}, i.e. 3.63 mol H{sub 2}/mol{sub ethanol}. This catalyst was subsequently evaluated under various reaction conditions. Whatever the temperature and the water to ethanol ratio, the ethanol steam reforming yielded a large amount of methane, which tends to reduce the H{sub 2} production. To elucidate the origin of the methane production, CO/CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} interconversion reactions were studied. It was shown that such catalyst favours the formation of methane via CO hydrogenation. The direct hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} was not observed. In parallel, the catalyst was active in the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, leading CO and H{sub 2}O. (author)

  19. The role of metal-support interaction for CO-free hydrogen from low temperature ethanol steam reforming on Rh-Fe catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Catherine K S; Chen, Luwei; Du, Yonghua; Schreyer, Martin; Daniel Ong, S W; Poh, Chee Kok; Hong, Liang; Borgna, Armando

    2017-02-08

    Rh-Fe catalysts supported on Ca-Al2O3, MgO and ZrO2 were evaluated in ethanol steam reforming at 623 K and compared to Rh catalysts on the same supports without iron promotion. The metal-support interaction among the three entities, i.e. Rh ↔ Fe2O3 ← support (ZrO2, MgO and Ca-Al2O3) was investigated using H2-chemisorption, TEM, XPS and in situ techniques such as DRIFTS, temperature-resolved XRD and XAS. As compared to the unpromoted Rh catalysts on the same supports, the CO selectivity is depressed in the presence of iron on Rh/MgO and Rh/Ca-Al2O3, the latter being significantly superior. The role of metal-support interaction for CO-free hydrogen generation was unravelled using a combination of techniques. It was found that the reducibility of iron oxide determines the extent of the strong metal support interaction between Rh and Fe2O3 and the reducibility of iron oxide was affected by the support. On Rh-Fe/Ca-Al2O3, a good balance of the interaction between Rh, Fe2O3 and Ca-Al2O3 prevents strong metal support interaction between Rh and Fe2O3 and thus promotes CO elimination via water-gas-shift reaction on Rh-FexOy sites.

  20. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Aishah Saidina Amin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional mathematical model was developed to simulate the performance of catalytic fixed bed reactor for carbon dioxide reforming of methane over Rh/Al2O3 catalyst at atmospheric pressure. The reactions involved in the system are carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CORM and reverse water gas shift reaction (RWGS. The profiles of CH4 and CO2 conversions, CO and H2 yields, molar flow rate and mole raction of all species as well as reactor temperature along the axial bed of catalyst were simulated. In addition, the effects of different reactor temperature on the reactor performance were also studied. The models can also be applied to analyze the performances of lab-scale micro reactor as well as pilot-plant scale reactor with certain modifications and model verification with experimental data. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 20 August 2008; Accepted: 25 September 2008][How to Cite: N.A.S. Amin, I. Istadi, N.P. Yee. (2008. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3 (1-3: 21-29.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7120.21-29][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7120.21-29 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7120

  1. Utilization of CO2 and biomass char derived from pyrolysis of Dunaliella salina: the effects of steam and catalyst on CO and H2 gas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Jia, Lishan; Su, Shuai; Tian, Zhongbiao; Song, Qianqian; Fang, Weiping; Chen, Changping; Liu, Guangfa

    2012-04-01

    Biomass char, by-product of Dunaliella salina pyrolysis at a final pyrolysis temperature of 500°C, was used as feedstock material in this study. The reactions of biomass char with CO(2) were performed in a fixed-bed reactor to evaluate the effect of temperature and steam on the CO(2) conversion, CO yield and gas composition. The CO(2) conversion and CO yield without steam and catalyst reached about 61.84% and 0.99mol/(mol CO(2)) at 800°C, respectively. Steam and high temperature led to high CO(2) conversion. A new approach for improving H(2) was carried out by using biomass char and Au/Al(2)O(3) catalyst, which combined steam gasification of biomass char and water gas shift reaction, and the H(2) concentration was 1.8 times higher than without catalyst. The process not only mitigated CO(2) emission and made use of residual biomass char, but also created renewable source.

  2. Catalyst mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Rosen, Brian A.

    2017-02-14

    Catalysts that include at least one catalytically active element and one helper catalyst can be used to increase the rate or lower the overpotential of chemical reactions. The helper catalyst can simultaneously act as a director molecule, suppressing undesired reactions and thus increasing selectivity toward the desired reaction. These catalysts can be useful for a variety of chemical reactions including, in particular, the electrochemical conversion of CO.sub.2 or formic acid. The catalysts can also suppress H.sub.2 evolution, permitting electrochemical cell operation at potentials below RHE. Chemical processes and devices using the catalysts are also disclosed, including processes to produce CO, OH.sup.-, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, O.sub.2, H.sub.2, (COOH).sub.2, or (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and a specific device, namely, a CO.sub.2 sensor.

  3. Catalytic and DRIFTS study of the WGS reaction on Pt-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignatti, Ch.; Avila, M.S.; Apesteguia, C.R.; Garetto, T.F. [Catalysis Science and Engineering Research Group (GICIC), Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica - INCAPE - (UNL-CONICET), Santiago del Estero 2654, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2010-07-15

    The water-gas shift (WGS) activity of Pt/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/CeO{sub 2} and Pt/TiO{sub 2} catalysts was studied by in-situ diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Samples contained a similar amount of Pt, between 0.34 and 0.50%, and were characterized by employing a variety of physical and spectroscopic techniques. The catalyst activities were evaluated through both CO conversion versus temperature and CO conversion versus time tests. The DRIFTS spectra were obtained on stream during the WGS reaction at increasing temperatures, from 303 to 573 K. Reduced ceria was the only active support and promoted the WGS reaction on surface bridging OH groups that react with CO to form formate intermediates. Pt/SiO{sub 2} was more active than CeO{sub 2} and catalyzed the WGS reaction through a monofunctional redox mechanism on metallic Pt sites. The CO conversion turnover rate was more than one order of magnitude greater on Pt/CeO{sub 2} than on Pt/SiO{sub 2} showing that the reaction proceeds faster via a bifunctional metal-support mechanism. Platinum on Pt/CeO{sub 2} increased the concentration of OH groups by increasing the ceria reduction extent and also provided a faster pathway for the formation of formate intermediates in comparison to CeO{sub 2} support. Pt/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were clearly more active than Pt/CeO{sub 2}. The WGS reaction on Pt/TiO{sub 2} was catalyzed via a bifunctional metal-support mechanism, probably involving the activation of CO and water on the metal and the support, respectively. The role of platinum on Pt/TiO{sub 2} was critical for promoting the reduction of Ti{sup 4+} ions to Ti{sup 3+} which creates oxygen vacancies in the support to efficiently activate water. (author)

  4. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  5. Methanol synthesis via CO₂ hydrogenation over a Au/ZnO catalyst: an isotope labelling study on the role of CO in the reaction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartadi, Yeusy; Widmann, Daniel; Behm, R Jürgen

    2016-04-28

    Methanol synthesis for chemical energy storage, via hydrogenation of CO2 with H2 produced by renewable energies, is usually accompanied by the undesired formation of CO via the reverse water-gas shift reaction. Aiming at a better mechanistic understanding of methanol formation from CO2/H2 on highly selective supported Au/ZnO catalysts we have investigated the role of CO in the reaction process using isotope labelling experiments. Using (13)C-labelled CO2, we found for reaction at 5 bar and 240 °C that (i) the methanol formation rate is significantly higher in CO2-containing gas mixtures than in a CO2-free mixture and (ii) in mixtures containing both CO2 and CO methanol formation from CO increases with the CO content up to 1% CO, and then remains at 20% of the total methanol formation up to a CO2/CO ratio of 1/1, making CO2 the preferred carbon source in these mixtures. A shift in the preferred carbon source for MeOH from CO2 towards CO is observed with increasing reaction temperatures between 240 °C and 300 °C. At even higher temperatures CO is expected to become the dominant carbon source. The consequences of these findings for the application of Au/ZnO catalysts for chemical storage of renewable energies are discussed.

  6. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  7. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    How can architecture promote the enriching experiences of the tolerant, the democratic, and the learning city - a city worth living in, worth supporting and worth investing in? Catalyst Architecture comprises architectural projects, which, by virtue of their location, context and their combination...... of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city development...

  8. Heterogeneous Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dakka, J.; Sheldon, R.A.; Sanderson, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of GB 2309655 (A) Heterogeneous catalysts comprising one or more metal compounds selected from the group consisting of tin, molybdenum, tungsten, zirconium and selenium compounds deposited on the surface of a silicalite are provided. Preferably Sn(IV) and/or Mo(VI) are employed. The cat

  9. Catalysis Science Initiative: Catalyst Design by Discovery Informatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgass, William Nicholas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Department of Chemistry; Caruthers, James [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Ribeiro, Fabio [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Thomson, Kendall [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts selectively enhance the rates of chemical reactions toward desired products. Such reactions provide great benefit to society in major commercial sectors such as energy production, protecting the environment, and polymer products and thereby contribute heavily to the country’s gross national product. Our premise is that the level of fundamental understanding of catalytic events at the atomic and molecular scale has reached the point that more predictive methods can be developed to shorten the cycle time to new processes. The field of catalysis can be divided into two regimes: heterogeneous and homogeneous. For the heterogeneous catalysis regime, we have used the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O + CO2 + H2O) over supported metals as a test bed. Detailed analysis and strong coupling of theory with experiment have led to the following conclusions: • The sequence of elementary steps goes through a COOH intermediate • The CO binding energy is a strong function of coverage of CO adsorbed on the surface in many systems • In the case of Au catalysts, the CO adsorption is generally too weak on surface with close atomic packing, but the enhanced binding at corner atoms (which are missing bonding partners) of cubo-octahedral nanoparticles increases the energy to a near optimal value and produces very active catalysts. • Reaction on the metal alone cannot account for the experimental results. The reaction is dual functional with water activation occurring at the metal-support interface. It is clear from our work that the theory component is essential, not only for prediction of new systems, but also for reconciling data and testing hypotheses regarding potential descriptors. Particularly important is the finding that the interface between nano-sized metal particles and the oxides that are used to support them represent a new state of matter in the sense that the interfacial bonding perturbs the chemical state of both metals atoms and the support

  10. The production of hydrogen through the use of a 77 wt% Pd 23 wt% Ag membrane water gas shift reactor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, Liberty N

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen as an energy carrier has the potential to decarbonize the energy sector. This work presents the application of a palladium-silver (Pd–Ag) membrane-based reactor. The membrane reactor which is made from Pd–Ag film supported by porous...

  11. Investigation of the Reverse Water Gas Shift Reaction for Production of Oxygen From Mars Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tom; Zubrin, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The first phase of the research includes a comprehensive analytical study examining the potential applications for engineering subsystems and mission strategies made possible by such RWGS based subsystems, and will include an actual experimental demonstration and performance characterization of a full-scale brassboard RWGS working unit. By the time of this presentation the laboratory demonstration unit will not yet be operational but we will present the results of our analytical studies to date and plans for the ongoing work.

  12. Investigation of the Reverse Water Gas Shift Reaction for Production of Oxygen From Mars Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tom; Zubrin, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The first phase of the research includes a comprehensive analytical study examining the potential applications for engineering subsystems and mission strategies made possible by such RWGS based subsystems, and will include an actual experimental demonstration and performance characterization of a full-scale brassboard RWGS working unit. By the time of this presentation the laboratory demonstration unit will not yet be operational but we will present the results of our analytical studies to date and plans for the ongoing work.

  13. EFFECT OF SURFACTANT ON TWO-PHASE FLOW PATTERNS OF WATER-GAS IN CAPILLARY TUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Flow patterns of liquid-gas two-phase flow were experimentally investigated. The experiments were carried out in both vertical and horizontal capillary tubes having inner diameters of 1.60 mm. The working liquid was the mixture of water and Sodium Dodecyl Benzoyl Sulfate (SDBS). The working gas was Nitrogen. For the water/SDBS mixture-gas flow in the vertical capillary tube, flow-pattern transitions occurred at lower flow velocities than those for the water-gas flow in the same tube. For the water/SDBS mixture-gas flow in the horizontal capillary tube, surface tension had little effect on the bubbly-intermittent transition and had only slight effect on the plug-slug and slug-annular transitions. However, surface tension had significant effect on the wavy stratified flow regime. The wavy stratified flow regime of water/SDBS mixture-gas flow expanded compared with that of water-gas.

  14. Experimental study of flow patterns and pressure drops of heavy oil-water-gas vertical flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-mao; ZHONG Hai-quan; LI Ying-chuan; LIU Zhong-neng; WANG Qi

    2014-01-01

    A stainless steel apparatus of 18.5 m high and 0.05 m in inner diameter is developed, with the heavy oil from Lukeqin Xinjiang oil field as the test medium, to carry out the orthogonal experiments for the interactions between heavy oil-water and heavy oil-water-gas. With the aid of observation windows, the pressure drop signal can be collected and the general multiple flow patterns of heavy oil-water-gas can be observed, including the bubble, slug, churn and annular ones. Compared with the conventional oil, the bubble flows are identified in three specific flow patterns which are the dispersed bubble (DB), the bubble gas-bubble heavy oil go(B-B), and the bubble gas-intermittent heavy oilgo(B-I). The slug flows are identified in two specific flow patterns which are the intermittent gas-bubble heavy oilgo(I-B)and the intermittent gas-intermittent heavy oilgo(I-I). Compared with the observa- tions in the heavy oil-water experiment, it is found that the conventional models can not accurately predict the pressure gradient. And it is not water but heavy oil and water mixed phase that is in contact with the tube wall. So, based on the principle of the energy con- servation and the kinematic wave theory, a new method is proposed to calculate the frictional pressure gradient. Furthermore, with the new friction gradient calculation method and a due consideration of the flow characteristics of the heavy oil-water-gas high speed flow, a new model is built to predict the heavy oil-water-gas pressure gradient. The predictions are compared with the experiment data and the field data. The accuracy of the predictions shows the rationality and the applicability of the new model.

  15. Analysis of Deactivation Mechanism on a Multi-Component Sulfur-Tolerant Steam Reforming Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    298 = -41 kJ/mol 3.2 While steam reforming is highly endothermic , water gas shift is moderately exothermic . The steam reforming is favored at...40 2.4.1. Definition of hydrogen yield ......................................................................... 41 xii...3H2 + CO ΔH o 298 = +206 kJ/mol 1.1 Water gas shift CO + H2O H2 + CO2 ΔH o 298 = -41 kJ/mol 1.2 The reforming reaction is endothermic and external

  16. New Homogeneous Chromophore/Catalyst Concepts for the Solar-Driven Reduction of Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Michael D. [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-22

    One of the major scientific and technical challenges of this century is to develop chemical means to store solar energy in the form of fuels. This can be accomplished by developing light-absorbing and catalytic compounds that function cooperatively to rearrange the chemical bonds of feedstocks in a way that allows solar energy to be stored and released on demand. The research conducted during this project was directed toward addressing fundamental questions that underlie the conversion of CO2 to a solar fuel using homogeneous molecular systems. The research focused particularly on developing methods for extracting the reducing equivalents for these photochemical conversions from H2, which is a renewable molecule sourced to water. The research followed two main lines. One effort focused on understanding the general principles that govern how light-absorbing molecules interact with independent H2 oxidation and CO2 reduction catalysts to produce a functional cycle for driving the energy-storing reverse water-gas-shift reaction with light. The second effort centered on developing the excited-state properties and H2 activation chemistry of tungsten–alkylidyne complexes. These chromophores were found to be powerful excited-state reducing agents, which could be incorporated into light-light-harvesting assemblies, and to hold the potential to be regenerated using H2.

  17. Nickel ferrite spinel as catalyst precursor in the dry reforming of methane:Synthesis, characterization and catalytic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafik Benrabaa; Hamza Boukhlouf; Axel L(o)fberg; Annick Rubbens; Rose-N(o)elle Vannier; Elisabeth Bordes-Richard; Akila Barama

    2012-01-01

    Dry reforming of methane by CO2 using nickel ferrite as precursor of catalysts was investigated.Nickel ferrite crystalline particles were prepared by coprecipitation of nitrates with NaOH or ammonia followed by calcination,or by hydrothermal synthesis without calcination step.The textural and structural properties were determined by a number of analysis methods,including X-ray diffraction (XRD),Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),among which X-ray diffraction (XRD) was at room and variable temperatures.All synthesized oxides showed the presence of micro or nanoparticles of NiFe2O4 inverse spinel,but Fe2O3 (hematite) was also present when ammonia was used for coprecipitation.The reducibility by hydrogen was studied by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and in situ XRD,which showed the influence of the preparation method.The surface area (BET),particle size (Rietveld refinement),as well as surface Ni/Fe atomic ratio (XPS) and the behavior upon reduction varied according to the synthesis method.The catalytic reactivity was investigated using isopropanol decomposition to determine the acid/base properties.The catalytic performance of methane reforming with CO2 was measured with and without the pre-treatment of catalysts under H2 in 650-800 ℃ range.The catalytic conversions of methane and CO2 were quite low but they increased when the catalysts were pre-reduced.A significant contribution of reverse water gas shift reaction accounted for the low values of H2/CO ratio.No coking was observed as shown by the reoxidation step performed after the catalytic reactions.The possible formation of nickel-iron alloy observed during the study of reducibility by hydrogen was invoked to account for the catalytic behavior.

  18. Novel Approach to Tar Removal from Biomass Producer Gas by Means of a Nickel-Based Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosecký, M.; Kameníková, P.; Pohořelý, M.; Skoblja, S.; Punčochář, M.

    The nickel-based catalyst was exposed to the raw gas from gasification of woody biomass with air in a fluidized-bed. After dust removal on a barrier filter and sulphur compounds capture, namely H2S, on an active sorbent made of CuO and ZnO, higher hydrocarbons as tar components were decomposed/reformed on aNi-catalyst. Steam reforming reactions led to decomposition of tar and all hydrocarbons higher than CH4 into mainly H2 and CO which further underwent reaction with steam via the water gas shift reaction to CO2. The reforming reactions caused approximately 10-20 % decrease in the lower heating values of the producer gas from the inlet values 5.0-6.5 MJ m-3. The gas yield increased fromvalues 2.4-2.6 m3 kg-1 to values 2.8-3.0 m3 kg-1 on dry biomass basis. The chosen tar removal concept based on combination of dolomite in the fluidized-bed with the secondary catalytic reactor was proved by 20 hours long experiment in which the finaltar content below 30 mg m-3 was attained corresponding to more than 97 % tar conversion. H2S content in producer gas was expected to be below 100 vol. ppm, bulk of which was captured on the sorbent. Only limited deactivation of thecatalyst by sulphur compounds was found in the front of the catalyst bed where sulphur content was determined as high as 173 wt. ppm compared to 22 wt. ppm in the fresh sample.

  19. Shifting Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  20. Shifting Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  1. Tough Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Robert S.; Verdezoto, Nervo; Holst, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    in a student dormitory and found that players did not shift their electricity use, because they were unwilling to change their schedules and found it easier to focus on reducing electricity use. Based on our findings, we discuss the implications for encouraging shifting, and also the challenges of integrating...

  2. Catalytic behavior of metal catalysts in high-temperature RWGS reaction: In-situ FT-IR experiments and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungjun; Sang, Byoung-In; Hong, Jongsup; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Byung-Kook; Kim, Hyoungchul

    2017-01-01

    High-temperature chemical reactions are ubiquitous in (electro) chemical applications designed to meet the growing demands of environmental and energy protection. However, the fundamental understanding and optimization of such reactions are great challenges because they are hampered by the spontaneous, dynamic, and high-temperature conditions. Here, we investigated the roles of metal catalysts (Pd, Ni, Cu, and Ag) in the high-temperature reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction using in-situ surface analyses and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Catalysts were prepared by the deposition-precipitation method with urea hydrolysis and freeze-drying. Most metals show a maximum catalytic activity during the RWGS reaction (reaching the thermodynamic conversion limit) with formate groups as an intermediate adsorbed species, while Ag metal has limited activity with the carbonate species on its surface. According to DFT calculations, such carbonate groups result from the suppressed dissociation and adsorption of hydrogen on the Ag surface, which is in good agreement with the experimental RWGS results.

  3. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city development...... meaningful for everyone. The exhibited works are designed by SANAA, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, James Corner Field Operation, JBMC Arquitetura e Urbanismo, Atelier Bow-Wow, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, COBE, Transform, BIG, Topotek1, Superflex, and by visual artist Jane Maria Petersen....

  4. Prediction of natural gas hydrate formation region in wellbore during deep- water gas well testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-yuan; SUN Bao-jiang; WANG Xue-rui; ZHANG Zhen-nan

    2014-01-01

    Wellbore temperature field equations are established with considerations of the enthalpy changes of the natural gas during the deep-water gas well testing. A prediction method for the natural gas hydrate formation region during the deep-water gas well testing is proposed, which combines the wellbore temperature field equations, the phase equilibrium conditions of the natural gas hydrate formation and the calculation methods for the pressure field. Through the sensitivity analysis of the parameters that affect the hydrate formation region, it can be concluded that during the deep-water gas well testing, with the reduction of the gas production rate and the decrease of the geothermal gradient, along with the increase of the depth of water, the hydrate formation region in the wellbore enlarges, the hydrate formation regions differ with different component contents of natural gases, as compared with the pure methane gas, with the increase of ethane and propane, the hydrate formation region expands, the admixture of inhibitors, the type and the concentrations of which can be optimized through the method proposed in the paper, will reduce the hydrate formation region, the throttling effect will lead to the abrupt changes of temperature and pressure, which results in a variation of the hydrate formation region, if the throttling occurs in the shallow part of the wellbore, the temperature will drop too much, which enlarges the hydrate formation region, otherwise, if the throttling occurs in the deep part of the wellbore, the hydrate formation region will be reduced due to the decrease of the pressure.

  5. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    the projects as case studies, which contribute with strategic knowledge rather than generalizing from average considerations. These are ‘strategic projects’ where we have looked for the specific and the particular (Flyvbjerg 1991). According to the case studies, we use the case study method developed by Bent......’ interpretations and architectural strategies are included in the analyses. This implies that there is a large variation of empirical knowledge about the selected problems. That is the reason why we give a short introduction to the exact use of approaches and methods in the beginning of each case study. Based...... in experience? Which design qualities do the best examples of architecture as urban catalysts have, and how can we as citizens, politicians and professionals use knowledge about this in the development of our cities as good places to live? We wish to throw light on these key questions through case studies...

  6. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  7. Power Shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ "We are entering a new era of world history: the end of Western domination and the arrival of the Asian century. The question is: will Washington wake up to this reality?" This is the central premise of Kishore Mahbubani's provocative new book The New Asian Hemisphere: The Irresistible Shift of Global Power to the East.

  8. Study and Commercial Application of Graded Optimization of Catalysts for Fixed Bed Residue Upgrading Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Zhaoming; Jiang Lijing

    2007-01-01

    The SHIFT-G technology of inverse catalyst loading is used to optimize the catalyst grading in the residue hydrotreating unit.The results,taken from pilot tests and commercial units,have showed that the optimized catalyst grading system can reasonably distribute the reaction load,effectively improve the properties of hydrotreated products,prolong the operating cycle and promote economic benefits.

  9. Effect of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O content in syngas on activity and selectivity of a cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poehlmann, F.; Kaiser, P.; Kern, C.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    When liquid hydrocarbons are to be used as CO{sub 2} neutral storage media for electrical energy, it is necessary to convert CO{sub 2} from e.g. flue gas and hydrogen from water electrolysis to synthesis gas (CO/H{sub 2}). This can be achieved by a high temperature reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Due to thermodynamic limitations, the product gas of RWGS reactors operated at technically feasible temperatures of around 900 C will always contain significant amounts of water and carbon dioxide, which can influence the activity of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts for the actual hydrocarbon production. In this study, a commercial cobalt catalyst was investigated under low temperature FTS conditions (2.5 MPa, 215 C) regard to activity and selectivity in the presence of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. A continuous flow apparatus including a fixed-bed reactor for the synthesis step was used to conduct all experiments. The experimental data reveals that the CO/CO{sub 2}-ratio does not affect the activity and product selectivity until the CO{sub 2}-concentration reaches 75 vol.-% (CO{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2})). On increasing the carbon dioxide concentration to 100 vol.-% (H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} = 2), the methane selectivity rose up to 70 % and even above. Addition of water caused an initial loss of activity. After the initial loss of activity the FT catalyst activity was found to remain constant, irrespectively of if the water was removed from the feed or not. Thus, the deactivation was permanent. (orig.)

  10. Effect of crystallite size on the performance and phase transformation of Co3O4/Al2O3 catalysts during CO-PrOx - an in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyathi, Thulani M; Fischer, Nico; York, Andy P E; Claeys, Michael

    2017-02-15

    The preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide has been identified as an effective route to remove trace amounts of CO (approx. 0.5-1.0 vol%) in the H2-rich reformate gas stream after the low-temperature water-gas shift. Instead of noble metal-based catalysts, Co3O4-based catalysts were investigated in this study as cheaper and more readily available alternatives. This study aimed at investigating the effect of crystallite size on the mass- and surface area-specific CO oxidation activity as well as on the reduction behaviour of Co3O4. Model Co3O4 catalysts with average crystallite sizes between 3 and 15 nm were synthesised using the reverse micelle technique. Results from the catalytic tests revealed that decreasing the size of the Co3O4 crystallites increased the mass-specific CO oxidation activity in the 50-200 °C temperature range. On the other hand, the surface area-specific CO oxidation activity displayed a volcano-type behaviour where crystallites with an average size of 8.5 nm were the most active within the same temperature range. In situ characterisation in the magnetometer revealed that the Co3O4 crystallites are partially reduced to metallic Co above 225 °C with crystallites larger than 7.5 nm showing higher degrees of reduction under the H2-rich environment of CO-PrOx. In situ PXRD experiments further showed the presence of CoO concurrently with metallic fcc Co in all the catalysts during the CO-PrOx runs. In all experiments, the formation of fcc Co coincided with the formation of CH4. Upon decreasing the reaction temperature below 250 °C under the reaction gas, both in situ techniques revealed that the fcc Co previously formed is partially re-oxidised to CoO.

  11. Environmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Christopher J.; McGillis, Wade R.; Raymond, Peter A.; Edson, James B.; Hintsa, Eric J.; Zemmelink, Hendrik J.; Dacey, John W. H.; Ho, David T.

    2007-05-01

    Air-water gas transfer influences CO2 and other climatically important trace gas fluxes on regional and global scales, yet the magnitude of the transfer is not well known. Widely used models of gas exchange rates are based on empirical relationships linked to wind speed, even though physical processes other than wind are known to play important roles. Here the first field investigations are described supporting a new mechanistic model based on surface water turbulence that predicts gas exchange for a range of aquatic and marine processes. Findings indicate that the gas transfer rate varies linearly with the turbulent dissipation rate to the ${^1}\\!/{_4 power in a range of systems with different types of forcing - in the coastal ocean, in a macro-tidal river estuary, in a large tidal freshwater river, and in a model (i.e., artificial) ocean. These results have important implications for understanding carbon cycling.

  12. The selective oxidation of ammonia over alumina supported catalysts. Experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.M.; Pourkashanian, M.; Williams, A.; Backreedy, R.I.; Darvell, L.I. [Energy and Resources Research Institute, School of Process Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS29JT (United Kingdom); Simell, P.; Heiskanen, K. [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1601, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Kilpinen, P. [AAbo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Laboratory for Industrial Chemistry, Turku (Finland)

    2005-09-01

    Hot gas-clean up will improve the efficiency of emerging gasification technologies. Selective catalytic oxidation (SCO) of ammonia is a promising approach for dealing with the main fixed nitrogen species. The work presented here comprises both laboratory scale experimental measurements of potential SCO catalysts, as well as the development of a simple four-step reaction model to describe the behaviour of one of the more promising catalysts. A range of transition metal oxides supported on {gamma}-alumina were studied for their activity in the SCO of ammonia in a simulated gasification gas mixture containing CO, H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}S and toluene as model tar species. Both copper and chromium based catalysts demonstrated a window of operating temperature over which they were resistant to poisoning by H{sub 2}S; Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was in fact promoted by this gas for the SCO reaction. The ammonia conversion over 7% Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied in more detail, and this data was further used to develop a kinetic model for the reactions taking place over the temperature range 723-906K. Excellent conversion and selectivity to N{sub 2} was found in the temperature window 973-1173K and 2.6vol% O{sub 2}. However, it also catalyses a rapid H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} reaction. This reaction consumes all remaining available oxygen so that no other oxidation reactions take place (e.g. of methane or 'tar'). The four-step reaction model was developed using the PLUG application of Chemkin and Surface Chemkin software coupled with the gas-phase mechanism. Rates for the heterogeneous oxidation of ammonia and hydrogen are included as well as forward and reverse reactions of the water gas shift. Over the temperature range in question, the surface reaction rates are much faster than the gas-phase reactions. The model is applicable for the 723-906K temperature range using a gas mixture containing 0.4vol% ammonia and 0.01vol% H{sub 2}S in the presence

  13. Foundation Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Goralski, Greg

    2010-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to Flash Catalyst for designers with intermediate to advanced skills. It discusses where Catalyst sits within the production process and how it communicates with other programs. It covers all of the features of the Flash Catalyst workspace, teaching you how to create designs from scratch, how to build application designs and add functionality, and how to master the Catalyst/Flex workflow. * Introduces Flash Catalyst * Focuses on production process * Covers the interrelation between Flash Catalyst and Photoshop/Illustrator/Flex/Flash What you'll learn Starting f

  14. Synthesis NiAl{sub 1,0}Fe{sub 1,0}O{sub 4} catalyst by the combustion reaction to their use in the shift reaction (WGSR); Sintese do catalisador de NiAl{sub 1,0}Fe{sub 1,0}O{sub 4} por reacao de combustao visando sua utilizacao na reacao de shift (WGSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, P.T.A.; Costa, A.C.F.M.; Neiva, L.S.; Gama, L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Argolo, F.; Andrade, H.M.C. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    This work aims at the synthesis of catalyst NiAl{sub 1,0}Fe{sub 1,0}O{sub 4} by combustion reaction using urea as fuel, to evaluate its performance in the production of hydrogen by the reaction of displacement of water vapor (WGSR). The initial composition of the solution was based on valencia total oxidizing and reducing reagents based on the concepts of the chemistry of propellants, using container as a crucible of glassy silica. The resulting powder was characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms (BET), scanning electronic microscope and catalytic tests. The DRX results reveal the presents majoritary phase NiAl{sub 1,0}Fe{sub 1,0}O{sub 4} spinel, the catalyst presents surface area 28 m{sup 2}/g and isotherms type III. Higher conversion CO/CO{sub 2} of 75% CO conversion observed at 500 deg C and catalytic activity of 43 mmolg{sup -1}.h{sup -1} at 450 deg C. (author)

  15. Catalysis Science Initiative: Catalyst Design by Discovery Informatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgass, William Nicholas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Department of Chemistry; Caruthers, James [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Ribeiro, Fabio [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Thomson, Kendall [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts selectively enhance the rates of chemical reactions toward desired products. Such reactions provide great benefit to society in major commercial sectors such as energy production, protecting the environment, and polymer products and thereby contribute heavily to the country’s gross national product. Our premise is that the level of fundamental understanding of catalytic events at the atomic and molecular scale has reached the point that more predictive methods can be developed to shorten the cycle time to new processes. The field of catalysis can be divided into two regimes: heterogeneous and homogeneous. For the heterogeneous catalysis regime, we have used the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O + CO2 + H2O) over supported metals as a test bed. Detailed analysis and strong coupling of theory with experiment have led to the following conclusions: • The sequence of elementary steps goes through a COOH intermediate • The CO binding energy is a strong function of coverage of CO adsorbed on the surface in many systems • In the case of Au catalysts, the CO adsorption is generally too weak on surface with close atomic packing, but the enhanced binding at corner atoms (which are missing bonding partners) of cubo-octahedral nanoparticles increases the energy to a near optimal value and produces very active catalysts. • Reaction on the metal alone cannot account for the experimental results. The reaction is dual functional with water activation occurring at the metal-support interface. It is clear from our work that the theory component is essential, not only for prediction of new systems, but also for reconciling data and testing hypotheses regarding potential descriptors. Particularly important is the finding that the interface between nano-sized metal particles and the oxides that are used to support them represent a new state of matter in the sense that the interfacial bonding perturbs the chemical state of both metals atoms and the support

  16. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Liu, J.; Macias, B.; Martin, D. S.; Minkoff, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Sargsyan, A.; Smith, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  17. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    was inspired by a computational screening, suggesting that alloys such as Ni-Fe, Co-Ni, and Co-Fe should show superior activity to the industrially used nickel catalyst. Especially the Ni-Fe system was considered to be interesting, since such alloy catalysts should be both more active and cheaper than the Ni...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...... pose an environmental risk. The focus was put on iron-containing zeolite catalysts, since these recently have shown great potential as catalysts for the process. A number of different zeolites were compared. BEA was found to be the most active, thus focus was put on this material. Different preparation...

  18. Catalysis by Design: Well-Defined Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Pelletier, Jeremie

    2016-03-09

    support taken as a X, L ligands in the Green formalism, the catalyst can be designed and generated by grafting the organometallic precursor containing the functional group(s) suitable to target a given transformation (surface organometallic fragments (SOMF)). The choice of these SOMF is based on the elementary steps known in molecular chemistry applied to the desired reaction. The coordination sphere necessary for any catalytic reaction involving paraffins, olefins, and alkynes also can thus be predicted. Only their most complete understanding can allow development of catalytic reactions with the highest possible selectivity, activity, and lifetime. This Account will examine the results of SOMC for hydrocarbon transformations on oxide surfaces bearing metals of group 4-6. The silica-supported catalysts are exhibiting remarkable performances for Ziegler-Natta polymerization and depolymerization, low temperature hydrogenolysis of alkanes and waxes, metathesis of alkanes and cycloalkanes, olefins metathesis, and related reactions. In the case of reactions involving molecules that do not contain carbon (water-gas shift, NH3 synthesis, etc.) this single site approach is also valid but will be considered in a later review. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  19. Pd Close Coupled Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Hua SHI; Mao Chu GONG; Yao Qiang CHEN

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst comprised novel high surface area alumina support was prepared to control emission of automobiles. The results showed that prepared catalyst could satisfy the requirements of a high performance close coupled catalyst for its good catalytic activity at low temperature and good stability at high temperature.

  20. Study of Pt–Rh/CeO{sub 2}–ZrO{sub 2}–M{sub x}O{sub y} (M = Y, La)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} three-way catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiaxiu, Guo, E-mail: guojiaxiu@scu.edu.cn [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065 (China); Zhonghua, Shi, E-mail: shizh96@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Dongdong, Wu [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Huaqiang, Yin [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065 (China); Maochu, Gong [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Yaoqiang, Chen, E-mail: chenyaoqiang@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2013-05-15

    CeO{sub 2}–ZrO{sub 2}–M{sub x}O{sub y} (M = Y; La) mixed oxides, prepared by co-precipitation method and characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra (RM) and oxygen pulse reaction, were comparatively investigated to elucidate the combinational effects of Y and/or La oxide promoters on the catalytic activity and anti-aging performance of monolithic cordierite honeycomb catalysts with low Pt and Rh content. The catalytic activities, water-gas shift (WGS) and steam reforming reaction (SR) were studied under a simulated gas mixture. The catalysts were also characterized by H{sub 2}-temperature-programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR) and O{sub 2}-temperature-programmed desorption (O{sub 2}-TPD). The results showed that the prepared CeO{sub 2}–ZrO{sub 2}–M{sub x}O{sub y} oxides have a face-centered cubic fluorite structure and are nanosize. La{sup 3+} ions can significantly improve thermal stability and efficiently retard CeO{sub 2}–ZrO{sub 2} crystal sintering and growth. Doped CeO{sub 2}–ZrO{sub 2} with Y{sup 3+} and La{sup 3+} has 105 and 60 m{sup 2}/g surface area and 460 and 390 μmol/g OSC before and after aging. The T{sub 50} of fresh Pt–Rh/CZYL/LA is 170 °C for CO, 222 °C for C{sub 3}H{sub 8} and 189 °C for NO, and shift to 205, 262 and 228 °C after hydrothermal aging, which are better than those of Pt–Rh/CZY/LA or Pt–Rh/CZL/LA. WGS and SR are relate to the OSC of oxygen storage materials and absorbed oxygen species on the catalyst surface and affect the three-way catalytic activities of catalysts. The reductive property of noble metals and the dissociatively adsorbed O{sub 2} on the surface of catalysts are closely related to the catalytic activities.

  1. Existence for a global pressure formulation of water-gas flow in porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Amaziane

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a model of water-gas flow in porous media with an incompressible water phase and a compressible gas phase. Such models appear in gas migration through engineered and geological barriers for a deep repository for radioactive waste. The main feature of this model is the introduction of a new global pressure and it is fully equivalent to the original equations. The system is written in a fractional flow formulation as a degenerate parabolic system with the global pressure and the saturation potential as the main unknowns. The major difficulties related to this model are in the nonlinear degenerate structure of the equations, as well as in the coupling in the system. Under some realistic assumptions on the data, including unbounded capillary pressure function and non-homogeneous boundary conditions, we prove the existence of weak solutions of the system. Furthermore, it is shown that the weak solution has certain desired properties, such as positivity of the saturation. The result is proved with the help of an appropriate regularization and a time discretization of the coupled system. We use suitable test functions to obtain a priori estimates and a compactness result in order to pass to the limit in nonlinear terms.

  2. Advances in interaction mechanism of water (gas) on clay minerals in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Manchao; Sun Xiaoming; Zhao Jian

    2014-01-01

    Dealing with large-scale deformations in soft-rock tunnels is a very important issue in soft-rock tunnel engineering. The mechanism of this large-scale deformation is closely related to the physical and chem-ical properties of soft rock, interaction between soft rock and water, and interaction between soft rock and gas contained in soft rock. In order to gain a better predictive understanding of the governing prin-ciples associated with this phenomenon, we used experimental and theoretical methods to study the effects of point defect on physical and chemical properties of soft rock and mechanism of interaction between water (gas) and soft rock. Firstly, we calculated the impurity formation energies and transition energy levels of defects by using the first-principle calculation, the results showed the microscopic mech-anism of defects substitution in kaolinite and effects of defects on the structure of kaolinite. Moreover, comparing the experimental and theoretical results, we found the mechanism of interaction between water and soft rock. The results show that water is one of the most important factors which can induce various kinds of geological disasters. At last, the interaction between soft rock and surrounding gas as CO2, CH4 and CO is disused, the influence of surrounding gas on soft rock should not be ignored.

  3. Salinity independent volume fraction prediction in water-gas-oil multiphase flows using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, C.M.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Brandao, Luis E.B., E-mail: otero@ien.gov.b, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.b, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (DIRA/IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radiofarmacos

    2011-07-01

    This work investigates the response of a volume fraction prediction system for water-gas-oil multiphase flows considering variations on water salinity. The approach is based on gamma-ray pulse height distributions pattern recognition by means the artificial neural networks (ANNs). The detection system uses appropriate fan beam geometry, comprised of a dual-energy gamma-ray source and two NaI(Tl) detectors adequately positioned outside the pipe in order measure transmitted and scattered beams. An ideal and static theoretical model for annular flow regime have been developed using MCNP-X code, which was used to provide training, test and validation data for the ANN. More than 500 simulations have been done, in which water salinity have been ranged from 0 to 16% in order to cover a most practical situations. Validation tests have included values of volume fractions and water salinity different from those used in ANN training phase. The results presented here show that the proposed approach may be successfully applied to material volume fraction prediction on watergas- oil multiphase flows considering practical (real) levels of variations in water salinity. (author)

  4. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  5. Resin Catalyst Hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Asaoka

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction: What are resin catalyst hybrids? There are typically two types of resin catalyst. One is acidic resin which representative is polystyrene sulfonic acid. The other is basic resin which is availed as metal complex support. The objective items of this study on resin catalyst are consisting of pellet hybrid, equilibrium hybrid and function hybrid of acid and base,as shown in Fig. 1[1-5].

  6. Preparation of Cs-Rb-V series sulphuric acid catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈振兴; 杨刚; 叶华

    2001-01-01

    Cs-Rb-V series low temperature sulphuric acid catalyst was prepared for the first time by using carbonized mother liquor containing alkali-metal salts. The results show that the conversion of SO2 on catalyst prepared directly with carbonized mother liquor could reach to 24.8% at 410℃. If n(Na)/n(V) was adjusted properly, the conversion of SO2 could be increased to 35.6% at 410℃. Refined carbonized mother liquor could make the catalytic activity even higher at low temperature, the conversion of SO2 could be increased to 36.65% at 410℃. The catalyst was examined with differential thermal analysis. It was found that both endothermic peaks and exothermic peaks of catalyst shifted forward obviously and the catalyst possessed higher activity at low temperature.

  7. A kinetic study of methanol synthesis in a slurry reactor using a CuO/ZnO/Al sub 2 O sub 3 catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Adwani, H.A.

    1992-05-01

    A kinetic model that describes the methanol production rate over a CuO/ZnO/AI{sub 2}0{sub 3} catalyst (United Catalyst L-951) at typical industrial operating conditions is developed using a slurry reactor. Different experiments are conducted in which the H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio is equal to 2, 1, and 0.5, respectively, while the CO/CO{sub 2} ratio is held constant at 9. At each H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio the space velocity is set at four different values in the range of 3000-13,000 1/hr kg{sub cat}. The effect of H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio and space velocity on methanol production rate, conversions, and product composition is further investigated. The results indicate that the highest methanol production rate can be achieved at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 1 followed by H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 0.5 and 2 respectively. The hydrogen and carbon monoxide conversions decrease with increasing space velocity for all H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratios tested. Carbon monoxide hydrogenation appears to be the main route to methanol at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 0.5 and 2. On the other hand, carbon dioxide hydrogenation appears to be the main route to methanol at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 1. At all H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratios, the extent of the reverse water gas shift reaction decreases with increasing space velocity. The effect of temperature on the kinetics is examined by using the same experimental approach at 508 K. It is found that a different reaction sequence takes place at each temperature. Also, a time on stream study is conducted simultaneously in order to investigate the characteristic of catalyst deactivation with time on stream. During the first 150 hours of time on stream, the catalyst loses approximately 2/3 of its initial activity before reaching a steady state activity.

  8. A kinetic study of methanol synthesis in a slurry reactor using a CuO/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Adwani, H.A.

    1992-05-01

    A kinetic model that describes the methanol production rate over a CuO/ZnO/AI{sub 2}0{sub 3} catalyst (United Catalyst L-951) at typical industrial operating conditions is developed using a slurry reactor. Different experiments are conducted in which the H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio is equal to 2, 1, and 0.5, respectively, while the CO/CO{sub 2} ratio is held constant at 9. At each H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio the space velocity is set at four different values in the range of 3000-13,000 1/hr kg{sub cat}. The effect of H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio and space velocity on methanol production rate, conversions, and product composition is further investigated. The results indicate that the highest methanol production rate can be achieved at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 1 followed by H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 0.5 and 2 respectively. The hydrogen and carbon monoxide conversions decrease with increasing space velocity for all H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratios tested. Carbon monoxide hydrogenation appears to be the main route to methanol at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 0.5 and 2. On the other hand, carbon dioxide hydrogenation appears to be the main route to methanol at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 1. At all H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratios, the extent of the reverse water gas shift reaction decreases with increasing space velocity. The effect of temperature on the kinetics is examined by using the same experimental approach at 508 K. It is found that a different reaction sequence takes place at each temperature. Also, a time on stream study is conducted simultaneously in order to investigate the characteristic of catalyst deactivation with time on stream. During the first 150 hours of time on stream, the catalyst loses approximately 2/3 of its initial activity before reaching a steady state activity.

  9. Energy phase shift as mechanism for catalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2012-05-01

    Catalysts are agents that by binding reactant molecules lower the energy barriers to chemical reaction. After reaction the catalyst is regenerated, its unbinding energy recruited from the environment, which is associated with an inevitable loss of energy. We show that combining several catalytic sites to become energetically and temporally phase-shifted relative to each other provides a possibility to sustain the overall reaction by internal \\'energy recycling\\', bypassing the need for thermal activation, and in principle allowing the system to work adiabatically. Using an analytical model for superimposed, phase-shifted potentials of F 1-ATP synthase provides a description integrating main characteristics of this rotary enzyme complex. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic catalyst bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, Wendy; Bol, A.A.; Geus, John W.

    2001-01-01

    After a discussion about the importance of the size of the catalyst bodies with reactions in the liquid-phase with a suspended catalyst, the possibilities of magnetic separation are dealt with. Deficiencies of the usual ferromagnetic particles are the reactivity and the clustering of the particles.

  11. External Catalyst Breakup Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    14-18 Mesh Catalyst 127 4-12 Hot Gas Thermal Fatigue Test Results for 25-30 Mesh Catalyst 128 4-13 Hot Gas Thermal Aging Test Results 131 - 19 - LISI ...magnitude of the thermal and internal pressure solution3, These solucions siu- Li.L fti’r oir =ztcrii ad the pressure and temperature profiles of

  12. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  13. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  14. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...

  15. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia

    2014-03-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  16. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  17. ALKALI RESISTANT CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention concerns the selective removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from gasses. In particular, the invention concerns a process, a catalyst and the use of a catalyst for the selective removal of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia from gases containing a significant amount...... of alkali metal and/or alkali-earth compounds which process comprises using a catalyst combined of (i) a formed porous superacidic support, said superacidic support having an Hammett acidity stronger than Ho=-12, and (ii) a metal oxide catalytic component deposited on said superacidic support selected from...

  18. High performance Pd-based catalysts for oxidation of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongfang; Liao, Shijun; Ji, Shan

    Two novel catalysts for anode oxidation of formic acid, Pd 2Co/C and Pd 4Co 2Ir/C, were prepared by an organic colloid method with sodium citrate as a complexing agent. These two catalysts showed better performance towards the anodic oxidation of formic acid than Pd/C catalyst and commercial Pt/C catalyst. Compared with Pd/C catalyst, potentials of the anodic peak of formic acid at the Pd 2Co/C and Pd 4Co 2Ir/C catalyst electrodes shifted towards negative value by 140 and 50 mV, respectively, meanwhile showed higher current densities. At potential of 0.05 V (vs. SCE), the current density for Pd 4Co 2Ir/C catalyst is as high as up to 13.7 mA cm -2, which is twice of that for Pd/C catalyst, and six times of that for commercial Pt/C catalyst. The alloy catalysts were nanostructured with a diameter of ca. 3-5 nm and well dispersed on carbon according to X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. The composition of alloy catalysts was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Pd 4Co 2Ir/C catalyst showed the highest activity and best stability making it the best potential candidate for application in a direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC).

  19. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  20. Use of the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrospinel as catalyst in the WGSR process; Utilizacao do ferroespinelio CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} como catalisador no processo de WGSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, M.S.; Dantas, J.; Costa, A.C.F.M., E-mail: joeldadantas@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (LabSMaC/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais. Laboratorio de Sintese de Materiais Ceramicos; Sazaki, J.M. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica; Andrade, H.M.C. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica Geral e Inorganica. Lab. de Catalise e Materiais

    2014-07-01

    This work investigates the use of ferrospinel CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as a catalyst in water gas shift reactions (WGSR). The ferrospinel was synthesized by combustion reaction using the following heating conditions: ceramic base, resistive muffle oven, and microwave oven. The samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, textural analysis and SEM. The catalytic tests were carried out on a bench scale using mixed CO/N{sub 2} (5% CO mol.mol) to the reaction flow 30mL.min{sup -1}, molar ratio H{sub 2}O/CO of 0.3. The results showed that for all heating conditions there was the monophasic formation of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, with crystallite size ranging from 38 to 40 nm. Samples showed mesoporous characteristics with type II isotherm and hysteresis loop H3. The sample synthesized in the muffle furnace showed the highest conversion rate of 56.0% and the sample synthesized in the ceramic base showed higher selectivity with 90.19% for the WGRS process. (author)

  1. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  2. New Catalysts for ROMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Berke; C. Frech; A. Lhamazares; O. Blacque; H.W. Schmalle; C. Adlhart; P. Chen

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP) is based on the olefin metathesis reaction, which requires transition metal catalysts. Mainly molybdenum, tungsten and ruthenium based catalysts have up to now been used. The "in-between" metal rhenium was only rarely applied in olefin metathesis reactions, and not at all in ROMP processes.We have found that cationic phosphine substituted dinitrosyl rhenium complexes[1]1a and 1b effectively catalyze ROMP of norbonene, dicyclopentadiene and of cyclooctene. See Fig. 1.

  3. Numerical modelling of methane oxidation efficiency and coupled water-gas-heat reactive transfer in a sloping landfill cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S; Ng, C W W; Leung, A K; Liu, H W

    2017-10-01

    Microbial aerobic methane oxidation in unsaturated landfill cover involves coupled water, gas and heat reactive transfer. The coupled process is complex and its influence on methane oxidation efficiency is not clear, especially in steep covers where spatial variations of water, gas and heat are significant. In this study, two-dimensional finite element numerical simulations were carried out to evaluate the performance of unsaturated sloping cover. The numerical model was calibrated using a set of flume model test data, and was then subsequently used for parametric study. A new method that considers transient changes of methane concentration during the estimation of the methane oxidation efficiency was proposed and compared against existing methods. It was found that a steeper cover had a lower oxidation efficiency due to enhanced downslope water flow, during which desaturation of soil promoted gas transport and hence landfill gas emission. This effect was magnified as the cover angle and landfill gas generation rate at the bottom of the cover increased. Assuming the steady-state methane concentration in a cover would result in a non-conservative overestimation of oxidation efficiency, especially when a steep cover was subjected to rainfall infiltration. By considering the transient methane concentration, the newly-modified method can give a more accurate oxidation efficiency. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Sulfur tolerant zeolite supported platinum catalysts for aromatics hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergem, Haakon

    1997-12-31

    The increased demand for transportation fuels at the expence of heavier fuel oil has forced the refinery industry to expand their conversion capacity with hydrotreating as one of the key processes. A shift towards more diesel powered vehicles along with tightening fuel regulations demanding cleaner fuels has lead to increasing interest in catalytic processes for the manufacturing of such environmentally acceptable fuels. This provides the motivation for this thesis. Its main objective was to study possible catalysts active for desulfurization, hydrogenation, and ring-opening of aromatics all in the presence of sulfur. A close examination of the physical properties and kinetical behaviour of the chosen catalysts has been performed. A high pressure reactor setup was designed and built for activity measurements. Zeolite supported platinum catalysts were prepared and both the metal and acid functions were characterized utilizing various experimental techniques. Hydrogenation of toluene was used as a model reaction and the effect of sulfur adsorption on the activity and kinetic behaviour of the catalysts was investigated. The catalyst samples showed hydrogenation activities comparable to a commercial Pt/Al2O3 catalyst. There were no clear differences in the effect of the various sulfur compounds studied. Platinum supported on zeolite Y gave considerably more sulfur tolerant catalysts compared to Al2O3 as support. 155 refs., 58 figs., 36 tabs.

  5. CATALYSTS FOR HIGH CETANE ETHERS AS DIESEL FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamil Klier; Richard G. Herman; Heock-Hoi Kwon; James G. C. Shen; Qisheng Ma; Robert A. Hunsicker; Andrew P. Butler; Scott J. Bollinger

    2003-03-01

    A tungstena-zirconia (WZ) catalyst has been investigated for coupling methanol and isobutanol to unsymmetrical ethers, i.e. methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and compared with earlier studied sulfated-zirconia (SZ) and Nafion-H catalysts. In all cases, the ether synthesis mechanism is a dual site S{sub N}2 process involving competitive adsorption of reactants on proximal acid sites. At low reaction temperatures, methylisobutylether (MIBE) is the predominant product. However, at temperatures >135 C the WZ catalyst is very good for dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene. The surface acid sites of the WZ catalyst and a Nafion-H catalyst were diagnosed by high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of N 1s shifts after adsorption of amines. Using pyridine, ethylenediamine, and triethylamine, it is shown that WZ has heterogeneous strong Broensted acid sites. Theoretical study located the transition state of the alcohol coupling reaction on proximal Broensted acid sites and accounted well for XPS core-level shifts upon surface acid-base interactions. While computations have not been carried out with WZ, it is shown that the SZ catalyst is a slightly stronger acid than CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}H (a model for Nafion-H) by 1.3-1.4 kcal/mol. A novel sulfated zirconia catalyst having proximal strong Broensted acid sites was synthesized and shown to have significantly enhanced activity and high selectivity in producing MIBE or isobutene from methanol/isobutanol mixtures. The catalyst was prepared by anchoring 1,2-ethanediol bis(hydrogen sulfate) salt precursor onto zirconium hydroxide, followed by calcination to remove the -(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2})- bridging residues.

  6. Volume 1, 1st Edition, Multiscale Tailoring of Highly Active and Stable Nanocomposite Catalysts, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veser, Goetz

    2009-08-31

    Nanomaterials have gained much attention as catalysts since the discovery of exceptional CO oxidation activity of nanoscale gold by Haruta. However, many studies avoid testing nanomaterials at the high-temperatures relevant to reactions of interest for the production of clean energy (T > 700°C). The generally poor thermal stability of catalytically active noble metals has thus far prevented significant progress in this area. We have recently overcome the poor thermal stability of nanoparticles by synthesizing a platinum barium-hexaaluminate (Pt-BHA) nanocomposite which combines the high activity of noble metal nanoparticles with the thermal stability of hexaaluminates. This Pt-BHA nanocomposite demonstrates excellent activity, selectivity, and long-term stability in CPOM. Pt-BHA is anchored onto a variety of support structures in order to improve the accessibility, safety, and reactivity of the nanocatalyst. Silica felts prove to be particularly amenable to this supporting procedure, with the resulting supported nanocatalyst proving to be as active and stable for CPOM as its unsupported counterpart. Various pre-treatment conditions are evaluated to determine their effectiveness in removing residual surfactant from the active nanoscale platinum particles. The size of these particles is measured across a wide temperature range, and the resulting “plateau” of stability from 600-900°C can be linked to a particle caging effect due to the structure of the supporting ceramic framework. The nanocomposites are used to catalyze the combustion of a dilute methane stream, and the results indicate enhanced activity for both Pt-BHA as well as ceria-doped BHA, as well as an absence of internal mass transfer limitations at the conditions tested. In water-gas shift reaction, nanocomposite Pt-BHA shows stability during prolonged WGS reaction and no signs of deactivation during start-up/shut-down of the reactor. The chemical and thermal stability, low molecular weight, and

  7. Effect of Oxide Coating on Performance of Copper-Zinc Oxide-Based Catalyst for Methanol Synthesis via Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Umegaki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of oxide coating on the activity of a copper-zinc oxide–based catalyst for methanol synthesis via the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide was investigated. A commercial catalyst was coated with various oxides by a sol-gel method. The influence of the types of promoters used in the sol-gel reaction was investigated. Temperature-programmed reduction-thermogravimetric analysis revealed that the reduction peak assigned to the copper species in the oxide-coated catalysts prepared using ammonia shifts to lower temperatures than that of the pristine catalyst; in contrast, the reduction peak shifts to higher temperatures for the catalysts prepared using L(+-arginine. These observations indicated that the copper species were weakly bonded with the oxide and were easily reduced by using ammonia. The catalysts prepared using ammonia show higher CO2 conversion than the catalysts prepared using L(+-arginine. Among the catalysts prepared using ammonia, the silica-coated catalyst displayed a high activity at high temperatures, while the zirconia-coated catalyst and titania-coated catalyst had high activity at low temperatures. At high temperature the conversion over the silica-coated catalyst does not significantly change with reaction temperature, while the conversion over the zirconia-coated catalyst and titania-coated catalyst decreases with reaction time. From the results of FTIR, the durability depends on hydrophilicity of the oxides.

  8. Compressive Shift Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Eldar, Yonina C.; Yang, Allen Y.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2014-08-01

    The classical shift retrieval problem considers two signals in vector form that are related by a shift. The problem is of great importance in many applications and is typically solved by maximizing the cross-correlation between the two signals. Inspired by compressive sensing, in this paper, we seek to estimate the shift directly from compressed signals. We show that under certain conditions, the shift can be recovered using fewer samples and less computation compared to the classical setup. Of particular interest is shift estimation from Fourier coefficients. We show that under rather mild conditions only one Fourier coefficient suffices to recover the true shift.

  9. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  10. Influence of current velocity and wind speed on air-water gas exchange in a mangrove estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David T.; Coffineau, Nathalie; Hickman, Benjamin; Chow, Nicholas; Koffman, Tobias; Schlosser, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of air-water gas transfer velocities and water residence times is necessary to study the fate of mangrove derived carbon exported into surrounding estuaries and ultimately to determine carbon balances in mangrove ecosystems. For the first time, the 3He/SF6 dual tracer technique, which has been proven to be a powerful tool to determine gas transfer velocities in the ocean, is applied to Shark River, an estuary situated in the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The mean gas transfer velocity was 3.3 ± 0.2 cm h-1 during the experiment, with a water residence time of 16.5 ± 2.0 days. We propose a gas exchange parameterization that takes into account the major sources of turbulence in the estuary (i.e., bottom generated shear and wind stress).

  11. Mesoporous molecular sieve catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Karen Thrane

    be used as solid acid catalysts but can also be used as a size-selective matrix. It was shown that it is possible to encapsulate 1-2 nm sized gold nanoparticles by silicalite-1 or ZSM-5 zeolite crystals thereby forming a sintering-stable and substrate size-selective oxidation catalyst. After carrying out...... calcination experiments, both in situ and ex situ indicated that the gold nanoparticles embedded in the crystals were highly stable towards sintering. The catalytic tests proved that the embedded gold nanoparticles were active in selective aldehyde oxidation and were only accessible through the micropores...

  12. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...... and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...

  13. Aerogel derived catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J. G., LLNL

    1996-12-11

    Aerogels area class of colloidal materials which have high surface areas and abundant mesoporous structure. SiO{sub 2} aerogels show unique physical, optical and structural properties. When catalytic metals are incorporated in the aerogel framework, the potential exists for new and very effective catalysts for industrial processes. Three applications of these metal-containing SiO{sub 2} aerogels as catalysts are briefly reviewed in this paper--NO{sub x} reduction, volatile organic compound destruction, and partial oxidation of methane.

  14. Olefin metathesis catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukes, S.G.; Banks, R.L.

    1986-05-20

    A process is described for preparing a disproportionation catalyst comprising admixing a catalytically effective amount of a calcined and activated catalyst consisting essentially of at least one metal oxide selected from molybdenum oxide and tungsten oxide and a support containing a major proportion of silica or alumina with a promoting amount of a methylating agent selected from the group consisting of dimethyl sulfate, dimethylsulfoxide, trimethyloxonium tetrafluorborate, methyl iodide, and methyl bromide, and subjecting same to inert atmospheric conditions for the methylating agent to promote the activity of the calcined molybdenum and tungsten oxides for the disproportionation of olefins.

  15. Surface Reaction Kinetics of Steam- and CO2-Reforming as Well as Oxidation of Methane over Nickel-Based Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Karla Herrera Delgado; Lubow Maier; Steffen Tischer; Alexander Zellner; Henning Stotz; Olaf Deutschmann

    2015-01-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling study on the Ni-catalyzed conversion of methane under oxidative and reforming conditions is presented. The numerical model is based on a surface reaction mechanism consisting of 52 elementary-step like reactions with 14 surface and six gas-phase species. Reactions for the conversion of methane with oxygen, steam, and CO2 as well as methanation, water-gas shift reaction and carbon formation via Boudouard reaction are included. The mechanism is implemented i...

  16. Effect of incorporation manner of Zr promoter on precipitated ironbased catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao-jian; MA Hong-fang; ZHANG Hai-tao; YING Wei-yong; FANG Ding-ye

    2012-01-01

    The promotional effects of Zr on the structure,reduction,carburization and catalytic behavior of precipitated iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts were investigated.The catalysts were characterized by N2 physisorption,temperature-programmed reduction (TPR),and M(o)ssbauer effect spectroscopy (MES) techniques.As revealed by N2 physisorption,Zr decreased the BET surface area and pore volume of the catalyst.The results of TPR and MES show that Zr suppresses the reduction and carburization of Fe catalysts because of the interaction between Fe and Zr.The FTS reaction results indicate that Zr decreases the FTS activity of Fe catalysts but improves the catalysts' stability.In addition,Zr promoter restraines the formation of light hydrocarbons (methane and C2~C4) and shifts the production distribution to the heavy hydrocarbons.

  17. 20 Years of Air-Water Gas Exchange Observations for Pesticides in the Western Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Wong, Fiona; Gawor, Anya; Kylin, Henrik; Helm, Paul A; Stern, Gary A; Strachan, William M J; Burniston, Deborah A; Bidleman, Terry F

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic has been contaminated by legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and currently used pesticides (CUPs) through atmospheric transport and oceanic currents. Here we report the time trends and air-water exchange of OCPs and CUPs from research expeditions conducted between 1993 and 2013. Compounds determined in both air and water were trans- and cis-chlordanes (TC, CC), trans- and cis-nonachlors (TN, CN), heptachlor exo-epoxide (HEPX), dieldrin (DIEL), chlorobornanes (ΣCHBs and toxaphene), dacthal (DAC), endosulfans and metabolite endosulfan sulfate (ENDO-I, ENDO-II, and ENDO SUL), chlorothalonil (CHT), chlorpyrifos (CPF), and trifluralin (TFN). Pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB and quintozene) and its soil metabolite pentachlorothianisole (PCTA) were also found in air. Concentrations of most OCPs declined in surface water, whereas some CUPs increased (ENDO-I, CHT, and TFN) or showed no significant change (CPF and DAC), and most compounds declined in air. Chlordane compound fractions TC/(TC + CC) and TC/(TC + CC + TN) decreased in water and air, while CC/(TC + CC + TN) increased. TN/(TC + CC + TN) also increased in air and slightly, but not significantly, in water. These changes suggest selective removal of more labile TC and/or a shift in chlordane sources. Water-air fugacity ratios indicated net volatilization (FR > 1.0) or near equilibrium (FR not significantly different from 1.0) for most OCPs but net deposition (FR < 1.0) for ΣCHBs. Net deposition was shown for ENDO-I on all expeditions, while the net exchange direction of other CUPs varied. Understanding the processes and current state of air-surface exchange helps to interpret environmental exposure and evaluate the effectiveness of international protocols and provides insights for the environmental fate of new and emerging chemicals.

  18. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least...... one metal oxide. In another aspect the present invention relates to the use of said catalyst and to a method of producing said catalyst. In addition, the present invention relates to a method of treating an catalyst for conferring thereon an improved resistance to alkali poisoning....

  19. Nanopore and nanoparticle catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J M; Raja, R

    2001-01-01

    The design, atomic characterization, performance, and relevance to clean technology of two distinct categories of new nanocatalysts are described and interpreted. Exceptional molecular selectivity and high activity are exhibited by these catalysts. The first category consists of extended, crystallographically ordered inorganic solids possessing nanopores (apertures, cages, and channels), the diameters of which fall in the range of about 0.4 to about 1.5 nm, and the second of discrete bimetallic nanoparticles of diameter 1 to 2 nm, distributed more or less uniformly along the inner walls of mesoporous (ca. 3 to 10 nm diameter) silica supports. Using the principles and practices of solid-state and organometallic chemistry and advanced physico-chemical techniques for in situ and ex situ characterization, a variety of powerful new catalysts has been evolved. Apart from those that, inter alia, simulate the behavior of enzymes in their specificity, shape selectivity, regio-selectivity, and ability to function under ambient conditions, many of these new nanocatalysts are also viable as agents for effecting commercially significant processes in a clean, benign, solvent-free, single-step fashion. In particular, a bifunctional, molecular sieve nanopore catalyst is described that converts cyclohexanone in air and ammonia to its oxime and caprolactam, and a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst that selectively converts cyclic polyenes into desirable intermediates. Nanocatalysts in the first category are especially effective in facilitating highly selective oxidations in air, and those in the second are well suited to effecting rapid and selective hydrogenations of a range of organic compounds.

  20. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-c

  1. Olefin metathesis and catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukes, S. G.; Banks, R. L.

    1985-05-14

    Olefins are converted into other olefins having different numbers of carbon atoms by contact with a catalyst comprising an inorganic refractory oxide support containing at least one of tungsten oxide and molybdenum oxide and a promoting amount of at least one methylating agent under conditions suitable for the methylating agent compounds to promote the activity of tungsten and molybdenum oxides for the disproportionation reaction.

  2. Deactivation of Oxidation Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Levenspiel (Reference 10) have proposed an equivalent general expression of the form dS _KST (4) dtk to account for deactivation due to catalyst pore...Voorhies, A., IEC, 1954, vol. 37, p. 318. 10. Szepe, S., and 0. Levenspiel , Proc. 4th Europ. Symp. Chem. React. Eng., Pergamon Press, p. 265. 11. U.S

  3. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta...

  4. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  5. An investigation of Water-gas interface migration of the upper Paleozoic gas pool of the Ordos Basin using reservoir fluid inclusion information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI Jingkui; XIAO Xianming; LIU Dehan; LI Xianqing; SHEN Jiagui

    2004-01-01

    There is a particular characteristic in the for-mation of the Upper Paleozoic gas pool in the Ordos Basin that is its water-gas interface migrated regional during geological history.However,there has been lack of detailed research on this paper,the formation time of hte fluid inclusions formed in the water-gas transition zone of the gas pool was deduced using their trapping temperatures and combining of the burial with geothermal history of the basin.On the basis of this,the isochrone of water-gas interface migration for the gas pool was mapped .The result shows that the gas pool began to form around the yanan Area at about 165Ma,and then developed and enlarged toward the north direction.The gas pool finally formed at about 129 Ma.Since the basin uplifted from the late Cretaceous and gas supply decreased,the water-gas interface of the gas pool migratec back to the present position.

  6. The selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde over bimetallic catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeb, Ann M. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-17

    The selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde has been investigated over a monometallic Pt/SiO2 catalyst and platinum bimetallic catalysts where the second metal was either silver, copper, or tin. The effects of addition of a second metal to the Pt/SiO2 system on the selectivity to crotyl alcohol were investigated. The Pt-Sn bimetallic catalysts were characterized by hydrogen chemisorption, 1H NMR and microcalorimetry. The Pt-Ag/SiO2 and Pt-Cu/SiO2 catalysts were characterized by hydrogen chemisorption. Pt-Sn/SiO2 catalysts selectively hydrogenated crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol and the method of preparation of these catalysts affected the selectivity. The most selective Pt-Sn/SiO2 catalysts for the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol were those in which the Sn precursor was dissolved in a HCl solution. Sn increased both the rate of formation of butyraldehyde and the rate of formation of crotyl alcohol. The Pt/SiO2, Pt-Ag/SiO2 and Pt-Cu/SiO2 catalysts produced only butyraldehyde. Initial heats of adsorption (~90 kJ/mol) measured using microcalorimetry were not affected by the presence of Sn on Pt. We can conclude that there is no through metal electronic interaction between Pt and Sn at least with respect to hydrogen surface bonds since the Pt and Pt-Sn at least with respect to hydrogen surface bonds since the Pt and Pt-Sn had similar initial heats of adsorption coupled with the invariance of the 1H NMR Knight shift.

  7. 变换工序硫化管线改造%Revamp of Vulcanization Pipeline in CO Shift Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李彦兴

    2013-01-01

    介绍合成氨装置变换催化剂选型、催化剂硫化工艺、硫化存在的问题及改造措施。%Describe the choice of CO shift catalyst , the catalyst vulcanization process , the vulcanization problems and the revamping measures .

  8. Implementing OpenShift

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A standard tutorial-based approach to using OpenShift and deploying custom or pre-built web applications to the OpenShift Online cloud.This book is for software developers and DevOps alike who are interested in learning how to use the OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service for developing and deploying applications, how the environment works on the back end, and how to deploy their very own open source Platform-as-a-Service based on the upstream OpenShift Origin project.

  9. Quantized beam shifts

    CERN Document Server

    Kort-Kamp, W J M; Dalvit, D A R

    2015-01-01

    We predict quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-H\\"anchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$, while the Goos- H\\"anchen ones in multiples of $\\alpha^2$. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  10. Fluorination process using catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochel, R.C.; Saturday, K.A.

    1983-08-25

    A process is given for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/, AgF/sub 2/ and NiF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/ and AgF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  11. Fluorination process using catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochel, Robert C.; Saturday, Kathy A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3, AgF.sub.2 and NiF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3 and AgF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  12. Photo catalyst; Ko shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    While titanium oxide is excited by the light, electrons of titanium oxide are taken away by the light energy to form positive holes. Water will be decomposed into hydrogen ion and hydroxy radical (OH) by these positive holes. This hydroxy radical is a strong reactive substance called active oxygen, it decomposes organisms. Besides this photo- catalyst function, the titanium oxide can also make surface of a substance superhydrophilic. The super hydrophilicity results in not forming water drops on the glass surface but spreading all over the surface to prevent a covering of fog on the glass surface. The published patents concerning the photo catalysts were 593 from Jan. 1998 to Jan. 1999. The applicant order is the first TOTO 143, the second Daikin Industry 19, the third Toshiba Raitech, Nitto Denko, Hitachi 17 respectively. (NEDO)

  13. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongkanand, Anusorn [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  14. Olefin metathesis and catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukes, S. G.; Banks, R. L.

    1985-03-12

    Olefins are converted into other olefins having different numbers of carbon atoms by contact with a catalyst comprising an inorganic refractory material containing at least one of tungsten oxide and molybdenum oxide and a promoting amount of at least one treating agent selected from chlorinated silicon compounds, thionyl chloride, and sulfuryl chloride under conditions suitable for the treating agent to promote the activity of tungsten and molybdenum oxides for the disporoportionation reaction.

  15. Deactivation of SCR catalysts in biomass fired power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Kjærgaard

    In order to meet national and European targets regarding reduction of the emission of greenhouse gases, fossil fuels are gradually being substituted with biomass, such as straw, wood chips and wood pellets, in Danish combined heat and power plants. The release of inorganic elements, present...... particle size distribution, from an aerodynamic diameter of 0.12 to 2.6 μm, showed no effect on the catalyst deactivation rate. This may be attributed to a continued presence of a significant number of ultrafine KCl particles in the flue gas. The K2SO4 aerosols caused a slower rate of deactivation compared...... to the KCl aerosols. This indicates that potassium bound in K2SO4 deposits, on the catalyst surface, is less mobile than that bound KCl. However, an effect of particle size on the catalyst deactivation cannot be excluded, as the obtained K2SO4 aerosols generally were shifted towards larger particles (mass...

  16. Mechanism and kinetics of the production of hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide in ethene/ozone/water gas-phase system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Bin; CHAO YuTao; CHEN ZhongMing

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of the production of hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP) in ethene/ozone/water gas-phase system were investigated at room temperature (298±2 K) and atmospheric pressure (1×105 Pa). The reactants were monitored in situ by long path FTIR spectroscopy. Peroxides were measured by an HPLC post-column fluorescence technique after sampling with a cold trap. The rate constants (k3) of reaction CH2O2+H2O→HMHP (R3) determined by fitting model calculations to experi mental data range from (1.6-6.0)×10-17 cma. Molecule-1. S-1. Moreover, a theoretical study of reaction (R3) was performed using density functional theory at QCISD(T)/6-311+(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level of theory. Based on the calculation of the reaction potential energy surface and intrinsic reaction coordinates, the classic transitional state theory (TST) derived k3 (kTST), canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) derivedk3 (kCVT), and the corrected kcvT with small-curvature tunneling (kCVT/SCT)were calculated using Polyrate Version 8.02 program to be 2.47×10-17, 2.47×10-17 and 5.22×10-17cm3. Molecule-1· s-1, respectively, generally in agreement with those fitted by the model.

  17. Mechanism of CO 2 Hydrogenation on Pd/Al 2 O 3 Catalysts: Kinetics and Transient DRIFTS-MS Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiang; Shi, Hui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, János

    2015-09-17

    The hydrogenation of CO2 was investigated over a wide range of reaction conditions, using two Pd/γ-Al2O3 catalysts with different Pd loadings (5% and 0.5%) and dispersions (~11% and ~100%, respectively). Turnover rates for CO and CH4 formation were both higher over 5% Pd/Al2O3 with a larger average Pd particle size than those over 0.5% Pd/Al2O3 with a smaller average particle size. The selectivity to methane (22-40%) on 5% Pd/Al2O3 was higher by a factor of 2-3 than that on 0.5% Pd/Al2O3. The drastically different rate expressions and apparent energies of activation for CO and CH4 formation lead us to conclude that reverse water gas shift and CO2 methanation do not share the same rate-limiting step on Pd, and that the two pathways are probably catalyzed at different surface sites. Measured reaction orders in CO2 and H2 pressures were similar over the two catalysts, suggesting that the reaction mechanism for each pathway does not change with particle size. In accordance, the DRIFTS results reveal that the prevalent surface species and their evolution patterns are comparable on the two catalysts during transient and steady-state experiments, switching feed gases among CO2, H2 and CO2+H2. The DRIFTS and MS results also demonstrate that no direct dissociation of CO2 takes place over the two catalysts, and that CO2 has to first react with surface hydroxyls on the oxide support. The thus-formed bicarbonates react with dissociatively adsorbed hydrogen on Pd particles to produce adsorbed formate species (bifunctional catalyst: CO2 activation on the oxide support, and H2 dissociation on the metal particles). Formates near the Pd particles (most likely at the metal/oxide interface) can react rapidly with adsorbed H

  18. OpenShift cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gulati, Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    If you are a web application developer who wants to use the OpenShift platform to host your next big idea but are looking for guidance on how to achieve this, then this book is the first step you need to take. This is a very accessible cookbook where no previous knowledge of OpenShift is needed.

  19. Shifting employment revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan; Gramuglia, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The CLR-network examined in 2006 the phenomenon of undeclared labour, with specific regard to the construction sector. The resulting study, Shifting Employment: undeclared labour in construction (Shifting-study hereafter), gave evidence that this is an area particularly affected by undeclared activi

  20. Making Shifts toward Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGatha, Maggie B.; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    The Leading for Mathematical Proficiency (LMP) Framework (Bay-Williams et al.) has three components: (1) The Standards for Mathematical Practice; (2) Shifts in classroom practice; and (3) Teaching skills. This article briefly describes each component of the LMP framework and then focuses more in depth on the second component, the shifts in…

  1. Shifted Independent Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2007-01-01

    Delayed mixing is a problem of theoretical interest and practical importance, e.g., in speech processing, bio-medical signal analysis and financial data modelling. Most previous analyses have been based on models with integer shifts, i.e., shifts by a number of samples, and have often been carrie...

  2. Catalyst systems and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Umit S.; Holmgreen, Erik M.; Yung, Matthew M.

    2012-07-24

    A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

  3. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benavides, Pahola T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  4. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Dennis P. (Maplewood, MN); Schmoeckel, Alison K. (Stillwater, MN); Vernstrom, George D. (Cottage Grove, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Wood, Thomas E. (Stillwater, MN); Yang, Ruizhi (Halifax, CA); Easton, E. Bradley (Halifax, CA); Dahn, Jeffrey R. (Hubley, CA); O' Neill, David G. (Lake Elmo, MN)

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  5. Privileged chiral ligands and catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2011-01-01

    This ultimate ""must have"" and long awaited reference for every chemist working in the field of asymmetric catalysis starts with the core structure of the catalysts, explaining why a certain ligand or catalyst is so successful. It describes in detail the history, the basic structural characteristics, and the applications of these ""privileged catalysts"". A novel concept that gives readers a much deeper insight into the topic.

  6. Preparation of syngas via steam reforming of glycerol over modified Ni/LTA catalysts%改良的5A分子筛载Ni催化剂上甘油水蒸汽重整制合成气

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄遵谕; 徐成华; 李钰春; 雷亚聪; 肖惠文; 张永祥; 陈军

    2012-01-01

    以Linde型5A分子筛(LTA)为载体,采用浸渍法制备了金属氧化物修饰的负载型Ni基催化剂,并用于甘油水蒸汽重整制合成气.催化剂表征及催化稳定性的考察结果表明Mo、La、Ca氧化物的同时修饰可抑制Ni/LTA催化剂中活性组分Ni与载体LTA的相互作用,在甘油重整反应中具有较好的稳定性能.反应工艺考察结果表明,NiMoLaCa/LTA在反应温度600℃、原料液中甘油/水的体积比3∶7、LHSV为2.67h-1的条件下,甘油重整反应产物气有理想的n(H2)/n(CO)比2.06;升高反应温度、降低甘油/水体积比和减小LHSV均可提高甘油的产气率,但会加快CO的水气变换反应;CO和CO2的甲烷化反应受反应温度的影响较大.%Ni based catalysts supported on Linde type 5A molecular sieves (LTA) modified by metal oxides were prepared by impregnation, and used for catalyzing glycerol steam reforming (GSR) to syngas. The results of the characterization and catalytic stability tests of the catalysts showed that the co-modification with Mo, La and Ca oxides could weaken the stronger interaction between active species Ni and support LTA in Ni/LTA catalysts, which improved the catalytic stability of NiMoLaCa/LTA in GSR. The effects of reaction parameters on GSR reaction over NiMoLaCa/LTA were investigated, and the results showed that under the conditions of temperature of 600℃, volume ratio of glyeerol to water of 3:7 and LHSV of 2.67h-1, the produced gaseous product had a ideal HVCO molar ratio of 2.06; a higher temperature, lower glycerol/water volume ratio and LHSV were helpful to improve GSR reaction and CO water-gas shift reaction; and the reactions of CO and CO2 methanation were obviously related to temperature.

  7. Bimetallic Au-decorated Pd catalyst for the liquid phase hydrodechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Juan [School of the Environment, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Chen, Huan, E-mail: hchen404@njust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Jiangsu Province for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental & Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Chen, Quanyuan; Huang, Zhaolu [School of the Environment, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Graphical abstract: 2,4-Dichlorophenol can be converted to phenol via the catalytic HDC method over Pd-Au/CNTs and the catalytic activity first increased and then decreased with Au content. - Highlights: • Bimetallic catalysts had smaller metal particles and larger number of exposed active site than the monometallic catalysts. • The cationization of Pd particles increased with Au content in the bimetallic catalysts. • The bimetallic catalysts exhibited higher catalytic activities for HDC of 2,4-DCP than the monometallic counterparts. • The concerted pathway for HDC of 2,4-DCP was more predominant with increasing Au content in the bimetallic catalyst. - Abstract: Monometallic and bimetallic Pd-Au catalysts supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with varied Au cooperation amounts were prepared using the complexing-reduction method in the presence of tetrahydrofuran (THF). The liquid phase catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) was investigated over these bimetallic catalysts. The catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and H{sub 2} chemisorption. Characterization results showed that the co-reduction of Pd and Au mainly formed alloy-like structure. The bimetallic catalysts had smaller metal particles and larger numbers of exposed active site than that of monometallic catalysts. In addition, compared with Pd(1.7)/CNTs and Au(0.4)/CNTs, the binding energies of Pd 3d{sub 5/2} shifted to higher positions while that of Au 4f{sub 7/2} had negative shifts in the Pd-Au bimetallic catalysts, which can be ascribed to the electrons transferred from metal Pd to Au and the cationization of Pd particles was enhanced. Accordingly, the bimetallic Pd-Au particles with different Au contents in the catalysts exhibited varied synergistic effects for the catalytic HDC of 2,4-DCP, with Pd(1.8)Au(0.4)/CNTs having the highest

  8. Theoretical Studies in Heterogenous Catalysis: Towards a Rational Design of Novel Catalysts for Hydrodesulfurization and Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez,J.A.; Liu, P.

    2008-10-01

    potential to become the next generation of industrial HDS catalysts. Then, systematic studies concerned with the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) on extended surfaces, organometallic complexes and enzymes are presented. Finally, the reasons for the high catalytic activity of Au-CeO{sub 2} and Cu-CeO{sub 2} in the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) are analyzed. It is shown that theoretical methods are very valuable tools for helping in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  9. Catalyst and electrolyte synergy in Li-O2 batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittleson, Forrest S; Sekol, Ryan C; Doubek, Gustavo; Linardi, Marcelo; Taylor, André D

    2014-02-21

    Understanding the interactions between catalyst and electrolyte in Li-O2 systems is crucial to improving capacities, efficiencies, and cycle life. In this study, supported noble metal catalysts Pt/C, Pd/C, and Au/C were paired with popular Li-O2 electrolyte solvents dimethoxyethane (DME), tetraglyme (TEGDME), and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The effects of these combinations on stability, kinetics, and activity were assessed. We show evidence of a synergistic effect between Pt and Pd catalysts and a DMSO-based electrolyte which enhances the kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution reactions. DME and TEGDME are more prone to decomposition and less kinetically favorable for oxygen reduction and evolution than DMSO. While the order of oxygen reduction onset potentials with each catalyst was found to be consistent across electrolyte (Pd > Pt > Au), larger overpotentials with DME and TEGDME, and negative shifts in onset after only five cycles favor the stability of a DMSO electrolyte. Full cell cycling experiments confirm that catalyst-DMSO combinations produce up to 9 times higher discharge capacities than the same with TEGDME after 20 cycles (∼707.4 vs. 78.8 mA h g(-1) with Pd/C). Ex situ EDS and in situ EIS analyses of resistive species in the cathode suggest that improvements in capacity with DMSO are due to a combination of greater electrolyte conductivity and catalyst synergies. Our findings demonstrate that co-selection of catalyst and electrolyte is necessary to exploit chemical synergies and improve the performance of Li-O2 cells.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis via Arc Discharge with a Yttria Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    M. I. Mohammad; Ahmed A. Moosa; J.H. Potgieter; Mustafa K. Ismael

    2013-01-01

    A facile method is proposed to use a computer controlled Arc discharge gap between graphite electrodes together with an yttria-nickel catalyst to synthesize carbon nanotubes under an Ar-H2 gases mixture atmosphere by applying different DC currents and pressure. This produces carbon nanotubes with decreased diameters and increased length. XRD evidence indicated a shift toward higher crystallinity nanotubes. Yields of the CNTs after purification were also enhanced.

  11. REACTOR FILLED WITH CATALYST MATERIAL, AND CATALYST THEREFOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9521691 (A1) Described is a reactor (1) at least partially filled with catalyst granules (11), which is intended for catalytically reacting at least one gas and at least one liquid with each other. According to the invention the catalyst granules (11) are collected in agglomerates

  12. Mechanochemistry, catalysis, and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butyagin, P.Yu.

    1987-07-01

    The physical basis of mechanochemistry and the reasons for the initiation and acceleration of chemical reactions upon the mechanical treatment of solids have been considered. The phenomenon of mechanical catalysis has been described in the example case of the oxidation of CO on oxide surfaces, and the nature of the active sites and the laws governing the mechanically activated chemisorption of gases on cleavage and friction surfaces of solids have been examined. The possibilities of the use of the methods of mechanochemistry in processes used to prepare catalysts have been analyzed in examples of decomposition reactions of inorganic compounds and solid-phase synthesis.

  13. Bimetallic Au-decorated Pd catalyst for the liquid phase hydrodechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juan; Chen, Huan; Chen, Quanyuan; Huang, Zhaolu

    2016-11-01

    Monometallic and bimetallic Pd-Au catalysts supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with varied Au cooperation amounts were prepared using the complexing-reduction method in the presence of tetrahydrofuran (THF). The liquid phase catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) was investigated over these bimetallic catalysts. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and H2 chemisorption. Characterization results showed that the co-reduction of Pd and Au mainly formed alloy-like structure. The bimetallic catalysts had smaller metal particles and larger numbers of exposed active site than that of monometallic catalysts. In addition, compared with Pd(1.7)/CNTs and Au(0.4)/CNTs, the binding energies of Pd 3d5/2 shifted to higher positions while that of Au 4f7/2 had negative shifts in the Pd-Au bimetallic catalysts, which can be ascribed to the electrons transferred from metal Pd to Au and the cationization of Pd particles was enhanced. Accordingly, the bimetallic Pd-Au particles with different Au contents in the catalysts exhibited varied synergistic effects for the catalytic HDC of 2,4-DCP, with Pd(1.8)Au(0.4)/CNTs having the highest catalytic activity. For the bimetallic catalysts, a disproportional increase of turnover frequency (TOF) was observed with increasing Au content due to the enhanced cationization of Pd particles. Moreover, the dechlorination of 2,4-DCP over the supported monometallic and bimetallic catalysts proceeded via both the stepwise and concerted pathway, and the concerted pathway became predominant with Au decoration amount in the catalyst.

  14. 可用于富氢重整气中 CO 消除的负载型 Ni 基甲烷化催化剂研究进展%Development in supported Ni-based methanation catalyst for removal of CO in hydrogen-rich reforming gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘斌; 姚楠

    2015-01-01

    Pt electrode of the fUel cells can be permanently poisoned by trace CO in the hydrogen-rich reformed gases. CO methanation is one of the effective methods of removal of the trace CO. The recent pro-gress in the composition,preparation methods and catalytic mechanisms of Ni-based methanation catalysts were reviewed. The effects of sUpport properties,the promoters of noble metal and rare earth metal,and their preparation methods on the performance of Ni-based methanation catalysts were also introdUced. The research will be focUsed on the preparation of novel Ni-based catalysts by optimizing the carrier,the composition and the preparation methods in order to obtain CO methanation catalysts with good activity, selectivity and stability at low temperatUre and inhibit CO2 methanation reaction and the reversed water-gas shift reaction at high temperatUre.%富氢重整气中微量 CO 会引起燃料电池中 Pt 电极的永久性中毒而影响燃料电池的性能,通过 CO 甲烷化反应是消除富氢重整气中微量 CO 的有效方法。介绍了近年来在 CO 甲烷化 Ni 基催化剂组成、制备方法和催化机理等方面的研究进展。阐述了载体的性质、稀土和贵金属助剂以及制备方法对 CO 甲烷化 Ni 基催化剂性能的影响。研究重点通过优化载体、组成和制备方法制备新型Ni 基催化剂,使其在低温下对 CO 甲烷化反应有着很好的催化活性、选择性和稳定性,同时抑制高温下 CO2甲烷化反应和逆水煤气反应的发生。

  15. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  16. Mechanism and kinetics of the production of hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide in ethene/ozone/water gas-phase system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of the production of hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP) in ethene/ ozone/water gas-phase system were investigated at room temperature (298±2 K) and atmospheric pressure (1×105 Pa). The reactants were monitored in situ by long path FTIR spectroscopy. Peroxides were measured by an HPLC post-column fluorescence technique after sampling with a cold trap. The rate constants (k3) of reaction CH2O2+H2O→HMHP (R3) determined by fitting model calculations to ex-perimental data range from (1.6―6.0)×10?17 cm3·molecule?1·s?1. Moreover, a theoretical study of reac-tion (R3) was performed using density functional theory at QCISD(T)/6-311+(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(2d, 2p) level of theory. Based on the calculation of the reaction potential energy surface and intrinsic reac-tion coordinates, the classic transitional state theory (TST) derived k3 (kTST), canonical variational tran-sition state theory (CVT) derived k3 (kCVT), and the corrected kCVT with small-curvature tunneling (kCVT/SCT) were calculated using Polyrate Version 8.02 program to be 2.47×10-17, 2.47×10-17 and 5.22×10-17 cm3·molecule-1·s-1, respectively, generally in agreement with those fitted by the model.

  17. Shift Verification and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Tara M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Gregory G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Seth R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-07

    This documentation outlines the verification and validation of Shift for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Five main types of problems were used for validation: small criticality benchmark problems; full-core reactor benchmarks for light water reactors; fixed-source coupled neutron-photon dosimetry benchmarks; depletion/burnup benchmarks; and full-core reactor performance benchmarks. We compared Shift results to measured data and other simulated Monte Carlo radiation transport code results, and found very good agreement in a variety of comparison measures. These include prediction of critical eigenvalue, radial and axial pin power distributions, rod worth, leakage spectra, and nuclide inventories over a burn cycle. Based on this validation of Shift, we are confident in Shift to provide reference results for CASL benchmarking.

  18. Shift Verification and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Tara M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Gregory G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Seth R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-07

    This documentation outlines the verification and validation of Shift for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LightWater Reactors (CASL). Fivemain types of problems were used for validation: small criticality benchmark problems; full-core reactor benchmarks for light water reactors; fixed source coupled neutron-photon dosimetry benchmarks; depletion/burnup benchmarks; and full-core reactor performance benchmarks. We compared Shift results to measured data and other simulated Monte Carlo radiation transport code results and found very good agreement in a variety of comparison measures. These include prediction of critical eigenvalue, radial and axial pin power distributions, rod worth, leakage spectra, and nuclide inventories over a burn cycle. Based on this validation of Shift, we are confident in Shift to provide reference results for CASL benchmarking.

  19. Influence of Gas Feed Composition and Pressure on the Catalytic Conversion of CO2 to Hydrocarbons Using a Traditional Cobalt-Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-25

    availability. Fuel independence would alleviate uncertainties in the world market supply of oil along with commercial fluctuations in price. In addition...this supply by supporting the development of synthetic hydrocarbon fuel from the vast natural resources, such as coal, shale, gas hydrates, and CO2...product a day by steam-reforming coal to generate syngas for the FT process.5 A water-gas shift is needed to obtain a 2:1 ratio of hydrogen/carbon

  20. Catalyst design for biorefining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-28

    The quest for sustainable resources to meet the demands of a rapidly rising global population while mitigating the risks of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change, represents a grand challenge for humanity. Biomass offers the most readily implemented and low-cost solution for sustainable transportation fuels, and the only non-petroleum route to organic molecules for the manufacture of bulk, fine and speciality chemicals and polymers. To be considered truly sustainable, biomass must be derived from resources which do not compete with agricultural land use for food production, or compromise the environment (e.g. via deforestation). Potential feedstocks include waste lignocellulosic or oil-based materials derived from plant or aquatic sources, with the so-called biorefinery concept offering the co-production of biofuels, platform chemicals and energy; analogous to today's petroleum refineries which deliver both high-volume/low-value (e.g. fuels and commodity chemicals) and low-volume/high-value (e.g. fine/speciality chemicals) products, thereby maximizing biomass valorization. This article addresses the challenges to catalytic biomass processing and highlights recent successes in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts facilitated by advances in nanotechnology and the synthesis of templated porous materials, as well as the use of tailored catalyst surfaces to generate bifunctional solid acid/base materials or tune hydrophobicity.

  1. Latent catalyst; Senzaisei shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Epoxy resin, an important function material to support such main industries as electric and electronic devices, automobiles, civil engineering, and building construction, is demanded of development of single liquid type resin having excellent quick hardening performance and storage stability. This requirement comes from environmental problems with an intention of saving energies and reducing resin wastes. The Company, using freely its independent phase separation technology that controls molecular structure of catalysts, developed a latent catalyst having excellent storage stability and high-temperature quick hardening performance. Its major features may be summarized as follows: (1) excellent storage stability at room temperature keeping the product stable for 2.5 months or longer (2 days in conventional products); (2) quick hardening performance hardening the resin in seven seconds at 150 degrees C (equivalent to conventional products); and (3) excellent insulation performance of hardened resin at 140 degrees C of 7 times 10 {sup 13} (ohm) (center dot) cm (2 times 10 {sup 12} (ohm) (center dot) cm in conventional products) (translated by NEDO)

  2. Evaluating the role of Lead In A Novel Ternary Catalysts For DMFCs

    CERN Document Server

    Halder, Aditi; Trahan, Matthew; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    The current density at lower potential is highly desirable in fuel cell technology and crucial center point for designing a new catalyst. By alloying platinum with various other metals, the improvisation of the fuel cell catalyst has achieved a lot of attention and interests. In this article, a novel porous ternary alloy PtPb@Ru as anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell had been synthesized by micro-emulsion technique. The catalysts had been characterized by various spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The activity and durability of the catalysts had been tested by running cyclic voltammetry in 0.1 M HClO4 and 1M Methanol. To explain the many fold increase in current density of the PtPb@Ru catalysts in comparison to the commercial available PtRu catalysts, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements, at the PtL3 edge (XANES and EXAFS) were carried out on the PtPb@Ru catalysts in an electrochemical cell. The down-shift in the d-band center of platinum observed in the XAS study, might b...

  3. Dehydrogenation of propane in the presence of carbon dioxide over chromium and gallium oxides catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V.; Menshova, M.V.; Kunusova, R.M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    Effective chromium and gallium oxides supported catalysts were prepared and tested in longduration experiments for propane dehydrogenation in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The optimal concentrations of active metals were found. It was shown that the activity, selectivity and stability of chromium oxides catalysts were higher than these parameters for gallium ones. Mechanism of propane oxidative dehydrogenation was studied over both catalysts using unstationary and spectroscopic methods. The employment of these methods allowed to establish the differences in process mechanism. It was shown that surface hydroxides took participation in propene formation over Cr-catalysts and hydrides - over Ga-ones. Propane and carbon dioxide participated in the reaction from the adsorbed state over both catalysts but they were differed by the adsorption capacity of the reaction components: CO2 was tied more firmly than C{sub 3}H{sub 6} over both catalysts, CO{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} were tied more strongly with Cr-catalysts than with Ga-ones. It was shown that CO{sub 2} took active participation in reverse watergas shift reaction and in oxidation of catalyst surface over chromium oxides catalysts. The main role of CO{sub 2} in propane dehydrogenation over gallium catalysts consisted in a decrease of coke formation. Step-schemes of propene and cracking products formation were proposed on the basis of literature and obtained data: via the redox mechanism over Cr-catalysts and through a heterolytic dissociation reaction pathway over Ga-ones. (orig.)

  4. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercaw, John E.; Herzog, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

  5. Protein Chemical Shift Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    The protein chemical shifts holds a large amount of information about the 3-dimensional structure of the protein. A number of chemical shift predictors based on the relationship between structures resolved with X-ray crystallography and the corresponding experimental chemical shifts have been developed. These empirical predictors are very accurate on X-ray structures but tends to be insensitive to small structural changes. To overcome this limitation it has been suggested to make chemical shift predictors based on quantum mechanical(QM) calculations. In this thesis the development of the QM derived chemical shift predictor Procs14 is presented. Procs14 is based on 2.35 million density functional theory(DFT) calculations on tripeptides and contains corrections for hydrogen bonding, ring current and the effect of the previous and following residue. Procs14 is capable at performing predictions for the 13CA, 13CB, 13CO, 15NH, 1HN and 1HA backbone atoms. In order to benchmark Procs14, a number of QM NMR calculatio...

  6. Ceramic catalyst materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  7. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2014-09-01

    Catalysts are critical inputs for many pathways that convert biomass into biofuels. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the production of catalysts and chemical inputs influence the life-cycle energy consumption, and GHG emissions of biofuels and need to be considered in biofuel life-cycle analysis (LCA). In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of three different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5]) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module. They were selected because they are consumed in existing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyses of biofuel processes. For example, a thermochemical ethanol production pathway (indirect gasification and mixed alcohol synthesis) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses olivine, DEPG, and tar reforming and alcohol synthesis catalysts (Dutta et al., 2011). ZSM-5 can be used in biofuel production pathways such as catalytic upgrading of sugars into hydrocarbons (Biddy and Jones, 2013). Other uses for these compounds and catalysts are certainly possible. In this report, we document the data sources and methodology we used to develop material and energy flows for the catalysts and compounds in the GREET catalyst module. In Section 2 we focus on compounds used in the model Dutta et al. (2011) developed. In Section 3, we report material and energy flows associated with ZSM-5 production. Finally, in Section 4, we report results.

  8. Hydrocarbon reforming catalysts and new reactor designs for compact hydrogen generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.; Schwab, E.; Urtel, H. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Farrauto, R. [BASF Catalysts LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2010-12-30

    A hydrogen based future energy scenario will use fuel cells for the conversion of chemically stored energy into electricity. Depending upon the type of fuel cell, different specifications will apply for the feedstock which is converted in the cell, ranging from very clean hydrogen for PEM-FC's to desulfurized methane for SOFC and MCFC technology. For the foreseeable future, hydrogen will be supplied by conventional reforming, however operated in compact and dynamic reformer designs. This requires that known catalyst formulations are offered in specific geometries, giving flexibility for novel reactor design options. These specific geometries can be special tablet shapes as well as monolith structures. Finally, also nonhydrocarbon feedstock might be used in special applications, e.g. bio-based methanol and ethanol. BASF offers catalysts for the full process chain starting from feedstock desulfurization via reforming, high temperature shift, low temperature shift to CO fine polishing either via selective oxidation or selective methanation. Depending upon the customer's design, most stages can be served either with precious metal based monolith solutions or base metal tablet solutions. For the former, we have taken the automobile catalyst monolith support and extended its application to the fuel cell hydrogen generation. Washcoats of precious metal supported catalysts can for example be deposited on ceramic monoliths and/or metal heat exchangers for efficient generation of hydrogen. Major advantages are high through puts due to more efficient heat transfer for catalysts on metal heat exchangers, lower pressure drop with greater catalyst mechanical and thermal stability compared to particulate catalysts. Base metal tablet catalysts on the other hand can have intrinsic cost advantages, larger fractions of the reactor can be filled with active mass, and if produced in unconventional shape, again novel reactor designs are made possible. Finally, if it comes to

  9. Impeded solid state reactions and transformations in ceramic catalysts supports and catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernő E. Kiss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Impeded chemical reactions and impeded polymorphous transformation in materials are discussed, as desired effects, for stabilization of ceramic catalyst supports and ceramic based catalysts. This paper gives a short overview about the possibilities of slowing down the aging processes in ceramic catalyst supports and catalysts. Special attention is given to alumina and titania based catalysts.

  10. A Shift of Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Administrative reforms are shifting prefecture government powers to the county level in an effort to boost local economies on July 8, the government of China’s southernmost Hainan Province announced that it was to hand over 177 of its administrative powers to county-level governments. The move practically dismantled the powers of the

  11. New hydrocracking catalysts increase throughput, run length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizinga, T. [Shell Internationale Petroleum Mij., The Hague (Netherlands); Theunissen, J.M.H. [Rayong Refinery Co. Ltd., Rayong (Thailand); Minderhoud, H.; Veen, R. van [Koninklijke/Shell-Lab., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-06-26

    An improved, second-stage hydrocracking catalyst has been developed by combining stabilized Y zeolites with amorphous silica alumina cracking components. A commercial application of this catalyst, along with a new, first-stage zeolitic hydrocracking catalyst, resulted in increased unit throughput and cycle length. The paper discusses the hydrocracking process, first-stage catalysts, second-stage catalysts, hydrogenation process, commercial results, and product properties.

  12. Biomass processing over gold catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Simakova, Olga A; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2014-01-01

    The book describes the valorization of biomass-derived compounds over gold catalysts. Since biomass is a rich renewable feedstock for diverse platform molecules, including those currently derived from petroleum, the interest in various transformation routes has become intense. Catalytic conversion of biomass is one of the main approaches to improving the economic viability of biorefineries.  In addition, Gold catalysts were found to have outstanding activity and selectivity in many key reactions. This book collects information about transformations of the most promising and important compounds derived from cellulose, hemicelluloses, and woody biomass extractives. Since gold catalysts possess high stability under oxidative conditions, selective oxidation reactions were discussed more thoroughly than other critical reactions such as partial hydrogenation, acetalization, and isomerization. The influence of reaction conditions, the role of the catalyst, and the advantages and disadvantages of using gold are pre...

  13. The innovation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them.

  14. Hydrocarbon conversion catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.35A, a water absorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of at least 8% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; an alumina binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  15. Montmorillonite supported Ni-Fe catalysts for hydrogen production from steam reforming of ethanol%Ni-Fe/蒙脱土催化剂催化乙醇水蒸气重整制氢的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宝茹; 殷雪梅; 吴旭; 安霞; 谢鲜梅

    2016-01-01

    采用浸渍法制备了一系列Ni-Fe/蒙脱土( MMT)催化剂,并应用于乙醇水蒸气重整制氢反应( ESR)。采用X射线衍射( XRD)、N2吸附脱附分析和H2-程序升温还原( H2-TPR)表征手段对催化剂的物理化学性质、还原性能、碳沉积等进行了研究。结果表明,Ni-Fe/MMT催化剂中,Ni、Fe高度分散在载体MMT层间及表面,而且Fe的加入降低了Ni颗粒的粒径,增强了Ni2+与载体的相互作用力。以10Ni5Fe/MMT为催化剂,在反应温度为500℃、水醇比为3:1、空速为12 h-1,反应进行30 h后,乙醇转化率为100%,氢气选择性仍保持72%,副产物CO和CH4含量明显降低。这是因为催化助剂Fe的引入,一方面,提高了Ni的分散度,使得ESR低温活性较好;另一方面,减小了Ni颗粒粒径,小颗粒的Ni有利于抑制甲烷的生成,并且Fe的加入加强了甲烷重整和水煤气变换反应,提高产物中氢气的选择性。%Ni-Fe/montmorillonite ( MMT ) catalysts were prepared by impregnation method for hydrogen production via ethanol steam reforming. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, H2-TPR, and N2 adsorption-desorption . It was found that Ni-Fe bimetallic catalysts exhibited higher activities and stability than single metallic catalysts due to the well dispersed Ni-Fe, small nickel crystallites and stronger interaction between Ni2+ and carrier. The conversion and selectivity were affected by the ratio of Ni to Fe. The 10Ni5Fe/MMT catalyst showed the optimum catalytic performance, its ethanol conversion was 100%, the selectivity of hydrogen gas remained at 72%, and selectivity of CO and CH4 were significantly decreased at 500℃ during 30 h testing. This could be attributed to the promoter Fe, which improves the dispersion of Ni and results in a good ESR activity at low reaction temperature. Small Ni particles can suppress methane formation and Fe addition can enhance the methane reforming with water and water gas shift reaction, resulting in higher

  16. On the Lamb shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarroel, D. [Av. Tobalaba 3696, Puente Alto, Santiago, Metropolitana (Chile)

    2008-02-15

    The Lamb shift is calculated, in an approximate way, considering the hydrogen atom as an isolated physical system; the quantized radiation field does not play any role in the present approach. Our formalism is based on the generalization of the Dirac wave equation that incorporates the effects of the electron self-fields directly into it. Both the physical picture as well as the mathematical formalism have their roots in the classical theory of the electron. (author)

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Cerium Doped Titanium Catalyst for the Degradation of Nitrobenzene Using Visible Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmini Ellappan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium doped catalyst was synthesized using Titanium isopropoxide as the Titanium source. The metal doped nanoparticles semiconductor catalyst was prepared by sol-sol method with the sol of Cerium. The synthesized catalyst samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and UV-vis diffuse reflectance measurements (DRS and compared with undoped TiO2 catalyst. The photocatalytic activity of the sample was investigated for the decomposition of nitrobenzene (NB using visible light as the artificial light source. Cerium doped catalyst was found to have better degradation of nitrobenzene owing to its shift in the band gap from UV to visible region as compared to undoped TiO2 catalyst. The operational parameters were optimized with catalyst dosage of 0.1 g L−1, pH of 9, and light intensity of 500 W. The degradation mechanism followed the Langmuir Hinshelwood kinetic model with the rate constant depending nonlinearly on the operational parameters as given by the relationship Kapp (theoretical = 2.29 * 10−4 * Intensity0.584 * Concentration−0.230 * Dosage0.425 * pH0.336.

  18. Vanadia on sulphated-ZrO2, a promising catalyst for NO abatement with ammonia in alkali containing flue gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kustov, Arkadii; Kustova, Marina; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    Vanadia supported on TiO2, ZrO2, and sulphated-ZrO2 have been prepared. These catalysts were characterized by elemental analysis, N-2-BET, XRD, FTIR, and NH3-TPD methods. The stability of surface sulphated groups, studied by FTIR- spectroscopy, was found to depend dramatically on the temperature...... in the total acidity is less pronounced in this case. The results of NO SCR with ammonia reveal a noticeable shift of the maximum catalytic activity towards higher temperatures in going from the conventional catalyst to vanadia supported on sulphated zirconia. The loading of the catalysts with potassium leads...... to considerable decrease of their catalytic activity, and to a shift of the maximum catalytic activity towards lower temperatures. Among all the catalysts, V2O5/sulphated-ZrO2 reveals the highest resistance towards alkali poisoning. The presence Of SO2 in the reaction mixture was found to enhance stability...

  19. Shifting Educational Paradigms: From Traditional to Competency-Based Education for Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Susan C.; Downey, Jayne A.

    2015-01-01

    In pursuit of innovative educational opportunities, district administration piloted competency-based education in their alternative program. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with school personnel to document perspectives of the programmatic shift. Analyses found local and national mandates, a catalyst, and a common moral…

  20. Exploration of Nanotube Structure Selectivity Using Bimetallic Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferle, Lisa

    2007-10-01

    Achieving selectivity for nanotube chirality is one of the holy grails for single-walled carbon nanotube research. One approach we are following is based on the ability to engineer the size and state of the initiating metal particle to constrain the type of cap formed. The chirality/structure of a nanotube is controlled by carbon cap formation on the metal particle during the nucleation step. It has been proposed that varying the carbon-metal catalyst binding energy could help lead to structure selectivity. One reason theoretically proposed for the favoring of armchair nanotubes, for example, is the proximity of low energy binding locations for two carbon atoms. Thus blocking sites or perturbing the binding energy on adjacent sites could in theory affect the structure of the carbon cap formed in the nucleation step. Our goal is to demonstrate structure selectivity in the growth of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using a bimetallic catalyst. The catalyst used was a bimetallic CoCr-MCM 41 and the effect of different molecular ratios between the two metals on the SWNT diameter distribution was studied. We have found that by adding Cr to the Co-MCM 41 monometallic catalyst the diameter distribution shifted in a systematic manner correlated to the development of a bimetallic phase as characterized by X-Ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). We have also found that the shift is accompanied by suppression of metallic SWNT, particularly those with diameter over 0.9 nm. We are also currently exploring the possibility of a further narrowing of the distribution by lowering the reaction temperatures.

  1. Development of Pd and Pd-Co catalysts supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes for formic acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Acosta, D.; Ledesma-Garcia, J.; Godinez, Luis A.; Rodríguez, H. G.; Álvarez-Contreras, L.; Arriaga, L. G.

    Pd-Co and Pd catalysts were prepared by the impregnation synthesis method at low temperature on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The nanotubes were synthesized by spray pyrolysis technique. Both catalysts were obtained with high homogeneous distribution and particle size around 4 nm. The morphology, composition and electrocatalytic properties were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction and electrochemical measurements, respectively. The electrocatalytic activity of Pd and PdCo/MWCNTs catalysts was investigated in terms of formic acid electrooxidation at low concentration in H 2SO 4 aqueous solution. The results obtained from voltamperometric studies showed that the current density achieved with the PdCo/MWCNTs catalyst is 3 times higher than that reached with the Pd/MWCNTs catalyst. The onset potential for formic acid electrooxidation on PdCo/MWCNTs electrocatalyst showed a negative shift ca. 50 mV compared with Pd/MWCNTs.

  2. The shifting beverage landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Maureen

    2010-04-26

    STOREY, M.L. The shifting beverage landscape. PHYSIOL BEHAV, 2010. - Simultaneous lifestyle changes have occurred in the last few decades, creating an imbalance in energy intake and energy expenditure that has led to overweight and obesity. Trends in the food supply show that total daily calories available per capita increased 28% since 1970. Total energy intake among men and women has also increased dramatically since that time. Some have suggested that intake of beverages has had a disproportional impact on obesity. Data collected by the Beverage Marketing Corporation between 1988-2008 demonstrate that, in reality, fewer calories per ounce are being produced by the beverage industry. Moreover, data from the National Cancer Institute show that soft drink intake represents 5.5% of daily calories. Data from NHANES 1999-2003 vs. 2003-06 may demonstrate a shift in beverage consumption for age/gender groups, ages 6 to>60years. The beverages provided in schools have significantly changed since 2006 when the beverage industry implemented School Beverage Guidelines. This voluntary action has removed full-calorie soft drinks from participating schools across the country. This shift to lower-calorie and smaller-portion beverages in school has led to a significant decrease in total beverage calories in schools. These data support the concept that to prevent and treat obesity, public health efforts should focus on energy balance and that a narrow focus on sweetened beverages is unlikely to have any meaningful impact on this complex problem. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Catastrophic shifts in ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Marten; Carpenter, Steve; Foley, Jonathan A.; Folke, Carl; Walker, Brian

    2001-10-01

    All ecosystems are exposed to gradual changes in climate, nutrient loading, habitat fragmentation or biotic exploitation. Nature is usually assumed to respond to gradual change in a smooth way. However, studies on lakes, coral reefs, oceans, forests and arid lands have shown that smooth change can be interrupted by sudden drastic switches to a contrasting state. Although diverse events can trigger such shifts, recent studies show that a loss of resilience usually paves the way for a switch to an alternative state. This suggests that strategies for sustainable management of such ecosystems should focus on maintaining resilience.

  4. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare

  5. Repetition and Translation Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zupan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition manifests itself in different ways and at different levels of the text. The first basic type of repetition involves complete recurrences; in which a particular textual feature repeats in its entirety. The second type involves partial recurrences; in which the second repetition of the same textual feature includes certain modifications to the first occurrence. In the article; repetitive patterns in Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” and its Slovene translation; “Konec Usherjeve hiše”; are compared. The author examines different kinds of repetitive patterns. Repetitions are compared at both the micro- and macrostructural levels. As detailed analyses have shown; considerable microstructural translation shifts occur in certain types of repetitive patterns. Since these are not only occasional; sporadic phenomena; but are of a relatively high frequency; they reduce the translated text’s potential for achieving some of the gothic effects. The macrostructural textual property particularly affected by these shifts is the narrator’s experience as described by the narrative; which suffers a reduction in intensity.

  6. [Shifting path of industrial pollution gravity centers and its driving mechanism in Pan-Yangtze River Delta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Xia; Jiang, Xiao-Wei; Cui, Jian-Xin

    2014-11-01

    Shifting path of industrial pollution gravity centers is the response of environmental special formation during the industry transfer process, in order to prove the responding of industrial pollution gravity centers to industry transfer in economically developed areas, this paper calculates the gravity centers of industrial wastewater, gas and solid patterns and reveals the shifting path and its driving mechanism, using the data of industrial pollution in the Pan-Yangtze River Delta from 2000 to 2010. The results show that the gravity center of the industrial waste in Pan-Yangtze River Delta shifts for sure in the last 10 years, and gravity center of solid waste shifts the maximum distance within the three wastes, which was 180.18 km, and shifting distances for waste gas and waste water were 109.51 km and 85.92 km respectively. Moreover, the gravity center of the industrial waste in Pan-Yangtze River Delta shifts westwards, and gravity centers of waste water, gas and solid shift for 0.40 degrees, 0.17 degrees and 0.03 degrees respectively. The shifting of industrial pollution gravity centers is driven by many factors. The rapid development of the heavy industry in Anhui and Jiangxi provinces results in the westward shifting of the pollutions. The optimization and adjustment of industrial structures in Yangtze River Delta region benefit to alleviating industrial pollution, and high-polluting industries shifted to Anhui and Jiangxi provinces promotes pollution gravity center shifting to west. While the development of massive clean enterprise, strong environmental management efforts and better environmental monitoring system slow the shifting trend of industrial pollution to the east in Yangtze River Delta. The study of industrial pollution gravity shift and its driving mechanism provides a new angle of view to analyze the relationship between economic development and environmental pollution, and also provides academic basis for synthetical management and control of

  7. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  8. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Jonathan A.; Wilson, Jamie R.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Petigny, Nathalie; Sarantopoulos, Christos

    2017-02-07

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a microstructure exhibiting substantially uniform pore size distribution as a result of using PMMA pore forming materials or a bi-modal particle size distribution of the porous support layer materials. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  9. deNOx catalysts for biomass combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steffen Buus

    industrial reference catalyst, after impregnation of 225 mole potassium/g of catalyst. A catalyst plate was synthesised using 20 wt.% sepiolite mixed with nano catalyst, supported by a SiO2-fibre mesh. Realistic potassium poisoning was performed on the catalyst plate, by exposure in a potassium aerosol...... for 632 hours at 350 C. Owing to physical blocking of potassium by sepiolite fibres the composite catalyst showed a further increase in potassium resistance compared with the unsupported catalyst. Finally a refined mechanism was proposed for the nano particle SCR catalyst explaining insitu FTIR...... observation done on the system. Most importantly it indicated that the V=O bond did not break during the SCR reaction, suggesting that another oxygen is responsible for the activity of the active vanadia site....

  10. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  11. Rhenium Nanochemistry for Catalyst Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Kessler

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The review presents synthetic approaches to modern rhenium-based catalysts. Creation of an active center is considered as a process of obtaining a nanoparticle or a molecule, immobilized within a matrix of the substrate. Selective chemical routes to preparation of particles of rhenium alloys, rhenium oxides and the molecules of alkyltrioxorhenium, and their insertion into porous structure of zeolites, ordered mesoporous MCM matrices, anodic mesoporous alumina, and porous transition metal oxides are considered. Structure-property relationships are traced for these catalysts in relation to such processes as alkylation and isomerization, olefin metathesis, selective oxidation of olefins, methanol to formaldehyde conversion, etc.

  12. Quick Guide to Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Elmansy, Rafiq

    2011-01-01

    How do you transform user interface designs created in Photoshop or Illustrator into interactive web pages? It's easier than you think. This guide shows you how to use Adobe Flash Catalyst to create interactive UIs and website wireframes for Rich Internet Applications-without writing a single line of code. Ideal for web designers, this book introduces Flash Catalyst basics with detailed step-by-step instructions and screenshots that illustrate every part of the process. You'll learn hands-on how to turn your static design or artwork into working user interfaces that can be implemented in Fla

  13. Paraffin Alkylation Using Zeolite Catalysts in a slurry reactor: Chemical Engineering Principles to Extend Catalyst Lifetime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Mesters, C.M.A.M.; Peferoen, D.G.R.; Brugge, P.T.M. van; Groot, C. de

    1996-01-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with 2-butene is carried out using a zeolitic catalyst in a well stirred slurry reactor. Whereas application of fixed bed technology using a solid acid alkylation catalyst has in the led to catalysts lifetimes in the range of minutes, in this work we report catalyst

  14. On-line regeneration of hydrodesulfurization catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jr., John L.

    1980-01-01

    A hydrotreating catalyst is regenerated as it concurrently hydrotreats a hydrocarbon fuel by introducing a low concentration of oxygen into the catalyst bed either continuously or periodically. At low oxygen concentrations the carbon deposits on the catalyst are burned off without harming the catalyst and without significantly affecting the hydrotreating process. In a preferred embodiment the hydrotreating process is hydrodesulfurization, and regenerating is done periodically with oxygen concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 volume percent.

  15. Efficient epoxidation of propene using molecular catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovits, Iulius I. E.; Anthofer, Michael H.; Kolding, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The epoxidation of propene is performed in homogeneous phase using various molecular catalysts and H2O2 or tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidants. A comparison between some molybdenum catalysts and methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) shows that the well known Re catalyst is the best among the examined...

  16. Catalysts and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-02-14

    The present invention provides a catalyst including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle and a catalytic material comprising iron. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the catalyst. In some examples, the catalyst can be used to hydrotreat fatty acids or to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks.

  17. Novel non-platinum metal catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel non-platinum metal catalyst material for use in low temperature fuel cells and electrolysers and to fuel cells and electrolysers comprising the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material. The present invention also relates to a novel method for synthesizing...... the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material....

  18. Activation of tungsten oxide catalyst on SiO sub 2 surface by low-temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blecha, J.; Dudas, J.; Lodes, A.; Derco, J. (Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Czechoslovakia))

    1989-03-01

    The disproportionation of alkenes, in particular propene, promotes an improvement in the balance of crude oil processing and is one of the possibilities of gaining a new raw-material source for petrochemical syntheses. The disproportionation processes comprising conversion of alkenes into the two qualitatively new ones proceed only in the presence of the catalysts. As the catalyst, tungsten oxide which is applicable on the silica gel carrier may be used. It was a practical effort which led the authors to study the plasma interaction with the WO{sub 3}/SiO{sub 3} catalyst to accelerate and achieve the more effective preparation of the catalyst needed for heterogeneous catalysis of propene, and thus to positively influence the catalyst quality. On the basis of investigation carried out on the catalyst's activity, selectivity, and lifetime - in relation to propene disproportionation - it may be stated that: the equilibrium degree of conversion is attainable with lower W/F values (W = mass of catalysts, F = feed rate); the composition of disproportionation products is shifted more to the ethylene formation; the lifetime of the catalyst remains unchanged; and for both dimerization and cracking no active centers are formed.

  19. Hydroformylation of Cyclohexene with Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Using Ruthenium Carbonyl Catalyst: Influence of Pressures of Gaseous Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Arai

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydroformylation of cyclohexene was studied with a catalyst system ofRu3(CO12 and LiCl using H2 and CO2 instead of CO in NMP. The influence of H2 andCO2 pressures on the total conversion and the product distribution was examined. It wasshown that increasing total pressure of H2 and CO2 promoted the reverse water gas shiftreaction and increased the yield of cyclohexanecarboxaldehyde. Its hydrogenation tocyclohexanemethanol was promoted with increasing H2 pressure but suppressed withincreasing CO2 pressure. Cyclohexane was also formed along with those products and thisdirect hydrogenation was suppressed with increasing CO2 pressure. The roles of CO2 as apromoter as well as a reactant were further examined by phase behavior observations andhigh pressure FTIR measurements.

  20. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  1. Biodiesel production using heterogenous catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current transesterification of triacylglycerides (TAG) to produce biodiesel is based on the homogenous catalyst method using strong base such as hydroxides or methoxides. However, this method results in a number of problems: (1) acid pre-treatment is required of feedstocks high in free fatty ac...

  2. Effects of K and Pt promoters on the performance of cobalt catalyst supported on CNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabidi, Noor Asmawati Mohd; Ali, Sardar; Subbarao, Duvvuri

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a comparative study on the effects of incorporation of potassium (K) and platinum (Pt) as promoters on the physicochemical properties of cobalt catalyst. The catalyst was prepared by a wet impregnation method on a CNTs support. Samples were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), H2-temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K and 1 atm, with H2/ CO = 2v / v and space velocity, SV of 12 L/g.h for 5 hours. The K-promoted and Pt-promoted Co catalysts have different physicochemical properties and catalytic performances compared to that of the un-promoted Co catalyst. XPS analysis revealed that K and Pt promoters induced electronic modifications as exhibited by the shifts in the Co binding energies. Incorporation of 0.06 wt% K and 0.06 wt% Pt in Co/CNTs catalyst resulted in an increase in the CO conversion and C5+ selectivity and a decrease in methane selectivity. Potassium was found to be a better promoter for Co/CNTs catalyst compared to platinum.

  3. A Microwave-Sensitive Solid Acid Catalyst Prepared from Sweet Potato via a Simple Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ying Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a microwave-sensitive solid acid catalyst was successfully synthesized from sweet potatoes via a simple process. The catalyst was proven to have superior microwave-sensitive and homogeneous properties. The physicochemical properties were characterized by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier-transform infrared spectra (FT-IR, thermogravimetric (TGA, scanning electron microscope (SEM and elemental analysis (EA. Results showed that the total acid density and specific surface area for the catalyst were 6.35 mmol/g and 78.35 m2/g, respectively. The elemental sulfur content reached 7.449% after sulfonation and the catalytic activity could reach over 91% within 30 min with microwave power density of 1.0 W/mL. The catalytic reaction temperature should not exceed 200 °C, as shown in TGA curve, and the moisture content in the oil raw material should be within 1%–2%. The catalyst deactivated gradually to 64.38% after reutilization five times, but the catalytic activity could be simply regenerated by re-sulfonation, albeit slightly reduced (87.56%. The shift of diffraction peaks in the XRD patterns and new absorption peaks at 619.98 and 1190.49 cm−1 of FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the –SO3H group was effectively attached to the catalyst. The SEM images displayed a loose and porous amorphous structure in the end catalyst.

  4. Effects of K and Pt promoters on the performance of cobalt catalyst supported on CNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabidi, Noor Asmawati Mohd, E-mail: noorasmawati-mzabidi@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Ali, Sardar, E-mail: alikhan-635@yahoo.com [Centralized Analytical Laboratory, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Subbarao, Duvvuri, E-mail: duvvuri-subbarao@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    This paper presents a comparative study on the effects of incorporation of potassium (K) and platinum (Pt) as promoters on the physicochemical properties of cobalt catalyst. The catalyst was prepared by a wet impregnation method on a CNTs support. Samples were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), H{sub 2}-temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K and 1 atm, with H{sub 2}/CO = 2v/v and space velocity, SV of 12 L/g.h for 5 hours. The K-promoted and Pt-promoted Co catalysts have different physicochemical properties and catalytic performances compared to that of the un-promoted Co catalyst. XPS analysis revealed that K and Pt promoters induced electronic modifications as exhibited by the shifts in the Co binding energies. Incorporation of 0.06 wt% K and 0.06 wt% Pt in Co/CNTs catalyst resulted in an increase in the CO conversion and C{sub 5+} selectivity and a decrease in methane selectivity. Potassium was found to be a better promoter for Co/CNTs catalyst compared to platinum.

  5. MECHANICAL STRENGTH AND RELIABILITY OF SOLID CATALYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongdan Li; Dongfang Wu; Y.S. Lin

    2004-01-01

    The mechanical strength of solid catalysts is one of the key parameters for reliable and efficient performance of a fixed bed reactor. Some recent developments and their basic mechanics within this context are reviewed. The main concepts discussed are brittle fracture which leads to the mechanical failure of the catalyst pellets, measurement and statistical properties of the catalyst strength data, and mechanical reliability of the catalyst pellets and their packed bed. The scientific basis for the issues on the catalyst mechanical properties calls yet for further elucidation and advancement.

  6. Characterization of Catalyst Materials for Production of Aerospace Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Lauren M.; De La Ree, Ana B.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Due to environmental, economic, and security issues, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to non-petroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. Additionally, efforts are concentrated on reducing costs coupled with fuel production from non-conventional sources. One solution to this issue is Fischer-Tropsch gas-to-liquid technology. Fischer-Tropsch processing of synthesis gas (CO/H2) produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fisher-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur or aromatic compounds. This process is most commonly catalyzed by heterogeneous (in this case, silver and platinum) catalysts composed of cobalt supported on alumina or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Physisorption, chemisorptions, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are described to better understand the potential performance of Fischer-Tropsch cobalt on alumina catalysts promoted with silver and platinum. The overall goal is to preferentially produce C8 to C18 paraffin compounds for use as aerospace fuels. Progress towards this goal will eventually be updated and achieved by a more thorough understanding of the characterization of catalyst materials. This work was supported by NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing and In-situ Resource Utilization projects.

  7. Automotive Catalyst State Diagnosis Using Microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moos Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The state of catalysts plays a key role in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment. The soot or ash loading of Diesel particulate filters, the oxygen loading degree in three-way catalysts, the amount of stored ammonia in SCR catalysts, or the NOx loading degree in NOx storage catalysts are important parameters that are today determined indirectly and in a model-based manner with gas sensors installed upstream and/or downstream of the catalysts. This contribution gives an overview on a novel approach to determine the catalyst state directly by a microwave-based technique. The method exploits the fact that the catalyst housing acts as a microwave cavity resonator. As “sensing” elements, one or two simple antennas are mounted inside the catalyst canning. The electrical properties of the catalyst device (ceramic honeycomb plus coating and storage material can be measured. Preferably, the resonance characteristics, e.g., the resonance frequencies, of selected cavity modes are observed. The information on the catalyst interior obtained in such a contactless manner is very well correlated with the catalyst state as will be demonstrated for different exhaust gas aftertreatment systems.

  8. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpel, Michael; Liu, Di-Jia

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  9. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  10. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  11. Catalytic and electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol over palladium-based nanoalloy catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Shan, Shiyao; Ng, Mei Shan; Yang, Lefu; Mott, Derrick; Fang, Weiqin; Kang, Ning; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-07-23

    The control of the nanoscale composition and structure of alloy catalysts plays an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. This paper describes novel findings of an investigation for Pd-based nanoalloy catalysts (PdCo and PdCu) for ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in gas phase and alkaline electrolyte. Although the PdCo catalyst exhibits a mass activity similar to Pd, the PdCu catalyst is shown to display a much higher mass activity than Pd for the electrocatalytic EOR in alkaline electrolyte. This finding is consistent with the finding on the surface enrichment of Pd on the alloyed PdCu surface, in contrast to the surface enrichment of Co in the alloyed PdCo surface. The viability of C-C bond cleavage was also probed for the PdCu catalysts in both gas-phase and electrolyte-phase EOR. In the gas-phase reaction, although the catalytic conversion rate for CO2 product is higher over Pd than PdCu, the nanoalloy PdCu catalyst appears to suppress the formation of acetic acid, which is a significant portion of the product in the case of pure Pd catalyst. In the alkaline electrolyte, CO2 was detected from the gas phase above the electrolyte upon acid treatment following the electrolysis, along with traces of aldehyde and acetic acid. An analysis of the electrochemical properties indicates that the oxophilicity of the base metal alloyed with Pd, in addition to the surface enrichment of metals, may have played an important role in the observed difference of the catalytic and electrocatalytic activities. In comparison with Pd alloyed with Co, the results for Pd alloyed with Cu showed a more significant positive shift of the reduction potential of the oxygenated Pd species on the surface. These findings have important implications for further fine-tuning of the Pd nanoalloys in terms of base metal composition toward highly active and selective catalysts for EOR.

  12. Use of Hydrogen Chemisorption and Ethylene Hydrogenation as Predictors for Aqueous Phase Reforming of Lactose over Ni@Pt and Co@Pt Bimetallic Overlayer Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Qinghua; Skoglund, Michael D.; Zhang, Chen; Morris, Allen R.; Holles, Joseph H.

    2016-10-20

    Overlayer Pt on Ni (Ni@Pt) or Co (Co@Pt) were synthesized and tested for H2 generation from APR of lactose. H2 chemisorption descriptor showed that Ni@Pt and Co@Pt overlayer catalysts had reduced H2 adsorption strength compared to a Pt only catalyst, which agree with computational predictions. The overlayer catalysts also demonstrated lower activity for ethylene hydrogenation than the Pt only catalyst, which likely resulted from decreased H2 binding strength decreasing the surface coverage of H2. XAS results showed that overlayer catalysts exhibited higher white line intensity than the Pt catalyst, which indicates a negative d-band shift for the Pt overlayer, further providing evidence for overlayer formation. Lactose APR studies showed that lactose can be used as feedstock to produce H2 and CO under desirable reaction conditions. The Pt active sites of Ni@Pt and Co@Pt overlayer catalysts showed significantly enhanced H2 production selectivity and activity when compared with that of a Pt only catalyst. The single deposition overlayer with the largest d-band shift showed the highest H2 activity. The results suggest that overlayer formation using directed deposition technique could modify the behavior of the surface metal and ultimately modify the APR activity.

  13. Methanol steam reforming over Cu/CeO2 catalysts: influence of zinc addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Tonelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol steam reforming reaction was studied over Cu(5 wt.%/CeO2 with and without the presence of Zn. The Zn addition decreased the Cu+2 reducibility and increased the oxygen mobility of ceria. The main products were CO2 and H2 with small amount of CO. Selectivity to CO decreased with the Zn addition and it was lower at lower reaction temperatures and lower space velocities. At 230 ºC and W/F MeOH = 648 g min mol-1 selectivities to H2 and to CO2 were 100% on Zn/Cu/Ce. The catalytic results indicated that CO was mainly a secondary product formed from reverse water gas shift reaction.

  14. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Melo Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinitsyn, Nikolai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-08

    We predict the existence of quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hanchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hanchen ones in multiples of α2. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  15. Beam shifts and distribution functions

    CERN Document Server

    Aiello, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    When a beam of light is reflected by a smooth surface its behavior deviates from geometrical optics predictions. Such deviations are quantified by the so-called spatial and angular Goos-Haenchen (GH) and Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shifts of the reflected beam. These shifts depend upon the shape of the incident beam, its polarization and on the material composition of the reflecting surface. In this article we suggest a novel approach that allows one to unambiguously isolate the beam-shape dependent aspects of GH and IF shifts. We show that this separation is possible as a result of some universal features of shifted distribution functions which are presented and discussed.

  16. 制备条件对用于甘油蒸汽重整反应Ni基催化剂性能的影响%Influence of the synthesis method parameters used to prepare nickel-based catalysts on the catalytic performance for the glycerol steam reforming reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. A. Goula; N. D. Charisiou; K. N. Papageridis; G. Siakavelas

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the synthesis method parameters used to prepare nickel‐based catalysts on the catalytic performance for the glycerol steam reforming reaction was studied. A series of Al2O3‐supported Ni catalysts were synthesized, with nickel loading of 8 wt%, using the incipient wetness, wet impregnation, and modified equilibrium deposition filtration methods. The catalysts’ surface and bulk properties were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP), N2 adsorp‐tion‐desorption isotherms (BET), X‐ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and temperature‐programmed reduction (TPR). Used catalysts were characterized by techniques such as elemental analysis and SEM in order to deter‐mine the level of carbon that was deposited and catalyst morphology. The results indicated that the synthesis method affected the textural, structural and surface properties of the catalysts, differenti‐ating the dispersion and the kind of nickel species on alumina’s surface. The formation of nickel aluminate phases was confirmed by the XRD and TPR analysis and theβ‐peak of the Ni/Al‐edf cata‐lyst was higher than in the other two catalysts, indicating that the nickel aluminate species of this catalyst were more reducible. Both Ni/Al‐wet and Ni/Al‐edf catalysts showed increasing CO2 selec‐tivities and approximately constant CO selectivities for temperatures above 550 °C, indicating that these catalysts successfully catalyze the water gas shift reaction. It was also confirmed that the Ni/Al‐edf catalyst had the highest values for glycerol to gaseous products conversion, hydrogen yield, allyl alcohol, acetaldehyde, and acetic acid selectivities at 650 °C and the lowest carbon depo‐sition of the catalysts tested. The correlation of the catalysts’ structural properties, dispersion and reducibility with catalytic performance reveals that the EDF method can provide catalysts with higher specific

  17. Biodiesel production using heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semwal, Surbhi; Arora, Ajay K; Badoni, Rajendra P; Tuli, Deepak K

    2011-02-01

    The production and use of biodiesel has seen a quantum jump in the recent past due to benefits associated with its ability to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG). There are large number of commercial plants producing biodiesel by transesterification of vegetable oils and fats based on base catalyzed (caustic) homogeneous transesterification of oils. However, homogeneous process needs steps of glycerol separation, washings, very stringent and extremely low limits of Na, K, glycerides and moisture limits in biodiesel. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The present report is review of the progress made in development of heterogeneous catalysts suitable for biodiesel production. This review shall help in selection of suitable catalysts and the optimum conditions for biodiesel production.

  18. Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Due-Hansen, Johannes;

    2012-01-01

    Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts were prepared using three different supports ZrO2, TiO2 and Mordenite zeolite. The majority of the catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of a commercial support, with vanadium, copper or iron precursor, one catalyst was prepared...... by onepot sol–gel method. All catalysts were characterized by BET, XRPD and NH3-TPD. Initial SCR activities of 8 out of 9 catalysts showed higher NO conversion at least at one temperature in the temperature range 300–500 ◦C compared to the conventional V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. After potassium poisoning (100......–130 µmol of K/g of catalyst) the relative drop in SCR activity and acidity was lower for all the alternative catalysts compared to the industrial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. Furthermore, Cu/MOR and Nano-V2O5/Sul-TiO2 catalysts showed 8–16 times higher SCR activities than the conventional even after high...

  19. Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1990-05-15

    This patent describes a catalyst composition. It comprises: a modified Y zeolite having a unit cell size below about 24.45 {angstrom}, a degree of crystallinity which is at least retained at increasing SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios, a SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratio between about 8 to about 15, a water adsorption capacity at (25{degree}C and a p/p{sub {ital o}} value of 0.2) of between about 10--15% by weight of modified zeolite and a pore volume of at lest about 0.25 ml/g. Between about 10 to about 40% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least about 8 nm; an amorphous cracking component comprising a silica-alumina containing 50--95% by weight of silica; a binder comprising alumina; from about 0.05 to about 10 percent by weight of nickel and from about 2 to about 40 percent by weight of tungsten, calculated as metals per 100 parts by weight of total catalyst. The modified Y zeolite and amorphous cracking component comprises about 60--85% by weight of the total catalyst, the binder comprises about 15--40% by weight of the total catalyst and the amount of modified Y zeolite ranges between about 10--75% of the combined amount of modified Y zeolite and amorphous cracking component.

  20. Kinetics of propane dehydrogenation in CO{sub 2} presence over chromium and gallium oxide catalysts based on MCM-41

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V.; Agafonov, A.Yu.; Botavina, M.A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Chromium and gallium catalysts based on MCM-41 with different contents of active metals were prepared and tested for propane dehydrogenation in the presence and absence of CO{sub 2}. It was shown that CO{sub 2} increased the yield of propene and decreased considerably the rate of deactivation of Cr/MCM-41 and decreased propene yield and slightly improved the stability of Ga/MCM-41. The study of kinetics in unstationary and stationary fields showed that the decrease of propene yield was connected with strong competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2} over Ga-catalysts what presented difficulties for propane adsorption. The formation of cracking products was decreased in CO{sub 2} presence over both catalysts. The catalysts were differed by the adsorption capacity of the reaction components: C{sub 3}H{sub 6} was tied more strongly than CO{sub 2} over Cr-catalysts, CO{sub 2} was tied more firmly than C{sub 3}H{sub 6} over Ga-catalysts. Kinetic data showed that of H{sub 2} was bounded with the surface of Ga-catalysts very firmly, reverse watergas shift reaction proceeded in considerably more extent over Cr-catalysts than over Gaones. CO{sub 2} took active participation in oxidation of coke and surface of Cr-catalysts. The positive role of CO{sub 2} in propane dehydrogenation over Ga-catalysts consisted in a decrease of coke and cracking products. Kinetic equations and step-schemes for propene and cracking products formation were proposed. (orig.)

  1. Correlation of Microstructure, Rheological and Morphological Characteristics of Synthesized Polypropylene (PP Reactor Blends Using Homogeneous Binary Metallocene Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Vaezi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel binary homogeneous catalyst system based on (I: rac-Me2Si(2-Me-4-PhIn2ZrCl2 and (II: (2-PhIn2ZrCl2 catalysts at various molar ratios was utilized for the synthesis of polypropylene (PP reactor blends with bimodal molecular weight distribution (MWD. The results of gel permeation chromatography analyses revealed that the catalyst (I was responsible for the production of i-PP with high molecular weight (MW while the individual use of catalyst (II led to the production of an elastomeric PP with relatively low MW. However, application of the binary catalyst system led to high MW bimodal MWD products being highly dependent on the catalysts’ molar ratios. Increasing the molar ratio of catalyst (II to catalyst (I resulted in a notable enhancement of the products’ complex viscosity due to the increased MW, a higher level of chains’ entanglements and formation of amorphous blocks along the polymer chains. All products exhibited a single relaxation that shifted towards longer times upon changing the catalysts’ molar ratios. Scanning electron microscopy results revealed that the fracture surface of the blends, synthesized by the binary catalyst system, became more heterogeneous in comparison with the products obtained by the individual use of the catalyst (I. The observed heterogeneity was found to increase by increasing the amount of catalyst (II. Such morphological change was further corroborated by the dynamic rheological data, indicating a promising correlation between the linear rheological results and the morphological features of the synthesized PP reactor blends.

  2. Catalysts from synthetic genetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander I; Pinheiro, Vitor B; Smola, Matthew J; Morgunov, Alexey S; Peak-Chew, Sew; Cozens, Christopher; Weeks, Kevin M; Herdewijn, Piet; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-02-19

    The emergence of catalysis in early genetic polymers such as RNA is considered a key transition in the origin of life, pre-dating the appearance of protein enzymes. DNA also demonstrates the capacity to fold into three-dimensional structures and form catalysts in vitro. However, to what degree these natural biopolymers comprise functionally privileged chemical scaffolds for folding or the evolution of catalysis is not known. The ability of synthetic genetic polymers (XNAs) with alternative backbone chemistries not found in nature to fold into defined structures and bind ligands raises the possibility that these too might be capable of forming catalysts (XNAzymes). Here we report the discovery of such XNAzymes, elaborated in four different chemistries (arabino nucleic acids, ANA; 2'-fluoroarabino nucleic acids, FANA; hexitol nucleic acids, HNA; and cyclohexene nucleic acids, CeNA) directly from random XNA oligomer pools, exhibiting in trans RNA endonuclease and ligase activities. We also describe an XNA-XNA ligase metalloenzyme in the FANA framework, establishing catalysis in an entirely synthetic system and enabling the synthesis of FANA oligomers and an active RNA endonuclease FANAzyme from its constituent parts. These results extend catalysis beyond biopolymers and establish technologies for the discovery of catalysts in a wide range of polymer scaffolds not found in nature. Evolution of catalysis independent of any natural polymer has implications for the definition of chemical boundary conditions for the emergence of life on Earth and elsewhere in the Universe.

  3. Metallocenes catalysts technology and environment; Technologie et environnement des catalyseurs metallocenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavi, A. [Centre de Recherche du Groupe TotalFinaElf, Seneffe (Belgium)

    2000-07-01

    The polyolefin industry is increasingly confronted with the challenge to meet restricting environmental regulations. In parallel, the environmentally conscious public opinion (customer), now globally organized, demands even more stringent anticipative actions to prevent any short or long term damages inflicted upon environment. The gradual shift from high pressure high temperature radical polymerisation for production of polyethylene to silica supported CrO{sub 3} based Phillips catalysts and several generations of stepwise improved TiCl{sub 3} based Ziegler-Natta catalyst technology has led to highly efficient catalytic systems accomplishing substantial improvement with respect to environmental issues. The development and progress of the last decade in single-site metallocene catalyst technology finally indicate that the advancing polyolefin industry has moved, in anticipation, towards even more modern technologies meeting the ultimate goal of employing clean processes that provide environmentally green products. (author)

  4. In Situ XANES/XPS Investigation of Doped Manganese Perovskite Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mierwaldt

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Studying catalysts in situ is of high interest for understanding their surface structure and electronic states in operation. Herein, we present a study of epitaxial manganite perovskite thin films (Pr1−xCaxMnO3 active for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER from electro-catalytic water splitting. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES at the Mn L- and O K-edges, as well as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS of the O 1s and Ca 2p states have been performed in ultra-high vacuum and in water vapor under positive applied bias at room temperature. It is shown that under the oxidizing conditions of the OER a reduced Mn2+ species is generated at the catalyst surface. The Mn valence shift is accompanied by the formation of surface oxygen vacancies. Annealing of the catalysts in O2 atmosphere at 120 °C restores the virgin surfaces.

  5. Regime shifts in resource management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zeeuw, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Resource management has to take account of the possibility of tipping points and regime shifts in ecological systems that provide the resources. This article focuses on the typical model of regime shifts in the ecological literature and analyzes optimal management and common-property issues when tra

  6. Work shifts in Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Recupero

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergency Medicine is known as a high stress specialty. The adverse effect of constantly rotating shifts is the single most important reason given for premature attrition from the field. In this work problems tied with night shift work will be taken into account and some solutions to reduce the impact of night work on the emergency physicians will be proposed.

  7. Metabolic impact of shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimberg, Ioná Zalcman; Fernandes Junior, Silvio A; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, shift work represents a considerable contingent workforce. Recently, studies have shown that overweight and obesity are more prevalent in shift workers than day workers. In addition, shift work has been associated with a higher propensity for the development of many metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance, diabetes, dislipidemias and metabolic syndrome. Recent data have pointed that decrease of the sleep time, desynchronization of circadian rhythm and alteration of environmental aspects are the main factors related to such problems. Shortened or disturbed sleep is among the most common health-related effects of shift work. The plausible physiological and biological mechanisms are related to the activation of the autonomic nervous system, inflammation, changes in lipid and glucose metabolism, and related changes in the risk for atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes. The present review will discuss the impact of shift work on obesity and metabolic disorders and how disruption of sleep and circadian misalignment may contribute to these metabolic dysfunctions.

  8. Promotional Effect of Bismuth as Dopant in Bi-Doped Vanadyl Pyrophosphate Catalysts for Selective Oxidation of n-Butane to Maleic Anhydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.H.Taufiq-Yap; Y.Kamiya; K.P.Tan

    2006-01-01

    Bismuth-promoted (1% and 3%) vanadyl pyrophosphate catalysts were prepared by refluxing creased the surface area and lowered the overall V oxidation state. Profiles of temperature programmed reduction (TPR) in H2 show a significant shift of the maxima of major reduction peaks to lower temperatures for the Bi-promoted catalysts. A new peak was also observed at the low temperature region for the catalyst with 3% of Bi dopant. The addition of Bi also increased the total amount of oxygen removed from the catalysts. The reduction pattern and reactivity information provide fundamental insight into the catalytic properties of the catalysts. Bi-promoted catalysts were found to be highly active (71% and 81%conversion for 1% and 3% Bi promoted catalysts, respectively, at 703 K), as compared to the unpromoted material (47% conversion). The higher activity of the Bi-promoted catalysts is due to that these catalysts possess highly active and labile lattice oxygen. The better catalytic performance can also be attributed to the larger surface area.

  9. Catalysts for decomposing ozone tail gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang-an; SUN De-zhi; WANG Hui; LI Wei

    2003-01-01

    The preparation of immobilizing-catalysts for decomposing ozone by using dipping method was studied. XRD, XPS and TEM were used to characterize the catalysts. The three kinds of catalysts were selected preferentially, and their catalytic activities were investigated. The results showed that the catalyst with activated carbon dipping acetate (active components are Mn: Cu = 3:2, active component proportion in catalyst is 15%, calcination temperature is 200℃ ) has the best catalytic activity for ozone decomposing. One gram of catalyst can decompose 17.6 g ozone at initial ozone concentration of 2.5 g/m3 and the residence time in reactor of 0.1 s. The experimental results also indicated that humidity of reaction system had negative effect on catalytic activity.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous hydrocracking catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, D.; Usman, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    Mesoporous catalysts have shown great prospective for catalytic reactions due to their high surface area that aids better distribution of impregnated metal. They have been found to contain more adsorption sites and controlled pore diameter. Hydrocracking, in the presence of mesoporous catalyst is considered more efficient and higher conversion of larger molecules is observed as compared to the cracking reactions in smaller microporous cavities of traditional zeolites. In the present study, a number of silica-alumina based mesoporous catalysts are synthesized in the laboratory. The concentration and type of surfactants and quantities of silica and alumina sources are the variables studied in the preparation of catalyst supports. The supports prepared are well characterized using SEM, EDX, and N2-BET techniques. Finally, the catalysts are tested in a high pressure autoclave reactor to study the activity and selectivity of the catalysts for the hydrocracking of a model mixture of plastics comprising of LDPE, HDPE, PP, and PS.

  11. Organic synthesis with olefin metathesis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grubbs, R.H. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Over the past nine years, early transition metal catalysts for the ring opening metathesis polymerization of cyclic olefins have been developed. These catalysts are simple organometallic complexes containing metal carbon multiple bonds that in most cases polymerize olefins by a living process. These catalysts have been used to prepare a family of near monodispersed and structurally homogeneous polymers. A series of group VII ROMP catalysts that allow a wide range of functionality to be incorporated into the polymer side chains have been prepared. The most important member of this family of complexes are the bisphosphinedihalo-ruthenium carbene complexes. These polymerization catalysts can also be used in the synthesis of fine chemicals by ring closing (RCM) and vinyl coupling reactions. The availability of the group VII catalysts allow metathesis to be carried out on highly functionalized substrates such as polypeptides and in unusual environments such as in aqueous emulsions.

  12. EFFECTS OF CATALYST MORPHOLOGY ON HYDROTREATING REACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TYE CHING THIAN

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the new environmental regulations for fuel quality, refineries need to process cleaner fuel. This requires an improvement in performance of hydrotreating catalysts. Improvements in catalyst activity require knowledge of the relationships between catalyst morphology and activity. Molybdenum sulfide, the generally agreed catalysts that give the best performance in hydrocracking and hydrotreating was investigated for its morphology effects on hydrotreating reactions. Three types of MoS2 catalysts with different morphology were studied. They are crystalline MoS2, exfoliated MoS2 and MoS2 derived from a precursor, molybdenum naphthenate. Exfoliated MoS2 with minimal long range order, with much higher rim edges has shown relative higher hydrogenation activity. Generally, results of MoS2 catalyst activities in hydrogenation, hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation and hydrideoxy¬gena¬tion are in agreement with the rim-edge model.

  13. Methane Tri-reforming over nickel catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    García Vargas, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The present work is part of a research program carried out in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Castilla-La Mancha, focused in the preparation, characterization and evaluation of catalysts that can be applied in industrially relevant reactions. In this way, the PhD work reported here was aimed to study and improve nickel catalysts applied to the tri-reforming process, evaluating the role of support, precursor and promoter and optimizing the catalyst preparation. Furt...

  14. Manufacture of Catalyst Systems for Ammonia Conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAKH S.V.; SAVENKOV D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Platinum catalyst gauzes have been in use since the moment of development of the process of catalyst oxidation of ammonia for production of nitric acid or hydrocyanic acid.Catalyst gauzes are usually made of platinum or its alloys with rhodium and palladium.These precious metals have remarkable properties that make them ideal catalysts for acceleration of the ammonia/oxygen reaction.In 2008,OJSC "SIC ‘Supermetal’" and Umicore AG&Co.KG launched a production line for Pt-alloy-based catalyst systems to be used for ammonia oxidation in the production of weak nitric acid.Catalyst systems consist of a pack of catalyst gauzes and a pack of catchment gauzes,which are made using flat-bed knitting machines and wire-cloth looms.Today,up-to-date catalyst systems MKSpreciseTM are being manufactured,the basic advantages of which are an individual structure of gauzes and composition of the material,which allows to define precisely the position of each gauze in the catalyst pack,a high activity of the catalyst pack,direct catching of platinum and rhodium in the catalyst system,and a reasonable combination of single- and multilayer types of gauzes.This makes it possible to vary the configuration of the catalyst and select an optimum composition of the system to ensure the maximum efficiency of the ammonia oxidation process.We also produce the catchment systems that allow to find the best decision from the economic point view for each individual case.

  15. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  16. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  17. Molecular catalysts structure and functional design

    CERN Document Server

    Gade, Lutz H

    2014-01-01

    Highlighting the key aspects and latest advances in the rapidly developing field of molecular catalysis, this book covers new strategies to investigate reaction mechanisms, the enhancement of the catalysts' selectivity and efficiency, as well as the rational design of well-defined molecular catalysts. The interdisciplinary author team with an excellent reputation within the community discusses experimental and theoretical studies, along with examples of improved catalysts, and their application in organic synthesis, biocatalysis, and supported organometallic catalysis. As a result, readers wil

  18. POLYMER-SUPPORTED LEWIS ACID CATALYSTS. VI. POLYSTYRENE-BONDED STANNIC CHLORIDE CATALYST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAN Ruicheng; FU Diankui

    1991-01-01

    A polystyrene-bonded stannic chloride catalyst was synthesized by the method of lithium polystyryl combined with stannic chloride. This catalyst is a polymeric organometallic compound containing 0.25 mmol Sn(IV)/g catalyst. The catalyst showed sufficient stability and catalytic activity in organic reaction such as esterification, acetalation and ketal formation, and it could be reused many times without losing its catalytic activity.

  19. Silica deactivation of bead VOC catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libanati, C.; Pereira, C.J. [Research Division, W. R. Grace and Co., Columbia, MD (United States); Ullenius, D.A. [Grace TEC Systems, De Pere, WI (United States)

    1998-01-15

    Catalytic oxidation is a key technology for controlling the emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from industrial plants. The present paper examines the deactivation by silica of bead VOC catalysts in a flexographic printing application. Post mortem analyses of field-aged catalysts suggest that organosilicon compounds contained in the printing ink diffuse into the catalyst and deposit as silica particles in the micropores. Laboratory activity evaluation of aged catalysts suggests that silica deposition is non-selective and that silica masks the noble metal active site

  20. Nanoparticular metal oxide/anatase catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts having a narrow particle size distribution. In particular, the invention concerns preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalyst precursors comprising combustible crystallization seeds upon which...... the catalyst metai oxide is co-precipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step. The present invention also concerns processes wherein the nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts of the invention are used, such as SCR (deNOx) reactions...

  1. The development of aqueous transfer hydrogenation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andrew; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ogo, Seiji

    2011-10-28

    This review discusses the development of aqueous phase, homogeneous, transfer hydrogenation catalysis. Transfer hydrogenation catalysts, based on Ru, Ir and Rh, reduce organic substrates in water by assisting the transfer of hydrogen from simple donor species. These catalysts are expected to have significant benefits when compared with organic phase catalysts, including greater activity, greater selectivity and smaller environmental impact. They will therefore be expected to make a significant contribution to homogeneous catalysis and 'green chemistry'. Here, we comprehensively examine these catalysts, paying special attention to structural features.

  2. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  3. Co and Cu modified Ni/Al2 O3 steam reforming catalysts for hydrogen production from model bio-oil%Ni/Al2 O3改性催化剂催化重整生物油模拟物制氢研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢登印; 张素平; 陈志远; 陈振奇; 许庆利

    2015-01-01

    制备了 Ni/Al2 O3、Ni-Cu/Al2 O3、Ni -Co/Al2 O3和 Ni -Co-Cu/Al2 O3催化剂,研究了 Co 和 Cu 对生物油水蒸气催化重整的影响。实验表明,Co 能促进水汽变换(WGS)反应,提高氢气的产率,Cu 能抑制反应中焦炭的形成,提高催化剂的稳定性。对催化剂 Ni-Co-Cu/Al2 O3进行工艺条件考察,当900℃、水油比为6 g/g、质量空速(WHSV)为1 h-1时,碳选择性达到87.5%,氢气产率达到84.2%,潜在氢气产率达到92.4%。%Ni/Al2 O3 cat aly st was selected as the reference catalyst for steam reformi ng of mo del bio-oil to produce hydrog en.Ni-Cu/Al2 O3 , Ni-Co/Al2 O3 and Ni-Co-Cu /Al2 O3 were prepared to investigate the influence of Co and Ni on steam reforming of bio-oil.The results show that Co can enhance the water gas shift (WGS) reaction rate, and Cu can prevent the formation of coke.The reaction conditions for the steam re formi ng of bio-oil with the Ni-Co-Cu/Al2 O3 catalyst were optimized as the follows: te mper ature of900 ℃, wat er-oil ratio (the mass ratio of steam to oil) of 6 g/g and weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 1 h-1 .The carbon selectivity of 87.5%, hydrogen yield of 84.2% and potential hydrogen yield of 92.4% can be obtained at the optimum conditions.

  4. Explaining (Missing) Regulator Paradigm Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigger, Angela; Buch-Hansen, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    of competition regulation is heaving into sight. It sets out to explain this from the vantage point of a critical political economy perspective, which identifies the circumstances under which a crisis can result in a regulatory paradigm shift. Contrasting the current situation with the shift in EC/EU competition...... capitalism; the social power configuration underpinning the neoliberal order remains unaltered; no clear counter-project has surfaced; the European Commission has been (and remains) in a position to oppose radical changes; and finally, there are no signs of a wider paradigm shift in the EU's regulatory...

  5. Activity Enhancement of Vanadium Catalysts with Ultrasonic Preparation Process for the Oxidation of Sulfur Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenxing Chen; Honggui Li; Lingsen Wang

    2003-01-01

    The effect of ultrasonic cavitations on the activity of vanadium catalysts at low temperatures for the oxidation of sulfur dioxide, in which refined carbonized mother liquor had been added, was investigated.Twenty minutes were needed to produce obvious cavitations when the catalyst raw material was treated in the 50 W ultrasonic generator. However, only 10 minutes would be needed in a 150 W ultrasonic generator.The higher the temperature of the wet material, the less time was needed to produce cavitations, and the optimal temperature was 60 ℃. The water content in the wet material mainly affected the quantity of cavitations. Ls-8 catalyst was prepared using ultrasonic. Its activity for conversion of SO2 reached to 52.5% at 410 ℃ and 4.2% at 350 ℃. The differential thermal analyses indicate that both endothermic peaks and exothermic peaks noticeably shifted forward compared with Ls catalyst prepared without ultrasonic, and SEM results show a uniform pore size distribution for Ls-8 catalyst.

  6. Improved anode catalysts for coal gas-fueled phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kackley, N. D.; McCatty, S. A.; Kosek, J. A.

    1990-07-01

    The feasibility of adapting phosphoric acid fuel cells to operate on coal gas fuels containing significant levels of contaminants such as CO, H2S and COS was investigated. The overall goal was the development of low-cost, carbon-supported anode fuel cell catalysts that can efficiently operate with a fossil fuel-derived hydrogen gas feed contaminated with carbon monoxide and other impurities. This development would reduce the cost of gas cleanup necessary in a coal gas-fueled PAFC power plant, thereby reducing the final power cost of the electricity produced. The problem to date was that the contaminant gases typically adsorb on catalytic sites and reduce the activity for hydrogen oxidation. An advanced approach investigated was to modify these alloy catalyst systems to operate efficiently on coal gas containing higher levels of contaminants by increasing the alloy catalyst impurity tolerance and ability to extract energy from the CO present through (1) generation of additional hydrogen by promoting the CO/H2 water shift reaction or (2) direct oxidation of CO to CO2 with the same result. For operation on anode gases containing high levels of CO, a Pt-Ti-Zn and Pt-Ti-Ni anode catalyst showed better performance over a Pt baseline or G87A-17-2 catalyst. The ultimate aim was to allow PAFC-based power plants to operate on coal gas fuels containing increased contaminant concentrations, thereby decreasing the need for and cost of rigorous coal gas cleanup procedures.

  7. Recycling of a spent iron based catalyst for the complete oxidation of toluene: effect of palladium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Chai; Nah, Jae Woon

    2015-01-01

    Complete oxidation of volatile organic compound (toluene) was carried out to assess the property and activity of the palladium-spent iron based catalyst. The properties of the prepared catalysts were characterized by using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and by conducting temperature-programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field emission transmission electron microscopy. The addition of palladium to the spent iron based catalyst pretreated with oxalic acid shifted the conversion curve for the total oxidation of toluene to lower temperature. An increase in the toluene conversion due to palladium was highly related to the easier lattice oxygen mobility of the catalysts. Instrumental analysis suggested the presence of a strong interaction between palladium and iron oxide species. Moreover, in the case of reducing the Pd/Fe catalyst with hydrogen, palladium accelerated the reducing iron oxides, subsequently decreasing the toluene conversion. As a result, the oxidation states of palladium and iron had an important effect on the catalytic activity.

  8. Comparison of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts for glucose-to-fructose isomerization in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Vinit; Pinar, Ana B; Lobo, Raul F; Vlachos, Dionisios G; Sandler, Stanley I

    2013-12-01

    Herein, the first comparison of the mechanisms of glucose-to-fructose isomerization in aqueous media enabled by homogeneous (CrCl3 and AlCl3 ) and heterogeneous catalysts (Sn-beta) by using isotopic-labeling studies is reported. A pronounced kinetic isotope effect (KIE) was observed if the deuterium label was at the C2 position, thus suggesting that a hydrogen shift from the C2 to C1 positions was the rate-limiting step with the three catalysts. (13) C and (1) H NMR spectroscopic investigations confirmed that an intra-hydride-transfer reaction pathway was the predominant reaction channel for all three catalysts in aqueous media. Furthermore, the deuterium atom in the labeled glucose could be mapped onto hydroxymethylfurfural and formic acid through reactions that followed the isomerization step in the presence of Brønsted acids. In all three catalysts, the active site appeared to be a bifunctional Lewis-acidic/Brønsted-basic site, based on a speciation model and first-principles calculations. For the first time, a mechanistic similarities between the homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis of aldose-to-ketose isomerization is established and it is suggested that learning from homogeneous catalysis could assist in the development of improved heterogeneous catalysts.

  9. A study on production of biodiesel using a novel solid oxide catalyst derived from waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Samrat; Ray, Srimanta

    2016-05-01

    The issues of energy security, dwindling supply and inflating price of fossil fuel have shifted the global focus towards fuel of renewable origin. Biodiesel, having renewable origin, has exhibited great potential as substitute for fossil fuels. The most common route of biodiesel production is through transesterification of vegetable oil in presence of homogeneous acid or base or solid oxide catalyst. But, the economics of biodiesel is not competitive with respect to fossil fuel due to high cost of production. The vegetable oil waste is a potential alternative for biodiesel production, particularly when disposal of used vegetable oil has been restricted in several countries. The present study evaluates the efficacy of a low-cost solid oxide catalyst derived from eggshell (a food waste) in transesterification of vegetable oil and simulated waste vegetable oil (SWVO). The impact of thermal treatment of vegetable oil (to simulate frying operation) on transesterification using eggshell-derived solid oxide catalyst (ESSO catalyst) was also evaluated along with the effect of varying reaction parameters. The study reported that around 90 % biodiesel yield was obtained with vegetable oil at methanol/oil molar ratio of 18:1 in 3 h reaction time using 10 % ESSO catalyst. The biodiesel produced with ESSO catalyst from SWVO, thermally treated at 150 °C for 24 h, was found to conform with the biodiesel standard, but the yield was 5 % lower compared to that of the untreated oil. The utilization of waste vegetable oil along with waste eggshell as catalyst is significant for improving the overall economics of the biodiesel in the current market. The utilization of waste for societal benefit with the essence of sustainable development is the novelty of this work.

  10. Nb K- and L3-edges XAFS study on the structure of supported Nb carbide catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikuni, N.; Yanagase, F.; Mitsuhara, K.; Hara, T.; Shimazu, S.

    2016-05-01

    Mesoporous silica SBA-15 supported NbC catalysts were prepared under reduced pressure of CH4-H2 gas in a closed circulating system. Nb K- and L 3-edges XAFS measurements revealed that small NbC cluster formed on SBA-15 support and gradual carburization process by lengthening the carburization temperature-maintaining period. Carburization degree of Nb species was clearly explained by using threshold energy shift of Nb L 3-edge XANES profile.

  11. 半水煤气脱硫技改运行总结%Sum-Up of Operation of Updated Technology for Desulfurization of Semi-Water Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹学斌; 徐勤永

    2013-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the technological renovation of desulfurization of semi-water gas over the years and operation parameters,and an analysis is done of the existing problems.After the renovation the desulfurization efficiency reaches over 99.50%,after desulfurization the H2S mass concentration in the gas is essentially controlled at below 0.010 g/m3,the soda consumption per ton of ammonia decreases from 6.0 kg to about 2.5 kg,and the resistance in the system drops from 6.0 ~ 8.0 kPa to 1.8 ~ 2.1 kPa.%介绍了历年半水煤气脱硫技改的详细过程、运行参数,并对存在的问题进行了分析.改造后,脱硫效率达到99.50%以上,脱硫后气体中H2S质量浓度基本控制在0.010 g/m3以下,吨氨纯碱消耗由6.0 kg降至2.5 kg左右,系统阻力由6.0~8.0 kPa降至1.8~2.1kPa.

  12. New Trends in Gold Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonarda F. Liotta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gold is an element that has fascinated mankind for millennia. The catalytic properties of gold have been a source of debate, due to its complete chemical inertness when in a bulk form, while it can oxidize CO at temperatures as low as ~200 K when in a nanocrystalline state, as discovered by Haruta in the late 1980s [1]. Since then, extensive activity in both applied and fundamental research on gold has been initiated. The importance of the catalysis by gold represents one of the fasted growing fields in science and is proven by the promising applications in several fields, such as green chemistry and environmental catalysis, in the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes, as modifiers of Ni catalysts for methane steam and dry reforming reactions and in biological and electrochemistry applications. The range of reactions catalyzed by gold, as well as the suitability of different supports and the influence of the preparation conditions have been widely explored and optimized in applied research [2]. Gold catalysts appeared to be very different from the other noble metal-based catalysts, due to their marked dependence on the preparation method, which is crucial for the genesis of the catalytic activity. Several methods, including deposition-precipitation, chemical vapor deposition and cation adsorption, have been applied for the preparation of gold catalysts over reducible oxides, like TiO2. Among these methods, deposition-precipitation has been the most frequently employed method for Au loading, and it involves the use of tetrachloroauric (III acid as a precursor. On the other hand, the number of articles dealing with Au-loaded acidic supports is smaller than that on basic supports, possibly because the deposition of [AuCl4]− or [AuOHxCl4−x]− species on acidic supports is difficult, due to their very low point of zero charge. Despite this challenge, several groups have reported the use of acidic zeolites as supports for gold. Zeolites

  13. Off-gas catalyst. Abgaskatalysator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saris, L.; Kloeck, H.

    1987-02-19

    The invention deals with a waste gas catalyst with a thermo-resistant SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing carrier of snarled ceramic fibres which form between themselves the flow paths for the waste gas to be purified and which are coated with platinum, palladium and/or rhodium. The ceramic fibres forming the carrier consist of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and have a diameter of 1 to 10 {mu}m. (orig./RB).

  14. Thermodynamic Properties of Supported Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorte, Raymond J.

    2014-03-26

    The goals of this work were to develop Coulometric Titration as a method for characterizing the thermodynamic redox properties of oxides and to apply this technique to the characterization of ceria- and vanadia-based catalysts. The redox properties of ceria and vanadia are a major part of what makes these materials catalytically active but their properties are also dependent on their structure and the presence of other oxides. Quantifying these properties through the measurement of oxidation energetics was the goal of this work.

  15. VP Anaphors and Object Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsnes, Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the placement of the VP anaphor det ‘it’ as a complement of verbs selecting VP complements in Danish. With verbs that only allow a VP complement, the VP anaphor must be in SpecCP regardless of its information structure properties. If SpecCP is occupied by an operator, the an...... be in situ. The article argues that a shifted pronominal in Danish must be categorially licensed by the verb and extends this analysis to shifting locatives. An Optimality Theory analysis is proposed that accounts for the observed facts......., the anaphor can be in situ, but it cannot shift. With verbs that allow its VP complement to alternate with an NP complement, the VP anaphor can be in SpecCP, shifted or in situ according to the information structural properties of the anaphor. Only if SpecCP is occupied by an operator, must a topical anaphor...

  16. Shift Work: Improving Daytime Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sleeping during the day. Do you have any sleep tips for shift workers? Answers from Timothy Morgenthaler, ... to be awake during the day and to sleep at night. Good daytime sleep is possible, though, ...

  17. Goos-Hänchen shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, A W; Love, J D

    1976-01-01

    An extremely simple derivation of the Goos-Hänchen shift is presented for total internal reflection at a plane interface between two semiinfinite dielectric media, as well as for optical waveguides of plane arid circular cross section. The derivation is based on energy considerations, requires knowledge of Fresnel's equation only, and shows explicitly that the shift is due to the flow of energy across the dielectric boundary.

  18. European workshop on spent catalysts. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    In 1999 and 2002 two well attended workshops on recycling, regeneration, reuse and disposal of spent catalysts took place in Frankfurt. This series has been continued in Berlin. The workshop was organized in collaboration with DGMK, the German Society for Petroleum and Coal Science and Technology. Contributions were in the following areas of catalyst deactivation: recycling of spent catalysts in chemical and petrochemical industry, recycling of precious metal catalysts and heterogenous base metal catalysts, legal aspects of transboundary movements, catalyst regeneration, quality control, slurry catalysts, commercial reactivation of hydrotreating catalysts. (uke)

  19. Catalyst, Volume 9, Number 3, Winter 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention publishes "Catalyst," a newsletter covering current Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence (AODV) prevention issues at institutions of higher education. "Catalyst" discusses emerging issues and highlights innovative efforts on…

  20. Catalyst, Volume 10, Number 1, Spring 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention publishes "Catalyst," a newsletter covering current Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence (AODV) prevention issues at institutions of higher education. "Catalyst" discusses emerging issues and highlights innovative efforts on…

  1. NEW REFORMING CATALYST DEVELOPED BY RIPP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PUZhong-ying

    2003-01-01

    To meet the demands for high-octane gasoline and aromatics,catalytic reforming process has been advancing quickly in China.The reforming catalysts developed by RIPP have been used in more than 80% capacity of domestic CCR and SR units.This paper introduces the properties of PSVI CCR catalyst developed by RIPP in recent years and also the result from commercial units.The PS-VI catalyst has high activity and good selectivity,under the same reaction conditions,the carbon on catalyst was lowered by 26% in mass as compared with that of the reference catalyst.Among the SR reforming catalysts,the new type of PRT series catalysts have excellent performance at low reaction pressure compared with the ref.Cat A.The aromatics and reformate mass yields of PRT catalyst were 2%-3% and 3%,respectively ,higher than those of Cat A,and the run length was 30%-40% longer as well,which exhibits good prospect of application.

  2. Catalyst, Volume 10, Number 2, Fall 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention publishes "Catalyst," a newsletter covering current Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence (AODV) prevention issues at institutions of higher education. "Catalyst" discusses emerging issues and highlights innovative efforts on…

  3. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  4. Magnetically retrievable catalysts for organic synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a catalyst in organic synthesis has become a subject of intense investigation. The recovery of expensive catalysts after catalytic reaction and reusing it without losing its activity is an important feature in the sustainable process de...

  5. Olefin polymerization over supported chromium oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Cr/SiO2 or Phillips-type catalysts are nowadays responsible for a large fraction of all polyethylene (HDPE and LLDPE) worldwide produced. In this review, several key-properties of Cr/SiO2 catalysts will be discussed in relation to their polymerization characteristics. It will be shown how the polyol

  6. Chemical engineering design of CO oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    How a chemical reaction engineer would approach the challenge of designing a CO oxidation catalyst for pulsed CO2 lasers is described. CO oxidation catalysts have a long history of application, of course, so it is instructive to first consider the special requirements of the laser application and then to compare them to the characteristics of existing processes which utilize CO oxidation catalysts. All CO2 laser applications require a CO oxidation catalyst with the following characteristics: (1) active at stoichiometric ratios of O2 and CO, (2) no inhibition by CO2 or other components of the laser environment, (3) releases no particulates during vibration or thermal cycling, and (4) long lifetime with a stable activity. In all applications, low consumption of power is desirable, a characteristic especially critical in aerospace applications and, thus, catalyst activity at low temperatures is highly desirable. High power lasers with high pulse repetition rates inherently require circulation of the gas mixture and this forced circulation is available for moving gas past the catalyst. Low repetition rate lasers, however, do not inherently require gas circulation, so a catalyst that did not require such circulation would be favorable from the standpoint of minimum power consumption. Lasers designed for atmospheric penetration of their infrared radiation utilize CO2 formed from rare isotopes of oxygen and this application has the additional constraint that normal abundance oxygen isotopes in the catalyst must not exchange with rare isotopes in the gas mixture.

  7. Immobilized Ruthenium Catalyst for Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Min YU; Jin Hua FEI; Yi Ping ZHANG; Xiao Ming ZHENG

    2006-01-01

    Three kinds of cross linked polystyrene resin (PS) supported ruthenium complexes were developed as catalysts for the synthesis of formic acid from carbon dioxide hydrogenation. Many factors, such as the functionalized supports, solvents and ligands, could influence their activities and reuse performances greatly. These immobilized catalysts also offer the industrial advantages such as easy separation.

  8. Magnetically retrievable catalysts for organic synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a catalyst in organic synthesis has become a subject of intense investigation. The recovery of expensive catalysts after catalytic reaction and reusing it without losing its activity is an important feature in the sustainable process de...

  9. Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2008-08-05

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  10. New catalysts for clean environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maijanen, A.; Hase, A. [eds.] [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    VTT launched a Research Programme on Chemical Reaction Mechanisms (CREAM) in 1993. The three-year programme (1993-1995) has focused on reaction mechanisms relevant to process industries and aimed at developing novel catalysts and biocatalysts for forest, food, and specialty chemicals industries as well as for energy production. The preliminary results of this programme have already been presented in the first symposium organized in Espoo in September 1994. To conclude the programme the second symposium is organized in Otaniemi, Espoo on January 29 - 30, 1996. Papers by 19 speakers and 17 poster presentations of the 1996 Symposium are included in this book. The Symposium consists of four sessions: Biotechnology for Natural Fibers Processing, New Biocatalysts, Catalysts for Clean Energy, and New Opportunities for Chemical Industry. The CREAM programme has tried to foresee solutions for the problems challenged by the public concern on environmental aspects, especially dealing with industrial processes and novel use of raw materials and energy. The programme has followed the basic routes that can lead to natural and simple solutions to develop processes in the fields of forest, food fine chemicals, and energy industry. This symposium presents the results of the programme to learn and further discuss together with the international experts that have been invited as keynote speakers. (author)

  11. Nanostructured Basic Catalysts: Opportunities for Renewable Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, William C; Huber, George; Auerbach, Scott

    2009-06-30

    This research studied and developed novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We focused on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts zeolites. These catalysts were compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, that were being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and would be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we had studied the aldolpyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

  12. Sulphur condensation influence in Claus catalyst performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, R L

    2000-12-01

    The Claus process is an efficient way of removing H(2)S from acid gas streams and this is widely practised in industries such as natural gas processing, oil refining and metal smelting. Increasingly strict pollution control regulations require maximum sulphur recovery from the Claus unit in order to minimise sulphur-containing effluent. The most widely used Claus catalyst in sulphur recovery units is non-promoted spherical activated alumina. Properties associated with optimum non-promoted Claus catalyst performance include high surface area, appropriate pore size distribution and enhanced physical properties. The objective of this paper is to outline a procedure in order to estimate Claus catalyst effectiveness after pore plugging due to sulphur condensation. Catalyst deactivation due to pore plugging by sulphur is modelled employing a Bethe lattice and its corresponding performance is described by means of a modified effectiveness factor. Model results show an improvement in the modified effectiveness factor due to modifications in catalyst porous structure.

  13. Theoretical investigations of olefin metathesis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cundari, T.R.; Gordon, M.S. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)

    1992-01-01

    An ab initio analysis of the electronic structure of high-valent, transition-metal alkylidenes as models for olefin metathesis catalysts is presented. The catalyst models studied fall into three categories: {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} metathesis catalyst models-tetrahedral M(OH){sup 2}(XH)(CH{sub 2}) complexes; {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} metathesis catalyst models-tetrahedral MCl{sub 2}(Y)(CH{sub 2}) complexes and alkylidene-substituted Mo metathesis catalysts, Mo(OH){sub 2}(NH)(=C(H)Z). The effect on the bonding caused by modification of either the metal, ligands, or alkylidene substitutents is considered. 21 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. MMC-High Propylene Selectivity DCC Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zheng; Xie Chaogang; Luo Yibin; Zhao Liuzhou; Shu Xingtian

    2007-01-01

    RIPP has developed the third generation novel DCC catalysts aimed at increasing the propylene yield, named as the MMC series catalysts. This catalyst is of the MFI structure composed of the ZSP zeolite as the main active component, which has higher capability for producing low-carbon olefins, in particular the propylene. The commercial application of this catalyst at SINOPEC Anqing Petrochemical Company has revealed that the adoption of the MMC-2 catalyst has resulted in a 1.6-4.0 percentages increase in propylene yield under basically similar conditions in terms of the feedstock property and process operating regime coupled with reduction in gasoline olefin content and increase in aromatic content to improve the gasoline quality.

  15. Testing commercial catalysts in recycle reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berty, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Recycle reactors for quality control of catalyst production and for testing new catalysts for known or new processes have the following advantages over tubular reactors: they can reproduce the physical and chemical regime which surrounds the catalyst in a commercial reactor; they can achieve high mass and heat transfer; they exhibit uniform coke deposit; and they provide independence of mass velocity and space velocity. Their disadvantage is the unconventional specification of experiments in terms of discharge concentration which derives from the implicit nature of the basic mathematical relationships. Recycle reactor test methods are outlined for quality control and for testing catalysts, e.g., supported nickel from different manufacturers, for processes whose chemistry is well known. Approaches for testing catalysts for new processes are discussed. The standard recycle reactor developed at Union Carbide Corp. and manufactured by Autoclave Engineers, and several of its modifications are described.

  16. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    New Pei Yee

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional mathematical model was developed to simulate the performance of catalytic fixed bedreactor for carbon dioxide reforming of methane over Rh/Al2O3 catalyst at atmospheric pressure. The reactionsinvolved in the system are carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CORM and reverse water gas shiftreaction (RWGS. The profiles of CH4 and CO2 conversions, CO and H2 yields, molar flow rate and molefraction of all species as well as reactor temperature along the axial bed of catalyst were simulated. In addition,the effects of different reactor temperature on the reactor performance were also studied. The modelscan also be applied to analyze the performances of lab-scale micro reactor as well as pilot-plant scale reactorwith certain modifications and model verification with experimental data. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 20 August 2008; Accepted: 25 September 2008][How to Cite: N.A.S. Amin, I. Istadi, N.P. Yee. (2008. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3 (1-3: 21-29. doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.19.21-29

  17. Catalysts for complete oxidation of gaseous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyestanaki, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    This thesis presents a study on the complete oxidation of propane, natural gas and the conversion of car exhaust gases over two types of catalysts: (a) knitted silica-fibre supported catalysts and (b) metal-modified ZSM zeolite catalysts. A hybrid textile made up of an organic-inorganic hybrid fibre containing 70 % cellulose and 30 % silicic acid was used as the raw material for preparation of the fibre support for combustion catalysts. The hybrid textile was burnt to obtain a knitted silica-fibre. The changes in the surface area, pore volume and the crystallinity of the obtained support were studied as a function of burning temperature. The stability of the support in steam-rich atmospheres was tested. The knitted silica-fibre obtained by burning the hybrid textile at 1223 K was found to have sufficient strength and high BET specific surface area (140 m{sub 2}/g) to be used as a catalyst support. A series of knitted silica-fibre supported metal oxides (oxides of Co, Ni, Mn, Cr and Cu) and combinations of them, platinum-activated metal oxides (Pt-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Pt-NiO, Pt-MnO{sub 2} and Pt-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) as well as noble metal (Pt, Pd) catalysts were prepared. The location of the metal oxides on the catalyst was studied by SEM equipped with EDXA. The metal oxide was found to be located mostly inside the pores rather than on the exterior surface of the silica-fibre. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, N{sub 2}-physisorption, O{sub 2}-TPD and the chemisorption of propane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The activity of the catalysts was tested in the combustion of propane, natural gas and in the conversion of automobile exhaust gases. The effect of residence time and stoichiometry on the conversion behaviour of the catalysts was studied

  18. Studies on the Hydrogenation of Acetonitrile over Fresh Mo2C/γ-Al2O3 Catalyst by In-situ IR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jing; Wu Weicheng; Liu Chuang; Ding Xiaoguang; Chu Gang; Zhang Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of acetonitrile, the co-adsorption of acetonitrile with CO, and hydrogenation of acetonitrile on fresh Mo2C/γ-Al2O3 catalyst were studied by in situ IR spectroscopy. It was found out that CH3CN exhibited strong interac-tion with the fresh Mo2C/γ-Al2O3 catalyst and was adsorbed mainly on Moδ+sites of fresh Mo2C/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. Moreover, CH3CN could affect the shifting of IR spectra for CO adsorption towards a lower wave number. The IR spectroscopic study on acetonitrile hydrogenation showed that CH3CN could be easily hydrogenated in the presence of H2 on the Mo2C/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. Furthermore, it was observed that CH3CN could be selectively hydrogenated to imines on fresh Mo2C/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. Additionally, the active sites of fresh Mo2C/γ-Al2O3 catalyst might be covered with coke during the hydrogenation reaction of acetonitrile. The treatment of catalyst with hydrogen at 673 K could not completely remove coke deposits on the surface of the Mo2C/γ-Al2O3 catalyst.

  19. A Theoretical Study of the Hydration of Methane, from the Aqueous Solution to the sI Hydrate-Liquid Water-Gas Coexistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Porfirio Luis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations were done with three recent water models TIP4P/2005 (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/2005, TIP4P/Ice (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/ Ice and TIP4Q (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 charges combined with two models for methane: an all-atom one OPLS-AA (Optimal Parametrization for the Liquid State and a united-atom one (UA; a correction for the C–O interaction was applied to the latter and used in a third set of simulations. The models were validated by comparison to experimental values of the free energy of hydration at 280, 300, 330 and 370 K, all under a pressure of 1 bar, and to the experimental radial distribution functions at 277, 283 and 291 K, under a pressure of 145 bar. Regardless of the combination rules used for σC,O, good agreement was found, except when the correction to the UA model was applied. Thus, further simulations of the sI hydrate were performed with the united-atom model to compare the thermal expansivity to the experiment. A final set of simulations was done with the UA methane model and the three water models, to study the sI hydrate-liquid water-gas coexistence at 80, 230 and 400 bar. The melting temperatures were compared to the experimental values. The results show the need to perform simulations with various different models to attain a reliable and robust molecular image of the systems of interest.

  20. A Theoretical Study of the Hydration of Methane, from the Aqueous Solution to the sI Hydrate-Liquid Water-Gas Coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Daniel Porfirio; García-González, Alcione; Saint-Martin, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations were done with three recent water models TIP4P/2005 (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/2005), TIP4P/Ice (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/ Ice) and TIP4Q (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 charges) combined with two models for methane: an all-atom one OPLS-AA (Optimal Parametrization for the Liquid State) and a united-atom one (UA); a correction for the C–O interaction was applied to the latter and used in a third set of simulations. The models were validated by comparison to experimental values of the free energy of hydration at 280, 300, 330 and 370 K, all under a pressure of 1 bar, and to the experimental radial distribution functions at 277, 283 and 291 K, under a pressure of 145 bar. Regardless of the combination rules used for σC,O, good agreement was found, except when the correction to the UA model was applied. Thus, further simulations of the sI hydrate were performed with the united-atom model to compare the thermal expansivity to the experiment. A final set of simulations was done with the UA methane model and the three water models, to study the sI hydrate-liquid water-gas coexistence at 80, 230 and 400 bar. The melting temperatures were compared to the experimental values. The results show the need to perform simulations with various different models to attain a reliable and robust molecular image of the systems of interest. PMID:27240339

  1. Silver-Copper Nanoalloy Catalyst Layer for Bifunctional Air Electrodes in Alkaline Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Fuyi; Jin, Yachao; Zhang, Nan; Johnston, Roy L

    2015-08-19

    A carbon-free and binder-free catalyst layer composed of a Ag-Cu nanoalloy on Ni foam was used as the air cathode in a zinc-air battery for the first time. The Ag-Cu catalyst was prepared using pulsed laser deposition. The structures of the catalysts were found to consist of crystalline Ag-Cu nanoalloy particles with an average size of 2.58 nm embedded in amorphous Cu films. As observed in the X-ray photoelectron spectra, the Ag 3d core levels shifted to higher binding energies, whereas the Cu 2p core levels shifted to lower binding energies, indicating alloying of the silver and copper. Rotating disk electrode measurements indicated that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeded through a four-electron pathway on the Ag50Cu50 and Ag90Cu10 nanoalloy catalysts in alkaline solution. Moreover, the catalytic activity of Ag50Cu50 in the ORR is more efficient than that of Ag90Cu10. By performing charge and discharge cycling measurements, the Ag50Cu50 catalyst layer was confirmed to have a maximum power density of approximately 86.3 mW cm(-2) and an acceptable cell voltage at 0.863 V for current densities up to 100 mA cm(-2) in primary zinc-air batteries. In addition, a round-trip efficiency of approximately 50% at a current density of 20 mA cm(-2) was also obtained in the test.

  2. Does the ARFIMA really shift?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monache, Davide Delle; Grassi, Stefano; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    Short memory models contaminated by level shifts have long-memory features similar to those associated to processes generated under fractional integration. In this paper, we propose a robust testing procedure, based on an encompassing parametric specification, that allows to disentangle the level...... the highest power compared to other existing tests for spurious long-memory. Finally, we illustrate the usefulness of the proposed approach on the daily series of bipower variation and share turnover and on the monthly inflation series of G7 countries....... shift term from the ARFIMA component. The estimation is carried out via a state-space methodology and it leads to a robust estimate of the fractional integration parameter also in presence of level shifts.The Monte Carlo simulations show that this approach produces unbiased estimates of the fractional...

  3. Impact of Soot on NOx Adsorption over Cu-Modified Hydrotalcite-Derived Lean NOx Trap Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Song, Chonglin; Lv, Gang; Chen, Ke; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-28

    The impact of soot on NOx adsorption was studied over a Cu-modified hydrotalcite-derived lean NOx trap catalyst in a NO + O2 atmosphere. Powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface properties of the pure catalyst and the soot/catalyst mixture. The adsorbed NOx species on the samples were evaluated by in situ diffuse reflectance Fourier transform spectroscopy. The soot coverage decreases the available adsorption sites on the surface of the catalyst, and a portion of active oxygen species are consumed by the soot oxidation during He pretreatment process. The NOx adsorption on two catalyst samples simultaneously undergoes two routes: the "nitrite route" and the "nitrate route". The "nitrite route" is more dominant than the "nitrate route". During NOx adsorption, the soot oxidation weakens the NO oxidation to NO2, and the released CO2 competes with NOx on the adsorption sites. Moreover, the temperature-programmed desorption tests indicate that the presence of soot reduces the NOx storage capacity of the catalyst and shifts the NO desorption peak to the lower temperature range by 50 °C.

  4. Catalysts, Protection Layers, and Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chorkendorff, Ib

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest solar fuel to produce and in this presentation we shall give a short overview of the pros and cons of various tandem devices [1]. The large band gap semiconductor needs to be in front, but apart from that we can chose to have either the anode in front or back using either...... acid or alkaline conditions. Since most relevant semiconductors are very prone to corrosion the advantage of using buried junctions and using protection layers offering shall be discussed [2-4]. Next we shall discuss the availability of various catalysts for being coupled to these protections layers...... and how their stability may be evaluated [5, 6]. Examples of half-cell reaction using protection layers for both cathode and anode will be discussed though some of recent examples under both alkaline and acidic conditions. Si is a very good low band gap semiconductor and by using TiO2 as a protection...

  5. Fundamental investigations of catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Christian Fink

    fundamental understanding of catalytic processes and our ability to make use of that understanding. This thesis presents fundamental studies of catalyst nanoparticles with particular focus on dynamic processes. Such studies often require atomic-scale characterization, because the catalytic conversion takes...... place on the molecular and atomic level. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has the ability to image nanostructures with atomic resolution and reveal the atomic configuration of the important nanoparticle surfaces. In the present work, TEM has been used to study nanoparticles in situ at elevated...... different topics, each related to different aspects of nanoparticle dynamics and catalysis. The first topic is the reduction of a homogeneous solid state precursor to form the catalytically active phase which is metal nanoparticles on an inert support. Here, we have reduced Cu phyllosilicate to Cu on silica...

  6. The AirWaterGas Teacher Professional Development Program: Lessons Learned by Pairing Scientists and Teachers to Develop Curriculum on Global Climate Change and Regional Unconventional Oil and Gas Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, L. S.; Hatheway, B.; Rogers, J. D.; Casey, J. G.; Lackey, G.; Birdsell, D.; Brown, K.; Polmear, M.; Capps, S.; Rosenblum, J.; Sitterley, K.; Hafich, K. A.; Hannigan, M.; Knight, D.

    2015-12-01

    The AirWaterGas Teacher Professional Development Program, run by the UCAR Center for Science Education, brought together scientists and secondary science teachers in a yearlong program culminating in the development of curriculum related to the impacts of unconventional oil and gas development. Graduate students and research scientists taught about their research area and its relationship to oil and gas throughout three online courses during the 2015-16 school year, during which teachers and scientists engaged in active online discussions. Topics covered included climate change, oil and gas infrastructure, air quality, water quality, public health, and practices and policies relating to oil and gas development. Building upon their initial online interactions and a face-to-face meeting in March, teachers were paired with appropriate AirWaterGas team members as science advisors during a month-long residency in Boulder, Colorado. During the residency, graduate student scientists provided resources and feedback as teachers developed curriculum projects in collaboration with each other and UCAR science educators. Additionally, teachers and AirWaterGas researchers shared experiences on an oil and gas well site tour, and a short course on drilling methods with a drilling rig simulator. Here, we share lessons learned from both sides of the aisle, including initial results from program assessment conducted with the participating teachers.

  7. Metallic oxides supported in CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}-La{sub 2} O{sub 3} for low temperature shift reaction; Oxidos metalicos suportados em CeO{sub 2} e CeO{sub 2}-La{sub 2} O{sub 3} para reacao shift a baixa temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maluf, Silvia Salua; Assaf, Elisabete Moreira [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: sil_maluf@iqsc.usp.br

    2008-07-01

    This work studied copper and zinc oxides supported in CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalytic tests for low temperature shift reaction, carried out for samples, showed the Cu-Ce catalyst presents the highest value of CO conversion (50%) and after the Cu-Ce-La catalysts (30%). The other catalysts showed CO conversion in range of 15%. This behavior is related with surface area, and also with the amount of Cu in the surface of samples (author)

  8. Effects of potassium on Ni-K/Al2O3 catalysts in the synthesis of carbon nanofibers by catalytic hydrogenation of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching S; Lin, Jarrn H; You, Jiann H; Yang, Kuo H

    2010-03-25

    Commercially available Ni/Al(2)O(3) samples containing various concentrations of potassium were used to achieve carbon deposition from CO(2) via catalytic hydrogenation. Experimental results show that K additives can induce the formation of carbon nanofibers or carbon deposition on Ni/Al(2)O(3) during the reverse water-gas shift reaction. This work proposes that the formation rate of carbon deposition depends closely on ensemble control, suggesting that the ensemble size necessary to form carbon may be approximately 0.5 potassium atoms. The results of CO(2) temperature-programmed desorption provide strong evidence that the new adsorption sites for CO(2) created on Ni-K/Al(2)O(3) closely depend upon the synthesis of carbon nanofibers. It is found that some potassium-related active phases obtained by calcination and reduction pretreatments can participate in the carbon deposition reaction. The formation pathway for carbon deposition suggests that the main source of carbon deposition is CO(2) and that the pathway is independent of the reaction products CO and CH(4) in the reverse water-gas shift reaction.

  9. Catalysts derived from waste slag for transesterification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowei Zhang; Wei Huang

    2011-01-01

    MgO-CaO/SiO2 solid catalysts derived from waste slag (WS) of metal magnesium plant were prepared.The catalytic performances were evaluated in the transesterification of rapeseed oil with methanol to biodiesel in a 500 mL three-necked reactor under atmospheric pressure.The basic strengh of the catalyst reached 22.0 measured by indicators accroding to Hammett scale.The results show that the MgO-CaO/SiO2 is an excellent catalyst for transesterification, and the conversion of rapeseed oil reach 98% under the optimum condition.

  10. Characterization of three-way automotive catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); LaBarge, W. [General Motors-AC Delco Systems, Flint, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    This has been the second year of a CRADA between General Motors - AC Delco Systems (GM-ACDS) and Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES) aimed at improved performance/lifetime of platinum-rhodium based three-way-catalysts (TWC) for automotive emission control systems. While current formulations meet existing emission standards, higher than optimum Pt-Rh loadings are often required. In additionk, more stringent emission standards have been imposed for the near future, demanding improved performance and service life from these catalysts. Understanding the changes of TWC conversion efficiency with ageing is a critical need in improving these catalysts.

  11. Oxide catalysts for oxidation of xylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusman Dossumov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Polioxide granulated catalysts based on transition and rare earth metals for oxidative conversion of xylene by oxygen have been investigated. It was defined the effect of the composition and concentration of the active phase of oxide catalysts: Cu-Mn-Ln; Cu-Mn-Ce and Cu-Mn-Nd on the o-xylene oxidation. It was found that the Cu-Mn-Ce catalyst has the highest activity at the concentrations of metals: copper – 3.0%; manganese – 3.0%; cerium – 1.0%.

  12. LC-finer catalyst testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, D.; Bronfenbrenner, J.C.

    1983-09-01

    The activity and aging rate of modified Shell 324 Ni-Mo-Al catalyst were studied in ICRC's process development unit (PDU) under SRC-I Demonstration Plant hydroprocessing conditions. The studies determined variations in SRC conversion, hydrocarbon gas production, hydrogen consumption, and heteroatom removal at both constant and increasing reaction temperatures. Samples of spent catalyst were analyzed to ascertain the reasons for catalyst deactivation. Finally, the PDU hydroprocessing results were compared with those generated at Lummus and Wilsonville pilot plants. 14 references, 25 figures, 16 tables.

  13. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  14. High pressure CO hydrogenation over bimetallic Pt-Co catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Medford, Andrew James; Studt, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The potential of bimetallic Pt-Co catalysts for production of higher alcohols in high pressure CO hydrogenation has been assessed. Two catalysts (Pt3Co/SiO2 and PtCo/SiO2) were tested, and the existing literature on CO hydrogenation over Pt-Co catalysts was reviewed. It is found that the catalyst...

  15. Efficient Nd Promoted Rh Catalysts for Vapor Phase Methanol Carbonylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Feng ZHANG; Qing Li QIAN; Ping Lai PAN; Yi CHEN; Guo Qing YUAN

    2005-01-01

    A Nd promoted-Rh catalysts supported on polymer-derived carbon beads for vapor-phase methanol carbonylation was developed. Rh-Nd bimetallic catalysts obviously have higher activity than that of supported Rh catalyst under similar reaction condition. The difference between the activity of above two catalyst systems is clearly caused by the intrinsic properties generated by the introduction of Nd.

  16. Supported catalyst systems and method of making biodiesel products using such catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Manhoe; Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2015-10-20

    A heterogeneous catalyst system, a method of preparing the catalyst system and a method of forming a biodiesel product via transesterification reactions using the catalyst system is disclosed. The catalyst system according to one aspect of the present disclosure represents a class of supported mixed metal oxides that include at least calcium oxide and another metal oxide deposited on a lanthanum oxide or cerium oxide support. Preferably, the catalysts include CaO--CeO.sub.2ZLa.sub.2O.sub.3 or CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3/CeO.sub.2. Optionally, the catalyst may further include additional metal oxides, such as CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3--GdOxZLa.sub.2O.sub.3.

  17. Anthropometric changes and fluid shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Rummel, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Several observations of body size, shape, posture, and configuration were made to document changes resulting from direct effects of weightlessness during the Skylab 4 mission. After the crewmen were placed in orbit, a number of anatomical and anthropometric changes occurred including a straightening of the thoracolumbar spine, a general decrease in truncal girth, and an increase in height. By the time of the earliest in-flight measurement on mission day 3, all crewmen had lost more than two liters of extravascular fluid from the calf and thigh. The puffy facies, the bird legs effect, the engorgement of upper body veins, and the reduced volume of lower body veins were all documented with photographs. Center-of-mass measurements confirmed a fluid shift cephalad. This shift remained throughout the mission until recovery, when a sharp reversal occurred; a major portion of the reversal was completed in a few hours. The anatomical changes are of considerable scientific interest and of import to the human factors design engineer, but the shifts of blood and extravascular fluid are of more consequence. It is hypothesized that the driving force for the fluid shift is the intrinsic and unopposed lower limb elasticity that forces venous blood and then other fluid cephalad.

  18. Environmental Protection: a shifting focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. ir. Jan Venselaar

    2004-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a fundamental change in the way chemistry handles environmental issues. A shift in focus has occurred from 'end-of-pipe' to prevention and process integration. Presently an even more fundamental change is brought about by the need for sustainable development. It is

  19. Wavelength-shifted Cherenkov radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krider, E. P.; Jacobson, V. L.; Pifer, A. E.; Polakos, P. A.; Kurz, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scintillation and Cherenkov responses of plastic Cherenkov radiators containing different wavelength-shifting fluors in varying concentrations have been studied in beams of low energy protons and pions. For cosmic ray applications, where large Cherenkov to scintillation ratios are desired, the optimum fluor concentrations are 0.000025 by weight or less.

  20. The Shift Needed for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter A. C.; Sharicz, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this action research is to begin to assess to what extent organizations have in practice begun to make the shift towards triple bottom line (TBL) sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: A definition of TBL sustainability is provided, and key elements of TBL sustainability considered necessary to success are identified…

  1. Crichton's phase-shift ambiguity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, D.; Johnson, P.W.; Mehta, N.; Roo, M. de

    1973-01-01

    A re-examination of the SPD phase-shift ambiguity is made with a view to understanding certain singular features of the elastic unitarity constraint. An explicit solution of Crichton's equations is presented, and certain features of this solution are displayed graphically. In particular, it is shown

  2. Synthesis of Organic Compounds over Selected Types of Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mohamed Saad Ismail

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study provides an overview for the utilization of different catalytic material in the synthesis of organic compounds for important reactions such as heck reaction, aldol reaction, Diels- Alder and other reactions. Comparisons between multiple catalysts for the same reaction and justifications for developing new catalyzed materials are discussed. The following topics are introduced in this work; (1 solid base catalysts, (2 clay catalysts, (3 palladium catalysts, and (4 catalysts to produce organic compound from CO2. The features of these catalysts a long with the conjugated reactions and their selectivity are explained in details, also, some alternatives for toxic or polluting catalysts used in industry are suggested.

  3. Development and Commercial Application of Third Generation Resid Hydrotreating Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Dawei; Yang Qinghe; Dai Lishun; Zhao Xinqiang

    2013-01-01

    Based on the mechanism of resid hydrotreating reaction by coordinating the catalyst activity and stability, the diffusion mechanism and catalyst reactivity, the cost and catalyst performance, and the production and application re-quirements, the third-generation series catalysts for residue hydrotreating have been developed by Research Institute of Petroleum Processing, SINOPEC. The new series RHT catalysts possess higher activity for HDS, HDM and HDCCR per-formance as well as longer run length. The commercial results for application of these catalysts have demonstrated that the new catalyst system performs better than the reference ones.

  4. Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Final report, September 1, 1990--January 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

    1994-05-06

    Previous work on isosynthesis (conversion of synthesis gas to isobutane and isobutylene) was performed at very low conversions or extreme process conditions. The objectives of this research were (1) determine the optimum process conditions for isosynthesis; (2) determine the optimum catalyst preparation method and catalyst composition/properties for isosynthesis; (3) determine the kinetics for the best catalyst; (4) develop reactor models for trickle bed, slurry, and fixed bed reactors; and (5) simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for isosynthesis. More improvement in catalyst activity and selectivity is needed before isosynthesis can become a commercially feasible (stand-alone) process. Catalysts prepared by the precipitation method show the most promise for future development as compared with those prepared hydrothermally, by calcining zirconyl nitrate, or by a modified sol-gel method. For current catalysts the high temperatures (>673 K) required for activity also cause the production of methane (because of thermodynamics). A catalyst with higher activity at lower temperatures would magnify the unique selectivity of zirconia for isobutylene. Perhaps with a more active catalyst and acidification, oxygenate production could be limited at lower temperatures. Pressures above 50 atm cause an undesirable shift in product distribution toward heavier hydrocarbons. A model was developed that can predict carbon monoxide conversion an product distribution. The rate equation for carbon monoxide conversion contains only a rate constant and an adsorption equilibrium constant. The product distribution was predicted using a simple ratio of the rate of CO conversion. This report is divided into Introduction, Experimental, and Results and Discussion sections.

  5. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-04-22

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size.

  6. Propene metathesis over silica-supported tungsten oxide catalyst-catalyst induction mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basrur, A.G.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vyas, S.N. (Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay (India))

    1991-01-01

    The propene metathesis reaction was studied from the point of view of elucidating the mechanism of catalyst induction and establishing conditions for maximum activity. Instrumental techniques such as ESR, IR, and TPD were used to study the various aspects. During catalyst induction, trace quantities of acetone and acetaldehyde were detected in the product stream, indicating that lattice oxygen from tungsten oxide might be responsible for these products. Induction appeared to proceed via two steps since pretreatment of the catalyst with nitrogen and hydrogen yielded a decreased amount of acetone in the latter case whereas acetaldehyde remained unaffected. ESR studies indicated some interaction between tungsten oxide and silica at the catalyst preparatory stage as well as stabilization of reduced tungsten species on the catalyst after its use and regeneration. Catalyst activity appeared to depend on conditions of pretreatment. Change in nitrogen pretreatment temperature from 500 to 600{sup o}C resulted in transition from strong to negligible external mass transfer behavior of the catalyst. TPD studies in this context showed possible loss of lattice oxygen from tungsten oxide under the above-mentioned conditions of catalyst pretreatment. ESR studies indicated the reduction of WO{sub 3} to a nonstoichiometric oxidation state. Hence catalytic activity appears to be related to the nonstoichiometric state of tungsten oxide, which may be WO{sub 2.9} (as deduced from the blue-violet color of the used catalyst).

  7. FCC Catalysts to Meet Demand of New Era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Daping

    2008-01-01

    The CGP series FCC catalysts for manufacture of clean gasoline and propylene and the catalyst RSC-2006 for processing inferior residuum with high yield of light distillates are novel catalysts jointly developed by Qilu Catalyst Branch Company of SINOPEC Corp. and the Research Institute of Petroleum Processing (RIPP). The results of commercial application of these catalysts have revealed that they can satisfactorily meet the requirements for environmental protection, good economic benefits and capability for processing inferior FCC feed under new circumstances.

  8. Assessment on Commercial Application of Novel S-RHT Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bian Fengming; Wen Huixin

    2004-01-01

    This article refers to the commercial application assessment of the novel S-RHT catalysts.The application outcome has shown that the catalysts loading was reduced with its performance kept at the original level at the initial and middle stages of operation. The performance of catalysts at the end of operation was analyzed, and factors affecting the performance of the novel catalysts at the end of run were identified to facilitate further improvement of the said catalysts.

  9. Preparative characteristics of hydrophobic polymer catalyst for the tritium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hee Suk; Choi, H. J.; Lee, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Paek, S. W.; Kim, J. G.; Chung, H. S

    2001-05-01

    The optimum method for the fabrication of hydrophobic catalyst was selected and the apparatuses for the preparation of catalyst support with high yield was developed for the large scale production. Also, we summarized the method of improving the physical property of the catalyst support, the loading characteristics of Pt metal as a catalyst, and the characteristics of the apparatus for the fabrication of the catalysts on a large scale.

  10. Mordenite - Type Zeolite SCR Catalysts with Iron or Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Cu/mordenite catalysts were found to be highly active for the SCR of NO with NH3 and exhibited high resistance to alkali poisoning. Redox and acidic properties of Cu/mordenite were well preserved after poisoning with potassium unlike that of vanadium catalysts. Fe-mordenite catalysts also reveale...... to be essential requirements for the high alkali resistance. Mordenite-type zeolite based catalysts could therefore be attractive alternatives to conventional SCR catalysts for biomass fired power plant flue gas treatment....

  11. Highly sensitive silicon microreactor for catalyst testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Toke Riishøj; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard;

    2009-01-01

    by directing the entire gas flow through the catalyst bed to a mass spectrometer, thus ensuring that nearly all reaction products are present in the analyzed gas flow. Although the device can be employed for testing a wide range of catalysts, the primary aim of the design is to allow characterization of model...... catalysts which can only be obtained in small quantities. Such measurements are of significant fundamental interest but are challenging because of the low surface areas involved. The relationship between the reaction zone gas flow and the pressure in the reaction zone is investigated experimentally......, it is found that platinum catalysts with areas as small as 15 mu m(2) are conveniently characterized with the device. (C) 2009 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3270191]...

  12. Synthesis and Understanding of Novel Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stair, Peter C. [Northwestern University

    2013-07-09

    The research took advantage of our capabilities to perform in-situ and operando Raman spectroscopy on complex systems along with our developing expertise in the synthesis of uniform, supported metal oxide materials to investigate relationships between the catalytically active oxide composition, atomic structure, and support and the corresponding chemical and catalytic properties. The project was organized into two efforts: 1) Synthesis of novel catalyst materials by atomic layer deposition (ALD). 2) Spectroscopic and chemical investigations of coke formation and catalyst deactivation. ALD synthesis was combined with conventional physical characterization, Raman spectroscopy, and probe molecule chemisorption to study the effect of supported metal oxide composition and atomic structure on acid-base and catalytic properties. Operando Raman spectroscopy studies of olefin polymerization leading to coke formation and catalyst deactivation clarified the mechanism of coke formation by acid catalysts.

  13. Nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Stern, Lucas-Alexandre; Hu, Xile

    2014-09-21

    Progress in catalysis is driven by society's needs. The development of new electrocatalysts to make renewable and clean fuels from abundant and easily accessible resources is among the most challenging and demanding tasks for today's scientists and engineers. The electrochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen has been known for over 200 years, but in the last decade and motivated by the perspective of solar hydrogen production, new catalysts made of earth-abundant materials have emerged. Here we present an overview of recent developments in the non-noble metal catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Emphasis is given to the nanostructuring of industrially relevant hydrotreating catalysts as potential HER electrocatalysts. The new syntheses and nanostructuring approaches might pave the way for future development of highly efficient catalysts for energy conversion.

  14. Heterogeneous Metal Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Eaqub Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation reactions may be considered as the heart of chemical synthesis. However, the indiscriminate uses of harsh and corrosive chemicals in this endeavor are threating to the ecosystems, public health, and terrestrial, aquatic, and aerial flora and fauna. Heterogeneous catalysts with various supports are brought to the spotlight because of their excellent capabilities to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions with low cost. They also minimize the use of chemicals in industries and thus are friendly and green to the environment. However, heterogeneous oxidation catalysis are not comprehensively presented in literature. In this short review, we clearly depicted the current state of catalytic oxidation reactions in chemical industries with specific emphasis on heterogeneous catalysts. We outlined here both the synthesis and applications of important oxidation catalysts. We believe it would serve as a reference guide for the selection of oxidation catalysts for both industries and academics.

  15. Environmentally benign catalysts for clean organic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Anjali

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis attracts researchers and industry because it satisfies most of green chemistry's requirements. Emphasizing the development of third generation catalysts, this book surveys trends and opportunities in academic and industrial research.

  16. Steam effects over Pd/Ce0.67Zr0.33O2-Al2O3 three-way catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jianqiang; SHEN Meiqing; WANG Jun; GAO Jidong; MA Jie; LIU Shuangxi

    2012-01-01

    Ceria-zirconia-alumina (CZA) solid solution was prepared by sol-gel method in the presem study.0.5 wt.% Pd supported on CZA was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation.The steam effects for CO and C3H8 oxidation,three-way catalytic activity and stoichiometric window property were studied.The light-off temperature of the CO oxidation reaction shifted to a lower temperature due to the water-gas shift (WGS) reactions.The oxidation of C3H8 was enhanced due to the steam reforming (SR) reactions.The steam promoted the C3H8 oxidation and NO reduction in three-way catalytic reaction.The amplitude of stoichiometric window was amplified by the addition of water to the feed stream.

  17. Bifunctional Catalysts for CO2 Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    dioxide reduction catalysis . (SA 1 – Catalyst candidate synthesis) As outlined in the original proposal, ligand platforms have been synthesized to...was limited to outer-sphere electron transfer (necessary oxidation potentials for catalysis > –2.1 V vs. [Cp2Fe] +/0). Thus, we pursued two...to heterogeneous Fischer-Tropsch13 catalysts. This reactivity must also be compared with mononuclear early transition metal ligands that require

  18. Co-catalyst free Titanate Nanorods for improved Hydrogen production under solar light irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Lakshmana Reddy; D Praveen Kumar; M V Shankar

    2016-04-01

    Harnessing solar energy for water splitting into hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) gases in the presence of semiconductor catalyst is one of the most promising and cleaner methods of chemical fuel (H2) production. Herein, we report a simplified method for the preparation of photo-active titanate nanorods catalyst and explore the key role of calcination temperature and time period in improving catalytic properties. Both as-synthesized and calcined material showed rod-like shape and trititanate structure as evidenced from crystal structure and morphology analysis. Notably, calcination process affected both length and diameter of the nanorods into shorter and smaller size respectively. In turn, they significantly influenced the band gap reduction, resulting in visible light absorption at optimized calcination conditions. The calcined nanorods showed shift in optical absorption band edge towards longer wave length than pristine nanorods. The rate of hydrogen generation using different photocatalysts was measured by suspending trititanate nanorods (in the absence of co-catalyst) in glycerol-water mixture under solar light irradiation. Among the catalysts, nanorods calcined at 250°C for 2 hours recorded high rate of H2 production and stability confirmed for five cycles. Photocatalytic properties and plausible pathway responsible for improved H2 production are discussed in detail.

  19. Effects of catalyst concentration and ultraviolet intensity on chemical mechanical polishing of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Tongqing; Pan, Guoshun; Lu, Xinchun

    2016-08-01

    Effects of catalyst concentration and ultraviolet intensity on chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of GaN were deeply investigated in this paper. Working as an ideal homogeneous substrate material in LED industry, GaN ought to be equipped with a smooth and flat surface. Taking the strong chemical stability of GaN into account, photocatalytic oxidation technology was adopted in GaN CMP process to realize efficient removal. It was found that, because of the improved reaction rate of photocatalytic oxidation, GaN material removal rate (MRR) increases by a certain extent with catalyst concentration increasing. Cross single line analysis on the surface after polishing by Phase Shift MicroXAM-3D was carried out to prove the better removal effect with higher catalyst concentration. Ultraviolet intensity field in H2O2-SiO2-based polishing system was established and simulated, revealing the variation trend of ultraviolet intensity around the outlet of the slurry. It could be concluded that, owing to the higher planarization efficiency and lower energy damage, the UV lamp of 125 W is the most appropriate lamp in this system. Based on the analysis, defects removal model of this work was proposed to describe the effects of higher catalyst concentration and higher power of UV lamp.

  20. Highly dispersed CoMoS phase on titania nanotubes as efficient HDS catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Escobar, J.; Angeles Chavez, C.; Lopez-Salinas, E.; Romero, E.; Ferrat, G.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A. [Molecular Engineering Program, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, G.A. Madero, 07730 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-01-15

    Nanotubular titania (NT) to be used as support for CoMo-based hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst was synthesized and characterized by various techniques. NT annealed at 400 C (under nitrogen) was constituted by nanotubes of {proportional_to}5.5 nm (internal diameter) and retained 236 m{sup 2}/g of surface area. Mo at 3 atoms/nm{sup 2} (nominal loading) and cobalt at Co/(Co + Mo) = 0.3 were impregnated under nearly neutral, acidic or basic media. By XPS analyses of NT-supported sulfided catalysts, highly dispersed MoS{sub 2} particles of low stacking degree (1-2 slabs) aligned along the nanotubes were observed by HR-TEM in all sulfided materials. The CoMo catalysts supported on nanostructured titania had dibenzothiophene (DBT) HDS activity (in pseudo first order kinetic constant basis) values {proportional_to}1.35 and {proportional_to}1.7 times (Mo impregnated under near neutral and basic media, respectively) higher to that of a commercial reference with alumina carrier. According to shifts to higher binding energy of the Co 2p peak corresponding to sulfided cobalt (as determined by XPS), MoS{sub 2} dispersed on NT support could be efficiently promoted by Co (''CoMoS'' phase formation), opening the possibility of developing new highly active HDS catalysts. (author)

  1. Atomistic Processes of Catalyst Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-11-27

    The purpose of this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Sasol North America, Inc., and the oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was to improve the stability of alumina-based industrial catalysts through the combination of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at ORNL and innovative sample preparation techniques at Sasol. Outstanding progress has been made in task 1, 'Atomistic processes of La stabilization'. STEM investigations provided structural information with single-atom precision, showing the lattice location of La dopant atoms, thus enabling first-principles calculations of binding energies, which were performed in collaboration with Vanderbilt University. The stabilization mechanism turns out to be entirely due to a particularly strong binding energy of the La tom to the {gamma}-alumina surface. The large size of the La atom precludes incorporation of La into the bulk alumina and also strains the surface, thus preventing any clustering of La atoms. Thus highly disperse distribution is achieved and confirmed by STEM images. la also affects relative stability of the exposed surfaces of {gamma}-alumina, making the 100 surface more stable for the doped case, unlike the 110 surface for pure {gamma}-alumina. From the first-principles calculations, they can estimate the increase in transition temperature for the 3% loading of La used commercially, and it is in excellent agreement with experiment. This task was further pursued aiming to generate useable recommendations for the optimization of the preparation techniques for La-doped aluminas. The effort was primarily concentrated on the connection between the boehmitre-{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase transition (i.e. catalyst preparation) and the resulting dispersion of La on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface. It was determined that the La distribution on boehmite was non-uniform and different from that on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and thus

  2. Deactivation and poisoning of fuel cell catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P. N., Jr.

    1985-06-01

    The deactivation and poisoning phenomena reviewed are: the poisoning of anode (fuel electrode) catalyst by carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide; the deactivation of the cathode (air electrode) catalyst by sintering; and the deactivation of the cathode by corrosion of the support. The anode catalyst is Pt supported on a conductive, high area carbon black, usually at a loading of 10 w/o. This catalyst is tolerant to some level of carbon monoxide or hydrogen sulfide or both in combination, the level depending on temperature and pressure. Much less is known about hydrogen sulfide poisoning. Typical tolerance levels are 2% CO, and 10 ppM H2S. The cathode catalyst is typically Pt supported on a raphitic carbon black, usually a furnace black heat-treated to 2700 C. The Pt loading is typically 10 w/o, and the dispersion (or percent exposed) as-prepared is typically 30%. The loss of dispersion in use depends on the operational parameters, most especially the cathode potential history, i.e., higher potentials cause more rapid decrease in dispersion. The mechanism of loss of dispersion is not well known. The graphitic carbon support corrodes at a finite rate that is also potential dependent. Support corrosion causes thickening of the electrolyte film between the gas pores and the catalyst particles, which in turn causes increased diffusional resistance and performance loss.

  3. Germanium nanowires grown using different catalyst metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia, R.C., E-mail: riama@ifsp.edu.br [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Área de Ciências, Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia de São Paulo, Rua Américo Ambrósio, 269, Jd. Canaã, Sertãozinho, CEP 14169-263 (Brazil); Kamimura, H.; Munhoz, R.; Rodrigues, A.D. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Leite, E.R. [Departamento de Química – LIEC, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Chiquito, A.J. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    Germanium nanowires have been synthesized by the well known vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism using gold, silver, cooper, indium and nickel as catalyst metals. The influence of metal seeds on nanowires structural and electronic transport properties was also investigated. Electron microscopy images demonstrated that, despite differences in diameters, all nanowires obtained presented single crystalline structures. X-ray patterns showed that all nanowires were composed by germanium with a small amount of germanium oxide, and the catalyst metal was restricted at the nanowires' tips. Raman spectroscopy evidenced the long range order in the crystalline structure of each sample. Electrical measurements indicated that variable range hopping was the dominant mechanism in carrier transport for all devices, with similar hopping distance, regardless the material used as catalyst. Then, in spite of the differences in synthesis temperatures and nanowires diameters, the catalyst metals have not affected the composition and crystalline quality of the germanium nanowires nor the carrier transport in the germanium nanowire network devices. - Highlights: • Ge nanowires were grown by VLS method using Au, Ag, Cu, In and Ni as catalysts. • All nanowires presented high single crystalline quality and long range order. • Devices showed semiconducting behavior having VRH as dominant transport mechanism. • The metal catalyst did not influence structural properties or the transport mechanism.

  4. Catalysts for the Selective Oxidation of Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Brookes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In industry, one of the main catalysts typically employed for the selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde is a multi-component oxide containing both bulk Fe2(MoO43 and excess MoO3. It is thought that the excess MoO3 primarily acts to replace any molybdenum lost through sublimation at elevated temperatures, therefore preventing the formation of an unselective Fe2O3 phase. With both oxide phases present however, debate has arisen regarding the active component of the catalyst. Work here highlights how catalyst surfaces are significantly different from bulk structures, a difference crucial for catalyst performance. Specifically, Mo has been isolated at the surface as the active surface species. This leaves the role of the Fe in the catalyst enigmatic, with many theories postulated for its requirement. It has been suggested that the supporting Fe molybdate phase enables lattice oxygen transfer to the surface, to help prevent the selectivity loss which would occur in the resulting oxygen deficit environment. To assess this phenomenon in further detail, anaerobic reaction with methanol has been adopted to evaluate the performance of the catalyst under reducing conditions.

  5. Carbon-based metal-free catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xien; Dai, Liming

    2016-11-01

    Metals and metal oxides are widely used as catalysts for materials production, clean energy generation and storage, and many other important industrial processes. However, metal-based catalysts suffer from high cost, low selectivity, poor durability, susceptibility to gas poisoning and have a detrimental environmental impact. In 2009, a new class of catalyst based on earth-abundant carbon materials was discovered as an efficient, low-cost, metal-free alternative to platinum for oxygen reduction in fuel cells. Since then, tremendous progress has been made, and carbon-based metal-free catalysts have been demonstrated to be effective for an increasing number of catalytic processes. This Review provides a critical overview of this rapidly developing field, including the molecular design of efficient carbon-based metal-free catalysts, with special emphasis on heteroatom-doped carbon nanotubes and graphene. We also discuss recent advances in the development of carbon-based metal-free catalysts for clean energy conversion and storage, environmental protection and important industrial production, and outline the key challenges and future opportunities in this exciting field.

  6. Looping through the Lamb Shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A U

    2007-02-06

    Sometimes in science, a small measurement can have big ramifications. For a team of Livermore scientists, such was the case when they measured a small shift in the spectrum of extremely ionized atoms of uranium. The measurement involves the Lamb shift, a subtle change in the energy of an electron orbiting an atom's nucleus. The precision of the Livermore result was 10 times greater than that of existing measurements, making it the best measurement to date of a complicated correction to the simplest quantum description of how atoms behave. The measurement introduces a new realm in the search for deviations between the theory of quantum electrodynamics (QED), which is an extension of quantum mechanics, and the real world. Such deviations, if discovered, would have far-reaching consequences, indicating that QED is not a fundamental theory of nature.

  7. Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Vanderhaeghen, Marc [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Carlson, Carl E. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    We consider the two-photon exchange contribution to the 2P-2S Lamb shift in muonic deuterium in the framework of forward dispersion relations. The dispersion integrals are evaluated with minimal model dependence using experimental data on elastic deuteron form factors and inelastic electron-deuteron scattering, both in the quasielastic and hadronic range. The subtraction constant that is required to ensure convergence of the dispersion relation for the forward Compton amplitude T{sub 1} (ν,Q{sup 2}) is related to the deuteron magnetic polarizability β(Q{sup 2}) and represents the main source of uncertainty in our analysis. We obtain for the Lamb shift ΔE{sub 2P-2S} = 1.620±0.190 meV and discuss ways to further reduce this uncertainty.

  8. Anthropometric changes and fluid shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Rummel, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to obtain the most comprehensive and coherent picture of changes under weightlessness, a set of measurements on Skylab 2 was initiated and at every opportunity, additional studies were added. All pertinent information from ancillary sources were gleaned and collated. On Skylab 2, the initial anthropometric studies were scheduled in conjunction with muscle study. A single set of facial photographs was made in-flight. Additional measurements were made on Skylab 3, with photographs and truncal and limb girth measurements in-flight. Prior to Skylab 4, it was felt there was considerable evidence for large and rapid fluid shifts, so a series of in-flight volume and center of mass measurements and infrared photographs were scheduled to be conducted in the Skylab 4 mission. A number of changes were properly documented for the first time, most important of which were the fluid shifts. The following description of Skylab anthropometrics address work done on Skylab 4 primarily.

  9. Pillared clays as catalysts for hydrocracking of heavy liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyftopoulou, M.E.; Bridgwater, A.V. [Bio-Energy Research Group, Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Millan, M.; Dugwell, D.; Kandiyoti, R. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology Imperial College London, London SW7 2BY (United Kingdom); Hriljac, J.A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-30

    Two sets of pillared clays (PILCs), chromia and tin-oxide-pillared montmorillonites and laponites, were successfully prepared at Aston University using both conventional and microwave-assisted methods and characterised by X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. Microwave irradiation enabled the preparation of the PILCs in a fraction of time of the conventional methods. X-ray powder diffraction was not a suitable method for characterizing laponite or pillared laponites due to the lack of first order reflections attributed to the small size of individual particles and the random rather than uniform face-to-face orientation of the clay platelets. Laponite appeared to be more thermally stable than montmorillonite. For pillared montmorillonites, dehydroxylation shifted to a lower temperature compared to the starting materials, whereas for tin-oxide-pillared laponites such a shift did not occur. On the other hand for chromia laponite dehydroxylation took place over a much wider temperature range compared to all other materials. The prepared PILCs were employed as catalysts in the hydrocracking of coal-derived liquids in a conventional microbomb reactor at Imperial College exhibiting high-quality performance and remaining active after 4h utilization regardless of high coke deposition. They actually showed an increase in the total conversion when reused.

  10. Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.40 A, a water adsorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of between 10% and 15% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; am amorphous cracking component, a binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  11. Debt Shifting and Ownership Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk Schindler; Guttorm Schjelderup

    2011-01-01

    Previous theoretical studies on the debt shifting behavior of multinationals have assumed affiliates of multinationals to be wholly owned. We develop a model that allows a multinational firm to determine both the leverage and ownership structure in affiliates endogenously. A main finding is that affiliates with minority owners have less debt than wholly owned affiliates and therefore a less tax efficient financing structure. This is due to an externality that arises endogenously in our model,...

  12. Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Carboni, G

    1973-01-01

    The author has calculated the various contributions to 2s-2p splitting for muonic deuterium. An instantaneous potential is constructed between the muon and the nucleus. Except for the Coulomb potential, all the remaining terms are treated as a perturbation. The effects taken into account are fine structure, magnetic and electric hyperfine structure, muonic Lamb shift, vacuum polarisation, nuclear polarisation and nuclear size. (11 refs).

  13. Frequency shifts in gravitational resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Baeßler, S; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Rebreyend, D; Kupriyanova, E A; Voronin, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Quantum states of ultracold neutrons in the gravitational field are to be characterized through gravitational resonance spectroscopy. This paper discusses systematic effects that appear in the spectroscopic measurements. The discussed frequency shifts, which we call Stern-Gerlach shift, interference shift, and spectator state shift, appear in conceivable measurement schemes and have general importance. These shifts have to be taken into account in precision experiments.

  14. Shift work and endocrine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulhôa, M A; Marqueze, E C; Burgos, L G A; Moreno, C R C

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review was to investigate the impact of shift and night work on metabolic processes and the role of alterations in the sleep-wake cycle and feeding times and environmental changes in the occurrence of metabolic disorders. The literature review was performed by searching three electronic databases for relevant studies published in the last 10 years. The methodological quality of each study was assessed, and best-evidence synthesis was applied to draw conclusions. The literature has shown changes in concentrations of melatonin, cortisol, ghrelin, and leptin among shift workers. Melatonin has been implicated for its role in the synthesis and action of insulin. The action of this hormone also regulates the expression of transporter glucose type 4 or triggers phosphorylation of the insulin receptor. Therefore, a reduction in melatonin can be associated with an increase in insulin resistance and a propensity for the development of diabetes. Moreover, shift work can negatively affect sleep and contribute to sedentarism, unhealthy eating habits, and stress. Recent studies on metabolic processes have increasingly revealed their complexity. Physiological changes induced in workers who invert their activity-rest cycle to fulfill work hours include disruptions in metabolic processes.

  15. Shift Work and Endocrine Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review was to investigate the impact of shift and night work on metabolic processes and the role of alterations in the sleep-wake cycle and feeding times and environmental changes in the occurrence of metabolic disorders. The literature review was performed by searching three electronic databases for relevant studies published in the last 10 years. The methodological quality of each study was assessed, and best-evidence synthesis was applied to draw conclusions. The literature has shown changes in concentrations of melatonin, cortisol, ghrelin, and leptin among shift workers. Melatonin has been implicated for its role in the synthesis and action of insulin. The action of this hormone also regulates the expression of transporter glucose type 4 or triggers phosphorylation of the insulin receptor. Therefore, a reduction in melatonin can be associated with an increase in insulin resistance and a propensity for the development of diabetes. Moreover, shift work can negatively affect sleep and contribute to sedentarism, unhealthy eating habits, and stress. Recent studies on metabolic processes have increasingly revealed their complexity. Physiological changes induced in workers who invert their activity-rest cycle to fulfill work hours include disruptions in metabolic processes.

  16. Role of Bismuth Oxide in Bi-MCo2O4(M=Co,Ni,Cu,Zn) Catalysts for Wet Air Oxidation of Acetic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Peng-bo; CHENG Tie-xin; ZHUANG Hong; CUI Xiang-hao; BI Ying-li; ZHEN Kai-ji

    2004-01-01

    Two series of cobalt(Ⅲ)-containing spinel catalysts were prepared by the decomposition of the corresponding nitrates. The catalysts doped with bismuth oxide exhibit a higher activity in the wet air oxidation of acetic acid than those without dopant bismuth oxide. The catalysts were investigated by XRD, TEM, ESR, UV-DRS and XPS, and the interaction between Co and Bi was studied as well. It has been found that nano-sized bismuth oxide is paved on the surface of cobalt spinel crystal and the structures of cobalt(Ⅲ)-containing spinel are still maintained. The shift of the binding energy of Bi4f7/2 is related to the catalytic activity of these catalysts doped with bismuth oxide.

  17. Influence of alkali promoters in the selective hydrogenation of 3-methyl-2-butenal over Ru/SiO{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waghray, A.; Wang, Jian; Oukaci, R.; Blackmond, D.G. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1992-07-09

    The addition of potassium as a promoter to a Ru/SiO{sub 2} catalyst resulted in a striking shift in product selectivity in the hydrogenation of 3-methyl-2-butenal. The rate of hydrogenation of the C=O bond to produce the unsaturated alcohol increased concomitant with a decrease in the rate of C=C hydrogenation. IR spectroscopy showed a strong perturbation of the C=O bond for the alkali-promoted catalyst, and volumetric chemisorption and TPD results suggested that the alkali species blocked adsorption at low-coordination Ru sites. These adsorption and reaction studies suggest that polarization of the adsorbed substrate at the C=O bond is responsible for the significant shift in product selectivity upon alkali promotion. This work combines spectroscopic tools with the use of the catalytic reaction itself as a probe of catalyst surface chemistry. 40 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Advances in HDS catalysts design: relation between catalyst structure and feed composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kagami, Narinobu

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a better understanding of ultra deep HDS for diesel, to contribute to the development of advanced catalysts. The characterization of catalyst structure was examined by XRD, TPR, TPS and Raman spectroscopy. The ranking of catalytic activities were tested using vario

  19. CO methanation over supported bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts: From computational studies towards catalyst optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kustov, Arkadii; Frey, Anne Mette; Larsen, Kasper Emil

    2007-01-01

    DFT calculations combined with a computational screening method have previously shown that bimetallic Ni-Fe alloys should be more active than the traditional Ni-based catalyst for CO methanation. That was confirmed experimentally for a number of bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts supported on MgAl2O4. He...

  20. The capacity of modified nickel catalysts derived from discharged catalyst of fertilizer plants for NOx treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, T. M. P.; Luong, N. T.; Le, P. N.

    2016-11-01

    In Vietnam for recent years, a large amount of hazardous waste containing nickel (Ni) derived from discharged catalyst of fertilizer plants has caused environmental problems in landfill overloading and the risk of soil or surface water sources pollution. Taking advantage of discharged catalyst, recycling Ni components and then synthesizing new catalysts apply for mono-nitrogen oxides (NOx) treatments is an approach to bring about both economic and environmental benefits. This study was carried out with the main objective: Evaluate the performance of modified catalysts (using recovered Ni from the discharged RKS-2-7H catalyst of Phu My Fertilizer Plant) on NOx treatment. The catalysts was synthesized and modified with active phases consist of recovered Ni and commercial Barium oxide (BaO), Manganese dioxide (MnO2) / Cerium (IV) oxide (CeO2) on the support Aluminium oxide (γ-Al2O3). The results show that the modified catalysts with Ni, Ba, Ce was not more beneficial for NOx removal than which with Ni, Ba, Mn. 98% NOx removal at 350°C with the start temperature at 115°C and the T60 value at 307°C can be obtained with 10Ni10Ba10Mn/Al catalyst.