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Sample records for water zrex hydrogen

  1. Experiments on interactions between zirconium-containing melt and water (ZREX). Hydrogen generation and chemical augmentation of energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, D.H.; Armstrong, D.R.; Gunther, W.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Basu, S.

    1998-01-01

    The results of the first data series of experiments on interactions between zirconium-containing melt and water are described. These experiments involved dropping 1-kg batches of pure zirconium or zirconium-zirconium dioxide mixture melt into a column of water. A total of nine tests were conducted, including four with pure zirconium melt and five with Zr-ZrO{sub 2} mixture melt. Explosions took place only in those tests which were externally triggered. While the extent of zirconium oxidation in the triggered experiments was quite extensive, the estimated explosion energetics were found to be very small compared to the combined thermal and chemical energy available. (author)

  2. Hydrogen by water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen production by water electrolysis (aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide) is shortly presented with theoretical aspects (thermodynamics and kinetics), and components of the electrolytic cell (structural materials, cathodes, anodes, diaphragms), and examples of industrial processes. (A.B.). 4 figs

  3. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S. G.; Roberts, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst

  4. Hydrogen by electrolysis of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen production by electrolytic decomposition of water is explained. Power efficiency, efficient energy utilization, and costs were emphasized. Four systems were considered: two were based on current electrolyzer technology using present efficiency values for electrical generation by fossil fired and nuclear thermal stations, and two using projected electrolyzer technology with advanced fossil and nuclear plants.

  5. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  6. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S.G.; Roberts, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    A process is described for exchanging isotopes (particularly tritium) between water and gaseous hydrogen. Isotope depleted gaseous hydrogen and water containing a hydrogen isotope are introduced into the vapour phase in a first reaction area. The steam and gaseous hydrogen are brought into contact with a supported metal catalyst in this area in a parallel flow at a temperature range of around 225 and 300 0 C. An effluent flow comprising a mixture of isotope enriched gaseous hydrogen and depleted steam is evacuated from this area and the steam condensed into liquid water [fr

  7. Hydrogen water chemistry for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.L.; Cowan, R.L.; Kass, J.N.; Law, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) is now a practical countermeasure for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of reactor structural materials in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). The concept, which involves adding hydrogen to the feedwater to suppress the formation of oxidizing species in the reactor, has been extensively studied in both the laboratory and in several operating plants. The Dresden-2 Unit of Commonwealth Edison Company has completed operation for one full 18-month fuel cycle under HWC conditions. The specifications, procedures, equipment, instrumentation and surveillance programs needed for commercial application of the technology are available now. This paper provides a review of the benefits to be obtained, the side affects, and the special operational considerations needed for commercial implementation of HWC. Technological and management ''Lessons Learned'' from work conducted to date are also described

  8. Hydrogen production by alkaline water electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Diogo M. F.; Sequeira, César A. C.; Figueiredo, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Water electrolysis is one of the simplest methods used for hydrogen production. It has the advantage of being able to produce hydrogen using only renewable energy. To expand the use of water electrolysis, it is mandatory to reduce energy consumption, cost, and maintenance of current electrolyzers, and, on the other hand, to increase their efficiency, durability, and safety. In this study, modern technologies for hydrogen production by water electrolysis have been investigated. In this article...

  9. Hydrogen and water reactor safety: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for papers presented in the following areas of interest: 1) hydrogen research programs; 2) hydrogen behavior during light water reactor accidents; 3) combustible gas generation; 4) hydrogen transport and mixing; 5) combustion modeling and experiments; 6) accelerated flames and detonations; 7) combustion mitigation and control; and 8) equipment survivability

  10. Hydrogen and water reactor safety: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for papers presented in the following areas of interest: 1) hydrogen research programs; 2) hydrogen behavior during light water reactor accidents; 3) combustible gas generation; 4) hydrogen transport and mixing; 5) combustion modeling and experiments; 6) accelerated flames and detonations; 7) combustion mitigation and control; and 8) equipment survivability.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide kinetics in water radiolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Kazuhiro; Sundin, Sara; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2018-04-01

    The kinetics of the formation and reaction of hydrogen peroxide in the long time γ- radiolysis of water is examined using a combination of experiment with model calculations. Escape yields of hydrogen peroxide on the microsecond time scale are easily measured with added radical scavengers even with substantial amounts of initial added hydrogen peroxide. The γ-radiolysis of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions without added radical scavengers reach a steady state limiting concentration of hydrogen peroxide with increasing dose, and that limit is directly proportional to the initial concentration of added hydrogen peroxide. The dose necessary to reach that limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration is also proportional to the initial concentration, but dose rate has a very small effect. The addition of molecular hydrogen to aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide leads to a decrease in the high dose limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration that is linear with the initial hydrogen concentration, but the amount of decrease is not stoichiometric. Proton irradiations of solutions with added hydrogen peroxide and hydrogen are more difficult to predict because of the decreased yields of radicals; however, with a substantial increase in dose rate there is a sufficient decrease in radical yields that hydrogen addition has little effect on hydrogen peroxide decay.

  12. Breath Hydrogen Produced by Ingestion of Commercial Hydrogen Water and Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Shimouchi, Akito; Nose, Kazutoshi; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Kondo, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare how and to what extent ingestion of hydrogen water and milk increase breath hydrogen in adults.Methods: Five subjects without specific diseases, ingested distilled or hydrogen water and milk as a reference material that could increase breath hydrogen. Their end-alveolar breath hydrogen was measured.Results: Ingestion of hydrogen water rapidly increased breath hydrogen to the maximal level of approximately 40 ppm 10–15 min after ingestion and thereafter rapidly decrease...

  13. Hydrogen behavior in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, M.; Cummings, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Three Mile Island accident resulted in the generation of an estimated 150 to 600 kg of hydrogen, some of which burned inside the containment building, causing a transient pressure rise of roughly 200 kPa (2 atm). With this accident as the immediate impetus and the improved safety of reactors as the long-term goal, the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission initiated research programs to study hydrogen behavior and control during accidents at nuclear plants. Several fundamental questions and issues arise when the hydrogen problem for light-water-reactor plants is examined. These relate to four aspects of the problem: hydrogen production; hydrogen transport, release, and mixing; hydrogen combustion; and prevention or mitigation of hydrogen combustion. Although much has been accomplished, some unknowns and uncertainties still remain, for example, the rate of hydrogen production during a degraded-core or molten-core accident, the rate of hydrogen mixing, the effect of geometrical structures and scale on combustion, flame speeds, combustion completeness, and mitigation-scheme effectiveness. This article discusses the nature and extent of the hydrogen problem, the progress that has been made, and the important unresolved questions

  14. Hydrogen production by alkaline water electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo M. F. Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water electrolysis is one of the simplest methods used for hydrogen production. It has the advantage of being able to produce hydrogen using only renewable energy. To expand the use of water electrolysis, it is mandatory to reduce energy consumption, cost, and maintenance of current electrolyzers, and, on the other hand, to increase their efficiency, durability, and safety. In this study, modern technologies for hydrogen production by water electrolysis have been investigated. In this article, the electrochemical fundamentals of alkaline water electrolysis are explained and the main process constraints (e.g., electrical, reaction, and transport are analyzed. The historical background of water electrolysis is described, different technologies are compared, and main research needs for the development of water electrolysis technologies are discussed.

  15. Hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, H.

    1983-01-01

    Deuterium is concentrated in a hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process enhanced by the use of catalyst materials in cold and hot tower contacting zones. Water is employed in a closed liquid recirculation loop that includes the cold tower, in which deuterium is concentrated in the water, and the upper portion of the hot tower in which said deuterium is concentrated in the hydrogen stream. Feed water is fed to the lower portion of said hot tower for contact with the circulating hydrogen stream. The feed water does not contact the water in the closed loop. Catalyst employed in the cold tower and the upper portion of the hot tower, preferably higher quality material, is isolated from impurities in the feed water that contacts only the catalyst, preferably of lower quality, in the lower portion of the hot zone. The closed loop water passes from the cold zone to the dehumidification zone, and a portion of said water leaving the upper portion of the hot tower can be passed to the humidification zone and thereafter recycled to said closed loop. Deuterium concentration is enhanced in said catalytic hydrogen-water system while undue retarding of catalyst activity is avoided

  16. Controlling hydrogen behavior in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullingford, H.S.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the aftermath of the incident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), a new and different treatment of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) risks is needed for public safety because of the specific events involving hydrogen generation, transport, and behavior following the core damage. Hydrogen behavior in closed environments such as the TMI-2 containment building is a complex phenomenon that is not fully understood. Hence, an engineering approach is presented for prevention of loss of life, equipment, and environment in case of a large hydrogen generation in an LWR. A six-level defense strategy is described that minimizes the possibility of ignition of released hydrogen gas and otherwise mitigates the consequences of hydrogen release. Guidance is given to reactor manufacturers, utility companies, regulatory agencies, and research organizations committed to reducing risk factors and insuring safety of life, equipment, and environment

  17. Separation of hydrogen isotope by hydrogen-water exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomura, Shohei; Kaetsu, Hayato; Nakane, Ryohei

    1979-01-01

    The deuterium exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and liquid water is studied by use of three kinds of trickle bed exchange columns packed with hydrophobic catalysts supporting platinum. All columns have the effective lengths of 30 cm. They are 17 mm, 30 mm, and 95 mm in diameters, respectively. The separation experiments are carried out by the once-through methods. The separation efficiencies of the columns are evaluated by the parameters such as the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (H. E. T. P.) and the mass transfer co-efficient. It is found that the operating condition of the exchange column is optimum when the superficial hydrogen flow velocity is 0.3 m/sec. (author)

  18. Hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, H.

    1984-01-01

    The objects of this invention are achieved by a dual temperature isotopic exchange process employing hydrogen-water exchange with water passing in a closed recirculation loop between a catalyst-containing cold tower and the upper portion of a catalyst-containing hot tower, with feed water being introduced to the lower portion of the hot tower and being maintained out of contact with the water recirculating in the closed loop. Undue retarding of catalyst activity during deuterium concentration can thus be avoided. The cold tower and the upper portion of the hot tower can be operated with relatively expensive catalyst material of higher catalyst activity, while the lower portion of the hot tower can be operated with a relatively less expensive, more rugged catalyst material of lesser catalyst activity. The feed water stream, being restricted solely to the lower portion of the hot tower, requires minimal pretreatment for the removal of potential catalyst contaminants. The catalyst materials are desirably coated with a hydrophobic treating material so as to be substantially inaccessible to liquid water, thereby retarding catalyst fouling while being accessible to the gas for enhancing isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water vapor. A portion of the water of the closed loop can be passed to a humidification zone to heat and humidify the circulating hydrogen gas and then returned to the closed loop

  19. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The emissions process of hydrogen sulfide was studied to quantify air–water transfer of hydrogen sulfide in sewer networks. Hydrogen sulfide transfer across the air–water interface was investigated at different turbulence levels (expressed in terms of the Froude number) and pH using batch...... experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...

  20. Vibrational polarizabilities of hydrogen-bonded water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vibrational polarizabilities of hydrogen-bonded water are analyzed theoretically. ► Total vibrational polarizability is (at least) comparable to the electronic one. ► Molecular translations contribute to the vibrational polarizability below 300 cm −1 . ► Intermolecular charge fluxes along H bonds are induced by molecular translations. ► The results are discussed in relation to the observed dielectric properties. - Abstract: The vibrational polarizabilities and the related molecular properties of hydrogen-bonded water are analyzed theoretically, taking the case of (water) 30 clusters as an example case. It is shown that some off-diagonal dipole derivatives are large for the translations of incompletely hydrogen-bonded molecules, and this is reasonably explained by the scheme of intermolecular charge fluxes induced along hydrogen bonds. In total, because of these intermolecular charge fluxes, molecular translations give rise to the vibrational polarizability of 2.8–3.3 a 0 3 per molecule, which is as large as about 40% of the electronic polarizability, mainly in the frequency region below 300 cm −1 . Adding the contributions of the molecular rotations (librations) and the translation–rotation cross term, the total polarizability (electronic + vibrational) at ∼100 cm −1 is slightly larger than the double of that at >4000 cm −1 . The relation of these results to some observed time- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of liquid water is briefly discussed

  1. A method for generating hydrogen from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godin, Paul; Mascarello, Jean; Millet, Jacques.

    1974-01-01

    Description is given of a method and an installation for generating hydrogen from water, through an endothermic cycle of several successive chemical reactions involving intermediate substances regenerated during said cycle, said reactions occuring at different temperatures. The reaction which takes place at the highest temperature is carried out electrochemically. This can be applied to power-generating units comprising a nuclear reactor [fr

  2. Light-water-reactor hydrogen manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, A.L.; Cummings, J.C.; Sherman, M.P.; Kupiec, C.F.; Healy, R.J.; Caplan, J.S.; Sandhop, J.R.; Saunders, J.H.

    1983-06-01

    A manual concerning the behavior of hydrogen in light water reactors has been prepared. Both normal operations and accident situations are addressed. Topics considered include hydrogen generation, transport and mixing, detection, and combustion, and mitigation. Basic physical and chemical phenomena are described, and plant-specific examples are provided where appropriate. A wide variety of readers, including operators, designers, and NRC staff, will find parts of this manual useful. Different sections are written at different levels, according to the most likely audience. The manual is not intended to provide specific plant procedures, but rather, to provide general guidance that may assist in the development of such procedures

  3. Process for exchanging tritium between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S.G.; Roberts, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method of exchanging and concentrating the radioactive isotope of hydrogen from water or hydrogen gas is described. This heavy water enrichment system involves a low pressure, dual temperature process. (U.K.)

  4. Heavy-water extraction from non-electrolytic hydrogen streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeRoy, R.L.; Hammerli, M.; Butler, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Heavy water may be produced from non-electrolytic hydrogen streams using a combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange process. The method comprises contacting feed water in a catalyst column with hydrogen gas originating partly from a non-electrolytic hydrogen stream and partly from an electrolytic hydrogen stream, so as to enrich the feed water with the deuterium extracted from both the non-electrolytic and electrolytic hydrogen gas, and passing the deuterium water to an electrolyser wherein the electrolytic hydrogen gas is generated and then fed through the catalyst column. (L.L.)

  5. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    during the HP decomposition. The model assumes that the enzyme decay is controlled by an inactivation stoichiometry related to the HP decomposition. In order to make the model easily applicable, it is furthermore assumed that the COD is a proxy of the active biomass concentration of the water and thereby......Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... reared or the nitrifying bacteria in the biofilters at concentrations required to eliminating pathogens. This calls for quantitative insight into the fate of the disinfectant residuals during water treatment. This paper presents a kinetic model that describes the HP decomposition in aquaculture water...

  6. Photochemical Production of Hydrogen from Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1978-01-01

    The energy flux in sunlight is 40 000 kW per head of the world population. Theoretically much of this energy can be used to photolyze water, in presence of a sensitizer, to H2 (and 02) for a hydrogen economy. The main difficulty in a homogeneous medium is the back-reaction of the primary products. According to the 'membrane principle', the reducing and the oxidizing primary products are released on opposite sides of asymmetric membranes, and so prevented from back-reacting. In essence, this is the mechanism of the photosynthetic machinery in plants and bacteria. This therefore serves as an example in the artificial construction of suitable asymmetric, 'vectorial', membranes. Relatively small areas of photolytic collectors, e.g. in tropical deserts, could cover the energy needs of large populations through hydrogen. (author)

  7. Tetrahedrality and hydrogen bonds in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Eszter; Varga, Imre K.; Baranyai, András

    2016-06-01

    We carried out extensive calculations of liquid water at different temperatures and pressures using the BK3 model suggested recently [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. In particular, we were interested in undercooled regions to observe the propensity of water to form tetrahedral coordination of closest neighbors around a central molecule. We compared the found tetrahedral order with the number of hydrogen bonds and with the partial pair correlation functions unfolded as distributions of the closest, the second closest, etc. neighbors. We found that contrary to the number of hydrogen bonds, tetrahedrality changes substantially with state variables. Not only the number of tetrahedral arrangements increases with lowering the pressure, the density, and the temperature but the domain size of connecting tetrahedral structures as well. The difference in tetrahedrality is very pronounced between the two sides of the Widom line and even more so between the low density amorphous (LDA) and high density amorphous (HDA) phases. We observed that in liquid water and in HDA, the 5th water molecule, contrary to ice and LDA, is positioned between the first and the second coordination shell. We found no convincing evidence of structural heterogeneity or regions referring to structural transition.

  8. Photoelectrochemical water splitting in separate oxygen and hydrogen cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Avigail; Dotan, Hen; Shter, Gennady E.; Wullenkord, Michael; Houaijia, Anis; Maljusch, Artjom; Grader, Gideon S.; Rothschild, Avner

    2017-06-01

    Solar water splitting provides a promising path for sustainable hydrogen production and solar energy storage. One of the greatest challenges towards large-scale utilization of this technology is reducing the hydrogen production cost. The conventional electrolyser architecture, where hydrogen and oxygen are co-produced in the same cell, gives rise to critical challenges in photoelectrochemical water splitting cells that directly convert solar energy and water to hydrogen. Here we overcome these challenges by separating the hydrogen and oxygen cells. The ion exchange in our cells is mediated by auxiliary electrodes, and the cells are connected to each other only by metal wires, enabling centralized hydrogen production. We demonstrate hydrogen generation in separate cells with solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 7.5%, which can readily surpass 10% using standard commercial components. A basic cost comparison shows that our approach is competitive with conventional photoelectrochemical systems, enabling safe and potentially affordable solar hydrogen production.

  9. Photocatalysis in Generation of Hydrogen from Water

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-04-18

    Solar energy can be converted by utilizing the thermal or photoelectric effects of photons. Concentrated solar power systems utilize thermal energy from the sun by either making steam and then generating power or shifting the chemical equilibrium of a reaction (e.g., water splitting or CO2 reduction) that occurs at extremely high temperatures. The photocatalytic system contains powder photocatalysts. Each photocatalyst particle should collect sufficient photons from the solar flux to cause the required multielectron reactions to occur. The band gap and band edge positions of semiconductors are the most critical parameters for assessing the suitability of photocatalysts for overall water splitting. The most important requirement when selecting photocatalyst materials is the band positions relative to hydrogen and oxygen evolution potentials. For most photocatalysts, surface modification by cocatalysts was found to be essential to achieve overall water splitting.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide and radiation water chemistry of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, E.; Watanabe, A.; Endo, M.; Takahashi, M.; Karasawa, H.

    1991-01-01

    G-values and rate constants at elevated temperature are reviewed and updated for computer simulation of water radiolysis in BWRs. Quantitative relationship between g-values of H 2 and OH was found out to govern numerically the radiolytic environment in the BWR primary system. Thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was measured in stagnant water in a quartz cell and the rate constant was determined at 2.4 x 10 -7 s -1 with the activation energy of 53.3 kJ/mol. Behaviors of hydrogen peroxide under HWC simulated with updated variables were consistent with plant observation at Forsmark 1 and 2. The most likely decomposition scheme of hydrogen peroxide at surface was identified as H 2 O 2 → H + HO 2 . Based on the surface decomposition process, actual level of hydrogen peroxide was estimated at 200-400 ppb under NWC condition from measured at BWR sampling stations. The estimation was consistent with the numerical simulation of BWR water radiolysis with updated variables. (author)

  11. Process for the production of hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William E [Naperville, IL; Maroni, Victor A [Naperville, IL; Willit, James L [Batavia, IL

    2010-05-25

    A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

  12. Deuterium exchange between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, S.M.; Ghosh, S.K.; Sadhukhan, H.K.

    1982-01-01

    The overall separation factors for the deuterium exchange between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen have been calculated over a wide range of temperature, pressure and deuterium concentrations. These data would be useful in the design and other considerations for heavy water production, based on hydrogen-water exchange. (author)

  13. Water-hydrogen isotope exchange process analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.; Alekseev, I.; Uborsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    The use of a numerical method is needed to find a solution to the equation system describing a general case of heterogeneous isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and liquid water in a column. A computer model of the column merely outputting the isotope compositions in the flows leaving the column, like the experimental column itself, is a 'black box' to a certain extent: the solution is not transparent and occasionally not fully comprehended. The approximate analytical solution was derived from the ZXY-diagram (McCabe-Thiele diagram), which illustrates the solution of the renewed computer model called 'EVIO-4.2' Several 'unusual' results and dependences have been analyzed and explained. (authors)

  14. Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Bowman, M.G.

    A process is described for the production of hydrogen from water by a sulfuric acid process employing electrolysis and thermo-chemical decomposition. The water containing SO/sub 2/ is electrolyzed to produce H/sub 2/ at the cathode and to oxidize the SO/sub 2/ to form H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at the anode. After the H/sub 2/ has been separated, a compound of the type M/sub r/X/sub s/ is added to produce a water insoluble sulfate of M and a water insoluble oxide of the metal in the radical X. In the compound M/sub r/X/sub s/, M is at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Ba/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Sr/sup 2 +/, La/sup 2 +/, and Pb/sup 2 +/; X is at least one radical selected from the group consisting of molybdate (MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), tungstate (WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and metaborate (BO/sub 2//sup 1 -/); and r and s are either 1, 2, or 3 depending upon the valence of M and X. The precipitated mixture is filtered and heated to a temperature sufficiently high to form SO/sub 3/ gas and to reform M/sub r/X/sub s/. The SO/sub 3/ is dissolved in a small amount of H/sub 2/O to produce concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the M/sub r/X/sub s/ is recycled to the process. Alternatively, the SO/sub 3/ gas can be recycled to the beginning of the process to provide a continuous process for the production of H/sub 2/ in which only water need be added in a substantial amount. (BLM)

  15. Novel catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Rolston, J.H.; Stevens, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Catalytic isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water offers many inherent potential advantages for the separation of hydrogen isotopes which is of great importance in the Canadian nuclear program. Active catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water vapor have long been available, but these catalysts are essentially inactive in the presence of liquid water. New, water-repellent platinum catalysts have been prepared by: (1) treating supported catalysts with silicone, (2) depositing platinum on inherently hydrophobic polymeric supports, and (3) treating platinized carbon with Teflon and bonding to a carrier. The activity of these catalysts for isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of liquid water and hydrogen saturated with water vapor has been measured in a packed trickle bed integral reactor. The performance of these hydrophobic catalysts is compared with nonwetproofed catalysts. The mechanism of the overall exchange reaction is briefly discussed. 6 figures

  16. Hydrogen Production by Water Electrolysis Via Photovoltaic Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hydrogen Production by Water Electrolysis Via Photovoltaic Panel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen fuel is a good alternative to fossil fuels. It can be produced using a clean energy without contaminated emissions. This work is concerned with experimental study on hydrogen production via solar energy. Photovoltaic module is used to convert solar radiation to electrical energy. The electrical energy is used for electrolysis of water into hydrogen and oxygen by using alkaline water electrolyzer with stainless steel electrodes. A MATLAB computer program is developed to solve a four-parameter-model and predict the characteristics of PV module under Baghdad climate conditions. The hydrogen production system is tested at different NaOH mass concentration of (50,100, 200, 300 gram. The maximum hydrogen production rate is 153.3 ml/min, the efficiency of the system is 20.88% and the total amount of hydrogen produced in one day is 220.752 liter.

  17. Hydrogen considerations in light-water power reactons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keilholtz, G.W.

    1976-02-01

    A critical review of the literature now available on hydrogen considerations in light-water power reactors (LWRs) and a bibliography of that literature are presented. The subject matter includes mechanisms for the generation of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures, a description of the fundamental properties of such mixtures, and their spontaneous ignition in both static and dynamic systems. The limits for hydrogen flammability and flame propagation are examined in terms of the effects of pressure, temperature, and additives; the emphasis is on the effects of steam and water vapor. The containment systems for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs) are compared, and methods to control hydrogen and oxygen under the conditions of both normal operation and postulated accidents are reviewed. It is concluded that hydrogen can be controlled so that serious complications from the production of hydrogen will not occur. The bibliography contains abstracts from the computerized files of the Nuclear Safety Information Center. Key-word, author, and permuted-title indexes are provided. The bibliography includes responses to questions asked by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which relate to hydrogen, as well as information on normal operations and postulated accidents including generation of hydrogen from core sprays. Other topics included in the ten sections of the bibliography are metal-water reactions, containment atmosphere, radiolytic gas, and recombiners

  18. Advances in hydrogen production by thermochemical water decomposition: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen demand as an energy currency is anticipated to rise significantly in the future, with the emergence of a hydrogen economy. Hydrogen production is a key component of a hydrogen economy. Several production processes are commercially available, while others are under development including thermochemical water decomposition, which has numerous advantages over other hydrogen production processes. Recent advances in hydrogen production by thermochemical water decomposition are reviewed here. Hydrogen production from non-fossil energy sources such as nuclear and solar is emphasized, as are efforts to lower the temperatures required in thermochemical cycles so as to expand the range of potential heat supplies. Limiting efficiencies are explained and the need to apply exergy analysis is illustrated. The copper-chlorine thermochemical cycle is considered as a case study. It is concluded that developments of improved processes for hydrogen production via thermochemical water decomposition are likely to continue, thermochemical hydrogen production using such non-fossil energy will likely become commercial, and improved efficiencies are expected to be obtained with advanced methodologies like exergy analysis. Although numerous advances have been made on sulphur-iodine cycles, the copper-chlorine cycle has significant potential due to its requirement for process heat at lower temperatures than most other thermochemical processes.

  19. Influence of Water Salinity on Air Purification from Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leybovych L.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of «sliding» water drop motion in the air flow was performed in software package FlowVision. The result of mathematical modeling of water motion in a droplet with diameter 100 microns at the «sliding» velocity of 15 m/s is shown. It is established that hydrogen sulfide oxidation occurs at the surface of phases contact. The schematic diagram of the experimental setup for studying air purification from hydrogen sulfide is shown. The results of the experimental research of hydrogen sulfide oxidation by tap and distilled water are presented. The dependence determining the share of hydrogen sulfide oxidized at the surface of phases contact from the dimensionless initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air has been obtained.

  20. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen - 2010 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thomas, George [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2011-06-01

    A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage The purpose of this White Paper is to describe and evaluate the potential of aluminum-water reactions for the production of hydrogen for on-board hydrogen-powered vehicle applications. Although the concept of reacting aluminum metal with water to produce hydrogen is not new, there have been a number of recent claims that such aluminum-water reactions might be employed to power fuel cell devices for portable applications such as emergency generators and laptop computers, and might even be considered for possible use as the hydrogen source for fuel cell-powered vehicles.

  1. [Determination of the redox potential of water saturated with hydrogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskarev, I M; Ushkanov, V A; Aristova, N A; Likhachev, P P; Myslivets, T C

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that the redox potential of water saturated with hydrogen is -500--700 mV. The time of the establishment of the potential is 24 h. The potential somewhat increases with increasing volume of hydrogen introduced to a reservoir with water and practically does not depend on the presence of additions in water, provided these additions are not reduced by hydrogen. The pH value of water does not change after the addition of water. In a glass vessel with a metallic cover resting on the side, no decrease in potential during the 2.5-month storage was observed. In plastic bottles, the content of hydrogen decreased; on storage for more than two weeks, it disappeared almost completely, and as a result, the potential increased after storage for three to four weeks to a level near zero. In an open vessel, the potential remained negative for two days.

  2. Hydrogen Production from Semiconductor-based Photocatalysis via Water Splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C. S. Wu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is the ideal fuel for the future because it is clean, energy efficient, and abundant in nature. While various technologies can be used to generate hydrogen, only some of them can be considered environmentally friendly. Recently, solar hydrogen generated via photocatalytic water splitting has attracted tremendous attention and has been extensively studied because of its great potential for low-cost and clean hydrogen production. This paper gives a comprehensive review of the development of photocatalytic water splitting for generating hydrogen, particularly under visible-light irradiation. The topics covered include an introduction of hydrogen production technologies, a review of photocatalytic water splitting over titania and non-titania based photocatalysts, a discussion of the types of photocatalytic water-splitting approaches, and a conclusion for the current challenges and future prospects of photocatalytic water splitting. Based on the literatures reported here, the development of highly stable visible–light-active photocatalytic materials, and the design of efficient, low-cost photoreactor systems are the key for the advancement of solar-hydrogen production via photocatalytic water splitting in the future.

  3. Neutronic studies of a liquid hydrogen-water composite moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, T.; Ooi, M.; Iwasa, H.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Iverson, E.B.; Crabtree, J.A.; Lucas, A.T.

    2001-01-01

    A liquid hydrogen-liquid water composite moderator may provide performance like liquid methane at high-power spallation sources where liquid methane is impractical. We have measured the neutronic properties of such a composite moderator, where a hydrogen layer 1.25 cm thick was closely backed by water layers of 1.75 cm and 3.75 cm thickness. We also studied a moderator in which a 1.75 cm water layer was closely backed by a 1.25 cm hydrogen layer. We further performed simulations for each of these systems for comparison to the experimental results. We observed enhancement of the spectral intensity in the 'thermal' energy range as compared to the spectrum from a conventional liquid hydrogen moderator. This enhancement grew more significant as the water thickness increased, although the pulse shapes became wider as well. (author)

  4. Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-31

    The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

  5. Analysis of a Hydrogen Isotope separation process based on a continuous hydrogen-water exchange on column Transitions of Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodor, I.

    1988-01-01

    The analysed system consists of two plane-parallel walls, a water film flows down a wall, a catalyst layer is disposed on the other, a water vapour-hydrogen mixture moves up between the walls. A mathematical treatment is presented which permits to calculate the overall transfer coefficients and other parameters of practical interest from the local differential equations. (author)

  6. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  7. Molecular cobalt pentapyridine catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Sun, Yujie

    2013-11-05

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition including the moiety of the general formula. [(PY5Me.sub.2)CoL].sup.2+, where L can be H.sub.2O, OH.sup.-, a halide, alcohol, ether, amine, and the like. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water or sea water can be subject to low electric potentials, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen.

  8. Development of Hydrogen Electrodes for Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjartansdóttir, Cecilía Kristín

    , production of electricity via fuel cells, fuel for internal combustion engines or gas turbines, or as a raw material for the production of synthetic fuels via Sabatier or Fischer - Tropsch process. In some situations it may be suitable to simply inject hydrogen into the existing natural gas based...... will be needed. Producing hydrogen via water electrolysis using surplus, low cost, power from renewables offers the possibility of increased production capacity and load management with no greenhouse emissions. Hydrogen is a valuable energy carrier, which is able to contribute to various forms of energy, such as...... infrastructure. Alkaline water electrolysis (AWE) is the current standard (stat of the art) for industrial large-scale water electrolysis systems. One of the main criteria for industrial AWE is efficient and durable electrodes. The aim of the present PhD study was to develop electrode materials for hydrogen...

  9. Hydrogen isotope separation in hydrophobic catalysts between hydrogen and liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Linsen, E-mail: yls2005@mail.ustc.edu.cn [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Luo, Deli [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, Jiangyou 621907 (China); Tang, Tao; Yang, Wan; Yang, Yong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Hydrogen isotope catalytic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water is a very effective process for deuterium-depleted potable water production and heavy water detritiation. To improve the characteristics of hydrophobic catalysts for this type of reaction, foamed and cellular structures of hydrophobic carbon-supported platinum catalysts were successfully prepared. Separation of deuterium or tritium from liquid water was carried out by liquid-phase catalytic exchange. At a gas–liquid ratio of 1.53 and exchange temperature of 70 °C, the theoretical plate height of the hydrophobic catalyst (HETP = 34.2 cm) was slightly lower than previously reported values. Changing the concentration of the exchange column outlet water yielded nonlinear changes in the height of the packing layer. Configurations of deuterium-depleted potable water and detritiation of heavy water provide references for practical applications.

  10. Mitigation of hydrogen hazards in water cooled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    Past considerations of hydrogen generated in containment buildings have tended to focus attention on design basis accidents (DBAs) where the extent of the in-core metal-water reaction is limited at low values by the operation of the emergency core cooling systems (ECCS). The radiolysis of water in the core and in the containment sump, together with the possible corrosion of metals and paints in the containment, are all relatively slow processes. Therefore, in DBAs the time scale involved for the generation of hydrogen allows sufficient time for initiation of measures to control the amount of hydrogen in the containment atmosphere and to prevent any burning. Provisions have been made in most plants to keep the local hydrogen concentration below its flammability limit (4% of volume) by means of mixing devices and thermal recombiners. Severe accidents, involving large scale core degradation and possibly even core concrete interactions, raise the possibility of hydrogen release rates greatly exceeding the capacity of conventional DBA hydrogen control measures. The accident at Three Mile Island illustrated the potential of unmitigated hydrogen accumulation to escalate the potential consequences of a severe accident. In a severe accident scenario, local high hydrogen concentrations can be reached in a short time, leading to flammable gas mixtures in containment. Another possibility is that local high steam concentrations will initially create an inert atmosphere and prevent burning for a limited time. While such temporary inerting provides additional time for mixing (dilution) of the hydrogen with containment air, depending on the quantity of hydrogen released, it prevents early intervention by deliberate ignition and sets up conditions for more severe combustion hazards after steam condensation eventually occurs, e.g., by spray initiation or the long term cooling down of the containment atmosphere. As the foregoing example indicates, analysis of the hydrogen threat in

  11. Tritium removal by hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water on hydrophobic catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, T.; Isomura, S.; Izawa, H.; Nakane, R.

    1980-01-01

    Many kinds of the hydrophobic catalysts for hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water have been prepared. The carriers are the hydrophobic organic materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE), monofluorocarbon-PTFE mixture(PTFE-FC), and styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer(SDB). 0.1 to 2 wt % Pt is deposited on the carriers. The Pt/SDB catalyst has much higher activity than the Pt/PTFE catalyst and the Pt/PTFE-FC catalyst shows the intermediate value of catalytic activity. The observation of electron microscope shows that the degrees of dispersion of Pt particles on the hydrophobic carriers result in the difference of catalytic activities. A gas-liquid separated type column containing ten stages is constructed. Each stage is composed of both the hydrophobic catalyst bed for the hydrogen gas/water vapor isotopic exchange and the packed column type bed for the water vapor/liquid water isotopic exchange. In the column hydrogen gas and water flow countercurrently and hydrogen isotopes are separated

  12. Exchange reaction between tritiated hydrogen and water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Koichi; Takano, Kenichi; Watanabe, Tamaki.

    1979-01-01

    Exchange reaction of tritiated hydrogen to water vapor under the condition of tritium gas concentration between 1 μCi/l and 1 mCi/l was studied. Tritium gas with hydrogen gas of 5 Torr and water of 20 mg were enclosed in a Pyrex glass ampule with volume of about 100 ml. The mixed gas with water vapor was heated with electric furnace. The heating time was between 2 and 100 hr, and the temperature was 776, 725, 675, 621, and 570.5 0 K. After heating, tritiated water was trapped with liquid nitrogen, and counted with a liquid scintillation counter. The radioactive concentration of initial tritiated hydrogen was measured with a calibrated ionization chamber. The main results obtained are as follows; 1) the concentration of produced tritiated water is well proportioned to that of initial tritiated hydrogen, 2) the activation energy of exchange reaction from tritiated hydrogen to tritiated water is 26.2 kcal/mol and that of inverse reaction is 27.4 kcal/mol, 3) the reaction rate at room temperature which calculated with activation energy is 1.04 x 10 -13 day -1 , and then exchange reaction at room temperature is negligible. (author)

  13. Hydrogen bonding characterization in water and small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2017-06-01

    The prototypical hydrogen bond in water dimer and hydrogen bonds in the protonated water dimer, in other small molecules, in water cyclic clusters, and in ice, covering a wide range of bond strengths, are theoretically investigated by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, considering not only a standard generalized gradient approximation functional but also, for the water dimer, hybrid and van der Waals corrected functionals. We compute structural, energetic, and electrostatic (induced molecular dipole moments) properties. In particular, hydrogen bonds are characterized in terms of differential electron density distributions and profiles, and of the shifts of the centres of maximally localized Wannier functions. The information from the latter quantities can be conveyed to a single geometric bonding parameter that appears to be correlated with the Mayer bond order parameter and can be taken as an estimate of the covalent contribution to the hydrogen bond. By considering the water trimer, the cyclic water hexamer, and the hexagonal phase of ice, we also elucidate the importance of cooperative/anticooperative effects in hydrogen-bonding formation.

  14. Hydrogen evolution from water using solid carbon and light energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, T; Sakata, T

    1979-11-15

    Hydrogen is produced from water vapour and solid carbon when mixed powders of TiO2, RuO2 and active carbon exposed to water vapor at room temperature, or up to 80 C, are illuminated. At 80 C, the rate of CO and COat2 formation increased. Therefore solar energy would be useful here as a combination of light energy and heat energy. Oxygen produced on the surface of the photocatalyst has a strong oxidising effect on the carbon. It is suggested that this process could be used for coal gasification and hydrogen production from water, accompanied by storage of solar energy.

  15. Formation of hydrogen during heterogeneous thermoradiolysis of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustamov, V.R.; Bugaenko, L.T.; Kerimov, V.K.; Kurbanov, M.A.; Mamedov, S.G.; Ali-Zade, Sh.N.

    1986-01-01

    At fairly high temperatures, the action of ionizing radiation on water should lead to chain decomposition of water, if in the system there is an acceptor for hydroxyl radical, which transforms it into a hydrogen atom by the reaction OH + X → XO + H, followed by the reaction of hydrogen atoms with a water molecule and formation of molecular hydrogen H + H 2 O → OH. This sequence has been realized in a homogeneous system containing carbon monoxide as an acceptor-transformer. It has been suggested that the same reactions can take place on the surface of solid bodies as in the gaseous phase. In the present work, results are reported of a study of radiational-chemical processes in water at 400 0 C in the presence of a highly dispersed iron(III) oxide with a specific surface of 5 x 10 3 m 2 /kg

  16. Method and apparatus for hydrogen production from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method, apparatuses and chemical compositions are provided for producing high purity hydrogen from water. Metals or alloys capable of reacting with water and producing hydrogen in aqueous solutions at ambient conditions are reacted with one or more inorganic hydrides capable of releasing hydrogen in aqueous solutions at ambient conditions, one or more transition metal compounds are used to catalyze the reaction and, optionally, one or more alkali metal-based compounds. The metal or alloy is preferably aluminum. The inorganic hydride is from a family of complex inorganic hydrides; most preferably, NaBH.sub.4. The transition metal catalyst is from the groups VIII and IB; preferably, Cu and Fe. The alkali metal-based compounds are preferably NaOH, KOH, and the like. Hydrogen generated has a purity of at least 99.99 vol. % (dry basis), and is used without further purification in all types of fuel cells, including the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell.

  17. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  18. Hydrogen in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Commission of the European Community (CEC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) decided in 1989 to update the state of the art concerning hydrogen in water cooled nuclear power reactors by commissioning a report which would review, all the available information to-date and make recommendations for the future. This joint report was prepared by committees formed by the IAEA and by the CEC. The aim of this report is to review the current understanding on the areas in which the research on hydrogen in LWR is conventionally presented, taking into account the results of the latest reported research developments. The main reactions through which hydrogen is produced are assessed together with their timings. An estimation of the amount of hydrogen produced by each reaction is given, in order to reckon their relative contribution to the hazard. An overview is then given of the state of knowledge of the most important phenomena taking place during its transport from the place of production and the phenomena which control the hydrogen combustion and the consequences of combustion under various conditions. Specific research work is recommended in each sector of the presented phenomena. The last topics reviewed in this report are the hydrogen detection and the prevent/mitigation of pressure and temperature loads on containment structures and structures and safety related equipment caused by hydrogen combustion

  19. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...... sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively....

  20. U.S. experience with hydrogen water chemistry in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.L.; Head, R.A.; Indig, M.E.; Ruiz, C.P.; Simpson, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen water chemistry in boiling water reactors is currently being adopted by many utilities in the U.S., with eleven units having completed preimplementation test programs, four units operating permanently with hydrogen water chemistry, and six other units in the process of installing permanent equipment. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking protection is required for the recirculation piping system and other regions of the BWR systems. The present paper explores progress in predicting and monitoring hydrogen water chemistry response in these areas. Testing has shown that impurities can play an important role in hydrogen water chemistry. Evaluation of their effects are also performed. Both computer modeling and in plant measurements show that each plant will respond uniquely to feedwater hydrogen addition. Thus, each plant has its own unique hydrogen requirement for recirculation system protecion. Furthermore, the modeling, and plant measurements show that different regions of the BWR respond differently to hydrogen injection. Thus, to insure protection of components other than the recirculation systems may require more (or less) hydrogen demand than indicated by the recirculation system measurements. In addition, impurities such as copper can play a significant role in establishing hydrogen demand. (Nogami, K.)

  1. Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid WaterMicrojets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2007-05-31

    We describe a method for generating molecular hydrogen directly from the charge separation effected via rapid flow of liquid water through a metal orifice, wherein the input energy is the hydrostatic pressure times the volume flow rate. Both electrokinetic currents and hydrogen production rates are shown to follow simple equations derived from the overlap of the fluid velocity gradient and the anisotropic charge distribution resulting from selective adsorption of hydroxide ions to the nozzle surface. Pressure-driven fluid flow shears away the charge balancing hydronium ions from the diffuse double layer and carries them out of the aperture. Downstream neutralization of the excess protons at a grounded target electrode produces gaseous hydrogen molecules. The hydrogen production efficiency is currently very low (ca. 10-6) for a single cylindrical jet, but can be improved with design changes.

  2. Photocatalysis in Generation of Hydrogen from Water

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Domen, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    of a reaction (e.g., water splitting or CO2 reduction) that occurs at extremely high temperatures. The photocatalytic system contains powder photocatalysts. Each photocatalyst particle should collect sufficient photons from the solar flux to cause

  3. Process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas and catalyst assembly therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A bithermal, catalytic, hydrogen isotope exchange process between liquid water and hydrogen gas to effect concentration of the deuterium isotope of hydrogen is described. Liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted with one another and with at least one catalytically active metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table; the catalyst body has a water repellent, gas and water vapor permeable, organic polymer or resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone resin coating, so that the isotope exchange takes place by two simultaneously occurring, and closely coupled in space, steps and concentration is effected by operating two interconnected sections containing catalyst at different temperatures. (U.S.)

  4. Nuclear quantum effects and hydrogen bond fluctuations in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Michele; Cuny, Jérôme; Parrinello, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogen bond (HB) is central to our understanding of the properties of water. However, despite intense theoretical and experimental study, it continues to hold some surprises. Here, we show from an analysis of ab initio simulations that take proper account of nuclear quantum effects that the hydrogen-bonded protons in liquid water experience significant excursions in the direction of the acceptor oxygen atoms. This generates a small but nonnegligible fraction of transient autoprotolysis events that are not seen in simulations with classical nuclei. These events are associated with major rearrangements of the electronic density, as revealed by an analysis of the computed Wannier centers and 1H chemical shifts. We also show that the quantum fluctuations exhibit significant correlations across neighboring HBs, consistent with an ephemeral shuttling of protons along water wires. We end by suggesting possible implications for our understanding of how perturbations (solvated ions, interfaces, and confinement) might affect the HB network in water. PMID:24014589

  5. The interaction of water and hydrogen with nickel surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Junjun

    2009-01-01

    As nickel and platinum are in the same group of the periodic table, the Ni(111) and Pt(111) surfaces may be expected to show similar interaction with water and hydrogen. However in this thesis, we show these interactions for Ni(111) are quite different from those of Pt(111). Moreover, our results

  6. Microstructure and hydrogen bonding in water-acetonitrile mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, Raymond D

    2010-12-16

    The connection of hydrogen bonding between water and acetonitrile in determining the microheterogeneity of the liquid mixture is examined using NPT molecular dynamics simulations. Mixtures for six, rigid, three-site models for acetonitrile and one water model (SPC/E) were simulated to determine the amount of water-acetonitrile hydrogen bonding. Only one of the six acetonitrile models (TraPPE-UA) was able to reproduce both the liquid density and the experimental estimates of hydrogen bonding derived from Raman scattering of the CN stretch band or from NMR quadrupole relaxation measurements. A simple modification of the acetonitrile model parameters for the models that provided poor estimates produced hydrogen-bonding results consistent with experiments for two of the models. Of these, only one of the modified models also accurately determined the density of the mixtures. The self-diffusion coefficient of liquid acetonitrile provided a final winnowing of the modified model and the successful, unmodified model. The unmodified model is provisionally recommended for simulations of water-acetonitrile mixtures.

  7. Hydrogen generation through static-feed water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, F. C.; Schubert, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    A static-feed water electrolysis system (SFWES), developed under NASA sponsorship, is presented for potential applicability to terrestrial hydrogen production. The SFWES concept uses (1) an alkaline electrolyte to minimize power requirements and materials-compatibility problems, (2) a method where the electrolyte is retained in a thin porous matrix eliminating bulk electrolyte, and (3) a static water-feed mechanism to prevent electrode and electrolyte contamination and to promote system simplicity.

  8. Finite size effects on hydrogen bonds in confined water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musat, R.; Renault, J.P.; Le Caer, S.; Pommeret, S.; Candelaresi, M.; Palmer, D.J.; Righini, R.

    2008-01-01

    Femtosecond IR spectroscopy was used to study water confined in 1-50 nm pores. The results show that even large pores induce significant changes (for example excited-state lifetimes) to the hydrogen-bond network, which are independent of pore diameter between 1 and 50 nm. Thus, the changes are not surface-induced but rather finite size effects, and suggest a confinement-induced enhancement of the acidic character of water. (authors)

  9. Critical overview on water - hydrogen isotopic exchange; a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculea, Marius

    2002-01-01

    Water - hydrogen isotopic exchange process is attractive due to its high separation factor; it is neither corrosive or pollutant and, when used as a technological process of heavy water production, it requires water as raw material. Its efficiency depends strongly on the catalyst performance and geometry of the isotopic water - hydrogen exchange zone in which the isotopic transfer proceeds in two steps: liquid vapor distillation in the presence of an inert gas and a catalytic reaction in vapor - gas gaseous phase. An overview of the water hydrogen isotopic exchange is presented and technological details of the Trail - Canada facility as well as characteristics of the two pilots operated in Romania with Ni, Cr and hydrophobic catalysts are described. The mathematical approach of the successive water-water vapor-hydrogen isotopic exchange process given is based on a mathematical model worked out earlier by Palibroda. Discrepancies between computation and experimental results, lower than 11% for extreme cases and around 6% for the average range are explained as due to the ratio of the exchange potentials. Assumption is made in the theoretical approach that this ratio is positive and constant all long the column while the measurements showed that it varies within 0.7 and 1.1 at the upper end and within - 2.5 and - 4.4 at the lower end, what indicates a strong end effect. In conclusion it is stressed that a competing technological solution is emerging based on a monothermal electrolytic process or a bithermal - bibaric process both for heavy water and tritium separation process

  10. Nuclear Production of Hydrogen Using Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.C.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Schultz, K.R.; Marshall, A.C.; Showalter, S.K.; Pickard, P.S.; Funk, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high-temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station in a thermochemical water-splitting cycle. We carried out a detailed literature search to create a searchable database with 115 cycles and 822 references. We developed screening criteria to reduce the list to 25 cycles. We used detailed evaluation to select two cycles that appear most promising, the Adiabatic UT-3 cycle and the Sulfur-Iodine cycle. We have selected the Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle for further development. We then assessed the suitability of various nuclear reactor types to the production of hydrogen from water using the Sulfur-Iodine cycle. A basic requirement is to deliver heat to the process interface heat exchanger at temperatures up to 900 deg. C. We considered nine categories of reactors: pressurized water-cooled, boiling water-cooled, organic-cooled, alkali metal-cooled, heavy metal-cooled, gas-cooled, molten salt-cooled, liquid-core and gas-core reactors. We developed requirements and criteria to carry out the assessment, considering design, safety, operational, economic and development issues. This assessment process led to our choice of the helium gas-cooled reactor for coupling to the Sulfur-Iodine cycle. In continuing work, we are investigating the improvements that have been proposed to the Sulfur-Iodine cycle and will generate an integrated flowsheet describing a hydrogen production plant powered by a high-temperature helium gas-cooled nuclear reactor. This will allow us to size process equipment and calculate hydrogen production efficiency and capital cost, and to estimate the cost of the hydrogen produced as a function of nuclear reactor cost. (authors)

  11. Thermochemical production of hydrogen from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, J.E.; Conger, W.L.; Carty, R.H.; Barker, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the selection and evaluation of multi-step thermochemical water-splitting cycles is presented. A computerized and thermodynamic and chemical engineering analysis procedure is discussed with calculates, among other things, the thermal efficiency of the process which is defined to be the ratio of the enthalpy change for water decomposition to the total thermal energy required by the process. Changes in the thermodynamic state in each step of the process are also determined. Engineering considerations such as the effect of approach to equilibrium in the chemical reaction steps on the work of separation, and the magnitude of the recycle streams are included. Important practical matters such as thermal regeneration in the product and reactant streams are dealt with in some detail. The effect of reaction temperature on thermal efficiency is described and the use of the analysis procedure is demonstrated by applying it to several processes. (author)

  12. Economics of liquid hydrogen from water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F. N.; Moore, W. I.; Walker, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    An economical model for preliminary analysis of LH2 cost from water electrolysis is presented. The model is based on data from vendors and open literature, and is suitable for computer analysis of different scenarios for 'directional' purposes. Cost data associated with a production rate of 10,886 kg/day are presented. With minimum modification, the model can also be used to predict LH2 cost from any electrolyzer once the electrolyzer's cost data are available.

  13. Generating para-water from para-hydrogen: A Gedankenexperiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Konstantin L; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2018-07-01

    A novel conceptual approach is described that is based on the transfer of hyperpolarization from para-hydrogen in view of generating a population imbalance between the two spin isomers of H 2 O. The approach is analogous to SABRE (Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange) and makes use of the transfer of spin order from para-hydrogen to H 2 O in a hypothetical organometallic complex. The spin order transfer is expected to be most efficient at avoided level crossings. The highest achievable enrichment levels of para- and ortho-water are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Water fog inerting of hydrogen-air mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalosh, R.G.; Bajpai, S.N.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory tests have been conducted to determine the effects of water fog density, droplet diameter and temperature on the lower flammable limit (LFL) of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Five different fog nozzles were used to generate dense fogs with volume mean drop diameters ranging from 20 micro-meters to 115 micro-meters. At 20 0 C, these nozzles marginally raised the hydrogen LFL from 4.0 vol.% hydrogen to typically 4.8%, with one exceptional nozzle producing an LFL of 7.2%. At 50 0 C, the LFL in the presence of dense fog ranged from 5.0 to 7.9%, while at 70 0 C, the range was 5.9 to 8.5%. Fog densities required to achieve a given level of partial inerting increased with approximately the second power of average drop diameter, as predicted by a theoretical flame quenching analysis

  15. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  16. Hydrogen/deuterium substitution methods: understanding water structure in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soper, A.K.

    1993-01-01

    The hydrogen/deuterium substitution method has been used for different applications, such as the short range order between water molecules in a number of different environments (aqueous solutions of organic molecules), or to study the partial structure factors of water at high pressure and temperature. The absolute accuracy that can be obtained remains uncertain, but important qualitative information can be obtained on the local organization of water in aqueous solution. Some recent results with pure water, methanol and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) solutions are presented. It is shown that the short range water structure is not greatly affected by most solutes except at high concentrations and when the solute species has its own distinctive interaction with water (such as a dissolved small ion). 3 figs., 14 refs

  17. Production of hydrogen using composite membrane in PEM water electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhi priya, E.L.; Mahender, C.; Mahesh, Naga; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally, Hyderabad-500 085, A.P (India); Anjaneyulu, Y. [Director, TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Electrolysis of water is the best known technology till today to produce hydrogen. The only practical way to produce hydrogen using renewable energy sources is by proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysis. The most commonly used PEM membrane is Nafion. Composite membrane of TiO2 is synthesized by casting method using Nafion 5wt% solution. RuO2 is used as anode and 10 wt% Pd on activated carbon is used as cathode in the water electrolyser system. The performance of this Composite membrane is studied by varying voltage range 1.8 to 2.6V with respect to hydrogen yield and at current density 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5(A cm-2). This Composite membrane has been tested using in-house fabricated single cell PEM water electrolysis cell with 10cm2 active area at temperatures ranging from 30,45,65 850c and at 1 atmosphere pressure.

  18. Hydrogen production by thermal water splitting using a thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudesocque, N.; Lafon, C.; Girold, C.; Vandensteendam, C.; Baronnet, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    CEA has been working for more than 10 years in plasma technologies devoted to waste treatment: incineration, vitrification, gases and liquid treatment. Based on this experience, CEA experiments since several years an innovative route for hydrogen production by thermal water splitting, using a plasma as heat source. This new approach could be considered as an alternative to electrolysis for massive hydrogen production from water and electricity. This paper presents a brief state of the art of water thermal plasmas, showing the temperatures and quench velocity ranges technologically achievable today. Thermodynamic properties of a water plasma are presented and discussed. A kinetic computational model is presented, describing the behavior of splitted products during the quench in a plasma plume for various parameters, such as the quench rate. The model results are compared to gas analysis in the plasma plume obtained with in-situ sampling probe. The plasma composition measurements are issued from an Optical Emission Spectroscopic method (OES). The prediction of 30 % H 2 recovery with a 108 K.s -1 quench rate has been verified. A second experimentation has been performed: mass gas analysis, flowrate measurement and OES to study the 'behavior' and species in underwater electrical arc stricken between graphite electrodes. With this quench, a synthesis gas was produced with a content 55 % of hydrogen. (authors)

  19. Molecular metal-Oxo catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2015-02-24

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition having the general formula [(PY5W.sub.2)MO].sup.2+, wherein PY5W.sub.2 is (NC.sub.5XYZ)(NC.sub.5H.sub.4).sub.4C.sub.2W.sub.2, M is a transition metal, and W, X, Y, and Z can be H, R, a halide, CF.sub.3, or SiR.sub.3, where R can be an alkyl or aryl group. The two accompanying counter anions, in one embodiment, can be selected from the following Cl.sup.-, I.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, and CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water containing electrolyte or straight sea water can be subject to an electric potential of between 1.0 V and 1.4 V relative to the standard hydrogen electrode, which at pH 7 corresponds to an overpotential of 0.6 to 1.0 V, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen with an optimal turnover frequency of ca. 1.5 million mol H.sub.2/mol catalyst per h.

  20. Deuterium isotope separation factor between hydrogen and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolston, J.H.; den Hartog, J.; Butler, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The overall deuterium isotope separation factor between hydrogen and liquid water, α, has been measured directly for the first time between 280 and 370 0 K. The data are in good agreement with values of α calculated from literature data on the equilibrium constant for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water vapor, K 1 , and the liquid-vapor separation factor, α/sub V/. The temperature dependence of α over the range 273-473 0 K based upon these new experimental results and existing literature data is given by the equation ln α = -0.2143 + (368.9/T) + (27,870/T 2 ). Measurements on α/sub V/ given in the literature have been surveyed and the results are summarized over the same temperature range by the equation ln α/sub V/ = 0.0592 - (80.3/T) +

  1. Preparation of water soluble chitosan by hydrolysis using hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhenqiang; Wu, Shengjun; Chen, Jinhua

    2013-08-01

    Chitosan is not soluble in water, which limits its wide application particularly in the medicine and food industry. In the present study, water soluble chitosan (WSC) was prepared by hydrolyzing chitosan using hydrogen peroxide under the catalysis of phosphotungstic acid in homogeneous phase. Factors affecting hydrolysis were investigated and the optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined. The WSC structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The resulting products were composed of chitooligosaccharides of DP 2-9. The WSC content of the product and the yield were 94.7% and 92.3% (w/w), respectively. The results indicate that WSC can be effectively prepared by hydrolysis of chitosan using hydrogen peroxide under the catalysis of phosphotungstic acid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A technique for measuring hydrogen and water in inert gases and the hydrogen concentration in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.A.

    1978-04-01

    A method is described of measuring the hydrogen and water content of an inert gas. It is based upon the use of an electrochemical oxygen cell and has a high sensitivity at low hydrogen and water levels. The following possible applications of the method are described together with supporting experimental measurements: improving the sensitivity and range of the present PFR secondary circuit hydrogen detection instruments; the measurement of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in steels; the measurement of waterside corrosion rates of boiler steels; on-line monitoring of waterside boiler corrosion. Attention is given to the characteristics of diffusion barriers in relation to the first and last of these. (author)

  3. Nuclear Data Libraries for Hydrogen in Light Water Ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, L; Gillette, V.H

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear data libraries were produced for hydrogen (H) in light water ice at different temperatures, 20, 30, 50, 77, 112, 180, 230 K.These libraries were produced using the NJOY nuclear data processing system.With this code we produce pointwise cross sections and related quantities, in the ENDF format, and in the ACE format for MCNP.Experimental neutron spectra at such temperatures were compared with MCNP4B simulations, based on the locally produced libraries, leading to satisfactory results

  4. Control of microbially generated hydrogen sulfide in produced waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, E.D.; Vance, I.; Gammack, G.F.; Duncan, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    Production of hydrogen sulfide in produced waters due to the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a potentially serious problem. The hydrogen sulfide is not only a safety and environmental concern, it also contributes to corrosion, solids formation, a reduction in produced oil and gas values, and limitations on water discharge. Waters produced from seawater-flooded reservoirs typically contain all of the nutrients required to support SRB metabolism. Surface processing facilities provide a favorable environment in which SRB flourish, converting water-borne nutrients into biomass and H{sub 2}S. This paper will present results from a field trial in which a new technology for the biochemical control of SRB metabolism was successfully applied. A slip stream of water downstream of separators on a produced water handling facility was routed through a bioreactor in a side-steam device where microbial growth was allowed to develop fully. This slip stream was then treated with slug doses of two forms of a proprietary, nonbiocidal metabolic modifier. Results indicated that H{sub 2}S production was halted almost immediately and that the residual effect of the treatment lasted for well over one week.

  5. Reforming water to generate hydrogen using mechanical alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena F, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to generate a hydrogen production system by means of mechanical milling, in which 0.1 g of magnesium were weighed using a volume of 300 μL for each water solvent (H_2O) and methanol (CH_3OH) in a container to start mechanical milling for 2, 4 and 6 h. Once the mechanical milling was finished, the hydrogen that was produced every two hours was measured to determine the appropriate milling time in the production, also in each period of time samples of the powders produced during the milling of Mg were taken, in this process we used characterization techniques such as: X-ray diffraction at an angle of 2θi 5 and 2θf 90 degrees and scanning electron microscopy, taking micrographs of 100, 500, 1000 and 5000 magnifications. According to the mechanical milling results hydrogen was obtained when using water, as well as with methanol. In the techniques of X-ray diffraction characterization different results were obtained before and after the milling, since by the diffractogram s is possible to observe how the magnesium to be put in the mechanical milling along with the water and methanol was diminishing to be transformed into hydroxide and magnesium oxide, as well as in the micrographs taken with scanning electron microscopy the change in the magnesium morphology to hydroxide and magnesium oxide is observed. (Author)

  6. Concept of low pressure water cracking for hydrogen production in the conventional Light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Young; Lee, Bong Ju

    2006-01-01

    The global warnings associated with the global warming due to the flue gas from fossil fuel and with the unstable market of the fossil fuel have been expanding. As a solution, it has been widely accepted that hydrogen can be a good candidate for the future energy source. Hydrogen can be produced by splitting water, an abundant material in the earth, and no pollutants are produced during its combustion. Furthermore, it can produce electricity directly in the fuel cell. Therefore, transport industry is preparing the vehicles for the hydrogen fuel. The future society based on the hydrogen energy naturally needs the power station for the mass production of the hydrogen and distribution and storage systems

  7. Water's Interfacial Hydrogen Bonding Structure Reveals the Effective Strength of Surface-Water Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sucheol; Willard, Adam P

    2018-06-05

    We combine all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with a mean field model of interfacial hydrogen bonding to analyze the effect of surface-water interactions on the structural and energetic properties of the liquid water interface. We show that the molecular structure of water at a weakly interacting ( i.e., hydrophobic) surface is resistant to change unless the strength of surface-water interactions are above a certain threshold. We find that below this threshold water's interfacial structure is homogeneous and insensitive to the details of the disordered surface, however, above this threshold water's interfacial structure is heterogeneous. Despite this heterogeneity, we demonstrate that the equilibrium distribution of molecular orientations can be used to quantify the energetic component of the surface-water interactions that contribute specifically to modifying the interfacial hydrogen bonding network. We identify this specific energetic component as a new measure of hydrophilicity, which we refer to as the intrinsic hydropathy.

  8. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  9. Molecular hydrogen solvated in water – A computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Śmiechowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The aqueous hydrogen molecule is studied with molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature and pressure conditions, using a newly developed flexible and polarizable H 2 molecule model. The design and implementation of this model, compatible with an existing flexible and polarizable force field for water, is presented in detail. The structure of the hydration layer suggests that first-shell water molecules accommodate the H 2 molecule without major structural distortions and two-dimensional, radial-angular distribution functions indicate that as opposed to strictly tangential, the orientation of these water molecules is such that the solute is solvated with one of the free electron pairs of H 2 O. The calculated self-diffusion coefficient of H 2 (aq) agrees very well with experimental results and the time dependence of mean square displacement suggests the presence of caging on a time scale corresponding to hydrogen bond network vibrations in liquid water. Orientational correlation function of H 2 experiences an extremely short-scale decay, making the H 2 –H 2 O interaction potential essentially isotropic by virtue of rotational averaging. The inclusion of explicit polarizability in the model allows for the calculation of Raman spectra that agree very well with available experimental data on H 2 (aq) under differing pressure conditions, including accurate reproduction of the experimentally noted trends with solute pressure or concentration

  10. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed

  11. Laser spectroscopic visualization of hydrogen bond motions in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratos, S.; Leicknam, J.-Cl.; Pommeret, S.; Gallot, G.

    2004-12-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe experiments are described permitting a visualization of molecular motions in diluted HDO/D 2O solutions. The experiments were realized in the mid-infrared spectral region with a time resolution of 150 fs. They were interpreted by a careful theoretical analysis, based on the correlation function approach of statistical mechanics. Combining experiment and theory, stretching motions of the OH⋯O bonds as well as HDO rotations were 'filmed' in real time. It was found that molecular rotations are the principal agent of hydrogen bond breaking and making in water. Recent literatures covering the subject, including molecular dynamics simulations, are reviewed in detail.

  12. Early hydrogen water chemistry in the boiling water reactor: industry-first demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Odell, Andrew D.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2012-09-01

    Hydrogen injection into the BWR feedwater during power operation has resulted in significant IGSCC reductions. Further, noble metal application (NMCA) during shutdown or On-line NobleChem TM (OLNC) during power operation has greatly reduced the required hydrogen injection rate by catalyzing the hydrogen-oxygen reaction on the metal surfaces, reducing the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at operating temperature to well below the mitigation ECP of -230 mV (SHE) at reactor water hydrogen to oxidant (O 2 + H 2 O 2 ) molar ratios of ≥2. Since IGSCC rates increase markedly at reduced temperature, and the potential for crack initiation exists, additional crack mitigation was desired. To close this gap in mitigation, the EPRI BWR Startup ECP Reduction research and development program commenced in 2008 to undertake laboratory and feasibility studies for adding a reductant to the reactor water system during start-ups. Under this program, ECP reductions of noble metal treated stainless steel sufficient to mitigate IGSCC at startup temperatures were achieved in the laboratory in the absence of radiation at hydrogen, hydrazine and carbohydrazide to oxygen molar ratios of ≥ 2, ≥1.5 and ≥0.7, respectively. Based on the familiarity of operating BWRs with using hydrogen, a demonstration of hydrogen injection during the startup of an actual BWR using noble metals was planned. This process, named EHWC (Early Hydrogen Water Chemistry), differs from the HDS (Hydrogen During Startup) approach that has been successful in Japan in that HDS injects sufficient hydrogen for bulk oxidant reduction whereas EHWC injects a smaller amount of hydrogen, sufficient to achieve a hydrogen:oxidant molar ratio of at least two at noble metal treated surfaces. The industry-first EHWC demonstration was performed at Exelon's Peach Bottom 3 nuclear power plant in October 2011. Prior to EHWC, Peach Bottom 3 had one NMCA (October 1999) and five annual OLNC applications (starting in 2007

  13. From water to water, hydrogen as a renewable energy vector for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillet, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    The most important property of hydrogen is that it is the cleanest fuel. Its combustion produces only water and a small amount of NO x . No acid rain, no greenhouse effect, no ozone layer depletion, no particulates aerosols. It seems then ideally suited for the conversion to renewable energy. Hydrogen has now established it self as a clean choice for an environmentally compatible energy system. It can provide a sustainable future for building, industrial and transport sectors of human activities. On average, it has about 20-30% higher combustion efficiency than fossil fuels and can produce electricity directly in fuel cells. In combination with solar PV- and hydro-electrolysis, it is compatible with land area requirements on a worldwide basis. If fossil fuels combustion environmental damage is taken into account, the hydrogen energy system is already cost effective. The question is thus no longer , but, and soon, will hydrogen energy become a practical solution to sustainable energy development. (Author)

  14. Generating hydrogen from sunlight and water using photovoltaic tandem cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-15

    Photoelectrochemical conversion of solar energy to energy in hydrogen at viable efficiency is a long-term goal needed to usher in the hydrogen economy worldwide. The twin cell technology based Tandem Cell tackles a number of challenges faced by single photoelectrochemical cell based water splitting and offers a novel way of utilising complimentary parts of the solar spectrum in two cells. The overall process results in a complete system driven by solar energy that splits water into hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen Solar Ltd is a UK based enterprise that is working towards commercialisation of this Tandem Cell technology. One of the main project activities involved the development and optimisation of methods for preparation of larger scale photocatalytic electrodes using reproducible low cost industrial processes, with efficiencies equal to or greater than those from small scale samples made experimentally in University laboratories. Stability is also an important issue and endurance testing was performed on some samples. Spray pyrolysis methods offer considerable promise as for preparation of metal oxide semiconductor films at low cost, reproducibly. These studies lead to optimised designs for Tandem Cells, resulting in construction of an array of 12 Tandem Cells. The findings of this array work, in particular engineering issues, were very significant. Based on this work it is intended to build another two array systems that consists of 24 Tandem Cells which will be tested for light to chemical conversion efficiency, to determine what efficiency has been achieved overall. The main conclusions resulting from this project were as follows. Overall, considerable progress was made in characterising the factors that affect photoelectrode performance efficiency but that, losses in efficiency when increasing the area of photoelectrodes was greater than expected and optimisation of efficiency at practical device scale needs more work. Based on the outcome of this work program

  15. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION; A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Jerry Meldon; Xiaomei Qi

    2001-01-01

    Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperature to improve reaction kinetics. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H(sub 2) removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H(sub 2)-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. In the first year of the project, we prepared a series of nanostructured Cu- and Fe-containing ceria catalysts by a special gelation/precipitation technique followed by air calcination at 650 C. Each sample was characterized by ICP for elemental composition analysis, BET-N2 desorption for surface area measurement, and by temperature-programmed reduction in H(sub 2) to evaluate catalyst reducibility. Screening WGS tests with catalyst powders were conducted in a flow microreactor at temperatures in the range of 200-550 C. On the basis of both activity and stability of catalysts in simulated coal gas, and in CO(sub 2)-rich gases, a Cu-CeO(sub 2) catalyst formulation was selected for further study in this project. Details from the catalyst development and testing work are given in this report. Also in this report, we present H(sub 2) permeation data collected with unsupported flat membranes of pure Pd and Pd-alloys over a wide temperature window

  16. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J. (Energy Systems)

    2011-03-14

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation without using an external power supply or circuitry. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen using OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  17. Experimental studies on catalytic hydrogen recombiners for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drinovac, P.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of core melt accidents in nuclear power plants a large amount of hydrogen can be produced and form an explosive or even detonative gas mixture with aerial oxygen in the reactor building. In the containment atmosphere of pressurized water reactors hydrogen combines a phlogistically with the oxygen present to form water vapor even at room temperature. In the past, experimental work conducted at various facilities has contributed little or nothing to an understanding of the operating principles of catalytic recombiners. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to conduct detailed investigations on a section of a recombiner essentially in order to deepen the understanding of reaction kinetics and heat transport processes. The results of the experiments presented in this dissertation form a large data base of measurements which provides an insight into the processes taking place in recombiners. The reaction-kinetic interpretation of the measured data confirms and deepens the diffusion theory - proposed in an earlier study. Thus it is now possible to validate detailed numeric models representing the processes in recombiners. Consequently the present study serves to broaden and corroborate competence in this significant area of reactor technology. In addition, the empirical knowledge thus gained may be used for a critical reassessment of previous numeric model calculations. (orig.)

  18. Modeling water and hydrogen networks with partitioning regeneration units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.M. Shehata

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Strict environment regulations in chemical and refinery industries lead to minimize resource consumption by designing utility networks within industrial process plants. The present study proposed a superstructure based optimization model for the synthesis of water and hydrogen networks with partitioning regenerators without mixing the regenerated sources. This method determines the number of partitioning regenerators needed for the regeneration of the sources. The number of the regenerators is based on the number of sources required to be treated for recovery. Each source is regenerated in an individual partitioning regenerator. Multiple regeneration systems can be employed to achieve minimum flowrate and costs. The formulation is linear in the regenerator balance equations. The optimized model is applied for two systems, partitioning regeneration systems of the fixed outlet impurity concentration and partitioning regeneration systems of the fixed impurity load removal ratio (RR for water and hydrogen networks. Several case studies from the literature are solved to illustrate the ease and applicability of the proposed method.

  19. Solubility of hydrogen in water in a broad temperature and pressure range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranenko, V.I.; Kirov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    In the coolant of water-water reactors, as a result of radiolytic decomposition of water and chemical additives (hydrazine and ammonia) and saturation of the make-up water of the first loop with free hydrogen in order to suppress radiolysis, 30-60 ml/kg of hydrogen is present in normal conditions. On being released from the water, it is free to accumulate in micropores of the metals, resulting in hydrogen embrittlement; gas accumulates in stagnant zones, with deterioration in heat transfer in the first loop and corresponding difficulty in the use of the reactor and the whole reactor loop. To determine the amount of free hydrogen and hydrogen dissolved in water in different elements of the first loop, it is necessary to know the limiting solubility of hydrogen in water at different temperatures and pressures, and also to have the corresponding theoretical dependences. The experimental data on the solubility of hydrogen in water are nonsystematic and do not cover the parameter ranges of modern nuclear power plants (P = 10-30 MPa, T = 260-370C). Therefore, the aim of the present work is to establish a well-founded method of calculating the limiting solubility of hydrogen in water and, on this basis, to compile tables of the limiting solubility of hydrogen in water at pressures 0.1-50 MPa and temperatures 0-370C

  20. The formation of hydrogen in the radiolysis of water in closed volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabakchi, S.A.; Lebedeva, I.E.

    1984-01-01

    By applying the sum total of the elementary reactions involving short-lived particles it is possible to fairly accurately calculate the kinetics of hydrogen formation and of its separation from water, and also to calculate the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and oxygen during radiolysis of pure water and water solutions at room temperature. This paper describes a semi-empirical method to calculate the kinetics of hydrogen formation for certain cases encountered in nuclear power production. (author)

  1. Interfacial electrochemistry of colloidal ruthenium dioxide and catalysis of the photochemical generation of hydrogen from water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The formation of hydrogen from water using solar energy is a very attractive research topic, because of the potential use of hydrogen as an alternative, clean fuel. It has been shown by many workers in the field that photochemical hydrogen generation can be achieved in an aqueous system,

  2. Separation of rate processes for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water in packed columns 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Hartog, J. den; Goodale, J.W.; Rolston, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    Wetproofed platinum catalysts in packed columns promote isotopic exchange between counter-current streams of hydrogen saturated with water vapour and liquid water. The net rate of deuterium transfer from isotopically enriched hydrogen has been measured and separated into two rate processes involving the transfer of deuterium from hydrogen to water vapour and from water vapour to liquid. These are compared with independent measurements of the two rate processes to test the two-step successive exchange model for trickle bed reactors. The separated transfer rates are independent of bed height and characterize the deuterium concentrations of each stream along the length of the bed. The dependences of the transfer rates upon hydrogen and liquid flow, hydrogen pressure, platinum loading and the effect of dilution of the hydrophobic catalyst with inert hydrophilic packing are reported. The results indicate a third process may be important in the transfer of deuterium between hydrogen and liquid water. (author)

  3. Analysis of hydrogen sulfide releases in heavy water production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, Cornelia; Dumitrescu, Maria; Preda, Irina; Lazar, Roxana

    1996-01-01

    Safety analyses conducted at ICIS concern primarily the heavy water production installations. The quantitative risk assessment needs the frequency calculation of accident sequences and consequences. In heavy water plants which obtain primary isotopic concentration of water by H 2 O - H 2 S exchange, large amounts of hydrogen sulfide which is a toxic, inflammable and explosive gas, are circulated. The first stage in calculating the consequences consists in potential analysis of H 2 S release. This work presents a study of this types of releases for pilot installations of the heavy water production at ICIS (Plant 'G' at Rm. Valcea). The installations which contain and maneuver large quantities of H 2 S and the mathematical models for different types of releases are presented. The accidents analyzed are: catastrophic column, container, spy-hole failures or gas-duct rupture and wall cracks in the installation. The main results are given as tables while the time variations of the flow rate and quantities of H 2 O released by stack disposal are plotted

  4. Modeling the transport of hydrogen in the primary coolant of pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, H.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Jain, A.K.; Dash, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy water (D 2 O) is used in primary heat transport systems of PHWRs. To suppress the radiolysis of heavy water and to control oxygen, hydrogen is added at regular intervals to the primary heat transport system. The added hydrogen finds it way to the heavy water storage tank after passing through the bleed condenser. Owing to the different temperatures and two phase region present in these systems, hydrogen gets redistributed. It is important to know the concentration of dissolved hydrogen in these regions in order to ensure a steady state dissolved hydrogen concentration in the primary system. Different power stations report variations in the frequency and quantity of hydrogen added to achieve the prescribed steady state level. This paper makes an attempt to account for the inventory of hydrogen and model its transport in PHT system. (author)

  5. Hydrogen evolution from water splitting on nanocomposite photocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Shangguan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The photocatalytic production of H2 in one step is potentially one of the most promising ways for the conversion and storage of solar energy. The paper overviews our recent studies on the photocatalysts splitting water into hydrogen under irradiation. The attention was mainly focused on the promotion effects of nanosized modifications in the interlayer and surface of photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution with visible light. The photocatalytic activity depended significantly on modification techniques, such as loading, proton exchange, and intercalation. The formation of a "nest" on the particle surface promoted a uniform distribution and strong combination of the nanosized particles on the surface of catalysts. By the methods of intercalation and pillaring as well as by selecting both host and guest, a large variety of molecular designed host–guest systems were obtained. Cadmium sulfide (CdS-intercalated composites showed higher activity and stability. This activity of K4Ce2M10O30 (M=Ta, Nb evolving H2 under visible light irradiation was enhanced by the incorporation of Pt, RuO2 and NiO as co-catalysts. Especially, the nanosized NiOx (Ni–NiO double-layer structure greatly prompted the photocatalytic H2 evolution significantly.

  6. An electrochemical sensor for monitoring oxygen or hydrogen in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitai Yang; Morris, D.R.; Lister, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Preliminary studies have been done on a simple electrochemical sensor which shows promise as a cheap, robust instrument for measuring dissolved oxygen or hydrogen in water. The sensor is based upon the solid-state electrolyte ''Nafion'' (trade name of perfluorinated sulphonic acid, manufactured by DuPont Inc.). The Nafion was dissolved in a mixture of aliphatic alcohols, made into a slurry with platinum black, and applied to a ∼1 cm-square electrode made of stainless steel gauze. The potential of the electrode was measured relative to a standard calomel electrode (SCE) in acid solutions at room temperature through which mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen or hydrogen and nitrogen were bubbled. The sensor was responsive to the equilibrating gas with good reproducibility. A similar sensor without the Nafion was not at all sensitive to changes in oxygen concentration. The voltage response of the sensor showed non-Nernstian behaviour, which suggests that the electrochemical reactions at the electrode surface are complex. Further testing of the sensor is required to verify its sensitivity and responsiveness in typical reactor coolant chemistries and to demonstrate its durability over a range of temperatures. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  7. An electrochemical sensor for monitoring oxygen or hydrogen in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Leitai; Morris, D R; Lister, D H [University of New Brunswick, Fredericton (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-02-01

    Preliminary studies have been done on a simple electrochemical sensor which shows promise as a cheap, robust instrument for measuring dissolved oxygen or hydrogen in water. The sensor is based upon the solid-state electrolyte ``Nafion`` (trade name of perfluorinated sulphonic acid, manufactured by DuPont Inc.). The Nafion was dissolved in a mixture of aliphatic alcohols, made into a slurry with platinum black, and applied to a {approx}1 cm-square electrode made of stainless steel gauze. The potential of the electrode was measured relative to a standard calomel electrode (SCE) in acid solutions at room temperature through which mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen or hydrogen and nitrogen were bubbled. The sensor was responsive to the equilibrating gas with good reproducibility. A similar sensor without the Nafion was not at all sensitive to changes in oxygen concentration. The voltage response of the sensor showed non-Nernstian behaviour, which suggests that the electrochemical reactions at the electrode surface are complex. Further testing of the sensor is required to verify its sensitivity and responsiveness in typical reactor coolant chemistries and to demonstrate its durability over a range of temperatures. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab.

  8. Hydrogen-water vapor mixtures: Control of hydrothermal atmospheres by hydrogen osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, H.R.

    1963-01-01

    Experiments at 700??C and 800 bars total pressure demonstrate positive deviations from ideality for mixtures of hydrogen and H2O gases. The deviations are greater than predicted with Stockmayer's method. The composition of the mixture and the fugacity of hydrogen are controlled by diffusing hydrogen through metallic membranes. The results give the fugacities of both H 2O and oxygen.

  9. Hydrogen absorption mechanisms and hydrogen interactions - defects: implications to stress corrosion of nickel based alloys in pressurized water reactors primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jambon, F.

    2012-01-01

    Since the late 1960's, a special form of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been identified for Alloy 600 exposed to pressurized water reactors (PWR) primary water: intergranular cracks develop during the alloy exposure, leading, progressively, to the complete ruin of the structure, and to its replacement. The main goal of this study is therefore to evaluate in which proportions the hydrogen absorbed by the alloy during its exposure to the primary medium can be responsible for SCC crack initiation and propagation. This study is aimed at better understanding of the hydrogen absorption mechanism when a metallic surface is exposed to a passivating PWR primary medium. A second objective is to characterize the interactions of the absorbed hydrogen with the structural defects of the alloy (dislocations, vacancies...) and evaluate to what extent these interactions can have an embrittling effect in relation with SCC phenomenon. Alloy 600-like single-crystals were exposed to a simulated PWR medium where the hydrogen atoms of water or of the pressuring hydrogen gas were isotopically substituted with deuterium, used as a tracer. Secondary ion mass spectrometry depth-profiling of deuterium was performed to characterize the deuterium absorption and localization in the passivated alloy. The results show that the hydrogen absorption during the exposure of the alloy to primary water is associated with the water molecules dissociation during the oxide film build-up. In an other series of experiments, structural defects were created in recrystallized samples, and finely characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, before or after the introduction of cathodic hydrogen. These analyses exhibited a strong hydrogen/defects interaction, evidenced by their structural reorganization under hydrogenation (coalescence, migrations). However, thermal desorption spectroscopy analyses indicated that these interactions are transitory, and dependent on

  10. Hydrogen production by water-splitting and HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courvoisier, P.; Rastouin, J.; Tilliette, Z.C.

    1976-01-01

    Some aspects of the use of heat of nuclear origin for the production of hydrogen by water-splitting are considered. General notions pertaining to the yield of chemical cycles are discussed and the heat balance corresponding to two specific processes is evaluated. The possibilities of high temperature reactors, with respect to the coolant temperature levels, are examined from the standpoint of core design and technology of some components. Furthermore these reactors can lead to excellent use of nuclear fuel. The coupling of the nuclear reactor with the chemical plant by means of a secondary helium circuit gives rise to the design of an intermediate heat exchanger, which is an important component of the overall installation [fr

  11. A new mechanism of hydrogen absorption in water-water reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, V.V.; Gann, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of fast protons, generated in water by fast neutrons of WWER-1000 reactor core, has been calculated using the code MCNPX. The main mechanism of fast proton generation in the moderator is found to be elastic scattering of fast neutrons on hydrogen nuclei. Fast protons with mean energy 1 MeV flow towards the surface of cladding material at flux density ∼ 0.1 μA/cm 2 . Proton range distribution profile in cladding material is calculated. The range of fast protons in zirconium averages 20 μm, the maximal proton range is larger than 200 μm. The rate of hydrogen deposition in 40 μm layer amounts to 5 x 10 -5 H/n/μ. A role of the suggested mechanism in process of zirconium clad hydrogenation during reactor irradiation is discussed.

  12. On the nature of hydrogen bonding between the phosphatidylcholine head group and water and dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Lawrence, M. Jayne; McLain, Sylvia E.; Lorenz, Christian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to provide a detailed investigation of the hydrogen bond networks around the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group in 1,2-dipropionyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine in pure water, 10 mol.% and 30 mol.% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-water solutions. Specifically, it is observed that DMSO replaces those water molecules that are within the first solvation shell of the choline, phosphate and ester groups of the PC head group, but are not hydrogen-bonded to the group. The effect of the presence of DMSO on the hydrogen bond network around the PC head groups of the lipid changes with the concentration of DMSO. In comparison to the hydrogen bond network observed in the pure water system, the number of hydrogen-bonded chains of solvent molecules increases slightly for the 10 mol.% DMSO system, while, in the 30 mol.% DMSO system, the number of hydrogen-bonded chains of solvent molecules decreases.

  13. Effects of hydrogen rich water on prolonged intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Ponte, Alessandro; Giovanelli, Nicola; Nigris, Daniele; Lazzer, Stefano

    2018-05-01

    Recent studies showed a positive effect of hydrogen rich water (HRW) intake on acid-base homeostasis at rest. We investigated 2-weeks of HRW intake on repeated sprint performance and acid-base status during prolonged intermittent cycling exercise. In a cross over single-blind protocol, 8 trained male cyclists (age [mean±SD] 41±7 years, body mass 72.3±4.4 kg, height 1.77±0.04 m, maximal oxygen uptake [V̇O2max] 52.6±4.4 mL·kg-1·min-1) were provided daily with 2 liters of placebo normal water (PLA, pH 7.6, oxidation/reduction potential [ORP] +230 mV, free hydrogen content 0 ppb) or HRW (pH 9.8, ORP -180 mV, free Hydrogen 450 ppb). Tests were performed at baseline and after each period of 2 weeks of treatment. The treatments were counter-balanced and the sequence randomized. The 30-minute intermittent cycling trial consisted in 10 3-minute blocks, each one composed by 90 seconds at 40% V̇O2max, 60 seconds at 60% V̇O2max, 16 seconds all out sprint, and 14 seconds active recovery. Oxygen uptake (V̇O2), heart rate and power output were measured during the whole test, while mean and peak power output (PPO), time to peak power and Fatigue Index (FI) were determined during all the 16 seconds sprints. Lactate, pH and bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations were determined at rest and after each sprint on blood obtained by an antecubital vein indwelling catheter. In the PLA group, PPO in absolute values decreased significantly at the 8th and 9th of 10 sprints and in relative values, ΔPPO, decreased significantly at 6th, 8th and 9th of 10 sprints (by mean: -12±5%, Pmay help to maintain PPO in repetitive sprints to exhaustion over 30 minutes.

  14. Generation of hydrogen free radicals from water for fuels by electric field induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nong, Guangzai; Chen, Yiyi; Li, Ming; Zhou, Zongwen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen free radicals are generated from water splitting. • Hydrogen fuel is generated from water by electric field induction. • Hydrocarbon fuel is generated from CO_2 and water by electric field induction. - Abstract: Water is the most abundant resource for generating hydrogen fuel. In addition to dissociating H"+ and "−OH ions, certain water molecules dissociate to radicals under an electric field are considered. Therefore, an electric field inducing reactor is constructed and operated to generate hydrogen free radicals in this paper. Hydrogen free radicals begin to be generated under a 1.0 V electric field, and increasing the voltage and temperature increases the number of hydrogen free radicals. The production rate of hydrogen free radicals is 0.245 mmol/(L h) at 5.0 V and room temperature. The generated hydrogen free radicals are converted to polymer fuel and hydrogen fuel at production rates of 0.0093 mmol/(L h) and 0.0038 mmol/(L h) respectively, under 5.0 V and 0.25 mA. The results provide a way to generate hydrogen free radicals, which might be used to generate hydrocarbon fuel in industrial manufacture.

  15. BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1993 Revision, Normal and hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, G.; Goddard, C.; Fitzpatrick, S.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of water chemistry control is to extend the operating life of the reactor and rector coolant system, balance-of-plant components, and turbines while simultaneously controlling costs to safeguard the continued economic viability of the nuclear power generation investment. To further this goal an industry committee of chemistry personnel prepared guidelines to identify the benefits, risks, and costs associated with water chemistry in BWRs and to provide a template for an optimized water chemistry program. This document replaces the BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines - 1986 Revision and the BWR Hydrogen Water Chemistry Guidelines -- 1987 Revision. It expands on the previous guidelines documents by covering the economic implications of BWR water chemistry control

  16. Hydrogen radiolytic release from zeolite 4A/water systems under γ irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frances, Laëtitia; Grivet, Manuel; Renault, Jean-Philippe; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; Ducret, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Although the radiolysis of bulk water is well known, some questions remain in the case of adsorbed or confined water, especially in the case of zeolites 4A, which are used to store tritiated water. An enhancement of the production of hydrogen is described in the literature for higher porous structures, but the phenomenon stays unexplained. We have studied the radiolysis of zeolites 4A containing different quantities of water under 137 Cs gamma radiation. We focused on the influence of the water loading ratio. The enhancement of hydrogen production compared with bulk water radiolysis has been attributed to the energy transfer from the zeolite to the water, and to the influence of the water structure organization in the zeolite. Both were observed separately, with a maximum efficiency for energy transfer at a loading ratio of about 13%, and a maximum impact of structuration of water at a loading ratio of about 4%. - Highlights: • We irradiated samples of zeolites 4A which contained different quantities of water. • We measured the quantity of hydrogen released. • Hydrogen radiolytic yields, present two maxima, for two water loading ratios. • Hydrogen release is enhanced by the strength of the zeolite/water interaction. • Hydrogen release is enhanced by the quantity of water interacting with the zeolite

  17. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  18. Measurement of the hydrogen yield in the radiolysis of water by dissolved fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, M.C. Jr.; Hart, E.J.; Flynn, K.F.; Gindler, J.E.

    1976-04-01

    Hydrogen from the radiolysis of water by dissolved fission products is stripped from the solution and collected by bubbling CO 2 through the solution. Quantitative measurements of the G value for hydrogen show that the yield is essentially the same as would be obtained by external gamma radiolysis of nonradioactive solutions of the same chemical composition. The hydrogen yield can be enhanced by addition of a hydrogen-atom donor, such as formic acid, to the solution. The yield of hydrogen from fission-waste solutions is discussed with respect to the question of whether it represents a significant energy source

  19. Determination of hydrogen peroxide in water by chemiluminescence detection, (1). Flow injection type hydrogen peroxide detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashiro, Naoya; Uchida, Shunsuke; Satoh, Yoshiyuki; Morishima, Yusuke; Yokoyama, Hiroaki; Satoh, Tomonori; Sugama, Junichi; Yamada, Rie

    2004-01-01

    A flow injection type hydrogen peroxide detection system with a sub-ppb detection limit has been developed to determine hydrogen peroxide concentration in water sampled from a high temperature, high pressure hydrogen peroxide water loop. The hydrogen peroxide detector is based on luminol chemiluminescence spectroscopy. A small amount of sample water (20 μl) is mixed with a reagent mixture, an aqueous solution of luminol and Co 2+ catalyst, in a mixing cell which is installed just upstream from the detection cell. The optimum values for pH and the concentrations of luminol and Co 2+ ion have been determined to ensure a lower detectable limit and a higher reproducibility. The photocurrent detected by the detection system is expressed by a linear function of the hydrogen peroxide concentration in the region of lower concentration ([H 2 O 2 ] 2 O 2 ] in the region of higher concentration ([H 2 O 2 ] > 10 ppb). The luminous intensity of luminol chemiluminescence is the highest when pH of the reagent mixture is 11.0. Optimization of the major parameters gives the lowest detectable limit of 0.3 ppb. (author)

  20. On line determination of deuterium in hydrogen water exchange reaction by mass spectrometry. IRP-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, J.D.; Alphonse, K.P.; Mishra, Sushama; Prabhu, S.A.; Mohan, Sadhana; Tangri, V.K.

    2007-01-01

    The Deuterium (D)/Hydrogen (H) analysis at low Concentration is generally carried out by Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometer is specially designed for the measurement of Mass 2 and 3 ratio. The Deuterium analysis of water and hydrogen in concentration range of a few ppm to about 1% plays an important role in the Heavy Water Production Plants. For the enrichment of the Deuterium concentration in H 2 O by H 2 - H 2 O exchange a catalyst is essential as reaction is relatively slow. Heavy Water Division has developed in house Platinum based catalyst for the isotopic exchange of Hydrogen and Water

  1. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysow, Jacek; del Rosso, Leonardo; Celli, Milva; Moraldi, Massimo; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2014-04-01

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

  2. Water in Earth's mantle: Hydrogen analysis of mantle olivine, pyroxenes and garnet using the SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Masanori; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Sueno, Shigeho

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen (or water) in the Earth's interior plays a key role in the evolution and dynamics of the planet. However, the abundance and the existence form of the hydrogen have scarcely been clear in practice. Hydrogen in the mantle was incorporated in the interior during the formation of the Earth. The incorporated hydrogen was hardly possible to concentrate locally inside the Earth considering its high mobility and high reactivity. The hydrogen, preferably, could be distributed homogeneously over the mantle and the core by the subsequent physical and chemical processes. Therefore, hydrogen in the mantle could be present in the form of trace hydrogen in nominally anhydrous mantle minerals. The hydrogen and the other trace elements in mantle olivines, orthopyroxenes, clinopyroxenes, and garnets were determined using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for elucidating (1) the exact hydrogen contents, (2) the correlation between the hydrogen and the other trace elements, (3) the dependence of the hydrogen contents on the depth, and (4) the dependence of the whole rock water contents on the depth.

  3. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortright, R. D.; Davda, R. R.; Dumesic, J. A.

    2002-08-01

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose-which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals-to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  4. Selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes (1981-1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.T.; Sutawane, U.B.; Rathi, B.N.

    1994-01-01

    A selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes is presented. This bibliography covers the period 1981-1992 and is in continuation to Division's earlier report BARC-1192 (1983). The sources of information for this compilation are Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atom Index and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in our library. No claim is made towards exhaustiveness of this bibliography even though sincere attempts have been made for a wide coverage. The bibliography is arranged under the headings: (1) production, purification, recovery, reprocessing and storage, (2) isotope exchange, 3) isotope analysis, (4) properties and (5) miscellaneous. Total number of references in the bibliography are 1762. (author)

  5. Decontamination flange film characterization for a boiling water reactor under hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, V.F.; Garbauskas, M.F.; Bozeman, J.

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steel artifacts removed from a boiling water reactor class 4 plant that operated under hydrogen water chemistry and experienced a difficult decontamination were submitted for oxide film characterization. The results reported for the corrosion film composition and structure are consistent with existing theoretical concepts for stainless steel corrosion, spinel structure site preferences (octahedral or tetrahedral) for transition metal ions, and potential-pH diagrams. The observed zinc effects on film stability and lower cobalt incorporation are also consistent with these theoretical concepts

  6. Separation of gaseous hydrogen from a water-hydrogen mixture in a fuel cell power system operating in a weightless environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, William E. (Inventor); Suljak, George T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A fuel cell power system for use in a weightless environment, such as in space, includes a device for removing water from a water-hydrogen mixture condensed from the exhaust from the fuel cell power section of the system. Water is removed from the mixture in a centrifugal separator, and is fed into a holding, pressure operated water discharge valve via a Pitot tube. Entrained nondissolved hydrogen is removed from the Pitot tube by a bleed orifice in the Pitot tube before the water reaches the water discharge valve. Water discharged from the valve thus has a substantially reduced hydrogen content.

  7. Evaporation of tungsten in vacuum at low hydrogen and water vapor pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrievskij, R.A.; Galkin, E.A.; Khromonozhkin, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of tungsten evaporation rates in the temperature range 1650-2500 K, partial hydrogen and water vapours pressures 1x10 -5 -10 Pa are presented. Experi-- mental plant, equipment employed and radiometric technique of tungsten evaporation study are described. The dependences of evaporation rate and probabilities of tungsten oxidation by residual vacuum water vapours and dependences of tungsten evaporation rate on partial hydrogen and water vapours pressures are determined [ru

  8. Laboratory Studies of Hydrogen Gas Generation Using the Cobalt Chloride Catalyzed Sodium Borohydride-Water Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    already use hydrogen for weather balloons . Besides cost, hydrogen has other advantages over helium. Hydrogen has more lift than helium, so larger...of water vapor entering the gas stream, and avoid damaging the balloon /aerostat (aerostats typically have an operational temperature range of -50 to...Aerostats: “Gepard” Tethered Aerostats with Mobile Mooring Systems. Available at http://rosaerosystems.com/aero/obj7. Accessed June 4, 2015. 11

  9. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  10. Inhalation of water electrolysis-derived hydrogen ameliorates cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats - A possible new hydrogen resource for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin; Chen, Xiao; Zhai, Xiao; Shi, Dongchen; Zhang, Rongjia; Zhi, Xin; Li, Xiaoqun; Gu, Zhengrong; Cao, Liehu; Weng, Weizong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liping; Sun, Xuejun; Ji, Fang; Hou, Jiong; Su, Jiacan

    2016-10-29

    Hydrogen is a kind of noble gas with the character to selectively neutralize reactive oxygen species. Former researches proved that low-concentration of hydrogen can be used to ameliorating cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Hydrogen electrolyzed from water has a hydrogen concentration of 66.7%, which is much higher than that used in previous studies. And water electrolysis is a potential new hydrogen resource for regular clinical use. This study was designed and carried out for the determination of safety and neuroprotective effects of water electrolysis-derived hydrogen. Sprague-Dawley rats were used as experimental animals, and middle cerebral artery occlusion was used to make cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. Pathologically, tissues from rats in hydrogen inhalation group showed no significant difference compared with the control group in HE staining pictures. The blood biochemical findings matched the HE staining result. TTC, Nissl, and TUNEL staining showed the significant improvement of infarction volume, neuron morphology, and neuron apoptosis in rat with hydrogen treatment. Biochemically, hydrogen inhalation decreased brain caspase-3, 3-nitrotyrosine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine-positive cells and inflammation factors concentration. Water electrolysis-derived hydrogen inhalation had neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats with the effect of suppressing oxidative stress and inflammation, and it is a possible new hydrogen resource to electrolyze water at the bedside clinically. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Hydrogen production through small capacity water electrolysis systems; Production d'hydrogene par electrolyse de l'eau. Application a des systemes de petite capacite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Ph. [TotalFinaElf, la Defense 6, 92 - Courbevoie (France)

    2002-01-01

    Less than 1 % of the world's hydrogen is produced by electrolysis of water, in large plants mainly in connection with hydropower. For users requiring extremely pure hydrogen, electrolysis can be a convenient mean of obtaining the required hydrogen quality, where cheap electricity is available. This paper aims at presenting the latest technical developments of small capacity electrolyzers, that could fuel hydrogen cells or internal combustion engines. (author)

  12. Update on materials performance and electrochemistry in hydrogen water chemistry at Dresden-2 BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indig, M.E.; Weber, J.E.; Davis, R.B.; Gordon, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies performed in 1982 indicated that if sufficient hydrogen was injected into the Dresden-2 BWR, IGSCC of sensitized austenitic stainless steel was mitigated. The present series of experiments were aimed at verification of the above finding, determining how much time off hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) could be tolerated and how HWC affected pre-existing cracks

  13. Hydrogen isotopes in individual amino acids reflect differentiated pools of hydrogen from food and water in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Marilyn L; Griffin, Patrick L; Newsome, Seth D

    2016-08-09

    Hydrogen isotope (δ(2)H) analysis is widely used in animal ecology to study continental-scale movement because δ(2)H can trace precipitation and climate. To understand the biochemical underpinnings of how hydrogen is incorporated into biomolecules, we measured the δ(2)H of individual amino acids (AAs) in Escherichia coli cultured in glucose-based or complex tryptone-based media in waters with δ(2)H values ranging from -55‰ to +1,070‰. The δ(2)H values of AAs in tryptone spanned a range of ∼250‰. In E. coli grown on glucose, the range of δ(2)H among AAs was nearly 200‰. The relative distributions of δ(2)H of AAs were upheld in cultures grown in enriched waters. In E. coli grown on tryptone, the δ(2)H of nonessential AAs varied linearly with the δ(2)H of media water, whereas δ(2)H of essential AAs was nearly identical to δ(2)H in diet. Model calculations determined that as much as 46% of hydrogen in some nonessential AAs originated from water, whereas no more than 12% of hydrogen in essential AAs originated from water. These findings demonstrate that δ(2)H can route directly at the molecular level. We conclude that the patterns and distributions in δ(2)H of AAs are determined through biosynthetic reactions, suggesting that δ(2)H could become a new biosignature for studying novel microbial pathways. Our results also show that δ(2)H of AAs in an organism's tissues provides a dual tracer for food and environmental (e.g., drinking) water.

  14. Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances around the reactor pressure vessel bottom of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shunsuke Uchida; Eishi Ibe; Katsumi Ohsumi

    1994-01-01

    Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances is a promising approach to preserve structural integrities of major components and structures in the primary cooling system of BWRs. The benefits of HWC application are usually accompanied by several disadvantages. After evaluating merits and demerits of HWC application, it is concluded that optimal amounts of hydrogen injected into the feed water can moderate corrosive circumstances, in the region to be preserved, without serious disadvantages. (authors). 1 fig., 4 refs

  15. Development and Improvement of Devices for Hydrogen Generation and Oxidation in Water Detritiation Facility Based on CECE Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenkevich, M.; Andreev, B.; Magomedbekov, E.; Park, Yu.; Sakharovsky, Yu.; Perevezentsev, A.

    2005-01-01

    Water detritiation facility based on CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) technology needs an electrolyser for water conversion to hydrogen. Use of a conventional alkali electrolyser requires a very deep purification of hydrogen stream from alkali prior to injection to LPCE (Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange) column. In some applications conversion of detritiated hydrogen back into water is required. This is usually performed via hydrogen catalytic oxidation in a recombiner. This paper presents results of study to improve hydrogen and oxygen purification for alkali electrolysers and develop a hydrogen recombiner based on use of hydrophobic catalyst

  16. Variation of the Effectiveness of Hydrogen Water Chemistry in a Boiling Water Reactor during Startup Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya

    2012-09-01

    For mitigating intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in an operating boiling water reactor (BWR), the technology of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) aiming at coolant chemistry improvement has been adopted worldwide. However, the hydrogen injection system employed in this technology was designed to operate only at power levels greater than 30% of the rated power or at coolant temperatures of greater than 450 deg. F. This system is usually in an idle and standby mode during a startup operation. The coolant in a BWR during a cold shutdown normally contains a relatively high level of dissolved oxygen from intrusion of atmospheric air. Accordingly, the structural materials in the primary coolant circuit (PCC) of a BWR could be exposed to a strongly oxidizing environment for a short period of time during a subsequent startup operation. At some plants, the feasibility of hydrogen water chemistry during startup operations has been studied, and its effectiveness on suppressing SCC initiation was evaluated. It is technically difficult to directly procure water chemistry data at various locations of an operating reactor. Accordingly, the impact of startup operation on water chemistry in the PCC of a BWR operating under normal water chemistry (NWC) or HWC can only be theoretically evaluated through computer modelling. In this study, a well-developed computer code DEMACE was used to investigate the variations in redox species concentration and in electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) of components in the PCC of a domestic BWR during startup operations in the presence of HWC. Simulations were carried out for [H2] FW s ranging from 0.0 to 2.0 parts per million (ppm) and for power levels ranging from 2.5% to 11.3% during startup operations. Our analyses indicated that for power levels with steam generation in the core, a higher power level would tend to promote a more oxidizing coolant environment for the structural components and therefore lead to less HWC

  17. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jerry Y.S. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  18. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  19. Nano-ferrites for water splitting: Unprecedented high photocatalytic hydrogen production under visible light

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.; Polshettiwar, Vivek; Labhsetwar, Nitin K.; Varma, Rajender S.; Rayalu, Sadhana Suresh

    2012-01-01

    In the present investigation, hydrogen production via water splitting by nano-ferrites was studied using ethanol as the sacrificial donor and Pt as co-catalyst. Nano-ferrite is emerging as a promising photocatalyst with a hydrogen evolution rate of 8.275 μmol h -1 and a hydrogen yield of 8275 μmol h -1 g -1 under visible light compared to 0.0046 μmol h -1 for commercial iron oxide (tested under similar experimental conditions). Nano-ferrites were tested in three different photoreactor configurations. The rate of hydrogen evolution by nano-ferrite was significantly influenced by the photoreactor configuration. Altering the reactor configuration led to sevenfold (59.55 μmol h -1) increase in the hydrogen evolution rate. Nano-ferrites have shown remarkable stability in hydrogen production up to 30 h and the cumulative hydrogen evolution rate was observed to be 98.79 μmol h -1. The hydrogen yield was seen to be influenced by several factors like photocatalyst dose, illumination intensity, irradiation time, sacrificial donor and presence of co-catalyst. These were then investigated in detail. It was evident from the experimental data that nano-ferrites under optimized reaction conditions and photoreactor configuration could lead to remarkable hydrogen evolution activity under visible light. Temperature had a significant role in enhancing the hydrogen yield. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Cyanobacterial System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyman, Philip D [J. Craig Venter Institute; Smith, Hamillton O.

    2014-12-03

    Photobiological processes are attractive routes to renewable H2 production. With the input of solar energy, photosynthetic microbes such as cyanobacteria and green algae carry out oxygenic photosynthesis, using sunlight energy to extract protons and high energy electrons from water. These protons and high energy electrons can be fed to a hydrogenase system yielding H2. However, most hydrogen-evolving hydrogenases are inhibited by O2, which is an inherent byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. The rate of H2 production is thus limited. Certain photosynthetic bacteria are reported to have an O2-tolerant evolving hydrogenase, yet these microbes do not split water, and require other more expensive feedstocks. To overcome these difficulties, the goal of this work has been to construct novel microbial hybrids by genetically transferring O2-tolerant hydrogenases from other bacteria into a class of photosynthetic bacteria called cyanobacteria. These hybrid organisms will use the photosynthetic machinery of the cyanobacterial hosts to perform the water-oxidation reaction with the input of solar energy, and couple the resulting protons and high energy electrons to the O2-tolerant bacterial hydrogenase, all within the same microbe (Fig. 1). The ultimate goal of this work has been to overcome the sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme to O2 and address one of the key technological hurdles to cost-effective photobiological H2 production which currently limits the production of hydrogen in algal systems. In pursuit of this goal, work on this project has successfully completed many subtasks leading to a greatly increased understanding of the complicated [NiFe]-hydrogenase enzymes. At the beginning of this project, [NiFe] hydrogenases had never been successfully moved across wide species barriers and had never been heterologously expressed in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, the idea that whole, functional genes could be extracted from complicated, mixed-sequence meta-genomes was not

  1. CO2-based hydrogen storage - Hydrogen generation from formaldehyde/water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trincado, Monica; Grützmacher, Hansjörg; Prechtl, Martin H. G.

    2018-04-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the simplest and most significant industrially produced aldehyde. The global demand is about 30 megatons annually. Industrially it is produced by oxidation of methanol under energy intensive conditions. More recently, new fields of application for the use of formaldehyde and its derivatives as, i.e. cross-linker for resins or disinfectant, have been suggested. Dialkoxymethane has been envisioned as a combustion fuel for conventional engines or aqueous formaldehyde and paraformaldehyde may act as a liquid organic hydrogen carrier molecule (LOHC) for hydrogen generation to be used for hydrogen fuel cells. For the realization of these processes, it requires less energy-intensive technologies for the synthesis of formaldehyde. This overview summarizes the recent developments in low-temperature reductive synthesis of formaldehyde and its derivatives and low-temperature formaldehyde reforming. These aspects are important for the future demands on modern societies' energy management, in the form of a methanol and hydrogen economy, and the required formaldehyde feedstock for the manufacture of many formaldehyde-based daily products.

  2. Combustion characteristics of nanoaluminum, liquid water, and hydrogen peroxide mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabourin, J.L.; Yetter, R.A. [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA 16801 (United States); Risha, G.A. [The Pennsylvania State University, Division of Business and Engineering, Altoona, PA 16601 (United States); Son, S.F. [Purdue University, School of Mechanical Engineering, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Tappan, B.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    An experimental investigation of the combustion characteristics of nanoaluminum (nAl), liquid water (H{sub 2}O{sub (l)}), and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) mixtures has been conducted. Linear and mass-burning rates as functions of pressure, equivalence ratio ({phi}), and concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in H{sub 2}O{sub (l)} oxidizing solution are reported. Steady-state burning rates were obtained at room temperature using a windowed pressure vessel over an initial pressure range of 0.24 to 12.4 MPa in argon, using average nAl particle diameters of 38 nm, {phi} from 0.5 to 1.3, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations between 0 and 32% by mass. At a nominal pressure of 3.65 MPa, under stoichiometric conditions, mass-burning rates per unit area ranged between 6.93 g/cm{sup 2} s (0% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and 37.04 g/cm{sup 2} s (32% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), which corresponded to linear burning rates of 9.58 and 58.2 cm/s, respectively. Burning rate pressure exponents of 0.44 and 0.38 were found for stoichiometric mixtures at room temperature containing 10 and 25% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, respectively, up to 5 MPa. Burning rates are reduced above {proportional_to}5 MPa due to the pressurization of interstitial spaces of the packed reactant mixture with argon gas, diluting the fuel and oxidizer mixture. Mass burning rates were not measured above {proportional_to}32% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} due to an anomalous burning phenomena, which caused overpressurization within the quartz sample holder, leading to tube rupture. High-speed imaging displayed fingering or jetting ahead of the normal flame front. Localized pressure measurements were taken along the sample length, determining that the combustion process proceeded as a normal deflagration prior to tube rupture, without significant pressure buildup within the tube. In addition to burning rates, chemical efficiencies of the combustion reaction were determined to be within approximately 10% of the theoretical maximum under all conditions

  3. Hydrogen embrittlement corrosion failure of water wall tubes in large power station boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, P.K.

    1981-01-01

    In the present paper, causes and mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement failure of water wall tubes in high pressure boilers have been discussed. A low pH boiler water environment, produced as a result of condenser leakage or some other type of system contamination and presence of internal metal oxide deposits, which permit boiler water solids to concentrate during the process of steam generation, have been ascribed to accelerate the formation of local corrosion cells conducive for acid attack resulting in hydrogen damage failure of water wall tubes. (author)

  4. Hydrogen bond dynamical properties of adsorbed liquid water monolayers with various TiO2 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Niall J.; Kavathekar, Ritwik S.; MacElroy, J. M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Equilibrium classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate the hydrogen-bonding kinetics of water in contact with rutile-(110), rutile-(101), rutile-(100), and anatase-(101) surfaces at room temperature (300 K). It was observed that anatase-(101) exhibits the longest-lived hydrogen bonds in terms of overall persistence, followed closely by rutile-(110). The relaxation times, defined as the integral of the autocorrelation of the hydrogen bond persistence function, were also longer for these two cases, while decay of the autocorrelation function was slower. The increased number and overall persistence of hydrogen bonds in the adsorbed water monolayers at these surfaces, particularly for anatase-(101), may serve to promote possible water photolysis activity thereon.

  5. A spectrophotometric method for the determination of Hydrogen Sulphide sugar cane juice and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadeviah, S.; Galil, Mansour S.; Kumar, M.S. Yogender; Suresha, M.S.; Nagendrappa, G.

    2006-01-01

    A sensitive spectrophotometric is developed for the determination of hydrogen sulphide in water and sugarcane juice. The method is based on the reaction of hydrogen sulphide with phospomolybdate (ammonium molybdate and phosphate) in sulphuric acid medium. The system obeys Lambert-Beer's law at 715 nm in the concentration range of 0.284-5.68 ug ml. Molar absorptivity, correlation coefficient and Sandell sensitivity values were found to be 5x10 l mol cm, 0.9995 and 0.0494 ug cm respectively. The method was employed for the determination of hydrogen sulphide in sugar cane juice and in water samples. The results obtained were reproducible with acceptable standard deviation 0.1140-0.1337 and relative standard deviation varies from 0.0797-0.6038%. For comparison, hydrogen sulphide present in sugarcane juice and water samples were also determined separately following the methylene blue official method. The results of the proposed method compare well with the official method. (author)

  6. Water electrolysis for hydrogen production in Brazilian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Carvalho, Fatima M.S.; Bergamaschi, Vanderlei Sergio; Linardi, Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CCCH/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Center], Email: saliba@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation and distributed energy sector of Brazilian economy. Fossil fuels are polluting by carbogenic emissions from their combustion, being so co-responsible for present global warming. However, no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally non-carbogenic hydrogen production process is currently available for commercialization. There are feasible possibilities to use electrolysis as one of the main sources of hydrogen, especially thinking on combination with renewable sources of energy, mainly eolic and solar. In this work some perspectives for Brazilian energy context is presented, where electrolysis combined with renewable power source and fuel cell power generation would be a good basis to improve the distributed energy supply for remote areas, where the electricity grid is not present or is deficient. (author)

  7. Hydrogen-water deuterium exchange over metal oxide promoted nickel catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagert, N H; Shaw-Wood, P E; Pouteau, R M.L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba. Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

    1975-11-01

    Specific rates have been measured for hydrogen-water deuterium isotope exchange over unsupported nickel promoted with about 20% of various metal oxides. The oxides used were Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MoO/sub 2/, MnO, WO/sub 2/-WO/sub 3/, and UO/sub 2/. Nickel surface areas, which are required to measure the specific rates, were determined by hydrogen chemisorption. Specific rates were measured as a function of temperature in the range 353 to 573 K and as a function of the partial pressure of hydrogen and water over a 10-fold range of partial pressure. The molybdenum and tungsten oxides gave the highest specific rates, and manganese and uranium oxides the lowest. Chromium oxide was intermediate, although it gave the highest rate per gram of catalyst. The orders with respect to hydrogen and water over molybdenum oxide and tungsten oxide promoted nickel were consistent with a mechanism in which nickel oxide is formed from the reaction of water with the catalyst, and then is reduced by hydrogen. Over manganese and uranium oxide promoted catalysts, these orders are consistent with a mechanism in which adsorbed water exchanges with chemisorbed hydrogen atoms on the nickel surface. Chromium oxide is intermediate. It was noted that those oxides which favored the nickel oxide route had electronic work functions closest to those of metallic nickel and nickel oxide.

  8. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification in a packed bed reactor: effects of hydrogen-to-water flow rate ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J W; Lee, K H; Park, K Y; Maeng, S K

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen dissolution and hydrogenotrophic denitrification performance were investigated in a lab-scale packed bed reactor (PBR) by varying the hydrogen flow rate and hydraulic retention time (HRT). The denitrification performance was enhanced by increasing the hydrogen flow rate and HRT as a result of high dissolved hydrogen concentration (0.39mg/L) and utilization efficiencies (79%). In this study, the hydrogen-to-water flow rate ratio (Q(g)/Q(w)) was found to be a new operating factor representing the two parameters of hydrogen flow rate and HRT. Hydrogen dissolution and denitrification efficiency were nonlinearly and linearly correlated with the Q(g)/Q(w), respectively. Based on its excellent linear correlation with denitrification efficiency, Q(g)/Q(w) should be greater than 2.3 to meet the WHO's guideline of nitrate nitrogen for drinking water. This study demonstrates that Q(g)/Q(w) is a simple and robust factor to optimize hydrogen-sparged bioreactors for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid Diffusion and Nanosegregation of Hydrogen in Magnesium Alloys from Exposure to Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P; Ievlev, Anton V; Fayek, Mostafa; Leonard, Donovan N; Frith, Matthew G; Meyer, Harry M; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J; Daemen, Luke L; Cheng, Yongqiang; Guo, Wei; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Thomson, Jeffrey; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Rother, Gernot; Shin, Dongwon; Song, Guang-Ling; Davis, Bruce

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogen gas is formed when Mg corrodes in water; however, the manner and extent to which the hydrogen may also enter the Mg metal is poorly understood. Such knowledge is critical as stress corrosion cracking (SCC)/embrittlement phenomena limit many otherwise promising structural and functional uses of Mg. Here, we report via D 2 O/D isotopic tracer and H 2 O exposures with characterization by secondary ion mass spectrometry, inelastic neutron scattering vibrational spectrometry, electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography techniques direct evidence that hydrogen rapidly penetrated tens of micrometers into Mg metal after only 4 h of exposure to water at room temperature. Further, technologically important microalloying additions of mechanical properties of Mg significantly increased the extent of hydrogen ingress, whereas Al additions in the 2-3 wt % range did not. Segregation of hydrogen species was observed at regions of high Mg/Zr/Nd nanoprecipitate density and at Mg(Zr) metastable solid solution microstructural features. We also report evidence that this ingressed hydrogen was unexpectedly present in the alloy as nanoconfined, molecular H 2 . These new insights provide a basis for strategies to design Mg alloys to resist SCC in aqueous environments as well as potentially impact functional uses such as hydrogen storage where increased hydrogen uptake is desired.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide generation in shipboard oily-water waste. Part 3. Ship factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgeman, D.K.; Fletcher, L.E.; Upsher, F.J.

    1995-04-01

    The chemical and microbiological composition of bilge-water in ships of the Royal Australian Navy has been investigated in relation to the formation of hydrogen sulfide by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were found in most ships in populations up to 800,000 per mL. Sulfate in the wastes is provided by sea-water. Sea-water constitutes up to 60% (median 20%) of the wastes analysed. Evidence for generation of hydrogen sulfide in the ships was found directly as sulfide or indirectly as depressed sulfate concentrations. The low levels of sulfide found in bilge-water from machinery spaces suggested the ventilation systems were effectively removing the gas from the working area. The effect of storage of the wastes under conditions which simulated the oily- water holding tanks of ships were also investigated. Some wastes were found to produce large quantities of hydrogen sulfide on storage. The wastes that failed to produce hydrogen sulfide were investigated to identify any specific nutritional deficiencies. Some organic substances present in bilge-water, such as lactate or biodegradable cleaning agents, and phosphate strongly influenced the generation of hydrogen sulfide in stored oily-water wastes.

  11. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-01-01

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH→Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH− oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion. PMID:27199009

  12. Water containing deuterium electrolysis to obtain gaseous hydrogen isotope in a high state of purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellanger, Gilbert

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the basic concept is to prepare hydrogen in a high state of purity by electrolysing water using a palladium cathode. During electrolysis, hydrogen is at first adsorbed at the palladium surface, and next it diffuses through it till opposite face of its entry where it is desorbed; thus permitting to regain it in a very pure state for storage. The method can be used from water containing deuterium. To improve hydrogen adsorption, surface effect of palladium must be studied. It was found that heat treatment of palladium improved the hydrogen permeation flux. The diffusivity of hydrogen is controlled by Fick and Sieverts equations in which temperature has a significant influence on permeation rates. Anyway, hydrogen desorption does not cause any difficulty. In a second part, we have studied the isotopic separation factor using water containing deuterium. We remarked in fact that it depends on current density, overpotential, diffusivity of hydrogen and deuterium and isotopic composition of electrolyte as expected. In the last part, we realized an original electrolysis model in a glove-box in which are taken into account the results given before and also the technology components employed in processes involving the use of tritium. (author) [fr

  13. Hydrogen isotope analysis of amino acids and whole cells reflects biosynthetic processing of nutrient- and water-derived hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, P.; Newsome, S.; Steele, A.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen (H) isotopes serve as sensitive tracers of biochemical processes that can be exploited to answer critical questions in biogeochemistry, ecology, and microbiology. Despite this apparent utility, relatively little is known about the specific mechanisms of H isotope fractionation involved in biosynthesis. In order to understand how organisms incorporate hydrogen from their chemical milieu into biomass, we have cultured the model bacterium E. coli MG1655 in a variety of media composed of deuterium-labeled nutrients and waters. Isotopic analysis of bulk cell mass reveals that the H fractionation between media water and cell material varies as a function of the nutrient source, with commonly used organic food sources (glucose and tryptone) leading to far smaller fractionation signals than non-standard ones (such as formamide, adenine, and urea). In addition, we have completed compound specific isotope analysis of amino acids using combined GC-IRMS. Amino acids harvested from E. coli cultured on glucose in water of varied D/H composition posses an extraordinary range of isotopic compositions (400-600 %). Furthermore, these amino acids follow a systematic distribution of D/H where proline is always heaviest and glycine is always lightest. However, when the short-chain peptide tryptone is used in place of glucose, only the non-essential amino acids reflect media water D/H values, suggesting the direct incorporation of some media-borne amino acids into cellular protein. These observations provide a foundation for understanding the cellular routing of hydrogen obtained from food and water sources and indicate that D/H analysis can serve as a powerful probe of biological function.

  14. Polyamides : hydrogen bonding, the Brill transition, and superheated water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra - Vinken, E.

    2008-01-01

    Aliphatic polyamide, commonly known as nylon, was the world’s first synthetic fiber and has found its largest application range in tires, carpets, stockings, upholstery, and adhesives. All polyamides have a recurring amide group (–CONH–) present in the molecular structure with hydrogen bonds between

  15. The interplay between surface-water and hydrogen bonding in a water adlayer on Pt(111) and Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delle Site, Luigi [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Ghiringhelli, Luca M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Andreussi, Oliviero [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Donadio, Davide [Computational Science, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI-Campus, via Giuseppe Buffi 13, CH-6900 Lugano (Switzerland); Parrinello, Michele [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56100 Pisa (Italy)

    2007-06-20

    The structure of a water adlayer on a Pt(111) surface is investigated by means of extensive first-principles calculations. Allowing for proton disorder, the ground state energy for the {radical}3 x {radical}3R30{sup o} structure can be found. This results from an interplay between water/metal chemical bonding and the hydrogen bonding of the water network. This picture is supported by substituting Pt(111) with Ag(111): the almost inert surface allows for the reconstruction of the hydrogen network. (fast track communication)

  16. The interplay between surface-water and hydrogen bonding in a water adlayer on Pt(111) and Ag(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delle Site, Luigi; Ghiringhelli, Luca M; Andreussi, Oliviero; Donadio, Davide; Parrinello, Michele

    2007-01-01

    The structure of a water adlayer on a Pt(111) surface is investigated by means of extensive first-principles calculations. Allowing for proton disorder, the ground state energy for the √3 x √3R30 o structure can be found. This results from an interplay between water/metal chemical bonding and the hydrogen bonding of the water network. This picture is supported by substituting Pt(111) with Ag(111): the almost inert surface allows for the reconstruction of the hydrogen network. (fast track communication)

  17. Hydrogen co-production from subcritical water-cooled nuclear power plants in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanapragasam, N.; Ryland, D.; Suppiah, S., E-mail: gnanapragasamn@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Subcritical water-cooled nuclear reactors (Sub-WCR) operate in several countries including Canada providing electricity to the civilian population. The high-temperature-steam-electrolysis process (HTSEP) is a feasible and laboratory-demonstrated large-scale hydrogen-production process. The thermal and electrical integration of the HTSEP with Sub-WCR-based nuclear-power plants (NPPs) is compared for best integration point, HTSEP operating condition and hydrogen production rate based on thermal energy efficiency. Analysis on integrated thermal efficiency suggests that the Sub-WCR NPP is ideal for hydrogen co-production with a combined efficiency of 36%. HTSEP operation analysis suggests that higher product hydrogen pressure reduces hydrogen and integrated efficiencies. The best integration point for the HTSEP with Sub-WCR NPP is upstream of the high-pressure turbine. (author)

  18. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heske, Clemens; Moujaes, Samir; Weimer, Alan; Wong, Bunsen; Siegal, Nathan; McFarland, Eric; Miller, Eric; Lewis, Michele; Bingham, Carl; Roth, Kurth; Sabacky, Bruce; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2011-09-29

    The objective of this work is to identify economically feasible concepts for the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. The ultimate project objective was to select one or more competitive concepts for pilot-scale demonstration using concentrated solar energy. Results of pilot scale plant performance would be used as foundation for seeking public and private resources for full-scale plant development and testing. Economical success in this venture would afford the public with a renewable and limitless source of energy carrier for use in electric power load-leveling and as a carbon-free transportation fuel. The Solar Hydrogen Generation Research (SHGR) project embraces technologies relevant to hydrogen research under the Office of Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology (HFCIT) as well as concentrated solar power under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Although the photoelectrochemical work is aligned with HFCIT, some of the technologies in this effort are also consistent with the skills and technologies found in concentrated solar power and photovoltaic technology under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water-splitting is a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or a combination of heat and electrolysis instead of pure electrolysis and meets the goals for hydrogen production using only water and renewable solar energy as feed-stocks. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production also meets these goals by implementing photo-electrolysis at the surface of a semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte with bias provided by a photovoltaic source. Here, water splitting is a photo-electrolytic process in which hydrogen is produced using only solar photons and water as feed-stocks. The thermochemical hydrogen task engendered formal collaborations among two universities, three national laboratories and two private sector

  19. Theoretical study on platinum-catalyzed isotope exchange reaction mechanism of hydrogen and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Sheng; Wang Heyi; Luo Shunzhong

    2009-04-01

    Based on electron and vibration approximate means and the density function theory B3LYP, the ΔG degree and equilibrium pressures of adsorption and dissociation reactions of H 2 and water vapor on Pt surface have been calculated. The adsorption, dissociation and coadsorption actions of H 2 and water were analyzed. According to the ΔG degree, hydrogen molecule combines with metal atoms in single atom, and water vapor molecule has no tendency to dissociate on Pt surface. The dissociation of hydrogen molecule would hold back the direct adsorption of water vapor molecules on Pt surface. The structures of Pt-H (OH 2 ) n + (n=1, 2, 3) hydroniums were optimized. According to the mulliken overlap populations, Pt-H (OH 2 ) + is not stable or produced. Hydrogen isotope exchange occurs between hydration layer and D atoms which adsorb on Pt surface via intermediates (H 2 O) n D + (ads) (n≥2). (authors)

  20. Dye-Sensitized Photocatalytic Water Splitting and Sacrificial Hydrogen Generation: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Chowdhury

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Today, global warming and green energy are important topics of discussion for every intellectual gathering all over the world. The only sustainable solution to these problems is the use of solar energy and storing it as hydrogen fuel. Photocatalytic and photo-electrochemical water splitting and sacrificial hydrogen generation show a promise for future energy generation from renewable water and sunlight. This article mainly reviews the current research progress on photocatalytic and photo-electrochemical systems focusing on dye-sensitized overall water splitting and sacrificial hydrogen generation. An overview of significant parameters including dyes, sacrificial agents, modified photocatalysts and co-catalysts are provided. Also, the significance of statistical analysis as an effective tool for a systematic investigation of the effects of different factors and their interactions are explained. Finally, different photocatalytic reactor configurations that are currently in use for water splitting application in laboratory and large scale are discussed.

  1. studies on solvent extraction of free hydrogen cyanide from river water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A method for free and strongly complexed cyanide measurement in river water was developed. Recovery tests from solution with and without river water, using various solvent combinations and background control were investigated to obtain an accurate and precise extraction method for the measurement of hydrogen ...

  2. Diels-Alder reactions in water : Enforced hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    1995-01-01

    Second-order rate constants have been measured for the Diels-Alder (DA) reactions of cyclopentadiene with dienophiles of varying hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bond acceptor capacity in water, in a series of organic solvents and in alcohol-water mixtures. The intramolecular DA reaction of

  3. DIELS-ALDER REACTIONS IN WATER - ENFORCED HYDROPHOBIC INTERACTION AND HYDROGEN-BONDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    Second-order rate constants have been measured for the Diels-Alder (DA) reactions of cyclopentadiene with dienophiles of varying hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bond acceptor capacity in water, in a series of organic solvents and in alcohol-water mixtures. The intramolecular DA reaction of

  4. Effect of water electrolysis temperature of hydrogen production system using direct coupling photovoltaic and water electrolyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuhiko Maeda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose control methods of a photovoltaic (PV-water electrolyzer (ELY system that generates hydrogen by controlling the number of ELY cells. The advantage of this direct coupling between PV and ELY is that the power loss of DC/DC converter is avoided. In this study, a total of 15 ELY cells are used. In the previous researches, the electrolyzer temperature was constantly controlled with a thermostat. Actually, the electrolyzer temperature is decided by the balance of the electrolysis loss and the heat loss to the outside. Here, the method to control the number of ELY cells was investigated. Maximum Power Point Tracking efficiency of more than 96% was achieved without ELY temperature control. Furthermore we construct a numerical model taking into account of ELY temperature. Using this model, we performed a numerical simulation of 1-year. Experimental data and the simulation results shows the validity of the proposed control method.

  5. Multisample conversion of water to hydrogen by zinc for stable isotope determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, C.; Coplen, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two techniques for the conversion of water to hydrogen for stable isotope ratio determination have been developed that are especially suited for automated multisample analysis. Both procedures involve reaction of zinc shot with a water sample at 450 ??C. in one method designed for water samples in bottles, the water is put in capillaries and is reduced by zinc in reaction vessels; overall savings in sample preparation labor of 75% have been realized over the standard uranium reduction technique. The second technique is for waters evolved under vacuum and is a sealed-tube method employing 9 mm o.d. quartz tubing. Problems inherent with zinc reduction include surface inhomogeneity of the zinc and exchange of hydrogen both with the zinc and with the glass walls of the vessels. For best results, water/zinc and water/glass surface area ratios of vessels should be kept as large as possible.

  6. Problems of hydrogen - water vapor - inert gas mixture use in heavy liquid metal coolant technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanov, V.V.; Martynov, P.N.; Gulevskij, V.A.; Teplyakov, Yu.A.; Fomin, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The reasons of slag deposit formation in circulation circuits with heavy liquid metal coolants, which can cause reactor core blockage, are considered. To prevent formation of deposits hydrogen purification of coolant and surfaces of circulation circuit is used. It consists in introduction of gaseous mixtures hydrogen - water vapor - rare gas (argon or helium) directly into coolant flow. The principle scheme of hydrogen purification and the processes occurring during it are under consideration. Measures which make it completely impossible to overlap of the flow cross section of reactor core, steam generators, pumps and other equipment by lead oxides in reactor facilities with heavy liquid metal coolants are listed [ru

  7. Comparative thermoeconomic analysis of hydrogen production by water electrolysis and by ethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riveros-Godoy, Gustavo; Chavez-Rodriguez, Mauro; Cavaliero, Carla [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Mechanical Engineering School], Email: garg@fem.unicamp.br

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen is the focus of this work that evaluates in comparative form through thermo economic analysis two hydrogen production processes: water electrolysis and ethanol steam reforming. Even though technical-economical barriers still exist for the development of an economy based on hydrogen, these difficulties are opportunities for the appearance of new business of goods and services, diversification of the energy mix, focus of research activities, development and support to provide sustainability to the new economy. Exergy and rational efficiency concept are used to make a comparison between both processes. (author)

  8. Effect of Heating Method on Hydrogen Production by Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhui Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glucose as a test sample of biomass is gasified in supercritical water with different heating methods driven by renewable solar energy. The performance comparisons of hydrogen production of glucose gasification are investigated. The relations between temperature raising speed of reactant fluid, variation of volume fraction, combustion enthalpy, and chemical exergy of H2 of the product gases with reactant solution concentration are presented, respectively. The results show that the energy quality of product gases with preheating process is higher than that with no preheating unit for hydrogen production. Hydrogen production quantity and gasification rate of glucose decrease obviously with the increase of concentration of material in no preheating system.

  9. Modeling of hydrogen stratification in a pressurized water reactor containment with the contain computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Skerlavaj, A.; Parzer, I.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen distribution during a severe accident in a nuclear power plant with a two-loop Westinghouse-type pressurized water reactor was simulated with the CONTAIN computer code. The accidents is initiated by a large-break loss-of-coolant accident which is nit successfully mitigated by the action of the emergency core cooling system. Cases with and without successful actuation of spray systems and fan coolers were considered. The simulations predicted hydrogen stratification within the containment main compartment with intensive hydrogen mixing in the containment dome region. Pressure and temperature responses were analyzed as well.(author)

  10. Hydrogen behavior in a large-dry pressurized water reactor containment building during a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu Wensheng; Chen Hungpei; Hung Zhenyu; Lin Huichen

    2014-01-01

    Following severe accidents in nuclear power plants, large quantities of hydrogen may be generated after core degradation. If the hydrogen is transported from the reactor vessel into the containment building, an explosion might occur, which might threaten the integrity of the building; this can ultimately cause the release of radioactive materials. During the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in 2011, the primary containment structures remained intact but contaminated fragments broke off the secondary containment structures, which disrupted mitigation activities and triggered subsequent explosions. Therefore, the ability to predict the behavior of hydrogen after severe accidents may facilitate the development of effective nuclear reactor accident management procedures. The present study investigated the behavior of hydrogen in a large-dry pressurized water reactor (PWR). The amount of hydrogen produced was calculated using the Modular Accident Analysis Program. The hydrogen transport behavior and the effect of the explosion on the PWR containment building were simulated using the Flame Acceleration Simulator. The simulation results showed that the average hydrogen volume fraction is approximately 7% in the containment building and that the average temperature is 330 K. The maximum predicted pressure load after ignition is 2.55 bar, which does not endanger the structural integrity of the containment building. The results of this investigation indicate that the hydrogen mitigation system should be arranged on both the upper and lower parts of the containment building to reduce the impact of an explosion. (author)

  11. Materials behavior in alternate (hydrogen) water chemistry in the Ringhals-1 boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Cubicciotti, D.; Trolle, M.

    1986-01-01

    In-plant studies on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized austenitic stainless steel (SS) have been performed at the Swedish Ringhals-1 boiling water reactor (BWR). The studies have covered the present [full-temperature (normal)] water chemistry (PWC) and the alternate (primary) water chemistry (AWC) with hydrogen addition. The test techniques applied were constant extension rate testing (CERT) and electrochemical potential (ECP) measurements. The program was covered by extensive environment monitoring. The results verify earlier laboratory studies which show that sensitized austenitic SS is susceptible to IGSCC in PWC, but not in AWC. Other pressure-bearing BWR construction materials are not adversely affected by AWC. The boundary conditions in Ringhals-1 have been established for an AWC, which is defined as an environment that does not produce IGSCC in sensitized SS. The results are compared with a similar program at Dresden-2, and the points of agreement and discordance in the results are discussed. The relevance of ECP measurements for the control of AWC is discussed

  12. Partial oxidation of n-hexadecane through decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in supercritical water

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. This work reports the experimental analysis of partial oxidation of n-hexadecane under supercritical water conditions. A novel reactor flow system was developed which allows for total decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in a separate reactor followed partial oxidation of n-hexadecane in a gasification reactor instead of having both reactions in one reactor. The kinetics of hydrothermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was studied in order to confirm its full conversion into water and oxygen under the desired partial oxidation conditions, and the kinetic data were found in a good agreement with previously reported literature. The gas yield and gasification efficiency were investigated under different operating parameters. Furthermore, the profile of C-C/C=C ratio was studied which showed the favourable conditions for maximising yields of n-alkanes via hydrogenation of their corresponding 1-alkenes. Enhanced hydrogenation of 1-alkenes was observed at higher O/C ratios and higher residence times, shown by the increase in the C-C/C=C ratio to more than unity, while increasing the temperature has shown much less effect on the C-C/C=C ratio at the current experimental conditions. In addition, GC-MS analysis of liquid samples revealed the formation of heavy oxygenated compounds which may suggest a new addition reaction to account for their formation under the current experimental conditions. Results show new promising routes for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogenation of heavy hydrocarbons in a supercritical water reactor.

  13. Advances of zeolite based membrane for hydrogen production via water gas shift reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a promising energy vector which can be obtained from various renewable sources. However, an efficient hydrogen production technology is still challenging. One technology to produce hydrogen with very high capacity with low cost is through water gas shift (WGS) reaction. Water gas shift reaction is an equilibrium reaction that produces hydrogen from syngas mixture by the introduction of steam. Conventional WGS reaction employs two or more reactors in series with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given volume of catalyst. Membrane reactor as new technology can cope several drawbacks of conventional reactor by removing reaction product and the reaction will favour towards product formation. Zeolite has properties namely high temperature, chemical resistant, and low price makes it suitable for membrane reactor applications. Moreover, it has been employed for years as hydrogen selective layer. This review paper is focusing on the development of membrane reactor for efficient water gas shift reaction to produce high purity hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Development of membrane reactor is discussed further related to its modification towards efficient reaction and separation from WGS reaction mixture. Moreover, zeolite framework suitable for WGS membrane reactor will be discussed more deeply.

  14. Hydrogen bonding interactions between ethylene glycol and water: density, excess molar volume, and spectral study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JianBin; ZHANG PengYan; MA Kai; HAN Fang; CHEN GuoHua; WEI XiongHui

    2008-01-01

    Studies of the density and the excess molar volume of ethylene glycol (EG)-water mixtures were carried out to illustrate the hydrogen bonding interactions of EG with water at different temperatures, The re-sults suggest that a likely complex of 3 ethylene glycol molecules bonding with 4 water molecules in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (EGW) is formed at the maximal excess molar volume, which displays stronger absorption capabilities for SO2 when the concentration of SO2 reaches 400×106 (volume ratio) in the gas phase. Meanwhile, FTIR and UV spectra of EGWs were recorded at various EG concentra-tions to display the hydrogen bonding interactions of EG with water. The FTIR spectra show that the stretching vibrational band of hydroxyl in the EGWs shifts to a lower frequency and the bending vibra-tional band of water shifts to a higher frequency with increasing the EG concentration, respectively. Furthermore, the UV spectra show that the electron transferring band of the hydroxyl oxygen in EG shows red shift with increasing the EG concentration. The frequency shifts in FTIR spectra and the shifts of absorption bands in UV absorption spectra of EGWs are interpreted as the strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the hydrogen atoms in water with the hydroxyl oxygen atoms of EG.

  15. Variation of the effectiveness of hydrogen water chemistry in a boiling water reactor during power coastdown operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh Tsungkuang; Wang Meiya; Chu, Charles F.; Chang Ching

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model was adapted to evaluate the impact of power coastdown on the water chemistry of a commercial boiling water reactor (BWR) in this work. In principle, the power density of a nuclear reactor upon a power level decrease would immediately be lowered, followed by water chemistry variations due to reduced radiolysis of water and extended coolant residence times in the core and near-core regions. It is currently a common practice for a commercial BWR to adopt hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for corrosion mitigation. The optimal feedwater hydrogen concentration may be different after a power coastdown is implemented in a BWR. A computer code DEMACE was used in the current study to investigate the impact of various power coastdown levels on major radiolytic species concentrations and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) behavior of components in the primary coolant circuit of a domestic reactor operating under either normal water chemistry or HWC. Our analyses indicated that under a rated core flow rate the chemical species concentrations and the ECP did not vary monotonously with decreases in reactor power level at a fixed feedwater hydrogen concentration. In particular, ECP variations basically followed the patterns of hydrogen peroxide in the select regions and exhibited high values at power level of 90% for Reactor X. (author)

  16. Fast Rotational Diffusion of Water Molecules in a 2D Hydrogen Bond Network at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisk, T. R.; Hoffmann, C.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Mamontov, E.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Wang, X.; Kent, P. R. C.; Anovitz, L. M.

    2018-05-01

    Individual water molecules or small clusters of water molecules contained within microporous minerals present an extreme case of confinement where the local structure of hydrogen bond networks are dramatically altered from bulk water. In the zinc silicate hemimorphite, the water molecules form a two-dimensional hydrogen bond network with hydroxyl groups in the crystal framework. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the structure and dynamics of water molecules within this network. The water molecules undergo a continuous phase transition in their orientational configuration analogous to a two-dimensional Ising model. The incoherent dynamic structure factor reveals two thermally activated relaxation processes, one on a subpicosecond timescale and another on a 10-100 ps timescale, between 70 and 130 K. The slow process is an in-plane reorientation of the water molecule involving the breaking of hydrogen bonds with a framework that, despite the low temperatures involved, is analogous to rotational diffusion of water molecules in the bulk liquid. The fast process is a localized motion of the water molecule with no apparent analogs among known bulk or confined phases of water.

  17. Stress corrosion mechanisms of alloy-600 polycrystals and monocrystals in primary water: effect of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600 primary water stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, this work is mainly focussed on the two following points. The first one is to understand the influence of hydrogen on SCC of industrial Alloy 600 and the second one is to study the crack initiation and propagation on polycrystals and single crystals. A cathodic potential applied during slow strain rate tests does not affect crack initiation but increases the slow crack growth rate by a factor 2 to 5. Cathodic polarisation, cold work and 25 cm 3 STP/kg hydrogen content increase the slow CGR so that the K ISCC (and therefore fast CGR) is reached. The influence of hydrogenated primary water has been studied for the first time on Alloy 600 single crystals. Cracks cannot initiate on tensile specimens but they can propagate on pre-cracked specimens. Transgranular cracks present a precise crystallographic aspect which is similar to that of 316 alloy in MgCl 2 solutions. Moreover, the following results improve the description of the cracking conditions. Firstly, the higher the hydrogen partial pressure, the lower the Alloy 600 passivation current transients. Since this result is not correlated with the effect of hydrogen on SCC, cracking is not caused by a direct effect of dissolved hydrogen on dissolution. Secondly, hydrogen embrittlement of Alloy 600 disappears at temperatures above 200 deg.C. Thirdly, grain boundary sliding (GBS) does not directly act on SCC but shows the mechanical weakness of grain boundaries. Regarding the proposed models for Alloy 600 SCC, it is possible to draw the following conclusions. Internal oxidation or absorbed hydrogen effects are the most probable mechanisms for initiation. Dissolution, internal oxidation and global hydrogen embrittlement models cannot explain crack propagation. On the other hand, the Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity Model gives a good description of the SCC propagation. (author)

  18. Review of the methods to form hydrogen peroxide in electrical discharge plasma with liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Bruce R.; Shih, Kai-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature dealing with the formation of hydrogen peroxide from plasma processes. Energy yields for hydrogen peroxide generation by plasma from water span approximately three orders of magnitude from 4 × 10-2 to 80 g kWh-1. A wide range of plasma processes from rf to pulsed, ac, and dc discharges directly in the liquid phase have similar energy yields and may thus be limited by radical quenching processes at the plasma-liquid interface. Reactor modification using discharges in bubbles and discharges over the liquid phase can provide modest improvements in energy yield over direct discharge in the liquid, but the interpretation is complicated by additional chemical reactions of gas phase components such as ozone and nitrogen oxides. The highest efficiency plasma process utilizes liquid water droplets that may enhance efficiency by sequestering hydrogen peroxide in the liquid and by suppressing decomposition reactions by radicals from the gas and at the interface. Kinetic simulations of water vapor reported in the literature suggest that plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide should approach 45% of the thermodynamics limit, and this fact coupled with experimental studies demonstrating improvements with the presence of the condensed liquid phase suggest that further improvements in energy yield may be possible. Plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide directly from water compares favorably with a number of other methods including electron beam, ultrasound, electrochemical and photochemical methods, and other chemical processes.

  19. Review of the methods to form hydrogen peroxide in electrical discharge plasma with liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, Bruce R; Shih, Kai-Yuan [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This paper presents a review of the literature dealing with the formation of hydrogen peroxide from plasma processes. Energy yields for hydrogen peroxide generation by plasma from water span approximately three orders of magnitude from 4 x 10{sup -2} to 80 g kWh{sup -1}. A wide range of plasma processes from rf to pulsed, ac, and dc discharges directly in the liquid phase have similar energy yields and may thus be limited by radical quenching processes at the plasma-liquid interface. Reactor modification using discharges in bubbles and discharges over the liquid phase can provide modest improvements in energy yield over direct discharge in the liquid, but the interpretation is complicated by additional chemical reactions of gas phase components such as ozone and nitrogen oxides. The highest efficiency plasma process utilizes liquid water droplets that may enhance efficiency by sequestering hydrogen peroxide in the liquid and by suppressing decomposition reactions by radicals from the gas and at the interface. Kinetic simulations of water vapor reported in the literature suggest that plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide should approach 45% of the thermodynamics limit, and this fact coupled with experimental studies demonstrating improvements with the presence of the condensed liquid phase suggest that further improvements in energy yield may be possible. Plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide directly from water compares favorably with a number of other methods including electron beam, ultrasound, electrochemical and photochemical methods, and other chemical processes.

  20. Process for enriching a hydrogen isotope bound in water and device for carrying out the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drescher, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to make compact construction in relatively small operating units with horizontally arranged separating columns possible for hydrogen isotope separation with different water phases moving in counterflow through a heating zone and a cooling zone, the water bound to a solid adsorption medium is moved in counterflow to a liquid phase of the water relative to the heating zone and the cooling zone. (orig.) [de

  1. Communication: Hydrogen bonding interactions in water-alcohol mixtures from X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Royce K.; Smith, Jacob W.; Saykally, Richard J., E-mail: saykally@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    While methanol and ethanol are macroscopically miscible with water, their mixtures exhibit negative excess entropies of mixing. Despite considerable effort in both experiment and theory, there remains significant disagreement regarding the origin of this effect. Different models for the liquid mixture structure have been proposed to address this behavior, including the enhancement of the water hydrogen bonding network around the alcohol hydrophobic groups and microscopic immiscibility or clustering. We have investigated mixtures of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol with water by liquid microjet X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the oxygen K-edge, an atom-specific probe providing details of both inter- and intra-molecular structure. The measured spectra evidence a significant enhancement of hydrogen bonding originating from the methanol and ethanol hydroxyl groups upon the addition of water. These additional hydrogen bonding interactions would strengthen the liquid-liquid interactions, resulting in additional ordering in the liquid structures and leading to a reduction in entropy and a negative enthalpy of mixing, consistent with existing thermodynamic data. In contrast, the spectra of the isopropanol-water mixtures exhibit an increase in the number of broken alcohol hydrogen bonds for mixtures containing up to 0.5 water mole fraction, an observation consistent with existing enthalpy of mixing data, suggesting that the measured negative excess entropy is a result of clustering or micro-immiscibility.

  2. Communication: Hydrogen bonding interactions in water-alcohol mixtures from X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Royce K.; Smith, Jacob W.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    While methanol and ethanol are macroscopically miscible with water, their mixtures exhibit negative excess entropies of mixing. Despite considerable effort in both experiment and theory, there remains significant disagreement regarding the origin of this effect. Different models for the liquid mixture structure have been proposed to address this behavior, including the enhancement of the water hydrogen bonding network around the alcohol hydrophobic groups and microscopic immiscibility or clustering. We have investigated mixtures of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol with water by liquid microjet X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the oxygen K-edge, an atom-specific probe providing details of both inter- and intra-molecular structure. The measured spectra evidence a significant enhancement of hydrogen bonding originating from the methanol and ethanol hydroxyl groups upon the addition of water. These additional hydrogen bonding interactions would strengthen the liquid-liquid interactions, resulting in additional ordering in the liquid structures and leading to a reduction in entropy and a negative enthalpy of mixing, consistent with existing thermodynamic data. In contrast, the spectra of the isopropanol-water mixtures exhibit an increase in the number of broken alcohol hydrogen bonds for mixtures containing up to 0.5 water mole fraction, an observation consistent with existing enthalpy of mixing data, suggesting that the measured negative excess entropy is a result of clustering or micro-immiscibility.

  3. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF HYDROGEN ADSORBING TO AMORPHOUS WATER ICE: DEFINING ADSORPTION IN CLASSICAL MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, John L.; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Center for Simulational Physics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Gas–grain and gas–phase reactions dominate the formation of molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas–grain reactions require a substrate (e.g., a dust or ice grain) on which the reaction is able to occur. The formation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the ISM is the prototypical example of a gas–grain reaction. In these reactions, an atom of hydrogen will strike a surface, stick to it, and diffuse across it. When it encounters another adsorbed hydrogen atom, the two can react to form molecular hydrogen and then be ejected from the surface by the energy released in the reaction. We perform in-depth classical molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen atoms interacting with an amorphous water-ice surface. This study focuses on the first step in the formation process; the sticking of the hydrogen atom to the substrate. We find that careful attention must be paid in dealing with the ambiguities in defining a sticking event. The technical definition of a sticking event will affect the computed sticking probabilities and coefficients. Here, using our new definition of a sticking event, we report sticking probabilities and sticking coefficients for nine different incident kinetic energies of hydrogen atoms [5–400 K] across seven different temperatures of dust grains [10–70 K]. We find that probabilities and coefficients vary both as a function of grain temperature and incident kinetic energy over the range of 0.99–0.22.

  4. Hydrogen behaviour and mitigation in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Loggia, E.

    1992-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities (CEC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), within the framework of their safety research activities, initiated and arranged a series of specialist meetings and research contracts on hydrogen behaviour and control. The result of this work is summarized in a report jointly prepared by the two international organizations entitled 'Hydrogen in water-cooled nuclear power reactors'. Independently, the Kurchatov Atomic Energy Institute organized a workshop on the hydrogen issue in Sukhumi, USSR, with CEC and IAEA cooperation. Commonly expressed views have emerged and recommendations were formulated to organize the subsequent seminar/workshop concentrating mainly on the most recent research and analytical projects and findings related to the hydrogen behaviour, and-most importantly-on the practical approaches and engineering solutions to the hydrogen control and mitigation. The seminar/workshop, therefore, addressed the 'theory and practice' aspects of the hydrogen issue. The workshop was structured in the following sessions: combustible gas production; hydrogen distribution; combustion phenomena; combustion effects and threats; and detection and migration

  5. Absorption of dissolved hydrogen from lithiated water during accelerated corrosion of zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolescu, A.V.; Mayer, P.; Rasile, E.M.; Mummenhoff, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was carried out to determine the extent of dissolved hydrogen absorption from lithiated water by zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium alloy during corrosion. The material was exposed at 340 0 C to 1 M LiOH aqueous solution containing 0 to approximately 70 cm 3 /L of dissolved hydrogen. Results indicate that dissolved hydrogen has no effect on the corrosion rate or on the amount of hydrogen absorbed by the material

  6. DESIGN OF A NOVEL CONDUCTING COMPOSITE SUPPORTED BY PLATINUM NANOPARTICLES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem BALUN KAYAN

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of the decrease in fossil fuel resources and the continuous increase in energy demands, clean energy requirements become extremely important for future energy generation systems. Hydrogen is well known as an efficient and environmentally friendly energy carrier. Highly catalytic active and low-cost electrocatalysts for hydrogen production are key issues for sustainable energy technologies. Here we report an aluminium electrode modified with polypyrrole (PPy-chitosan (Chi composite film decorated with Pt nanoparticles for hydrogen production from water. Hydrogen evolution reaction (HER is examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV, Tafel polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS in 0.5M H2SO4. The structural properties of the modified surfaces analyses were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The stability tests also performed for aluminium electrode coted with PPy-Chi/Pt composite film.

  7. Hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of water vapour and nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Pierre Py; Alain Capitaine

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents hydrogen production by a nuclear reactor (High Temperature Reactor, HTR or Pressurized Water Reactor, PWR) coupled to a High Temperature Electrolyser (HTE) plant. With respect to the coupling of a HTR with a HTE plant, EDF and AREVA NP had previously selected a combined cycle HTR scheme to convert the reactor heat into electricity. In that case, the steam required for the electrolyser plant is provided either directly from the steam turbine cycle or from a heat exchanger connected with such cycle. Hydrogen efficiency production is valued using high temperature electrolysis. Electrolysis production of hydrogen can be performed with significantly higher thermal efficiencies by operating in the steam phase than in the water phase. The electrolysis performance is assessed with solid oxide and solid proton electrolysis cells. The efficiency from the three operating conditions (endo-thermal, auto-thermal and thermo-neutral) of a high temperature electrolysis process is evaluated. The technical difficulties to use the gases enthalpy to heat the water are analyzed, taking into account efficiency and technological challenges. EDF and AREVA NP have performed an analysis to select an optimized process giving consideration to plant efficiency, plant operation, investment and production costs. The paper provides pathways and identifies R and D actions to reach hydrogen production costs competitive with those of other hydrogen production processes. (authors)

  8. Small-scale, hydrogen-oxidizing-denitrifying bioreactor for treatment of nitrate-contaminated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L; Buckwalter, Seanne P; Repert, Deborah A; Miller, Daniel N

    2005-05-01

    Nitrate removal by hydrogen-coupled denitrification was examined using flow-through, packed-bed bioreactors to develop a small-scale, cost effective system for treating nitrate-contaminated drinking-water supplies. Nitrate removal was accomplished using a Rhodocyclus sp., strain HOD 5, isolated from a sole-source drinking-water aquifer. The autotrophic capacity of the purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium made it particularly adept for this purpose. Initial tests used a commercial bioreactor filled with glass beads and countercurrent, non-sterile flow of an autotrophic, air-saturated, growth medium and hydrogen gas. Complete removal of 2 mM nitrate was achieved for more than 300 days of operation at a 2-h retention time. A low-cost hydrogen generator/bioreactor system was then constructed from readily available materials as a water treatment approach using the Rhodocyclus strain. After initial tests with the growth medium, the constructed system was tested using nitrate-amended drinking water obtained from fractured granite and sandstone aquifers, with moderate and low TDS loads, respectively. Incomplete nitrate removal was evident in both water types, with high-nitrite concentrations in the bioreactor output, due to a pH increase, which inhibited nitrite reduction. This was rectified by including carbon dioxide in the hydrogen stream. Additionally, complete nitrate removal was accomplished with wastewater-impacted surface water, with a concurrent decrease in dissolved organic carbon. The results of this study using three chemically distinct water supplies demonstrate that hydrogen-coupled denitrification can serve as the basis for small-scale remediation and that pilot-scale testing might be the next logical step.

  9. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of geothermal waters in the southern hachimantai area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubaya, Osamu; Etchu, Hiroshi; Takenaka, Teruo; Yoshida, Yutaka.

    1985-01-01

    Geothermal waters from the Matsukawa and Kakkonda Geothermal Plants, wells at Amihari-Motoyu, and Nyuto and Tazawako areas were isotopically studied. The geothermal waters from Mutsukawa, Kakkonda and Amihari-Motoyu have hydrogen isotope ratios similar to the local meteoric waters, while have higher oxygen isotope ratios than the local meteoric waters. This relationship of hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios, that is called ''oxygen shift'', means that these geothermal waters are meteoric waters undergone the oxygen isotope exchange with rocks at high temperature of underground. The exygen shifts are 2 -- 3 per mil in Matsukawa and Kakkonda, and 7 per mil in Amihari-Motoyu. This difference may be important to understand the processe of water-rock interaction in this area. The geothermal waters at Nyuto and Tazawako areas also show 2 -- 3 per mil oxygen shift. The steam from the Tazawako-cho well and the hot spring water form the Tsurunoyu are estimated to be vapor and liquid phases separated form a single geothermal water of NaCl type, though the hot water from the Tsurunoyu is diluted with shallow meteoric water. (author)

  10. Effect of addition of water-soluble salts on the hydrogen generation of aluminum in reaction with hot water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi-Tousi, S.S.; Szpunar, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum powder was ball milled for different durations of time with different weight percentages of water-soluble salts (NaCl and KCl). The hydrogen generation of each mixture in reaction with hot water was measured. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) as well as energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the morphology, surfaces and cross sections of the produced particles. The results show that the presence of salts in the microstructure of the aluminum considerably increases the hydrogen generation rate. At shorter milling times, the salt covers the aluminum particles and becomes embedded in layers within the aluminum matrix. At higher milling durations, salt and aluminum phases form composite particles. A higher percentage of the second phase significantly decreases the milling time needed for activation of the aluminum particles. Based on the EDS results from cross sections of the milled particles, a mechanism for improvement of the hydrogen generation rate in the presence of salts is suggested. - Highlights: • Milling and water soluble salts have a synergic effect on hydrogen generation. • Salt and aluminum form composite particles by milling. • Salt is dissolved in water leaving aluminum with much fresh surfaces for the reaction. • The chemical effect of salt on the reaction is negligible compared to its structural effect.

  11. Method for the preparation of deuterium-enriched water in the preparation of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandrin, C.

    1984-01-01

    The synthesis-gas plant is operated in a number of successive operating periods such that during the first operating period an excess of fresh water is supplied to the synthesis gas plant and the waste water from the resulting mixture is separated in a condenser and supplied to a storage container. During the subsequent operating periods, the waste water stored in the container is used as the feed water for the synthesis gas plant and the waste water obtained on each occasion is stored in the container with increasing deuterium concentration. The waste water obtained during the last operating period and having the highest deuterium concentration is used to feed a plant for producing heavy water. This process, when used in a synthesis gas plant for producing hydrogen, can be used to obtain deuterium-enriched water as a feedstock for a heavy-water plant without expensive additional energy-consuming devices

  12. Studing electronic structure of water molecules in aquocomplexes by the method of pions minus capture by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezhi, I.; Krumshtejn, Z.V.; Molnar, B.; Petrukhin, V.I.; Rybakov, V.N.; Suvorov, V.M.; Khorvat, D.; Tsisek, Z.; Yutlandov, I.A.

    1980-01-01

    Using the effect of electron shell state on π-meson capture by chemically bound hydrogen studied has been change of electron density in hydrogen atoms of water molecules bound into aquocomplexes. The fact of depression of π-meson capture probability by hydrogen of water in aquocomplexes has been established. The magnitudes of depression indicate essential decrease of electron density in a hydrogen atom of coordinated water. Interaction of ligands with oxygen-containing anions also essentially contributes to a magnitude of depression

  13. Confinement dependence of electro-catalysts for hydrogen evolution from water splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaela Lindgren

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory is utilized to articulate a particular generic deconstruction of the electrode/electro-catalyst assembly for the cathode process during water splitting. A computational model was designed to determine how alloying elements control the fraction of H2 released during zirconium oxidation by water relative to the amount of hydrogen picked up by the corroding alloy. This model is utilized to determine the efficiencies of transition metals decorated with hydroxide interfaces in facilitating the electro-catalytic hydrogen evolution reaction. A computational strategy is developed to select an electro-catalyst for hydrogen evolution (HE, where the choice of a transition metal catalyst is guided by the confining environment. The latter may be recast into a nominal pressure experienced by the evolving H2 molecule. We arrived at a novel perspective on the uniqueness of oxide supported atomic Pt as a HE catalyst under ambient conditions.

  14. Preparation of Pt-PTFE hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen-water isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junhua; Kang Yi; Han Yande; Ruan Hao; Dou Qincheng; Hu Shilin

    2001-01-01

    The hydrophobic catalyst used in the hydrogen-water isotope exchange is prepared with Pt as the active metal, PTFE as the hydrophobic material, active carbon or silicon dioxide as the support. The isotope catalytic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water is carried out in the trickle bed and the effects of different carriers, mass fraction of Pt and PTFE on the catalytic activity are discussed. The experimental results show that the activity of Pt-C-PTFE hydrophobic catalyst with the ratio between PTFE and Pt-C from 1 to 2 is higher than other kinds of catalysts and the overall volume transfer coefficient is increased with the increasing of the hydrogen flow rate and reaction temperature

  15. Role of synergism effect of mixed metal oxides on molecular hydrogen formation from photocatalitic water splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmudov, H.M.; Ismayilova, M.K.; Jafarova, N.A.; Azizova, K.V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with hydrogen production using photocatalysis. In particular, we focus on the role of synergism on the reaction rate. For hydrogen production presented photocatalyst is composed of nanoAl_2O_3 and dispers TiO_2. Yet, the presence of the two mixed metal oxides together results in considerable enhancement of the reaction rate. The main reason for this is the increase of the charge carriers lifetime allowing for electron transfer to hydrogen ions and hole transfer to oxygen ions. It was investigated the mechanism of water splitting in presence of mixed nanocatalysed. It has been shown that the effect occurs during irradiation as a result of photooxidation of water with mixed metal oxides catalyst.

  16. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  17. Toward enhanced hydrogen generation from water using oxygen permeating LCF membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    © the Owner Societies. Hydrogen production from water thermolysis can be enhanced by the use of perovskite-type mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes, through which oxygen permeation is driven by a chemical potential gradient. In this work, water thermolysis experiments were performed using 0.9 mm thick La0.9Ca0.1FeO3-δ (LCF-91) perovskite membranes at 990 °C in a lab-scale button-cell reactor. We examined the effects of the operating conditions such as the gas species concentrations and flow rates on the feed and sweep sides on the water thermolysis rate and oxygen flux. A single step reaction mechanism is proposed for surface reactions, and three-resistance permeation models are derived. Results show that water thermolysis is facilitated by the LCF-91 membrane especially when a fuel is added to the sweep gas. Increasing the gas flow rate and water concentration on the feed side or the hydrogen concentration on the sweep side enhances the hydrogen production rate. In this work, hydrogen is used as the fuel by construction, so that a single-step surface reaction mechanism can be developed and water thermolysis rate parameters can be derived. Both surface reaction rate parameters for oxygen incorporation/dissociation and hydrogen-oxygen reactions are fitted at 990 °C. We compare the oxygen fluxes in water thermolysis and air separation experiments, and identify different limiting steps in the processes involving various oxygen sources and sweep gases for this 0.9 mm thick LCF-91 membrane. In the air feed-inert sweep case, the bulk diffusion and sweep side surface reaction are the two limiting steps. In the water feed-inert sweep case, surface reaction on the feed side dominates the oxygen permeation process. Yet in the water feed-fuel sweep case, surface reactions on both the feed and sweep sides are rate determining when hydrogen concentration in the sweep side is in the range of 1-5 vol%. Furthermore, long term studies show that the surface

  18. Experimental determination of reaction rates of water. Hydrogen exchange of tritium with hydrophobic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixel, J.C.; Hartzell, B.W.; Park, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    This study was undertaken to obtain data needed for further development of a process for the enrichment and removal of tritium from the water associated with light-water reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, and tritium-handling laboratories. The approach is based on the use of antiwetting, hydrophobic catalysts which permit the chemical exchange reactions between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen in direct contact, thus eliminating problems of catalyst deactivation and the complexity of reactor design normally associated with current catalytic-detritiation techniques involving gas-phase catalysis. An apparatus and procedure were developed for measuring reaction rates of water-hydrogen chemical exchange with hydrophobic catalysts. Preliminary economic evaluations of the process were made as it might apply to the AGNS fuel reprocessing plant

  19. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. II. Hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbar, M.; Farhataziz; Ross, A.B.

    1975-05-01

    Rates of reactions of hydrogen atoms (from radiolysis of water and other sources) with organic and inorganic molecules, ions, and transients in aqueous solution were tabulated. Directly measured rates obtained by kinetic spectroscopy or conductimetric methods, and relative rates determined by competition kinetics are included. (U.S.)

  20. Intracrystalline site preference of hydrogen isotopes in the water of crystallization of copper sulfate pentahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, I.; Matsuo, S.

    1981-01-01

    Difference in the isotopic partition at different sites of the water of crystallization of CuSO 4 .5H 2 O (the site preference) was estimated for the hydrogen isotopes. Fractional dehydration of CuSO 4 .5H 2 O under vacuum at 0 and 25 0 C was used to determine the isotopic ratio, the amount of dehydrated water, and the rate process of dehydration. The following results were obtained. (1) Two maxima occur in the isotopic ratio in the dehydration range, F < 0.8. (2) The dehydration occurs by the three sequential zeroth-order rate processes which have different rate constants for dehydration. The three different rate constants may be explained by the combination of the rate constants of dehydration of the water molecules dehydrated. The estimation of the difference in hydrogen isotope distribution for different sites, i.e., four of the five water molecules in the coordination sphere of copper ion (site A) and one bonded to the sulfate ion through hydrogen bonding (site B) was made. The site preference of hydrogen isotopes (delta D,%) was concluded to be -3.20 +- 0.52 for site A and +2.26 +- 2.09 for site B, where the delta D value was referred to the isotopic ratio of the mother liquor from which the crystal was formed

  1. Intracrystalline site preference of hydrogen isotopes in the water of crystallization of copper sulfate pentahydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, I.; Matsuo, S.

    1981-04-02

    Difference in the isotopic partition at different sites of the water of crystallization of CuSO/sub 4/.5H/sub 2/O (the site preference) was estimated for the hydrogen isotopes. Fractional dehydration of CuSO/sub 4/.5H/sub 2/O under vacuum at 0 and 25/sup 0/C was used to determine the isotopic ratio, the amount of dehydrated water, and the rate process of dehydration. The following results were obtained. (1) Two maxima occur in the isotopic ratio in the dehydration range, F < 0.8. (2) The dehydration occurs by the three sequential zeroth-order rate processes which have different rate constants for dehydration. The three different rate constants may be explained by the combination of the rate constants of dehydration of the water molecules dehydrated. The estimation of the difference in hydrogen isotope distribution for different sites, i.e., four of the five water molecules in the coordination sphere of copper ion (site A) and one bonded to the sulfate ion through hydrogen bonding (site B) was made. The site preference of hydrogen isotopes (delta D,%) was concluded to be -3.20 +- 0.52 for site A and +2.26 +- 2.09 for site B, where the delta D value was referred to the isotopic ratio of the mother liquor from which the crystal was formed.

  2. Development program of hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water splitting is process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryutaro Hino

    2005-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been conducting R and D on the HTGR and also on thermo-chemical water splitting hydrogen production by using a iodine-sulfur cycle (IS process) in the HTTR project. The continuous hydrogen production for one week was demonstrated with a bench-scale test apparatus made of glass, and the hydrogen production rare was about 31 NL/h. Based on the test results and know-how obtained through the bench-scale test, a pilot test plant, which has a hydrogen production performance of 30 Nm 3 /h and will be operated under the high pressure up to 2 MPa, is being designed conceptually as the next step of the IS process development aiming to realize a future nuclear hydrogen production coupled with the HTGR. In this paper, we will introduce one-week continuous hydrogen production conducted with the bench-scale test apparatus and the pilot test program including R and D and an analytical system necessary for designing the pilot test plant. MW. Figure 1 shows an overview of the HTTR-IS plant. In this paper, we will introduce latest test results obtained with the bench-scale test apparatus and concepts of key components of the IS process, a sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) and a sulfur trioxide (SO 3 ) decomposers working under high-temperature corrosive circumstance, are also introduced as well as relating R and D and an analytical system for the pilot plant design. (authors)

  3. Modelling of hydrogen assisted cracking of nickel-base Alloy X-750 in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, T.; Ballinger, R.G.; Hwang, I.S.

    1992-01-01

    A closed-form, semi-empirical, electrochemical model has been developed to rationalize the intergranular corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy X-750 in aqueous electrolytes. The model is based on the assumption that, in the electrolytes investigated and for the microstructures studied, that hydrogen assisted crack growth is the dominant mechanism. Further, it is assumed that the rate of hydrogen reduction is a controlling factor in the magnitude of the environmental component of crack growth. Electrolyte conductivity, dissolution and passivation kinetics of precipitates, grain boundary coverage of precipitates are identified as important environmental and microstructural variables governing the hydrogen reduction rate at the crack tip. The model is compared with experimental data for fatigue crack growth where hydrogen is supplied by external charging and with data where galvanically-generated local hydrogen is responsible for enhanced crack growth. It is shown that predicted results characterize the observed effects of frequency, microstructure, electrolyte conductivity, and stress intensity factor. The agreement between the hydrogen reduction model and measured crack growth rate is believed to support the proposed galvanic corrosion mechanism for the intergranular cracking of alloy X-750 in low temperature water

  4. Hydrogen Economy Model for Nearly Net-Zero Cities with Exergy Rationale and Energy-Water Nexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birol Kılkış

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The energy base of urban settlements requires greater integration of renewable energy sources. This study presents a “hydrogen city” model with two cycles at the district and building levels. The main cycle comprises of hydrogen gas production, hydrogen storage, and a hydrogen distribution network. The electrolysis of water is based on surplus power from wind turbines and third-generation solar photovoltaic thermal panels. Hydrogen is then used in central fuel cells to meet the power demand of urban infrastructure. Hydrogen-enriched biogas that is generated from city wastes supplements this approach. The second cycle is the hydrogen flow in each low-exergy building that is connected to the hydrogen distribution network to supply domestic fuel cells. Make-up water for fuel cells includes treated wastewater to complete an energy-water nexus. The analyses are supported by exergy-based evaluation metrics. The Rational Exergy Management Efficiency of the hydrogen city model can reach 0.80, which is above the value of conventional district energy systems, and represents related advantages for CO2 emission reductions. The option of incorporating low-enthalpy geothermal energy resources at about 80 °C to support the model is evaluated. The hydrogen city model is applied to a new settlement area with an expected 200,000 inhabitants to find that the proposed model can enable a nearly net-zero exergy district status. The results have implications for settlements using hydrogen energy towards meeting net-zero targets.

  5. Biogenic Properties of Deep Waters from the Black Sea Reduction (Hydrogen Sulphide) Zone for Marine Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Polikarpov, Gennady G.; Lazorenko, Galina Е.; Тereschenko, Natalya N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Generalized data of biogenic properties investigations of the Black Sea deep waters from its reduction zone for marine algae are presented. It is shown on board and in laboratory that after pre-oxidation of hydrogen sulphide by intensive aeration of the deep waters lifted to the surface of the sea, they are ready to be used for cultivation of the Black Sea unicellular, planktonic, and multicellular, benthic, algae instead of artificial medium. Naturally balanced micro- and macroeleme...

  6. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low energy nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, George H.; Shrestha, Prajakti J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews light water and hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) including the different methodologies used to study these reactions and the results obtained. Reports of excess heat production, transmutation reactions, and nuclear radiation emission are cited. An aim of this review is to present a summary of the present status of light water LENR research and provide some insight into where this research is heading. (author)

  7. Production of hydrogen and hydrocarbons from cellulose and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, M; Kawai, T; Tamaru, K

    1981-01-01

    H, CH4, and CO are produced by the thermal reaction (300 degrees) of cellulose and water vapor using Pt, Pt-TiO2 and Ru/SiO2 as catalysts, among which the Ru/SiO2 catalyst showed the highest activity for direct production of CH4 and H.

  8. Electrochemically reduced water exerts superior reactive oxygen species scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeki Hamasaki

    Full Text Available Electrochemically reduced water (ERW is produced near a cathode during electrolysis and exhibits an alkaline pH, contains richly dissolved hydrogen, and contains a small amount of platinum nanoparticles. ERW has reactive oxygen species (ROS-scavenging activity and recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen-dissolved water exhibits ROS-scavenging activity. Thus, the antioxidative capacity of ERW is postulated to be dependent on the presence of hydrogen levels; however, there is no report verifying the role of dissolved hydrogen in ERW. In this report, we clarify whether the responsive factor for antioxidative activity in ERW is dissolved hydrogen. The intracellular ROS scavenging activity of ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water was tested by both fluorescent stain method and immuno spin trapping assay. We confirm that ERW possessed electrolysis intensity-dependent intracellular ROS-scavenging activity, and ERW exerts significantly superior ROS-scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water. ERW retained its ROS-scavenging activity after removal of dissolved hydrogen, but lost its activity when autoclaved. An oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and chemiluminescence assay could not detect radical-scavenging activity in both ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water. These results indicate that ERW contains electrolysis-dependent hydrogen and an additional antioxidative factor predicted to be platinum nanoparticles.

  9. Hydrogen iodide processing section in a thermochemical water-splitting iodine-sulfur process using a multistage hydrogen iodide decomposer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sakaba, Nariaki; Imai, Yoshiyuki; Kubo, Shinji; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Kato, Ryoma

    2009-01-01

    A multistage hydrogen iodide (HI) decomposer (repetition of HI decomposition reaction and removal of product iodine by a HIx solution) in a thermochemical water-splitting iodine-sulfur process for hydrogen production using high-temperature heat from the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor was numerically evaluated, especially in terms of the flow rate of undecomposed HI and product iodine at the outlet of the decomposer, in order to reduce the total heat transfer area of heat exchangers for the recycle of undecomposed HI and to eliminate components for the separation. A suitable configuration of the multistage HI decomposer was countercurrent rather than concurrent, and the HIx solution from an electro-electro dialysis at a low temperature was a favorable feed condition for the multistage HI decomposer. The flow rate of undecomposed HI and product iodine at the outlet of the multistage HI decomposer was significantly lower than that of the conventional HI decomposer, because the conversion was increased, and HI and iodine were removed by the HIx solution. Based on this result, an alternative HI processing section using the multistage HI decomposer and eliminating some recuperators, coolers, and components for the separation was proposed and evaluated. The total heat transfer area of heat exchangers in the proposed HI processing section could be reduced to less than about 1/2 that in the conventional HI processing section. (author)

  10. Thermodynamic evaluation of geothermal energy powered hydrogen production by PEM water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Ceyhun; Kanoglu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis of a PEM water electrolyzer driven by geothermal power for hydrogen production is performed. For this purpose, work is produced from a geothermal resource by means of the organic Rankine cycle; the resulting work is used as a work input for an electrolysis process; and electrolysis water is preheated by the waste geothermal water. The first and second-law based performance parameters are identified for the considered system and the system performance is evaluated. The effects of geothermal water and electrolysis temperatures on the amount of hydrogen production are studied and these parameters are found to be proportional to each other. We consider a geothermal resource at 160 °C available at a rate of 100 kg/s. Under realistic operating conditions, 3810 kW power can be produced in a binary geothermal power plant. The produced power is used for the electrolysis process. The electrolysis water can be preheated to 80 °C by the geothermal water leaving the power plant and hydrogen can be produced at a rate of 0.0340 kg/s. The energy and exergy efficiencies of the binary geothermal power plant are 11.4% and 45.1%, respectively. The corresponding efficiencies for the electrolysis system are 64.0% and 61.6%, respectively, and those for the overall system are 6.7% and 23.8%, respectively. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production by PEM electrolysis powered by geothermal energy. • Power is used for electrolyser; used geothermal water is for preheating electrolysis water. • Effect of geothermal water and electrolysis temperatures on the amount of hydrogen production. • Hydrogen can be produced at a rate of 0.0340 kg/s for a resource at 160 °C available at 100 kg/s. • Energy and exergy efficiencies of the overall system are 6.7% and 23.8%, respectively

  11. Understanding the circulation of geothermal waters in the Tibetan Plateau using oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Hongbing; Zhang, Yanfei; Zhang, Wenjie; Kong, Na; Zhang, Qing; Huang, Jingzhong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Unique geothermal resources in Tibetan Plateau were discussed. • Isotopes were used to trace circulation of geothermal water. • Magmatic water mixing dominates geothermal water evolution. - Abstract: With the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau, many of the world’s rarest and most unique geothermal fields have been developed. This study aims to systematically analyze the characteristics of the hydrogen and oxygen isotopic data of geothermal, river, and lake waters to understand the circulation of groundwater and to uncover the mechanism of geothermal formation in the Tibetan Plateau. Field observations and isotopic data show that geothermal water has higher temperatures and hydraulic pressures, as well as more depleted D and 18 O isotopic compositions than river and lake waters. Thus, neither lakes nor those larger river waters are the recharge source of geothermal water. Snow-melt water in high mountains can vertically infiltrate and deeply circulate along some stretching tensile active tectonic belts or sutures and recharge geothermal water. After deep circulation, cold surface water evolves into high-temperature thermal water and is then discharged as springs at the surface again in a low area, under high water-head difference and cold–hot water density difference. Therefore, the large-scale, high-temperature, high-hydraulic-pressure geothermal systems in the Tibetan Plateau are developed and maintained by rapid groundwater circulation and the heat source of upwelled residual magmatic water. Inevitably, the amount of geothermal water will increase if global warming accelerates the melting of glaciers in high mountains

  12. Design of a Simple and Cheap Water Electrolyser for the Production of Solar Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Prasad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available conventional alkaline electrolyser and advanced polymer membrane electrolysers for water electrolysis are quite expensive. Taking into account this aspect, a very simple and cheap water electrolyser has been designed and fabricated utilising easily available economical materials for small scale production of hydrogen using renewable energy from photovoltaic panel. The construction details of the electrolyser with a schematic drawing of the experimental set-up for PV production of H2 are given. In order to fabricate the compact electrolyser, two coaxial tubular PVC pipes were used. The lower part of the inner pipe has fine perforations for the transport of ions through electrolyte between the electrodes. Two cylindrical electrodes, cathode and anode are kept in inner and outer pipes respectively. The performance of hydrogen production was measured using a photovoltaic panel directly connected to the electrolyser under atmospheric pressure and in 27wt% KOH solution. Flow rates of hydrogen and oxygen were measured using a digital flow meter. High purity fuel cell grade hydrogen (99.98% and oxygen (99.85% have been produced. The experimental results confirm that the present electrolyser has eligible properties for hydrogen production in remote areas. No such electrolyser has been reported prior to this work. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All rights reserved.[Received: 20 May 2009, Revised: 14 August 2009, Accepted: 19 August 2009][How to Cite: R. Prasad. (2009. Design of a Simple and Cheap Water Electrolyser for the Production of Solar Hydrogen. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 10-15.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7113.10-15][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7113.10-15 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7113 ] 

  13. Design of a Simple and Cheap Water Electrolyser for the Production of Solar Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Prasad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available conventional alkaline electrolyser and advanced polymer membrane electrolysers for water electrolysis are quite expensive. Taking into account this aspect, a very simple and cheap water electrolyser has been designed and fabricated utilising easily available economical materials for small scale production of hydrogen using renewable energy from photovoltaic panel. The construction details of the electrolyser with a schematic drawing of the experimental set-up for PV production of H2 are given. In order to fabricate the compact electrolyser, two coaxial tubular PVC pipes were used. The lower part of the inner pipe has fine perforations for the transport of ions through electrolyte between the electrodes. Two cylindrical electrodes, cathode and anode are kept in inner and outer pipes respectively. The performance of hydrogen production was measured using a photovoltaic panel directly connected to the electrolyser under atmospheric pressure and in 27wt% KOH solution. Flow rates of hydrogen and oxygen were measured using a digital flow meter. High purity fuel cell grade hydrogen (99.98% and oxygen (99.85% have been produced. The experimental results confirm that the present electrolyser has eligible properties for hydrogen production in remote areas. No such electrolyser has been reported prior to this work. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All rights reserved.[Received: 20 May 2009, Revised: 14 August 2009, Accepted: 19 August 2009][How to Cite: R. Prasad. (2009. Design of a Simple and Cheap Water Electrolyser for the Production of Solar Hydrogen. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 10-15. doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.21.10-15][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.21.10-15

  14. A Hydrogen-Evolving Hybrid-Electrolyte Battery with Electrochemical/Photoelectrochemical Charging from Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhaoyu; Li, Panpan; Xiao, Dan

    2017-02-08

    Decoupled hydrogen and oxygen production were successfully embedded into an aqueous dual-electrolyte (acid-base) battery for simultaneous energy storage and conversion. A three-electrode configuration was adopted, involving an electrocatalytic hydrogen-evolving electrode as cathode, an alkaline battery-type or capacitor-type anode as shuttle, and a charging-assisting electrode for electro-/photoelectrochemically catalyzing water oxidation. The conceptual battery not only synergistically outputs electricity and chemical fuels with tremendous specific energy and power densities, but also supports various approaches to be charged by pure or solar-assisted electricity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A new type separation column for the water-hydrogen isotope catalytic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Trenin, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic water/hydrogen isotope exchange process is by right considered the most attractive for the solution a number of urgent problems of hydrogen isotope separation. A new type exchange reaction column is described and studied in details by computer simulation and with the help of McCabe-Thiele diagrams. It is shown that the new column in comparison with a traditional one needs less catalyst quantity and a smaller diameter for the solving of the same separation tasks. Generalized calculation data are presented in graphical form

  16. Hydrogen production via thermochemical water-splitting by lithium redox reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Naoya; Miyaoka, Hiroki; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Hydrogen production via water-splitting by lithium redox reactions possibly proceeds below 800 °C. •Entropy control by using nonequilibrium technique successfully reduces the reaction temperature. •The operating temperature should be further reduced by optimizing the nonequilibrium condition to control the cycle. -- Abstracts: Hydrogen production via thermochemical water-splitting by lithium redox reactions was investigated as energy conversion technique. The reaction system consists of three reactions, which are hydrogen generation by the reaction of lithium and lithium hydroxide, metal separation by thermolysis of lithium oxide, and oxygen generation by hydrolysis of lithium peroxide. The hydrogen generation reaction completed at 500 °C. The metal separation reaction is thermodynamically difficult because it requires about 3400 °C in equilibrium condition. However, it was indicated from experimental results that the reaction temperature was drastically reduced to 800 °C by using nonequilibrium technique. The hydrolysis reaction was exothermic reaction, and completed by heating up to 300 °C. Therefore, it was expected that the water-splitting by lithium redox reactions was possibly operated below 800 °C under nonequilibrium condition

  17. Hydrogen generation from water using Mg nanopowder produced by arc plasma method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Uda, Hideo Okuyama, Tohru S Suzuki and Yoshio Sakka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report that hydrogen gas can be easily produced from water at room temperature using a Mg nanopowder (30–1000 nm particles, average diameter 265 nm. The Mg nanopowder was produced by dc arc melting of a Mg ingot in a chamber with mixed-gas atmosphere (20% N2–80% Ar at 0.1 MPa using custom-built nanopowder production equipment. The Mg nanopowder was passivated with a gas mixture of 1% O2 in Ar for 12 h in the final step of the synthesis, after which the nanopowder could be safely handled in ambient air. The nanopowder vigorously reacted with water at room temperature, producing 110 ml of hydrogen gas per 1 g of powder in 600 s. This amount corresponds to 11% of the hydrogen that could be generated by the stoichiometric reaction between Mg and water. Mg(OH2 flakes formed on the surface of the Mg particles as a result of this reaction. They easily peeled off, and the generation of hydrogen continued until all the Mg was consumed.

  18. Simulation of gas hydrogen diffusion through partially water saturated mono-modal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boher, C.; Lorente, S.; Frizon, F.; Bart, F.

    2012-01-01

    Concerning the disposal of nuclear wastes, it is important to design concrete envelopes with pore networks that allow the diffusion of hydrogen towards the outside. This work documents the relationship between geo-polymers, which are materials with a quasi mono-modal pore network, and their gaseous diffusivity capacities. Using a mono-modal material allows studying a specific pore size contribution to gaseous diffusion. The pore network is characterized by mercury porosimetry. These experimental results are used as data in a model named MOHYCAN. The modeling work consists of creating a virtual pore network. Then, water layers are deposited in this network to simulate variable water saturation levels. Finally hydrogen is transported through the virtual network using a combination of ordinary diffusion and Knudsen diffusion. MOHYCAN calculates the hydrogen diffusion coefficient for water saturation degree from 0% to 100%. The impacts of the pore network arrangement or the pore network discretization have been studied. The results are, for a quasi mono-modal material: -) the diffusion coefficient is not sensitive to different virtual pore network arrangement; -) the diffusion coefficient values have a sharp drop at specific water saturation (this is due to the water saturation of the main and unique pore family); -) a 2 pores family based model is sufficient to represent the pore network. Theses observations will not be valid if we consider a material with a large pore size distribution, like cementitious materials

  19. Experimental study of hydrogen combustion in a flammable atmosphere in presence of water drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheikhravat, Homan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is part of safety studies on Pressurized Water Reactors for nuclear power plants. Scenarios including a release of hydrogen predict to trigger spraying in order to reduce the pressure and collect the aerosols towards the bottom. However spraying involves lowering the temperature and, consequently, the content of water vapor initially sufficient to render the atmosphere inert. The purpose of this thesis is to study the de-inerting conditions of premixed hydrogen / air / water vapor in presence of fogs and then to analyze the interaction between the water spray and the flame which can initially be laminar or turbulent. For this purpose two facilities have been designed: a spherical one of 56 L with central ignition that can be heated to 200 C and a large one optimised for flame acceleration (ENACCEF). With these tools have been determined the flammability limits of H 2 /air/water vapor as a function of pressure and temperature, the behavior of flames close to the limits, the effect of sprinkling on de-inerting and finally the interaction between the flame front and the droplets considering different mean droplets sizes. The influence of a hydrogen concentration gradient on the acceleration criterion and the role of sprinkling on the propagation of a turbulent flame have also been studied. It appears that the spray can cause not only de-inerting but also be ineffective in extinguishing the flame and, in some cases, can even increase the turbulence rate and consequently the flame acceleration process. (author)

  20. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation from water under visible light using core/shell nano-catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Shih, K; Li, X Y

    2010-01-01

    A microemulsion technique was employed to synthesize nano-sized photocatalysts with a core (CdS)/shell (ZnS) structure. The primary particles of the photocatalysts were around 10 nm, and the mean size of the catalyst clusters in water was about 100 nm. The band gaps of the catalysts ranged from 2.25 to 2.46 eV. The experiments of photocatalytic H(2) generation showed that the catalysts (CdS)(x)/(ZnS)(1-x) with x ranging from 0.1 to 1 were able to produce hydrogen from water photolysis under visible light. The catalyst with x=0.9 had the highest rate of hydrogen production. The catalyst loading density also influenced the photo-hydrogen production rate, and the best catalyst concentration in water was 1 g L(-1). The stability of the nano-catalysts in terms of size, morphology and activity was satisfactory during an extended test period for a specific hydrogen production rate of 2.38 mmol g(-1) L(-1) h(-1) and a quantum yield of 16.1% under visible light (165 W Xe lamp, lambda>420 nm). The results demonstrate that the (CdS)/(ZnS) core/shell nano-particles are a novel photo-catalyst for renewable hydrogen generation from water under visible light. This is attributable to the large band-gap ZnS shell that separates the electron/hole pairs generated by the CdS core and hence reduces their recombinations.

  1. Towards a unified description of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water: A dynamics based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Zhou, Tiecheng; Clark, Aurora E.

    2014-01-01

    The definition of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) is intimately related to the topological and dynamic properties of the hydrogen bond network within liquid water. The development of a universal H-bond definition for water is an active area of research as it would remove many ambiguities in the network properties that derive from the fixed definition employed to assign whether a water dimer is hydrogen bonded. This work investigates the impact that an electronic-structure based definition, an energetic, and a geometric definition of the H-bond has upon both topological and dynamic network behavior of simulated water. In each definition, the use of a cutoff (either geometric or energetic) to assign the presence of a H-bond leads to the formation of transiently bonded or broken dimers, which have been quantified within the simulation data. The relative concentration of transient species, and their duration, results in two of the three definitions sharing similarities in either topological or dynamic features (H-bond distribution, H-bond lifetime, etc.), however no two definitions exhibit similar behavior for both classes of network properties. In fact, two networks with similar local network topology (as indicated by similar average H-bonds) can have dramatically different global network topology (as indicated by the defect state distributions) and altered H-bond lifetimes. A dynamics based correction scheme is then used to remove artificially transient H-bonds and to repair artificially broken bonds within the network such that the corrected network exhibits the same structural and dynamic properties for two H-bond definitions (the properties of the third definition being significantly improved). The algorithm described represents a significant step forward in the development of a unified hydrogen bond network whose properties are independent of the original hydrogen bond definition that is employed

  2. Covariance of oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions in plant water: species effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, L.W.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Leaf water becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen during evapotranspiration. The magnitude of the enrichment has been shown to be influenced by temperature and humidity, but the effects of species—specific factors on leaf water enrichment of D and 18 O have not been studied for different plants growing together. Accordingly, to learn whether leaf water enrichment patterns and processes for D and 18 O are different for individual species growing under the same environmental conditions we tested the proposal that leaf waters in plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) show higher slopes (m in the leaf water equation °D = m ° 18 O + b) than in C 3 plants. We determined the relationships between the stable hydrogen (°D) and oxygen (° 18 O) isotope ratios of leaf waters collected during the diurnal cycle of evapotranspiration for Yucca schidigera, Ephedra aspera, Agave deserti, Prunus ilicifolia, Yucca whipplei, Heteromeles arbutifolia, Dyckia fosteriana, Simmondsia chinensis, and Encelia farinosa growing at two sites in southern California. Slopes (m in the above leaf water equation) ranged from 1.50 to 3.21, compared to °8 for meteoric water, but differences in slope could not be attributed to carboxylation pathway (CAM vs. C 3 ) nor climate (coastal California vs. Sonoran Desert). Higher slopes were correlated with greater overall ranges of leaf water enrichment of D and 18 O. Water in plants with higher slopes also differed most from unaltered meteoric water. Leaf water isotope ratios in plants with lower slopes were better correlated with temperature and humidity. The findings indicate that m in the aforementioned equation is related to the overall residence time for water in the leaf and proportions of water subjected to repeated evapotranspiration enrichments of heavy isotopes

  3. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of alkaline black liquor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Changqing; Guo, Liejin; Chen, Yunan; Lu, Youjun [Xi' an Jiatong Univ. (China)

    2010-07-01

    Black liquor was gasified continuously in supercritical water successfully and the main gaseous products were H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} with little amount of CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The increase of the temperature and the decrease of the flow rate and black liquor concentration enhanced SCWG of black liquor. The change of the system pressure had limited influence on the gasification effect. The maximal COD removal efficiency of 88.69 % was obtained at the temperature of 600 C. The pH values of the aqueous residue were all decreased to the range of 6.4{proportional_to}8 while the pH value of cooling effluence below 360 C increased to about 11 and the sodium content was much higher than that in the aqueous residue. The reaction rate for COD degradation in supercritical water was obtained by assuming pseudo first order reaction. And the activation energy and pre-exponential for COD removal in SCWG were 74.38kJ/mol and 1.11 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1} respectively. (orig.)

  4. Hydrogen from renewable energy - Photovoltaic/water electrolysis as an exemplary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprafka, R. J.; Tison, R. R.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A feasibility study has been conducted for a NASA Kennedy Space Center liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen production facility using solar cell arrays as the power source for electrolysis. The 100 MW output of the facility would be split into 67.6 and 32 MW portions for electrolysis and liquefaction, respectively. The solar cell array would cover 1.65 sq miles, and would be made up of 249 modular 400-kW arrays. Hydrogen and oxygen are generated at either dispersed or centralized water electrolyzers. The yearly hydrogen output is projected to be 5.76 million lbs, with 8 times that much oxygen; these fuel volumes can support approximately 18 Space Shuttle launches/year.

  5. Effect of water fogs on the deliberate ignition of hydrogen. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalosh, R.G.; Bajpai, S.N.

    1982-11-01

    This report presents an experimental evaluation of the effects of water fog density, droplet diameter, and temperature on the lower flammable limit (LFL) of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. The results show that the LFL for hydrogen in air at 20 0 C is only marginally higher with fog than without. Most of the nozzles tested at 20 0 C raised the hydrogen LFL from 4.0 vol % to about 4.8%, for the case of dense fogs with volume-average drop size in the range 45 to 90 microns. The lower flammable limit at 50 0 C was typically 7.2% for dense fogs with drop size in the range 25 to 50 microns. The lower flammable limit at 70 0 C was typically 7.6%. Typical fog concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 0.09 vol % at 20 0 C and decreased with increasing fog temperature. 7 figures, 4 tables

  6. Corrosion of copper in distilled water without molecular oxygen and the detection of produced hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultquist, G.; Graham, M.J.; Kodra, O.; Moisa, S.; Liu, R.; Bexell, U.; Smialek, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on hydrogen pressures measured during the longterm immersion (∼19 000 hours) of copper in oxygen-free distilled water. Hydrogen gas evolution is from copper corrosion and similar pressures (in the mbar range) are measured for copper contained in either a 316 stainless steel or titanium system. Copper corrosion products have been examined ex-situ by SEM and characterized by Xray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). XPS strongly indicates a corrosion product containing both hydroxide and oxide. SIMS shows that oxygen is mainly present in the outer 0.3 μm surface region and that hydrogen penetrates to depths in the substrate well below the corrosion product

  7. Spectroscopic identification of ethanol-water conformers by large-amplitude hydrogen bond librational modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas; Heimdal, J.; Larsen, René Wugt

    2015-01-01

    ⋯HO hydrogen bond acceptor in the two most stable conformations. In the most stable conformation, the water subunit forces the ethanol molecule into its less stable gauche configuration upon dimerization owing to a cooperative secondary weak O⋯HC hydrogen bondinteraction evidenced by a significantly blue......-shift of the low-frequency in-plane donor OH librational band origin. The strong correlation between the low-frequency in-plane donor OH librational motion and the secondary intermolecular O⋯HC hydrogen bond is demonstrated by electronic structure calculations. The experimental findings are further supported...... by CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pVQZ calculations of the conformationalenergy differences together with second-order vibrational perturbation theory calculations of the large-amplitude donor OH librational band origins....

  8. Hydrogen Through Water Electrolysis and Biomass Gasification for Application in Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kirosa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is considered to be one of the most promising green energy carrier in the energy storage and conversion scenario. Although it is abundant on Earth in the form of compounds, its occurrence in free form is extremely low. Thus, it has to be produced by reforming processes, steam reforming (SR, partial oxidation (POX and auto-thermal reforming (ATR mainly from fossil fuels for high throughput with high energy requirements, pyrolysis of biomass and electrolysis. Electrolysis is brought about by passing electric current though two electrodes to evolve water into its constituent parts, viz. hydrogen and oxygen, respectively. Hydrogen produced by non-noble metal catalysts for both anode and cathode is therefore cost-effective and can be integrated into fuel cells for direct chemical energy conversion into electrical energy electricity, thus meeting the sustainable and renewable use with low carbon footprint.

  9. Oral intake of hydrogen-rich water ameliorated chlorpyrifos-induced neurotoxicity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Ling; Liu, Mengyu; Xie, Fei; Ma, Xuemei, E-mail: xmma@bjut.edu.cn; Zhao, Pengxiang; Liu, Yunqi; Li, Jiala; Wang, Minglian; Yang, Zhaona; Zhang, Yutong

    2014-10-01

    Chronic exposure to low-levels of organophosphate (OP) compounds, such as chlorpyrifos (CPF), induces oxidative stress and could be related to neurological disorders. Hydrogen has been identified as a novel antioxidant which could selectively scavenge hydroxyl radicals. We explore whether intake of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) can protect Wistar rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity. Rats were gavaged daily with 6.75 mg/kg body weight (1/20 LD{sub 50}) of CPF and given HRW by oral intake. Nissl staining and electron microscopy results indicated that HRW intake had protective effects on the CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons and neuronal mitochondria. Immunostaining results showed that the increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes induced by CPF exposure can be ameliorated by HRW intake. Moreover, HRW intake also attenuated CPF-induced oxidative stress as evidenced by enhanced level of MDA, accompanied by an increase in GSH level and SOD and CAT activity. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity tests showed significant decrease in brain AChE activity after CPF exposure, and this effect can be ameliorated by HRW intake. An in vitro study demonstrated that AChE activity was more intense in HRW than in normal water with or without chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO), the metabolically-activated form of CPF. These observations suggest that HRW intake can protect rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity, and the protective effects of hydrogen may be mediated by regulating the oxidant and antioxidant status of rats. Furthermore, this work defines a novel mechanism of biological activity of hydrogen by directly increasing the AChE activity. - Highlights: • Hydrogen molecules protect rats from CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons. • The increased GFAP expression induced by CPF can also be ameliorated by hydrogen. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated the increase in CPF-induced oxidative stress. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated AChE inhibition in vivo

  10. Oral intake of hydrogen-rich water ameliorated chlorpyrifos-induced neurotoxicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Ling; Liu, Mengyu; Xie, Fei; Ma, Xuemei; Zhao, Pengxiang; Liu, Yunqi; Li, Jiala; Wang, Minglian; Yang, Zhaona; Zhang, Yutong

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to low-levels of organophosphate (OP) compounds, such as chlorpyrifos (CPF), induces oxidative stress and could be related to neurological disorders. Hydrogen has been identified as a novel antioxidant which could selectively scavenge hydroxyl radicals. We explore whether intake of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) can protect Wistar rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity. Rats were gavaged daily with 6.75 mg/kg body weight (1/20 LD 50 ) of CPF and given HRW by oral intake. Nissl staining and electron microscopy results indicated that HRW intake had protective effects on the CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons and neuronal mitochondria. Immunostaining results showed that the increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes induced by CPF exposure can be ameliorated by HRW intake. Moreover, HRW intake also attenuated CPF-induced oxidative stress as evidenced by enhanced level of MDA, accompanied by an increase in GSH level and SOD and CAT activity. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity tests showed significant decrease in brain AChE activity after CPF exposure, and this effect can be ameliorated by HRW intake. An in vitro study demonstrated that AChE activity was more intense in HRW than in normal water with or without chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO), the metabolically-activated form of CPF. These observations suggest that HRW intake can protect rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity, and the protective effects of hydrogen may be mediated by regulating the oxidant and antioxidant status of rats. Furthermore, this work defines a novel mechanism of biological activity of hydrogen by directly increasing the AChE activity. - Highlights: • Hydrogen molecules protect rats from CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons. • The increased GFAP expression induced by CPF can also be ameliorated by hydrogen. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated the increase in CPF-induced oxidative stress. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated AChE inhibition in vivo and in

  11. Ammonia-water exchange front end process for ammonia-hydrogen heavy water plants (Preprint No. PD-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadhukhan, H.K.; Varadarajan, T.G.; Nair, N.K.; Das, S.K.; Nath, G.K.

    1989-04-01

    The ammonia-hydrogen exchange process, which utilizes the deutrium exchange between liquid ammonia and gaseous hydrogen is a parasitic process and the heavy water plants (HWP) based on this process has to be linked with the fertilizer plant (FP) for its enormous requirements of hydrogen (synthesis gas, N 2 +3H 2 ). This dependence of HWP on FP gives rise to certain constraints which are listed. These deficiencies of the ammonia-hydrogen process can be overcome to a great extent by delinking the HWP from FP by incorporating NH 3 -H 2 O exchange as the front end step. In addition to the elimination of the above limitations, by employing water as the ultimate feed for the HWP, the plant capacity can be increased substantially and this would go a long way in achieving economies of the large capacity plants. A schematic diagram of this integrated plant is given. Some of the results of developmental efforts and feasibility studies of this NH 3 -H 2 O exchange are briefly reviewed. (author). 4 figs

  12. Fractionation of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes between hydrated and free water molecules in aqueous urea solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakiuchi, M.; Matsuo, S.

    1985-01-01

    Ratios of D/H and 18 O/ 16 O in the vapor phase in equilibrium with aqueous urea solution with different urea molalities were measured at 15 and 25 0 C. Under the assumption that urea solutions consist of two species, i.e., the urea-water cluster and free water, the results are interpreted to give the average hydration number, i.e., the number of water molecules per urea molecule in the urea-water cluster. Good agreement was obtained for the hydration number estimated independently from hydrogen and oxygen isotopic fractions. On the basis of hydrogen isotopic data at 25 0 C, the average hydration number of urea in the cluster is 6.3 +/- 0.8 at 2.1 m and 2.75 +/- 0.08 at saturation (20.15 m). The corresponding average hydration numbers based on oxygen isotopic data were calculated to be 6.7 +/- 2.4 at 2.1 m and 2.75 +/- 0.25 at urea saturation. HD 16 O is enriched in the urea-water cluster and H 2 18 O is enriched in free water. Isotopic partitioning between the cluster and free water is markedly different from those between hydration spheres and free water in aqueous electrolyte solutions. 29 references, 6 figures, 5 tables

  13. Covariance of oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition in plant water: Species effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, L.W.; DeNiro, M.J. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1989-12-01

    Leaf water becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen during evapotranspiration. The magnitude of the enrichment has been shown to be influenced by temperature and humidity, but the effects of species-specific factors on leaf water enrichment of D and {sup 18}O have not been studied for different plants growing together. To learn whether leaf water enrichment patterns and processes for D and {sup 18}O are different for individual species growing under the same environmental conditions the authors tested the proposal that leaf waters in plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) show high sloped (m in the leaf water equation {delta}D = m {delta}{sup 18}O + b) than in C{sub 3} plants. They determined the relationships between the stable hydrogen ({delta}D) and oxygen ({delta}{sup 18}O) isotope ratios of leaf waters collected during the diurnal cycle of evapotranspiration for Yucca schidigera, Ephedra aspera, Agave deserti, Prunus ilicifolia, Yucca whipplei, Heteromeles arbutifolia, Dyckia fosteriana, Simmondsia chinensis, and Encelia farinosa growing at two sites in southern California. The findings indicate that m in the aforementioned equation is related to the overall residence time for water in the leaf and proportions of water subjected to repeated evapotranspiration enrichments of heavy isotopes.

  14. Silicon based multilayer photoelectrodes for photoelectrolysis of water to produce hydrogen from the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruque, Faisal

    The main objective of this work is to study different materials for the direct photosynthesis of hydrogen from water. A variety of photocatalysts such as titanium dioxide, titanium oxy-nitride, silicon carbide, and gallium nitride are being investigated by others for the clean production of hydrogen for fuel cells and hydrogen economy. Our approach was to deposit suitable metallic regions on photocatalyst nanoparticles to direct the efficient synthesis of hydrogen to a particular site for convenient collection. We studied different electrode metals such as gold, platinum, titanium, palladium, and tungsten. We also studied different solar cell materials such as silicon (p- and n-types), silicon carbide and titanium dioxide semiconductors in order to efficiently generate electrons under illumination. We introduced a novel silicon-based multilayer photosynthesis device to take advantage of suitable properties of silicon and tungsten to efficiently produce hydrogen. The device consisted of a silicon (0.5mm) substrate, a deposited atomic layer of Al2O 3 (1nm), a doped polysilicon (0.1microm), and finally a tungsten nanoporous (5-10nm) layer acting as an interface electrode with water. The Al2O 3 layer was introduced to reduce leakage current and to prevent the spreading of the diffused p-n junction layer between the silicon and doped polysilicon layers. The surface of the photoelectrode was coated with nanotextured tungsten nanopores (TNP), which increased the surface area of the electrodes to the electrolyte, assisting in electron-hole mobility, and acting as a photocatalyst. The reported device exhibited a fill factor (%FF) of 27.22% and solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 0.03174%. This thesis describes the structures of the device, and offers a characterization and comparison between different photoelectrodes.

  15. Chromatographic enrichment of isotopes in hydrogen and water samples on palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, B.M.; Polevoi, A.S.; Perevezentsev, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    Data on the isotopic enrichment of hydrogen and water samples by chromatography on palladium have been analyzed. Experimental data on the effect of temperature, hydrogen flow, volume of the enriched fraction, and length of the chromatographic column on the degree of separation attainable in the column have been obtained. It has been shown that the maximum separation achievable (regardless of the type of the isotope mixture) at 273 K falls with increase of hydrogen flow and volume of the enriched gas fraction recoverable from the column. A separation degree of ∼ 1040 has been achieved for a mixture of protium and deuterium in a 10-mm wide and 0.6-m long chromatographic column packed with palladium black with a grain size of 0.2-0.5 mm at 273 K and a specific hydrogen flow of 1.22 mole/m 2 x sec. For a protium-tritium mixture a separation degree of ∼ 90 has been reached in a similar column at 273 K and a specific hydrogen flow of 0.4 mole/m 2 x sec

  16. Imaging the Extended Hot Hydrogen Exosphere at Mars to Determine the Water Escape Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Dolon

    2017-08-01

    ACS SBC imaging of the extended hydrogen exosphere of Mars is proposed to identify the hot hydrogen population present in the exosphere of Mars. Determining the characteristics of this population and the underlying processes responsible for its production are critical towards constraining the escape flux of H from Mars, which in turn is directly related to the water escape history of Mars. Since the hot atoms appear mainly at high altitudes, these observations will be scheduled when Mars is far from Earth allowing us to image the hot hydrogen atoms at high altitudes where they dominate the population. The altitude coverage by HST will extend beyond 30,000 km or 8.8 Martian radii in this case, which makes it perfect for this study as orbiting spacecraft remain at low altitudes (MAVEN apoapse is 6000 km) and cannot separate hot atoms from the thermal population at those altitudes. The observations will also be carried out when Mars is near aphelion, the atmospheric temperature is low, and the thermal population has a small scale height, allowing the clear characterization of the hot hydrogen layer. Another advantage of conducting this study in this cycle is that the solar activity is near its minimum, allowing us to discriminate between changes in the hot hydrogen population from processes taking place within the atmosphere of Mars and changes due to external drivers like the solar wind, producing this non-thermal population. This proposal is part of the HST UV initiative.

  17. Modeling of biomass to hydrogen via the supercritical water pyrolysis process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divilio, R.J. [Combustion Systems Inc., Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A heat transfer model has been developed to predict the temperature profile inside the University of Hawaii`s Supercritical Water Reactor. A series of heat transfer tests were conducted on the University of Hawaii`s apparatus to calibrate the model. Results of the model simulations are shown for several of the heat transfer tests. Tests with corn starch and wood pastes indicated that there are substantial differences between the thermal properties of the paste compared to pure water, particularly near the pseudo critical temperature. The assumption of constant thermal diffusivity in the temperature range of 250 to 450 C gave a reasonable prediction of the reactor temperatures when paste is being fed. A literature review is presented for pyrolysis of biomass in water at elevated temperatures up to the supercritical range. Based on this review, a global reaction mechanism is proposed. Equilibrium calculations were performed on the test results from the University of Hawaii`s Supercritical Water Reactor when corn starch and corn starch and wood pastes were being fed. The calculations indicate that the data from the reactor falls both below and above the equilibrium hydrogen concentrations depending on test conditions. The data also indicates that faster heating rates may be beneficial to the hydrogen yield. Equilibrium calculations were also performed to examine the impact of wood concentration on the gas mixtures produced. This calculation showed that increasing wood concentrations favors the formation of methane at the expense of hydrogen.

  18. Hydrogen water chemistry for BWRs: A status report on the EPRI development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.L.; Nelson, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Many BWRs have experienced extensive intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in their austenitic stainless steel coolant system piping, resulting in serious adverse impacts on plant capacity factors, O and M costs, and personnel radiation exposures. A major research program to provide remedies for BWR pipe cracking was co-funded by EPRI, GE, and the BWR Owners Group for IGSCC Research between 1979 and 1988. Results from this program show that the likelihood of IGSCC depends on reactor water chemistry (particularly on the concentrations of ionic impurities and oxidizing radiolysis products) as well as on material condition and the level of tensile stress. Tests have demonstrated that the concentration of oxidizing radiolysis products in the recirculating water of a BWR can be reduced substantially by injecting hydrogen into the feedwater. Recent plant data show that the use of hydrogen injection can reduce the rate of IGSCC to insignificant levels if the concentration of ionic impurities in the reactor water is kept sufficiently low. This approach to the control of BWR pipe cracking is called hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). This paper presents a review of the results of EPRI's HWC development program from 1980 to the present. In addition, plans for additional work to investigate the feasibility of adapting HWC to protect the BWR vessel and major internal components from potential stress corrosion cracking problems are summarized. (orig.)

  19. Heterogeneously catalyzed deuterium separation processes: Hydrogen-water exchange studies at elevated temperatures and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, J.D.; Rolston, J.H.; Au, J.C.; Den Hartog, J.; Tremblay, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    New processes for the separation of hydrogen isotopes are required to produce heavy water for CANDU nuclear reactors and to extract tritium formed in the moderator during reactor operation. Wetproofed platinum catalysts capable of promoting rapid exchange of isotopes between countercurrent flows of hydrogen and liquid water in packed columns have been developed at CRNL over the past 15 years. These catalysts provide a catalystic surface for the gas phase exchange reaction H/sub 2/O/sub (v)/ + HD/sub (g)/ ↔ HDO/sub (v)/ + H/sub 2(g)/ as well as a large liquid surface for the liquid phase isotope transfer reaction HDO/sub (v)/ + H/sub 2/O/sub (iota)/↔HDO/sub (iota)/+H/sub 2/O/sub (v)/. Any economic stand-alone heavy water separation process, based on bithermal hydrogen-water exchange over wetproofed platinum catalysts, requires rapid overall exchange of isotopes between two phases at two temperatures. Catalysts developed for cold tower operation at 25-60 0 C are now being tested in a laboratory scale stainless steel trickle bed reactor for performance and stability at simulated hot tower conditions, 150 0 C and 2.0 MPa pressure. Catalytically active layers containing platinum supported on carbon or crystalline silica and wetproofed with Teflon have been prepared on ceramic spheres and stainless steel screening and tested in both random and ordered bed columns

  20. Hydrogen production from high-moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Adschiri, T.; Ekbom, T. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Most hydrogen is produced by steam reforming methane at elevated pressures. The goal of this research is to develop commercial processes for the catalytic steam reforming of biomass and other organic wastes at high pressures. This approach avoids the high cost of gas compression and takes advantage of the unique properties of water at high pressures. Prior to this year the authors reported the ability of carbon to catalyze the decomposition of biomass and related model compounds in supercritical water. The product gas consists of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and traces of higher hydrocarbons. During the past year the authors have: (a) developed a method to extend the catalyst life, (b) begun studies of the role of the shift reaction, (c) completed studies of carbon dioxide absorption from the product effluent by high pressure water, (d) measured the rate of carbon catalyst gasification in supercritical water, (e) discovered the pumpability of oil-biomass slurries, and (f) completed the design and begun fabrication of a flow reactor that will steam reform whole biomass feedstocks (i.e. sewage sludge) and produce a hydrogen rich synthesis gas at very high pressure (>22 MPa).

  1. A light water excess heat reaction suggests that cold fusion may be alkali-hydrogen fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Mills and Kneizys presented data in support of a light water excess heat reaction obtained with an electrolytic cell highly reminiscent of the Fleischmann-Pons cold fusion cell. The claim of Mills and Kneizys that their excess heat reaction can be explained on the basis of a novel chemistry, which supposedly also explains cold fusion, is rejected in favor of their reaction being, instead, a light water cold fusion reaction. It is the first known light water cold fusion reaction to exhibit excess heat, it may serve as a prototype to expand our understanding of cold fusion. From this new reactions are deduced, including those common to past cold fusion studies. This broader pattern of nuclear reactions is typically seen to involve a fusion of the nuclides of the alkali atoms with the simplest of the alkali-type nuclides, namely, protons, deuterons, and tritons. Thus, the term alkali-hydrogen fusion seems appropriate for this new type of reaction with three subclasses: alkali-hydrogen fusion, alkali-deuterium fusion, and alkali-tritium fusion. A new three-dimensional transmission resonance model (TRM) is sketched. Finally, preliminary experimental evidence in support of the hypothesis of a light water nuclear reaction and alkali-hydrogen fusion is reported. Evidence is presented that appears to strongly implicate the transmission resonance phenomenon of the new TRM

  2. SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld heat-affected zone in hydrogenated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2010-01-01

    It is known that the SCC growth rate of stainless steels in high-temperature water is accelerated by cold-work (CW). The weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of stainless steels is also deformed by weld shrinkage. However, only little have been reported on the SCC growth of weld HAZ of SUS316 and SUS304 in hydrogenated high-temperature water. Thus, in this present study, SCC growth experiments were performed using weld HAZ of stainless steels, especially to obtain data on the dependence of SCC growth on (1) temperature and (2) hardness in hydrogenated water at temperatures from 250degC to 340degC. And then, the SCC growth behaviors were compared between weld HAZ and CW stainless steels. The following results have been obtained. Significant SCC growth were observed in weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) in hydrogenated water at 320degC. The SCC growth rates of the HAZ are similar to that of 10% CW non-sensitized SUS316, in accordance with that the hardness of weld HAZ is also similar to that of 10% CW SUS316. Temperature dependency of SCC growth of weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) is also similar to that of 10% CW non-sensitized SUS316. That is, no significant SCC were observed in the weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) in hydrogenated water at 340degC. This suggests that SCC growth behaviors of weld HAZ and CW stainless steels are similar and correlated with the hardness or yield strength of the materials, at least in non-sensitized regions. And the similar temperature dependence between the HAZ and CW stainless steels suggests that the SCC growth behaviors are also attributed to the common mechanism. (author)

  3. Effect of dissolved hydrogen on corrosion of 316NG stainless steel in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Lijin [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang City 110819 (China); Peng, Qunjia, E-mail: qunjiapeng@imr.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Zhang, Zhiming [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Shoji, Tetsuo [Frontier Research Initiative, New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-10, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Wang, Lei [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang City 110819 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Dissolved hydrogen (DH) effect on corrosion of stainless steel in high temperature water. • Increasing DH caused decrease of Cr- but increase of Fe-concentrations in the inner oxide layer. • Concentration gradient of Cr and Fe in the inner oxide layer. • DH effect was attributed to the accelerated diffusion of Fe ion in the inner oxide layer. - Abstract: Characterizations of oxide films formed on 316 stainless steel in high temperature, hydrogenated water were conducted. The results show the oxide film consists of an outer layer with oxide particles of Fe–Ni spinel and hematite, and an inner continuous layer of Fe–Cr–Ni spinel. Increasing dissolved hydrogen (DH) concentrations causes decrease of Cr- and increase of Fe-concentrations in the inner layer. A continuous decrease of Cr- and increase of Fe-concentrations was observed from the surface of the inner layer to the oxide/substrate interface. The DH effect is attributed to the enhanced diffusion of Fe ions in the oxide film by hydrogen.

  4. The effect of plutonium dioxide water surface coverage on the generation of hydrogen and oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veirs, Douglas K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crowder, Mark L. [Savannah River National Laboratory

    2012-06-20

    The conditions for the production of oxygen during radiolysis of water adsorbed onto plutonium dioxide powder are discussed. Studies in the literature investigating the radiolysis of water show that both oxygen and hydrogen can be generated from water adsorbed on high-purity plutonium dioxide powder. These studies indicate that there is a threshold in the amount of water below which oxygen is not generated. The threshold is associated with the number of monolayers of adsorbed water and is shown to occur at approximately two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water. Material in equilibrium with 50% relative humidity (RH) will be at the threshold for oxygen generation. Using two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water as the threshold for oxygen production, the total pressure under various conditions is calculated assuming stoichiometric production of hydrogen and oxygen. The specific surface area of the oxide has a strong effect on the final partial pressure. The specific surface areas resulting in the highest pressures within a 3013 container are evaluated. The potential for oxygen generation is mitigated by reduced relative humidity, and hence moisture adsorption, at the oxide surface which occurs if the oxide is warmer than the ambient air. The potential for oxygen generation approaches zero as the temperature difference between the ambient air and the material approaches 6 C.

  5. Photoproduction of hydrogen by a non-sulphur bacterium isolated from root zones of water fern Azolla pinnata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Pandey, K.D. (Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (IN). Centre of Advanced Study in Botany)

    1990-01-01

    A photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. BHU strain 1 was isolated from the root zone of water fern Azolla pinnata. The bacterium was found to produce hydrogen with potato starch under phototrophic conditions. The immobilized bacterial cells showed sustained hydrogen production with a more than 4-fold difference over free cell suspensions. The data have been discussed in the light of possible utilization of relatively cheaper raw materials by non-sulphur bacteria to evolve hydrogen. (author).

  6. Determination of Hydrogen Bond Structure in Water versus Aprotic Environments To Test the Relationship Between Length and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigala, Paul A; Ruben, Eliza A; Liu, Corey W; Piccoli, Paula M B; Hohenstein, Edward G; Martínez, Todd J; Schultz, Arthur J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-05-06

    Hydrogen bonds profoundly influence the architecture and activity of biological macromolecules. Deep appreciation of hydrogen bond contributions to biomolecular function thus requires a detailed understanding of hydrogen bond structure and energetics and the relationship between these properties. Hydrogen bond formation energies (ΔGf) are enormously more favorable in aprotic solvents than in water, and two classes of contributing factors have been proposed to explain this energetic difference, focusing respectively on the isolated and hydrogen-bonded species: (I) water stabilizes the dissociated donor and acceptor groups much better than aprotic solvents, thereby reducing the driving force for hydrogen bond formation; and (II) water lengthens hydrogen bonds compared to aprotic environments, thereby decreasing the potential energy within the hydrogen bond. Each model has been proposed to provide a dominant contribution to ΔGf, but incisive tests that distinguish the importance of these contributions are lacking. Here we directly test the structural basis of model II. Neutron crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that O-H···O hydrogen bonds in crystals, chloroform, acetone, and water have nearly identical lengths and very similar potential energy surfaces despite ΔGf differences >8 kcal/mol across these solvents. These results rule out a substantial contribution from solvent-dependent differences in hydrogen bond structure and potential energy after association (model II) and thus support the conclusion that differences in hydrogen bond ΔGf are predominantly determined by solvent interactions with the dissociated groups (model I). These findings advance our understanding of universal hydrogen-bonding interactions and have important implications for biology and engineering.

  7. The hydrogen generated as a gas and storage in Zircaloy during water quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Eduardo A.

    1999-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional diffusion model has been developed for the complex process of Zircaloy oxidation during water quenching, calculating the hydrogen liberated as a gas and the hydrogen stored in the metal. The model was developed on the basis of small-scale separate-effects quench experiments performed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The new oxide surface and the new metallic surface produced by cracking of the oxide during quenching are calculated for each experiment performed at 1200 , 1400 and 1600 C degrees using as-received Zircaloy-4 (no pre oxidation) and with Zircaloy specimens pre oxidised to give oxide thicknesses of 100μm and 300μm. The results are relevant to accident management in light water reactors. (author)

  8. Influence of rolling direction and carbide precipitation on IGSCC susceptibility in hydrogenated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arioka, Koji; Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Chiba, Goro

    2005-01-01

    IGSCC growth behaviors of austenitic stainless steels in hydrogenated high temperature water were studied using compact type specimens (0.5T for cold worked materials). The effect of cold rolling direction, alloy composition and carbide precipitation on crack growth behaviors was studied in hydrogenated high temperature water. Then, to examine the effect of cold work and carbide precipitation on IGSCC behaviors, the role of grain boundary sliding studied in high temperature air using CT specimens. The similar dependences of carbide precipitation and cold work on IGSCC and creep behaviors suggest that grain boundary sliding might play an important role by itself or in conjunction with other reactions such as crack tip dissolution etc. (author)

  9. Gaseous exchange reaction of deuterium between hydrogen and water on hydrophobic catalyst supporting platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izawa, Hirozumi; Isomura, Shohei; Nakane, Ryohei.

    1979-01-01

    The deuterium exchange reaction between hydrogen and water in the gas phase where the fed hydrogen gas is saturated with water vapor is studied experimentally by use of the proper hydrophobic catalysts supporting platinum. It is found that the activities of those catalysts for this reaction system are very high compared with the other known ones for the systems in which gas and liquid should coexist on catalyst surfaces, and that the apparent catalytic activity becomes larger as the amount of platinum supported on a catalyst particle increases. By analyses of the data the following informations are obtained. The exchange reaction can be expressed by a first order reversible reaction kinetics. The pore diffusion in the catalyst particles has significant effect on the overall reaction mechanisms. (author)

  10. Formation of water-soluble soybean polysaccharides from spent flakes by hydrogen peroxide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wichmann, Jesper; Tran, Tam H.

    2016-01-01

    70% of the original insoluble material as high molar mass soluble polysaccharides. A design of experiment was used to quantify the effects of pH, reaction time, and hydrogen peroxide concentration on the reaction yield, average molar mass, and free monosaccharides generated. The resulting product......In this paper we propose a novel chemical process for the generation of water-soluble polysaccharides from soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry. This process entails treatment of spent flake with hydrogen peroxide at an elevated temperature, resulting in the release of more than...... is low in protein, fat, and minerals and contains predominantly water-soluble polysaccharides of high molar mass, including arabinan, type I arabinogalactan, homogalacturonan, xyloglucan, rhamnogalacturonan, and (glucurono)arabinoxylan. This treatment provides a straightforward approach for generation...

  11. Electrolytically generated hydrogen warm water cleanses the keratin-plug-clogged hair-pores and promotes the capillary blood-streams, more markedly than normal warm water does

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiharu Tanaka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical properties of hydrogen water have been extensively investigated, but the effect of hydrogen on good healthy subjects remains unclear. This study was designed to explore the hygiene improvement by electrolytically generated hydrogen warm water (40°C on capillary blood streams, skin moisture, and keratin plugs in skin pores in normal good healthy subjects with their informed consents. Fingertip-capillary blood stream was estimated after hand-immersing in hydrogen warm water by videography using a CCD-based microscope, and the blood flow levels increased to about 120% versus normal warm water, after 60 minutes of the hand-immersing termination. Skin moisture of subjects was assessed using an electro-conductivity-based skin moisture meter. Immediately after taking a bath filled with hydrogen warm water, the skin moisture increased by 5–10% as compared to before bathing, which was kept on for the 7-day test, but indistinct, because of lower solubility of hydrogen in “warm” water than in room-temperature water. Cleansing of keratin plugs in skin-pores was assessed by stereoscopic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. After hydrogen warm water bathing, the numbers of cleansed keratin plugs also increased on cheek of subjects 2.30- to 4.47-fold as many as the control for normal warm water. And areas of cleansed keratin plugs in the cheeks increased about 1.3-fold as much as the control. More marked improvements were observed on cheeks than on nostrils. Hydrogen warm water may thoroughly cleanse even keratin-plugs of residual amounts that could not be cleansed by normal warm water, through its permeability into wide-ranged portions of hair-pores, and promote the fingertip blood streams more markedly than merely through warmness due to normal warm water.

  12. Hydrophobic catalyst mixture for the isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paek, S.; Ahn, D. H.; Choi, H. J.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, M.; Yim, S. P.; Chung, H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    Pt/SDBC catalyst, which is used for the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange reaction, was prepared. The various properties of the catalyst, such as the thermal stability, pore structure and the platinum dispersion, were investigated. A hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of the WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities.

  13. Hydrophobic catalyst mixture for the isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, S.; Ahn, D. H.; Choi, H. J.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, M.; Yim, S. P.; Chung, H.

    2005-01-01

    Pt/SDBC catalyst, which is used for the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange reaction, was prepared. The various properties of the catalyst, such as the thermal stability, pore structure and the platinum dispersion, were investigated. A hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of the WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities

  14. Doubly labeled water method: in vivo oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoeller, D.A.; Leitch, C.A.; Brown, C.

    1986-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of the doubly labeled water method for measuring energy expenditure are influenced by isotope fractionation during evaporative water loss and CO 2 excretion. To characterize in vivo isotope fractionation, we collected and isotopically analyzed physiological fluids and gases. Breath and transcutaneous water vapor were isotopically fractionated. The degree of fractionation indicated that the former was fractionated under equilibrium control at 37 0 C, and the latter was kinetically fractionated. Sweat and urine were unfractionated. By use of isotopic balance models, the fraction of water lost via fractionating routes was estimated from the isotopic abundances of body water, local drinking water, and dietary solids. Fractionated water loss averaged 23% (SD = 10%) of water turnover, which agreed with our previous estimates based on metabolic rate, but there was a systematic difference between the results based on O 2 and hydrogen. Corrections for isotopic fractionation of water lost in breath and (nonsweat) transcutaneous loss should be made when using labeled water to measure water turnover or CO 2 production

  15. Prototype CIRCE plant-industrial demonstration of heavy-water production from a reformed hydrogen source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spagnolo, D.A.; Boniface, H.A.; Sadhankar, R.R.; Everatt, A.E.; Miller, A.I. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Blouin, J. [Air Liquide Canada, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-09-01

    Heavy-water (D{sub 2}0) production has been dominated by the Girdler-Sulphide (G-S) process, which suffers several intrinsic disadvantages that lead to high production costs. Processes based on hydrogen/water exchange have become more attractive with the development of proprietary wetproofed catalysts by AECL. One process that is synergistic with industrial hydrogen production by steam methane reforming (SMR), the combined industrial reforming and catalytic exchange (CIRCE) process, offers the best prospect for commercialization. SMRs are common globally in the oil upgrading and ammonia industries. To study the CIRCE process in detail, AECL, in collaboration with Air Liquide Canada, constructed a prototype CIRCE plant (PCP) in Hamilton, ON. The plant became fully operational in 2000 July and is expected to operate to at least the late fall of 2002. To date, plant operation has confirmed the adequacy of the design and the capability of enriching deuterium to produce heavy water without compromising hydrogen production. The proprietary wetproofed catalyst has performed as expected, both in activity and in robustness. (author)

  16. Solute's perspective on how trimethylamine oxide, urea, and guanidine hydrochloride affect water's hydrogen bonding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Ileana M; Gai, Feng

    2012-10-18

    While the thermodynamic effects of trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), urea, and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) on protein stability are well understood, the underlying mechanisms of action are less well characterized and, in some cases, even under debate. Herein, we employ the stretching vibration of two infrared (IR) reporters, i.e., nitrile (C≡N) and carbonyl (C═O), to directly probe how these cosolvents mediate the ability of water to form hydrogen bonds with the solute of interest, e.g., a peptide. Our results show that these three agents, despite having different effects on protein stability, all act to decrease the strength of the hydrogen bonds formed between water and the infrared probe. While the behavior of TMAO appears to be consistent with its protein-protecting ability, those of urea and GdnHCl are inconsistent with their role as protein denaturants. The latter is of particular interest as it provides strong evidence indicating that although urea and GdnHCl can perturb the hydrogen-bonding property of water their protein-denaturing ability does not arise from a simple indirect mechanism.

  17. Efficient hydrogen production on MoNi4 electrocatalysts with fast water dissociation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Tao; Liu, Pan; Liao, Zhongquan; Liu, Shaohua; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Chen, Mingwei; Zschech, Ehrenfried; Feng, Xinliang

    2017-05-01

    Various platinum-free electrocatalysts have been explored for hydrogen evolution reaction in acidic solutions. However, in economical water-alkali electrolysers, sluggish water dissociation kinetics (Volmer step) on platinum-free electrocatalysts results in poor hydrogen-production activities. Here we report a MoNi4 electrocatalyst supported by MoO2 cuboids on nickel foam (MoNi4/MoO2@Ni), which is constructed by controlling the outward diffusion of nickel atoms on annealing precursor NiMoO4 cuboids on nickel foam. Experimental and theoretical results confirm that a rapid Tafel-step-decided hydrogen evolution proceeds on MoNi4 electrocatalyst. As a result, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst exhibits zero onset overpotential, an overpotential of 15 mV at 10 mA cm-2 and a low Tafel slope of 30 mV per decade in 1 M potassium hydroxide electrolyte, which are comparable to the results for platinum and superior to those for state-of-the-art platinum-free electrocatalysts. Benefiting from its scalable preparation and stability, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst is promising for practical water-alkali electrolysers.

  18. Hydrolytic hydrogen generation using milled aluminum in water activated by Li, In, and Zn additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, M.Q.; Liu, S.; Wang, C.; Chen, D.; Shu, K.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2012-08-15

    A method for obtaining hydrogen through the hydrolytic reaction of highly activated aluminum (Al) alloy is investigated. The optimized Al-3 wt.% Li-4 wt.% In-7 wt.% Zn alloy significantly improves the maximum hydrogen generation rate and amount (137 mL g{sup -1} min{sup -1} and 1,243 mL g{sup -1}, respectively). An efficiency of 100% was reached within 1 h at 298 K. The synergistic catalytic effects of Li, In, and Zn, which stimulated Al hydrolysis through the formation of micro galvanic cells of In-Li and Al-In-Zn alloys in water, were observed. The reactions were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and hydrolytic experiments. The In-Li alloy functions as an initial active center and produces LiOH in water, which further stimulates and changes the hydrolytic process of the Al-In-Zn alloy. The effects of alloy composition, milling time, and hydrolytic temperature were considered and discussed. The results indicate that the hydrolytic reaction of Al-Li-In-Zn alloy in water might be feasible for the production of inexpensive, pure, and safe hydrogen for micro fuel cells. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Prototype CIRCE plant-industrial demonstration of heavy-water production from a reformed hydrogen source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spagnolo, D.A.; Boniface, H.A.; Sadhankar, R.R.; Everatt, A.E.; Miller, A.I.; Blouin, J.

    2002-09-01

    Heavy-water (D 2 0) production has been dominated by the Girdler-Sulphide (G-S) process, which suffers several intrinsic disadvantages that lead to high production costs. Processes based on hydrogen/water exchange have become more attractive with the development of proprietary wetproofed catalysts by AECL. One process that is synergistic with industrial hydrogen production by steam methane reforming (SMR), the combined industrial reforming and catalytic exchange (CIRCE) process, offers the best prospect for commercialization. SMRs are common globally in the oil upgrading and ammonia industries. To study the CIRCE process in detail, AECL, in collaboration with Air Liquide Canada, constructed a prototype CIRCE plant (PCP) in Hamilton, ON. The plant became fully operational in 2000 July and is expected to operate to at least the late fall of 2002. To date, plant operation has confirmed the adequacy of the design and the capability of enriching deuterium to produce heavy water without compromising hydrogen production. The proprietary wetproofed catalyst has performed as expected, both in activity and in robustness. (author)

  20. Prototype CIRCE plant - industrial demonstration of heavy water production from reformed hydrogen source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spagnolo, D.A.; Boniface, H.A.; Sadhankar, R.R.; Everatt, A.E.; Miller, A.I.; Blouin, J.

    2002-01-01

    Heavy water (D 2 0) production has been dominated by the Girdler-Sulphide (G-S) process, which suffers several intrinsic disadvantages that lead to high production costs. Processes based on hydrogen/water exchange have become more attractive with the development of proprietary wetproofed catalysts by AECL. One process that is synergistic with industrial hydrogen production by steam methane reforming (SMR), the Combined Industrial Reforming and Catalytic Exchange (CIRCE) process, offers the best prospect for commercialization. SMRs are common globally in the oil-upgrading and ammonia industries. To study the CIRCE process in detail, AECL, in collaboration with Air Liquide Canada, constructed a prototype CIRCE plant (PCP) in Hamilton, Ontario. The plant became fully operational in 2000 July and is expected to operate to at least late fall of 2002. To-date, plant operation has confirmed the adequacy of the design and the capability of enriching deuterium to produce heavy water without compromising hydrogen production. The proprietary wetproofed catalyst has performed as expected, both in activity and in robustness. (author)

  1. Sims Analysis of Water Abundance and Hydrogen Isotope in Lunar Highland Plagioclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Hejiu; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Neal, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of indigenous water in mare basaltic glass beads has challenged the view established since the Apollo era of a "dry" Moon. Since this discovery, measurements of water in lunar apatite, olivine-hosted melt inclusions, agglutinates, and nominally anhydrous minerals have confirmed that lunar igneous materials contain water, implying that some parts of lunar mantle may have as much water as Earth's upper mantle. The interpretation of hydrogen (H) isotopes in lunar samples, however, is controversial. The large variation of H isotope ratios in lunar apatite (delta Deuterium = -202 to +1010 per mille) has been taken as evidence that water in the lunar interior comes from the lunar mantle, solar wind protons, and/or comets. The very low deuterium/H ratios in lunar agglutinates indicate that solar wind protons have contributed to their hydrogen content. Conversely, H isotopes in lunar volcanic glass beads and olivine-hosted melt inclusions being similar to those of common terrestrial igneous rocks, suggest a common origin for water in both Earth and Moon. Lunar water could be inherited from carbonaceous chondrites, consistent with the model of late accretion of chondrite-type materials to the Moon as proposed by. One complication about the sources of lunar water, is that geologic processes (e.g., late accretion and magmatic degassing) may have modified the H isotope signatures of lunar materials. Recent FTIR analyses have shown that plagioclases in lunar ferroan anorthosite contain approximately 6 ppm H2O. So far, ferroan anorthosite is the only available lithology that is believed to be a primary product of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). A possible consequence is that the LMO could have contained up to approximately 320 ppm H2O. Here we examine the possible sources of water in the LMO through measurements of water abundances and H isotopes in plagioclase of two ferroan anorthosites and one troctolite from lunar highlands.

  2. Statics and dynamics of free and hydrogen-bonded OH groups at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila Verde, Ana; Bolhuis, Peter G; Campen, R Kramer

    2012-08-09

    We use classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two water models (SPC/E and TIP4P/2005) to investigate the orientation and reorientation dynamics of two subpopulations of OH groups belonging to water molecules at the air/water interface at 300 K: those OH groups that donate a hydrogen bond (called "bonded") and those that do not (called "free"). Free interfacial OH groups reorient in two distinct regimes: a fast regime from 0 to 1 ps and a slow regime thereafter. Qualitatively similar behavior was reported by others for free OH groups near extended hydrophobic surfaces. In contrast, the net reorientation of bonded OH groups occurs at a rate similar to that of bulk water. This similarity in reorientation rate results from compensation of two effects: decreasing frequency of hydrogen-bond breaking/formation (i.e., hydrogen-bond exchange) and faster rotation of intact hydrogen bonds. Both changes result from the decrease in density at the air/water interface relative to the bulk. Interestingly, because of the presence of capillary waves, the slowdown of hydrogen-bond exchange is significantly smaller than that reported for water near extended hydrophobic surfaces, but it is almost identical to that reported for water near small hydrophobic solutes. In this sense water at the air/water interface has characteristics of water of hydration of both small and extended hydrophobic solutes.

  3. Hydrogen bonding donation of N-methylformamide with dimethylsulfoxide and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alexandre; Cordeiro, João M. M.

    2013-04-01

    20% N-methylformamide (NMF) mixtures with water and with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) have been studied. A comparison between the hydrogen bonding (H-bond) donation of N-methylformamide with both solvents in the mixtures is presented. Results of radial distribution functions, pair distribution energies, molecular dipole moment correlation, and geometry of the H-bonded species in each case are shown. The results indicate that the NMF - solvent H-bond is significantly stronger with DMSO than with water. The solvation shell is best organized in the DMSO mixture than in the aqueous one.

  4. Selection of the process for the heavy water production using isotopic exchange amonia-hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman R, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    The utilization of the Petroleos Mexicanos ammonia plants for heavy water production by the isotopic exchange NH 3 -H 2 process is presented, in addition a description of the other heavy water production processes was presented. In the ammonia hydrogen process exist two possible alternatives for the operation of the system, one of them is to carry out the enrichment to the same temperature, the second consists in making the enrichment at two different temperatures (dual temperature process), an analysis was made to select the best alternative. The conclusion was that the best operation is the dual temperature process, which presents higher advantages according to the thermodynamics and engineering of the process. (author)

  5. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in water by ozone-hydrogen peroxide process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ying-hui; MA Jun; HOU Yan-jun

    2006-01-01

    This study reports an investigation into the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in bubble contactor column by O3/H2O2 process, which is widely used as a principal advanced oxidation process. The degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was studied under different H2O2/O3 molar ratio and pH value. Meanwhile, TOC removal was investigated both in distilled water and tap water. The influences of ozone transfer and consumed hydrogen peroxide were also discussed. The degradation products and oxidation intermediates were identified by GC-MS and LC-MS. A possible reaction mechanism was thus proposed.

  6. Computer simulation for risk management: Hydrogen refueling stations and water supply of a large region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Kozine, Igor

    2012-01-01

    in applying DES models to the analysis of large infrastructures for refueling stations and water supply. Two case studies are described which are concerned with the inherently safer supply and storage of hydrogen at refueling stations and an established drinking water supply system of a large metropolitan...... area, respectively. For both, the simulation aims at identifying points of potential improvement from the reliability point of view. This allows setting up a list of activities and safety measures to reduce risk and possible losses and mitigate the consequences of accidents. Based on the cases...

  7. Simulation of the effect of hydrogen bonds on water activity of glucose and dextran using the Veytsman model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, Francesca; Veytsman, Boris; Painter, Paul; Kokini, Jozef L

    2015-03-06

    Carbohydrates exhibit either van der Waals and ionic interactions or strong hydrogen bonding interactions. The prominence and large number of hydrogen bonds results in major contributions to phase behavior. A thermodynamic framework that accounts for hydrogen bonding interactions is therefore necessary. We have developed an extension of the thermodynamic model based on the Veytsman association theory to predict the contribution of hydrogen bonds to the behavior of glucose-water and dextran-water systems and we have calculated the free energy of mixing and its derivative leading to chemical potential and water activity. We compared our calculations with experimental data of water activity for glucose and dextran and found excellent agreement far superior to the Flory-Huggins theory. The validation of our calculations using experimental data demonstrated the validity of the Veytsman model in properly accounting for the hydrogen bonding interactions and successfully predicting water activity of glucose and dextran. Our calculations of the concentration of hydrogen bonds using the Veytsman model were instrumental in our ability to explain the difference between glucose and dextran and the role that hydrogen bonds play in contributing to these differences. The miscibility predictions showed that the Veytsman model is also able to correctly describe the phase behavior of glucose and dextran. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Occurrence and distribution of color and hydrogen sulfide in water of the principal artesian aquifers in the Valdosta area, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Richard E.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide and color occur in objectionable amounts in ground water from the principal artesian aquifer in the Valdosta , Ga., area. Generally, water from wells south of Valdosta is high in hydrogen sulfide; water from wells north of the city is high in color. Water with high sulfate is likely to be a problem in wells deeper than about 540 ft. Heavy pumpage concentrated in a small area may cause high-sulfate water to migrate vertically upward into shallower wells. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Site-Dependent Environmental Impacts of Industrial Hydrogen Production by Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Christian Koj

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Industrial hydrogen production via alkaline water electrolysis (AEL is a mature hydrogen production method. One argument in favor of AEL when supplied with renewable energy is its environmental superiority against conventional fossil-based hydrogen production. However, today electricity from the national grid is widely utilized for industrial applications of AEL. Also, the ban on asbestos membranes led to a change in performance patterns, making a detailed assessment necessary. This study presents a comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA using the GaBi software (version 6.115, thinkstep, Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Germany, revealing inventory data and environmental impacts for industrial hydrogen production by latest AELs (6 MW, Zirfon membranes in three different countries (Austria, Germany and Spain with corresponding grid mixes. The results confirm the dependence of most environmental effects from the operation phase and specifically the site-dependent electricity mix. Construction of system components and the replacement of cell stacks make a minor contribution. At present, considering the three countries, AEL can be operated in the most environmentally friendly fashion in Austria. Concerning the construction of AEL plants the materials nickel and polytetrafluoroethylene in particular, used for cell manufacturing, revealed significant contributions to the environmental burden.

  10. Efficient solar hydrogen production by photocatalytic water splitting: From fundamental study to pilot demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Dengwei; Guo, Liejin; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Ximin; Liu, Huan; Li, Mingtao; Shen, Shaohua; Liu, Guanjie; Hu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xianghui; Zhang, Kai; Ma, Lijin; Guo, Penghui [State Key Lab of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning West Road, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2010-07-15

    Photocatalytic water splitting with solar light is one of the most promising technologies for solar hydrogen production. From a systematic point of view, whether it is photocatalyst and reaction system development or the reactor-related design, the essentials could be summarized as: photon transfer limitations and mass transfer limitations (in the case of liquid phase reactions). Optimization of these two issues are therefore given special attention throughout our study. In this review, the state of the art for the research of photocatalytic hydrogen production, both outcomes and challenges in this field, were briefly reviewed. Research progress of our lab, from fundamental study of photocatalyst preparation to reactor configuration and pilot level demonstration, were introduced, showing the complete process of our effort for this technology to be economic viable in the near future. Our systematic and continuous study in this field lead to the development of a Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) based photocatalytic hydrogen production solar rector for the first time. We have demonstrated the feasibility for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production under direct solar light. The exiting challenges and difficulties for this technology to proceed from successful laboratory photocatalysis set-up up to an industrially relevant scale are also proposed. These issues have been the object of our research and would also be the direction of our study in future. (author)

  11. Decoupling Hydrogen and Oxygen Production in Acidic Water Electrolysis Using a Polytriphenylamine-Based Battery Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2018-03-05

    Hydrogen production through water splitting is considered a promising approach for solar energy harvesting. However, the variable and intermittent nature of solar energy and the co-production of H 2 and O 2 significantly reduce the flexibility of this approach, increasing the costs of its use in practical applications. Herein, using the reversible n-type doping/de-doping reaction of the solid-state polytriphenylamine-based battery electrode, we decouple the H 2 and O 2 production in acid water electrolysis. In this architecture, the H 2 and O 2 production occur at different times, which eliminates the issue of gas mixing and adapts to the variable and intermittent nature of solar energy, facilitating the conversion of solar energy to hydrogen (STH). Furthermore, for the first time, we demonstrate a membrane-free solar water splitting through commercial photovoltaics and the decoupled acid water electrolysis, which potentially paves the way for a new approach for solar water splitting. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Yield of Ozone, Nitrite Nitrogen and Hydrogen Peroxide Versus Discharge Parameter Using APPJ Under Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bingyan; Wen Wen; Zhu Changping; Wang Yuan; Gao Ying; Fei Juntao; He Xiang; Yin Cheng; Jiang Yongfeng; Chen Longwei

    2016-01-01

    Discharge plasma in and in contact with water can be accompanied with ultraviolet radiation and electron impact, thus can generate hydroxyl radicals, ozone, nitrite nitrogen and hydrogen peroxide. In this paper, a non-equilibrium plasma processing system was established by means of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet immersed in water. The hydroxyl intensities and discharge energy waveforms were tested. The results show that the positive and negative discharge energy peaks were asymmetric, where the positive discharge energy peak was greater than the negative one. Meanwhile, the yield of ozone and nitrite nitrogen was enhanced with the increase of both the treatment time and the discharge energy. Moreover, the pH value of treated water was reduced rapidly and maintained at a lower level. The residual concentration of hydrogen peroxide in APPJ treated water was kept at a low level. Additionally, both the efficiency energy ratio of the yield of ozone and nitrite nitrogen and that of the removal of p-nitrophenol increased as a function of discharge energy and discharge voltage. The experimental results were fully analyzed and the chemical reaction equations and the physical processes of discharges in water were given. (paper)

  13. Laser Spectroscopic Analysis of Liquid Water Samples for Stable Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are tracers of choice for water cycle processes in hydrological, atmospheric and ecological studies. The use of isotopes has been limited to some extent because of the relatively high cost of isotope ratio mass spectrometers and the need for specialized operational skills. Here, the results of performance testing of a recently developed laser spectroscopic instrument for measuring stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of water samples are described, along with a procedure for instrument installation and operation. Over the last four years, the IAEA Water Resources Programme conducted prototype and production model testing of these instruments and this publication is the outcome of those efforts. One of the main missions of the IAEA is to promote the use of peaceful applications of isotope and nuclear methods in Member States and this publication is intended to facilitate the use of laser absorption based instruments for hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope analyses of liquid water samples for hydrological and other studies. The instrument uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy to measure absolute abundances of 2 HHO, HH 18 O, and HHO via laser absorption. Test results using a number of natural and synthetic water standards and samples with a large range of isotope values demonstrate adequate precision and accuracy (e.g. precisions of 1 per mille for δ 2 H and 0.2 per mille for δ 18 O). The laser instrument has much lower initial and maintenance costs than mass spectrometers and is substantially easier to operate. Thus, these instruments have the potential to bring about a paradigm shift in isotope applications by enabling researchers in all fields to measure isotope ratios by themselves. The appendix contains a detailed procedure for the installation and operation of the instrument. Using the procedure, new users should be able to install the instrument in less than two hours. It also provides step

  14. Electron-induced hydrogen loss in uracil in a water cluster environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, M.; Kohanoff, J.; Fabrikant, I. I.

    2014-01-01

    Low-energy electron-impact hydrogen loss due to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to the uracil and thymine molecules in a water cluster environment is investigated theoretically. Only the A ′ -resonance contribution, describing the near-threshold behavior of DEA, is incorporated. Calculations are based on the nonlocal complex potential theory and the multiple scattering theory, and are performed for a model target with basic properties of uracil and thymine, surrounded by five water molecules. The DEA cross section is strongly enhanced when the attaching molecule is embedded in a water cluster. This growth is due to two effects: the increase of the resonance lifetime and the negative shift in the resonance position due to interaction of the intermediate negative ion with the surrounding water molecules. A similar effect was earlier found in DEA to chlorofluorocarbons

  15. Electron-induced hydrogen loss in uracil in a water cluster environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, M.; Kohanoff, J. [Atomistic Simulation Centre, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Fabrikant, I. I., E-mail: ifabrikant1@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588, USA and Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-14

    Low-energy electron-impact hydrogen loss due to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to the uracil and thymine molecules in a water cluster environment is investigated theoretically. Only the A{sup ′}-resonance contribution, describing the near-threshold behavior of DEA, is incorporated. Calculations are based on the nonlocal complex potential theory and the multiple scattering theory, and are performed for a model target with basic properties of uracil and thymine, surrounded by five water molecules. The DEA cross section is strongly enhanced when the attaching molecule is embedded in a water cluster. This growth is due to two effects: the increase of the resonance lifetime and the negative shift in the resonance position due to interaction of the intermediate negative ion with the surrounding water molecules. A similar effect was earlier found in DEA to chlorofluorocarbons.

  16. The hydrogen-bond network of water supports propagating optical phonon-like modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, Daniel C; Fernández-Serra, Marivi

    2016-01-04

    The local structure of liquid water as a function of temperature is a source of intense research. This structure is intimately linked to the dynamics of water molecules, which can be measured using Raman and infrared spectroscopies. The assignment of spectral peaks depends on whether they are collective modes or single-molecule motions. Vibrational modes in liquids are usually considered to be associated to the motions of single molecules or small clusters. Using molecular dynamics simulations, here we find dispersive optical phonon-like modes in the librational and OH-stretching bands. We argue that on subpicosecond time scales these modes propagate through water's hydrogen-bond network over distances of up to 2 nm. In the long wavelength limit these optical modes exhibit longitudinal-transverse splitting, indicating the presence of coherent long-range dipole-dipole interactions, as in ice. Our results indicate the dynamics of liquid water have more similarities to ice than previously thought.

  17. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  18. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  19. Hydrogen Production via Water Dissociation Using Pt–TiO2 Photocatalysts: An Oxidation–Reduction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Guayaquil-Sosa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several TiO2 based semiconductors with different Pt loadings are prepared using incipient impregnation, wet impregnation and the sol-gel method. These photocatalysts are evaluated in the Photo-CREC-Water II Photoreactor for hydrogen production via water dissociation, using an organic renewable scavenger (ethanol. Results obtained show the influence of the photocatalyst preparation in the production of hydrogen and in the observed quantum yields. Furthermore, it is established that the reaction networks leading to hydrogen production, using various photocatalysts, share common features. This analysis is developed by both identifying and quantifying different chemical species and their changes with irradiation time. Key species in this oxidation–reduction network are hydrogen, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, methane, ethane, acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. On this basis, it is shown that under an inert gas atmosphere, ethanol consumption is sub-stoichiometric. This points towards simultaneous ethanol consumption and the formation of the ethanol scavenger.

  20. Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.C.; Funk, J.F.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    OAK B188 Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process, nor is such a process available for commercialization. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Fossil fuels are polluting and carbon dioxide emissions from their combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. Almost 800 literature references were located which pertain to thermochemical production of hydrogen from water and over 100 thermochemical watersplitting cycles were examined. Using defined criteria and quantifiable metrics, 25 cycles have been selected for more detailed study

  1. A comparative economic assessment of hydrogen production from coke oven gas, water electrolysis and steam reforming of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Y.V.; Ngo, Y.A.; Tinkler, M.J.; Cowan, N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the comparative economics of producing hydrogen for the hydrogen economy by recovering it from waste gases from the steel industry, by water electrolysis and by conventional steam reforming of natural gas. Steel makers produce coke for their blast furnace operation by baking coal at high temperature in a reduced environment in their coke ovens. These ovens produce a coke oven gas from the volatiles in the coal. The gas, containing up to 60% hydrogen, is commonly used for its heating value with some of it being flared. The feasibility of recovering this hydrogen from the gas will be presented. A comparison of this opportunity with that of hydrogen from water electrolysis using low cost off-peak electricity from nuclear energy will be made. The impact of higher daily average electricity rate in Ontario will be discussed. The benefits of these opportunities compared with those from conventional steam reforming of natural gas will be highlighted. (author)

  2. Effectiveness of hydrogen rich water on antioxidant status of subjects with potential metabolic syndrome-an open label pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Atsunori; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Sharma, Prachi; Evans, Malkanthi; Guthrie, Najla

    2010-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by cardiometabolic risk factors that include obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Oxidative stress is known to play a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of hydrogen rich water (1.5-2 L/day) in an open label, 8-week study on 20 subjects with potential metabolic syndrome. Hydrogen rich water was produced, by placing a metallic magnesium stick into drinking water (hydrogen concentration; 0.55-0.65 mM), by the following chemical reaction; Mg + 2H(2)O --> Mg (OH)(2) + H(2). The consumption of hydrogen rich water for 8 weeks resulted in a 39% increase (pfasting glucose levels during the 8 week study. In conclusion, drinking hydrogen rich water represents a potentially novel therapeutic and preventive strategy for metabolic syndrome. The portable magnesium stick was a safe, easy and effective method of delivering hydrogen rich water for daily consumption by participants in the study.

  3. Pilot Scale Water Gas Shift - Membrane Device for Hydrogen from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Tom [Western Research Inst. (WRI), Laramie, WY (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The objectives of the project were to build pilot scale hydrogen separation systems for use in a gasification product stream. This device would demonstrate fabrication and manufacturing techniques for producing commercially ready facilities. The design was a 2 lb/day hydrogen device which included composite hydrogen separation membranes, a water gas shift monolith catalyst, and stainless steel structural components. Synkera Technologies was to prepare hydrogen separation membranes with metallic rims, and to adjust the alloy composition in their membranes to a palladium-gold composition which is sulfur resistant. Chart was to confirm their brazing technology for bonding the metallic rims of the composite membranes to their structural components and design and build the 2 lbs/day device incorporating membranes and catalysts. WRI prepared the catalysts and completed the testing of the membranes and devices on coal derived syngas. The reactor incorporated eighteen 2'' by 7'' composite palladium alloy membranes. These membranes were assembled with three stacks of three paired membranes. Initial vacuum testing and visual inspection indicated that some membranes were cracked, either in transportation or in testing. During replacement of the failed membranes, while pulling a vacuum on the back side of the membranes, folds were formed in the flexible composite membranes. In some instances these folds led to cracks, primarily at the interface between the alumina and the aluminum rim. The design of the 2 lb/day device was compromised by the lack of any membrane isolation. A leak in any membrane failed the entire device. A large number of tests were undertaken to bring the full 2 lb per day hydrogen capacity on line, but no single test lasted more than 48 hours. Subsequent tests to replace the mechanical seals with brazing have been promising, but the technology remains promising but not proven.

  4. Double-side illuminated titania nanotubes for high volume hydrogen generation by water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Susanta K.; Mahajan, Vishal K.; Misra, Mano

    2007-11-01

    A sonoelectrochemical anodization method is proposed to synthesize TiO2 nanotubular arrays on both sides of a titanium foil (TiO2/Ti/TiO2). Highly ordered TiO2 nanotubular arrays of 16 cm2 area with uniform surface distribution can be obtained using this anodization procedure. These double-sided TiO2/Ti/TiO2 materials are used as both photoanode (carbon-doped titania nanotubes) and cathode (Pt nanoparticles dispersed on TiO2 nanotubes; PtTiO2/Ti/PtTiO2) in a specially designed photoelectrochemical cell to generate hydrogen by water splitting at a rate of 38 ml h-1. The nanomaterials are characterized by FESEM, HRTEM, STEM, EDS, FFT, SAED and XPS techniques. The present approach can be used for large-scale hydrogen generation using renewable energy sources.

  5. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of wastewater from food waste treatment processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In-Gu [Korea Institute of Energy Research (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    Korean food wastes have high moisture content (more than 85 wt%) and their major treatment processes such as drying or biological fermentations generate concentrated organic wastewater (CODs of about 100,000 mgO{sub 2}/L). For obtaining both wastewater treatment and hydrogen production from renewable resources, supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of the organic wastewater was carried out in this work. The effect of catalyst, reaction temperature, and reactor residence time on COD destruction and composition of gas products was examined. As a result, a SCWG of the wastewater over Ni- Y/activated charcoal at 700 C, 28 MPa yielded 99 % COD destruction and hydrogen-rich gas production (45 vol% H{sub 2}). A liquid-phase thermal pretreatment to destroy solid particles from the wastewater was proposed for more effective operation of the SCWG system. (orig.)

  6. Technical basis for hydrogen-water chemistry: Laboratory studies of water chemistry effects on SCC [stress-corrosion-cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Soppet, W.K.

    1986-10-01

    The influence of different impurities, viz., oxyacids and several chloride salts, on the stress-corrosion-cracking (SCC) of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel (SS) was investigated in constant-extension-rate-tensile (CERT) tests in 289 0 C water at a low dissolved-oxygen concentration ( 0 C in low-oxygen environments with and without sulfate at low concentrations. In these experiments, the crack growth behavior of the materials was correlated with the type and concentration of the impurities and the electrochemical potentials of Type 304 SS and platinum electrodes in the simulated hydrogen-water chemistry environments. The information suggests that better characterization of water quality, through measurement of the concentrations of individual species (SO 4 2- , NO 3 - , Cu 2+ , etc.) coupled with measurements of the corrosion and redox potentials at high temperatures will provide a viable means to monitor and ultimately improve the performance of BWR system materials

  7. Technical and economical feasibility studies and preliminary plan of a heavy water plant by the criogenic distillation method of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias Vargas, F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the pre-feasibility study of a heavy water production plant, both from the technical and economical point of view. Criogenic distillation of hydrogen is used as the final enrichment stage. The deuterium source is water treated previously by a process of enrichment based on the water-hydrogen isotopic exchange. The economical analysis is aimed at the study of the feasibility of the installation of a heavy water moderated reaction in Chile. General properties of heavy water are presented and also the various materials of its enrichment at the industrial scale. The plant itself has a first stage based on the water-hydrogen isotopic exchange procesS, where deuterium is extracted from the water by the hydrogen which is subsequently treated in a criogenic distillation stage. An important fact of the plant analysis is the calculation of heat exchangers mainly in relation to the problem posed by tHe hydrogen's low point of liquifaction. The distillation units are also treated and designed. The economic evaluation produces project diScount rates of 15.71% and 21.97%, for 25 tons/year and 40 tons/year of production capacity. The heavy water price used for these evaluation was 600 $/Kg

  8. Hydrogen production by thermochemical cycles of water splitting coupled to a solar energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charvin, P.

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this work is to identify, to test and to estimate new thermochemical cycles able to efficiently produce hydrogen from concentrated solar energy. In fact, the aim is to propose a hydrogen production way presenting a global energetic yield similar to electrolysis, that is to say 20-25%, electrolysis being at the present time the most advanced current process for a clean hydrogen production from water. After a first chapter dealing with the past and present researches on thermochemical cycles, the first step of this study has consisted on a selection of a limited number of thermochemical cycles able to produce great quantities of hydrogen from concentrated solar energy. It has consisted in particular on a review of the thermochemical cycles present in literature, on a first selection from argued criteria, and on an exergetic and thermodynamic analysis of the retained cycles for a first estimation of their potential. The second step of this study deals with the experimental study of all the chemical reactions occurring in the retained cycles. Two different oxides cycles have been particularly chosen and the aims are to demonstrate the feasibility of the reactions, to identify the optimal experimental conditions, to estimate and optimize the kinetics and the chemical yields. The following part of this work deals with the design, the modeling and the test of a solar reactor. A CFD modeling of a high temperature reactor of cavity type allows to identify the main heat losses of the reactor and to optimize the geometry of the cavity. A dynamic modeling of the reactor gives data on its behaviour in transient regime and under a real solar flux. The results of the preliminary experimental results are presented. The last part of this study deals with a process analysis of the thermochemical cycles from the results of the experimental study (experimental conditions, yields...). The matter and energy balances are established in order to estimate the global energetic

  9. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  10. Evidence for phase separation of ethanol-water mixtures at the hydrogen terminated nanocrystalline diamond surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Stoffel D; Drijkoningen, Sien; Saitner, Marc; Boyen, Hans-Gerd; Wagner, Patrick; Larsson, Karin; Haenen, Ken

    2012-07-28

    Interactions between ethanol-water mixtures and a hydrophobic hydrogen terminated nanocrystalline diamond surface, are investigated by sessile drop contact angle measurements. The surface free energy of the hydrophobic surface, obtained with pure liquids, differs strongly from values obtained by ethanol-water mixtures. Here, a model which explains this difference is presented. The model suggests that, due to a higher affinity of ethanol for the hydrophobic surface, when compared to water, a phase separation occurs when a mixture of both liquids is in contact with the H-terminated diamond surface. These results are supported by a computational study giving insight in the affinity and related interaction at the liquid-solid interface.

  11. Process for the preparation of deuterium enriched water in the production of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandrin, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    A synthesis gas facility is operated for n consecutive periods. During the first period excess feed water is added to the facility. The effluent from the resulting mixture is fed to a storage container. During the following n-1 operating periods the stored effluent water is used as feed for the synthesis gas facility. The effluent from each operating period is stored in layers with corresponding deuterium concentration in the storage container. The effluent from the last operating period involving the highest deuterium concentration is fed to a second container and from there to a heavy water production unit. In order to recuperate the deuterium contained in the gas mixture leaving the condensor (consisting of hydrogen, vapour and residual compounds), the mixture is fed to an exchange stage. There the mixture is isotopically exchanged with additional water in a cross flow whereby this water gets enriched in deuterium and is fed to the synthesis gas facility. The process leads to an improved yield of heavy water in the heavy water production facility

  12. Role of residual water hydrogen bonding in sugar/water/biomolecule systems: a possible explanation for trehalose peculiarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordone, L; Cottone, G; Giuffrida, S [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo and CNISM (Italy)

    2007-05-23

    We report on the set of experimental and simulative evidences which enabled us to suggest how biological structures embedded in a non-liquid water-saccharide solvent are anchored to the surrounding matrix via a hydrogen bond network. Such a network, whose rigidity increases by decreasing the sample water content, couples the degrees of freedom of the biostructure to those of the matrix and gives place to protein-saccharide-water structures (protein-solvent conformational substates). In particular, the whole set of data evidences that, while the protein-sugar interaction is well described in terms of a water entrapment hypothesis, the water replacement hypothesis better describes the sugar-membrane interaction; furthermore, it gives a hint towards the understanding of the origin of the trehalose peculiarity since the biomolecule-matrix coupling, specific to each particular sugar, always results in being the tightest for trehalose. In line with the heterogeneous dynamics in supercooled fluids and in carbohydrate glasses of different residual water contents, recent results confirm, at the single molecule level, the existence of protein-solvent conformational substates, spatially heterogeneous and interconverting, whose rigidity increases by lowering the sample hydration.

  13. Solar water splitting by photovoltaic-electrolysis with a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency over 30%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jieyang; Seitz, Linsey C.; Benck, Jesse D.; Huo, Yijie; Chen, Yusi; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Bilir, Taner; Harris, James S.; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen production via electrochemical water splitting is a promising approach for storing solar energy. For this technology to be economically competitive, it is critical to develop water splitting systems with high solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiencies. Here we report a photovoltaic-electrolysis system with the highest STH efficiency for any water splitting technology to date, to the best of our knowledge. Our system consists of two polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysers in series with one InGaP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb triple-junction solar cell, which produces a large-enough voltage to drive both electrolysers with no additional energy input. The solar concentration is adjusted such that the maximum power point of the photovoltaic is well matched to the operating capacity of the electrolysers to optimize the system efficiency. The system achieves a 48-h average STH efficiency of 30%. These results demonstrate the potential of photovoltaic-electrolysis systems for cost-effective solar energy storage. PMID:27796309

  14. Hydrogen generation due to water splitting on Si - terminated 4H-Sic(0001) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingfang; Li, Qiqi; Yang, Cuihong; Rao, Weifeng

    2018-02-01

    The chemical reactions of hydrogen gas generation via water splitting on Si-terminated 4H-SiC surfaces with or without C/Si vacancies were studied by using first-principles. We studied the reaction mechanisms of hydrogen generation on the 4H-SiC(0001) surface. Our calculations demonstrate that there are major rearrangements in surface when H2O approaches the SiC(0001) surface. The first H splitting from water can occur with ground-state electronic structures. The second H splitting involves an energy barrier of 0.65 eV. However, the energy barrier for two H atoms desorbing from the Si-face and forming H2 gas is 3.04 eV. In addition, it is found that C and Si vacancies can form easier in SiC(0001)surfaces than in SiC bulk and nanoribbons. The C/Si vacancies introduced can enhance photocatalytic activities. It is easier to split OH on SiC(0001) surface with vacancies compared to the case of clean SiC surface. H2 can form on the 4H-SiC(0001) surface with C and Si vacancies if the energy barriers of 1.02 and 2.28 eV are surmounted, respectively. Therefore, SiC(0001) surface with C vacancy has potential applications in photocatalytic water-splitting.

  15. Interaction of the Helium, Hydrogen, Air, Argon, and Nitrogen Bubbles with Graphite Surface in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartali, Ruben; Otyepka, Michal; Pykal, Martin; Lazar, Petr; Micheli, Victor; Gottardi, Gloria; Laidani, Nadhira

    2017-05-24

    The interaction of the confined gas with solid surface immersed in water is a common theme of many important fields such as self-cleaning surface, gas storage, and sensing. For that reason, we investigated the gas-graphite interaction in the water medium. The graphite surface was prepared by mechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The surface chemistry and morphology were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, profilometry, and atomic force microscopy. The surface energy of HOPG was estimated by contact angle measurements using the Owens-Wendt method. The interaction of gases (Ar, He, H 2 , N 2 , and air) with graphite was studied by a captive bubble method, in which the gas bubble was in contact with the exfoliated graphite surface in water media. The experimental data were corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations. The surface energy of HOPG equaled to 52.8 mJ/m 2 and more of 95% of the surface energy was attributed to dispersion interactions. The results on gas-surface interaction indicated that HOPG surface had gasphilic behavior for helium and hydrogen, while gasphobic behavior for argon and nitrogen. The results showed that the variation of the gas contact angle was related to the balance between the gas-surface and gas-gas interaction potentials. For helium and hydrogen the gas-surface interaction was particularly high compared to gas-gas interaction and this promoted the favorable interaction with graphite surface.

  16. Hydrogen bonding in (substituted benzene)·(water)n clusters with n≤4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, H.-D.; Buchhold, K.; Djafari, S.; Reimann, B.; Lommatzsch, U.; Brutschy, B.

    1998-01-01

    Infrared ion-depletion spectroscopy, a double resonance method combining vibrational predissociation with resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy, has been applied to study mixed clusters of the type (substituted benzene)·(H 2 O) n with n≤4. The UV chromophores were p-difluorobenzene, fluorobenzene, benzene, toluene, p-xylene and anisole. From the IR depletion spectra in the region of the OH stretching vibrations it could be shown that the water molecules are attached as subclusters to the chromophores. Size and configuration of the subclusters could be deduced from the IR depletion spectra. In the anisole·(H 2 O) 1 a nd 2 complexes the water clusters form an ordinary hydrogen bond to the oxygen atom of the methoxy group. In all other mixed complexes a π-hydrogen bond is formed between one of the free OH groups of a water subcluster and the π-system of the chromophore. According to the strength of this interaction the frequency of the respective absorption band exhibits a characteristic red-shift which could be related to the total atomic charges in the aromatic ring. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Efficiency of the sulfur-iodine thermochemical water splitting process for hydrogen production based on ADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, D.; Garcia, L.; Garcia, C.; Garcia, L.; Brayner, C.

    2013-01-01

    The current hydrogel production is based on fossil fuels; they have a huge contribution to the atmosphere's pollution. thermochemical water splitting cycles don't present this issue because the required process heat is obtained from nuclear energy and therefore, the environmental impact is smaller than using conventional fuels. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantities of hydrogen in an efficient way using nuclear energy is the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. The nuclear source proposed in this paper is a pebble bed gas cooled transmutation facility. Pebble bed very high temperature advanced systems have great perspectives to assume the future nuclear energy. Software based on Chemical Process Simulation (CPS) can be used to simulate the thermochemical water splitting sulfur-iodine cycle for hydrogen production. In this paper, a model for analyzing the sulfur-iodine process sensibility is developed. Efficiency is also calculated and the influence of different parameters on this value. The behavior of the proposed model before different values of initial reactant's flow is analyzed. (Author)

  18. Ozone and hydrogen peroxide applications for disinfection by-products control in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collivignarelli, C.; Sorlini, S.; Riganti, V.

    2001-01-01

    A great interest has been developed during the last years for ozone in drinking water treatments thanks to its strong oxidant and disinfectant power and for its efficiency in disinfection by-products (DBPs) precursors removal. However ozonization produces some specific DBPs, such as aldehydes and ketones; moreover, the presence of bromide in raw water engages ozone in a complex cycle in which both organic bromide and inorganic bromate are end products. In this paper the combination of hydrogen peroxide with ozone (known as peroxone process) and the ozone alone process were experimented on one surface water coming from the lake of Brugneto (Genova) in order to investigate bromate formation and trihalomethanes precursors removal during the oxidation process. The results show that the advanced peroxone process can be applied for bromate reduction (about 30-40%) with better results in comparison with the ozone alone process, while no advantages are shown for THMs precursors removal. The addition of in-line filtration step after pre-oxidation improves both bromate and THMs precursors removal, particularly with increasing hydrogen peroxide/ozone ratio in the oxidation step [it

  19. Thermo-chemical production of hydrogen from water by metal oxides fixed on ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeb, M.; Monnerie, N.; Schmitz, M.; Sattler, C.; Konstandopoulos, A.G.; Agrafiotis, C.; Zaspalis, V.T.; Nalbandian, L.; Steele, A.; Stobbe, P.

    2006-01-01

    In the European project HYDROSOL a simple two-step thermo-chemical cycle process has been developed and investigated. It is based on metal oxide redox pair systems, which can split water molecules by abstracting oxygen atoms and reversibly incorporating them into their lattice. If concentrated solar radiation is used as the heat source one has a promising method in hand to produce hydrogen without any environmentally critical emissions. The basic idea is to combine a support capable of achieving high temperatures when heated by concentrated solar radiation, with a redox pair system suitable for water dissociation and at the same time for regeneration at these temperatures, so that complete operation of the whole process could be achieved by a single solar energy converter. The feasibility of the process has proven possible in a mini-plant scale using concentrated sunlight provided by the solar furnace in Cologne. Suitable redox materials as coatings and a dedicated receiver-reactor have been developed to produce hydrogen with significant conversions by repeating several subsequent water splitting and regeneration steps. In a design study a possible way of operating the process in commercial scale is demonstrated. (authors)

  20. Hydrogen-enriched water restoration of impaired calcium propagation by arsenic in primary keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Tai; Chiu, Yi-Ching; Lee, Chih-Hung; Yoshioka, Tohru; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2013-11-01

    Endemic contamination of artesian water for drinking by arsenic is known to cause several human cancers, including cancers of the skin, bladder, and lungs. In skin, multiple arsenic-induced Bowen's disease (As-BD) can develop into invasive cancers after decades of arsenic exposure. The characteristic histological features of As-BD include full-layer epidermal dysplasia, apoptosis, and abnormal proliferation. Calcium propagation is an essential cellular event contributing to keratinocyte differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, all of which occur in As-BD. This study investigated how arsenic interferes calcium propagation of skin keratinocytes through ROS production and whether hydrogen-enriched water would restore arsenic-impaired calcium propagation. Arsenic was found to induce oxidative stress and inhibit ATP- and thapsigaragin-induced calcium propagation. Pretreatment of arsenic-treated keratinocytes by hydrogen-enriched water or beta-mercaptoethanol with potent anti-oxidative effects partially restored the propagation of calcium by ATP and by thapsigaragin. It was concluded that arsenic may impair calcium propagation, likely through oxidative stress and interactions with thiol groups in membrane proteins.

  1. Transportation cost of nuclear off-peak power for hydrogen production based on water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Saburo; Ueno, Shuichi

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes transportation cost of the nuclear off-peak power for a hydrogen production based on water electrolysis in Japan. The power could be obtainable by substituting hydropower and/or fossil fueled power supplying peak and middle demands with nuclear power. The transportation cost of the off-peak power was evaluated to be 1.42 yen/kWh when an electrolyser receives the off-peak power from a 6kV distribution wire. Marked reduction of the cost was caused by the increase of the capacity factor. (author)

  2. Ratio of tritiated water and hydrogen generated in mercury through a nuclear reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manabe, K. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: manabe.kentaro@jaea.go.jp; Yokoyama, S. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    Tritium generated in a mercury target is a source of potential exposure of personnel at high-energy accelerator facilities. Knowledge of the chemical form of tritium is necessary to estimate the internal doses. We studied the tritium generation upon thermal neutron irradiation of a mercury target modified into liquid lithium amalgam to examine the ratio of tritiated water ([{sup 3}H]H{sub 2}O) and tritiated hydrogen ([{sup 3}H]H{sub 2}). The ratio between [{sup 3}H]H{sub 2}O and [{sup 3}H]H{sub 2} generated in lithium amalgam was 4:6 under these experimental conditions.

  3. Microbial Electrodialysis Cell for Simultaneous Water Desalination and Hydrogen Gas Production

    KAUST Repository

    Mehanna, Maha; Kiely, Patrick D.; Call, Douglas F.; Logan, Bruce. E.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to water desalination is to use exoelectrogenic bacteria to generate electrical power from the biodegradation of organic matter, moving charged ions from a middle chamber between two membranes in a type of microbial fuel cell called a microbial desalination cell. Desalination efficiency using this approach is limited by the voltage produced by the bacteria. Here we examine an alternative strategy based on boosting the voltage produced by the bacteria to achieve hydrogen gas evolution from the cathode using a three-chambered system we refer to as a microbial electrodialysis cell (MEDC). We examined the use of the MEDC process using two different initial NaCl concentrations of 5 g/L and 20 g/L. Conductivity in the desalination chamber was reduced by up to 68 ± 3% in a single fed-batch cycle, with electrical energy efficiencies reaching 231 ± 59%, and maximum hydrogen production rates of 0.16 ± 0.05 m3 H2/m3 d obtained at an applied voltage of 0.55 V. The advantage of this system compared to a microbial fuel cell approach is that the potentials between the electrodes can be better controlled, and the hydrogen gas that is produced can be used to recover energy to make the desalination process self-sustaining with respect to electrical power requirements. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  4. Microbial Electrodialysis Cell for Simultaneous Water Desalination and Hydrogen Gas Production

    KAUST Repository

    Mehanna, Maha

    2010-12-15

    A new approach to water desalination is to use exoelectrogenic bacteria to generate electrical power from the biodegradation of organic matter, moving charged ions from a middle chamber between two membranes in a type of microbial fuel cell called a microbial desalination cell. Desalination efficiency using this approach is limited by the voltage produced by the bacteria. Here we examine an alternative strategy based on boosting the voltage produced by the bacteria to achieve hydrogen gas evolution from the cathode using a three-chambered system we refer to as a microbial electrodialysis cell (MEDC). We examined the use of the MEDC process using two different initial NaCl concentrations of 5 g/L and 20 g/L. Conductivity in the desalination chamber was reduced by up to 68 ± 3% in a single fed-batch cycle, with electrical energy efficiencies reaching 231 ± 59%, and maximum hydrogen production rates of 0.16 ± 0.05 m3 H2/m3 d obtained at an applied voltage of 0.55 V. The advantage of this system compared to a microbial fuel cell approach is that the potentials between the electrodes can be better controlled, and the hydrogen gas that is produced can be used to recover energy to make the desalination process self-sustaining with respect to electrical power requirements. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. Remarks on the thermochemical production of hydrogen from water using heat from the high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert, H.

    1980-06-01

    In this report, some aspects of the production of hydrogen from water using heat from the High Temperature Reactor has been studied. These aspects are: the theoretical potential for economic competitivness, the application of hydrogen in the Heat Market, the size of the market potential in the Federal Republic of Germany and the extent of research and development work. In addition another novel proposal for a thermochemical cycle has been studied. For the description of the theoretical potential for economic competitivness, a definition of the 'coupling', has been introduced, which is thermodynamicaly developed; the thermochemical cycle is compared with the thermochemical cycle. Using the coupling, it becomes possible to describe a relation between thermodynamical parameters and the ecomomical basic data of capital costs. Reasons are given from the theoretical point of view for the application of hydrogen as an energy carrier of high exergetic value in the heat market. The discussion of energy problems as 'questions of global survival' leads here to a proposal for the introduction of the term 'extropy'. The market potential in the Federal Republic of Germany is estimated. A further novel proposal for a thermochemical cycle is the 'hydrocarbon-hybrid-process'. The extent of research and development work is explained. (orig.) [de

  6. Hydrodesulphurization of Light Gas Oil using hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdulaziz

    2009-12-01

    The production of clean fuel faces the challenges of high production cost and complying with stricter environmental regulations. In this research, the ability of using a novel technology of upgrading heavy oil to treat Light Gas Oil (LGO) will be investigated. The target of this project is to produce cleaner transportation fuel with much lower cost of production. Recently, a novel process for upgrading of heavy oil has been developed at University of Waterloo. It is combining the two essential processes in bitumen upgrading; emulsion breaking and hydroprocessing into one process. The water in the emulsion is used to generate in situ hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). This hydrogen can be used for the hydrogenation and hydrotreating reaction which includes sulfur removal instead of the expensive molecular hydrogen. This process can be carried out for the upgrading of the bitumen emulsion which would improve its quality. In this study, the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of LGO was conducted using in situ hydrogen produced via the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). The main objective of this experimental study is to evaluate the possibility of producing clean LGO over dispersed molybdenum sulphide catalyst and to evaluate the effect of different promoters and syn-gas on the activity of the dispersed Mo catalyst. Experiments were carried out in a 300 ml Autoclave batch reactor under 600 psi (initially) at 391°C for 1 to 3 hours and different amounts of water. After the hydrotreating reaction, the gas samples were collected and the conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen via WGSR was determined using a refinery gas analyzer. The sulphur content in liquid sample was analyzed via X-Ray Fluorescence. Experimental results showed that using more water will enhance WGSR but at the same time inhibits the HDS reaction. It was also shown that the amount of sulfur removed depends on the reaction time. The plan is to investigate the effect of synthesis gas (syngas

  7. Influence of dissolved hydrogen and temperature on primary water stress corrosion cracking of mill annealed alloy 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totsuka, Nobuo; Nishikawa, Yoshito [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Nakajima, Nobuo

    2002-09-01

    The influence of dissolved hydrogen and temperature on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of alloy 600 was experimentally studied at temperature ranging from 310 to 360degC and hydrogen contents ranging from 0 to 4 ppm using slow strain rate tensile technique (SSRT) and constant load tensile test. As a result, it was revealed that the PWSCC susceptibility of alloy 600 has a maximum near 3 ppm of dissolved hydrogen at 360degC and the peak shifts to 1 ppm at 320degC. The mechanism of the peak shift is not clear yet, however, it is possibly explained by the change of absorbed hydrogen in the metal caused by the change of hydrogen recombination reaction and/or change of the surface film. (author)

  8. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a

  9. Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances around the reactor pressure vessel bottom of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Ibe, Eishi; Nakata, Kiyatomo; Fuse, Motomasa; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie

    1995-01-01

    Many efforts to preserve the structural integrity of major piping, components, and structures in a boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling system have been directed toward avoiding intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Application of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) to moderate corrosive circumstances is a promising approach to preserve the structural integrity during extended lifetimes of BWRs. The benefits of HWC application are (a) avoiding the occurrence of IGSCC on structural materials around the bottom of the crack growth rate, even if microcracks are present on the structural materials. Several disadvantage caused by HWC are evaluated to develop suitable countermeasures prior to HWC application. The advantages and disadvantages of HWC are quantitatively evaluated base on both BWR plant data and laboratory data shown in unclassified publications. Their trade-offs are discussed, and suitable applications of HWC are described. It is concluded that an optimal amount of Hydrogen injected into the feedwater can moderate corrosive circumstances, in the region to be preserved, without serious disadvantages. The conclusions have been drawn by combining experimental and theoretical results. Experiments in BWR plants -- e.g., direct measurements of electrochemical corrosion potential and crack growth rate at the RPV bottom -- are planned that would collect data to support the theoretical considerations

  10. Presence of hydrogen peroxide, a source of hydroxyl radicals, in acid electrolyzed water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mokudai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acid electrolyzed water (AEW, which is produced through the electrolysis of dilute sodium chloride (NaCl or potassium chloride solution, is used as a disinfectant in various fields because of its potent antimicrobial activity. The hydroxyl radical, an oxygen radical species, is often suggested as a putative active ingredient for AEW antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of the present study is to detect hydroxyl radicals in AEW. The hydroxyl radicals in AEW prepared under different conditions were determined using an electron spin resonance (ESR technique. A signal from 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO-OH, an adduct of DMPO and the hydroxyl radical, was detected in AEW prepared by double or triple electrolyses of 1% NaCl but not of 0.1% NaCl solution. Then the presence of hydrogen peroxide as a proposed source of hydroxyl radicals was examined using a combination of ESR and a Fenton reaction. The DMPO-OH signal was clearly detected, even in AEW prepared by single electrolysis of 0.1% NaCl solution, when ferrous sulfate was added to induce a Fenton reaction, indicating the presence of hydrogen peroxide in the AEW. Since sodium formate, a hydroxyl radical scavenger, did not affect the bactericidal activity of AEW, it is concluded that the radical is unlikely to contribute to the antimicrobial activity of AEW, although a small amount of the radical is produced from hydrogen peroxide. Dimethyl sulfoxide, the other hydroxyl radical scavenger used in the present study, canceled the bactericidal activity of AEW, accompanied by complete depletion of free available chlorine, suggesting that hypochlorous acid is probably a major contributor to the antimicrobial activity. CONCLUSIONS: It is strongly suggested that although hydrogen peroxide is present in AEW as a source of hydroxyl radicals, the antimicrobial activity of AEW does not depend on these radicals.

  11. Antioxidant activities of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water assessed by ESR and 2,2′-bipyridyl methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shinya; Matsuoka, Daigo; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We prepared nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water (nano-H water) which contained hydrogen nano-bubbles of < 717-nm diameter for 54% of total bubbles. In the DMPO-spin trap electron spin resonance (ESR) method, the DMPO-OH:MnO ratio, being attributed to amounts of hydroxyl radicals (·OH), was 2.78 for pure water (dissolved hydrogen [DH] ≤ 0.01 ppm, oxidation-reduction potential [ORP] = + 324 mV), 2.73 for tap water (0.01 ppm, + 286 mV), 2.93 for commercially available hydrogen water (0.075 ppm, + 49 mV), and 2.66 for manufactured hydrogen water (0.788 ppm, − 614 mV), whereas the nano-H water (0.678 ppm, − 644 mV) exhibited 2.05, showing the superiority of nano-H water to other types of hydrogen water in terms of ·OH-scavenging activity. Then, the reduction activity of nano-H water was assessed spectrophotometrically by the 2,2′-bipyridyl method. Differential absorbance at 530 nm was in the order: 0.018 for pure water, 0.055 for tap water, 0.079 for nano-H water, 0.085 for commercially available hydrogen water, and 0.090 for manufactured hydrogen water, indicating a prominent reduction activity of hydrogen water and nano-H water against oxidation in ascorbate-coupled ferric ion–bipyridyl reaction. Thus, nano-H water has an improved antioxidant activity as compared to hydrogen water of similar DH-level, indicating the more marked importance of nano-bubbles rather than the concentration of hydrogen in terms of ·OH-scavenging. - Highlights: • We assessed the antioxidant activity of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water (nano-H water). • Nano-H water exhibited superior ·OH-scavenging activity in DMPO-spin trap ESR. • A reduction ability of nano-H water was shown in 2,2′-bipyridyl reaction. • Nano-H water has an improved antioxidant activity as compared to hydrogen water of similar DH-level. • Results indicated the importance of nano-bubbles rather than the concentration of hydrogen

  12. Conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond network between TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Hansen, Louise Valentin; Mokrosinski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Five highly conserved polar residues connected by a number of structural water molecules together with two rotamer micro-switches, TrpVI:13 and TyrVII:20, constitute an extended hydrogen bond network between the intracellular segments of TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII of 7TM receptors. Molecular dynamics...... to apparently function as a catching trap for water molecules. Mutational analysis of the beta2-adrenergic receptor demonstrated that the highly conserved polar residues of the hydrogen bond network were all important for receptor signaling but served different functions, some dampening constitutive activity...... (AsnI:18, AspII:10, and AsnVII:13), whereas others (AsnVII:12 and AsnVII:16) located one helical turn apart and sharing a water molecule were shown to be essential for agonist-induced signaling. It is concluded that the conserved water hydrogen bond network of 7TM receptors constitutes an extended...

  13. Preparation of hydrogenated-TiO2/Ti double layered thin films by water vapor plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pranevicius, L.L.; Milcius, D.; Tuckute, S.; Gedvilas, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated reaction of water plasma with nanocrystalline TiO 2 films. ► Simultaneous oxidation and hydrogenation of Ti was observed during plasma treatment. ► Water plasma treatment forms hydrogenated nanocrystalline TiO 2 in the shallow surface. - Abstract: We have investigated the structural and compositional variations in 200–500 nm thick Ti films deposited by magnetron sputter-deposition technique and treated in water vapor plasma at different processing powers. It was found that the upper layer of treated film with the thickness of 110 nm was changed into the black hydrogenated-TiO 2 with around 16 nm sized nanocystals during 10 min for dissipated power 200 W at room temperature. Analysis of the experimental results is used to obtain insights into the effects of water layer adsorbed on hydrophilic oxidized titanium surfaces exposed to plasma radiation.

  14. Time and concentration dependency in the potentially affected fraction of species: the case of hydrogen peroxide treatment of ballast water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.G.D.; Ebbens, E.; Jak, R.G.; Huijbregts, M.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Transport of large volumes of ballast water contributes greatly to invasions of species. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can be used as a disinfectant to prevent the spread of exotic species via ballast water. Instead of using environmental risk assessment techniques for protecting a certain fraction of

  15. Development of new electrode materials for hydrogen production by water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozain, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    It is expected that PEM water electrolysis will play a significant role in the hydrogen society as a key process for producing hydrogen from renewable energy sources but before this, substantial cost reductions are still required. Because of the high acidity of membrane materials used in PEM water electrolysers, expensive noble-metals or their oxides are required as electrocatalysts (platinum for hydrogen evolution and iridium for oxygen evolution). As the oxygen evolution reaction takes place with a large overpotential (anodic potential ≥ 1.6 V) only few materials can be used to avoid corrosion. In state-of-the-art, noble metal oxides are generally used alone in the active layer with typical loadings of 2-3 mg/cm 2 and act as both catalyst and electronic conductor.In order to reduce the noble metal loadings and keep a good electronic conductivity of the catalytic layer, iridium can be supported onto a conductive and electrochemical stable material support. To gain more insights, several MEAs with anodes made of pure iridium oxide or 50 wt % IrO 2 /Ti anodes have been prepared and characterized using cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy, and by measuring polarization curves at different operating temperatures. Without the catalyst support, anodic loadings can be reduced down to 0,5 mg/cm 2 without any degradation in the electrochemical performances. By using anodes made of iridium oxide and titanium particles, further reductions of anodic loading can be made down to 0.1 mg/cm 2 with performances similar to those obtained with conventional loadings of several mg cm 2 . (author) [fr

  16. Steam generators of Phenix: Measurement of the hydrogen concentration in sodium for detecting water leaks in the steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambillard, E.; Lacroix, A.; Langlois, J.; Viala, J.

    1975-01-01

    The Phenix secondary circuits are provided with measurement systems of hydrogen concentration in sodium, that allow for the detection of possible water leaks in steam generators and the location of a faulty module. A measurement device consists of : a detector with nickel membranes of 0, 3 mm wall thickness, an ion pump with a 200 l/s flow rate, a quadrupole mass spectrometer and a calibrated hydrogen leak. The temperature correction is made automatically. The main tests carried out on the leak detection systems are reported. Since the first system operation (October 24, 1973), the measurements allowed us to obtain the hydrogen diffusion rates through the steam generator tube walls. (author)

  17. Photocatalyst based on titanium or iron semiconductors for the generation of hydrogen from water upon solar irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The objective of present thesis is to prepare and evaluate photocatalyst for hydrogen generation from water methanol mixture using solar light. This general objective has been accomplished by applying different methodology in material preparation as well as exploring the photocatalytic activity of novel semiconductors. In this way after a general introduction to the feed showing the relevance of solar fuels and in particular hydrogen generation, the...

  18. Probabilistic consequence assessment of hydrogen sulphide releases from a heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baynes, C.J.

    1986-05-01

    This report provides a summary of work carried out on behalf of the Atomic Energy Control Board, concerned with the consequences of accidental releases to the atmosphere of hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) at a heavy water plant. In this study, assessments of consequences are made in terms of the probabilities of a range of possible outcomes, i.e., numbers of fatalities, given a certain release scenario. The report describes the major features of a computer model which was developed to calculate the consequences and their associated probabilities, and the major input data used in applying the model to a consequence assessment of the Bruce heavy water plant (HWP) in Ontario. The results of the sensitivity analyses of the model are summarized. Finally, the results of the consequence assessments of 43 accidental release scenarios at the Bruce HWP are summarized, together with a number of conclusions which were drawn from these results regarding the predicted consequences and the factors which influence them

  19. Deuterium exchange between hydrogen and water in a trickle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enright, J.T.; Chuang, T.T.

    1978-01-01

    The catalyzed exchange of deuterium between hydrogen and liquid water has been studied as the basis for a heavy water production process. Platinum catalyst which had been waterproofed with Teflon was tested in a 0.2 m diameter trickle bed reactor at pressures and temperatures up to 6 MPa and 440 K. Extensive experimental data were used to test a model of the system which was developed from fundamental principles. It was found that mass transfer plays a very important role in the overall exchange and the conventional theory of vapour/liquid mass transfer does not adequately describe the absorption process. Modelling of the data has resulted in the postulation of a second method of mass transfer whereby HDO transfers directly from the catalyst to the bulk liquid phase. (author)

  20. Research on Liquid Management Technology in Water Tank and Reactor for Propulsion System with Hydrogen Production System Utilizing Aluminum and Water Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Ryoji; Imamura, Takuya; Sugioka, Masatoshi; Higashino, Kazuyuki

    2017-12-01

    High pressure hydrogen produced by aluminum and water reaction is considered to be applied to space propulsion system. Water tank and hydrogen production reactor in this propulsion system require gas and liquid separation function under microgravity condition. We consider to install vane type liquid acquisition device (LAD) utilizing surface tension in the water tank, and install gas-liquid separation mechanism by centrifugal force which swirling flow creates in the hydrogen reactor. In water tank, hydrophilic coating was covered on both tank wall and vane surface to improve wettability. Function of LAD in water tank and gas-liquid separation in reaction vessel were evaluated by short duration microgravity experiments using drop tower facility. In the water tank, it was confirmed that liquid was driven and acquired on the outlet due to capillary force created by vanes. In addition of this, it was found that gas-liquid separation worked well by swirling flow in hydrogen production reactor. However, collection of hydrogen gas bubble was sometimes suppressed by aluminum alloy particles, which is open problem to be solved.

  1. Mechanism of conformational coupling in SecA: Key role of hydrogen-bonding networks and water interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, Stefan; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta

    2016-02-01

    SecA uses the energy yielded by the binding and hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to push secretory pre-proteins across the plasma membrane in bacteria. Hydrolysis of ATP occurs at the nucleotide-binding site, which contains the conserved carboxylate groups of the DEAD-box helicases. Although crystal structures provide valuable snapshots of SecA along its reaction cycle, the mechanism that ensures conformational coupling between the nucleotide-binding site and the other domains of SecA remains unclear. The observation that SecA contains numerous hydrogen-bonding groups raises important questions about the role of hydrogen-bonding networks and hydrogen-bond dynamics in long-distance conformational couplings. To address these questions, we explored the molecular dynamics of SecA from three different organisms, with and without bound nucleotide, in water. By computing two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding maps we identify networks of hydrogen bonds that connect the nucleotide-binding site to remote regions of the protein, and sites in the protein that respond to specific perturbations. We find that the nucleotide-binding site of ADP-bound SecA has a preferred geometry whereby the first two carboxylates of the DEAD motif bridge via hydrogen-bonding water. Simulations of a mutant with perturbed ATP hydrolysis highlight the water-bridged geometry as a key structural element of the reaction path. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Hydrogen bonding interactions between ethylene glycol and water:density,excess molar volume,and spectral study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Studies of the density and the excess molar volume of ethylene glycol (EG)-water mixtures were carried out to illustrate the hydrogen bonding interactions of EG with water at different temperatures. The re-sults suggest that a likely complex of 3 ethylene glycol molecules bonding with 4 water molecules in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (EGW) is formed at the maximal excess molar volume,which displays stronger absorption capabilities for SO2 when the concentration of SO2 reaches 400×10?6 (volume ratio) in the gas phase. Meanwhile,FTIR and UV spectra of EGWs were recorded at various EG concentra-tions to display the hydrogen bonding interactions of EG with water. The FTIR spectra show that the stretching vibrational band of hydroxyl in the EGWs shifts to a lower frequency and the bending vibra-tional band of water shifts to a higher frequency with increasing the EG concentration,respectively. Furthermore,the UV spectra show that the electron transferring band of the hydroxyl oxygen in EG shows red shift with increasing the EG concentration. The frequency shifts in FTIR spectra and the shifts of absorption bands in UV absorption spectra of EGWs are interpreted as the strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the hydrogen atoms in water with the hydroxyl oxygen atoms of EG.

  3. Application of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of waters in Tengchong hydrothermal systems of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Minzi; Hou Fagao; Lin Ruifen; Ni Baoling

    1988-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results obtained for hydrothermal systems in Tengchong by using deuterium, oxygen-18 and tritium as natural tracers. On the basis of deuterium and oxygen-18 analyses of 69 thermal springs and some other meteoric, surface and underground water samples it has been confirmed that all geothermal waters are originally meteoric, but the δD of hot spring waters is often lighter than that of local surface and underground waters. It seems that the recharging water is from higher elevations and far from the thermal areas. The differences in oxygen-18 and deuterium contents between thermal springs and deep thermal waters have been calculated for single-stage steam separation from 276 deg. C to 96 deg. C. The oxygen isotope shift of deep thermal water produced by water-rock reactions is of 1.57 per mille and part of the observed oxygen isotope shift of thermal springs seems to have occurred due to subsurface boiling. The tritium content ( 18 O three subsurface processes would have been distinguished, they are subsurface boiling, mixing-subsurface boiling and subsurface boiling-mixing. The springs formed by subsurface boiling have tritium content of less than 5 TU. The tritium content of 5-10 TU is for springs formed by mixing-subsurface boiling and 10-20 TU is for subsurface boiling-mixing. The tritium content of geothermal water in Hot Sea, geothermal field seems higher than that of the Geysers U.S.A. and Wairakei N.Z. It would show that the circulation time of the thermal water in Hot Sea geothermal system is not so long, the reservoir is quite good with percolation and the recharging water is sufficiently enough. The most important applications of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of water in geothermal study are in two ways, as tracers of water origins and as tracers of reservoir processes. This paper discussed these two aspects of Tengchong hydrothermal systems. 6 refs, 6 figs, 5 tabs

  4. Analysis of hydrogen-deuterium mixtures and of mixtures of heavy-water and light-water by means of a mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenouard, J.; Gueron, J.; Roth, E.

    1951-07-01

    The differences between hydrogen and deuterium with respect to the capture of thermal neutrons (hydrogen = 0.31 barn; deuterium 0.00065 barn) explains the interest of detecting small variations of the isotopic composition of the heavy waters used in the Chatillon nuclear pile. The aim of this report is to describe and discuss the method used since more than a year for the dosimetry of heavy waters. After a recall of the principle of mass spectroscopy analysis of deuterium-hydrogen mixtures, the preciseness of the results is presented and the balancing method used for the determination of the isotopic composition of hydrogen-deuterium mixtures is explained in detail. Finally, a brief comparison of the preciseness of mass spectroscopy measurements with the analyses made with other methods is performed. Some calculations and the tables of results are presented in appendixes. (J.S.)

  5. Hydrogen bond dynamics and water structure in glucose-water solutions by depolarized Rayleigh scattering and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolantoni, Marco; Sassi, Paola; Morresi, Assunta; Santini, Sergio

    2007-07-01

    The effect of glucose on the relaxation process of water at picosecond time scales has been investigated by depolarized Rayleigh scattering (DRS) experiments. The process is assigned to the fast hydrogen bonding dynamics of the water network. In DRS spectra this contribution can be safely separated from the slower relaxation process due to the sugar. The detected relaxation time is studied at different glucose concentrations and modeled considering bulk and hydrating water contributions. As a result, it is found that in diluted conditions the hydrogen bond lifetime of proximal water molecules becomes about three times slower than that of the bulk. The effect of the sugar on the hydrogen bond water structure is investigated by analyzing the low-frequency Raman (LFR) spectrum sensitive to intermolecular modes. The addition of glucose strongly reduces the intensity of the band at 170cm-1 assigned to a collective stretching mode of water molecules arranged in cooperative tetrahedral domains. These findings indicate that proximal water molecules partially lose the tetrahedral ordering typical of the bulk leading to the formation of high density environments around the sugar. Thus the glucose imposes a new local order among water molecules localized in its hydration shell in which the hydrogen bond breaking dynamics is sensitively retarded. This work provides new experimental evidences that support recent molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamics results.

  6. Mixed filling for the successive isotopic exchange in the phase sequence water - water vapors - hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, D.; Peculea, M.; Hirean, I.; Croitoru, C.

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the process of the isotopic exchange implied in heavy water production. Details concerning the structural arrangement of the process contact elements inside the exchange columns are presented. A hydrophilic filling, based on phosphorous bronze, and the platinum catalyst structure , resulted from this work, are to be implemented in the column equipment of the heavy water distillation pilot operating in connection with the CANDU type reactors. The performances of the mixed catalyst components were derived from experimental data by means of the three fluids model equations

  7. Microscopic models for proton transfer in water and strongly hydrogen-bonded complexes with a single-well proton potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism and formalism for proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds introduced recently [1], is applied to a proton transfer in liquid water. "Structural diffusion" of hydroxonium ions is regarded as totally adiabatic process, with synchronous hindered translation...... of two closest water molecules to and from the reaction complex as crucial steps. The water molecules induce a "gated" shift of the proton from the donor to the acceptor in the double-well potential with simultaneous breaking/formation of hydrogen bonds between these molecules and the proton donor...... and acceptor. The short-range and long-range proton transfer as "structural diffusion" of Zundel complexes is also considered. The theoretical formalism is illustrated with the use of Morse, exponential, and harmonic molecular potentials. This approach is extended to proton transfer in strongly hydrogen...

  8. Metal-polypyridyl catalysts for electro- and photochemical reduction of water to hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, David Z; Chantarojsiri, Teera; Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-07-21

    Climate change, rising global energy demand, and energy security concerns motivate research into alternative, sustainable energy sources. In principle, solar energy can meet the world's energy needs, but the intermittent nature of solar illumination means that it is temporally and spatially separated from its consumption. Developing systems that promote solar-to-fuel conversion, such as via reduction of protons to hydrogen, could bridge this production-consumption gap, but this effort requires invention of catalysts that are cheap, robust, and efficient and that use earth-abundant elements. In this context, catalysts that utilize water as both an earth-abundant, environmentally benign substrate and a solvent for proton reduction are highly desirable. This Account summarizes our studies of molecular metal-polypyridyl catalysts for electrochemical and photochemical reduction of protons to hydrogen. Inspired by concept transfer from biological and materials catalysts, these scaffolds are remarkably resistant to decomposition in water, with fast and selective electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversions that are sustainable for several days. Their modular nature offers a broad range of opportunities for tuning reactivity by molecular design, including altering ancillary ligand electronics, denticity, and/or incorporating redox-active elements. Our first-generation complex, [(PY4)Co(CH3CN)2](2+), catalyzes the reduction of protons from a strong organic acid to hydrogen in 50% water. Subsequent investigations with the pentapyridyl ligand PY5Me2 furnished molybdenum and cobalt complexes capable of catalyzing the reduction of water in fully aqueous electrolyte with 100% Faradaic efficiency. Of particular note, the complex [(PY5Me2)MoO](2+) possesses extremely high activity and durability in neutral water, with turnover frequencies at least 8500 mol of H2 per mole of catalyst per hour and turnover numbers over 600 000 mol of H2 per mole of catalyst over 3 days at an

  9. Application of cylinder symmetry to iron and titanium oxidation by oxygen or hydrogen-water vapour mixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynaud, Pierre

    1980-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of the oxidation reaction in the case of corrosion of iron by oxygen, hydrogen sulphide or hydrogen-water vapour mixes, and in the case of oxidation of titanium and of titanium nitride by hydrogen-water vapour mixes. It first addresses the corrosion of iron by oxygen with an experiment performed in cylinder symmetry: description of operational conditions, discussion of kinetic curves, development of a law of generation of multiple layers in cylinder symmetry, analytical exploitation of experimental results. The second part addresses the oxidation of iron by hydrogen-water vapour mixes: experimental conditions, influence of temperature on kinetics, micrographic study (oxide morphology, coating morphology, interpretation of differences with the case of plane symmetry), discussion of the influence of cylinder symmetry on oxidation kinetics. The third part addresses the oxidation of titanium by hydrogen-water vapour mixes: global kinetic evolution, reaction products and micrographic examination, morphology and texture studies, discussion of the oxidation mechanism and of cylinder symmetry [fr

  10. Green synthesis of nanosilver as a sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Vineet K.; Yadav, Raghvendra S.; Yadav, Poonam; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Present “green” synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach. ► TEM shows average particle size of 8.25 ± 1.37 nm of synthesized nanosilver, giving UV–vis absorption at 410 nm. ► FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation (stability up to three months). ► The nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). ► The recovery percentage of H 2 O 2 in water is 92–105%, which is applicable for sensors and water/waste water plants. - Abstract: Present “green” synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach for nanosilver formation, which offers numerous benefits over physiochemical approaches. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern suggests the formation and crystallinity of nanosilver. The average particle size of silver nanoparticles was 8.25 ± 1.37 nm as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UV–vis absorption spectrum shows a characteristic absorption peak of silver nanoparticles at 410 nm. FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation. In addition, the nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The produced nanosilver is stable and comparable in size. These silver nanoparticles show potential applications in the field of sensors, catalysis, fuel cells and nanodevices.

  11. Green synthesis of nanosilver as a sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Vineet K., E-mail: vineet2shukla@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Application Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Yadav, Raghvendra S. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Yadav, Poonam [National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Pandey, Avinash C. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Present 'green' synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TEM shows average particle size of 8.25 {+-} 1.37 nm of synthesized nanosilver, giving UV-vis absorption at 410 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation (stability up to three months). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recovery percentage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in water is 92-105%, which is applicable for sensors and water/waste water plants. - Abstract: Present 'green' synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach for nanosilver formation, which offers numerous benefits over physiochemical approaches. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern suggests the formation and crystallinity of nanosilver. The average particle size of silver nanoparticles was 8.25 {+-} 1.37 nm as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UV-vis absorption spectrum shows a characteristic absorption peak of silver nanoparticles at 410 nm. FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation. In addition, the nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The produced nanosilver is stable and comparable in size. These silver nanoparticles show potential applications in the field of sensors, catalysis, fuel cells and nanodevices.

  12. Solar Metal Sulfate-Ammonia Based Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cunping (Inventor); T-Raissi, Ali (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Two classes of hybrid/thermochemical water splitting processes for the production of hydrogen and oxygen have been proposed based on (1) metal sulfate-ammonia cycles (2) metal pyrosulfate-ammonia cycles. Methods and systems for a metal sulfate MSO.sub.4--NH3 cycle for producing H2 and O2 from a closed system including feeding an aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 solution into a photoctalytic reactor to oxidize the aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 into aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 and reduce water to hydrogen, mixing the resulting aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 with metal oxide (e.g. ZnO) to form a slurry, heating the slurry of aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 and ZnO(s) in the low temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of NH3 and H2O and solid ZnSO4(s), heating solid ZnSO4 at a high temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 and solid product ZnO, mixing the gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 with an NH3 and H2O stream in an absorber to form aqueous (NH4)(2)SO3 solution and separate O2 for aqueous solution, recycling the resultant solution back to the photoreactor and sending ZnO to mix with aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 solution to close the water splitting cycle wherein gaseous H2 and O2 are the only products output from the closed ZnSO4--NH3 cycle.

  13. Hydrogen-bond memory and water-skin supersolidity resolving the Mpemba paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Huang, Yongli; Ma, Zengsheng; Zhou, Yichun; Zhou, Ji; Zheng, Weitao; Jiang, Qing; Sun, Chang Q

    2014-11-14

    The Mpemba paradox, that is, hotter water freezes faster than colder water, has baffled thinkers like Francis Bacon, René Descartes, and Aristotle since B.C. 350. However, a commonly accepted understanding or theoretical reproduction of this effect remains challenging. Numerical reproduction of observations, shown herewith, confirms that water skin supersolidity [Zhang et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., DOI: ] enhances the local thermal diffusivity favoring heat flowing outwardly in the liquid path. Analysis of experimental database reveals that the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) possesses memory to emit energy at a rate depending on its initial storage. Unlike other usual materials that lengthen and soften all bonds when they absorb thermal energy, water performs abnormally under heating to lengthen the O:H nonbond and shorten the H-O covalent bond through inter-oxygen Coulomb coupling [Sun et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 2013, 4, 3238]. Cooling does the opposite to release energy, like releasing a coupled pair of bungees, at a rate of history dependence. Being sensitive to the source volume, skin radiation, and the drain temperature, the Mpemba effect proceeds only in the strictly non-adiabatic 'source-path-drain' cycling system for the heat "emission-conduction-dissipation" dynamics with a relaxation time that drops exponentially with the rise of the initial temperature of the liquid source.

  14. Water electrolysis with a conducting carbon cloth: subthreshold hydrogen generation and superthreshold carbon quantum dot formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Mandakini; Deshpande, Aparna; Kelkar, Sarika; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2014-03-01

    A conducting carbon cloth, which has an interesting turbostratic microstructure and functional groups that are distinctly different from other ordered forms of carbon, such as graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes, was synthesized by a simple one-step pyrolysis of cellulose fabric. This turbostratic disorder and surface chemical functionalities had interesting consequences for water splitting and hydrogen generation when such a cloth was used as an electrode in the alkaline electrolysis process. Importantly, this work also gives a new twist to carbon-assisted electrolysis. During electrolysis, the active sites in the carbon cloth allow slow oxidation of its surface to transform the surface groups from COH to COOH and so forth at a voltage as low as 0.2 V in a two-electrode system, along with platinum as the cathode, instead of 1.23 V (plus overpotential), which is required for platinum, steel, or even graphite anodes. The quantity of subthreshold hydrogen evolved was 24 mL cm(-2)  h(-1) at 1 V. Interestingly, at a superthreshold potential (>1.23 V+overpotential), another remarkable phenomenon was found. At such voltages, along with the high rate and quantity of hydrogen evolution, rapid exfoliation of the tiny nanoscale (5-7 nm) units of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are found in copious amounts due to an enhanced oxidation rate. These CQDs show bright-blue fluorescence under UV light. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Water level measurement system in reactor pressure vessel of BWR and hydrogen concentration monitoring system for severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Hidehiko; Okazaki, Koki; Shiraishi, Fujio; Kenjyo, Hiroaki; Isoda, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident caused severe accident to lose functions of many instrumentation systems. As a result, many important plant parameters couldn't be monitored. In order to monitor plant parameters in the case of severe accident, new instrumentation systems available in the severe conditions are being developed. Water level in reactor pressure vessel and hydrogen concentration in primary containment vessel are one of the most important parameters. Performance test results about water level measurement sensor and hydrogen sensor in severe environmental conditions are described. (author)

  16. Mitigation of climate change via a copper-chlorine hybrid thermochemical water splitting cycle for hydrogen production from nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, M.F.; Dincer, I.; Rosen, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Concerns regarding climate change have motivated research on clean energy resources. While many energy resources have limitations, nuclear energy has the potential to supply a significant share of energy supply without contributing to climate change. Nuclear energy has been used mainly for electric power generation, but hydrogen production via thermochemical water decomposition provides another option for the utilization of nuclear thermal energy. This paper describes nuclear-based hydrogen production technologies and discusses the role of the Cu-Cl cycle for thermochemical water decomposition, potentially driven in part by waste heat from a nuclear generating station, in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. (author)

  17. Research Update: Photoelectrochemical water splitting and photocatalytic hydrogen production using ferrites (MFe2O4) under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillert, Ralf; Taffa, Dereje H.; Wark, Michael; Bredow, Thomas; Bahnemann, Detlef W.

    2015-10-01

    The utilization of solar light for the photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic production of molecular hydrogen from water is a scientific and technical challenge. Semiconductors with suitable properties to promote solar-driven water splitting are a desideratum. A hitherto rarely investigated group of semiconductors are ferrites with the empirical formula MFe2O4 and related compounds. This contribution summarizes the published results of the experimental investigations on the photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic properties of these compounds. It will be shown that the potential of this group of compounds in regard to the production of solar hydrogen has not been fully explored yet.

  18. Water feed and effluent treatment for hydrogen sulfide-water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spevack, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    This invention provides a feed and effluent treatment system for improving the recovery of a gas (e.g. H 2 S) from solution in a liquid (e.g. water) when the liquid also contains dissolved nonvolatile components (e.g. the salts of sea water) at low temperatures. In a gas/liquid contact process in which the gas is at least partially soluble in the liquid, a portion of the liquid is extracted after it passes through a hot zone, the pressure of the liquid is reduced by flashing it through pressure reduction means to remove a portion of the dissolved gas, and the gas thus recovered is returned to the process

  19. Improvements on heavy water separation technology by isotopic water-hydrogen sulfide exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculea, M.

    1987-01-01

    A series of possible variance is presented for the heavy water separation technology by isotopic H 2 O-H 2 S exchange at dual temperatures. The critical study of these variants, which are considered as characteristic quantities for the isotopes transport (production) and the extraction level is related to a dual temperature plant fed by liquid and cold column, which is the up-to-date technology employed in all heavy water production plants as variants of following plants are studied: dual temperature plant with double feeding; dual-temperature plant with equilibrium column (booster); dual-temperature-dual-pressure plant. Attention is paid to the variant with equilibration column (booster), executed and tested at the State Committee for Nuclear Energy and to the dual-temperature-dual pressure plant which presents the highest efficiency. (author)

  20. Hydrogen Production From Water By Thermo-Chemical Methods (UT-3): Evaluation of Side Reactions By Simulation Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusli, A.

    1997-01-01

    Hydogen fuel with its advantages will be able to replace all the positions of fossil fuels post o il and gas or migas . Among the advantages of hydrogen fuel are pollution free, abundant of raw material in the form of water molecule, flexible in application, able to stroge and transport as well as fossil energy sources (oil and gas). Hydogen could be produced from water by means of thermochemical, thermolysis, photolysis and electrolysis. Nuclear heat (HTGR), solar heat or waste heat from steel industry can be used as energy source for these processes. In case of thermochemical method, some problems realated to production process should be studied and evaluated. Simulation is considered can be applied to study the effects of side reactions and also to resolve its problems in hydrogen production process. In this paper is reported the evalution results of hydrogen production process by thermochemical (UT-3) through both of the experimental and computer simulation. It has been proposed a new flow chart of hydrogen production to achieve the hydrogen production continuously. A simulator has been developed based on experimental data and related mathematical equations. This simulator can be used to scle-up the UT-3 thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production process

  1. Kinetics of the hydrogen production reaction in a copper-chlorine water splitting plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2009-01-01

    The exothermic reaction of HCl with particulate Cu occurs during hydrogen production step in the thermochemical copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) water splitting cycle. In this paper, this chemical reaction is modeled kinetically, and a parametric study is performed to determine the influences of particle size, temperature and molar ratios on the reaction kinetics. It is determined that the residence time of copper particles varies between 10 and 100 s, depending on the operating conditions. The hydrogen conversion at equilibrium varies between 55 and 85%, depending on the reaction temperature. The heat flux at the particle surface, caused by the exothermic enthalpy of reaction, reaches about 3,000 W/m 2 when the particle shrinks to 0.1% from its initial size. A numerical algorithm is developed to solve the moving boundary Stefan problem with a chemical reaction. It predicts the shrinking of copper particles based on the hypothesis that the chemical reaction and heat transfer are decoupled. The model allows for estimation of the temperature of the copper particle, assumed spherical, in the radial direction. The maximum temperature at the interface is higher than the melting point of CuCl by 10-50 o C, depending on the assumed operating conditions. (author)

  2. pH buffers for sea water media based on the total hydrogen ion concentration scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Andrew G.

    1993-01-01

    Published e.m.f. values measured using the cell ? where p° = 101.325 kPa, and BH + and B are the conjugate acid-base pairs of 2-aminopyridine, 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol (tris), tetrahydro-1,4-isoxazine (morpholine), and 2-amino-2-methyl-1, 3-propanediol (bis), have been re-evaluated to assign pH values based on the "total" hydrogen ion concentration scale to equimolal ( m =0.04 mol kg -1) buffer solutions based on these compounds. These pH values are consistent with the best available equilibrium constants for acid-base processes in sea water and such pH buffers can be used as pH calibration standards to measure accurate values for oceanic pH on the "total" hydrogen ion pH scale. In addition, the published e.m.f. results for these various amine bases have been used to calculate their respective acidity constants on this pH scale.

  3. Life Cycle Assessment and Water Footprint of Hydrogen Production Methods: From Conventional to Emerging Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Mehmeti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A common sustainability issue, arising in production systems, is the efficient use of resources for providing goods or services. With the increased interest in a hydrogen (H2 economy, the life-cycle environmental performance of H2 production has special significance for assisting in identifying opportunities to improve environmental performance and to guide challenging decisions and select between technology paths. Life cycle impact assessment methods are rapidly evolving to analyze multiple environmental impacts of the production of products or processes. This study marks the first step in developing process-based streamlined life cycle analysis (LCA of several H2 production pathways combining life cycle impacts at the midpoint (17 problem-oriented and endpoint (3 damage-oriented levels using the state-of-the-art impact assessment method ReCiPe 2016. Steam reforming of natural gas, coal gasification, water electrolysis via proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM, solid oxide electrolyzer cell (SOEC, biomass gasification and reforming, and dark fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass were analyzed. An innovative aspect is developed in this study is an analysis of water consumption associated with H2 production pathways by life-cycle stage to provide a better understanding of the life cycle water-related impacts on human health and natural environment. For water-related scope, Water scarcity footprint (WSF quantified using Available WAter REmaining (AWARE method was applied as a stand-alone indicator. The paper discusses the strengths and weaknesses of each production pathway, identify the drivers of environmental impact, quantify midpoint environmental impact and its influence on the endpoint environmental performance. The findings of this study could serve as a useful theoretical reference and practical basis to decision-makers of potential environmental impacts of H2 production systems.

  4. Drinking water purification by electrosynthesis of hydrogen peroxide in a power-producing PEM fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Winton; Bonakdarpour, Arman; Gyenge, Előd; Wilkinson, David P

    2013-11-01

    The industrial anthraquinone auto-oxidation process produces most of the world's supply of hydrogen peroxide. For applications that require small amounts of H2 O2 or have economically difficult transportation means, an alternate, on-site H2 O2 production method is needed. Advanced drinking water purification technologies use neutral-pH H2 O2 in combination with UV treatment to reach the desired water purity targets. To produce neutral H2 O2 on-site and on-demand for drinking water purification, the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell operated in either electrolysis (power consuming) or fuel cell (power generating) mode could be a possible solution. The work presented here focuses on the H2 /O2 fuel cell mode to produce H2 O2 . The fuel cell reactor is operated with a continuous flow of carrier water through the cathode to remove the product H2 O2 . The impact of the cobalt-carbon composite cathode catalyst loading, Teflon content in the cathode gas diffusion layer, and cathode carrier water flowrate on the production of H2 O2 are examined. H2 O2 production rates of up to 200 μmol h(-1)  cmgeometric (-2) are achieved using a continuous flow of carrier water operating at 30 % current efficiency. Operation times of more than 24 h have shown consistent H2 O2 and power production, with no degradation of the cobalt catalyst. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Photofragmentation of water and hydrogen sulphide in the first continuum: A critical survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, K.A.

    1987-06-01

    Photofragmentation of H 2 O and H 2 S in the first absorption continuum has been investigated experimentally and theoretically by several authors. The fragmentation dynamics of both molecules are reviewed in this article. While the excited 1 B 1 state in H 2 O is responsible for the first continuum, ambiguity exists in the true nature of the upper state of the first continuum in H 2 S. From the evidence available so far, it is proposed that both in water and hydrogen sulphide, a single state of B 1 symmetry, which is of Rydberg type for short internuclear distances and of valence type for large internuclear distances, is the possible upper state which dissociates to produce the absorption continuum. (author). Refs

  6. Hydrogen production by water-splitting using heat supplied by a high-temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courvoisier, P.; Rastoin, J.; Titiliette, Z.

    1976-01-01

    Some aspects of the use of heat of nuclear origin for the production of hydrogen by water-splitting are considered. General notions pertaining to the yield of chemical cycles are discussed and the heat balance corresponding to two specific processes is evaluated. The possibilities of high temperature reactors, with respect to the coolant temperature levels, are examined from the standpoint of core design and technology of some components. Furthermore, subject to a judicious selection of their characteristics, these reactors can lead to excellent use of nuclear fuel. The coupling of the nuclear reactor with the chemical plant by means of a secondary helium circuit gives rise to the design of an intermediate heat exchanger, which is an important component of the overall installation. (orig.) [de

  7. Hydrogen apparent fractionation between source water and epicuticular waxes of Pinus sylvestris in North East Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, S. L.; Grace, J.; Pedentchouk, N.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogen isotopic composition of plant biomass provides crucial information about plant ecophysiology and local hydrology. Little is known about the apparent fractionation between hydrogen in source water and epicuticular leaf waxes of coniferous tree species that dominate the boreal forest ecosystem exposed to prolonged periods of sunlight during the growing season. In this study, single rope canopy access techniques were used to harvest needle and twig material from the upper, middle and lower crown of north and south facing branches of Pinus sylvestris within the subarctic forest of North East Finland. Samples were collected towards the beginning of the growing season in July and repeated in late September 2010. Leaf and twig waters were extracted cryogenically and analysed for D-enrichment. Individual n-alkanes are currently being quantified and analyzed for 13C/12C and D/H compositions. The molecular and isotopic data are supplemented by long-term in-situ cuvette photosynthetic assimilation measurements as well as relative humidity (RH), air temperature, precipitation and wind speed data collected by Helsinki University (SMEAR I). In addition RH, air temperature, wind speed and incoming solar radiation measurements were made at each individual sample point at the time of harvesting to quantify meteorological and microclimatological variation within individual trees. The outcome of this investigation will provide important insights into plant biochemistry and physiology of a crucial climate sensitive higher plant species subjected to continuous low light throughout the season. Furthermore, this work will expand our understanding of modern and palaeo-hydrology not only in northern Finland but also in other boreal forests around the world.

  8. The deuterium-exchange reaction between water and hydrogen with the thin-film hydrophobic catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hisao; Mizumoto, Mamoru; Matsuda, Shimpei

    1985-01-01

    The deuterium-exchange reaction between water and hydrogen with a hydrophobic catalyst was studied. The hydrophobic catalyst was composed of platinum as an active component and porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) as a support. The PTFE support was in two forms, i.e., (a) a pellet and (b) a thin-film with the thickness of 50 μm. The primary purpose of the thin film hydrophobic catalyst was to reduce the platinum usage in the reactor. The activity of the catalyst was measured in a trickle bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and temperature of 20 ∼ 70 deg C. It has been found that the employment of the thin-film catalyst reduced the platinum usage to 1/5 of the reactor in the case of using a conventional catalyst. Platinum particles on the thin-film catalyst work efficiently because the reactants were easily diffused to the active sites. It has also been found that the isotopic exchange rate with the thin-film catalyst increased with the increase in the ratio of liquid/gas and increased with the rise of the reaction temperature. It was found from an endurance test that the activity of the thin-film catalyst decreased gradually due to the condensation of water vapor in the catalyst, but was regenarated by heating the catalyst to remove the condensed water. (author)

  9. Quantitative separation of the influence of hydrogen bonding of ethanol/water mixture on the shape recovery behavior of polyurethane shape memory polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong; Min Huang, Wei; Fu, Y Q

    2014-01-01

    A thermally responsive polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) can be actuated in water through a hydrogen bonding interaction between water and the SMP. In this work, we present a comprehensive approach to quantify the hydrogen bonding on the shape recovery behavior of a polyurethane SMP. The stimuli response to the hydrogen bonding of the polyurethane SMP was investigated in ethanol/water mixtures by varying the water content. It was found that depending on the water content, the SMP features a critical hydrogen bonding strength associated with its shape recovery behavior. The Hildebrand solubility parameter theory was employed to quantitatively identify and separate the hydrogen bonding effect of the ethanol/water mixture on the shape recovery ratio and the time. Furthermore, a phenomenological model was developed to predict the glass transition temperature and the shape recovery time of a polyurethane SMP and was verified by the available experimental results. (paper)

  10. UO{sub 2} surface oxidation by mixtures of water vapor and hydrogen as a function of temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espriu-Gascon, A., E-mail: alexandra.espriu@upc.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica Catalunya-Barcelona Tech, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Llorca, J.; Domínguez, M. [Institut de Tècniques Energètiques (INTE), Universitat Politècnica Catalunya-Barcelona Tech, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE), Universitat Politècnica Catalunya-Barcelona Tech, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Giménez, J.; Casas, I. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica Catalunya-Barcelona Tech, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pablo, J. de [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica Catalunya-Barcelona Tech, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Plaça de la Ciència 2, E-08243 Manresa (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    In the present work, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was used to study the effect of water vapor on the UO{sub 2} surface as a function of temperature. The experiments were performed in situ inside a high pressure chamber attached to the XPS instrument. UO{sub 2} samples were put in contact with either hydrogen or argon streams, saturated with water at room temperature, and the sample surface evolution was analyzed by XPS. In the case of the water vapor/argon experiments, one experiment at 350 °C was performed and, in the case of the water vapor/hydrogen experiments, the temperatures used inside the reactor were 60, 120, 200 and 350 °C. On one hand, in presence of argon, the results obtained showed that the water vapor in the argon stream oxidized 93% of the U(IV) in the sample surface. On the other hand, the degree of UO{sub 2} surface oxidation showed a different dependence on the temperature in the experiments performed in the presence of hydrogen: the maximum surface oxidation occurred at 120 °C, where 65.4% of U(IV) in the sample surface was oxidized, while at higher temperatures, the surface oxidation decreased. This observation is attributed to the increase of hydrogen reducing effect when temperature increases which prevents part of the oxidation of the UO{sub 2} surface by the water vapor. - Highlights: • UO{sub 2} surface has been oxidized by water vapor in an argon stream at 350 °C. • H{sub 2} reduced more uranium oxidation produced by water at 350 °C when compared to Ar. • In H{sub 2} presence, the uranium oxidation produced by water depends on the temperature.

  11. IGSCC growth behaviors of Alloy 690 in hydrogenated high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arioka, K.; Yamada, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Terachi, T. [INSS, (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    The rate of growth of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was measured for cold worked and thermally treated and solution treated Alloy 690 (UNS N06690, CW TT690, CW ST690) in hydrogenated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water under static load condition. Three important patterns were observed: First, Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was observed on both TT and ST690 even in static load condition if materials were heavily cold worked although the rate of SCC growth was much slower than that of CW mill annealed Alloy 600. Furthermore much rapid SCC growth was recognized in 20% CW TT690 than that of 20% CW ST690. This is quite different result in the literature in high temperature caustic solution. Second, in order to assess the role of creep, rates of creep crack growth were measured in air, argon, and hydrogen gas environments using 20% CW TT690, and 20% CW MA600 in the range of temperatures between 360 and 460 C; intergranular creep cracking (IG creep cracking) was observed on the test materials even in air. Similar slope of 1/T-type temperature dependencies on IGSCC and IG creep crack growth were observed on 20% CW TT690. Similar fracture morphologies and similar 1/T-type temperature dependencies suggest that creep is important in the growth of IGSCC of CW TT690 in high temperature water. Third, cavities and pores were observed at grain boundaries near tips of SCC and creep although the size of the cavities and pores of SCC were much smaller than that of creep cracks. Also the population and size of cavities seem to decrease with decreasing test temperature. These results suggest that the difference in the size and population of cavities might be related with the difference in crack growth rate. And the cavities seem to be formed result from collapse of vacancies at grain boundaries as the crack embryo. This result suggests that diffusion of condensation of vacancies in high stressed fields occurs in high temperature water and gas environments

  12. Supercritical water gasification of landfill leachate for hydrogen production in the presence and absence of alkali catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijin, Gong; Binbin, Li; Qingyu, Wang; Zuohua, Huang; Liang, Zhao

    2018-03-01

    Gasification of landfill leachate in supercritical water using batch-type reactor is investigated. Alkali such as NaOH, KOH, K 2 CO 3 , Na 2 CO 3 is used as catalyst. The effect of temperature (380-500 °C), retention time (5-25 min), landfill leachate concentration (1595 mg L -1 -15,225 mg L -1 ), catalyst adding amount (1-10 wt%) on hydrogen mole fraction, hydrogen yield, carbon gasification rate, COD, TOC, TN removal efficiency are investigated. The results showed that gaseous products mainly contained hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide without addition of catalyst. However, the main gaseous products are hydrogen and methane with addition of NaOH, KOH, K 2 CO 3 , Na 2 CO 3 . In the absence of alkali catalyst, the effect of temperature on landfill leachate gasification is positive. Hydrogen mole fraction, hydrogen yield, carbon gasification ratio increase with temperature, which maximum value being 55.6%, 107.15 mol kg -1 , 71.96% is obtained at 500 °C, respectively. Higher raw landfill leachate concentration leads to lower hydrogen production and carbon gasification rate. The suitable retention time is suggested to be 15 min for higher hydrogen production and carbon gasification rate. COD, TOC and TN removal efficiency also increase with increase of temperature, decrease of landfill leachate concentration. In the presence of catalyst, the hydrogen production is obviously promoted by addition of alkali catalyst. the effect of catalysts on hydrogen production is in the following order: NaOH > KOH > Na 2 CO 3  > K 2 CO 3 . The maximum hydrogen mole fraction and hydrogen yield being 74.40%, 70.05 mol kg -1 is obtained with adding amount of 5 wt% NaOH at 450 °C, 28 MPa, 15 min. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. A two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded water layer in the structure of a cobalt(III) cubane complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ji; Zhai, Xiang-Sheng; Zhu, Hong-Lin; Lin, Jian-Li

    2014-02-01

    A tetranuclear Co(III) oxide complex with cubane topology, tetrakis(2,2'-bipyridine-κ(2)N,N')di-μ2-carbonato-κ(4)O:O'-tetra-μ3-oxido-tetracobalt(III) pentadecahydrate, [Co4(CO3)2O4(C10H8N2)4]·15H2O, with an unbounded hydrogen-bonded water layer, has been synthesized by reaction of CoCO3 and 2,2'-bipyridine. The solvent water molecules form a hydrogen-bonded net with tetrameric and pentameric water clusters as subunits. The Co4O4 cubane-like cores are sandwiched between the water layers, which are further stacked into a three-dimensional metallo-supramolecular network.

  14. The seat of ground water discharge as ore-mabilizing factor in the formatian of hydrogenic uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natal'chenko, B.I.; Gol'dshtejn, R.I.

    1982-01-01

    The role of structural-hydrogeological factor in the process of ore-controlling zoning development during hydrogeneous deposit formation is discussed, as reflecting in the most objective way the spreading of stratal oxidation zones and morphology of uranium mineralization as regards discharge seats because there are only they which mobilize stratal waters for active displacement. The types of discharge seats of stratal waters and their effect on formation of ore-controlling zones of stratal oxidation with uranium mineralization are presented. The conclusion is drawn that local and regional discharge seats of stratal waters dictate both the spacing of regional fronts of stratal-oxidized rocks and their ore content degree. The displacement of discharge seats or their growing into local regions of alimentation results in reorganization of the total ore-controlling zoning, which enables to consider the seats of water discharge as ore-mobilizing structures in the formation of hydrogenic uranium deposits

  15. The production of hydrogen through the use of a 77 wt% Pd 23 wt% Ag membrane water gas shift reactor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, Liberty N

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available stainless steel (PSS) is evaluated for the production of hydrogen and the potential replacement of the current two-stage Water-Gas Shift (WGS) reaction by a single stage reaction. The permeability of a 20 µm Pd–Ag membrane reactor was examined at 320 °C, 380...

  16. Support screening studies on the hydrogenation of levulinic acid to γ‐valerolactone in water using RU catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piskun, Anna; Winkelman, Jozef G M; Tang, Zhenchen; Heeres, Hero Jan

    2016-01-01

    γ-Valerolactone (GVL) has been identified as a sustainable platform chemical for the production of carbon-based chemicals. Here we report a screening study on the hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) to GVL in water using a wide range of ruthenium supported catalysts in a batch set-up (1 wt. % Ru,

  17. Coupling of copper-chloride hybrid thermochemical water splitting cycle with a desalination plant for hydrogen production from nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, Mehmet F.; Dincer, Ibrahim; Naterer, Greg F.; Rosen, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    Energy and environmental concerns have motivated research on clean energy resources. Nuclear energy has the potential to provide a significant share of energy supply without contributing to environmental emissions and climate change. Nuclear energy has been used mainly for electric power generation, but hydrogen production via thermochemical water decomposition provides another pathway for the utilization of nuclear thermal energy. One option for nuclear-based hydrogen production via thermochemical water decomposition uses a copper-chloride (Cu-Cl) cycle. Another societal concern relates to supplies of fresh water. Thus, to avoid causing one problem while solving another, hydrogen could be produced from seawater rather than limited fresh water sources. In this study we analyze a coupling of the Cu-Cl cycle with a desalination plant for hydrogen production from nuclear energy and seawater. Desalination technologies are reviewed comprehensively to determine the most appropriate option for the Cu-Cl cycle and a thermodynamic analysis and several parametric studies of this coupled system are presented for various configurations. (author)

  18. Activation of aqueous hydrogen peroxide for non-catalyzed dihydroperoxidation of ketones by azeotropic removal of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkl Renar, K; Pečar, S; Iskra, J

    2015-09-28

    Cyclic and acyclic ketones were selectively converted to gem-dihydroperoxides in 72-99% yield with 30% aq. hydrogen peroxide by azeotropic distillation of water from the reaction mixture without any catalyst. The reactions were more selective than with 100% H2O2 and due to neutral conditions also less stable products could be obtained.

  19. Multi-saline sample distillation apparatus for hydrogen isotope analyses: design and accuracy. Water-resources investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.A.

    1981-04-01

    A distillation apparatus for saline water samples was designed and tested. Six samples may be distilled simultaneously. The temperature was maintained at 400 degrees C to ensure complete dehydration of the precipitating salts. Consequently, the error in the measured ratio of stable hydrogen isotopes resulting from incomplete dehydration of hydrated salts during distillation was eliminated

  20. Efficacy and tolerability of hydrogen carbonate-rich water for heartburn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, André-Michael; Uebelhack, Ralf; Pohl, Ute

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy and safety of mineral water with a high content of hydrogen carbonate in patients with heartburn. METHODS: This open, single-center, single-arm clinical pilot study enrolled 50 patients, 18-64 years old, who had been suffering from heartburn at least twice a week for at least 3 mo before entering the study. Pharmacological treatment of heartburn was not permitted, and patients with severe organic diseases were excluded. After a run-in period of one week, the participants received 1.5 L of the test water for the following 6 wk; 300 mL with meals t.i.d., the remainder to be drunk throughout the day. During the trial, there were five visits at the study center (screening, baseline, two interim visits and the final visit). The efficacy endpoints included incidence and duration of heartburn episodes per week by patient’s self-assessment (heartburn diary) as well as changes in symptom severity as per symptom specific questionnaires [Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ); Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD); Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index] and overall health-related quality of life per SF-12 (12-question short form) at each visit. At the end of the study, patients and investigators independently rated the overall efficacy of the test water on a 4-point Likert scale. Safety was assessed by evaluation of adverse events (AEs), vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure) and laboratory parameters. Changes from initial to final examinations were assessed by the non-parametric Wilcoxon test; categorical variables were compared using the χ2 test, and for more than 5 categories, by the U-test. RESULTS: Twenty-eight participants were men, 22 women. The mean age of the patients in the full analysis set/intention-to treat population (FAS/ITT) was 40.6 years. Forty-two participants completed the study according to the study protocol and formed the per-protocol set (PP population); 48 participants drank the water at least once as

  1. Process for the separation of deuterium and tritium from water using ammonia and a hydrogen-nitrogen-mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandrin, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    A multistage process for separation of deuterium and tritium from water using ammonia and a hydrogen-nitrogen mixture. In a first stage isotopic exchange takes place between water containing deuterium and tritium, and ammonia depleted in deuterium and tritium. The molar ammonia throughput is chosen to be greater than two third of the molar throughput of water. The advantage of the process consists in the fact that the main product is water almost entirely free from deuterium and tritium. The byproducts are compounds enriched in deuterium and tritium, and nitrogen enriched in N-15

  2. Investigation of Iron Oxide Morphology in a Cyclic Redox Water Splitting Process for Hydrogen Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Bobek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A solar fuels generation research program is focused on hydrogen production by means of reactive metal water splitting in a cyclic iron-based redox process. Iron-based oxides are explored as an intermediary reactive material to dissociate water molecules at significantly reduced thermal energies. With a goal of studying the resulting oxide chemistry and morphology, chemical assistance via CO is used to complete the redox cycle. In order to exploit the unique characteristics of highly reactive materials at the solar reactor scale, a monolithic laboratory scale reactor has been designed to explore the redox cycle at temperatures ranging from 675 to 875 K. Using high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, the oxide morphology and the oxide state are quantified, including spatial distributions. These images show the change of the oxide layers directly after oxidation and after reduction. The findings show a significant non-stoichiometric O/Fe gradient in the atomic ratio following oxidation, which is consistent with a previous kinetics model, and a relatively constant, non-stoichiometric O/Fe atomic ratio following reduction.

  3. Development of styrene divinyl benzene catalyst in isotopic exchange reaction of water and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Teizo; Noda, Shigeyuki; Tan, Tsutomu; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Styrene divinyl benzene copolymer (SDBC) is hydrophobic, and porous with large specific surface area. Utilizing these properties, the SDBC was used for the carrier of catalyst in water-hydrogen exchange reaction process, and the hydrophobic platinum catalyst with very high performance was able to be developed. However, the SDBC is usually fine particles smaller than 1 mm, and is not suitable as the filling catalyst for exchange reaction towers. Therefore, in this study, using only platinum as a catalyst metal, the improvement of the property of carriers was emphatically examined, and platinum bearing was proved with an optical or electron microscope. As the result, it was found that the SDBC catalyst showed high activity practically usable as the hydrophobic catalyst for heavy water or tritium exchange reaction. The characteristics of SDBC are explained. The manufacturing processes of the catalyst by making SDBC carriers with fine particles and letting them bear platinum are described. The results of the trial manufacture of spherical, extrusion-formed and honeycomb carrier catalysts are reported. Platinum must be dispersed over the large specific surface area of SDBC carriers. (Kako, I.)

  4. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Harbor Hospital Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Yong [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Yedidi, Ravikiran S. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dewdney, Tamaria G. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Reiter, Samuel J. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Brunzelle, Joseph S. [Northwestern Univ. Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Kovari, Iulia A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Kovari, Ladislau C. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-12-19

    Success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. Additionally, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  5. Continuous high-temperature surveillance instrumentation for Dresden-2 hydrogen water chemistry program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, M.F.; Mitchell, R.A.; Nelson, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this program (under EPRI Contract RP1930-11) is to install and operate a high-temperature surveillance instrumentation system capable of monitoring the length of cracks in boiling water reactor (BWR) piping during plant operation. The ability to measure crack growth in BWR power plant piping welds is important to rapidly identify the effectiveness of repairs (such as the Hydrogen Water Chemistry Program). The feasibility of a system capable of continuous ultrasonic instrumentation at 600 0 F (288 0 C) was successfully demonstrated at the Dresden-2 suction line known as N1B. This intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) surveillance instrumentation is sound in principal, because it survived on N1B for a time period of more than nine months from April 1985 to January 1986 (the last time data were recorded). The redesigned low-profile transducer system used for this system operated successfully for the same nine-month time period. This low profile transducer fits in the two-inch space normally occupied by insulation. As a result of poor routing of the coaxial cables running from the low-profile transducer to the electrical feed-throughs between the drywell and containment, these cables melted. Other instrument cables nearby were not damaged

  6. Probabilistic consequence assessment of hydrogen sulphide releases from a heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This report is concerned with the evaluation of the consequences to the public of an accidental release of hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) to the atmosphere following a pipe or pressure envelope failure, or some other process upset, at a heavy water plant. It covers the first stage of a programme in which the nature of the problem was analyzed and recommendations made for the implementation of a computer model. The concepts of risk assessment and consequence assessment are discussed and a methodology proposed for combining the various elements of the problem into an overall consequence model. These elements are identified as the 'Initiating Events', 'Route to Receptor' and 'Receptor Response' and each is studied in detail in the report. Such phenomena as the blowdown of H 2 S from a rupture, the initial gas cloud behaviour, atmospheric dispersion and the toxicity of H 2 S and sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) are addressed. Critical factors are identified and modelling requirements specified, with special reference to the Bruce heavy water plant. Finally, an overall model is recommended for implementation at the next stage of the programme, together with detailed terms of reference for the remaining work

  7. Hydrogenated TiO2 nanotube photonic crystals for enhanced photoelectrochemical water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ming; Zhou, Sihua; Yang, Lun; Gan, Zhixing; Liu, Kuili; Tian, Fengshou; Zhu, Yu; Li, ChunYang; Liu, Weifeng; Yuan, Honglei; Zhang, Yan

    2018-04-02

    We report the design, fabrication and characterization of novel TiO 2 nanotube photonic crystals with a crystalline core/disordered shell structure as well as substantial oxygen vacancies for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. The novel TiO 2 nanotube photonic crystals are fabricated by annealing of anodized TiO 2 nanotube photonic crystals in hydrogen atmosphere at various temperatures. The optimized novel TiO 2 nanotube photonic crystals produce a maximal photocurrent density of 2.2 mA cm -2 at 0.22 V versus Ag/AgCl, which is two times higher that of the TiO 2 nanotube photonic crystals annealed in air. Such significant PEC performance improvement can be ascribed to synergistic effects of the disordered surface layer and oxygen vacancies. The reduced band gap owing to the disordered surface layer and localized states induced by oxygen vacancies can enhance the efficient utilization of visible light. In addition, the disordered surface layer and substantial oxygen vacancies can promote the efficiency for separation and transport of the photogenerated carriers. This work may open up new opportunities for the design and construction of the high efficient and low-cost PEC water splitting system.

  8. Investigation of advanced nanostructured multijunction photoanodes for enhanced solar hydrogen generation via water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Hidetaka

    As the worldwide demand for fossil-based fuel increases every day and the fossil reserve continues to be depleted, the need for alternative/renewable energy sources has gained momentum. Electric, hybrid, and hydrogen cars have been at the center of discussion lately among consumers, automobile manufacturers, and politicians, alike. The development of a fuel-cell based engine using hydrogen has been an ambitious research area over the last few decades-ever since Fujishima showed that hydrogen can be generated via the solar-energy driven photo-electrolytic splitting of water. Such solar cells are known as Photo-Electro-Chemical (PEC) solar cells. In order to commercialize this technology, various challenges associated with photo-conversion efficiency, chemical corrosion resistance, and longevity need to be overcome. In general, metal oxide semiconductors such as titanium dioxide (TiO 2, titania) are excellent candidates for PEC solar cells. Titania nanotubes have several advantages, including biocompatibility and higher chemical stability. Nevertheless, they can absorb only 5-7% of the solar spectrum which makes it difficult to achieve the higher photo-conversion efficiency required for successful commercial applications. A two-prong approach was employed to enhance photo-conversion efficiency: 1) surface modification of titania nanotubes using plasma treatment and 2) nano-capping of the titania nanotubes using titanium disilicide. The plasma surface treatment with N2 was found to improve the photo-current efficiency of titania nanotubes by 55%. Similarly, a facile, novel approach of nano-capping titania nanotubes to enhance their photocurrent response was also investigated. Electrochemically anodized titania nanotubes were capped by coating a 25 nm layer of titanium disilicide using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The optical properties of titania nanotubes were not found to change due to the capping; however, a considerable increase (40%) in the photocurrent

  9. Magnetite solubility studies under simulated PWR primary-side conditions, using lithiated, hydrogenated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, John; Morrison, Jonathan; Cooper, Christopher; Ponton, Clive; Connolly, Brian; Dickinson, Shirley; Henshaw, Jim

    2014-01-01

    As software for modelling dissolution, precipitation, and transport of metallic species and subsequent CRUD deposition within nuclear plant becomes more advanced, there is an increasing need for accurate and reliable thermodynamic data. The solubility behaviour of magnetite is an example of such data, and is central to any treatment of CRUD solubility due to the prevalence of magnetite and nickel ferrites in CRUD. Several workers have shown the most consistent solubility data comes from once-through flowing systems. However, despite a strong consensus between the results in acidic to mildly alkaline solutions, there is disagreement between the results at approximately pH 25C 9 and higher. A programme of experimental work is on-going at the University of Birmingham, focusing on solubility of metal oxides (e.g., magnetite) in conditions relevant to PWR primary coolant. One objective of this programme is to calculate thermodynamic constants from the data obtained. Magnetite solubility from 200 to 300°C, in lithiated, hydrogenated water of pH 25C 9–11 is being studied using a once-through rig constructed of 316L stainless steel. The feedwater is pumped at 100 bar pressure through a heated bed of magnetite granules, and the output solution is collected and analysed for iron and several other metals by ICP-MS. This paper presents results from preliminary tests without magnetite granules, in which the corroding surface of the rig itself was used as the sole source of soluble iron and of dissolved hydrogen. Levels of iron were generally within an order of magnitude of literature solubility values. Comparison of results at different flow rates and temperatures, in conjunction with conclusions drawn from the published literature, suggests that this is likely due to the presence of particulate matter in a greatly under-saturated solution, compensating for the low surface area of oxide in contact with the solution. (author)

  10. Alleviation of cadmium toxicity in Medicago sativa by hydrogen-rich water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Weiti; Gao, Cunyi; Fang, Peng [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Lin, Guoqing [Laboratory Center of Life Sciences, Co. Laboratory of Nanjing Agricultural University and Carl Zeiss Far East, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shen, Wenbiao, E-mail: wbshenh@njau.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • HRW can alleviate Cd-induced alfalfa seedling growth inhibition and DNA laddering. • HRW alleviates Cd-induced oxidative stress by activating antioxidant enzymes. • Cd uptake in alfalfa seedling roots was decreased by HRW. • HRW can re-establish glutathione homeostasis under Cd stress. -- Abstract: Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) induces plant tolerance to several abiotic stresses, including salinity and paraquat exposure. However, the role of H{sub 2} in cadmium (Cd)-induced stress amelioration is largely unknown. Here, pretreatment with hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of H{sub 2} in the alleviation of Cd toxicity in alfalfa plants. Our results showed that the addition of HRW at 10% saturation significantly decreased contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) caused by Cd, and inhibited the appearance of Cd toxicity symptoms, including the improvement of root elongation and seedling growth. These responses were related to a significant increase in the total or isozymatic activities of representative antioxidant enzymes, or their corresponding transcripts. In vivo imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the detection of lipid peroxidation and the loss of plasma membrane integrity provided further evidence for the ability of HRW to improve Cd tolerance significantly, which was consistent with a significant enhancement of the ratio of reduced/oxidized (homo)glutathione ((h)GSH). Additionally, plants pretreated with HRW accumulated less amounts of Cd. Together, this study suggested that the usage of HRW could be an effective approach for Cd detoxification and could be explored in agricultural production systems.

  11. Alleviation of cadmium toxicity in Medicago sativa by hydrogen-rich water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Weiti; Gao, Cunyi; Fang, Peng; Lin, Guoqing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • HRW can alleviate Cd-induced alfalfa seedling growth inhibition and DNA laddering. • HRW alleviates Cd-induced oxidative stress by activating antioxidant enzymes. • Cd uptake in alfalfa seedling roots was decreased by HRW. • HRW can re-establish glutathione homeostasis under Cd stress. -- Abstract: Hydrogen gas (H 2 ) induces plant tolerance to several abiotic stresses, including salinity and paraquat exposure. However, the role of H 2 in cadmium (Cd)-induced stress amelioration is largely unknown. Here, pretreatment with hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of H 2 in the alleviation of Cd toxicity in alfalfa plants. Our results showed that the addition of HRW at 10% saturation significantly decreased contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) caused by Cd, and inhibited the appearance of Cd toxicity symptoms, including the improvement of root elongation and seedling growth. These responses were related to a significant increase in the total or isozymatic activities of representative antioxidant enzymes, or their corresponding transcripts. In vivo imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the detection of lipid peroxidation and the loss of plasma membrane integrity provided further evidence for the ability of HRW to improve Cd tolerance significantly, which was consistent with a significant enhancement of the ratio of reduced/oxidized (homo)glutathione ((h)GSH). Additionally, plants pretreated with HRW accumulated less amounts of Cd. Together, this study suggested that the usage of HRW could be an effective approach for Cd detoxification and could be explored in agricultural production systems

  12. Photoelectrochemical study of nanostructured ZnO thin films for hydrogen generation from water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolcott, Abraham; Zhang, Jin Z. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz 1156 High St. Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Smith, Wilson A.; Zhao, Yiping [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Kuykendall, Tevye R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2009-06-23

    Photoelectrochemical cells based on traditional and nanostructured ZnO thin films are investigated for hydrogen generation from water splitting. The ZnO thin films are fabricated using three different deposition geometries: normal pulsed laser deposition, pulsed laser oblique-angle deposition, and electron-beam glancing-angle deposition. The nanostructured films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectroscopy and photoelectrochemical techniques. Normal pulsed laser deposition produces dense thin films with ca. 200 nm grain sizes, while oblique-angle deposition produces nanoplatelets with a fishscale morphology and individual features measuring ca. 900 by 450 nm on average. In contrast, glancing-angle deposition generates a highly porous, interconnected network of spherical nanoparticles of 15-40 nm diameter. Mott-Schottky plots show the flat band potential of pulsed laser deposition, oblique-angle deposition, and glancing-angle deposition samples to be -0.29, -0.28 and +0.20 V, respectively. Generation of photocurrent is observed at anodic potentials and no limiting photocurrents were observed with applied potentials up to 1.3 V for all photoelectrochemical cells. The effective photon-to-hydrogen efficiency is found to be 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.6% for pulsed laser deposition, oblique-angle deposition and glancing-angle deposition samples, respectively. The photoelectrochemical properties of the three types of films are understood to be a function of porosity, crystal defect concentration, charge transport properties and space charge layer characteristics. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Potentials of using mixed culture bacteria incorporated with sodium bicarbonate for hydrogen production from water hyacinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazeri, Alaa; Elsamadony, Mohamed; Roux, Sophie Le; Peu, Pascal; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2018-05-08

    The aim of this study is to assess the potentials of using mixed culture bacteria incorporated with different concentrations of NaHCO 3 for hydrogen production from water hyacinth (WH). The lowest hydrogen yield (HY) of 30.4 ± 1.9 mL/g TVS , H 2 content (HC) of 19.5 ± 1.5% and hydrogenase enzyme (HE) activity of 0.06 ± 0.01 mgM.B reduced /min were registered for the cultures without supplementation of NaHCO 3 . The HY, HC, and HE activity were maximized at levels of 69.2 ± 4.3 mL/g TVS, 58.4 ± 3.6% and 0.18 ± 0.01 mgM.B reduced /min. respectively for the anaerobes supplied with 3.0 g NaHCO 3 /L. Furthermore, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin destruction efficiencies were 37.2 ± 2.3, 30.0 ± 1.9 and 20.9 ± 1.3% respectively due to the increase of cellulase and xylanase activities up to 2.73 ± 0.17 and 1.87 ± 0.12 U/mL, respectively. Moreover, the abundance of Firmicutes was substantially increased and accounted for 71% of the total OTU's. Microbes belonging to the order Clostridiales and OPB54 were particularly enriched in the medium supplemented with NaHCO 3 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Proton transfer through hydrogen bonds in two-dimensional water layers: A theoretical study based on ab initio and quantum-classical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of proton transfer (PT) through hydrogen bonds in a two-dimensional water layer confined between two graphene sheets at room temperature are investigated through ab initio and quantum-classical simulations. The excess proton is found to be mostly solvated as an Eigen cation where the hydronium ion donates three hydrogen bonds to the neighboring water molecules. In the solvation shell of the hydronium ion, the three coordinated water molecules with two donor hydrogen bonds are found to be properly presolvated to accept a proton. Although no hydrogen bond needs to be broken for transfer of a proton to such presolvated water molecules from the hydronium ion, the PT rate is still found to be not as fast as it is for one-dimensional chains. Here, the PT is slowed down as the probability of finding a water with two donor hydrogen bonds in the solvation shell of the hydronium ion is found to be only 25%-30%. The hydroxide ion is found to be solvated mainly as a complex anion where it accepts four H-bonds through its oxygen atom and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxide ion remains free all the time. Here, the presolvation of the hydroxide ion to accept a proton requires that one of its hydrogen bonds is broken and the proton comes from a neighboring water molecule with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds. The coordination number reduction by breaking of a hydrogen bond is a slow process, and also the population of water molecules with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds is only 20%-25% of the total number of water molecules. All these factors together tend to slow down the hydroxide ion migration rate in two-dimensional water layers compared to that in three-dimensional bulk water

  15. Hydrogen production by water dissociation from a nuclear reactor; Production d'hydrogene par dissociation de l'eau a partir d'un reacteur nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This memento presents the production of hydrogen by water decomposition, the energy needed for the electrolysis, the thermochemical cycles for a decomposition at low temperature and the possible nuclear reactors associated. (A.L.B.)

  16. Multiple bandgap combination of thin film photovoltaic cells and a photoanode for efficient hydrogen and oxygen generation by water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avachat, Upendra S.; Jahagirdar, Anant H.; Dhere, Neelkanth G. [Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), University of Central Florida 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL, 32922-5703 (United States)

    2006-09-22

    The objective of this research is to develop cheaper and more efficient photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells for the production of highly pure hydrogen and oxygen by water splitting. FSEC PV Materials Lab has developed PEC set up consisting of two thin film photovoltaic (PV) cells, a RuS{sub 2} photoanode for efficient oxygen evolution and a platinum cathode for hydrogen evolution. A p-type transparent-conducting layer is prepared at the back of PV cell to transmit unabsorbed infrared photons onto the photoanode for efficient oxygen evolution. This paper presents the preparation and characterization of p- type ZnTe:Cu transparent conducting back layer and PEC cell. (author)

  17. Study on the interaction of lithium orthosilicate with water vapor and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, S.

    1994-09-01

    The present work discusses the adsorption of H 2 O(g) as well as the reactions of D 2 O(g) and D 2 (g) with lithium orthosilicate (Li 4 SiO 4 ), a potential tritium breeding ceramic for future fusion reactors. An apparatus was constructed which permits H 2 O partial pressures as low as 1 μbar to be generated and subsequently measured with high accuracy and precision. Using the frontal analysis of gas chromatography, adsorption isotherms were determined at temperatures and water vapor pressures ranging from 653 to 1093 K and 1 to 10 μbar, respectively. Based upon the data, the tritium inventory at the surface of Li 4 SiO 4 (cr) can be estimated as function of temperature and water vapor concentration in the purge gas of a solid breeder blanket. The reactions of lithium orthosilicate with deuterium oxide and deuterium were studied at high temperature (1160 - 1420K) by means of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. In both cases the production of lithium hydroxide and the establishment of an equilibrium between LiOD(g) and D 2 O(g) were observed; D 2 O is derived from oxidation of deuterium, presumably under formation of a reduced surface layer. Equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies were computed for the reaction of Li 4 SiO 4 (cr) with D 2 O(g). In addition, the vapor pressure of LiOD(g) above Li 4 SiO 4 (cr) was determined as function of temperature and deuterium oxide pressure. Further experiments with lithium orthosilicate were carried out under flowing hydrogen in order to analyze the effects of temperature, H 2 -concentration, gas flow, sample size and sample pretreatment on the formation of water vapor. The results confirm the mass spectrometric findings mentioned above. (orig.) [de

  18. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen and power production by supercritical water reforming of glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galera, S.; Gutiérrez Ortiz, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The environmental performance of the supercritical water reforming (SCWR) of glycerol was assessed. • Biogenic CO 2 emissions allowed quantifying a realistic GHG inventory of 3.8 kg CO 2 -eq/kg H 2 . • The environmental profile of SCWR process was compared to those of other technologies. • A good environmental performance of H 2 and power production by SCWR of glycerol was obtained. - Abstract: The environmental performance of hydrogen and electricity production by supercritical water reforming (SCWR) of glycerol was evaluated following a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach. The heat-integrated process was designed to be energy self-sufficient. Mass and energy balances needed for the study were performed using Aspen Plus 8.4, and the environmental assessment was carried out through SimaPro 8.0. CML 2000 was selected as the life cycle impact assessment method, considering as impact categories the global warming, ozone layer depletion, abiotic depletion, photochemical oxidant formation, eutrophication, acidification, and cumulative energy demand. A distinction between biogenic and fossil CO 2 emissions was done to quantify a more realistic GHG inventory of 3.77 kg CO 2 -eq per kg H 2 produced. Additionally, the environmental profile of SCWR process was compared to other H 2 production technologies such as steam methane reforming, carbon gasification, water electrolysis and dark fermentation among others. This way, it is shown that SCWR of glycerol allows reducing greenhouse gas emissions and obtaining a favorable positive life cycle energy balance, achieving a good environmental performance of H 2 and power production by SCWR of glycerol

  19. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the US Geological Survey's continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta 2 H (δ 2 H) and as delta 18 O (δ 18 O), respectively. The values of δ 2 H and δ 18 O in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respectively. The values of δ 2 H and δ 18 O in water from the 38 ground-water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively

  20. Environmental Fatigue Behaviors of CF8M Stainless Steel in 310 .deg. C Deoxygenated Water - Effects of Hydrogen and Microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hun; Cho, Pyungyeon; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Soon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    The effects of environment and microstructure on low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviors of CF8M stainless steels containing 11% of ferrites were investigated in a 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water environment. The reduction of LCF life of CF8M in a 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water was smaller than 316LN stainless steels. Based on the microstructure and fatigue surface analyses, it was confirmed that the hydrogen induced cracking contributed to the reduction in LCF life for CF8M as well as for 316LN. However, many secondary cracks were found on the boundaries of ferrite phases in CF8M, which effectively reduced the stress concentration at the crack tip. Because of the reduced stress concentration, the accelerated fatigue crack growth by hydrogen induced cracking was less significant, which resulted in the smaller environmental effects for CF8M than 316LN in a 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water.

  1. Early hydrogen water chemistry project review, improvement opportunities and conceptural design options at Exelon boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Odell, Andrew D.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2012-09-01

    Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) and its impacts have been a major concern to the BWR fleet since the mid-70's. Several alternative strategies have been employed to reduce the negative impacts, however, the newest being Early Hydrogen Water Chemistry (EHWC). The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the BWRVIP (Vessel Internals Project) has strongly supported the development of EHWC, including laboratory testing and a demonstration program that was performed at Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station in October 2011. This paper will review the impacts of a 'Special Test Program' on a BWR plant including: Project management findings; technical reviews and documents required to support such a demonstration program; temporary equipment design, installation and testing; keeping the demonstration progressing along with the plant return from a refuel outage; and lessons learned that can be applied to EHWC implementation during future start-ups. Details will be compared between various Exelon BWRs in support of conceptual designs for EHWC systems and operation. Some comparisons on operational impacts will be provided between various types of BWR plants with differing 'Balance of Plant' designs. (authors)

  2. Reactions of plutonium dioxide with water and oxygen-hydrogen mixtures: Mechanisms for corrosion of uranium and plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, John M.; Allen, Thomas H.; Morales, Luis A.

    1999-06-18

    Investigation of the interactions of plutonium dioxide with water vapor and with an oxygen-hydrogen mixture show that the oxide is both chemically reactive and catalytically active. Correspondence of the chemical behavior with that for oxidation of uranium in moist air suggests that similar catalytic processes participate in the mechanism of moisture-enhanced corrosion of uranium and plutonium. Evaluation of chemical and kinetic data for corrosion of the metals leads to a comprehensive mechanism for corrosion in dry air, water vapor, and moist air. Results are applied in confirming that the corrosion rate of Pu in water vapor decreases sharply between 100 and 200 degrees C.

  3. Radiation Effects in Hydrogen-Laden Porous Water Ice Films: Implications for Interstellar Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Ujjwal; Baragiola, Raul; Mitchell, Emma; Shi, Jianming

    H _{2} molar remains trapped in the ice even upon removal of ambient gas-phase H _{2}, and is stable to 170 K, where the ice film desorbs. We will describe the dependence of net loss of adsorbed hydrogen on important parameters such as ice film thickness and the ratio of ion flux (f) to H _{2} flux (F _{H}). Both fluxes are higher by orders of magnitude than interstellar values. However, the information obtained from these experiments, especially the behavior in the limit of low flux (f Journal, 1983. 275: p. 391-404. 3.Shi, J., B.D. Teolis, and R.A. Baragiola, Irradiation-enhanced adsorption and trapping of O2 on nanoporous water ice. Physical Review B, 2009. 79(23): p. 235422. 4.Raut, U., et al., Compaction of microporous amorphous solid water by ion irradiation. Journal of Chemical Physics, 2007. 126(24): p. 244511.

  4. Research and application of multi-hydrogen acidizing technology of low-permeability reservoirs for increasing water injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Mengmeng; Che, Hang; Kong, Weizhong; Wang, Peng; Liu, Bingxiao; Xu, Zhengdong; Wang, Xiaochao; Long, Changjun; Zhang, Bin; Wu, Youmei

    2017-12-01

    The physical characteristics of Xiliu 10 Block reservoir is poor, it has strong reservoir inhomogeneity between layers and high kaolinite content of the reservoir, the scaling trend of fluid is serious, causing high block injection well pressure and difficulty in achieving injection requirements. In the past acidizing process, the reaction speed with mineral is fast, the effective distance is shorter and It is also easier to lead to secondary sedimentation in conventional mud acid system. On this point, we raised multi-hydrogen acid technology, multi-hydrogen acid release hydrogen ions by multistage ionization which could react with pore blockage, fillings and skeletal effects with less secondary pollution. Multi-hydrogen acid system has advantages as moderate speed, deep penetration, clay low corrosion rate, wet water and restrains precipitation, etc. It can reach the goal of plug removal in deep stratum. The field application result shows that multi-hydrogen acid plug removal method has good effects on application in low permeability reservoir in Block Xiliu 10.

  5. Reactive radical-driven bacterial inactivation by hydrogen-peroxide-enhanced plasma-activated-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songjie; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    The combined effects of plasma activated water (PAW) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), PAW/HP, in sterilization were investigated in this study. To assess the synergistic effects of PAW/HP, S. aureus was selected as the test microorganism to determine the inactivation efficacy. Also, the DNA/RNA and proteins released by the bacterial suspensions under different conditions were examined to confirm membrane integrity. Additionally, the intracellular pH (pHi) of S. aureus was measured in our study. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was employed to identify the presence of radicals. Finally, the oxidation reduction potential (ORP), conductivity and pH were measured. Our results revealed that the inactivation efficacy of PAW/HP is much greater than that of PAW, while increased H2O2 concentration result in higher inactivation potential. More importantly, as compared with PAW, the much stronger intensity ESR signals and higher ORP in PAW/HP suggests that the inactivation mechanism of the synergistic effects of PAW/HP: more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), especially OH and NO radicals, are generated in PAW combined with H2O2 resulting in more deaths of the bacteria.

  6. Probabilistic consequence assessment of hydrogen sulphide releases from a heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report is the second in a series concerned with the evaluation of the consequences to the public of an accidental release of hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) to the atmosphere following a pipe or pressure envelope failure, or some other process upset, at a heavy water plant. It consists of documentation of the code GASPROB, which has been developed to provide consequence probabilities for a range of postulated releases. The code includes mathematical simulations of initial gas behaviour upon release to the atmosphere, such as gravitational settling of a cold release and the rise of jets and flares, subsequent atmospheric dispersion under a range of weather conditions, and the toxic effects on the exposed population. The code makes use of the site-specific dispersion climatology, topography and population distribution, as well as the probabilistic lethal dose data for the released gas. Output for a given postulated release can be provided in terms of the concentration of the gas at ground level around the point of release, projected numbers of fatalities within specified areas and the projected total fatalities regardless of location. This report includes a general description of GASPROB, and specifics of the code structure, the function of each subroutine, input and output data, and the permanent data files established. Three appendices to the report contain a complete code listing, detailed subroutine descriptions and a sample output

  7. A high precision mass spectrometer for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.; Prahallada Rao, B.S.; Handu, V.K.; Satam, J.V.

    1979-01-01

    A high precision mass spectrometer with two ion collector assemblies and direct on line reduction facility (with uranium at 700 0 C) for water samples for hydrogen isotopic analysis has been designed and developed. The ion source particularly gives high sensitivity and at the same tike limits the H 3 + ions to a minimum. A digital ratiometer with a H 2 + compensator has also been developed. The overall precision obtained on the spectrometer is 0.07% 2sub(sigmasub(10)) value. Typical results on the performance of the spectrometer, which is working since a year and a half are given. Possible methods of extending the ranges of concentration the spectrometer can handle, both on lower and higher sides are discussed. Problems of memory between samples are briefly listed. A multiple inlet system to overcome these problems is suggested. This will also enable faster analysis when samples of highly varying concentrations are to be analyzed. A few probable areas in which the spectrometer will be shortly put to use are given. (auth.)

  8. Influence of dissolved hydrogen on oxide film and PWSCC of Alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Totsuka, Nobuo; Nakajima, Nobuo [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    In order to investigate the influence of dissolved hydrogen (DH) on the corrosion behavior and PWSCC of Alloy 600 in primary water of PWR under actual operating temperature range, we carried out electrochemical polarization measurement, repassivation test, analysis of the oxide film on the alloy by AES, XPS and PWSCC test. In all cases, the content of DH was changed from 0 to 45 cc/kgH{sub 2}O. The anodic polarization curve reveals that the peak current density increases with increasing DH. The result of the repassivation test shows that the repassivation rate decreases with increasing DH, and the changes of the above two become larger between 11 and 22 cc/kgH{sub 2}O of DH. According to the results of oxide film analysis, it is seen that the oxide films formed below 11 cc/kgH{sub 2}O of DH are relatively thick and rich in Ni, but those formed at higher DH contents are relatively thin and rich in Cr and Fe. The susceptibility of the alloy to PWSCC has a peak at 11 cc/kgH{sub 2}O of DH, which reveals that the property of the oxide film may play important role in PWSCC of alloy. (author)

  9. Advanced gasifier and water gas shift technologies for low cost coal conversion to high hydrogen syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Andrew Kramer [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and team members RTI International (RTI), Coanda Research and Development, and Nexant, are developing and maturing a portfolio of technologies to meet the United States Department of Energy (DOE) goals for lowering the cost of producing high hydrogen syngas from coal for use in carbon capture power and coal-to-liquids/chemicals. This project matured an advanced pilot-scale gasifier, with scalable and commercially traceable components, to readiness for use in a first-of-a-kind commercially-relevant demonstration plant on the scale of 500-1,000 tons per day (TPD). This was accomplished through cold flow simulation of the gasifier quench zone transition region at Coanda and through an extensive hotfire gasifier test program on highly reactive coal and high ash/high ash fusion temperature coals at GTI. RTI matured an advanced water gas shift process and catalyst to readiness for testing at pilot plant scale through catalyst development and testing, and development of a preliminary design basis for a pilot scale reactor demonstrating the catalyst. A techno-economic analysis was performed by Nexant to assess the potential benefits of the gasifier and catalyst technologies in the context of power production and methanol production. This analysis showed an 18%reduction in cost of power and a 19%reduction in cost of methanol relative to DOE reference baseline cases.

  10. Effect of soluble zinc additions on the SCC performance of nickel alloys in deaerated hydrogenated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, D.S.; Thompson, C.D.; Gladding, D.; Schurman, M.K.

    1997-08-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth rates (SCCGR) of alloy 600, EN82H and X-750 were measured in deaerated hydrogenated water to determine if soluble zinc mitigates SCCGR. Constant load compact tension specimen tests were conducted. Two test strategies were used to discern a possible zinc effect. The first strategy employed separate SCCGR tests in zinc and non-zinc environments and compared the resulting crack growth rates. The second strategy varied zinc levels at the midterm of single specimen SCCGR tests and characterized the resulting crack growth rate effect through an electrical potential drop in-situ crack monitor. Results from the direct comparison and midterm changing chemistry tests did not discern a zinc influence; any apparent zinc influence is within test to test variability (∼1.5x change in crack growth rate). AEM, AUGER and ESCA crack tip fracture surface studies identified that zinc was not incorporated within crack tip oxides. These studies identified nickel rich crack tip oxides and spinel, with incorporated zinc, (∼5 atom percent) bulk surface oxides

  11. Feasibility of the hydrogen sulfide test for the assessment of drinking water quality in post-earthquake Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weppelmann, Thomas A; Alam, Meer T; Widmer, Jocelyn; Morrissey, David; Rashid, Mohammed H; De Rochars, Valery M Beau; Morris, J Glenn; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A

    2014-12-01

    In 2010, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti, severely damaging the drinking and wastewater infrastructure and leaving millions homeless. Compounding this problem, the introduction of Vibrio cholerae resulted in a massive cholera outbreak that infected over 700,000 people and threatened the safety of Haiti's drinking water. To mitigate this public health crisis, non-government organizations installed thousands of wells to provide communities with safe drinking water. However, despite increased access, Haiti currently lacks the monitoring capacity to assure the microbial safety of any of its water resources. For these reasons, this study was designed to assess the feasibility of using a simple, low-cost method to detect indicators of fecal contamination of drinking water that could be implemented at the community level. Water samples from 358 sources of drinking water in the Léogâne flood basin were screened with a commercially available hydrogen sulfide test and a standard membrane method for the enumeration of thermotolerant coliforms. When compared with the gold standard method, the hydrogen sulfide test had a sensitivity of 65 % and a specificity of 93 %. While the sensitivity of the assay increased at higher fecal coliform concentrations, it never exceeded 88 %, even with fecal coliform concentrations greater than 100 colony-forming units per 100 ml. While its simplicity makes the hydrogen sulfide test attractive for assessing water quality in low-resource settings, the low sensitivity raises concerns about its use as the sole indicator of the presence or absence of fecal coliforms in individual or community water sources.

  12. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  13. Hydrogen-rich water affected blood alkalinity in physically active men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojic, Sergej M; Stojanovic, Marko D

    2014-01-01

    Possible appliance of effective and safe alkalizing agent in the treatment of metabolic acidosis could be of particular interest to humans experiencing an increase in plasma acidity, such as exercise-induced acidosis. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the daily oral intake of 2L of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) for 14 days would increase arterial blood alkalinity at baseline and post-exercise as compared with the placebo. This study was a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 52 presumably healthy physically active male volunteers. Twenty-six participants received HRW and 26 a placebo (tap water) for 14 days. Arterial blood pH, partial pressure for carbon dioxide (pCO2), and bicarbonates were measured at baseline and postexercise at the start (day 0) and at the end of the intervention period (day 14). Intake of HRW significantly increased fasting arterial blood pH by 0.04 (95% confidence interval; 0.01 - 0.08; p < 0.001), and postexercise pH by 0.07 (95% confidence interval; 0.01 - 0.10; p = 0.03) after 14 days of intervention. Fasting bicarbonates were significantly higher in the HRW trial after the administration regimen as compared with the preadministration (30.5 ± 1.9 mEq/L vs. 28.3 ± 2.3 mEq/L; p < 0.0001). No volunteers withdrew before the end of the study, and no participant reported any vexatious side effects of supplementation. These results support the hypothesis that HRW administration is safe and may have an alkalizing effect in young physically active men.

  14. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26798423

  15. Polygeneration microgrids: A viable solution in remote areas for supplying power, potable water and hydrogen as transportation fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriakarakos, George; Dounis, Anastasios I.; Rozakis, Stelios; Arvanitis, Konstantinos G.; Papadakis, George

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Polygeneration of power, hydrogen and potable water through desalination in remote areas. → Particle Swarm Optimization for the design of Polygeneration microgrid design with TRNSYS, GenOpt and TRNOPT. → Economic evaluation with Monte Carlo simulation for the calculation of NPV distribution. → Polygeneration microgrids are technically feasible and most likely financially profitable. -- Abstract: This paper presents the concept and the design of a hybrid renewable energy polygeneration microgrid along with its technical and economical evaluation. The energy of the sun and the wind is harvested by photovoltaics and a wind turbine. Besides that, the components of the microgrid include a battery bank, a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, a PEM electrolyzer, a metal hydride tank, a reverse osmosis desalination unit using energy recovery and a control system. The microgrid covers the electricity, transport and water needs and thus its products are power, hydrogen as transportation fuel and potable water through desalination. Hydrogen and the desalinated water also act as medium to long term seasonal storage. A design tool based on TRNSYS 16, GenOpt 2.0 and TRNOPT was developed using Particle Swarm Optimization method. The economic evaluation of the concept was based on the discounting cash flow approach. The Monte Carlo Simulation method was used in order to take uncertainty into account. A technically feasible polygeneration microgrid adapted to a small island is financially profitable with a probability of 90% for the present and 100% at the medium term.

  16. Effects of temperature on SCC propagation in high temperature water injected with hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Sato, Tomonori; Kato, Chiaki; Yoshiyuki, Kaji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Tsukada, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    To understand the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) in the boiling water reactor (BWR) coolant environment, it is significant to investigate the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) produced by the radiolysis of water on SCC under the various water chemistry and operational conditions. At the start-up or shut-down periods, for example, the conditions of radiation and temperature on the structural materials are different from those during the plant normal operation, and may be influencing on SCC behaviour. Therefore, the effect of temperature on SCC in high temperature water injected with H 2 O 2 was evaluated by SCC propagation test at the present study. Oxide films on the metal surface in crack were examined and the thermal equilibrium diagram was calculated to estimate the environmental situation in the crack. On the thermally sensitized type 304 SS, crack growth tests were conducted in high temperature water injected with H 2 O 2 to simulate water radiolysis in the core. Small CT type specimens with a width of 15.5 mm and thickness of 6.2 mm were machined from the sensitized SS. SCC growth tests were conducted in high temperature water injected with 100 ppb H 2 O 2 at 453 and 561 K. To minimize H 2 O 2 decomposition by a contact with metal surface of autoclave, the CT specimen was isolated from inner surface of the autoclave by the inner modules made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and PTFE lining was also used for the inner surface of inlet and sampling tubes. Base on the measurement of sampled water, it was confirmed that 80-90 % of injected H 2 O 2 remained around the CT specimen in autoclave. Constant load at initial K levels of 11-20 MPam 1/2 was applied to the CT specimens during crack growth tests. After crack growth tests, CT specimens were split into two pieces on the plane of crack propagation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination and laser Raman spectroscopy for outer oxide layer of oxide

  17. Efficiency of the sulfur–iodine thermochemical water splitting process for hydrogen production based on ADS (accelerator driven system)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García, Lázaro; González, Daniel; García, Carlos; García, Laura; Brayner, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The current hydrogen production is based on fossil fuels; they have a huge contribution to the atmosphere's pollution. Thermochemical water splitting cycles don't present this issue because the required process heat is obtained from nuclear energy and therefore, the environmental impact is smaller than using conventional fuels. Although, solar hydrogen production could be also used for practical applications because it's lower environmental impact. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantities of hydrogen in an efficient way using nuclear energy is the sulfur–iodine (S–I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. The nuclear source proposed in this paper is a pebble bed gas cooled transmutation facility. Pebble bed very high temperature advanced systems have great perspectives to assume the future nuclear energy. Softwares based on CPS (chemical process simulation) can be used to simulate the thermochemical water splitting sulfur-iodine cycle for hydrogen production. In this paper, a model for analyzing the sulfur-iodine process sensibility respect to the thermodynamics parameters: temperature, pressure and mass flow is developed. Efficiency is also calculated and the influence of different parameters on this value. The behavior of the proposed model for different values of initial reactant's flow, is analyzed. - Highlights: • Chemical Process Simulation (CPS) of the complete sulfur iodine cycle. • Conceptual design of an accelerator driven system for hydrogen production. • Radial and axial temperature profile for the end of stationary cycle (EOC). • Thermal stability of the sulfuric and hydriodic acid sections determination. • Sulfur iodine cycle efficiency analyses for different heat flow from the ADS

  18. Experimental investigation of hydrogen energy share improvement in a compression ignition engine using water injection and compression ratio reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintala, V.; Subramanian, K.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy efficiency (EE) increased with increase in hydrogen (H_2) energy share. • H_2 energy share increased from 19% to 79% with combined CR reduction and water. • In-cylinder temperature decreased significantly with water addition and CR reduction. • HC, CO, smoke and NO_x emissions with water and CR are lower than base diesel. - Abstract: This study deals with the effect of water addition on enhancement of maximum hydrogen energy share in a compression ignition engine (7.4 kW rated power at 1500 rpm) under dual fuel mode. The specific water consumption (SWC) was varied from 130 to 480 g/kW h in step of 70 g/kW h using manifold and port injection methods. Subsequently, the combined effect of reduction of compression ratio (CR) of the engine (from 19.5:1 (base) to 16.5:1 and 15.4:1) along with water addition on further enhancement of hydrogen energy share is investigated. The hydrogen energy share was limited to 18.8% with conventional dual fuel mode due to knocking. However, the energy share increased to 66.5% with water addition (maximum SWC: 480 g/kW h), and 79% with combined control strategies (SWC of 340 g/kW h and CR reduction to 16.5:1). Thermal efficiency of the engine under water added dual fuel mode is higher than base diesel mode (single fuel mode), but it is lower than the conventional dual fuel mode without water. The efficiency of the engine with reduced CR and water addition is lower than the conventional dual fuel mode, however at the CR of 16.5:1 and SWC of 340 g/kW h, the efficiency is comparable with base diesel mode efficiency. Hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, smoke, and oxides of nitrogen emissions of the engine with water addition (340 g/kW h) and CR reduction (to 16.5:1) decreased significantly as compared to base diesel mode, but slightly higher than conventional dual fuel mode.

  19. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from water/methanol decomposition using Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alenzi, Naser; Ehlig-Economides, Christine [Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Liao, Wei-Ssu; Cremer, Paul S. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Sanchez-Torres, Viviana; Cheng, Zhengdong [Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Wood, Thomas K. [Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Biology, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3258 (United States); Zachry Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 3136 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Though less frequently studied for solar-hydrogen production, films are more convenient to use than powders and can be easily recycled. Anatase TiO{sub 2} films decorated with Ag nanoparticles are synthesized by a rapid, simple, and inexpensive method. They are used to cleave water to produce H{sub 2} under UV light in the presence of methanol as a hole scavenger. A simple and sensitive method is established here to monitor the time course of hydrogen production for ultralow amounts of TiO{sub 2}. The average hydrogen production rate of Ag/TiO{sub 2} anatase films is 147.9 {+-} 35.5 {mu}mol/h/g. Without silver, it decreases dramatically to 4.65 {+-} 0.39 {mu}mol/h/g for anatase TiO{sub 2} films and to 0.46 {+-} 0.66 {mu}mol/h/g for amorphous TiO{sub 2} films fabricated at room temperature. Our method can be used as a high through-put screening process in search of high efficiency heterogeneous photocatalysts for solar-hydrogen production from water-splitting. (author)

  20. Diffusion of helium and estimated diffusion coefficients of hydrogen dissolved in water-saturated, compacted Ca-montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashihara, Tomohiro; Sato, Seichi; Ohashi, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Teppei

    2001-01-01

    The diffusion coefficients of hydrogen gas dissolved in water-saturated, compacted montmorillonite are required to estimate the performance of bentonite buffer materials for geological disposal of nuclear waste. As part of the effort to determine the diffusion coefficients, the diffusion coefficients of helium in water-saturated, compacted calcium montmorillonite (Ca-montmorillonite) were determined as a function of dry density, 0.78 to 1.37x10 3 kg m -3 , by a transient diffusion method. The diffusion coefficients were from 8.3x10 -10 m 2 s -1 at 0.78x10 3 kgm -3 to 2.8x10 -10 m 2 s -1 at 1.37x10 3 kgm -3 . The data obtained by this diffusion experiment of helium were highly reproducible. The diffusion coefficients of helium in Ca-montmorillonite were somewhat larger than those previously obtained for helium in sodium montmorillonite (Na-montmorillonite). The diffusion coefficients of hydrogen gas in the montmorillonites were roughly estimated using the diffusion coefficients of helium. These estimates were based on assumptions that both helium and hydrogen molecules are non-adsorptive and that the geometric factors in the compacted montmorillonites are approximately the same for diffusion of helium and diffusion of hydrogen. (author)

  1. Hydrazine and hydrogen coinjection to mitigate stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in boiling water reactors (7). Effects of bulk water chemistry on ECP distribution inside a crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yoichi; Ishida, Kazushige; Tachibana, Masahiko; Aizawa, Motohiro; Fuse, Motomasa

    2007-01-01

    Water chemistry in a simulated crack (crack) has been studied to understand the mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking in a boiling water reactor environment. Electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) in a crack made in an austenite type 304 stainless steel specimen was measured. The ECP distribution along the simulated crack was strongly affected by bulk water chemistry and bulk flow. When oxygen concentration was high in the bulk water, the potential difference between the crack tip and the outside of the crack (ΔE), which must be one motive force for crack growth, was about 0.3V under a stagnant condition. When oxygen was removed from the bulk water, ECP inside and outside the crack became low and uniform and ΔE became small. The outside ECP was also lowered by depositing platinum on the steel specimen surface and adding stoichiometrically excess hydrogen to oxygen to lower ΔE. This was effective only when bulk water did not flow. Under the bulk water flow condition, water-borne oxygen caused an increase in ECP on the untreated surface inside the crack. This also caused a large ΔE. The ΔE effect was confirmed by crack growth rate measurements with a catalyst-treated specimen. Therefore, lowering the bulk oxidant concentration by such measures as hydrazine hydrogen coinjection, which is currently under development, is important for suppressing the crack growth. (author)

  2. Phenomenology of deflagration and detonation of hydrogen-air mixtures in water cooled nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, G.

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes fundamentals of the flammability of the hydrogen-air mixtures and hydrogen-air containing added steam or other inerting agent. The flammability behaviour of such gaseous mixtures is described with reference to physical and chemical conditions close enough to those expected in the containment of a nuclear reactor during a LOCA

  3. Calculation of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure at finite temperatures: Spectral signatures of hydrogen bond breaking in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetenyi, Balazs; De Angelis, Filippo; Giannozzi, Paolo; Car, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure of H 2 O in the gas, hexagonal ice, and liquid phases using heuristic density-functional based methods. We present a detailed comparison of our results with experiment. The differences between the ice and water spectra can be rationalized in terms of the breaking of hydrogen bonds around the absorbing molecule. In particular the increase in the pre-edge absorption feature from ice to water is shown to be due to the breaking of a donor hydrogen bond. We also find that in water approximately 19% of hydrogen bonds are broken

  4. Water-Protein Hydrogen Exchange in the Micro-Crystalline Protein Crh as Observed by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeckmann, Anja; Juy, Michel; Bettler, Emmanuel; Emsley, Lyndon; Galinier, Anne; Penin, Francois; Lesage, Anne

    2005-01-01

    We report site-resolved observation of hydrogen exchange in the micro-crystalline protein Crh. Our approach is based on the use of proton T 2 ' -selective 1 H- 13 C- 13 C correlation spectra for site-specific assignments of carbons nearby labile protein protons. We compare the proton T 2 ' selective scheme to frequency selective water observation in deuterated proteins, and discuss the impacts of deuteration on 13 C linewidths in Crh. We observe that in micro-crystalline proteins, solvent accessible hydroxyl and amino protons show comparable exchange rates with water protons as for proteins in solution, and that structural constraints, such as hydrogen bonding or solvent accessibility, more significantly reduce exchange rates

  5. Influence of hydrogen peroxide in drinking water on diazepam pharmacokinetics in chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaareb J. Mousa

    Full Text Available Aim: Stressful conditions affect drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. This study examines the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in drinking water on the pharmacokinetics of diazepam in a chick model of oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: Day old chicks were either provided with plane tap water (control group or H2O2 in tap water as 0.5% v/v drinking solution for two weeks in order to produce oxidative stress. On treatment days 7–14, the chicks were treated with a sedative dose of diazepam at 10 mg/kg, intramuscularly. Blood samples were obtained from chicks (5/each sampling time at times of between 0.17 to 4 h. The concentrations of diazepam in the plasma were determined by an HPLC method with UV-detector. Pharmacokinetic parameters of diazepam were calculated from the mean drug concentrations in the plasma by a non-compartmental analysis using a Windows-based computer program. Results: Injection of diazepam resulted in the appearance of the drug in the plasma of control and H2O2 -treated chicks at mean concentrations ranging between 0.11 to 0.444 and 0.131 to 0.535 μg/ml, respectively when measured between 0.17 to 4 h after administration. Diazepam concentrations of the H O -treated chicks were significantly higher than those of the control group at the sampling times 0.5, 0.75, 1 and 4 h. The highest concentration of diazepam in the plasma of both the control and H2O2 treated chicks occurred one h after the injection. The elimination half-life, mean residence time, maximum plasma concentration, area under the moment curve and area under plasma concentration-time curve in the H2O2 -treated chicks were higher than those of the control group by 35, 28, 23, 91 and 49%, respectively. Correspondingly, the steady state volume of distribution, elimination rate constant and total body clearance in the H2O2 -treated chicks decreased from those of the respective control values by 15, 24 and 33%. Conclusion: The data suggest that oral

  6. Hydrogen energy share improvement along with NOx (oxides of nitrogen) emission reduction in a hydrogen dual-fuel compression ignition engine using water injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintala, V.; Subramanian, K.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • H 2 energy share increased from 20% without water to 39% with SWC 270 g/kWh. • Specific water consumption (SWC) 200 g/kWh was selected as the optimum quantity. • NO x decreased about 24% with the optimum water quantity at 20% H 2 energy share. • At 20% H 2 share, energy efficiency decreased about 5.5% with the optimum water. • HC, CO and smoke emissions increased 38%, 100% and 69% with optimum water at 20% H 2 share. - Abstract: The study aims at enhancement of Hydrogen (H 2 ) energy share and reduction of Oxides of Nitrogen (NO x ) emission in a 7.4 kW-CI engine at 1500 rpm using water injection. The test engine was modified to run under dual-fuel operation with diesel–biodiesel blend (B20) and H 2 fuels for different Specific Water Consumption (SWC) of 130, 200, and 270 g/kWh. Under conventional H 2 dual-fuel mode, energy efficiency and NO x emission increased significantly while Hydrocarbon (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO) and smoke emissions decreased. The maximum H 2 energy share increased from 20% without water to 32%, 36%, and 39% with SWC of 130, 200, and 270 g/kWh respectively. However, SWC of 200 g/kWh was selected as an optimum water quantity for knock free operation, better performance and lower emissions. At the optimum SWC with 20% H 2 energy share, the NO x emission and energy efficiency decreased about 24% and 5.7%, while HC and smoke emissions increased about 38% and 69%. At 20% H 2 energy share, the CO emission increased from 0.0 g/kWh without water to 1.2 g/kWh with the optimum SWC. However, reduction of these HC and CO emissions using oxidation catalysts needs to be studied further. A new methodology for determining heat release rate with consideration of crevice gas was proposed in the study

  7. The effect of water on the stability of iron oxide and iron carbide nanoparticles in hydrogen and syngas followed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuene, P.C.; Moodley - Gengan, P.; Scheijen, F.J.E.; Fredriksson, H.O.A.; Lancee, R.J.; Kropf, J.; Miller, J.T.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of water on iron-based nanoparticles under hydrogen and syngas was investigated by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The iron oxide (¿-Fe2O3) nanoparticles, dispersed as a monolayer on flat silica surfaces, were readily converted into metallic iron in dry hydrogen at 350 °C and into

  8. A hybrid HTGR system producing electricity, hydrogen and such other products as water demanded in the Middle East

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, X., E-mail: yan.xing@jaea.go.jp; Noguchi, H.; Sato, H.; Tachibana, Y.; Kunitomi, K.; Hino, R.

    2014-05-01

    Alternative energy products are being considered by the Middle East countries for both consumption and export. Electricity, water, and hydrogen produced not from oil and gas are amongst those desirable. A hybrid nuclear production system, GTHTR300C, under development in JAEA can achieve this regional strategic goal. The system is based on a 600 MWt HTGR and equipped to cogenerate electricity by gas turbine and seawater desalination by using only the nuclear plant waste heat. Hydrogen is produced via a thermochemical water-splitting process driven by the reactor's 950 °C heat. Additionally process steam may be produced for industrial uses. An example is shown of manufacturing soda ash, an internationally traded commodity, from using the steam produced and the brine discharged from desalination. The nuclear reactor satisfies nearly all energy requirements for the hybrid generations without emitting CO{sub 2}. The passive safety of the reactor as described in the paper permits proximity of siting the reactor with the production facilities to enhance energy transmission. Production flowsheet of the GTHTR300C is given for up to 300 MWe electricity, 58 t/day hydrogen, 56,000 m{sup 3}/day potable water, 3500 t/day steam, and 1000 t/day soda ash. The production thermal efficiency reaches 88%.

  9. Reforming water to generate hydrogen using mechanical alloy; El reformado del agua para generar hidrogeno mediante aleado mecanico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena F, D. L.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this research was to generate a hydrogen production system by means of mechanical milling, in which 0.1 g of magnesium were weighed using a volume of 300 μL for each water solvent (H{sub 2}O) and methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) in a container to start mechanical milling for 2, 4 and 6 h. Once the mechanical milling was finished, the hydrogen that was produced every two hours was measured to determine the appropriate milling time in the production, also in each period of time samples of the powders produced during the milling of Mg were taken, in this process we used characterization techniques such as: X-ray diffraction at an angle of 2θi 5 and 2θf 90 degrees and scanning electron microscopy, taking micrographs of 100, 500, 1000 and 5000 magnifications. According to the mechanical milling results hydrogen was obtained when using water, as well as with methanol. In the techniques of X-ray diffraction characterization different results were obtained before and after the milling, since by the diffractogram s is possible to observe how the magnesium to be put in the mechanical milling along with the water and methanol was diminishing to be transformed into hydroxide and magnesium oxide, as well as in the micrographs taken with scanning electron microscopy the change in the magnesium morphology to hydroxide and magnesium oxide is observed. (Author)

  10. Assessment of hydrogen bonding effect on ionization of water from ambient to supercritical region–MD simulation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiatla-Wojcik, D.; Mozumder, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based, strategy to analyze how the degree of hydrogen bonding may influence the ionization and dissociation of water upon heating from ambient to supercritical temperatures. Calculations show a negligible change in the ionization energy up to 200 °C. At higher temperatures the ionization energy increases due to the decreasing degree of hydrogen bonding. The influence of density (pressure) is pronounced in the supercritical region. The ionization is more energy consuming in the less dense fluid. We also show that high temperature and low density may promote dissociation of the electronically excited water molecules. Implications on the initial radiation chemical yields of the hydrated electron, hydrogen atom and hydroxyl radical are discussed. - Highlights: • Up to 200 °C changes in the vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials are negligible. • At higher temperatures ionization is more energy consuming. • Ionization potential increases with decreasing density of supercritical water. • High temperature and low density promote dissociation of the excited molecules

  11. Measurement of in-core and recirculation system response to hydrogen water chemistry at Nine Mile Point 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head, R.A.; Indig, M.E.; Andresen, P.L.

    1991-03-01

    The value of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) as a mitigation technique for out-of-core piping systems susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) is well established. However, certain reactor internal components exposed to high levels of radiation are susceptible to a cracking mechanism referred to as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Some of the components potentially affected by IASCC include the top guide, SRM/IRM housings, the core shroud, and control blades. Fortunately, laboratory data indicate that IASCC can be controlled by altering the coolant environment. Hot cell tests performed at GE's Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) on highly irradiated material produced a fracture surface with 99% IGSCC under normal BWR water chemistry. However, under HWC conditions, only ductile failure occurred. With this background, a program was established to determine the chemistry and oxidizing potential of the core bypass coolant at Nine Mile Point-1 (NMP-1) under normal and HWC conditions. The objective of the program was to assess whether HWC could sufficiently modify the core bypass environment to mitigate IASCC. Results showed that with the addition of hydrogen to the feedwater, core bypass dissolved oxygen decreased very rapidly, compared to the recirculation water, indicating very efficient recombination of hydrogen and oxygen in the non-boiling core bypass region. Since low concentrations of dissolved oxygen have been shown to eliminate IASCC, these results are encouraging. 8 figs., 1 tab

  12. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION; F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2001-01-01

    This technical report summarizes our activities conducted in Yr II. In Yr I we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing the hydrogen selective SiC membrane with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. In addition, a SiC macroporous membrane was fabricated as a substrate candidate for the proposed SiC membrane. In Yr II we have focused on the development of a microporous SiC membrane as an intermediate layer between the substrate and the final membrane layer prepared from CVD. Powders and supported thin silicon carbide films (membranes) were prepared by a sol-gel technique using silica sol precursors as the source of silicon, and phenolic resin as the source of carbon. The powders and films were prepared by the carbothermal reduction reaction between the silica and the carbon source. The XRD analysis indicates that the powders and films consist of SiC, while the surface area measurement indicates that they contain micropores. SEM and AFM studies of the same films also validate this observation. The powders and membranes were also stable under different corrosive and harsh environments. The effects of these different treatments on the internal surface area, pore size distribution, and transport properties, were studied for both the powders and the membranes using the aforementioned techniques and XPS. Finally the SiC membrane materials are shown to have satisfactory hydrothermal stability for the proposed application. In Yr III, we will focus on the demonstration of the potential benefit using the SiC membrane developed from Yr I and II for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction

  13. Generation of Hydrogen and Methane during Experimental Low-Temperature Reaction of Ultramafic Rocks with Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Donaldson, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks is widely recognized as a source of molecular hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) to support microbial activity, but the extent and rates of formation of these compounds in low-temperature, near-surface environments are poorly understood. Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature reaction of water with ultramafic rocks and minerals. Experiments were performed by heating olivine or harzburgite with aqueous solutions at 90°C for up to 213 days in glass bottles sealed with butyl rubber stoppers. Although H2 and CH4 increased steadily throughout the experiments, the levels were very similar to those found in mineral-free controls, indicating that the rubber stoppers were the predominant source of these compounds. Levels of H2 above background were observed only during the first few days of reaction of harzburgite when CO2 was added to the headspace, with no detectable production of H2 or CH4 above background during further heating of the harzburgite or in experiments with other mineral reactants. Consequently, our results indicate that production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature alteration of ultramafic rocks may be much more limited than some recent experimental studies have suggested. We also found no evidence to support a recent report suggesting that spinels in ultramafic rocks may stimulate H2 production. While secondary silicates were observed to precipitate during the experiments, formation of these deposits was dominated by Si released by dissolution of the glass bottles, and reaction of the primary silicate minerals appeared to be very limited. While use of glass bottles and rubber stoppers has become commonplace in experiments intended to study processes that occur during serpentinization of ultramafic rocks at low temperatures, the high levels of H2, CH4, and SiO2 released during heating indicate that these reactor materials are unsuitable for this purpose.

  14. Production of hydrogen bromide and oxygen from water and bromine using a metal oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Nakane, Masanori; Ishii, Eiichi; Uehara, Itsuki; Miyake, Yoshizo

    1978-01-01

    In order to produce hydrogen by the thermochemical water splitting cycle, the following two-step reactions have been investigated. M.O + Br 2 → M.Br 2 + 1/2O 2 (1) M.Br 2 + H 2 O → M.O + 2HBr (2) At first, indium, zinc, cobalt, manganese and nickel were picked up as suitable elements based on ΔG 0 -T diagram of the reactions. Then, each fundamental reaction was checked experimentally. In the case of cobalt, manganese and nickel, reaction (1) hardly proceeded below 900 0 C under atmospheric pressure of Br 2 . Therefore, detailed experiments were carried out on zinc and indium. In the case of zinc, the equilibrium conversion of Br 2 for reaction (1) was estimated to be 37% at 900 0 C and that of ZnBr 2 (g) for reaction (2) was estimated to be 5% at the same temperature. Also in the case of indium, both the equilibrium conversions of Br 2 and of InBr 3 (g) turned out 10% under the same conditions. As the rate of conversion was rather low, large amounts of unreacted substances should be recycled to proceed these reactions. In the hydrolysis of both ZnBr 2 and InBr 3 , the use of five and ten times larger amount of H 2 O could reduce the amounts of unreacted metal bromides to about a half and one third of the values mentioned above, respectively. Under the present conditions the two-step sub-cycle using the metal oxide is considered to be difficult to realize from technical points of view. (author)

  15. Density functional for van der Waals forces accounts for hydrogen bond in benchmark set of water hexamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelkkanen, Kari André; Lundqvist, Bengt; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2009-01-01

    A recent extensive study has investigated how various exchange-correlation (XC) functionals treat hydrogen bonds in water hexamers and has shown traditional generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functionals used in density-functional (DF) theory to give the wrong dissociation-energy trend...... of low-lying isomers and van der Waals (vdW) dispersion forces to give key contributions to the dissociation energy. The question raised whether functionals that incorporate vdW forces implicitly into the XC functional predict the correct lowest-energy structure for the water hexamer and yield accurate...

  16. Process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of liquid water and gaseous halohydrocarbon and an apparatus therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, E.A.; Rolston, J.H.; Clermont, M.J.; Paterson, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    This invention provides a process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of liquid water and gaseous halohydrocarbons comprising: (a) bringing into contact a water stream, a halohydrocarbon stream, and a catalytic porous anion exchange resin so that the isotope-deficient halohydrocarbon stream is enriched; (b) decomposing the halohydrocarbon stream photolytically into two gaseous streams, one enriched and the other deficient; (c) removing as a product the first, enriched stream; and (d) recycling the second stream for enrichment. An apparatus is also provided

  17. Non-equilibrium hydrogen exchange for determination of H-bond strength and water accessibility in solid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohe, Kristof; Movellan, Kumar Tekwani; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate measurement of non-equilibrium backbone amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates (HDX) for solid proteins. The target of this study are the slowly exchanging residues in solid samples, which are associated with stable secondary-structural elements of proteins. These hydrogen exchange processes escape methods measuring equilibrium exchange rates of faster processes. The method was applied to a micro-crystalline preparation of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin. Therefore, from a 100% back-exchanged micro-crystalline protein preparation, the supernatant buffer was exchanged by a partially deuterated buffer to reach a final protonation level of approximately 20% before packing the sample in a 1.3 mm rotor. Tracking of the HN peak intensities for 2 weeks reports on site-specific hydrogen bond strength and also likely reflects water accessibility in a qualitative manner. H/D exchange can be directly determined for hydrogen-bonded amides using 1 H detection under fast magic angle spinning. This approach complements existing methods and provides the means to elucidate interesting site-specific characteristics for protein functionality in the solid state.

  18. Hydrogen/deuterium isotope effects in water and aqueous solutions of organic molecules and proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, David L.; Fu, Ling; Bermejo, F. Javier; Fernandez-Alonso, Felix; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydrogen/deuterium substitution has significant effects in hydrogenous materials. ► The effects can involve structure, phase behavior and protein stability. ► The effects must be kept in mind in the interpretation of scattering experiments. ► The effects may be mitigated by an appropriate choice of experimental conditions. - Abstract: It is pointed out that hydrogen/deuterium substitution, frequently used in neutron scattering studies of the structure and dynamics of hydrogenous samples, can have significant effects on structure, phase behavior and protein stability. The effects must be kept in mind in the interpretation of such experiments. In suitable cases, these effects can be mitigated by an appropriate choice of experimental conditions

  19. Partial oxidation of n-hexadecane through decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in supercritical water

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Y.M.; Hellgardt, K.

    2015-01-01

    -MS analysis of liquid samples revealed the formation of heavy oxygenated compounds which may suggest a new addition reaction to account for their formation under the current experimental conditions. Results show new promising routes for hydrogen production

  20. A bio-inspired molecular water oxidation catalyst for renewable hydrogen generation: an examination of salt effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimblecombe, Robin; Rotstein, Miriam; Koo, Annette; Dismukes, G. Charles; Swiegers, Gerhard F.; Spiccia, Leone

    2009-08-01

    Most transport fuels are derived from fossil fuels, generate greenhouse gases, and consume significant amounts of water in the extraction, purification, and/or burning processes. The generation of hydrogen using solar energy to split water, ideally from abundant water sources such as sea water or other non-potable sources, could potentially provide an unlimited, clean fuel for the future. Solar, electrochemical water splitting typically combines a photoanode at which water oxidation occurs, with a cathode for proton reduction to hydrogen. In recent work, we have found that a bioinspired tetra-manganese cluster catalyzes water oxidation at relatively low overpotentials (0.38 V) when doped into a Nafion proton conduction membrane deposited on a suitable electrode surface, and illuminated with visible light. We report here that this assembly is active in aqueous and organic electrolyte solutions containing a range of different salts in varying concentrations. Similar photocurrents were obtained using electrolytes containing 0.0 - 0.5 M sodium sulfate, sodium perchlorate or sodium chloride. A slight decline in photocurrent was observed for sodium perchlorate but only at and above 5.0 M concentration. In acetonitrile and acetone solutions containing 10% water, increasing the electrolyte concentration was found to result in leaching of the catalytic species from the membrane and a decrease in photocurrent. Leaching was not observed when the system was tested in an ionic liquid containing water, however, a lower photocurrent was generated than observed in aqueous electrolyte. We conclude that immersion of the membrane in an aqueous solution containing an electrolyte concentration of 0.05 - 0.5M represent good conditions for operation for the cubium/Nafion catalytic system.

  1. Fast Breaking Detergents: Their Role in the Generation of Hydrogen Sulfide in Oily-Water Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    acid (Dwyer & Tiedje, 1983) and Desulfowibrio desulfitricans to produce ethanol and acetic acid (Dwyer & Tiedje, 1986). Under anaerobic conditions, the...glycol, glycolic acid, hydrogen, carbon dioxide and a number of intermediates. The acetic acid and ethylene glycol are utilised by some species of SRB...are consequently being introduced. Hydrogen sulfide generation by anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a concern for the RAN because it can

  2. Hydrogen-rich Water Exerting a Protective Effect on Ovarian Reserve Function in a Mouse Model of Immune Premature Ovarian Failure Induced by Zona Pellucida 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Wang, Shu-Yu; Yin, Cheng-Hong; Wang, Tong; Jia, Chan-Wei; Ma, Yan-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background: Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a disease that affects female fertility but has few effective treatments. Ovarian reserve function plays an important role in female fertility. Recent studies have reported that hydrogen can protect male fertility. Therefore, we explored the potential protective effect of hydrogen-rich water on ovarian reserve function through a mouse immune POF model. Methods: To set up immune POF model, fifty female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: Control (mice consumed normal water, n = 10), hydrogen (mice consumed hydrogen-rich water, n = 10), model (mice were immunized with zona pellucida glycoprotein 3 [ZP3] and consumed normal water, n = 15), and model-hydrogen (mice were immunized with ZP3 and consumed hydrogen-rich water, n = 15) groups. After 5 weeks, mice were sacrificed. Serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels, granulosa cell (GC) apoptotic index (AI), B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and BCL2-associated X protein (Bax) expression were examined. Analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) software. Results: Immune POF model, model group exhibited markedly reduced serum AMH levels compared with those of the control group (5.41 ± 0.91 ng/ml vs. 16.23 ± 1.97 ng/ml, P = 0.033) and the hydrogen group (19.65 ± 7.82 ng/ml, P = 0.006). The model-hydrogen group displayed significantly higher AMH concentrations compared with that of the model group (15.03 ± 2.75 ng/ml vs. 5.41 ± 0.91 ng/ml, P = 0.021). The GC AI was significantly higher in the model group (21.30 ± 1.74%) than those in the control (7.06 ± 0.27%), hydrogen (5.17 ± 0.41%), and model-hydrogen groups (11.24 ± 0.58%) (all P hydrogen group compared with that of the hydrogen group (11.24 ± 0.58% vs. 5.17 ± 0.41%, P = 0.021). Compared with those of the model group, ovarian tissue Bcl-2 levels increased (2.18 ± 0.30 vs. 3.01 ± 0.33, P = 0.045) and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio decreased in the model-hydrogen group

  3. Hydrogen production by high-temperature electrolysis of water vapor steam. Test results obtained with an electrolysis tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1995-01-01

    High-temperature electrolysis of water vapor steam is an advanced hydrogen production process decomposing high temperature steam up to 1,000degC, which applies an electro-chemical reaction reverse to the solid oxide fuel cell. At Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, laboratory-scale experiments have been conducted using a practical electrolysis tube with 12 electrolysis cells in order to develop heat utilization systems for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The electrolysis cells of which electrolyte was yttria-stabilized zirconia were formed on a porous ceramic tube in series by plasma spraying. In the experiments, water steam mixed with argon carrier gas was supplied into the electrolysis tube heated at a constant temperature regulated in the range from 850degC to 950degC, and electrolysis power was supplied by a DC power source. Hydrogen production rate increased with applied voltage and electrolysis temperature; the maximum production rate was 6.9Nl/h at 950degC. Hydrogen production rate was correlated with applied current densities on the basis of experimental data. High energy efficiency was achieved under the applied current density ranging from 80 to 100 mA/cm 2 . (author)

  4. Temperature effect on the photoinduced reduction of methyl viologen with several sensitizers and the evolution of hydrogen from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenadovic, M.T.; Micic, O.I.; Rajh, T.; Savic, D.

    1983-01-01

    Irradiation by visible light of an aqueous solution containing a photosensitizer, methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid leads to the formation of the reduced form of methyl viologen (MV/sup +/). The quantum yield for the formation of MV/sup +/ depends strongly on the time during which the formation is observed owing to the reaction of MV/sup +/ with oxidative products and its reduction to MV/sup 0/. Proflavin, acridine yellow and ruthenium(II)tris(2,2-bipyridyl) were used as photosensitizers and showed the same ability to promote hydrogen evolution. When CdS was used as a sensitizer a factor of 10 less hydrogen was obtained than when the dyes were used. The redox catalysts platinum, Pt-TiO/sub 2/-RuO/sub 2/ and Pt-CdS in colloidal systems showed approximately the same activity towards the reduction of water. The reduction of MV/sup 2 +/ and the evolution of hydrogen were enhanced at higher temperatures (70/sup 0/C). The optimum conditions for water reduction on redox catalysts in colloidal system under continuous illumination are analysed.

  5. Efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production from water over Pt-Eosin Y catalyst: A systemic study of reaction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhao, Hui; Chen, Yong; Sun, Ruimin; Han, Bing

    2016-07-01

    A high efficient homogeneous system for hydrogen production from water consisting of Eosin Y as a photosensitizer, methyl viologen (MV2+) as an electron transfer mediator, triethanolamine (TEOA) as a sacrificial electron donor and colloid Pt as a catalyst, has been systemicly studied. The initial system pH and the concentration of Eosin Y have remarkable effects on the rate of hydrogen evolution. The optimal pH and concentration of Eosin Y are 9 and 7.2×10-5 M. Triethanolamine (TEOA) as an electron donor, can reductively quench the oxidized Eosin Y and the quenching is well modeled by the Stern-Volmer equation. The optimal concentration of TEOA and the concentration of MV2+ are 0.3 M and 3.1×10-4 M, respectively. In addition, the role of colloid Pt has been investigated.

  6. Characterisation of water hyacinth with microwave-heated alkali pretreatment for enhanced enzymatic digestibility and hydrogen/methane fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Song, Wenlu; Ding, Lingkan; Xie, Binfei; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-04-01

    Microwave-heated alkali pretreatment (MAP) was investigated to improve enzymatic digestibility and H2/CH4 production from water hyacinth. SEM revealed that MAP deconstructed the lignocellulose matrix and swelled the surfaces of water hyacinth. XRD indicated that MAP decreased the crystallinity index from 16.0 to 13.0 because of cellulose amorphisation. FTIR indicated that MAP effectively destroyed the lignin structure and disrupted the crystalline cellulose to reduce crystallinity. The reducing sugar yield of 0.296 g/gTVS was achieved at optimal hydrolysis conditions (microwave temperature = 190°C, time = 10 min, and cellulase dosage = 5 wt%). The sequentially fermentative hydrogen and methane yields from water hyacinth with MAP and enzymatic hydrolysis were increased to 63.9 and 172.5 mL/gTVS, respectively. The energy conversion efficiency (40.0%) in the two-stage hydrogen and methane cogeneration was lower than that (49.5%) in the one-stage methane production (237.4 mL/gTVS) from water hyacinth with MAP and enzymatic hydrolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. THAI test facility for experimental research on hydrogen and fission product behaviour in light water reactor containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, S., E-mail: gupta@becker-technologies.com [Becker Technologies GmbH, Koelner Strasse 6, 65760 Eschborn (Germany); Schmidt, E.; Laufenberg, B. von; Freitag, M.; Poss, G. [Becker Technologies GmbH, Koelner Strasse 6, 65760 Eschborn (Germany); Funke, F. [AREVA GmbH, P.O. Box 1109, 91001 Erlangen (Germany); Weber, G. [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Forschungszentrum, Boltzmannstraße 14, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Large scale facility for investigating representative LWR severe accident scenarios. • Coupled effect tests in the field of thermal-hydraulics, hydrogen, aerosol and iodine. • Measurement techniques improved and adapted for severe accident conditions. • Testing of passive mitigation systems (e.g. PAR) under accident conditions. • THAI data application for validation and development of CFD and LP codes. - Abstract: The test facility THAI (thermal-hydraulics, hydrogen, aerosol, and iodine) aims at addressing open questions concerning gas distribution, behaviour of hydrogen, iodine and aerosols in the containment of light water reactors during severe accidents. Main component of the facility is a 60 m{sup 3} stainless steel vessel, 9.2 m high and 3.2 m in diameter, with exchangeable internals for multi-compartment investigations. The maximal design pressure of the vessel is 14 bar which allows H{sub 2} combustion experiments at a severe accident relevant H{sub 2} concentration level. The facility is approved for the use of low-level radiotracer I-123 which enables the measurement of time resolved iodine behaviour. The THAI test facility allows investigating various accident scenarios, ranging from turbulent free convection to stagnant stratified containment atmospheres and can be combined with simultaneous use of hydrogen, iodine and aerosol issues. THAI experimental research also covers investigations related to mitigation systems employed in light water reactor containments by performing experiments on, e.g. pressure suppression pool hydrodynamics, performance behaviour of passive autocatalytic recombiners, and spray interaction with hydrogen–steam–air flames in phenomenon orientated and coupled-effects experiments. The THAI experimental data have been widely used for the validation and further development of Lumped Parameter and Computational Fluid Dynamics codes with 3D capabilities, e.g. International Standard Problems ISP-47 (thermal

  8. A Raman spectroscopy study on the effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on water molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fabing; Li, Zhanlong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Shenghan; Wang, Xiaojun; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2018-05-01

    The structural forms of water/deuterated water molecules located on the surface of borosilicate capillaries have been first investigated in this study on the basis of the Raman spectral data obtained at different temperatures and under atmospheric pressure for molecules in bulk and also for molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface. The strongest two fundamental bands locating at 3063 cm-1 (2438 cm-1) in the recorded Raman spectra are assigned here to the Osbnd H (Osbnd D) bond stretching vibrations and they are compared with the corresponding bands observed at 3124 cm-1 (2325 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum of ice Ih. Our spectroscopic observations have indicated that the structure of water and deuterated water molecules on borosilicate surface is similar to that of ice Ih (hexagonal phase of ice). These observations have also indicated that water molecules locate on the borosilicate surface so as to construct a bilayer structure and that strong and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between water/deuterated molecules and silanol groups on borosilicate surface. In accordance with these findings, water and deuterated water molecules at the interface of capillary have a higher melting temperature.

  9. Hydrogen Bonding in Proteins and Water Studied by Far-IR and Low-Wavenumber Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greve, Tanja Maria; Birklund Andersen, Kristine; Engdahl, Anders; Nelander, Bengt; Faurskov Nielsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Far-IR spectra with a synchrotron radiation source were for the first time recorded through a microscope coupled to an FTIR-spectrometer. A comparison with spectra recorded with an ordinary globar source revealed that no artifacts occurred with synchrotron radiation. A comparison of ATR (Si-prism) and transmission spectra of a tetrapeptide showed that the ATR-microscope technique could be applied. ATR- and transmission spectra were recorded of polyglycine and compared to the low wavenumber Raman spectrum in the R(v)-representation. A protein band at 115-125 cm -1 was assigned to hydrogen bond modes. Collectively these modes might drive conformational changes in proteins. Based mainly on previously published results the determination of water with a structure like that in bulk liquid water was performed for human and animal skin samples. Changes in water content were reported for freezing and thawing of human skin biopsies and for human skin with benign or malignant skin diseases.

  10. Effect of high-temperature water and hydrogen on the fracture behavior of a low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Seifert, H.-P.; Spätig, P.; Que, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is critical for safety and lifetime. Possible degradation of fracture resistance of RPV steel due to exposure to coolant and hydrogen is a concern. In this study tensile and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) tests in air (hydrogen pre-charged) and EFPM tests in hydrogenated/oxygenated high-temperature water (HTW) was done, using a low-alloy RPV steel. 2–5 wppm hydrogen caused embrittlement in air tensile tests at room temperature (25 °C) and at 288 °C, effects being more significant at 25 °C and in simulated weld coarse grain heat affected zone material. Embrittlement at 288 °C is strain rate dependent and is due to localized plastic deformation. Hydrogen pre-charging/HTW exposure did not deteriorate the fracture resistance at 288 °C in base metal, for investigated loading rate range. Clear change in fracture morphology and deformation structures was observed, similar to that after air tests with hydrogen. - Highlights: • Hydrogen content, microstructure of LAS, and strain rate affects tensile properties at 288 °C. • Strength affects hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility to a greater extent than grain size. • Hydrogen in LAS leads to strain localization and restricts cross-slip at 288 °C. • Possible hydrogen pickup due to exposure to 288 °C water alters fracture surface appearance without affecting fracture toughness in bainitic base material. • Simulated weld heat affected zone microstructure shows unstable crack propagation in 288 °C water.

  11. Effect of high-temperature water and hydrogen on the fracture behavior of a low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roychowdhury, S., E-mail: sroy27@gmail.com [Paul Scherrer Institut, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen, PSI (Switzerland); Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Mod-Lab, D-Block, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Seifert, H.-P.; Spätig, P.; Que, Z. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen, PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-09-15

    Structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is critical for safety and lifetime. Possible degradation of fracture resistance of RPV steel due to exposure to coolant and hydrogen is a concern. In this study tensile and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) tests in air (hydrogen pre-charged) and EFPM tests in hydrogenated/oxygenated high-temperature water (HTW) was done, using a low-alloy RPV steel. 2–5 wppm hydrogen caused embrittlement in air tensile tests at room temperature (25 °C) and at 288 °C, effects being more significant at 25 °C and in simulated weld coarse grain heat affected zone material. Embrittlement at 288 °C is strain rate dependent and is due to localized plastic deformation. Hydrogen pre-charging/HTW exposure did not deteriorate the fracture resistance at 288 °C in base metal, for investigated loading rate range. Clear change in fracture morphology and deformation structures was observed, similar to that after air tests with hydrogen. - Highlights: • Hydrogen content, microstructure of LAS, and strain rate affects tensile properties at 288 °C. • Strength affects hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility to a greater extent than grain size. • Hydrogen in LAS leads to strain localization and restricts cross-slip at 288 °C. • Possible hydrogen pickup due to exposure to 288 °C water alters fracture surface appearance without affecting fracture toughness in bainitic base material. • Simulated weld heat affected zone microstructure shows unstable crack propagation in 288 °C water.

  12. Preventive Effects of Drinking Hydrogen-Rich Water on Gingival Oxidative Stress and Alveolar Bone Resorption in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Toshiki; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Ekuni, Daisuke; Irie, Koichiro; Azuma, Tetsuji; Machida, Tatsuya; Miyai, Hisataka; Fujimori, Kouhei; Morita, Manabu

    2017-01-13

    Obesity induces gingival oxidative stress, which is involved in the progression of alveolar bone resorption. The antioxidant effect of hydrogen-rich water may attenuate gingival oxidative stress and prevent alveolar bone resorption in cases of obesity. We examined whether hydrogen-rich water could suppress gingival oxidative stress and alveolar bone resorption in obese rats fed a high-fat diet. Male Fischer 344 rats ( n = 18) were divided into three groups of six rats each: a control group (fed a regular diet and drinking distilled water) and two experimental groups (fed a high-fat diet and drinking distilled water or hydrogen-rich water). The level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was determined to evaluate oxidative stress. The bone mineral density of the alveolar bone was analyzed by micro-computerized tomography. Obese rats, induced by a high-fat diet, showed a higher gingival level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and a lower level of alveolar bone density compared to the control group. Drinking hydrogen-rich water suppressed body weight gain, lowered gingival level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, and reduced alveolar bone resorption in rats on a high-fat diet. The results indicate that hydrogen-rich water could suppress gingival oxidative stress and alveolar bone resorption by limiting obesity.

  13. Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of tap water reveal structure of the San Francisco Bay Area's water system and adjustments during a major drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipple, Brett J; Jameel, Yusuf; Chau, Thuan H; Mancuso, Christy J; Bowen, Gabriel J; Dufour, Alexis; Chesson, Lesley A; Ehleringer, James R

    2017-08-01

    Water availability and sustainability in the Western United States is a major flashpoint among expanding communities, growing industries, and productive agricultural lands. This issue came to a head in 2015 in the State of California, when the State mandated a 25% reduction in urban water use following a multi-year drought that significantly depleted water resources. Water demands and challenges in supplying water are only expected to intensify as climate perturbations, such as the 2012-2015 California Drought, become more common. As a consequence, there is an increased need to understand linkages between urban centers, water transport and usage, and the impacts of climate change on water resources. To assess if stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios could increase the understanding of these relationships within a megalopolis in the Western United States, we collected and analyzed 723 tap waters across the San Francisco Bay Area during seven collection campaigns spanning 21 months during 2013-2015. The San Francisco Bay Area was selected as it has well-characterized water management strategies and the 2012-2105 California Drought dramatically affected its water resources. Consistent with known water management strategies and previously collected isotope data, we found large spatiotemporal variations in the δ 2 H and δ 18 O values of tap waters within the Bay Area. This is indicative of complex water transport systems and varying municipality-scale management decisions. We observed δ 2 H and δ 18 O values of tap water consistent with waters originating from snowmelt from the Sierra Nevada Mountains, local precipitation, ground water, and partially evaporated reservoir sources. A cluster analysis of the isotope data collected in this study grouped waters from 43 static sampling sites that were associated with specific water utility providers within the San Francisco Bay Area and known management practices. Various management responses to the drought, such as

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of the use a chemical heat pump to link a supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor and a thermochemical water-splitting cycle for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.; Pioro, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Increases in the power generation efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPPs) are mainly limited by the permissible temperatures in nuclear reactors and the corresponding temperatures and pressures of the coolants in reactors. Coolant parameters are limited by the corrosion rates of materials and nuclear-reactor safety constraints. The advanced construction materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ supercritical water (SCW) as a coolant and heat carrier, permit improved 'steam' parameters (outlet temperatures up to 625degC and pressures of about 25 MPa). An increase in the temperature of steam allows it to be utilized in thermochemical water splitting cycles to produce hydrogen. These methods are considered by many to be among the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require an intensive heat supply at temperatures higher than 550-600degC. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump, which increases the temperature of the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. Here, a high-temperature chemical heat pump, which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction, is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with the second steam cycle of a SCW nuclear power generation plant on one side and a thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature of the 'nuclear' heat and, consequently, the intensity of heat transfer into the water splitting cycle. A comparative preliminary thermodynamic analysis is conducted of

  15. Hydrogen production system based on high temperature gas cooled reactor energy using the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, L.; Gonzalez, D.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen production from water using nuclear energy offers one of the most attractive zero-emission energy strategies and the only one that is practical on a substantial scale. Recently, strong interest is seen in hydrogen production using heat of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The high-temperature characteristics of the modular helium reactor (MHR) make it a strong candidate for producing hydrogen using thermochemical or high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) processes. Eventually it could be also employ a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which is particularly attractive because it has unique capability, among potential future generation nuclear power options, to produce high-temperature heat ideally suited for nuclear-heated hydrogen production. Using heat from nuclear reactors to drive a sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical hydrogen production process has been interest of many laboratories in the world. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantity of hydrogen in an efficient way using the nuclear energy is the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Among the thermochemical cycles, the sulfur iodine process remains a very promising solution in matter of efficiency and cost. This work provides a pre-conceptual design description of a SI-Based H2-Nuclear Reactor plant. Software based on chemical process simulation (CPS) was used to simulate the thermochemical water splitting cycle Sulfur-Iodine for hydrogen production. (Author)

  16. Diel cycles of hydrogen peroxide in marine bathing waters in Southern California, USA: In situ surf zone measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Catherine D.; De Bruyn, Warren J.; Hirsch, Charlotte M.; Aiona, Paige

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is photochemically produced in natural waters. It has been implicated in the oxidative-induced mortality of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), a microbial water quality measure. To assess levels and cycling of peroxide in beach waters monitored for FIB, diel studies were carried out in surf zone waters in July 2009 at Crystal Cove State Beach, Southern California, USA. Maximum concentrations of 160-200 nM were obtained within 1 h of solar noon. Levels dropped at night to 20-40 nM, consistent with photochemical production from sunlight. Day-time production and night-time dark loss rates averaged 16 ± 3 nM h -1 and 12 ± 4 nM h -1 respectively. Apparent quantum yields averaged 0.07 ± 0.02. Production was largely dominated by sunlight, with some dependence on chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) levels in waters with high absorption coefficients. Peroxide levels measured here are sufficient to cause oxidative-stress-induced mortality of bacteria, affect FIB diel cycling and impact microbial water quality in marine bathing waters.

  17. Pilot study: Effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on muscle fatigue caused by acute exercise in elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Kosuke

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle contraction during short intervals of intense exercise causes oxidative stress, which can play a role in the development of overtraining symptoms, including increased fatigue, resulting in muscle microinjury or inflammation. Recently it has been said that hydrogen can function as antioxidant, so we investigated the effect of hydrogen-rich water (HW on oxidative stress and muscle fatigue in response to acute exercise. Methods Ten male soccer players aged 20.9 ± 1.3 years old were subjected to exercise tests and blood sampling. Each subject was examined twice in a crossover double-blind manner; they were given either HW or placebo water (PW for one week intervals. Subjects were requested to use a cycle ergometer at a 75 % maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 for 30 min, followed by measurement of peak torque and muscle activity throughout 100 repetitions of maximal isokinetic knee extension. Oxidative stress markers and creatine kinase in the peripheral blood were sequentially measured. Results Although acute exercise resulted in an increase in blood lactate levels in the subjects given PW, oral intake of HW prevented an elevation of blood lactate during heavy exercise. Peak torque of PW significantly decreased during maximal isokinetic knee extension, suggesting muscle fatigue, but peak torque of HW didn’t decrease at early phase. There was no significant change in blood oxidative injury markers (d-ROMs and BAP or creatine kinease after exercise. Conclusion Adequate hydration with hydrogen-rich water pre-exercise reduced blood lactate levels and improved exercise-induced decline of muscle function. Although further studies to elucidate the exact mechanisms and the benefits are needed to be confirmed in larger series of studies, these preliminary results may suggest that HW may be suitable hydration for athletes.

  18. Potential for hydrogen-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic and diazotrophic populations to initiate biofilm formation in oligotrophic, deep terrestrial subsurface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofen; Pedersen, Karsten; Edlund, Johanna; Eriksson, Lena; Åström, Mats; Andersson, Anders F; Bertilsson, Stefan; Dopson, Mark

    2017-03-23

    Deep terrestrial biosphere waters are separated from the light-driven surface by the time required to percolate to the subsurface. Despite biofilms being the dominant form of microbial life in many natural environments, they have received little attention in the oligotrophic and anaerobic waters found in deep bedrock fractures. This study is the first to use community DNA sequencing to describe biofilm formation under in situ conditions in the deep terrestrial biosphere. In this study, flow cells were attached to boreholes containing either "modern marine" or "old saline" waters of different origin and degree of isolation from the light-driven surface of the earth. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we showed that planktonic and attached populations were dissimilar while gene frequencies in the metagenomes suggested that hydrogen-fed, carbon dioxide- and nitrogen-fixing populations were responsible for biofilm formation across the two aquifers. Metagenome analyses further suggested that only a subset of the populations were able to attach and produce an extracellular polysaccharide matrix. Initial biofilm formation is thus likely to be mediated by a few bacterial populations which were similar to Epsilonproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and unclassified bacteria. Populations potentially capable of attaching to a surface and to produce extracellular polysaccharide matrix for attachment were identified in the terrestrial deep biosphere. Our results suggest that the biofilm populations were taxonomically distinct from the planktonic community and were enriched in populations with a chemolithoautotrophic and diazotrophic metabolism coupling hydrogen oxidation to energy conservation under oligotrophic conditions.

  19. The Drinking Effect of Hydrogen Water on Atopic Dermatitis Induced by Dermatophagoides farinae Allergen in NC/Nga Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Mistica C. Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen water (HW produced by electrolysis of water has characteristics of extremely low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP value and high dissolved hydrogen (DH. It has been proved to have various beneficial effects including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects; however, HW effect on atopic dermatitis (AD, an inflammatory skin disorder, is poorly documented. In the present study, we examined the immunological effect of drinking HW on Dermatophagoides farinae-induced AD-like skin in NC/Nga mice. Mice were administered with HW and purified water (PW for 25 days. We evaluated the serum concentration of pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-12p70, Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10, and cytokine expressed by both subsets (GM-CSF to assess their possible relationship to the severity of AD. The serum levels of cytokines such as IL-10, TNF-α, IL-12p70, and GM-CSF of mice administered with HW was significantly reduced as compared to PW group. The results suggest that HW affects allergic contact dermatitis through modulation of Th1 and Th2 responses in NC/Nga mice. This is the first note on the drinking effect of HW on AD, clinically implying a promising potential remedy for treatment of AD.

  20. Process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of liquid water and gaseous halohydrocarbon and an apparatus therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, E. A.; Clermont, M. J.; Paterson, L. M.; Rolston, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope (e.g. deuterium) exchange from liquid water to a gaseous halohydrocarbon (e.g. fluoroform, CF 3 H-CF 3 D) is obtained at an operating temperature in the range 0 0 to 100 0 C. using a catalytically active mass comprising a porous anion exchange resin in the hydroxide ion form and enriched gaseous halohydrocarbon stream is decomposed by isotope selective photo-decomposition into a first, gaseous stream enriched in the hydrogen isotope, which is removed as a product, and a depleted gaseous halohydrocarbon stream, which is recirculated for enrichment again. The catalytically active mass may, for example, be in the form of resin particles suspended in a fluidized bed or packed as resin particles between sheets wound into a roll. One of the sheets may be corrugated and have open interstices to form a packing in a column which permits countercurrent gas and liquid flow past the resin. Preferably the wound sheets are hydrophilic to retard flooding by the liquid water. The liquid water stream may contain dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) added as co-solvent

  1. Performance of wave function and density functional methods for water hydrogen bond spin-spin coupling constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de la Vega, J M; Omar, S; San Fabián, J

    2017-04-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in water monomer and dimer have been calculated using several wave function and density functional-based methods. CCSD, MCSCF, and SOPPA wave functions methods yield similar results, specially when an additive approach is used with the MCSCF. Several functionals have been used to analyze their performance with the Jacob's ladder and a set of functionals with different HF exchange were tested. Functionals with large HF exchange appropriately predict 1 J O H , 2 J H H and 2h J O O couplings, while 1h J O H is better calculated with functionals that include a reduced fraction of HF exchange. Accurate functionals for 1 J O H and 2 J H H have been tested in a tetramer water model. The hydrogen bond effects on these intramolecular couplings are additive when they are calculated by SOPPA(CCSD) wave function and DFT methods. Graphical Abstract Evaluation of the additive effect of the hydrogen bond on spin-spin coupling constants of water using WF and DFT methods.

  2. “Inexhaustible” source of hydrogen may be unlocked by salt water

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce

    2011-12-01

    A grain of salt or two may be all that microbial electrolysis cells need to produce hydrogen from wastewater or organic by-products, without adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere or using grid electricity, according to engineers in the USA at The Pennsylvania State University. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. “Inexhaustible” source of hydrogen may be unlocked by salt water

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    A grain of salt or two may be all that microbial electrolysis cells need to produce hydrogen from wastewater or organic by-products, without adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere or using grid electricity, according to engineers in the USA at The Pennsylvania State University. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Production cost comparisons of hydrogen from fossil and nuclear fuel and water decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    The comparative costs entailed in producing hydrogen by major technologies that rely on petroleum, natural gas, coal, thermochemical cycles, and electrolysis are examined. Techniques were developed for comparing these processes by formulating the process data and economic assessments on a uniform and consistent basis. These data were normalized to permit a meaningful comparative analysis of product costs of these processes.

  5. Learning about Regiochemistry from a Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears-Dundes, Christopher; Huon, Yoeup; Hotz, Richard P.; Pinhas, Allan R.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment has been developed in which the hydrogen-atom abstraction and the coupling of propionitrile, using Fenton's reagent, are investigated. Students learn about the regiochemistry of radical formation, the stereochemistry of product formation, and the interpretation of GC-MS data, in a safe reaction that can be easily completed in one…

  6. Water leak detection in sodium heated steam generators through measurement of hydrogen concentration in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambillard, E.; Lacroix, A.; Martin, P.; Viala, J.

    1980-07-01

    This report includes a description of apparatus for measuring hydrogen concentration in the secondary sodium system of the PHENIX reactor. The calibration method and results obtained since the commissioning of the reactor are also described. Mention is made of improvements to be built into SUPER PHENIX [fr

  7. Hydrogen production from water gas shift reaction in a high gravity (Higee) environment using a rotating packed bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Syu, Yu-Jhih [Department of Greenergy, National University of Tainan, Tainan 700 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Hydrogen production via the water gas shift reaction (WGSR) was investigated in a high gravity environment. A rotating packed bed (RPB) reactor containing a Cu-Zn catalyst and spinning in the range of 0-1800 rpm was used to create high centrifugal force. The reaction temperature and the steam/CO ratio ranged from 250 to 350 C and 2 to 8, respectively. A dimensionless parameter, the G number, was derived to account for the effect of centrifugal force on the enhancement of the WGSR. With the rotor speed of 1800 rpm, the induced centrifugal force acting on the reactants was as high as 234 g on average in the RPB. As a result, the CO conversion from the WGSR was increased up to 70% compared to that without rotation. This clearly revealed that the centrifugal force was conducive to hydrogen production, resulting from intensifying mass transfer and elongating the path of the reactants in the catalyst bed. From Le Chatelier's principle, a higher reaction temperature or a lower steam/CO ratio disfavors CO conversion; however, under such a situation the enhancement of the centrifugal force on hydrogen production from the WGSR tended to become more significant. Accordingly, a correlation between the enhancement of CO conversion and the G number was established. As a whole, the higher the reaction temperature and the lower the steam/CO ratio, the higher the exponent of the G number function and the better the centrifugal force on the WGSR. (author)

  8. Generation of an electromotive force by hydrogen-to-water oxidation with Pt-coated oxidized titanium foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schierbaum, Klaus; El Achhab, Mhamed [Department of Materials Science, Institute for Experimental Condensed Matter Physics, Heinrich-Heine University, 40225 Duesseldorf, Universitaetsstrasse 1 (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    We show that chemically induced current densities up to 20 mA cm{sup -2} and an electromotive force (EMF) up to 465 mV are generated during the hydrogen-to-water-oxidation over Pt/TiO{sub 2}/Ti devices. We prepare the samples by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of titanium foils and deposition of Pt contact paste. This process yields porous structures and, depending on the anodization voltage, Schottky diode-type current-voltage curves of various ideality parameters. Our experiments demonstrate that Pt coated anodized titanium can also be utilized as hydrogen sensor; the system offers a number of advantages such as a wide temperature range of operation from -40 to 80 C, quick response and decay times of signals, and good electrical stability. Idealized sketch of the Pt coated anodized Ti foil and application as hydrogen sensor and electric generator. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Advanced water splitting for green hydrogen gas production through complete oxidation of starch by in vitro metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Eung; Kim, Eui-Jin; Chen, Hui; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2017-11-01

    Starch is a natural energy storage compound and is hypothesized to be a high-energy density chemical compound or solar fuel. In contrast to industrial hydrolysis of starch to glucose, an alternative ATP-free phosphorylation of starch was designed to generate cost-effective glucose 6-phosphate by using five thermophilic enzymes (i.e., isoamylase, alpha-glucan phosphorylase, 4-α-glucanotransferase, phosphoglucomutase, and polyphosphate glucokinase). This enzymatic phosphorolysis is energetically advantageous because the energy of α-1,4-glycosidic bonds among anhydroglucose units is conserved in the form of phosphorylated glucose. Furthermore, we demonstrated an in vitro 17-thermophilic enzyme pathway that can convert all glucose units of starch, regardless of branched and linear contents, with water to hydrogen at a theoretic yield (i.e., 12 H 2 per glucose), three times of the theoretical yield from dark microbial fermentation. The use of a biomimetic electron transport chain enabled to achieve a maximum volumetric productivity of 90.2mmol of H 2 /L/h at 20g/L starch. The complete oxidation of starch to hydrogen by this in vitro synthetic (enzymatic) biosystem suggests that starch as a natural solar fuel becomes a high-density hydrogen storage compound with a gravimetric density of more than 14% H 2 -based mass and an electricity density of more than 3000Wh/kg of starch. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. A molecular molybdenum–schiff base electro-catalyst for generating hydrogen from acetic acid or water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Jie-Ping; Fang, Ting; Zhou, Ling-Ling; Fu, Ling-Zhi; Zhan, Shuzhong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The reaction of ligand, H 2 L and MoCl 5 gives a Mo(VI) complex [MoL(O) 2 ] 1. • Complex 1 is capable of catalyzing hydrogen evolution from acetic acid and water. • TOF reaches a maximum of 68 (DMF) and 356 (buffer, pH 6) moles/h, respectively. • Sustained proton reduction catalysis occurs over a 69 h period and no decomposition of 1. - ABSTRACT: The reaction of 2-pyridylamino-N,N-bis(2-methylene-4-ethyl-6-tert-butylphenol) (H 2 L) and MoCl 5 gives a molybdenum(VI) complex [MoL(O) 2 ] 1, a new molecular electrocatalyst, which has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Electrochemical studies show that complex 1 can catalyze hydrogen evolution from acetic acid or aqueous buffer. Turnover frequency (TOF) reaches a maximum of 68 (in N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF)) and 356 (in buffer, pH 6.0) moles of hydrogen per mole of catalyst per hour, respectively. Sustained proton reduction catalysis occurs at glassy carbon (GC) electrode to give H 2 over a 69 h electrolysis period and no observable decomposition of the catalyst

  11. Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Pressure Hydrogen Production. A comprehensive project report (FY2010 - FY2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaehn, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Peterson, Eric [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Orme, Christopher [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bhandari, Dhaval [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Miller, Scott [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Ku, Anthony [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Polishchuk, Kimberly [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Narang, Kristi [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Singh, Surinder [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Wei, Wei [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Shisler, Roger [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Wickersham, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); McEvoy, Kevin [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Alberts, William [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Howson, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Barton, Thomas [Western Research inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Sethi, Vijay [Western Research inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL), GE Global Research (GEGR), and Western Research Institute (WRI) have successfully produced hydrogen-selective membranes for water-gas-shift (WGS) modules that enable high-pressure hydrogen product streams. Several high performance (HP) polymer membranes were investigated for their gas separation performance under simulated (mixed gas) and actual syngas conditions. To enable optimal module performance, membranes with high hydrogen (H2) selectivity, permeance, and stability under WGS conditions are required. The team determined that the VTEC PI 80-051 and VTEC PI 1388 (polyimide from Richard Blaine International, Inc.) are prime candidates for the H2 gas separations at operating temperatures (~200°C). VTEC PI 80-051 was thoroughly analyzed for its H2 separations under syngas processing conditions using more-complex membrane configurations, such as tube modules and hollow fibers. These membrane formats have demonstrated that the selected VTEC membrane is capable of providing highly selective H2/CO2 separation (α = 7-9) and H2/CO separation (α = 40-80) in humidified syngas streams. In addition, the VTEC polymer membranes are resilient within the syngas environment (WRI coal gasification) at 200°C for over 1000 hours. The information within this report conveys current developments of VTEC PI 80-051 as an effective H2 gas separations membrane for high-temperature syngas streams.

  12. Application of water-assisted ultraviolet light in combination of chlorine and hydrogen peroxide to inactivate Salmonella on fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuanghuan; Huang, Runze; Chen, Haiqiang

    2017-09-18

    With the demand for fresh produce increases in recent decades, concerns for microbiological safety of fresh produce are also raised. To identify effective ultraviolet (UV) light treatment for fresh produce decontamination, we first determined the effect of three forms of UV treatment, dry UV (samples were treated by UV directly), wet UV (samples were dipped in water briefly and then exposed to UV), and water-assisted UV (samples were treated by UV while being immersed in agitated water) on inactivation of Salmonella inoculated on tomatoes and fresh-cut lettuce. In general, the water-assisted UV treatment was found to be the most effective for both produce items. Chlorine and hydrogen peroxide were then tested to determine whether they could be used to enhance the decontamination efficacy of water-assisted UV treatment and prevent transfer of Salmonella via wash water by completely eliminating it. Neither of them significantly enhanced water-assisted UV inactivation of Salmonella on tomatoes. Chlorine significantly improved the decontamination effectiveness of the water-assisted UV treatment for baby-cut carrots and lettuce, but not for spinach. In general, the single water-assisted UV treatment and the combined treatment of water-assisted UV and chlorine were similar or more effective than the chlorine washing treatment. In most of the cases, no Salmonella was detected in the wash water when the single water-assisted UV treatment was used to decontaminate tomatoes. In a few cases when Salmonella was detected in the wash water, the populations were very low,≤2CFU/mL, and the wash water contained an extremely high level of organic load and soil level. Therefore, the single water-assisted UV treatment could potentially be used as an environmentally friendly and non-chemical alternative to chlorine washing for tomatoes after validation in industrial scale. For lettuce, spinach and baby-cut carrots, the combined treatment of water-assisted UV treatment and chlorine

  13. Production of liquid alkanes by controlling reactivity of sorbitol hydrogenation with a Ni/HZSM-5 catalyst in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Tiejun; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Qi; Ma, Longlong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: MCM-41-modified Ni/HZSM-5 catalyst was developed by impregnation method with high catalytic performance for sorbitol hydrogenation in water. Appropriate amount of MCM-41 addition can distinctly promote the improvement in the surface structure and modulation of acidic sites of the catalyst. The scission of C–O bond in the sorbitol molecule into liquid alkanes was easily carried out on the catalyst containing more Lewis acidic sites. - Highlights: • Ni/HZSM-5 promoted with MCM-41 is active for sorbitol hydrogenation to liquid alkanes. • Lewis acidic sites of Ni/HZSM-5 can be modulated by pure silica MCM-41. • MCM-41 added can distinctly decrease carbon deposition on the catalyst surface. - Abstract: Liquid fuels derived from renewable biomass are of great importance on the potential substitution for diminishing fossil fuels. The conversion of sorbitol (a product of biomass-derived glucose hydrogenation) into liquid alkanes such as pentane and hexane over the Ni/HZSM-5 catalysts with or without MCM-41 addition was investigated in the presence of hydrogen in water medium. The production distribution of sorbitol hydrogenation can be controlled by adjusting the acidity of the catalyst. The scission of C–C bond in the sorbitol molecule into light C 1 –C 4 alkanes was mainly carried out over Ni/HZSM-5 containing strong Brønsted acid sites, while C–O bond scission into heavier alkanes was dominated over the catalysts added by MCM-41 containing weak Lewis acid sites. The sorbitol conversion and total liquid alkanes selectivity were found to be 67.1% and 98.7% over 2%Ni/HZSM-5 modified by 40 wt% of MCM-41, whereas the corresponding value was 40% and 35.6% over 2%Ni/HZSM-5 in the absence of MCM-41. The effect of MCM-41 on the structure, acidity, and reducibility of Ni/HZSM-5 was investigated by using XRD, Py-IR, IR, and H 2 -TPR. Meanwhile, the resistance of carbon deposition over the catalyst modified by MCM-41 was studied by using TG

  14. Study of the bipolar electrolysis of the tritiated water applied to the hydrogen isotopes separation by electrochemical permeation threw Pd-Ag alloy membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinze, S.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study is to enrich waters of poor tritium concentration, by electrolysis in the same time of an hydrogen emission of low activity. In this framework the hydrogen electrochemical permeation threw Pd-Ag alloy membranes has been used. The first part of the study concerns the hydrogen and the deuterium diffusion threw these membranes. The activation and the thermal treatments influence have been studied. A relation between the membrane microstructure and the diffusion mechanism has been proposed. The second part of the study is devoted to the hydrogen gate mechanism determination in the membrane by impedance spectroscopy. The last part concerns the determination of the isotopic separation factor hydrogen-deuterium. Experimental results agree the calculated theoretical data. The operation of an operational membrane cell has been simulated and the process feasibility has been proved. (A.L.B.)

  15. A nuclear magnetic relaxation study of hydrogen exchange and water dynamics in aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankhorst, D.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis exchange of water protons in solutions of some weak electrolytes and polyelectrolytes is studied. Also the dynamical behaviour of water molecules in pure water is investigated. For these purposes nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements, in solutions of oxygen-17 enriched water, are interpreted. The exchange rate of the water protons is derived from the contribution of 1 H- 17 O scalar coupling to the proton transverse relaxation rate. This rate is measured by the Carr-Purcell technique. (Auth.)

  16. Grain boundary selective oxidation and intergranular stress corrosion crack growth of high-purity nickel binary alloys in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, S. M.; Olszta, M. J.; Toloczko, M. B.; Schreiber, D. K.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of alloying elements in Ni-5at%X binary alloys on intergranular (IG) corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been assessed in 300-360°C hydrogenated water at the Ni/NiO stability line. Alloys with Cr or Al additions exhibited grain boundary oxidation and IGSCC, while localized degradation was not observed for pure Ni, Ni-Cu or Ni-Fe alloys. Environment-enhanced crack growth was determined by comparing the response in water and N2 gas. Results demonstrate that selective grain boundary oxidation of Cr and Al promoted IGSCC of these Ni alloys in hydrogenated water.

  17. Caution on the storage of waters and aqueous solutions in plastic containers for hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Jorge E

    2012-11-30

    The choice of containers for storage of aqueous samples between their collection, transport and water hydrogen ((2)H) and oxygen ((18)O) stable isotope analysis is a topic of concern for a wide range of fields in environmental, geological, biomedical, food, and forensic sciences. The transport and separation of water molecules during water vapor or liquid uptake by sorption or solution and the diffusive transport of water molecules through organic polymer material by permeation or pervaporation may entail an isotopic fractionation. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the extent of such fractionation. Sixteen bottle-like containers of eleven different organic polymers, including low and high density polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE), polypropylene (PP), polycarbonate (PC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and perfluoroalkoxy-Teflon (PFA), of different wall thickness and size were completely filled with the same mineral water and stored for 659 days under the same conditions of temperature and humidity. Particular care was exercised to keep the bottles tightly closed and prevent loss of water vapor through the seals. Changes of up to +5‰ for δ(2)H values and +2.0‰ for δ(18)O values were measured for water after more than 1 year of storage within a plastic container, with the magnitude of change depending mainly on the type of organic polymer, wall thickness, and container size. The most important variations were measured for the PET and PC bottles. Waters stored in glass bottles with Polyseal™ cone-lined PP screw caps and thick-walled HDPE or PFA containers with linerless screw caps having an integrally molded inner sealing ring preserved their original δ(2)H and δ(18)O values. The carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen stable isotope compositions of the organic polymeric materials were also determined. The results of this study clearly show that for precise and accurate measurements of the water stable isotope composition in aqueous solutions, rigorous sampling and

  18. Atomic scale study of the chemistry of oxygen, hydrogen and water at SiC surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amy, Fabrice

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the achievable degree of homogeneity and the effect of surface structure on semiconductor surface chemistry is both academically challenging and of great practical interest to enable fabrication of future generations of devices. In that respect, silicon terminated SiC surfaces such as the cubic 3C-SiC(1 0 0) 3 x 2 and the hexagonal 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) 3 x 3 are of special interest since they give a unique opportunity to investigate the role of surface morphology on oxygen or hydrogen incorporation into the surface. In contrast to silicon, the subsurface structure plays a major role in the reactivity, leading to unexpected consequences such as the initial oxidation starting several atomic planes below the top surface or the surface metallization by atomic hydrogen. (review article)

  19. Analysis of the hybrid copper oxide-copper sulfate cycle for the thermochemical splitting of water for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, Ross B.; Law, Victor J.; Prindle, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The hybrid copper oxide-copper sulfate water-splitting thermochemical cycle involves two principal steps: (1) hydrogen production from the electrolysis of water, SO 2 (g) and CuO(s) at room temperature and (2) the thermal decomposition of the CuSO 4 product to form oxygen and SO 2 , which is recycled to the first step. A four-reaction version of the cycle (known in the literature as Cycle H-5) was used as the basis of the present work. For several of the four reactions, a rotating batch reactor sequence is proposed in order to overcome equilibrium limitations. Pinch technology was used to optimize heat integration. Sensitivity analyses revealed it to be economically more attractive to use a 10 C approach to minimize heat loss (rather than 20 C). Using standard Aspen Plus features and the Peng-Robinson equation of state for separations involving oxygen and sulfur oxides, a proposed flowsheet for the cycle was generated to yield ''Level 3'' results. A cost analysis of the designed plant (producing 100 million kmol/yr hydrogen) indicates a total major equipment cost of approximately $45 million. This translates to a turnkey plant price (excluding the cost of the high-temperature heat source or electrolyzer internals) of approximately $360 million. Based on a $2.50/kg selling price for hydrogen, gross annual revenue could be on the order of $500 million, resulting in a reasonable payback period when all capital and operating costs are considered. Previous efficiency estimates using Level 1 and Level 2 methods gave the process efficiency in the neighborhood of 47-48%. The Level 3 efficiency computation was 24-25% depending on the approach temperature used for recuperation. If the low quality heat rejected by the process can be recovered and used elsewhere, the Level 3 analysis could be as high as 51-53%. (author)

  20. Removal of distal protein-water hydrogen bonds in a plant epoxide hydrolase increases catalytic turnover but decreases thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaeus, Ann; Naworyta, Agata; Mowbray, Sherry L; Widersten, Mikael

    2008-07-01

    A putative proton wire in potato soluble epoxide hydrolase 1, StEH1, was identified and investigated by means of site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetic measurements, temperature inactivation studies, and X-ray crystallography. The chain of hydrogen bonds includes five water molecules coordinated through backbone carbonyl oxygens of Pro(186), Leu(266), His(269), and the His(153) imidazole. The hydroxyl of Tyr(149) is also an integrated component of the chain, which leads to the hydroxyl of Tyr(154). Available data suggest that Tyr(154) functions as a final proton donor to the anionic alkylenzyme intermediate formed during catalysis. To investigate the role of the putative proton wire, mutants Y149F, H153F, and Y149F/H153F were constructed and purified. The structure of the Y149F mutant was solved by molecular replacement and refined to 2.0 A resolution. Comparison with the structure of wild-type StEH1 revealed only subtle structural differences. The hydroxyl group lost as a result of the mutation was replaced by a water molecule, thus maintaining a functioning hydrogen bond network in the proton wire. All mutants showed decreased catalytic efficiencies with the R,R-enantiomer of trans-stilbene oxide, whereas with the S,S-enantiomer, k (cat)/K (M) was similar or slightly increased compared with the wild-type reactions. k (cat) for the Y149F mutant with either TSO enantiomer was increased; thus the lowered enzyme efficiencies were due to increases in K (M). Thermal inactivation studies revealed that the mutated enzymes were more sensitive to elevated temperatures than the wild-type enzyme. Hence, structural alterations affecting the hydrogen bond chain caused increases in k (cat) but lowered thermostability.

  1. Sensitivity of hydrogen bonds of DNA and RNA to hydration, as gauged by 1JNH measurements in ethanol-water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manalo, Marlon N.; Kong Xiangming; LiWang, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond lengths of nucleic acids are (1) longer in DNA than in RNA, and (2) sequence dependent. The physicochemical basis for these variations in hydrogen-bond lengths is unknown, however. Here, the notion that hydration plays a significant role in nucleic acid hydrogen-bond lengths is tested. Watson-Crick N1...N3 hydrogen-bond lengths of several DNA and RNA duplexes are gauged using imino 1 J NH measurements, and ethanol is used as a cosolvent to lower water activity. We find that 1 J NH values of DNA and RNA become less negative with added ethanol, which suggests that mild dehydration reduces hydrogen-bond lengths even as the overall thermal stabilities of these duplexes decrease. The 1 J NH of DNA are increased in 8 mol% ethanol to those of RNA in water, which suggests that the greater hydration of DNA plays a significant role in its longer hydrogen bonds. The data also suggest that ethanol-induced dehydration is greater for the more hydrated G:C base pairs and thereby results in greater hydrogen-bond shortening than for the less hydrated A:T/U base pairs of DNA and RNA

  2. Questioning hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag, Roel; Mazza, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen is to be compared to electricity, the only widespread and viable alternative. When hydrogen is used to transmit renewable electricity, only 51% can reach the end user due to losses in electrolysis, hydrogen compression, and the fuel cell. In contrast, conventional electric storage technologies allow between 75% and 85% of the original electricity to be delivered. Even when hydrogen is extracted from gasified coal (with carbon sequestration) or from water cracked in high-temperature nuclear reactors, more of the primary energy reaches the end user if a conventional electric process is used instead. Hydrogen performs no better in mobile applications, where electric vehicles that are far closer to commercialization exceed fuel cell vehicles in efficiency, cost and performance. New, carbon-neutral energy can prevent twice the quantity of GHG's by displacing fossil electricity than it can by powering fuel cell vehicles. The same is true for new, natural gas energy. New energy resources should be used to displace high-GHG electric generation, not to manufacture hydrogen

  3. A combined experimental and theoretical approach to the study of hydrogen bond interaction in the binary mixture of N-methylimidazole with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Rongyi; Du, Rongbin; Liu, Guangxiang; Zhao, Xiuqin; Ye, Shiyong; Wu, Genhua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Densities of N-methylimidazole with water binary mixture were measured. ► Excess molar volumes were fitted to Redlich–Kister polynomial equation. ► Excess molar volumes are negative in the whole mole fraction range. ► 1:1 Hydrogen complex formation between the unlike components was observed. ► Formation of hydrogen bonds in the binary mixture was confirmed by DFT//B3LYP. - Abstract: The intermolecular hydrogen bond interactions in the N-methylimidazole (MeIm) with water binary mixture have been studied by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. The densities of the binary mixture have been measured at T = (288.15 to 323.15) K and at atmospheric pressure. From the experimental data, excess molar volumes were determined as a function of composition at each temperature. The results reveal the formation of 1:1 hydrogen bond complex between MeIm with water at the maximal excess molar volume. Meanwhile, the formation of hydrogen bonds in the binary mixture was further confirmed by high level theoretical calculation. The structures, interactional energies and bond characteristics of the hydrogen bond complexes were calculated in the gas phase using density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) theory levels. The changes of thermodynamic properties from the monomers to hydrogen bond complexes with the temperature ranging from (288.15 to 323.15) K were obtained using the statistical thermodynamic method. Thermodynamic analyses have been interpreted in terms of intermolecular interactions and excess molar volume changes in the binary mixture. It was also found that the formation reaction of the hydrogen bond complex of MeIm with water was an exothermic, entropy reduced and spontaneous thermodynamic process at all the temperature studied.

  4. Preparation of the vulcan XC-72R-supported Pt nanoparticles for the hydrogen evolution reaction in PEM water electrolysers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Huy Du; Nguyen, T Thuy Luyen; Nguyen, Khac Manh; Ha, Thuc Huy; Nguyen, Quoc Hien

    2015-01-01

    Pt nanoparticles on vulcan XC-72R support (Pt/vulcan XC-72R) were prepared by the impregnation–reduction method. The Pt content, the morphological properties and the electrochemical catalysis of the Pt/vulcan XC 72R materials have been investigated by ICP-OES analysis, FESEM, TEM, and cyclic voltammetry. These materials were then used as catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction at the cathode of proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysers. The best catalyst was Pt/vulcan XC-72R prepared by the impregnation–reduction method which is conducted in two reducing steps with the reductants of sodium borohydride and ethylene glycol, respectively. The current density of PEM water electrolysers reached 1.0 A cm"−"2 when applying a voltage of 2.0 V at 25 °C. (paper)

  5. Operating experiences of Heavy Water Plant at Talcher using bithermal ammonia-hydrogen exchange process (Paper No. 1.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haldar, T.K.; Manoj Kumar; Ramamurty, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    A heavy water plant employing bithermal ammonia-hydrogen exchange process was set up at Talcher (India). The energy consumption in the process is lower as compared to monothermal process. The plant performance was affected by various problems and has resulted in low heavy water production. The problems are: (i)formation of solid deposits, (ii)inability of exchange towers to process design gas flow rates, (iii)inadequate exchange efficiency of the sieve trays provided as exchange trays, and (iv)differential amide concentration in different plant sections. These problems and their effect on the overall plant performance are discussed in detail and modifications to improve the performance are suggested. (author). 4 figs

  6. Deuterium exchange reaction between hydrogen and water in a trickle-bed column packed with novel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, D. H.; Baek, S. W.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, K. R.; Kang, H. S.; Lee, S. H.; Jeong, H. S.

    1998-01-01

    The activity of a novel catalyst (Pt/SDBC) for deuterium exchange reaction between water and hydrogen streams in a trickle bed was measured. The performance of the catalyst was compared with a commercial catalyst with same metal content. The catalytic activity for the bed of wet-proofed catalyst diluted with hydrophillic packing material also measured. The Pt/SDBC catalyst shows higher activity in the liquid phase reaction than the commercial catalyst as measured in the vapor phase reaction. The performance for 50% dilution of the Pt/SDBC catalyst bed with hydrophillic packing material is better than that of the 100% bed due to more liquid holdup and better water distribution

  7. Comparative exploration of hydrogen sulfide and water transmembrane free energy surfaces via orthogonal space tempering free energy sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chao; Aitchison, Erick W; Wu, Dongsheng; Zheng, Lianqing; Cheng, Xiaolin; Yang, Wei

    2016-03-05

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S), a commonly known toxic gas compound, possesses unique chemical features that allow this small solute molecule to quickly diffuse through cell membranes. Taking advantage of the recent orthogonal space tempering (OST) method, we comparatively mapped the transmembrane free energy landscapes of H2 S and its structural analogue, water (H2 O), seeking to decipher the molecular determinants that govern their drastically different permeabilities. As revealed by our OST sampling results, in contrast to the highly polar water solute, hydrogen sulfide is evidently amphipathic, and thus inside membrane is favorably localized at the interfacial region, that is, the interface between the polar head-group and nonpolar acyl chain regions. Because the membrane binding affinity of H2 S is mainly governed by its small hydrophobic moiety and the barrier height inbetween the interfacial region and the membrane center is largely determined by its moderate polarity, the transmembrane free energy barriers to encounter by this toxic molecule are very small. Moreover when H2 S diffuses from the bulk solution to the membrane center, the above two effects nearly cancel each other, so as to lead to a negligible free energy difference. This study not only explains why H2 S can quickly pass through cell membranes but also provides a practical illustration on how to use the OST free energy sampling method to conveniently analyze complex molecular processes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Investigation of a novel concept for hydrogen production by PEM water electrolysis integrated with multi-junction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrero, Domenico; Santarelli, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A 2D model of a PEM water electrolyzer is developed and validated. • A novel system integrating PEM and multi-junction solar cells is proposed. • The model is applied to the simulation of the novel system. • The integration of PEM and MJ cells enhances the hydrogen production efficiency. - Abstract: A 2D finite element model of a high-pressure PEM water electrolyzer is developed and validated over experimental data obtained from a demonstration prototype. The model includes the electrochemical, fluidic and thermal description of the repeating unit of a PEM electrolyzer stack. The model is applied to the simulation of a novel system composed by a high-temperature, high-pressure PEM electrochemical cell coupled with a photovoltaic multi-junction solar cell installed in a solar concentrator. The thermo-electrochemical characterization of the solar-driven PEM electrolysis system is presented and the advantages of the high-temperature operation and of the direct coupling of electrolyzer and solar cell are assessed. The results show that the integration of the multi-junction cell enhances the performance of the electrolyzer and allows to achieve higher system efficiency compared to separated photovoltaic generation and hydrogen production by electrolysis.

  9. Energy and exergy analyses of a copper-chlorine thermochemical water decomposition pilot plant for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, M.F.; Dincer, I.; Rosen, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear-based hydrogen production via thermochemical water decomposition using a copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle consists of a series of chemical reactions in which water is split into hydrogen and oxygen as the net result. This is accomplished through reactions involving intermediate copper and chlorine compounds, which are recycled. Energy and exergy analyses are reported here of a Cu-Cl pilot plant, including the relevant chemical reactions. The reference environment is taken to be at a temperature of 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure (1 atm). The chemical exergy of a substance, which is the maximum work that can be obtained from it by taking it to chemical equilibrium with the reference environment at constant temperature and pressure, is calculated with property data for the substance and the reference environment, with enthalpy and entropy values calculated using Shomate equations. The reaction heat, exergy destruction and efficiencies in each chemical reaction vary with the reaction temperature and reference-environment temperature. A parametric study with variable reaction and reference-environment temperatures is also presented. (author)

  10. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of biomass. Phase 1 -- Technical and business feasibility study, technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The nine-month Phase 1 feasibility study was directed toward the application of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) for the economical production and end use of hydrogen from renewable energy sources such as sewage sludge, pulp waste, agricultural wastes, and ultimately the combustible portion of municipal solid waste. Unique in comparison to other gasifier systems, the properties of supercritical water (SCW) are ideal for processing biowastes with high moisture content or contain toxic or hazardous contaminants. During Phase I, an end-to-end SCWG system was evaluated. A range of process options was initially considered for each of the key subsystems. This was followed by tests of sewage sludge feed preparation, pumping and gasification in the SCW pilot plant facility. Based on the initial process review and successful pilot-scale testing, engineering evaluations were performed that defined a baseline system for the production, storage and end use of hydrogen. The results compare favorably with alternative biomass gasifiers currently being developed. The results were then discussed with regional wastewater treatment facility operators to gain their perspective on the proposed commercial SCWG systems and to help define the potential market. Finally, the technical and business plans were developed based on perceived market needs and the projected capital and operating costs of SCWG units. The result is a three-year plan for further development, culminating in a follow-on demonstration test of a 5 MT/day system at a local wastewater treatment plant.

  11. The #betta# irradiation-enhanced corrosion of stainless and mild steels by water in the presence of air, argon and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, W.G.; Marsh, W.R.; Walters, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    When air-saturated pure water was #betta#-irradiated in the presence of air to high doses in sealed stainless steel containers hydrogen and oxygen were formed. The amounts were less than one tenth of the maximum possible for continuous aqueous radiolysis but the increase in oxygen appearing as gas was less than that equivalent to the hydrogen formed from the water present, indicating that metallic corrosion had occurred. In the absence of radiation no change in gas composition was observed. When the air in solution and in the gas space was replaced by argon or by hydrogen, radiolysis and corrosion were virtually suppressed. When the container was made of mild steel or strips of mild steel were initially introduced into a sealed stainless steel container containing air and water, oxygen was consumed on irradiation, and hydrogen was formed, together with a suspended brown oxide. In the absence of radiation oxygen was consumed and hydrogen was formed but both at a lower rate than in the presence of radiation. In this case, unlike the case of stainless steel, the formation of hydrogen was not prevented by replacing the air present with argon. The results are discussed. (author)

  12. Toward enhanced hydrogen generation from water using oxygen permeating LCF membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Xiao-Yu; Chang, Le; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Kirchen, Patrick; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2015-01-01

    and flow rates on the feed and sweep sides on the water thermolysis rate and oxygen flux. A single step reaction mechanism is proposed for surface reactions, and three-resistance permeation models are derived. Results show that water thermolysis

  13. Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel in Energy Conversion Devices (a.k.a. Understanding Photosystem I as a Biomolecular Reactor for Energy Conversion)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel in Energy Conversion Devices (a.k.a. Understanding Photosystem I as...Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-6904 April 2014 Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel in Energy...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 10/1/2010–10/1/2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel

  14. Comparison of hydrogen generation for TVSM and TVSA fuel assemblies for water water energy reactor (VVER)-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, A.E.; Groudev, P.P.; Atanasova, B.P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results received during investigation of hydrogen generation for both types fuel assemblies-the old modernistic type of fuel assemblies (TVSM) and recently installed new one alternative type of fuel assemblies (TVSA) in case of severe accident. There are some differences between both types FAs. They have different geometry as well as different burnable poisons. To investigate behavior of new fuel assemblies during the severe conditions it have been performed comparison of fuel behavior of old type TVSM fuel assembly to new one TVSA. To perform this investigation it has been used MELCOR 'input model' for Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) VVER 1000. The model was developed by Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy-Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (INRNE-BAS) for investigation of severe accident scenarios and Probabilistic Safety Analyses (PSA) level 2. The model provides a significant analytical capability for the Bulgarian technical specialists, working in the field of the NPP safety, for analysis of core and containment damaged states and the estimation of radionuclides release outside fuel cladding. It was accepted criteria for vessel integrity about hydrogen concentration to be 8%. This criterion was based on the decision of RSK (Germany commission for reactor safety). Generally based on the received results it was made conclusion that using both types of fuel assemblies it was not disturbance safety conditions of NPP

  15. Oxidation of Alloy 82 in nominal PWR primary water at 340 deg. C and in hydrogenated steam at 400 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaumun, Elizabeth; Guerre Catherine; Duhamel, Cecilie; Sennour, Mohamed; Curieres, Ian-de

    2012-09-01

    Nickel-base weld metals are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary water. As tests in laboratory need to last, in some cases, at least several thousand hours to get stress corrosion crack initiation or propagation in simulated primary water, pure hydrogenated steam at 400 deg. C was used to perform accelerated tests. To confirm that these conditions are still representative of primary water conditions, results of oxidation tests of coupons in hydrogenated steam at 400 deg. C and in primary water at 340 deg. C have been compared. Surface oxide layers have been characterized in order to discuss the influence of the temperature and of the media (water or steam). (authors)

  16. Solar Hydrogen Reaching Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongé Jan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly vast research efforts are devoted to the development of materials and processes for solar hydrogen production by light-driven dissociation of water into oxygen and hydrogen. Storage of solar energy in chemical bonds resolves the issues associated with the intermittent nature of sunlight, by decoupling energy generation and consumption. This paper investigates recent advances and prospects in solar hydrogen processes that are reaching market readiness. Future energy scenarios involving solar hydrogen are proposed and a case is made for systems producing hydrogen from water vapor present in air, supported by advanced modeling.

  17. Effect of isotopic hydrogen exchange on thermochemistry of solution of ammonium halides and deuteroammonium in water, heavy water and their mixtures with dimethylsulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, G.I.

    1996-01-01

    Standard dissolution enthalpies of ammonium and deuteroammonium bromides and iodides in water, heavy water and their mixtures with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) at 298.15 K and compositions up to X=0.4 (X-mole part of DMSO) are presented. The influence of isotopic hydrogen exchange on the values of the standard dissolution enthalpies of NH 4 Cl, ND 4 Cl, NH 4 Br, ND 4 BR and NH 4 I in H 2 O, D 2 O and H 2 O (D 2 O)-DMSO mixture at 298.15 K, as well as of NH 4 Cl and ND 4 Cl in the same solvents at 323.15 K has been discussed. The values of NH 4 Cl and ND 4 Cl crystal lattice enthalpies have been compared. 15 refs., 3 tabs

  18. Engineering Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Catalysts for Water-Splitting Hydrogen Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Xianyi; Tang, Yingying; Duus, Jens Øllgaard

    2017-01-01

    Development of advanced energy conversion and storage technologies is essential for optimizing the integration of sustainable energy resources into current-running power grid systems. As one of the key energy-storage carriers, hydrogen (H2) possesses ultrahigh gravimetric energy density, eco...... working principles of HER electrocatalysts, and main synthetic methods of 2D TMDs based materials. We then highlight some representative 2D-TMD materials used as HER electrocatalysts and conclude with the remarks and outlook of the relevant research lines....

  19. Electro-activity of cobalt and nickel complexes for the reduction of protons into di-hydrogen. Application to PEM water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantani, O.; Anxolabehere, E.; Aukauloo, A.; Millet, P.

    2006-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysis is a safe and efficient way to perform water splitting into di-hydrogen and di-oxygen. In a PEM water electrolyser, platinum is commonly used as electro-catalyst on the cathodic side of the cells, mostly because of its efficiency for hydrogen evolution. But for cost considerations, there is a need to find alternative low-cost electrocatalysts. Molecular chemistry offers the possibility of synthesizing new compounds for this purpose, such as transition metal complexes. Results obtained with nickel- and cobalt-oximes compounds are presented in this paper. They have been chemically (1H NMR, EPR) and electrochemically (voltametry, spectro-electrochemistry) characterized. Their ability to electrochemically reduce protons into di-hydrogen when they are either dissolved in solution or immobilized at the surface of a solid electrode is discussed. (authors)

  20. The production of hydrogen through the use of a 77 wt% Pd 23 wt% Ag membrane water gas shift reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberty N. Baloyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen as an energy carrier has the potential to decarbonize the energy sector. This work presents the application of a palladium-silver (Pd–Ag membrane-based reactor. The membrane reactor which is made from Pd–Ag film supported by porous stainless steel (PSS is evaluated for the production of hydrogen and the potential replacement of the current two-stage Water-Gas Shift (WGS reaction by a single stage reaction. The permeability of a 20 μm Pd–Ag membrane reactor was examined at 320 °C, 380 °C and 430 °C. The effect of continuous hydrogen exposure on the Pd–Ag membrane at high temperature and low temperature was examined to investigate the thermal stability and durability of the membrane. During continuous operation to determine thermal stability, the membrane reactor exhibited stable hydrogen permeation at 320 °C for 120 h and unstable hydrogen permeation at 430 °C was observed. For the WGS reaction, the reactor was loaded with Ferrochrome catalyst. The membrane showed the ability to produce high purity hydrogen, with a CO conversion and an H2 recovery of 84% and 88%, respectively. The membrane suffered from hydrogen embrittlement due to desorption and adsorption of hydrogen on the membrane surface. SEM analysis revealed cracks that occurred on the surface of the membrane after hydrogen exposure. XRD analysis revealed lattice expansion after hydrogen loading which suggests the occurrence of phase change from α-phase to the more brittle β-phase.

  1. Solar-hydrogen energy systems: an authoritative review of water-splitting systems by solar beam and solar heat : hydrogen production, storage, and utilisation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ōta, Tokio

    1979-01-01

    ... An Authoritative Review of Watersplitting Systems by Solar Beam and Solar Heat: Hydrogen Production, Storage and Utilisation edited by TOKIO OHTA Professor of Materials Science and Energy System Yoko...

  2. Dependence of ion-water distances on covalent radii, ionic radii in water and distances of oxygen and hydrogen of water from ion/water boundaries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyrovská, Raji

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 429, č. 4-6 (2006), s. 600-605 ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : ion-water distances * covalent and ionic radius Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.462, year: 2006

  3. Hydrogen and Oxygen stable isotope analysis of water in fruits and vegetables by using cavity ring-down spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yaeko

    2016-01-01

    We determined oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope ratios (δ"1"8O and δD) of water in fruits (citrus) and vegetables (ginger) using cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS) for assessment of their authenticity. The δ"1"8O and δD values of fruits and straight juice had higher than those of concentrated juice. The citrus fruits from Japan had relatively lower δ"1"8O and δD values of than those from Australia, South Africa and the United States. The δD values and d-excess of ginger samples from Japan were relatively higher than those of ginger samples from China. The δ"1"8O and δD values of water in fruits and vegetables would be representative of the ambient water, depending on geographical parameters such as the latitude and altitude. These results suggested that δ"1"8O and δD values of water in fruits and vegetables by using CRDS would be potentially useful for assessment of their authenticity. (author)

  4. Photocatalytic Hydrogen or Oxygen Evolution from Water over S- or N-Doped TiO2 under Visible Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumoto Nishijima

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available S- or N-doping of TiO2 powder having an anatase or rutile phase extended the photocatalytic activity for water oxidation and reduction under UV light and visible light irradiation. For the reduction of water, anatase-doped TiO2 showed higher level of activity than that of doped TiO2 having a rutile phase using ethanol as an electron donor. Furthermore, the activity level of S-doped TiO2 for hydrogen evolution was higher than that of N-doped TiO2 photocatalysts under visible light. Photocatalytic oxidation of water on doped TiO2 having a rutile phase proceeded with fairly high efficiency when Fe3+ ions were used as electron acceptors compared to that on doped TiO2 having an anatase phase. In addition, water splitting under visible light irradiation was achieved by construction of a Z-scheme photocatalysis system employing the doped TiO2 having anatase and rutile phases for H2 and O2 evolution and the I−/IO3− redox couple as an electron relay.

  5. The relationship between stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios of water in astomatal plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lee W.; DeNiro, Michael J.; Keeley, Jon E.; Taylor, H. P.; O'Neil, J. R.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1991-01-01

    Isotropic fractination of leaf water during transpiration is influenced by both equilibrium and kinetic factors. Previous workers have predicted that the influence of each factor varies depending upon the path of water loss,m whether centralized through stomata, or diffuse through the cuticle. We studied the relationship between the δD and δ18O values of lead and stem waters of laurel sumac, Rhus laurina (Nutt.) T. & G., and its parasite, dodder, Cuscuta subinclusa D. & H., growing in the field. Stomatal transpiration, associated with more stagnant boundary layers, predominates in R. laurina; cuticular transpiration, associated with more turbulent boundary layers, is most important in the largely astomatal C. subinclusa. We also studied the diurnal variation in the δD and δ18O values of lead waters of two astomatal plants, Chiloschista lunifera (Rchb. F.) J.J.S. and Stylites andicola Amstutz, and two stomatal plants, Tillandsia balbisiana Schult. and Lilaeopsis schaffneriana (Schlecht.) C. & R., growing with them under the same conditions in the laboratory. Slopes, m, for the relation δD = mδ18O + b were significantly higher for stem waters in C. subinclusa that for leaf waters in R. laurina (1.77), consistent with the difference in the boundary layers through which water was lost in the two species. The magnitude of diurnal heavy isotope enrichment of tissue water was smaller in C. subinclusa than in R. laurina, which is also consistent with predictions concerning evapotranspiration through difference types of boundary layers. The slopes, m, in plant waters in the laboratory experiments, conducted at high humidity, were not different than those observed during evaporation of water from pans, regardless of plant anatomy. The observation suggests that cuticular transpiration is important in influencing isotopic fractionation of water only at low humidity. Our results indicate that the isotopic composition of water vapor released by plants in arid regions may

  6. On the intermolecular vibrational coupling, hydrogen bonding, and librational freedom of water in the hydration shell of mono- and bivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Namboodiri, V; Singh, Ajay K; Mondal, Jahur A

    2014-10-28

    The hydration energy of an ion largely resides within the first few layers of water molecules in its hydration shell. Hence, it is important to understand the transformation of water properties, such as hydrogen-bonding, intermolecular vibrational coupling, and librational freedom in the hydration shell of ions. We investigated these properties in the hydration shell of mono- (Cl(-) and I(-)) and bivalent (SO4(2-) and CO3(2-)) anions by using Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) spectroscopy in the OH stretch, HOH bend, and [bend+librational] combination bands of water. Raman-MCR of aqueous Na-salt (NaCl, NaI, Na2SO4, and Na2CO3) solutions provides ion-correlated spectra (IC-spectrum) which predominantly bear the vibrational characteristics of water in the hydration shell of respective anions. Comparison of these IC-spectra with the Raman spectrum of bulk water in different spectral regions reveals that the water is vibrationally decoupled with its neighbors in the hydration shell. Hydrogen-bond strength and librational freedom also vary with the nature of anion: hydrogen-bond strength, for example, decreases as CO3(2-) > SO4(2-) > bulk water ≈ Cl(-) > I(-); and the librational freedom increases as CO3(2-) ≈ SO4(2-) water water in the hydration shell of anions.

  7. Research Update: Photoelectrochemical water splitting and photocatalytic hydrogen production using ferrites (MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillert, Ralf [Institut für Technische Chemie, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität Hannover, Callinstr. 3, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Laboratorium für Nano- und Quantenengineering, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität Hannover, Schneiderberg 39, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Taffa, Dereje H.; Wark, Michael [Institut für Chemie, Technische Chemie, Carl-von-Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Carl-von-Ossietzky Str. 9-11, 26129 Oldenburg (Germany); Bredow, Thomas [Mulliken Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universität Bonn, Beringstraße 4, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Bahnemann, Detlef W. [Institut für Technische Chemie, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität Hannover, Callinstr. 3, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Laboratory for Nanocomposite Materials, Department of Photonics, Faculty of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, Ulianovskaia Str. 3, Peterhof, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-01

    The utilization of solar light for the photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic production of molecular hydrogen from water is a scientific and technical challenge. Semiconductors with suitable properties to promote solar-driven water splitting are a desideratum. A hitherto rarely investigated group of semiconductors are ferrites with the empirical formula MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and related compounds. This contribution summarizes the published results of the experimental investigations on the photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic properties of these compounds. It will be shown that the potential of this group of compounds in regard to the production of solar hydrogen has not been fully explored yet.

  8. Hydrogen incorporation by plasma treatment gives mesoporous black TiO 2 thin films with visible photoelectrochemical water oxidation activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Syed Z.; Reed, Allen; Nagpure, Suraj; Wanninayake, Namal; Browning, James F.; Strzalka, Joseph; Kim, Doo Young; Rankin, Stephen E.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we use neutron reflectometry (NR) to investigate the roles of hydrogen in plasma treated hydrogen doped mesoporous black titania thin films in their visible light absorption and enhanced photoactivity for water oxidation. The cubic ordered mesoporous TiO2 thin films are prepared by a surfactant-templated sol-gel method and are treated with hydrogen plasma, an approach hypothesized to capitalize on the high degree of disorder in the material and the high energy of the plasma species to achieve efficient hydrogen doping. UV-vis absorbance spectra indicate that H2 plasma treatment makes TiO2 films black, with broad-spectrum enhancement of visible light absorption, and XPS analysis shows peak for Ti3+ state in treated films. The presence of hydrogen in black mesoporous titania (H-TiO2) films is confirmed by the scattering length density (SLD) profiles obtained from neutron reflectometry measurements. The H-TiO2 shows ca. 28 times and 8 times higher photocurrent for photoelectrochemical water oxidation compared to undoped TiO2 films under UV (365 nm) and blue (455 nm) LED irradiation, respectively. These findings provide the first direct evidence that the dramatic change in visible light absorbance of H-treated black TiO2 is accompanied by significant hydrogen uptake and not just Ti3+ generation or surface disordering.

  9. Method and apparatus for electrokinetic co-generation of hydrogen and electric power from liquid water microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saykally, Richard J; Duffin, Andrew M; Wilson, Kevin R; Rude, Bruce S

    2013-02-12

    A method and apparatus for producing both a gas and electrical power from a flowing liquid, the method comprising: a) providing a source liquid containing ions that when neutralized form a gas; b) providing a velocity to the source liquid relative to a solid material to form a charged liquid microjet, which subsequently breaks up into a droplet spay, the solid material forming a liquid-solid interface; and c) supplying electrons to the charged liquid by contacting a spray stream of the charged liquid with an electron source. In one embodiment, where the liquid is water, hydrogen gas is formed and a streaming current is generated. The apparatus comprises a source of pressurized liquid, a microjet nozzle, a conduit for delivering said liquid to said microjet nozzle, and a conductive metal target sufficiently spaced from said nozzle such that the jet stream produced by said microjet is discontinuous at said target. In one arrangement, with the metal nozzle and target electrically connected to ground, both hydrogen gas and a streaming current are generated at the target as it is impinged by the streaming, liquid spray microjet.

  10. Analysis of Water Hammer with Different Closing Valve Laws on Transient Flow of Hydrogen-Natural Gas Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norazlina Subani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Water hammer on transient flow of hydrogen-natural gas mixture in a horizontal pipeline is analysed to determine the relationship between pressure waves and different modes of closing and opening of valves. Four types of laws applicable to closing valve, namely, instantaneous, linear, concave, and convex laws, are considered. These closure laws describe the speed variation of the hydrogen-natural gas mixture as the valve is closing. The numerical solution is obtained using the reduced order modelling technique. The results show that changes in the pressure wave profile and amplitude depend on the type of closing laws, valve closure times, and the number of polygonal segments in the closing function. The pressure wave profile varies from square to triangular and trapezoidal shape depending on the type of closing laws, while the amplitude of pressure waves reduces as the closing time is reduced and the numbers of polygonal segments are increased. The instantaneous and convex closing laws give rise to minimum and maximum pressure, respectively.

  11. Review of data of oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition in thermal waters in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Zhicheng; Wang Jiyang

    1988-01-01

    Based on the data of δD and δ 18 O content from more than 600 water samples, this paper reviews the stable isotope composition of thermal waters in China. Data to be used in this paper were mostly collected from published literatures with a few by authors. 9 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Experimental Assessment of Water Sprays Utilization for Controlling Hydrogen Sulfide Releases in Confined Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfeng Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reported the utilization of water spray for controlling H2S release in a confined space, which is especially important in industry. A typical spray tower was modified to simulate the confined space for people's enterable routine operation (e.g., pump room, in which the dilution capacity of water sprays can also be evaluated. This work consists of two parts: the first part focuses on the influences of different operating conditions on chemical dilution capacities of water sprays in mechanisms; the second one is comparison between two nozzle configurations for evaluating their feasibilities of practical application. Water sprays express eligible performance for H2S release control even though their dilution capacity was weakened at high gaseous concentrations and rates of releases. The presence of Na2CO3 can significantly improve absorption effectiveness of H2S in water and the optimal Na2CO3 additive was found to be 1.0 g·L−1 in this test. Compared with Na2CO3, adjusting water flow rate may be an effective strategy in enhancing dilution capacity of water sprays due to the fact that larger flow rate led to both less dilution time (TD and dilution concentration (CD. Furthermore, multinozzle configuration is more efficient than single-nozzle configuration under the same water consumption.