WorldWideScience

Sample records for water wave problem

  1. Linear Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N.; Maz'ya, V.; Vainberg, B.

    2002-08-01

    This book gives a self-contained and up-to-date account of mathematical results in the linear theory of water waves. The study of waves has many applications, including the prediction of behavior of floating bodies (ships, submarines, tension-leg platforms etc.), the calculation of wave-making resistance in naval architecture, and the description of wave patterns over bottom topography in geophysical hydrodynamics. The first section deals with time-harmonic waves. Three linear boundary value problems serve as the approximate mathematical models for these types of water waves. The next section uses a plethora of mathematical techniques in the investigation of these three problems. The techniques used in the book include integral equations based on Green's functions, various inequalities between the kinetic and potential energy and integral identities which are indispensable for proving the uniqueness theorems. The so-called inverse procedure is applied to constructing examples of non-uniqueness, usually referred to as 'trapped nodes.'

  2. Initial-Boundary Value Problem Solution of the Nonlinear Shallow-water Wave Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoglu, U.; Aydin, B.

    2014-12-01

    The hodograph transformation solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear shallow-water wave (NSW) equations are usually obtained through integral transform techniques such as Fourier-Bessel transforms. However, the original formulation of Carrier and Greenspan (1958 J Fluid Mech) and its variant Carrier et al. (2003 J Fluid Mech) involve evaluation integrals. Since elliptic integrals are highly singular as discussed in Carrier et al. (2003), this solution methodology requires either approximation of the associated integrands by smooth functions or selection of regular initial/boundary data. It should be noted that Kanoglu (2004 J Fluid Mech) partly resolves this issue by simplifying the resulting integrals in closed form. Here, the hodograph transform approach is coupled with the classical eigenfunction expansion method rather than integral transform techniques and a new analytical model for nonlinear long wave propagation over a plane beach is derived. This approach is based on the solution methodology used in Aydın & Kanoglu (2007 CMES-Comp Model Eng) for wind set-down relaxation problem. In contrast to classical initial- or boundary-value problem solutions, here, the NSW equations are formulated to yield an initial-boundary value problem (IBVP) solution. In general, initial wave profile with nonzero initial velocity distribution is assumed and the flow variables are given in the form of Fourier-Bessel series. The results reveal that the developed method allows accurate estimation of the spatial and temporal variation of the flow quantities, i.e., free-surface height and depth-averaged velocity, with much less computational effort compared to the integral transform techniques such as Carrier et al. (2003), Kanoglu (2004), Tinti & Tonini (2005 J Fluid Mech), and Kanoglu & Synolakis (2006 Phys Rev Lett). Acknowledgments: This work is funded by project ASTARTE- Assessment, STrategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe. Grant 603839, 7th FP (ENV.2013.6.4-3 ENV

  3. Water wave scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Birendra Nath

    2015-01-01

    The theory of water waves is most varied and is a fascinating topic. It includes a wide range of natural phenomena in oceans, rivers, and lakes. It is mostly concerned with elucidation of some general aspects of wave motion including the prediction of behaviour of waves in the presence of obstacles of some special configurations that are of interest to ocean engineers. Unfortunately, even the apparently simple problems appear to be difficult to tackle mathematically unless some simplified assumptions are made. Fortunately, one can assume water to be an incompressible, in viscid and homogeneous

  4. A Variational Reduction and the Existence of a Fully Localised Solitary Wave for the Three-Dimensional Water-Wave Problem with Weak Surface Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffoni, Boris; Groves, Mark D.; Wahlén, Erik

    2018-06-01

    Fully localised solitary waves are travelling-wave solutions of the three- dimensional gravity-capillary water wave problem which decay to zero in every horizontal spatial direction. Their existence has been predicted on the basis of numerical simulations and model equations (in which context they are usually referred to as `lumps'), and a mathematically rigorous existence theory for strong surface tension (Bond number {β} greater than {1/3}) has recently been given. In this article we present an existence theory for the physically more realistic case {0 point of the reduced functional is found by minimising it over its natural constraint set.

  5. Nonlinear Water Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume brings together four lecture courses on modern aspects of water waves. The intention, through the lectures, is to present quite a range of mathematical ideas, primarily to show what is possible and what, currently, is of particular interest. Water waves of large amplitude can only be fully understood in terms of nonlinear effects, linear theory being not adequate for their description. Taking advantage of insights from physical observation, experimental evidence and numerical simulations, classical and modern mathematical approaches can be used to gain insight into their dynamics. The book presents several avenues and offers a wide range of material of current interest. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the subject, the book should be of interest to mathematicians (pure and applied), physicists and engineers. The lectures provide a useful source for those who want to begin to investigate how mathematics can be used to improve our understanding of water wave phenomena. In addition, some of the...

  6. Water Waves The Mathematical Theory with Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stoker, J J

    2011-01-01

    Offers an integrated account of the mathematical hypothesis of wave motion in liquids with a free surface, subjected to gravitational and other forces. Uses both potential and linear wave equation theories, together with applications such as the Laplace and Fourier transform methods, conformal mapping and complex variable techniques in general or integral equations, methods employing a Green's function. Coverage includes fundamental hydrodynamics, waves on sloping beaches, problems involving waves in shallow water, the motion of ships and much more.

  7. Rogue waves in shallow water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomere, T.

    2010-07-01

    Most of the processes resulting in the formation of unexpectedly high surface waves in deep water (such as dispersive and geometrical focusing, interactions with currents and internal waves, reflection from caustic areas, etc.) are active also in shallow areas. Only the mechanism of modulational instability is not active in finite depth conditions. Instead, wave amplification along certain coastal profiles and the drastic dependence of the run-up height on the incident wave shape may substantially contribute to the formation of rogue waves in the nearshore. A unique source of long-living rogue waves (that has no analogues in the deep ocean) is the nonlinear interaction of obliquely propagating solitary shallow-water waves and an equivalent mechanism of Mach reflection of waves from the coast. The characteristic features of these processes are (i) extreme amplification of the steepness of the wave fronts, (ii) change in the orientation of the largest wave crests compared with that of the counterparts and (iii) rapid displacement of the location of the extreme wave humps along the crests of the interacting waves. The presence of coasts raises a number of related questions such as the possibility of conversion of rogue waves into sneaker waves with extremely high run-up. Also, the reaction of bottom sediments and the entire coastal zone to the rogue waves may be drastic.

  8. Topology optimization of wave-propagation problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures.......Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures....

  9. Nonlinear effects in water waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, P.A.E.M.

    1989-05-01

    This set of lecture notes on nonlinear effects in water waves was written on the occasion of the first ICTP course on Ocean Waves and Tides held from 26 September until 28 October 1988 in Trieste, Italy. It presents a summary and unification of my knowledge on nonlinear effects of gravity waves on an incompressible fluid without vorticity. The starting point of the theory is the Hamiltonian for water waves. The evolution equations of both weakly nonlinear, shallow water and deep water gravity waves are derived by suitable approximation of the energy of the waves, resulting in the Korteweg-de Vries equation and the Zakharov equation, respectively. Next, interesting properties of the KdV equation (solitons) and the Zakharov equation (instability of a finite amplitude wave train) are discussed in some detail. Finally, the evolution of a homogeneous, random wave field due to resonant four wave processes is considered and the importance of this process for ocean wave prediction is pointed out. 38 refs, 21 figs

  10. Real time wave measurements and wave hindcasting in deep waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Mandal, S.; SanilKumar, V.; Nayak, B.U.

    Deep water waves off Karwar (lat. 14~'45.1'N, long. 73~'34.8'E) at 75 m water depth pertaining to peak monsoon period have been measured using a Datawell waverider buoy. Measured wave data show that the significant wave height (Hs) predominantly...

  11. Turbulent wind waves on a water current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zavolgensky

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model of water waves generated by the wind over the water surface is presented. A simple modeling method of wind waves is described based on waves lengths diagram, azimuthal hodograph of waves velocities and others. Properties of the generated waves are described. The wave length and wave velocity are obtained as functions on azimuth of wave propagation and growth rate. Motionless waves dynamically trapped into the general picture of three dimensional waves are described. The gravitation force does not enter the three dimensional of turbulent wind waves. That is why these waves have turbulent and not gravitational nature. The Langmuir stripes are naturally modeled and existence of the rogue waves is theoretically proved.

  12. Topology Optimization for Transient Wave Propagation Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, René

    The study of elastic and optical waves together with intensive material research has revolutionized everyday as well as cutting edge technology in very tangible ways within the last century. Therefore it is important to continue the investigative work towards improving existing as well as innovate...... new technology, by designing new materials and their layout. The thesis presents a general framework for applying topology optimization in the design of material layouts for transient wave propagation problems. In contrast to the high level of modeling in the frequency domain, time domain topology...... optimization is still in its infancy. A generic optimization problem is formulated with an objective function that can be field, velocity, and acceleration dependent, as well as it can accommodate the dependency of filtered signals essential in signal shape optimization [P3]. The analytical design gradients...

  13. Mathematical aspects of surface water waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, Walter; Wayne, Clarence E

    2007-01-01

    The theory of the motion of a free surface over a body of water is a fascinating subject, with a long history in both applied and pure mathematical research, and with a continuing relevance to the enterprises of mankind having to do with the sea. Despite the recent advances in the field (some of which we will hear about during this Workshop on Mathematical Hydrodynamics at the Steklov Institute), and the current focus of the mathematical community on the topic, many fundamental mathematical questions remain. These have to do with the evolution of surface water waves, their approximation by model equations and by computer simulations, the detailed dynamics of wave interactions, such as would produce rogue waves in an open ocean, and the theory (partially probabilistic) of approximating wave fields over large regions by averaged 'macroscopic' quantities which satisfy essentially kinetic equations of motion. In this note we would like to point out open problems and some of the directions of current research in the field. We believe that the introduction of new analytical techniques and novel points of view will play an important role in the future development of the area.

  14. Metamaterials, from electromagnetic waves to water waves, bending waves and beyond

    KAUST Repository

    Dupont, G.

    2015-08-04

    We will review our recent work on metamaterials for different types of waves. Transposition of transform optics to water waves and bending waves on plates will be considered with potential applications of cloaking to water waves protection and anti-vibrating systems.

  15. Reduced-order prediction of rogue waves in two-dimensional deep-water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsis, Themistoklis; Farazmand, Mohammad

    2017-11-01

    We consider the problem of large wave prediction in two-dimensional water waves. Such waves form due to the synergistic effect of dispersive mixing of smaller wave groups and the action of localized nonlinear wave interactions that leads to focusing. Instead of a direct simulation approach, we rely on the decomposition of the wave field into a discrete set of localized wave groups with optimal length scales and amplitudes. Due to the short-term character of the prediction, these wave groups do not interact and therefore their dynamics can be characterized individually. Using direct numerical simulations of the governing envelope equations we precompute the expected maximum elevation for each of those wave groups. The combination of the wave field decomposition algorithm, which provides information about the statistics of the system, and the precomputed map for the expected wave group elevation, which encodes dynamical information, allows (i) for understanding of how the probability of occurrence of rogue waves changes as the spectrum parameters vary, (ii) the computation of a critical length scale characterizing wave groups with high probability of evolving to rogue waves, and (iii) the formulation of a robust and parsimonious reduced-order prediction scheme for large waves. T.S. has been supported through the ONR Grants N00014-14-1-0520 and N00014-15-1-2381 and the AFOSR Grant FA9550-16-1-0231. M.F. has been supported through the second Grant.

  16. Travelling water waves with compactly supported vorticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatah, Jalal; Walsh, Samuel; Zeng, Chongchun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we prove the existence of two-dimensional, travelling, capillary-gravity, water waves with compactly supported vorticity. Specifically, we consider the cases where the vorticity is a δ-function (a point vortex), or has small compact support (a vortex patch). Using a global bifurcation theoretic argument, we construct a continuum of finite-amplitude, finite-vorticity solutions for the periodic point vortex problem. For the non-periodic case, with either a vortex point or patch, we prove the existence of a continuum of small-amplitude, small-vorticity solutions. (paper)

  17. Mathematical problems in wave propagation theory

    CERN Document Server

    1970-01-01

    The papers comprising this collection are directly or indirectly related to an important branch of mathematical physics - the mathematical theory of wave propagation and diffraction. The paper by V. M. Babich is concerned with the application of the parabolic-equation method (of Academician V. A. Fok and M. A, Leontovich) to the problem of the asymptotic behavior of eigenfunc­ tions concentrated in a neighborhood of a closed geodesie in a Riemannian space. The techniques used in this paper have been föund useful in solving certain problems in the theory of open resonators. The topic of G. P. Astrakhantsev's paper is similar to that of the paper by V. M. Babich. Here also the parabolic-equation method is used to find the asymptotic solution of the elasticity equations which describes Love waves concentrated in a neighborhood of some surface ray. The paper of T. F. Pankratova is concerned with finding the asymptotic behavior of th~ eigenfunc­ tions of the Laplace operator from the exact solution for the surf...

  18. Water waves generated by underwater explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Mehaute, Bernard Le

    1996-01-01

    This is the first book on explosion-generated water waves. It presents the theoretical foundations and experimental results of the generation and propagation of impulsively generated waves resulting from underwater explosions. Many of the theories and concepts presented herein are applicable to other types of water waves, in particular, tsunamis and waves generated by the fall of a meteorite. Linear and nonlinear theories, as well as experimental calibrations, are presented for cases of deep and shallow water explosions. Propagation of transient waves on dissipative, nonuniform bathymetries to

  19. Simulation of Irregular Waves and Wave Induced Loads on Wind Power Plants in Shallow Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumars, Jenny [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Water Environment Transport

    2004-05-01

    The essay gives a short introduction to waves and discusses the problem with non-linear waves in shallow water and how they effect an offshore wind energy converter. The focus is on the realisation of non-linear waves in the time domain from short-term statistics in the form of a variance density spectrum of the wave elevation. For this purpose the wave transformation from deep water to the near to shore site of a wind energy farm at Bockstigen has been calculated with the use of SWAN (Simulating Waves Near Shore). The result is a wave spectrum, which can be used as input to the realisation. The realisation of waves is done by perturbation theory to the first and second-order. The properties calculated are the wave elevation, water particle velocity and acceleration. The wave heights from the second order perturbation equations are higher than those from the first order perturbation equations. This is also the case for the water particle kinematics. The increase of variance is significant between the first order and the second order realisation. The calculated wave elevation exhibits non-linear features as the peaks become sharper and the troughs flatter. The resulting forces are calculated using Morison's equation. For second order force and base moment there is an increase in the maximum values. The force and base moment are largest approximately at the zero up and down crossing of the wave elevation. This indicates an inertia dominated wave load. So far the flexibility and the response of the structure have not been taken into account. They are, however, of vital importance. For verification of the wave model the results will later on be compared with measurements at Bockstigen off the coast of Gotland in the Baltic Sea.

  20. Problems of application of wave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'yakov, A.F.; Morozkina, M.V.

    1993-01-01

    Technical solutions of using the energy both sea waves and lake ones are analyzed. Mathematical description of wave processes and phenomena as well as techniques of selection and conversion of the wave energy are given. Wave energy electromechanical converters are considered. Great attention is paid to linear generators of electromechanical converters eddy currents in massive sections of these generators and features of their calculation. Techniques for optimization of the linear generator parameters are shown. 60 refs

  1. Wave forces on cylinder submerged horizontally in shallow water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitani, H; Sasaki, K; Kobayashi, T; Nomura, N; Kawabe, H; Sugimoto, H

    1976-12-01

    To estimate the wave forces on offshore and/or coastal structures, the ideal method is undoubtedly to obtain the more accurate solution of hydrodynamic equations under suitable boundary conditions. However, in practice, it is difficult to introduce precise solutions under present technical levels because some important problems still remain. Among them is the unsteady boundary layers with separation around the objects. Consequently, every effort is being made in this field to approximate these conditions. Among these approximations, the Diffraction Wave Theory and the Morrison's Method are the most famous means in practice, although both still have some problems. Some problems with the traditional Finite Amplitude Wave Theories such as Stokes and Cnoidal Wave Theories are examined, and by applying additional computed results to the Morrison's formula, the estimated formula for wave forces on a cylinder submerged horizontally in shallow water is introduced. Subsequently, the applicability of the formula and also the specific characteristics of wave forces on a horizontally settled cylinder are investigated in detail, attaching first importance to the distinctions from the vertically settled cylinder, based on the comparison of computed results with experimental results. The experiments were carried out on two different diameters of cylinder, 70 mm and 140 mm, and bottom slopes of the experimental tanks, /sup 1///sub 100/ and /sup 1///sub 30/, under various conditions varying water depth, wave period, wave height and also setting position of cylinder.

  2. String theory and water waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Clifford V; Pennington, Jeffrey S

    2011-01-01

    We uncover a remarkable role that an infinite hierarchy of nonlinear differential equations plays in organizing and connecting certain c-hat <1 string theories non-perturbatively. We are able to embed the type 0A and 0B (A, A) minimal string theories into this single framework. The string theories arise as special limits of a rich system of equations underpinned by an integrable system known as the dispersive water wave hierarchy. We observe that there are several other string-like limits of the system, and conjecture that some of them are type IIA and IIB (A, D) minimal string backgrounds. We explain how these and several string-like special points arise and are connected. In some cases, the framework endows the theories with a non-perturbative definition for the first time. Notably, we discover that the Painleve IV equation plays a key role in organizing the string theory physics, joining its siblings, Painleve I and II, whose roles have previously been identified in this minimal string context.

  3. Green function for three-wave coupling problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molevich, N E

    2001-01-01

    The Green function is found for three-wave coupling problems. The function was used for analysis of parametric amplification in dissipative and active media. It is shown that the parametric increment in active media can become exponential. As an example, the nonstationary stimulated scattering of electromagnetic waves by sound and temperatures waves is considered. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  4. Turbulence beneath finite amplitude water waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beya, J.F. [Universidad de Valparaiso, Escuela de Ingenieria Civil Oceanica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Valparaiso (Chile); The University of New South Wales, Water Research Laboratory, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Peirson, W.L. [The University of New South Wales, Water Research Laboratory, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Banner, M.L. [The University of New South Wales, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2012-05-15

    Babanin and Haus (J Phys Oceanogr 39:2675-2679, 2009) recently presented evidence of near-surface turbulence generated below steep non-breaking deep-water waves. They proposed a threshold wave parameter a {sup 2}{omega}/{nu} = 3,000 for the spontaneous occurrence of turbulence beneath surface waves. This is in contrast to conventional understanding that irrotational wave theories provide a good approximation of non-wind-forced wave behaviour as validated by classical experiments. Many laboratory wave experiments were carried out in the early 1960s (e.g. Wiegel 1964). In those experiments, no evidence of turbulence was reported, and steep waves behaved as predicted by the high-order irrotational wave theories within the accuracy of the theories and experimental techniques at the time. This contribution describes flow visualisation experiments for steep non-breaking waves using conventional dye techniques in the wave boundary layer extending above the wave trough level. The measurements showed no evidence of turbulent mixing up to a value of a {sup 2}{omega}/{nu} = 7,000 at which breaking commenced in these experiments. These present findings are in accord with the conventional understandings of wave behaviour. (orig.)

  5. CFD Analysis of Water Solitary Wave Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Smida

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new numerical wave generation method is used to investigate the head-on collision of two solitary waves. The reflection at vertical wall of a solitary wave is also presented. The originality of this model, based on the Navier-Stokes equations, is the specification of an internal inlet velocity, defined as a source line within the computational domain for the generation of these non linear waves. This model was successfully implemented in the PHOENICS (Parabolic Hyperbolic Or Elliptic Numerical Integration Code Series code. The collision of two counter-propagating solitary waves is similar to the interaction of a soliton with a vertical wall. This wave generation method allows the saving of considerable time for this collision process since the counter-propagating wave is generated directly without reflection at vertical wall. For the collision of two solitary waves, numerical results show that the run-up phenomenon can be well explained, the solution of the maximum wave run-up is almost equal to experimental measurement. The simulated wave profiles during the collision are in good agreement with experimental results. For the reflection at vertical wall, the spatial profiles of the wave at fixed instants show that this problem is equivalent to the collision process.

  6. WAVE-E: The WAter Vapour European-Explorer Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-LLuva, David; Deiml, Michael; Pavesi, Sara

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade, stratosphere-troposphere coupling processes in the Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) have been increasingly recognized to severely impact surface climate and high-impact weather phenomena. Weakened stratospheric circumpolar jets have been linked to worldwide extreme temperature and high-precipitation events, while anomalously strong stratospheric jets can lead to an increase in surface winds and tropical cyclone intensity. Moreover, stratospheric water vapor has been identified as an important forcing for global decadal surface climate change. In the past years, operational weather forecast and climate models have adapted a high vertical resolution in the UTLS region in order to capture the dynamical processes occurring in this highly stratified region. However, there is an evident lack of available measurements in the UTLS region to consistently support these models and further improve process understanding. Consequently, both the IPCC fifth assessment report and the ESA-GEWEX report 'Earth Observation and Water Cycle Science Priorities' have identified an urgent need for long-term observations and improved process understanding in the UTLS region. To close this gap, the authors propose the 'WAter Vapour European - Explorer' (WAVE-E) space mission, whose primary goal is to monitor water vapor in the UTLS at 1 km vertical, 25 km horizontal and sub-daily temporal resolution. WAVE-E consists of three quasi-identical small ( 500 kg) satellites (WAVE-E 1-3) in a constellation of Sun-Synchronous Low Earth Orbits, each carrying a limb sounding and cross-track scanning mid-infrared passive spectrometer (824 cm-1 to 829 cm-1). The core of the instruments builds a monolithic, field-widened type of Michelson interferometer without any moving parts, rendering it rigid and fault tolerant. Synergistic use of WAVE-E and MetOp-NG operational satellites is identified, such that a data fusion algorithm could provide water vapour profiles from the

  7. Problems of generation and reception of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.F.

    1975-01-01

    The present day status of the problems of gravitation, wave radiation and reception is surveyed. The physical presentation and mathematical description of the processes of radiation, propagation and interaction of gravitation waves with matter and the electromagnetic field are given. The experiments on the search for gravitation waves of astophysical nature are analysed. The laboratory and cosmic sources of these waves and the methods of their reception are described. Special attention is drawn to the analysis of the proposals to perform a complete laboratory gravitation wave experiment

  8. Problems of generation and reception of gravitational waves. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarev, A F [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR)

    1975-01-01

    The present day status of the problems of gravitation, wave radiation and reception is surveyed. The physical presentation and mathematical description of the processes of radiation, propagation and interaction of gravitation waves with matter and the electromagnetic field are given. The experiments on the search for gravitation waves of astophysical nature are analysed. The laboratory and cosmic sources of these waves and the methods of their reception are described. Special attention is drawn to the analysis of the proposals to perform a complete laboratory gravitation wave experiment.

  9. Wave power potential in Malaysian territorial waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmida Mohd Nasir, Nor; Maulud, Khairul Nizam Abdul

    2016-06-01

    Up until today, Malaysia has used renewable energy technology such as biomass, solar and hydro energy for power generation and co-generation in palm oil industries and also for the generation of electricity, yet, we are still far behind other countries which have started to optimize waves for similar production. Wave power is a renewable energy (RE) transported by ocean waves. It is very eco-friendly and is easily reachable. This paper presents an assessment of wave power potential in Malaysian territorial waters including waters of Sabah and Sarawak. In this research, data from Malaysia Meteorology Department (MetMalaysia) is used and is supported by a satellite imaginary obtained from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Malaysia Remote Sensing Agency (ARSM) within the time range of the year 1992 until 2007. There were two types of analyses conducted which were mask analysis and comparative analysis. Mask analysis of a research area is the analysis conducted to filter restricted and sensitive areas. Meanwhile, comparative analysis is an analysis conducted to determine the most potential area for wave power generation. Four comparative analyses which have been carried out were wave power analysis, comparative analysis of wave energy power with the sea topography, hot-spot area analysis and comparative analysis of wave energy with the wind speed. These four analyses underwent clipping processes using Geographic Information System (GIS) to obtain the final result. At the end of this research, the most suitable area to develop a wave energy converter was found, which is in the waters of Terengganu and Sarawak. Besides that, it was concluded that the average potential energy that can be generated in Malaysian territorial waters is between 2.8kW/m to 8.6kW/m.

  10. Topology optimization of vibration and wave propagation problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2007-01-01

    The method of topology optimization is a versatile method to determine optimal material layouts in mechanical structures. The method relies on, in principle, unlimited design freedom that can be used to design materials, structures and devices with significantly improved performance and sometimes...... novel functionality. This paper addresses basic issues in simulation and topology design of vibration and wave propagation problems. Steady-state and transient wave propagation problems are addressed and application examples for both cases are presented....

  11. Problems of the orthogonalized plane wave method. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farberovich, O.V.; Kurganskii, S.I.; Domashevskaya, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    The main problems of the orthogonalized plane wave method are discussed including (a) consideration of core states; (b) effect of overlap of wave functions of external core states upon the band structure; (c) calculation of d-type states. The modified orthogonal plane wave method (MOPW method) of Deegan and Twose is applied in a general form to solve the problems of the usual OPW method. For the first time the influence on the spectrum of the main parameters of the MOPW method is studied systematically by calculating the electronic energy spectrum in the transition metals Nb and V. (author)

  12. Forecasting Water Waves and Currents: A Space-time Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambati, V.R.

    2008-01-01

    Forecasting water waves and currents in near shore and off shore regions of the seas and oceans is essential to maintain and protect our environment and man made structures. In wave hydrodynamics, waves can be classified as shallow and deep water waves based on its water depth. The mathematical

  13. Black Hole Information Problem and Wave Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Pantskhava, Lasha

    2018-06-01

    By reexamination of the boundary conditions of wave equation on a black hole horizon it is found not harmonic, but real-valued exponentially time-dependent solutions. This means that quantum particles probably do not cross the Schwarzschild horizon, but are absorbed and some are reflected by it, what potentially can solve the famous black hole information paradox. To study this strong gravitational lensing we are introducing an effective negative cosmological constant between the Schwarzschild and photon spheres. It is shown that the reflected particles can obtain their additional energy in this effective AdS space and could explain properties of some unusually strong signals, like LIGO events, gamma ray and fast radio bursts.

  14. Electromagnetic waves in complex systems selected theoretical and applied problems

    CERN Document Server

    Velychko, Lyudmyla

    2016-01-01

    This book gives guidance to solve problems in electromagnetics, providing both examples of solving serious research problems as well as the original results to encourage further investigations. The book contains seven chapters on various aspects of resonant wave scattering, each solving one original problem. All of them are unified by the authors’ desire to show advantages of rigorous approaches at all stages, from the formulation of a problem and the selection of a method to the interpretation of results. The book reveals a range of problems associated with wave propagation and scattering in natural and artificial environments or with the design of antennas elements. The authors invoke both theoretical (analytical and numerical) and experimental techniques for handling the problems. Attention is given to mathematical simulations, computational efficiency, and physical interpretation of the experimental results. The book is written for students, graduate students and young researchers. .

  15. Nonlocal Reformulations of Water and Internal Waves and Asymptotic Reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablowitz, Mark J.

    2009-09-01

    Nonlocal reformulations of the classical equations of water waves and two ideal fluids separated by a free interface, bounded above by either a rigid lid or a free surface, are obtained. The kinematic equations may be written in terms of integral equations with a free parameter. By expressing the pressure, or Bernoulli, equation in terms of the surface/interface variables, a closed system is obtained. An advantage of this formulation, referred to as the nonlocal spectral (NSP) formulation, is that the vertical component is eliminated, thus reducing the dimensionality and fixing the domain in which the equations are posed. The NSP equations and the Dirichlet-Neumann operators associated with the water wave or two-fluid equations can be related to each other and the Dirichlet-Neumann series can be obtained from the NSP equations. Important asymptotic reductions obtained from the two-fluid nonlocal system include the generalizations of the Benney-Luke and Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equations, referred to as intermediate-long wave (ILW) generalizations. These 2+1 dimensional equations possess lump type solutions. In the water wave problem high-order asymptotic series are obtained for two and three dimensional gravity-capillary solitary waves. In two dimensions, the first term in the asymptotic series is the well-known hyperbolic secant squared solution of the KdV equation; in three dimensions, the first term is the rational lump solution of the KP equation.

  16. Nonlinear water waves: introduction and overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, A.

    2017-12-01

    For more than two centuries progress in the study of water waves proved to be interdependent with innovative and deep developments in theoretical and experimental directions of investigation. In recent years, considerable progress has been achieved towards the understanding of waves of large amplitude. Within this setting one cannot rely on linear theory as nonlinearity becomes an essential feature. Various analytic methods have been developed and adapted to come to terms with the challenges encountered in settings where approximations (such as those provided by linear or weakly nonlinear theory) are ineffective. Without relying on simpler models, progress becomes contingent upon the discovery of structural properties, the exploitation of which requires a combination of creative ideas and state-of-the-art technical tools. The successful quest for structure often reveals unexpected patterns and confers aesthetic value on some of these studies. The topics covered in this issue are both multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary: there is a strong interplay between mathematical analysis, numerical computation and experimental/field data, interacting with each other via mutual stimulation and feedback. This theme issue reflects some of the new important developments that were discussed during the programme `Nonlinear water waves' that took place at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (Cambridge, UK) from 31st July to 25th August 2017. A cross-section of the experts in the study of water waves who participated in the programme authored the collected papers. These papers illustrate the diversity, intensity and interconnectivity of the current research activity in this area. They offer new insight, present emerging theoretical methodologies and computational approaches, and describe sophisticated experimental results. This article is part of the theme issue 'Nonlinear water waves'.

  17. Topology Optimization for Wave Propagation Problems with Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk

    designed using the proposed method is provided. A novel approach for designing meta material slabs with selectively tuned negative refractive behavior is outlined. Numerical examples demonstrating the behavior of a slab under different conditions is provided. Results from an experimental studydemonstrating...... agreement with numerical predictions are presented. Finally an approach for designing acoustic wave shaping devices is treated. Three examples of applications are presented, a directional sound emission device, a wave splitting device and a flat focusing lens. Experimental results for the first two devices......This Thesis treats the development and experimental validation of density-based topology optimization methods for wave propagation problems. Problems in the frequency regime where design dimensions are between approximately one fourth and ten wavelengths are considered. All examples treat problems...

  18. Simulation and Analysis of Converging Shock Wave Test Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-21

    Results and analysis pertaining to the simulation of the Guderley converging shock wave test problem (and associated code verification hydrodynamics test problems involving converging shock waves) in the LANL ASC radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE are presented. One-dimensional (1D) spherical and two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric geometric setups are utilized and evaluated in this study, as is an instantiation of the xRAGE adaptive mesh refinement capability. For the 2D simulations, a 'Surrogate Guderley' test problem is developed and used to obviate subtleties inherent to the true Guderley solution's initialization on a square grid, while still maintaining a high degree of fidelity to the original problem, and minimally straining the general credibility of associated analysis and conclusions.

  19. Disciplinary Knots and Learning Problems in Waves Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzone, Simone; Frati, Serena; Montalbano, Vera

    An investigation on student understanding of waves is performed during an optional laboratory realized in informal extracurricular way with few, interested and talented pupils. The background and smart intuitions of students rendered the learning path very dynamic and ambitious. The activities started by investigating the basic properties of waves by means of a Shive wave machine. In order to make quantitative observed phenomena, the students used a camcorder and series of measures were obtained from the captured images. By checking the resulting data, it arose some learning difficulties especially in activities related to the laboratory. This experience was the starting point for a further analysis on disciplinary knots and learning problems in the physics of waves in order to elaborate a teaching-learning proposal on this topic.

  20. Comparison of matrix methods for elastic wave scattering problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, S.J.; Varadan, V.K.; Varadan, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    This article briefly describes the T-matrix method and the MOOT (method of optimal truncation) of elastic wave scattering as they apply to A-D, SH- wave problems as well as 3-D elastic wave problems. Two methods are compared for scattering by elliptical cylinders as well as oblate spheroids of various eccentricity as a function of frequency. Convergence, and symmetry of the scattering cross section are also compared for ellipses and spheroidal cavities of different aspect ratios. Both the T-matrix approach and the MOOT were programmed on an AMDHL 470 computer using double precision arithmetic. Although the T-matrix method and MOOT are not always in agreement, it is in no way implied that any of the published results using MOOT are in error

  1. Explicit wave action conservation for water waves on vertically sheared flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Brenda; Toledo, Yaron; Shrira, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Water waves almost always propagate on currents with a vertical structure such as currents directed towards the beach accompanied by an under-current directed back toward the deep sea or wind-induced currents which change magnitude with depth due to viscosity effects. On larger scales they also change their direction due to the Coriolis force as described by the Ekman spiral. This implies that the existing wave models, which assume vertically-averaged currents, is an approximation which is far from realistic. In recent years, ocean circulation models have significantly improved with the capability to model vertically-sheared current profiles in contrast with the earlier vertically-averaged current profiles. Further advancements have coupled wave action models to circulation models to relate the mutual effects between the two types of motion. Restricting wave models to vertically-averaged non-turbulent current profiles is obviously problematic in these cases and the primary goal of this work is to derive and examine a general wave action equation which accounts for these shortcoming. The formulation of the wave action conservation equation is made explicit by following the work of Voronovich (1976) and using known asymptotic solutions of the boundary value problem which exploit the smallness of the current magnitude compared to the wave phase velocity and/or its vertical shear and curvature. The adopted approximations are shown to be sufficient for most of the conceivable applications. This provides correction terms to the group velocity and wave action definition accounting for the shear effects, which are fitting for application to operational wave models. In the limit of vanishing current shear, the new formulation reduces to the commonly used Bretherton & Garrett (1968) no-shear wave action equation where the invariant is calculated with the current magnitude taken at the free surface. It is shown that in realistic oceanic conditions, the neglect of the vertical

  2. Localization Problem in the 5D Standing Wave Braneworld

    OpenAIRE

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Midodashvili, Pavle; Midodashvili, Levan

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the problem of pure gravitational localization of matter fields within the 5D standing wave braneworld generated by gravity coupled to a phantom-like scalar field. We show that in the case of increasing warp factor there exist normalizable zero modes of spin-0, -1/2, -1, and -2 fields on the brane.

  3. A mathematical framework for inverse wave problems in heterogeneous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blazek, K.D.; Stolk, C.; Symes, W.W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a theoretical foundation for some common formulations of inverse problems in wave propagation, based on hyperbolic systems of linear integro-differential equations with bounded and measurable coefficients. The coefficients of these time-dependent partial differential equations

  4. A boundary element model for diffraction of water waves on varying water depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Sanne

    1997-12-31

    In this thesis a boundary element model for calculating diffraction of water waves on varying water depth is presented. The varying water depth is approximated with a perturbed constant depth in the mild-slope wave equation. By doing this, the domain integral which is a result of the varying depth is no longer a function of the unknown wave potential but only a function of position and the constant depth wave potential. The number of unknowns is the resulting system of equations is thus reduced significantly. The integration procedures in the model are tested very thoroughly and it is found that a combination of analytical integration in the singular region and standard numerical integration outside works very well. The gradient of the wave potential is evaluated successfully using a hypersingular integral equation. Deviations from the analytical solution are only found on the boundary or very close to, but these deviations have no significant influence on the accuracy of the solution. The domain integral is evaluated using the dual reciprocity method. The results are compared with a direct integration of the integral, and the accuracy is quite satisfactory. The problem with irregular frequencies is taken care of by the CBIEM (or CHIEF-method) together with a singular value decomposition technique. This method is simple to implement and works very well. The model is verified using Homma`s island as a test case. The test cases are limited to shallow water since the analytical solution is only valid in this region. Several depth ratios are examined, and it is found that the accuracy of the model increases with increasing wave period and decreasing depth ratio. Short waves, e.g. wind generated waves, can allow depth variations up to approximately 2 before the error exceeds 10%, while long waves can allow larger depth ratios. It is concluded that the perturbation idea is highly usable. A study of (partially) absorbing boundary conditions is also conducted. (EG)

  5. Variational structure of inverse problems in wave propagation and vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1995-03-01

    Practical algorithms for solving realistic inverse problems may often be viewed as problems in nonlinear programming with the data serving as constraints. Such problems are most easily analyzed when it is possible to segment the solution space into regions that are feasible (satisfying all the known constraints) and infeasible (violating some of the constraints). Then, if the feasible set is convex or at least compact, the solution to the problem will normally lie on the boundary of the feasible set. A nonlinear program may seek the solution by systematically exploring the boundary while satisfying progressively more constraints. Examples of inverse problems in wave propagation (traveltime tomography) and vibration (modal analysis) will be presented to illustrate how the variational structure of these problems may be used to create nonlinear programs using implicit variational constraints.

  6. Lecture Notes for the Course in Water Wave Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    knowledge. The course is at the same time an introduction to the course in coastal hydraulics on the 8th semester. The notes cover the following five lectures: 1. Definitions. Governing equations and boundary conditions. Derivation of velocity potential for linear waves. Dispersion relationship. 2. Particle...... paths, velocities, accelerations, pressure variation, deep and shallow water waves, wave energy and group velocity. 3. Shoaling, refraction, diffraction and wave breaking. 4. Irregular waves. Time domain analysis of waves. 5. Wave spectra. Frequency domain analysis of waves. The present notes are based...

  7. On the interaction of deep water waves and exponential shear currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Cang, Jie; Liao, Shi-Jun

    2009-05-01

    A train of periodic deep-water waves propagating on a steady shear current with a vertical distribution of vorticity is investigated by an analytic method, namely the homotopy analysis method (HAM). The magnitude of the vorticity varies exponentially with the magnitude of the stream function, while remaining constant on a particular streamline. The so-called Dubreil-Jacotin transformation is used to transfer the original exponentially nonlinear boundary-value problem in an unknown domain into an algebraically nonlinear boundary-value problem in a known domain. Convergent series solutions are obtained not only for small amplitude water waves on a weak current but also for large amplitude waves on a strong current. The nonlinear wave-current interaction is studied in detail. It is found that an aiding shear current tends to enlarge the wave phase speed, sharpen the wave crest, but shorten the maximum wave height, while an opposing shear current has the opposite effect. Besides, the amplitude of waves and fluid velocity decay over the depth more quickly on an aiding shear current but more slowly on an opposing shear current than that of waves on still water. Furthermore, it is found that Stokes criteria of wave breaking is still valid for waves on a shear current: a train of propagating waves on a shear current breaks as the fiuid velocity at crest equals the wave phase speed. Especially, it is found that the highest waves on an opposing shear current are even higher and steeper than that of waves on still water. Mathematically, this analytic method is rather general in principle and can be employed to solve many types of nonlinear partial differential equations with variable coefficients in science, finance and engineering.

  8. Theoretical Model of Acoustic Wave Propagation in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozaczka Eugeniusz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the propagation of low frequency waves in a shallow sea. As a source of acoustic waves, underwater disturbances generated by ships were adopted. A specific feature of the propagation of acoustic waves in shallow water is the proximity of boundaries of the limiting media characterised by different impedance properties, which affects the acoustic field coming from a source situated in the water layer “deformed” by different phenomena. The acoustic field distribution in the real shallow sea is affected not only by multiple reflections, but also by stochastic changes in the free surface shape, and statistical changes in the seabed shape and impedance. The paper discusses fundamental problems of modal sound propagation in the water layer over different types of bottom sediments. The basic task in this case was to determine the acoustic pressure level as a function of distance and depth. The results of the conducted investigation can be useful in indirect determination of the type of bottom.

  9. Computation of nonlinear water waves with a high-order Boussinesq model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.; Bingham, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Computational highlights from a recently developed high-order Boussinesq model are shown. The model is capable of treating fully nonlinear waves (up to the breaking point) out to dimensionless depths of (wavenumber times depth) kh \\approx 25. Cases considered include the study of short......-crested waves in shallow/deep water, resulting in hexagonal/rectangular surface patterns; crescent waves, resulting from unstable perturbations of plane progressive waves; and highly-nonlinear wave-structure interactions. The emphasis is on physically demanding problems, and in eachcase qualitative and (when...

  10. SIMULATION OF NEGATIVE PRESSURE WAVE PROPAGATION IN WATER PIPE NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Van Lam

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject: factors such as pipe wall roughness, mechanical properties of pipe materials, physical properties of water affect the pressure surge in the water supply pipes. These factors make it difficult to analyze the transient problem of pressure evolution using simple programming language, especially in the studies that consider only the magnitude of the positive pressure surge with the negative pressure phase being neglected. Research objectives: determine the magnitude of the negative pressure in the pipes on the experimental model. The propagation distance of the negative pressure wave will be simulated by the valve closure scenarios with the help of the HAMMER software and it is compared with an experimental model to verify the quality the results. Materials and methods: academic version of the Bentley HAMMER software is used to simulate the pressure surge wave propagation due to closure of the valve in water supply pipe network. The method of characteristics is used to solve the governing equations of transient process of pressure change in the pipeline. This method is implemented in the HAMMER software to calculate the pressure surge value in the pipes. Results: the method has been applied for water pipe networks of experimental model, the results show the affected area of negative pressure wave from valve closure and thereby we assess the largest negative pressure that may appear in water supply pipes. Conclusions: the experiment simulates the water pipe network with a consumption node for various valve closure scenarios to determine possibility of appearance of maximum negative pressure value in the pipes. Determination of these values in real-life network is relatively costly and time-consuming but nevertheless necessary for identification of the risk of pipe failure, and therefore, this paper proposes using the simulation model by the HAMMER software. Initial calibration of the model combined with the software simulation results and

  11. Band gaps and localization of surface water waves over large-scale sand waves with random fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Yan; Shao, Hao; Zhong, Yaozhao; Zhang, Sai; Zhao, Zongxi

    2012-06-01

    Band structure and wave localization are investigated for sea surface water waves over large-scale sand wave topography. Sand wave height, sand wave width, water depth, and water width between adjacent sand waves have significant impact on band gaps. Random fluctuations of sand wave height, sand wave width, and water depth induce water wave localization. However, random water width produces a perfect transmission tunnel of water waves at a certain frequency so that localization does not occur no matter how large a disorder level is applied. Together with theoretical results, the field experimental observations in the Taiwan Bank suggest band gap and wave localization as the physical mechanism of sea surface water wave propagating over natural large-scale sand waves.

  12. Experimental Observation of Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinhua; Yang, Jiong; Zi, Jian; Chan, C. T.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The gravity of Earth is responsible for the formation of water waves and usually difficult to change. Although negative effective gravity was recently predicted theoretically in water waves, it has not yet been observed in experiments and remains a mathematical curiosity which is difficult to understand. Here we experimentally demonstrate that close to the resonant frequency of purposely-designed resonating units, negative effective gravity can occur for water waves passing through an array of resonators composing of bottom-mounted split tubes, resulting in the prohibition of water wave propagation. It is found that when negative gravity occurs, the averaged displacement of water surface in a unit cell of the array has a phase difference of π to that along the boundary of the unit cell, consistent with theoretical predictions. Our results provide a mechanism to block water waves and may find applications in wave energy conversion and coastal protection. PMID:23715132

  13. Some problems in generalized electromagnetic thermoelasticity and wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, S.E.S.

    2012-01-01

    The first chapter contains a review of the classical theory of elasticity, the theory of thermodynamics, the theory of uncoupled thermoelasticity, the coupled theory of thermoelasticity, the generalized theory of thermoelasticity with one relaxation time, electromagneto thermoelasticity and an introduction to wave propagation in elastic media. Chapter two is devoted to the study of wave propagation for a problem of an infinitely long solid conducting circular cylinder whose lateral surface is traction free and subjected to a known surrounding temperatures in the presence of a uniform magnetic field in the direction of the axis of the cylinder. Laplace transform techniques are used to derive the solution in the Laplace transform domain. The inversion process is carried out using asymptotic expansions valid for short tines. Numerical results are computed for the temperature, displacement, stress,induced magnetic field and induced electric field distributions. The chapter contains also a study of the wave propagation in the elastic medium. In chapter three, we consider the two-dimensional problem of an infinitely long conducting solid cylinder. The lateral surface of the cylinder is taken to be traction free and is subjected to a known temperature distribution independent of z in the presence of a uniform magnetic field in the direction of the axis of the cylinder. Laplace transform techniques are used. The inversion process is carried out using a numerical method based on Fourier series expansions. Numerical results are computed and represented graphically. The chapter contains also a study of the wave propagation in the elastic medium. In chapter four, we consider a two-dimensional problem for an infinity long cylinder. The lateral surface of the cylinder is taken to be traction free and is subjected to a known temperature distribution independent of φ in the presence of a uniform electric field in the direction of the binomial of the cylinder axis. Laplace and

  14. Initial value problem for colliding gravitational plane waves. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, I.; Ernst, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a homogeneous Hilbert problem (HHP) approach to the initial value problem (IVP) for colliding gravitational plane waves with noncollinear polarization that began in two earlier papers [I. Hauser and F. J. Ernst, J. Math. Phys. 30, 872 (1989) and 30, 2322 (1989)] is continued. After formulating the HHP, the description of how one can apply it to generate a new family of solutions of the colliding wave problem that generalizes a three-parameter family constructed by Ernst, Garcia, and Hauser [J. Math. Phys. 29, 681 (1988)] using a double-Harrison transformation is given. Then the proof that the solution of the new HHP indeed solves the IVP that is posed is presented. A matrix Fredholm equation of the second kind that is equivalent to the HHP is also deduced. This will be used in a sequel to complete the proof of existence of solutions of the HHP and the proof that certain assumed differentiability hypotheses are in fact valid

  15. FUTURE WATER MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS IN ASIAN MEGACITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Prinz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Today, about half of the world population lives in urban areas and in the coming 20 years, urbanization is expected to increase steadily, especially in the Developing World. Based on UN data and projections, about 4 out of the 5 billion world urban population will live in developing countries by 2030. Large cities in the Developing World face the problem of unplanned growth, coupled with the financial and operational inability to offer the public services needed to sustain a decent life in urban environments. Water is one of those essential commodities which is often short in supply and/or of low quality. Additionally, flood poses a threat to urban dwellers during rainy season. The water management challenges in tropical urban areas today and in the decades to come can be characterized by (1 fighting physical shortcomings in water resources, (2 coping with contamination of groundwater, rivers, lakes, and reservoirs by domestic, agricultural or industrial waste and waste water, (3 mitigating environmental impacts of water extraction (such as loss of wetlands, subsidence and seawater intrusion , (4 preventing / mastering flood situations and (5 overcoming administrative and financial strains and operational incapacities. Solutions to the problems of urban water in 20 years time are to be found in supply side and demand side measures. The first group includes (1 optimal use of surface water and groundwater resources, (2 pollution protection, (3 watershed management and (4 more water storage. The second group includes (1 educational training, (2 technological innovation, (3 water conservation and (4 water pricing.

  16. Wave driven magnetic reconnection in the Taylor problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Ma Zhiwei; Linde, Timur

    2003-01-01

    An improved Laplace transform theory is developed in order to investigate the initial response of a stable slab plasma equilibrium enclosed by conducting walls to a suddenly applied wall perturbation in the so-called Taylor problem. The novel feature of this theory is that it does not employ asymptotic matching. If the wall perturbation is switched on slowly compared to the Alfven time then the plasma response eventually asymptotes to that predicted by conventional asymptotic matching theory. However, at early times there is a compressible Alfven wave driven contribution to the magnetic reconnection rate which is not captured by asymptotic matching theory, and leads to a significant increase in the reconnection rate. If the wall perturbation is switched on rapidly compared to the Alfven time then strongly localized compressible Alfven wave-pulses are generated which bounce backward and forward between the walls many times. Each instance these wave-pulses cross the resonant surface they generate a transient surge in the reconnection rate. The maximum pulse driven reconnection rate can be much larger than that predicted by conventional asymptotic matching theory

  17. Rogue waves in a water tank: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Recently many rogue waves have been reported as the main cause of ship incidents on the sea. One of the main characteristics of rogue waves is its elusiveness: they present unexpectedly and disappear in the same wave. Some authors (Zakharov and al.2010) are attempting to find the probability of their appearances apart from studyingthe mechanism of the formation. As an effort on this topic we tried the generation of rogue waves in a water wave tank using a symmetric spectrum(Akhmediev et al. 2011) as input on the wave maker. The produced waves were clearly rogue waves with a rate (maximum wave height/ Significant wave height) of 2.33 and a kurtosis of 4.77 (Janssen 2003, Onorato 2006). These results were already presented (Lechuga 2012). Similar waves (in pattern aspect, but without being extreme waves) were described as crossing waves in a water tank(Shemer and Lichter1988). To go on further the next step has been to apply a theoretical model to the envelope of these waves. After some considerations the best model has been an analogue of the Ginzburg-Landau equation. This apparently amazing result is easily explained: We know that the Ginzburg-Landau model is related to some regular structures on the surface of a liquid and also in plasmas, electric and magnetic fields and other media. Another important characteristic of the model is that their solutions are invariants with respectto the translation group. The main aim of this presentation is to extract conclusions of the model and the comparison with the measured waves in the water tank.The nonlinear structure of waves and their regularity make suitable the use of the Ginzburg-Landau model to the envelope of generated waves in the tank,so giving us a powerful tool to cope with the results of our experiment.

  18. An efficient flexible-order model for 3D nonlinear water waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Bingham, Harry B.; Lindberg, Ole

    2009-01-01

    The flexible-order, finite difference based fully nonlinear potential flow model described in [H.B. Bingham, H. Zhang, On the accuracy of finite difference solutions for nonlinear water waves, J. Eng. Math. 58 (2007) 211-228] is extended to three dimensions (3D). In order to obtain an optimal......, robustness and energy conservation are presented together with demonstrations of grid independent iteration count and optimal scaling of the solution effort. Calculations are made for 3D nonlinear wave problems for steep nonlinear waves and a shoaling problem which show good agreement with experimental...

  19. A review on water pricing problem for sustainable water resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hek, Tan Kim; Ramli, Mohammad Fadzli; Iryanto

    2017-05-01

    A report that presented at the World Forum II at The Hague in March 2000, said that it would be water crisis around the world and some countries will be lack of water in 2025, as a result of global studies. Inefficient using of water and considering water as free goods which means it can be used as much as we want without any lost. Thus, it causes wasteful consumption and low public awareness in using water without effort to preserve and conserve the water resources. In addition, the excessive exploitation of ground water for industrial facilities also leads to declining of available freshwater. Therefore, this paper reviews some problems arise all over the world regarding to improper and improving management, policies and methods to determine the optimum model of freshwater price in order to avoid its wasteful thus ensuring its sustainability. In this paper, we also proposed a preliminary model of water pricing represents a case of Medan, North Sumatera, Indonesia.

  20. A metasurface carpet cloak for electromagnetic, acoustic and water waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Yu, Faxin; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-29

    We propose a single low-profile skin metasurface carpet cloak to hide objects with arbitrary shape and size under three different waves, i.e., electromagnetic (EM) waves, acoustic waves and water waves. We first present a metasurface which can control the local reflection phase of these three waves. By taking advantage of this metasurface, we then design a metasurface carpet cloak which provides an additional phase to compensate the phase distortion introduced by a bump, thus restoring the reflection waves as if the incident waves impinge onto a flat mirror. The finite element simulation results demonstrate that an object can be hidden under these three kinds of waves with a single metasurface cloak.

  1. Lecture Notes for the Course in Water Wave Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter; Burcharth, Hans F.

    knowledge. The course is at the same time an introduction to the course in coastal hydraulics on the 8th semester. The notes cover the first four lectures of the course: • Definitions. Governing equations and boundary conditions. • Derivation of velocity potential for linear waves. Dispersion relationship...... Particle velocities and accelerations. • Particle paths, pressure variation, deep and shallow water waves, wave energy and group velocity. • Shoaling, refraction, diffraction and wave breaking. The last part of the course is on analysis of irregular waves and was included in the first two editions...

  2. Velocity flow field and water level measurements in shoaling and breaking water waves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mukaro, R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on the laboratory investigations of breaking water waves. Measurements of the water levels and instantaneous fluid velocities were conducted in water waves breaking on a sloping beach within a glass flume. Instantaneous water...

  3. Shock wave focusing in water inside convergent structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiments on shock focusing in water-filled convergent structures have been performed. A shock wave in water is generated by means of a projectile, launched from a gas gun, which impacts a water-filled convergent structure. Two types of structures have been tested; a bulk material and a thin shell structure. The geometric shape of the convergent structures is given by a logarithmic spiral, and this particular shape is chosen because it maximizes the amount of energy reaching the focal region. High-speed schlieren photography is used to visualize the shock dynamics during the focusing event. Results show that the fluid-structure interaction between the thin shell structure and the shock wave in the water is different from that of a bulk structure; multiple reflections of the shock wave inside the thin shell are reflected back into the water, thus creating a wave train, which is not observed for shock focusing in a bulk material.

  4. Higher-Order Hamiltonian Model for Unidirectional Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, J. L.; Carvajal, X.; Panthee, M.; Scialom, M.

    2018-04-01

    Formally second-order correct, mathematical descriptions of long-crested water waves propagating mainly in one direction are derived. These equations are analogous to the first-order approximations of KdV- or BBM-type. The advantage of these more complex equations is that their solutions corresponding to physically relevant initial perturbations of the rest state may be accurate on a much longer timescale. The initial value problem for the class of equations that emerges from our derivation is then considered. A local well-posedness theory is straightforwardly established by a contraction mapping argument. A subclass of these equations possess a special Hamiltonian structure that implies the local theory can be continued indefinitely.

  5. Boundary value problems in time for wave equations on RN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Smiley

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Let Lλ denote the linear operator associated with the radially symmetric form of the wave operator ∂t2−Δ+λ together with the side conditions of decay to zero as r=‖x‖→+∞ and T-periodicity in time. Thus Lλω=ωtt−(ωrr+N−1rωr+λω, when there are N space variables. For δ,R,T>0 let DT,R=(0,T×(R,+∞ and Lδ2(D denote the weighted L2 space with weight function exp(δr. It is shown that Lλ is a Fredholm operator from dom(Lλ⊂L2(D onto Lδ2(D with non-negative index depending on λ. If [2πj/T]2<λ≤[2π(j+1/T]2 then the index is 2j+1. In addition it is shown that Lλ has a bounded partial inverse Kλ:Lδ2(D→Hδ1(D⋂Lδ∞(D, with all spaces weighted by the function exp(δr. This provides a key ingredient for the analysis of nonlinear problems via the method of alternative problems.

  6. Comparative Study on Water Impact Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Liang; Yang, Hao; Yan, Shiqiang; Ma, Qingwei; Bihnam, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative numerical study for the water impact problems due to dropping of triangular wedges or ship sections. In the numerical investigation, both the dynamic mesh technique and immersed boundary method adopting fixed Cartesian grids have been adopted in order to conform to the motion of the structure. For the former, a multiple-phase solver with the volume of fluid for identifying the free surface is implemented. In the simulation using this method, both the compress...

  7. Corrosion problems in light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion problems encountered during the author's career are reviewed. Attention is given to the development of Zircaloys and attendant factors that affect corrosion; the caustic and chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel steam generator tubing; the qualification of Inconel Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing and the subsequent corrosion problem of secondary side wastage, caustic SCC, pitting, intergranular attack, denting, and primary side SCC; and SCC in weld and furnace sensitized stainless steel piping and internals in boiling water reactor primary coolants. Also mentioned are corrosion of metallic uranium alloy fuels; corrosion of aluminum and niobium candidate fuel element claddings; crevice corrosion and seizing of stainless steel journal-sleeve combinations; SCC of precipitation hardened and martensitic stainless steels; low temperature SCC of welded austenitic stainless steels by chloride, fluoride, and sulfur oxy-anions; and corrosion problems experienced by condensers

  8. Diffusive Wave Approximation to the Shallow Water Equations: Computational Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan; Radwan, Hany; Dalcin, Lisandro; Calo, Victor M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the use of time adaptivity applied to the one dimensional diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations. A simple and computationally economical error estimator is discussed which enables time-step size adaptivity

  9. Rotating magnetic shallow water waves and instabilities in a sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Artavia, X.; Jones, C. A.; Tobias, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    Waves in a thin layer on a rotating sphere are studied. The effect of a toroidal magnetic field is considered, using the shallow water ideal MHD equations. The work is motivated by suggestions that there is a stably stratified layer below the Earth's core mantle boundary, and the existence of stable layers in stellar tachoclines. With an azimuthal background field known as the Malkus field, ?, ? being the co-latitude, a non-diffusive instability is found with azimuthal wavenumber ?. A necessary condition for instability is that the Alfvén speed exceeds ? where ? is the rotation rate and ? the sphere radius. Magneto-inertial gravity waves propagating westward and eastward occur, and become equatorially trapped when the field is strong. Magneto-Kelvin waves propagate eastward at low field strength, but a new westward propagating Kelvin wave is found when the field is strong. Fast magnetic Rossby waves travel westward, whilst the slow magnetic Rossby waves generally travel eastward, except for some ? modes at large field strength. An exceptional very slow westward ? magnetic Rossby wave mode occurs at all field strengths. The current-driven instability occurs for ? when the slow and fast magnetic Rossby waves interact. With strong field the magnetic Rossby waves become trapped at the pole. An asymptotic analysis giving the wave speed and wave form in terms of elementary functions is possible both in polar trapped and equatorially trapped cases.

  10. Non-dispersive traveling waves in inclined shallow water channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2009-01-01

    Existence of traveling waves propagating without internal reflection in inclined water channels of arbitrary slope is demonstrated. It is shown that traveling non-monochromatic waves exist in both linear and nonlinear shallow water theories in the case of a uniformly inclined channel with a parabolic cross-section. The properties of these waves are studied. It is shown that linear traveling waves should have a sign-variable shape. The amplitude of linear traveling waves in a channel satisfies the same Green's law, which is usually derived from the energy flux conservation for smoothly inhomogeneous media. Amplitudes of nonlinear traveling waves deviate from the linear Green's law, and the behavior of positive and negative amplitudes are different. Negative amplitude grows faster than positive amplitude in shallow water. The phase of nonlinear waves (travel time) is described well by the linear WKB approach. It is shown that nonlinear traveling waves of any amplitude always break near the shoreline if the boundary condition of the full absorption is applied.

  11. Horizon effects with surface waves on moving water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseaux, Germain; Maissa, Philippe; Mathis, Christian; Coullet, Pierre [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Laboratoire J-A Dieudonne, UMR CNRS-UNS 6621, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France); Philbin, Thomas G; Leonhardt, Ulf, E-mail: Germain.Rousseaux@unice.f [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    Surface waves on a stationary flow of water are considered in a linear model that includes the surface tension of the fluid. The resulting gravity-capillary waves experience a rich array of horizon effects when propagating against the flow. In some cases, three horizons (points where the group velocity of the wave reverses) exist for waves with a single laboratory frequency. Some of these effects are familiar in fluid mechanics under the name of wave blocking, but other aspects, in particular waves with negative co-moving frequency and the Hawking effect, were overlooked until surface waves were investigated as examples of analogue gravity (Schuetzhold R and Unruh W G 2002 Phys. Rev. D 66 044019). A comprehensive presentation of the various horizon effects for gravity-capillary waves is given, with emphasis on the deep water/ short wavelength case kh>>1, where many analytical results can be derived. A similarity of the state space of the waves to that of a thermodynamic system is pointed out.

  12. Shock wave convergence in water with parabolic wall boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanuka, D.; Shafer, D.; Krasik, Ya.

    2015-01-01

    The convergence of shock waves in water, where the cross section of the boundaries between which the shock wave propagates is either straight or parabolic, was studied. The shock wave was generated by underwater electrical explosions of planar Cu wire arrays using a high-current generator with a peak output current of ∼45 kA and rise time of ∼80 ns. The boundaries of the walls between which the shock wave propagates were symmetric along the z axis, which is defined by the direction of the exploding wires. It was shown that with walls having a parabolic cross section, the shock waves converge faster and the pressure in the vicinity of the line of convergence, calculated by two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations coupled with the equations of state of water and copper, is also larger

  13. Assessing the performance of wave breaking parameterizations in shallow waters in spectral wave models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shangfei; Sheng, Jinyu

    2017-12-01

    Depth-induced wave breaking is the primary dissipation mechanism for ocean surface waves in shallow waters. Different parametrizations were developed for parameterizing depth-induced wave breaking process in ocean surface wave models. The performance of six commonly-used parameterizations in simulating significant wave heights (SWHs) is assessed in this study. The main differences between these six parameterizations are representations of the breaker index and the fraction of breaking waves. Laboratory and field observations consisting of 882 cases from 14 sources of published observational data are used in the assessment. We demonstrate that the six parameterizations have reasonable performance in parameterizing depth-induced wave breaking in shallow waters, but with their own limitations and drawbacks. The widely-used parameterization suggested by Battjes and Janssen (1978, BJ78) has a drawback of underpredicting the SWHs in the locally-generated wave conditions and overpredicting in the remotely-generated wave conditions over flat bottoms. The drawback of BJ78 was addressed by a parameterization suggested by Salmon et al. (2015, SA15). But SA15 had relatively larger errors in SWHs over sloping bottoms than BJ78. We follow SA15 and propose a new parameterization with a dependence of the breaker index on the normalized water depth in deep waters similar to SA15. In shallow waters, the breaker index of the new parameterization has a nonlinear dependence on the local bottom slope rather than the linear dependence used in SA15. Overall, this new parameterization has the best performance with an average scatter index of ∼8.2% in comparison with the three best performing existing parameterizations with the average scatter index between 9.2% and 13.6%.

  14. Standing Waves and Inquiry Using Water Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Dina; Vondracek, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Most high school and introductory college physics classes study simple harmonic motion and various wave phenomena. With the majority of states adopting the Next Generation Science Standards and pushing students to explore the scientific process for themselves, there is a growing demand for hands-on inquiry activities that involve and develop more…

  15. Calming the Waters or Riding the Waves?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydén, Pernille; Kottika, Efthymia; Hossain, Muhammad Ismail

    Traditional consumer anger management tends to be compromising rather than empowering the brand. This paper conceptualizes and provides a case example on how consumer empowerment and negative emotions can in fact create opportunities for companies to ride the waves of consumer anger in a way that...

  16. Problems of the water environment and water consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raetsep, Aavo

    1999-01-01

    Water extraction and consumption in Ida-Viru County are based mainly on the groundwater and surface water. The major part of the surface water is consumed by power engineering, while households and industry are the main consumers of groundwater. The difference between water extraction and consumption shows that the unused mine water pumped up for draining the oil shale mines and open pits and discharged into rivers forms an essential part (on the average 86%, quantitatively 159-226 millions m 3 /yr.). Serious water supply problems have risen in connection with oil shale mining: numerous village and household wells have been depleted due to a deep drawdown cone, the groundwater of the upper aquifers is polluted with nitrates, phenols and oil products. The poor condition of water-pipes and great leakages (up to 60%) make it difficult to supply townspeople and villagers with high-grade drinking water meeting the Estonian general standard EVS 663:1995. Water pollution is conditioned by poorly treated wastewaters and sewage directed practically into all the major rivers and lakes of the county by industrial and power engineering enterprises and towns and rural settlements. The rivers of the Purtse basin have been continuously under a heavy pollution load: both the mine waters with high minerality and phenolic wastewaters (so-called ash hill waters) of the oil shale thermal processing have been discharged into the rivers. Various water contamination from land areas has led to excessive pollution of Northeast Estonian coastal waters of the Gulf of Finland with toxic organic compounds and nutrients, specially in the regions of Purtse, Saka, Sillamaee and Narva-Joesuu. Up to now, Estonia has not managed completely fulfil the recommendations of the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM) of the Convention on the Protection of the Marine Environment of the Baltic Sea Area. In 1998-2010, water management in Ida-Viru County should be directed towards achieving two Principal objectives

  17. Initial-value problem for the Gardner equation applied to nonlinear internal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvinskaya, Ekaterina; Kurkina, Oxana; Kurkin, Andrey; Talipova, Tatiana; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2017-04-01

    The Gardner equation is a fundamental mathematical model for the description of weakly nonlinear weakly dispersive internal waves, when cubic nonlinearity cannot be neglected. Within this model coefficients of quadratic and cubic nonlinearity can both be positive as well as negative, depending on background conditions of the medium, where waves propagate (sea water density stratification, shear flow profile) [Rouvinskaya et al., 2014, Kurkina et al., 2011, 2015]. For the investigation of weakly dispersive behavior in the framework of nondimensional Gardner equation with fixed (positive) sign of quadratic nonlinearity and positive or negative cubic nonlinearity {eq1} partial η/partial t+6η( {1± η} )partial η/partial x+partial ^3η/partial x^3=0, } the series of numerical experiments of initial-value problem was carried out for evolution of a bell-shaped impulse of negative polarity (opposite to the sign of quadratic nonlinear coefficient): {eq2} η(x,t=0)=-asech2 ( {x/x0 } ), for which amplitude a and width x0 was varied. Similar initial-value problem was considered in the paper [Trillo et al., 2016] for the Korteweg - de Vries equation. For the Gardner equation with different signs of cubic nonlinearity the initial-value problem for piece-wise constant initial condition was considered in detail in [Grimshaw et al., 2002, 2010]. It is widely known, for example, [Pelinovsky et al., 2007], that the Gardner equation (1) with negative cubic nonlinearity has a family of classic solitary wave solutions with only positive polarity,and with limiting amplitude equal to 1. Therefore evolution of impulses (2) of negative polarity (whose amplitudes a were varied from 0.1 to 3, and widths at the level of a/2 were equal to triple width of solitons with the same amplitude for a 1) was going on a universal scenario with the generation of nonlinear Airy wave. For the Gardner equation (1) with the positive cubic nonlinearity coefficient there exist two one-parametric families of

  18. An elementary introduction to the problem of density wave oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svanholm, Kjell; Friedly, John C.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a simple graphical method for analysis of density wave instability in two-phase channels. The objectives are to give the reader a basic knowledge of the physical mechanism behind the oscillations, an understanding of the effect of some of the channel parameters on instability, and a means of qualitatively analyzing for the effect of more complicated operating conditions. The methodology proposed should be useful in providing physical insight into the effect of design modifications, before extensive simulations are carried out, or understanding the physics of the problem enough to appreciate the results of mathematical stability analyses. In summary: a graphical analysis of the principal features of density wave instability has been suggested. The approach is approximate, but incorporates what is believed to be the most important aspects of the physics of the phenomenon. Furthermore, the elementary graphical analysis technique permits incorporation of other effect superimposed on those considered. This permits the designer to make a quick estimate of the effect of certain discrepancies between a real application and the idea cases considered here. Such an estimate may well be used to decide whether it is worthwhile to consider more detailed simulation of the effect. The above analysis can be used very rapidly to investigate qualitatively the effect of a number of parametric effects that may be important in a particular application. Because the analysis is approximative however the reader is cautioned to consider the results estimates only. A practical application may well include effects which tends to dominate those considered most important in the above discussion. The treatment considers the effect on the two-phase density by the inlet velocity (and the velocity of the boiling boundary) and its propagation the most important to determining stability. As presented here it does not include the effect of the varying velocities in the two

  19. Pressure wave propagation in the discharge piping with water pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Young S.; Seul, Kwang W.; Kim, In Goo

    2004-01-01

    Pressure wave propagation in the discharge piping with a sparger submerged in a water pool, following the opening of a safety relief valve, is analyzed. To predict the pressure transient behavior, a RELAP5/MOD3 code is used. The applicability of the RELAP5 code and the adequacy of the present modeling scheme are confirmed by simulating the applicable experiment on a water hammer with voiding. As a base case, the modeling scheme was used to calculate the wave propagation inside a vertical pipe with sparger holes and submerged within a water pool. In addition, the effects on wave propagation of geometric factors, such as the loss coefficient, the pipe configuration, and the subdivision of sparger pipe, are investigated. The effects of inflow conditions, such as water slug inflow and the slow opening of a safety relief valve are also examined

  20. THE DECISION OF FORM FOR DIFFRACTIVE STRUCTURES IN THE PROBLEM OF SCATTERING OF RADIO WAVES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Preobrazhensky

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of scattering of electromagnetic waves in different diffraction structures. The solution of the scattering problem is based on the method of integral equations. On diagrams of backscattering at various frequencies of the incident wave, the decision about the form of the object is carried out.

  1. Wave Loads on Ships Sailing in Restricted Water Depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2003-01-01

    depth for a container vessel. The results show that if the water depth is less than two times the draft of the vessel, the wave-induced bending moment becomes significant larger than in deep water with the same sea state description. The peak in the frequency response function for the wave bending......The wave-induced bending moment in ships is the most important sea load parameter for ships larger than 100m in length. Hence, any rational ship design procedure must include a reasonable accurate determination of this load and a large amount of various hydrodynamic formulations have been published......, ranging from semi-empirical formulas to three-dimensional non-linear procedures. A review of the state-of-the art can be found in ISSC.VI.1 (2000). These procedures must be combined with operational and sea state information to predict the probability distribution of the maximum wave-induced bending...

  2. Wave-guide type photo reactor for water purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobuaki, Negishi; Feng, He; Sadao, Matsuzawa; Koji, Takeuchi; Kayo, Ohno

    2006-01-01

    A wave-guide type photo-catalytic rod that is consisting of a glass tube with transparent TiO 2 (outside) and an optical wave-guide rod (inside) was designed and examined its performance. A model of polluted water, which contains 100 ppm of toluene or phenol, was taken in a 500 ml of beaker and the performance of this unit was evaluated by the removal rate of pollutants in water under photo-irradiation. Acrylic rod with 6-mm diameter was used as the wave-guide of light. One end of acrylic rod 50 mm had a frosted part or a screw thread for increasing seep out of the light. For the glass tube with transparent TiO 2 , four kinds with different film thickness were prepared by the dip-coating method. The wave-guide type photo-catalytic rods effectively eliminated toluene and phenol and the total amount of intermediates formation was low. (authors)

  3. Silicone-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Water Wave Energy Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tian Xiao; Jiang, Tao; Zhu, Jian Xiong; Liang, Xi; Xu, Liang; Shao, Jia Jia; Zhang, Chun Lei; Wang, Jie; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2018-01-31

    Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) has been proven to be efficient for harvesting water wave energy, which is one of the most promising renewable energy sources. In this work, a TENG with a silicone rubber/carbon black composite electrode was designed for converting the water wave energy into electricity. The silicone-based electrode with a soft texture provides a better contact with the dielectric film. Furthermore, a spring structure is introduced to transform low-frequency water wave motions into high-frequency vibrations. They together improve the output performance and efficiency of TENG. The output performances of TENGs are further enhanced by optimizing the triboelectric material pair and tribo-surface area. A spring-assisted TENG device with the segmented silicone rubber-based electrode structure was sealed into a waterproof box, which delivers a maximum power density of 2.40 W m -3 , as triggered by the water waves. The present work provides a new strategy for fabricating high-performance TENG devices by coupling flexible electrodes and spring structure for harvesting water wave energy.

  4. Metamaterial Absorber for Electromagnetic Waves in Periodic Water Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young Joon; Ju, Sanghyun; Park, Sang Yoon; Ju Kim, Young; Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-09-10

    Perfect metamaterial absorber (PMA) can intercept electromagnetic wave harmful for body in Wi-Fi, cell phones and home appliances that we are daily using and provide stealth function that military fighter, tank and warship can avoid radar detection. We reported new concept of water droplet-based PMA absorbing perfectly electromagnetic wave with water, an eco-friendly material which is very plentiful on the earth. If arranging water droplets with particular height and diameter on material surface through the wettability of material surface, meta-properties absorbing electromagnetic wave perfectly in GHz wide-band were shown. It was possible to control absorption ratio and absorption wavelength band of electromagnetic wave according to the shape of water droplet-height and diameter- and apply to various flexible and/or transparent substrates such as plastic, glass and paper. In addition, this research examined how electromagnetic wave can be well absorbed in water droplets with low electrical conductivity unlike metal-based metamaterials inquiring highly electrical conductivity. Those results are judged to lead broad applications to variously civilian and military products in the future by providing perfect absorber of broadband in all products including transparent and bendable materials.

  5. Shock waves in water at low energy pulsed electric discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinchuk, M E; Kolikov, V A; Rutberg, Ph G; Leks, A G; Dolinovskaya, R V; Snetov, V N; Stogov, A Yu

    2012-01-01

    Experimental results of shock wave formation and propagation in water at low energy pulsed electric discharges are presented. To study the hydrodynamic structure of the shock waves, the direct shadow optical diagnostic device with time resolution of 5 ns and spatial resolution of 0.1 mm was designed and developed. Synchronization of the diagnostic and electrodischarge units by the fast optocouplers was carried out. The dependences of shock wave velocities after breakdown of interelectrode gap for various energy inputs (at range of ≤1 J) into discharge were obtained. Based on the experimental results the recommendations for the adjustment parameters of the power supply and load were suggested.

  6. System for harvesting water wave energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Su, Yanjie; Zhu, Guang; Chen, Jun

    2016-07-19

    A generator for harvesting energy from water in motion includes a sheet of a hydrophobic material, having a first side and an opposite second side, that is triboelectrically more negative than water. A first electrode sheet is disposed on the second side of the sheet of a hydrophobic material. A second electrode sheet is disposed on the second side of the sheet of a hydrophobic material and is spaced apart from the first electrode sheet. Movement of the water across the first side induces an electrical potential imbalance between the first electrode sheet and the second electrode sheet.

  7. Spectral characteristics of high shallow water waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; AshokKumar, K.

    with significant wave height. V. Sanil Kumar, K. Ashok Kumar / Ocean Engineering 35 (2008) 900–911 903 Author's personal copy g ¼ 9:5H 0:34 s f p . (4) Young (1998) showed that a ¼ 0:008ðU 10 =C p Þ 0:73 , (5) g ¼ 1:9, (6) where U 10 is the wind speed at 10m above... 2 4 3 5 g exp½C0ðfC0f p Þ 2 =2s 2 f 2 p C138 . (7) Donelan et al. (1985) related the JONSWAP parameters with wave age as given below: a ¼ 0:006ðU 10 =C p Þ 0:55 , (8) g ¼ 1:7 for 0:83oU 10 =C p o1 ¼ 1:7 þ 6 log 10 ðU 10 =C p Þ for 1pU 10 =C p o5. (9...

  8. Deep-water bedforms induced by refracting Internal Solitary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcini, Federico; Droghei, Riccardo; Casalbore, Daniele; Martorelli, Eleonora; Mosetti, Renzo; Sannino, Gianmaria; Santoleri, Rosalia; Latino Chiocci, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Subaqueous bedforms (or sand waves) are typically observed in those environments that are exposed to strong currents, characterized by a dominant unidirectional flow. However, sand-wave fields may be also observed in marine environments where no such current exists; the physical processes driving their formation are enigmatic or not well understood. We propose that internal solitary waves (ISWs), induced by tides, can produce an effective, unidirectional boundary flow filed that forms asymmetric sand waves. We test this idea by examining a sand-wave field off the Messina Strait, where we hypothesize that ISWs formed at the interface between intermediate and surface waters are refracted by topography. Hence, we argue that the deflected pattern (i.e., the depth-dependent orientation) of the sand-wave field is due to refraction of such ISWs. Combining field observations and numerical modelling, we show that ISWs can account for three key features: ISWs produce fluid velocities capable of mobilizing bottom sediments; the predicted refraction pattern resulting from the interaction of ISWs with bottom topography matches the observed deflection of the sand waves; and predicted migration rates of sand waves match empirical estimates. This work shows how ISWs may contribute to sculpting the structure of continental margins and it represents a promising link between the geological and oceanographic communities.

  9. Electromagnetic wave theory for boundary-value problems an advanced course on analytical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Eom, Hyo J

    2004-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave theory is based on Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic boundary-value problems must be solved to understand electromagnetic scattering, propagation, and radiation. Electromagnetic theory finds practical applications in wireless telecommunications and microwave engineering. This book is written as a text for a two-semester graduate course on electromagnetic wave theory. As such, Electromagnetic Wave Theory for Boundary-Value Problems is intended to help students enhance analytic skills by solving pertinent boundary-value problems. In particular, the techniques of Fourier transform, mode matching, and residue calculus are utilized to solve some canonical scattering and radiation problems.

  10. Kinematics and dynamics of green water on a fixed platform in a large wave basin in focusing wave and random wave conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Wei-Liang; Chang, Kuang-An; Mercier, Richard

    2018-06-01

    Green water kinematics and dynamics due to wave impingements on a simplified geometry, fixed platform were experimentally investigated in a large, deep-water wave basin. Both plane focusing waves and random waves were employed in the generation of green water. The focusing wave condition was designed to create two consecutive plunging breaking waves with one impinging on the frontal vertical wall of the fixed platform, referred as wall impingement, and the other directly impinging on the deck surface, referred as deck impingement. The random wave condition was generated using the JONSWAP spectrum with a significant wave height approximately equal to the freeboard. A total of 179 green water events were collected in the random wave condition. By examining the green water events in random waves, three different flow types are categorized: collapse of overtopping wave, fall of bulk water, and breaking wave crest. The aerated flow velocity was measured using bubble image velocimetry, while the void fraction was measured using fiber optic reflectometry. For the plane focusing wave condition, measurements of impact pressure were synchronized with the flow velocity and void fraction measurements. The relationship between the peak pressures and the pressure rise times is examined. For the high-intensity impact in the deck impingement events, the peak pressures are observed to be proportional to the aeration levels. The maximum horizontal velocities in the green water events in random waves are well represented by the lognormal distribution. Ritter's solution is shown to quantitatively describe the green water velocity distributions under both the focusing wave condition and the random wave condition. A prediction equation for green water velocity distribution under random waves is proposed.

  11. Water vapor estimation using digital terrestrial broadcasting waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, S.; Ohta, H.; Hanado, H.; Yamamoto, M. K.; Shiga, N.; Kido, K.; Yasuda, S.; Goto, T.; Ichikawa, R.; Amagai, J.; Imamura, K.; Fujieda, M.; Iwai, H.; Sugitani, S.; Iguchi, T.

    2017-03-01

    A method of estimating water vapor (propagation delay due to water vapor) using digital terrestrial broadcasting waves is proposed. Our target is to improve the accuracy of numerical weather forecast for severe weather phenomena such as localized heavy rainstorms in urban areas through data assimilation. In this method, we estimate water vapor near a ground surface from the propagation delay of digital terrestrial broadcasting waves. A real-time delay measurement system with a software-defined radio technique is developed and tested. The data obtained using digital terrestrial broadcasting waves show good agreement with those obtained by ground-based meteorological observation. The main features of this observation are, no need for transmitters (receiving only), applicable wherever digital terrestrial broadcasting is available and its high time resolution. This study shows a possibility to estimate water vapor using digital terrestrial broadcasting waves. In the future, we will investigate the impact of these data toward numerical weather forecast through data assimilation. Developing a system that monitors water vapor near the ground surface with time and space resolutions of 30 s and several kilometers would improve the accuracy of the numerical weather forecast of localized severe weather phenomena.

  12. Well-posedness of the Cauchy problem for models of large amplitude internal waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyenne, Philippe; Lannes, David; Saut, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    We consider in this paper the 'shallow-water/shallow-water' asymptotic model obtained in Choi and Camassa (1999 J. Fluid Mech. 396 1–36), Craig et al (2005 Commun. Pure. Appl. Math. 58 1587–641) (one-dimensional interface) and Bona et al (2008 J. Math. Pures Appl. 89 538–66) (two-dimensional interface) from the two-layer system with rigid lid, for the description of large amplitude internal waves at the interface of two layers of immiscible fluids of different densities. For one-dimensional interfaces, this system is of hyperbolic type and its local well-posedness does not raise serious difficulties, although other issues (blow-up, loss of hyperbolicity, etc) turn out to be delicate. For two-dimensional interfaces, the system is nonlocal. Nevertheless, we prove that it conserves some properties of 'hyperbolic type' and show that the associated Cauchy problem is locally well posed in suitable Sobolev classes provided some natural restrictions are imposed on the data. These results are illustrated by numerical simulations with emphasis on the formation of shock waves

  13. An inexpensive instrument for measuring wave exposure and water velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figurski, J.D.; Malone, D.; Lacy, J.R.; Denny, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean waves drive a wide variety of nearshore physical processes, structuring entire ecosystems through their direct and indirect effects on the settlement, behavior, and survivorship of marine organisms. However, wave exposure remains difficult and expensive to measure. Here, we report on an inexpensive and easily constructed instrument for measuring wave-induced water velocities. The underwater relative swell kinetics instrument (URSKI) is a subsurface float tethered by a short (<1 m) line to the seafloor. Contained within the float is an accelerometer that records the tilt of the float in response to passing waves. During two field trials totaling 358 h, we confirmed the accuracy and precision of URSKI measurements through comparison to velocities measured by an in situ acoustic Doppler velocimeter and those predicted by a standard swell model, and we evaluated how the dimensions of the devices, its buoyancy, and sampling frequency can be modified for use in a variety of environments.

  14. Propagation of Singularities and Some Inverse Problems in Wave Propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Symes, William W

    1989-01-01

    ... in various useful coefficient classes, separation of scales,...We explain the essential role of travel time in the study of these problems, and show how its function may be generalized to multidimensional (i.e. non-layered) problems.

  15. A water wave model with horizontal circulation and accurate dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotter, C.; Bokhove, Onno

    We describe a new water wave model which is variational, and combines a depth-averaged vertical (component of) vorticity with depth-dependent potential flow. The model facilitates the further restriction of the vertical profile of the velocity potential to n-th order polynomials or a finite element

  16. Lake St. Clair: Storm Wave and Water Level Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    R. A. Luettich, C. Dawson, V. J. Cardone , A. T. Cox, M. D. Powell, H. J. Westerink, and H. J. Roberts. 2010. A high resolution coupled riverine flow...Storm Wave and Water Level Modeling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Tyler J. Hesser

  17. Shear-wave splitting measurements – Problems and solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vecsey, Luděk; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Babuška, Vladislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 462, č. 1-4 (2008), s. 178-196 ISSN 0040-1951 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300120605; GA AV ČR IAA3012405; GA AV ČR IAA300120709 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : seismic anisotropy * shear-wave splitting * comparison of cross- correlation * eigenvalue * transverse minimization methods Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.677, year: 2008

  18. Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Jun

    2015-06-09

    We describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves. © 2015, Nature Publishing Group. All rights reserved.

  19. Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Jiang, Xu; Fang, Nicholas; Georget, Elodie; Abdeddaim, Redha; Geffrin, Jean-Michel; Farhat, Mohamed; Sabouroux, Pierre; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2015-06-09

    We describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves.

  20. Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Jun; Jiang, Xu; Fang, Nicholas; Georget, Elodie; Abdeddaim, Redha; Geffrin, Jean Michel; Farhat, Mohamed; Sabouroux, Pierre; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sé bastien

    2015-01-01

    We describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves. © 2015, Nature Publishing Group. All rights reserved.

  1. Coupled Triboelectric Nanogenerator Networks for Efficient Water Wave Energy Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Jiang, Tao; Lin, Pei; Shao, Jia Jia; He, Chuan; Zhong, Wei; Chen, Xiang Yu; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2018-02-27

    Water wave energy is a promising clean energy source, which is abundant but hard to scavenge economically. Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) networks provide an effective approach toward massive harvesting of water wave energy in oceans. In this work, a coupling design in TENG networks for such purposes is reported. The charge output of the rationally linked units is over 10 times of that without linkage. TENG networks of three different connecting methods are fabricated and show better performance for the ones with flexible connections. The network is based on an optimized ball-shell structured TENG unit with high responsivity to small agitations. The dynamic behavior of single and multiple TENG units is also investigated comprehensively to fully understand their performance in water. The study shows that a rational design on the linkage among the units could be an effective strategy for TENG clusters to operate collaboratively for reaching a higher performance.

  2. Wavefront modulation of water surface wave by a metasurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hai-Tao; Cheng Ying; Liu Xiao-Jun; Wang Jing-Shi

    2015-01-01

    We design a planar metasurface to modulate the wavefront of a water surface wave (WSW) on a deep sub-wavelength scale. The metasurface is composed of an array of coiling-up-space units with specially designed parameters, and can take on the work of steering the wavefront when it is pierced into water. Like their acoustic counterparts, the modulation of WSW is ascribed to the gradient phase shift of the coiling-up-space units, which can be perfectly tuned by changing the coiling plate length and channel number inside the units. According to the generalized Snell’s law, negative refraction and ‘driven’ surface mode of WSW are also demonstrated at certain incidences. Specially, the transmitted WSW could be efficiently guided out by linking a symmetrically-corrugated channel in ‘driven’ surface mode. This work may have potential applications in water wave energy extraction and coastal protection. (paper)

  3. Atlantic Coast Hindcast, Shallow-Water, Significant Wave Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    AULICS LAB N E JENSEN JAN 83 UNCLASSIFIED W SRF 21NL mEEohhohhhmhEE EhhhEmmhhmhEEEE 1111 .0= 128 llI Ir111-1 11111.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART...six data products: 1. Geographical variation in the wave climate :, 2. Twenty-year percent occurrence tables: (Continued) DD EUnclassified SECUmTY...PAOCleWff DO& MIew0O I]1 Preface In late 1976, a study to produce a wave climate for U. S. coastal waters was initiated at the U. S. Army Engineer

  4. Problems especially relating to sea water condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, Raymond.

    1975-01-01

    Sea water forms a nearly unlimited cold source well adapted to the open circuit cooling of large nuclear power plants. As a counter-part, its physico-chemical and biological characteristics generally require complicated arrangements for preventing: - first, the sea water to enter accidentally, especially as a consequence of corrosions and erosion-corrosions. Indeed, certain materials used in modern plants very badly suffer any introduction of salted water into the cycle steam-water mixture: - secondly, damaging the flow conditions of the cooling water (increase in friction coefficients, restriction of passage cross sections, blocking) and heat exchange parameters (resisting deposits, circulation troubles...) [fr

  5. Reflective measurement of water concentration using millimeter wave illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shijun; Bennett, David; Taylor, Zachary; Bajwa, Neha; Tewari, Priyamvada; Maccabi, Ashkan; Culjat, Martin; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-04-01

    THz and millimeter wave technology have shown the potential to become a valuable medical imaging tool because of its sensitivity to water and safe, non-ionizing photon energy. Using the high dielectric constant of water in these frequency bands, reflectionmode THz sensing systems can be employed to measure water content in a target with high sensitivity. This phenomenology may lead to the development of clinical systems to measure the hydration state of biological targets. Such measurements may be useful in fast and convenient diagnosis of conditions whose symptoms can be characterized by changes in water concentration such as skin burns, dehydration, or chemical exposure. To explore millimeter wave sensitivity to hydration, a reflectometry system is constructed to make water concentration measurements at 100 GHz, and the minimum detectable water concentration difference is measured. This system employs a 100 GHz Gunn diode source and Golay cell detector to perform point reflectivity measurements of a wetted polypropylene towel as it dries on a mass balance. A noise limited, minimum detectable concentration difference of less than 0.5% by mass can be detected in water concentrations ranging from 70% to 80%. This sensitivity is sufficient to detect hydration changes caused by many diseases and pathologies and may be useful in the future as a diagnostic tool for the assessment of burns and other surface pathologies.

  6. Ripplon laser through stimulated emission mediated by water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Samuel; Martin, Leopoldo L.; Maayani, Shai; Carmon, Tal

    2016-12-01

    Lasers rely on stimulated electronic transition, a quantum phenomenon in the form of population inversion. In contrast, phonon masers depend on stimulated Raman scattering and are entirely classical. Here we extend Raman lasers to rely on capillary waves, which are unique to the liquid phase of matter and relate to the attraction between intimate fluid particles. We fabricate resonators that co-host capillary and optical modes, control them to operate at their non-resolved sideband and observe stimulated capillary scattering and the coherent excitation of capillary resonances at kilohertz rates (which can be heard in audio files recorded by us). By exchanging energy between electromagnetic and capillary waves, we bridge the interfacial tension phenomena at the liquid phase boundary to optics. This approach may impact optofluidics by allowing optical control, interrogation and cooling of water waves.

  7. Advanced computational simulations of water waves interacting with wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Freniere, Cole; Raessi, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Wave energy converter (WEC) devices harness the renewable ocean wave energy and convert it into useful forms of energy, e.g. mechanical or electrical. This paper presents an advanced 3D computational framework to study the interaction between water waves and WEC devices. The computational tool solves the full Navier-Stokes equations and considers all important effects impacting the device performance. To enable large-scale simulations in fast turnaround times, the computational solver was developed in an MPI parallel framework. A fast multigrid preconditioned solver is introduced to solve the computationally expensive pressure Poisson equation. The computational solver was applied to two surface-piercing WEC geometries: bottom-hinged cylinder and flap. Their numerically simulated response was validated against experimental data. Additional simulations were conducted to investigate the applicability of Froude scaling in predicting full-scale WEC response from the model experiments.

  8. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the propagation of weakly nonlinear waves in optical fibers and on the water surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabchoub, A., E-mail: achabchoub@swin.edu.au [Centre for Ocean Engineering Science and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Kibler, B.; Finot, C.; Millot, G. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS, Université de Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon (France); Onorato, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Dudley, J.M. [Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR 6174 CNRS- Université de Franche-Comté, 25030 Besançon (France); Babanin, A.V. [Centre for Ocean Engineering Science and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    The dynamics of waves in weakly nonlinear dispersive media can be described by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). An important feature of the equation is that it can be derived in a number of different physical contexts; therefore, analogies between different fields, such as for example fiber optics, water waves, plasma waves and Bose–Einstein condensates, can be established. Here, we investigate the similarities between wave propagation in optical Kerr media and water waves. In particular, we discuss the modulation instability (MI) in both media. In analogy to the water wave problem, we derive for Kerr-media the Benjamin–Feir index, i.e. a nondimensional parameter related to the probability of formation of rogue waves in incoherent wave trains.

  9. Wave scattering theory and the absorption problem for a black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, N.

    1977-01-01

    The general problem of scattering and absorption of waves from a Schwarzschild black hole is investigated. A scattering absorption amplitude is introduced. The unitarity theorem for this problem is derived from the wave equation and its boundary conditions. The formulation of the problem, within the formal scattering theory approach, is also given. The existence of a singularity in space-time is related explicitly to the presence of a nonzero absorption cross section. Another derivation of the unitarity theorem for our problem is given by operator methods. The reciprocity relation is also proved; that is, for the scattering of waves the black hole is a reciprocal system. Finally, the elastic scattering problem is considered, and the elastic scattering amplitude is calculated for high frequencies and small scattering angles

  10. Overdetermined shooting methods for computing standing water waves with spectral accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkening, Jon; Yu Jia

    2012-01-01

    A high-performance shooting algorithm is developed to compute time-periodic solutions of the free-surface Euler equations with spectral accuracy in double and quadruple precision. The method is used to study resonance and its effect on standing water waves. We identify new nucleation mechanisms in which isolated large-amplitude solutions, and closed loops of such solutions, suddenly exist for depths below a critical threshold. We also study degenerate and secondary bifurcations related to Wilton's ripples in the traveling case, and explore the breakdown of self-similarity at the crests of extreme standing waves. In shallow water, we find that standing waves take the form of counter-propagating solitary waves that repeatedly collide quasi-elastically. In deep water with surface tension, we find that standing waves resemble counter-propagating depression waves. We also discuss the existence and non-uniqueness of solutions, and smooth versus erratic dependence of Fourier modes on wave amplitude and fluid depth. In the numerical method, robustness is achieved by posing the problem as an overdetermined nonlinear system and using either adjoint-based minimization techniques or a quadratically convergent trust-region method to minimize the objective function. Efficiency is achieved in the trust-region approach by parallelizing the Jacobian computation, so the setup cost of computing the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator in the variational equation is not repeated for each column. Updates of the Jacobian are also delayed until the previous Jacobian ceases to be useful. Accuracy is maintained using spectral collocation with optional mesh refinement in space, a high-order Runge–Kutta or spectral deferred correction method in time and quadruple precision for improved navigation of delicate regions of parameter space as well as validation of double-precision results. Implementation issues for transferring much of the computation to a graphic processing units are briefly

  11. Topology optimization of bounded acoustic problems using the hybrid finite element-wave based method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goo, Seongyeol; Wang, Semyung; Kook, Junghwan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative topology optimization method for bounded acoustic problems that uses the hybrid finite element-wave based method (FE-WBM). The conventional method for the topology optimization of bounded acoustic problems is based on the finite element method (FEM), which...

  12. Financial problems and delinquency in adolescents and young adults : a 6-year three-wave study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, M.; Jak, S.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Meeuws, W.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the link between financial problems and delinquency in adolescents and young adults (N = 1,258). Using three measurement waves that covered a time span of 6 years, we conducted cross-lagged panel analyses. Overall, we found evidence that financial problems increase the

  13. Initial boundary value problems of nonlinear wave equations in an exterior domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yunmei.

    1987-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the existence and uniqueness of the global solutions to the initial boundary value problems of nonlinear wave equations in an exterior domain. When the space dimension n >= 3, the unique global solution of the above problem is obtained for small initial data, even if the nonlinear term is fully nonlinear and contains the unknown function itself. (author). 10 refs

  14. Financial problems and delinquency in adolescents and young adults : A 6-year three-wave study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, Machteld; Jak, Suzanne; Stams, Geert Jan J. M.; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the link between financial problems and delinquency in adolescents and young adults (N = 1,258). Using three measurement waves that covered a time span of 6 years, we conducted cross-lagged panel analyses. Overall, we found evidence that financial problems increase the

  15. Financial Problems and Delinquency in Adolescents and Young Adults : A 6-Year Three-Wave Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, Machteld; Jak, Suzanne; Stams, Geert Jan J M; Meeus, Wim H J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070442215

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the link between financial problems and delinquency in adolescents and young adults (N = 1,258). Using three measurement waves that covered a time span of 6 years, we conducted cross-lagged panel analyses. Overall, we found evidence that financial problems increase the

  16. Generation and Active Absorption of 2- and 3-Dimensional Linear Water Waves in Physical Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten

    in the wave channel in front of the wave generator. The results of physical model tests performed with an absorbing wave maker based on this principle show that the problem of rereflection is reduced significantly when active absorption is performed. Finally, an absorbing directional wave generator for 3-D...... generator is capable of of reducing the problem of rereflection in multidirectional, irregular wave fields significantly....

  17. The viscous lee wave problem and its implications for ocean modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Callum J.; Hogg, Andrew McC.

    2017-05-01

    Ocean circulation models employ 'turbulent' viscosity and diffusivity to represent unresolved sub-gridscale processes such as breaking internal waves. Computational power has now advanced sufficiently to permit regional ocean circulation models to be run at sufficiently high (100 m-1 km) horizontal resolution to resolve a significant part of the internal wave spectrum. Here we develop theory for boundary generated internal waves in such models, and in particular, where the waves dissipate their energy. We focus specifically on the steady lee wave problem where stationary waves are generated by a large-scale flow acting across ocean bottom topography. We generalise the energy flux expressions of [Bell, T., 1975. Topographically generated internal waves in the open ocean. J. Geophys. Res. 80, 320-327] to include the effect of arbitrary viscosity and diffusivity. Applying these results for realistic parameter choices we show that in the present generation of models with O(1) m2s-1 horizontal viscosity/diffusivity boundary-generated waves will inevitably dissipate the majority of their energy within a few hundred metres of the boundary. This dissipation is a direct consequence of the artificially high viscosity/diffusivity, which is not always physically justified in numerical models. Hence, caution is necessary in comparing model results to ocean observations. Our theory further predicts that O(10-2) m2s-1 horizontal and O(10-4) m2s-1 vertical viscosity/diffusivity is required to achieve a qualitatively inviscid representation of internal wave dynamics in ocean models.

  18. A problem-based approach to elastic wave propagation: the role of constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, Claudio; Guastella, Ivan; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    A problem-based approach to the teaching of mechanical wave propagation, focused on observation and measurement of wave properties in solids and on modelling of these properties, is presented. In particular, some experimental results, originally aimed at measuring the propagation speed of sound waves in metallic rods, are used in order to deepen the role of constraints in mechanical wave propagation. Interpretative models of the results obtained in the laboratory are built and implemented by using a well-known simulation environment. The simulation results are, then, compared with experimental data. The approach has been developed and experimented in the context of a workshop on mechanical wave propagation of the two-year Graduate Program for Physics Teacher Education at University of Palermo.

  19. Public water supply sources - the practical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, E.G.W.

    1990-01-01

    A complex system of reservoirs, streams, treatment works and pipe networks is used to provide the public water supply to consumers in Strathclyde. The manner in which a nuclear event would affect the quality of water available from this supply would depend on a wide variety of factors. The extent to which the quality from each source could be maintained or improved if found to be unsatisfactory would depend on the extent of contamination and the particular characteristics of each source. Development of contingency plans will incorporate monitoring of supplies and development of effective communications both internally and externally. (author)

  20. Structural Optimization of Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting Water Wave Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Li Min; Chen, Xiangyu; Han, Chang Bao; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Liang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-12-22

    Ocean waves are one of the most abundant energy sources on earth, but harvesting such energy is rather challenging due to various limitations of current technologies. Recently, networks formed by triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) have been proposed as a promising technology for harvesting water wave energy. In this work, a basic unit for the TENG network was studied and optimized, which has a box structure composed of walls made of TENG composed of a wavy-structured Cu-Kapton-Cu film and two FEP thin films, with a metal ball enclosed inside. By combination of the theoretical calculations and experimental studies, the output performances of the TENG unit were investigated for various structural parameters, such as the size, mass, or number of the metal balls. From the viewpoint of theory, the output characteristics of TENG during its collision with the ball were numerically calculated by the finite element method and interpolation method, and there exists an optimum ball size or mass to reach maximized output power and electric energy. Moreover, the theoretical results were well verified by the experimental tests. The present work could provide guidance for structural optimization of wavy-structured TENGs for effectively harvesting water wave energy toward the dream of large-scale blue energy.

  1. Localized corrosion problems in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriou, Henri.

    1977-01-01

    Main localized etching on the structure materials of water reactors are studied: stress corrosion on stainless steel 304 (B.W.R), stress corrosion, 'wall thinning' and denting of Inconel 600 vapor generator tubes (P.W.R.). Some mechanisms are examined and practical exemples in reactors are described. Various possible cures are presented [fr

  2. Resonant interaction of electromagnetic wave with plasma layer and overcoming the radiocommunication blackout problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatskaya, A. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Tereshonok, M. V.; Adjemov, S. S.; Popov, A. M.

    2018-05-01

    We present an analysis of the possibility of penetrating electromagnetic waves through opaque media using an optical-mechanical analogy. As an example, we consider the plasma sheath surrounding the vehicle as a potential barrier and analyze the overcoming of radiocommunication blackout problem. The idea is to embed a «resonator» between the surface on the vehicle and plasma sheath which is supposed to provide an effective tunneling of the signal to the receiving antenna. We discuss the peculiarities of optical mechanical analogy applicability and analyze the radio frequency wave tunneling regime in detail. The cases of normal and oblique incidence of radiofrequency waves on the vehicle surface are studied.

  3. Organizational problems of Water Distribution in Khorezm, Uzbekistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegerich, K.

    2004-01-01

    The paper addresses problems of water resource management on the district and provincial level in the Khorezm province, Uzbekistan. The district water organizations are responsible for equitable water distribution to the agricultural users. These organizations do not have the necessary logistical

  4. Performance of ERA-Interim wave data in the nearshore waters around India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Naseef, T.M.

    Bulk wave parameters, such as wave height and wave period, are required for engineering and environmental applications. In this study, measured wave data from six shallow-water locations in the data-sparse north Indian Ocean are used to assess...

  5. The "shallow-waterness" of the wave climate in European coastal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkon Christensen, Kai; Carrasco, Ana; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Breivik, Øyvind

    2017-07-01

    In contrast to deep water waves, shallow water waves are influenced by bottom topography, which has consequences for the propagation of wave energy as well as for the energy and momentum exchange between the waves and the mean flow. The ERA-Interim reanalysis is used to assess the fraction of wave energy associated with shallow water waves in coastal regions in Europe. We show maps of the distribution of this fraction as well as time series statistics from eight selected stations. There is a strong seasonal dependence and high values are typically associated with winter storms, indicating that shallow water wave effects can occasionally be important even in the deeper parts of the shelf seas otherwise dominated by deep water waves.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Oscillating Water Columns Wave-Structure Interaction in Ocean Energy Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitor J. Garrido

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oscillating Water Column (OWC-based power take-off systems are one of the potential solutions to the current energy problems arising from the use of nuclear fission and the consumption of fossil fuels. This kind of energy converter turns wave energy into electric power by means of three different stages: firstly wave energy is transformed into pneumatic energy in the OWC chamber, and then a turbine turns it into mechanical energy and finally the turbogenerator module attached to the turbine creates electric power from the rotational mechanical energy. To date, capture chambers have been the least studied part. In this context, this paper presents an analytical model describing the dynamic behavior of the capture chamber, encompassing the wave motion and its interaction with the OWC structure and turbogenerator module. The model is tested for the case of the Mutriku wave power plant by means of experimental results. For this purpose, representative case studies are selected from wave and pressure drop input-output data. The results show an excellent matching rate between the values predicted by the model and the experimental measured data with a small bounded error in all cases, so that the validity of the proposed model is proven.

  7. Mechanical Balance Laws for Boussinesq Models of Surface Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Alfatih; Kalisch, Henrik

    2012-06-01

    Depth-integrated long-wave models, such as the shallow-water and Boussinesq equations, are standard fare in the study of small amplitude surface waves in shallow water. While the shallow-water theory features conservation of mass, momentum and energy for smooth solutions, mechanical balance equations are not widely used in Boussinesq scaling, and it appears that the expressions for many of these quantities are not known. This work presents a systematic derivation of mass, momentum and energy densities and fluxes associated with a general family of Boussinesq systems. The derivation is based on a reconstruction of the velocity field and the pressure in the fluid column below the free surface, and the derivation of differential balance equations which are of the same asymptotic validity as the evolution equations. It is shown that all these mechanical quantities can be expressed in terms of the principal dependent variables of the Boussinesq system: the surface excursion η and the horizontal velocity w at a given level in the fluid.

  8. Diffusive Wave Approximation to the Shallow Water Equations: Computational Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2011-05-14

    We discuss the use of time adaptivity applied to the one dimensional diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations. A simple and computationally economical error estimator is discussed which enables time-step size adaptivity. This robust adaptive time discretization corrects the initial time step size to achieve a user specified bound on the discretization error and allows time step size variations of several orders of magnitude. In particular, in the one dimensional results presented in this work feature a change of four orders of magnitudes for the time step over the entire simulation.

  9. Industrial Water Waste, Problems and the Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alif Noor Anna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the long term development in Indonesia has changed agricultural sector to the industrial sector. This development can apparently harm our own people. This is due to the waste that is produced from factories. The waste from various factories seems to have different characteristics. This defference encourages us to be able to find out different of methods of managing waste so that cost can be reduced, especially in water treatment. In order that industrial development and environmental preservation can run together in balance, many institutions involved should be consider, especially in the industrial chain, the environment, and human resource, these three elements can be examined in terms of their tolerance to waste.

  10. Frequency shift of the Bragg and Non-Bragg backscattering from periodic water wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Biyang; Li, Ke

    2016-08-01

    Doppler effect is used to measure the relative speed of a moving target with respect to the radar, and is also used to interpret the frequency shift of the backscattering from the ocean wave according to the water-wave phase velocity. The widely known relationship between the Doppler shift and the water-wave phase velocity was deduced from the scattering measurements data collected from actual sea surface, and has not been verified under man-made conditions. Here we show that this ob- served frequency shift of the scattering data from the Bragg and Non-Bragg water wave is not the Doppler shift corresponding to the water-wave phase velocity as commonly believed, but is the water-wave frequency and its integral multiple frequency. The power spectrum of the backscatter from the periodic water wave consists of serials discrete peaks, which is equally spaced by water wave frequency. Only when the water-wave length is the integer multiples of the Bragg wave, and the radar range resolution is infinite, does the frequency shift of the backscattering mathematically equal the Doppler shift according to the water-wave phase velocity.

  11. Analytical solution of the problem of a shock wave in the collapsing gas in Lagrangian coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuropatenko, V. F.; Shestakovskaya, E. S.

    2016-10-01

    It is proposed the exact solution of the problem of a convergent shock wave and gas dynamic compression in a spherical vessel with an impermeable wall in Lagrangian coordinates. At the initial time the speed of cold ideal gas is equal to zero, and a negative velocity is set on boundary of the sphere. When t > t0 the shock wave spreads from this point into the gas. The boundary of the sphere will move under the certain law correlated with the motion of the shock wave. The trajectories of the gas particles in Lagrangian coordinates are straight lines. The equations determining the structure of the gas flow between the shock front and gas border have been found as a function of time and Lagrangian coordinate. The dependence of the entropy on the velocity of the shock wave has been found too. For Lagrangian coordinates the problem is first solved. It is fundamentally different from previously known formulations of the problem of the self-convergence of the self-similar shock wave to the center of symmetry and its reflection from the center, which was built up for the infinite area in Euler coordinates.

  12. Experimental study of the attenuation waves oriented to transients caused by the sodium-water explosive reaction in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroso, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    One of the problems related to fluid-structure interaction that can compromise the structural integrity of components of a fast reactor is the explosion caused by the sodium-water reaction, in the case of a flood at the level of the thermic exchange wall at the steam generator. In this paper we have considered the aspects of the pressure-waves damping caused by the reaction, when these waves transverse certain perforated structures. In order to solve this problem, we also adopted a parametric experimental approach, using a scale model (RIO test rig). (author)

  13. An efficient flexible-order model for 3D nonlinear water waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engsig-Karup, A.P.; Bingham, H.B.; Lindberg, O.

    2009-01-01

    The flexible-order, finite difference based fully nonlinear potential flow model described in [H.B. Bingham, H. Zhang, On the accuracy of finite difference solutions for nonlinear water waves, J. Eng. Math. 58 (2007) 211-228] is extended to three dimensions (3D). In order to obtain an optimal scaling of the solution effort multigrid is employed to precondition a GMRES iterative solution of the discretized Laplace problem. A robust multigrid method based on Gauss-Seidel smoothing is found to require special treatment of the boundary conditions along solid boundaries, and in particular on the sea bottom. A new discretization scheme using one layer of grid points outside the fluid domain is presented and shown to provide convergent solutions over the full physical and discrete parameter space of interest. Linear analysis of the fundamental properties of the scheme with respect to accuracy, robustness and energy conservation are presented together with demonstrations of grid independent iteration count and optimal scaling of the solution effort. Calculations are made for 3D nonlinear wave problems for steep nonlinear waves and a shoaling problem which show good agreement with experimental measurements and other calculations from the literature

  14. An efficient flexible-order model for 3D nonlinear water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engsig-Karup, A. P.; Bingham, H. B.; Lindberg, O.

    2009-04-01

    The flexible-order, finite difference based fully nonlinear potential flow model described in [H.B. Bingham, H. Zhang, On the accuracy of finite difference solutions for nonlinear water waves, J. Eng. Math. 58 (2007) 211-228] is extended to three dimensions (3D). In order to obtain an optimal scaling of the solution effort multigrid is employed to precondition a GMRES iterative solution of the discretized Laplace problem. A robust multigrid method based on Gauss-Seidel smoothing is found to require special treatment of the boundary conditions along solid boundaries, and in particular on the sea bottom. A new discretization scheme using one layer of grid points outside the fluid domain is presented and shown to provide convergent solutions over the full physical and discrete parameter space of interest. Linear analysis of the fundamental properties of the scheme with respect to accuracy, robustness and energy conservation are presented together with demonstrations of grid independent iteration count and optimal scaling of the solution effort. Calculations are made for 3D nonlinear wave problems for steep nonlinear waves and a shoaling problem which show good agreement with experimental measurements and other calculations from the literature.

  15. Algebraic internal wave solitons and the integrable Calogero--Moser--Sutherland N-body problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.H.; Lee, Y.C.; Pereira, N.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Benjamin--Ono equation that describes nonlinear internal waves in a stratified fluid is solved by a pole expansion method. The dynamics of poles which characterize solitons is shown to be identical to the well-known integrable N-body problem of Calogero, Moser, and Sutherland

  16. A comparison of high-order polynomial and wave-based methods for Helmholtz problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Alice; Gabard, Gwénaël; Bériot, Hadrien

    2016-09-01

    The application of computational modelling to wave propagation problems is hindered by the dispersion error introduced by the discretisation. Two common strategies to address this issue are to use high-order polynomial shape functions (e.g. hp-FEM), or to use physics-based, or Trefftz, methods where the shape functions are local solutions of the problem (typically plane waves). Both strategies have been actively developed over the past decades and both have demonstrated their benefits compared to conventional finite-element methods, but they have yet to be compared. In this paper a high-order polynomial method (p-FEM with Lobatto polynomials) and the wave-based discontinuous Galerkin method are compared for two-dimensional Helmholtz problems. A number of different benchmark problems are used to perform a detailed and systematic assessment of the relative merits of these two methods in terms of interpolation properties, performance and conditioning. It is generally assumed that a wave-based method naturally provides better accuracy compared to polynomial methods since the plane waves or Bessel functions used in these methods are exact solutions of the Helmholtz equation. Results indicate that this expectation does not necessarily translate into a clear benefit, and that the differences in performance, accuracy and conditioning are more nuanced than generally assumed. The high-order polynomial method can in fact deliver comparable, and in some cases superior, performance compared to the wave-based DGM. In addition to benchmarking the intrinsic computational performance of these methods, a number of practical issues associated with realistic applications are also discussed.

  17. Shallow water effects on wave energy converters with hydraulic power take-off system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashank Sinha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of water depth on the power absorption by a single heaving point absorber wave energy converter, attached to a hydraulic power take-off system, is simulated and analysed. The wave energy flux for changing water depths is presented and the study is carried out at a location in the north-west Portuguese coast, favourable for wave power generation. This analysis is based on a procedure to modify the wave spectrum as the water depth reduces, namely, the TMA spectrum (Transformation spectrum. The present study deals with the effect of water depth on the spectral shape and significant wave heights. The reactive control strategy, which includes an external damping coefficient and a negative spring term, is used to maximize power absorption by the wave energy converter. The presented work can be used for making decisions regarding the best water depth for the installation of point absorber wave energy converters in the Portuguese nearshore.

  18. Numerical analysis of regular waves over an onshore oscillating water column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davyt, D.P.; Teixeira, P.R.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), RS (Brazil)], E-mail: pauloteixeira@furg.br; Ramalhais, R. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal). Fac. de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Didier, E. [Laboratorio Nacional de Engenharia Civil, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: edidier@lnec.pt

    2010-07-01

    The potential of wave energy along coastal areas is a particularly attractive option in regions of high latitude, such as the coasts of northern Europe, North America, New Zealand, Chile and Argentina where high densities of annual average wave energy are found (typically between 40 and 100 kW/m of wave front). Power estimated in the south of Brazil is 30kW/m, creating a possible alternative of source energy in the region. There are many types and designs of equipment to capture energy from waves under analysis, such as the oscillating water column type (OWC) which has been one of the first to be developed and installed at sea. Despite being one of the most analyzed wave energy converter devices, there are few case studies using numerical simulation. In this context, the numerical analysis of regular waves over an onshore OWC is the main objective of this paper. The numerical models FLUINCO and FLUENT are used for achieving this goal. The FLUINCO model is based on RANS equations which are discretized using the two-step semi-implicit Taylor-Galerkin method. An arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation is used to enable the solution of problems involving free surface movements. The FLUENT code (version 6.3.26) is based on the finite volume method to solve RANS equations. Volume of Fluid method (VOF) is used for modeling free surface flows. Time integration is achieved by a second order implicit scheme, momentum equations are discretized using MUSCL scheme and HRIC (High Resolution Interface Capturing) scheme is used for convective term of VOF transport equation. The case study consists of a 10.m deep channel with a 10 m wide chamber at its end. One meter high waves with different periods are simulated. Comparisons between FLUINCO and FLUENT results are presented. Free surface elevation inside the chamber; velocity distribution and streamlines; amplification factor (relation between wave height inside the chamber and incident wave height); phase angle (angular

  19. An Investigation of Potable Water Supply Problems in Akinima ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The major sources of drinking water are harvested rainwater, water from boreholes, and rivers. These sources are indentified to have varied problems of contamination and pollution, which range from high levels of chemical and microbiological contamination of harvested rainwater and rivers respectively, to saline intrusion ...

  20. An efficient flexible-order model for coastal and ocean water waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Bingham, Harry B.; Lindberg, Ole

    Current work are directed toward the development of an improved numerical 3D model for fully nonlinear potential water waves over arbitrary depths. The model is high-order accurate, robust and efficient for large-scale problems, and support will be included for flexibility in the description...... as in the original works \\cite{LiFleming1997,BinghamZhang2007}. The new and improved approach employs a GMRES solver with multigrid preconditioning to achieve optimal scaling of the overall solution effort, i.e., directly with $n$ the total number of grid points. A robust method is achieved through a special...

  1. Toward a scalable flexible-order model for 3D nonlinear water waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Ducrozet, Guillaume; Bingham, Harry B.

    For marine and coastal applications, current work are directed toward the development of a scalable numerical 3D model for fully nonlinear potential water waves over arbitrary depths. The model is high-order accurate, robust and efficient for large-scale problems, and support will be included...... for flexibility in the description of structures by the use of curvilinear boundary-fitted meshes. The mathematical equations for potential waves in the physical domain is transformed through $\\sigma$-mapping(s) to a time-invariant boundary-fitted domain which then becomes a basis for an efficient solution...... strategy on a time-invariant mesh. The 3D numerical model is based on a finite difference method as in the original works \\cite{LiFleming1997,BinghamZhang2007}. Full details and other aspects of an improved 3D solution can be found in \\cite{EBL08}. The new and improved approach for three...

  2. A stabilised nodal spectral element method for fully nonlinear water waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Eskilsson, C.; Bigoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    can cause severe aliasing problems and consequently numerical instability for marginally resolved or very steep waves. We show how the scheme can be stabilised through a combination of over-integration of the Galerkin projections and a mild spectral filtering on a per element basis. This effectively......We present an arbitrary-order spectral element method for general-purpose simulation of non-overturning water waves, described by fully nonlinear potential theory. The method can be viewed as a high-order extension of the classical finite element method proposed by Cai et al. (1998) [5], although...... the numerical implementation differs greatly. Features of the proposed spectral element method include: nodal Lagrange basis functions, a general quadrature-free approach and gradient recovery using global L2 projections. The quartic nonlinear terms present in the Zakharov form of the free surface conditions...

  3. Exact solution of planar and nonplanar weak shock wave problem in gasdynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, L.P.; Ram, S.D.; Singh, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An exact solution is derived for a problem of weak shock wave in adiabatic gas dynamics. → The density ahead of the shock is taken as a power of the position from the origin of the shock wave. → For a planar and non-planar motion, the total energy carried by the wave varies with respect to time. → The solution obtained for the planer, and cylindrically symmetric flow is new one. → The results obtained are also presented graphically for different Mach numbers. - Abstract: In the present paper, an analytical approach is used to determine a new exact solution of the problem of one dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow of planer and non-planer weak shock waves in an inviscid ideal fluid. Here it is assumed that the density ahead of the shock front varies according to the power law of the distance from the source of disturbance. The solution of the problem is presented in the form of a power in the distance and the time.

  4. Loss of hyperbolicity changes the number of wave groups in Riemann problems

    OpenAIRE

    Vítor Matos; Julio D. Silva; Dan Marchesin

    2016-01-01

    Themain goal of ourwork is to showthat there exists a class of 2×2 Riemann problems for which the solution comprises a singlewave group for an open set of initial conditions. This wave group comprises a 1-rarefaction joined to a 2-rarefaction, not by an intermediate state, but by a doubly characteristic shock, 1-left and 2-right characteristic. In order to ensure that perturbations of initial conditions do not destroy the adjacency of the waves, local transversality between a composite curve ...

  5. Observations and estimates of wave-driven water level extremes at the Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrifield, M. A.; Becker, J. M.; Ford, M.; Yao, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Wave-driven extreme water levels are examined for coastlines protected by fringing reefs using field observations obtained in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The 2% exceedence water level near the shoreline due to waves is estimated empirically for the study sites from breaking wave height at the outer reef and by combining separate contributions from setup, sea and swell, and infragravity waves, which are estimated based on breaking wave height and water level over the reef flat. Although each component exhibits a tidal dependence, they sum to yield a 2% exceedence level that does not. A hindcast based on the breaking wave height parameterization is used to assess factors leading to flooding at Roi-Namur caused by an energetic swell event during December 2008. Extreme water levels similar to December 2008 are projected to increase significantly with rising sea level as more wave and tide events combine to exceed inundation threshold levels.

  6. Freely floating structures trapping time-harmonic water waves (revisited)

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Motygin, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    We study the coupled small-amplitude motion of the mechanical system consisting of infinitely deep water and a structure immersed in it. The former is bounded above by a free surface, whereas the latter is formed by an arbitrary finite number of surface-piercing bodies floating freely. The mathematical model of time-harmonic motion is a spectral problem in which the frequency of oscillations serves as the spectral parameter. It is proved that there exist axisymmetric structures consisting of ...

  7. Water quality problems associated with intermittent water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokajian, S; Hashwa, F

    2003-01-01

    A controlled study was conducted in Lebanon over a period of 12 months to determine bacterial regrowth in a small network supplying the Beirut suburb of Naccache that had a population of about 3,000. The residential area, which is fed by gravity, is supplied twice a week with chlorinated water from two artesian wells of a confined aquifer. A significant correlation was detected between the turbidity and the levels of heterotrophic plate count bacteria (HPC) in the samples from the distribution network as well as from the artesian wells. However, a negative significant correlation was found between the temperature and the HPC count in the samples collected from the source. A statistically significant increase in counts, possibly due to regrowth, was repeatedly established between two sampling points lying on a straight distribution line but 1 km apart. Faecal coliforms were detected in the source water but none in the network except during a pipe breakage incident with confirmed Escherichia coli reaching 40 CFU/100 mL. However, coliforms such as Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter agglomerans, E. cloacae and E. skazakii were repeatedly isolated from the network, mainly due to inadequate chlorination. A second controlled study was conducted to determine the effect of storage on the microbial quality of household storage tanks (500 L), which were of two main types - galvanized cast iron and black polyethylene. The mean bacterial count increased significantly after 7 d storage in both tank types. A significant difference was found in the mean HPC/mL between the winter and the summer. Highest counts were found April-June although the maximum temperature was reported later in the summer. A positive correlation was established between the HPC/mL and pH, temperature and storage time.

  8. Uncertainty principles for inverse source problems for electromagnetic and elastic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesmaier, Roland; Sylvester, John

    2018-06-01

    In isotropic homogeneous media, far fields of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves radiated by compactly supported volume currents, and elastic waves radiated by compactly supported body force densities can be modelled in very similar fashions. Both are projected restricted Fourier transforms of vector-valued source terms. In this work we generalize two types of uncertainty principles recently developed for far fields of scalar-valued time-harmonic waves in Griesmaier and Sylvester (2017 SIAM J. Appl. Math. 77 154–80) to this vector-valued setting. These uncertainty principles yield stability criteria and algorithms for splitting far fields radiated by collections of well-separated sources into the far fields radiated by individual source components, and for the restoration of missing data segments. We discuss proper regularization strategies for these inverse problems, provide stability estimates based on the new uncertainty principles, and comment on reconstruction schemes. A numerical example illustrates our theoretical findings.

  9. A comparative study of diffraction of shallow-water waves by high-level IGN and GN equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, B.B. [College of Shipbuilding Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China); Ertekin, R.C. [Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, University of Hawai' i, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); College of Shipbuilding Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China); Duan, W.Y., E-mail: duanwenyangheu@hotmail.com [College of Shipbuilding Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China)

    2015-02-15

    This work is on the nonlinear diffraction analysis of shallow-water waves, impinging on submerged obstacles, by two related theories, namely the classical Green–Naghdi (GN) equations and the Irrotational Green–Naghdi (IGN) equations, both sets of equations being at high levels and derived for incompressible and inviscid flows. Recently, the high-level Green–Naghdi equations have been applied to some wave transformation problems. The high-level IGN equations have also been used in the last decade to study certain wave propagation problems. However, past works on these theories used different numerical methods to solve these nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations and at different levels. Moreover, different physical problems have been solved in the past. Therefore, it has not been possible to understand the differences produced by these two sets of theories and their range of applicability so far. We are thus motivated to make a direct comparison of the results produced by these theories by use of the same numerical method to solve physically the same wave diffraction problems. We focus on comparing these two theories by using similar codes; only the equations used are different but other parts of the codes, such as the wave-maker, damping zone, discretion method, matrix solver, etc., are exactly the same. This way, we eliminate many potential sources of differences that could be produced by the solution of different equations. The physical problems include the presence of various submerged obstacles that can be used for example as breakwaters or to represent the continental shelf. A numerical wave tank is created by placing a wavemaker on one end and a wave absorbing beach on the other. The nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations are solved by the finite-difference method. The results are compared with different equations as well as with the available experimental data.

  10. Design guidelines of triboelectric nanogenerator for water wave energy harvesters

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Abdelsalam

    2017-04-11

    Ocean waves are one of the cleanest and most abundant energy sources on earth, and wave energy has the potential for future power generation. Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) technology has recently been proposed as a promising technology to harvest wave energy. In this paper, a theoretical study is performed on a duck-shaped TENG wave harvester recently introduced in our work. To enhance the design of the duck-shaped TENG wave harvester, the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the harvester\\'s overall structure, as well as its inner configuration, are analyzed, respectively, under different wave conditions, to optimize parameters such as duck radius and mass. Furthermore, a comprehensive hybrid 3D model is introduced to quantify the performance of the TENG wave harvester. Finally, the influence of different TENG parameters is validated by comparing the performance of several existing TENG wave harvesters. This study can be applied as a guideline for enhancing the performance of TENG wave energy harvesters.

  11. Design guidelines of triboelectric nanogenerator for water wave energy harvesters

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Abdelsalam; Hassan, Islam; Jiang, Tao; Youssef, Khalid; Liu, Lian; Hedaya, Mohammad; Yazid, Taher Abu; Zu, Jean; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-01-01

    Ocean waves are one of the cleanest and most abundant energy sources on earth, and wave energy has the potential for future power generation. Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) technology has recently been proposed as a promising technology to harvest wave energy. In this paper, a theoretical study is performed on a duck-shaped TENG wave harvester recently introduced in our work. To enhance the design of the duck-shaped TENG wave harvester, the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the harvester's overall structure, as well as its inner configuration, are analyzed, respectively, under different wave conditions, to optimize parameters such as duck radius and mass. Furthermore, a comprehensive hybrid 3D model is introduced to quantify the performance of the TENG wave harvester. Finally, the influence of different TENG parameters is validated by comparing the performance of several existing TENG wave harvesters. This study can be applied as a guideline for enhancing the performance of TENG wave energy harvesters.

  12. Design guidelines of triboelectric nanogenerator for water wave energy harvesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdelsalam; Hassan, Islam; Jiang, Tao; Youssef, Khalid; Liu, Lian; Hedaya, Mohammad; Yazid, Taher Abu; Zu, Jean; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-05-05

    Ocean waves are one of the cleanest and most abundant energy sources on earth, and wave energy has the potential for future power generation. Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) technology has recently been proposed as a promising technology to harvest wave energy. In this paper, a theoretical study is performed on a duck-shaped TENG wave harvester recently introduced in our work. To enhance the design of the duck-shaped TENG wave harvester, the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the harvester's overall structure, as well as its inner configuration, are analyzed, respectively, under different wave conditions, to optimize parameters such as duck radius and mass. Furthermore, a comprehensive hybrid 3D model is introduced to quantify the performance of the TENG wave harvester. Finally, the influence of different TENG parameters is validated by comparing the performance of several existing TENG wave harvesters. This study can be applied as a guideline for enhancing the performance of TENG wave energy harvesters.

  13. Ground-water problems in highway construction and maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, W.C.; Haigler, L.B.

    1953-01-01

    This report discusses the occurrence of ground water in relation to certain problems in highway construction and maintenance. These problems are: the subdrainage of roads; quicksand; the arrest of soil creep in road cuts; the construction of lower and larger culverts necessitated by the farm-drainage program; the prevention of failure of bridge abutments and retaining walls; and the water-cement ratio of sub-water-table concrete. Although the highway problems and suggested solutions are of general interest, they are considered with special reference to the State of Delaware, in relation to the geology of that State. The new technique of soil stabilization by electroosmosis is reviewed in the hope that it might find application here in road work and pile setting, field application by the Germans and Russians is reviewed.

  14. Wave energy conversion utilizing vertical motion of water in the array of water chambers aligned in the direction of wave propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesayoshi Hadano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As a new technical approach, wave energy converter by using vertical motion of water in the multiple water chambers were developed to realize actual wave power generation as eco-environmental renewable energy. And practical use of wave energy converter was actually to require the following conditions: (1 setting up of the relevant device and its application to wave power generation in case that severe wave loading is avoided; (2 workability in installation and maintenance operations; (3 high energy conversion potential; and (4 low cost. In this system, neither the wall(s of the chambers nor the energy conversion device(s are exposed to the impulsive load due to water wave. Also since this system is profitable when set along the jetty or along a long floating body, installation and maintenance are done without difficulty and the cost is reduced. In this paper, we describe the system which consists of a float, a shaft connected with another shaft, a rack and pinion arrangement, a ratchet mechanism, and rotary type generator(s. Then, we present the dynamics model for evaluating the output electric power, and the results of numerical calculation including the effect of the phase shift of up/down motion of the water in the array of water chambers aligned along the direction of wave propagation.

  15. Water Related Health Problems in Central Asia—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakir Bekturganov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper provides an extensive literature review on water related health issues in Central Asia. Even though the per capita amount of available freshwater is substantial in all Central Asian states the uneven distribution in time and space creates problems for water availability. Due to this, the Central Asian economies are developing under increasing water deficiency. The degradation of water supply systems and sewage treatment plants is often severe leading to potentially high water loss rates and inadequate accessibility to safe water supply. In this context, rural areas are the most affected. Low tariffs in combination with absent metering and low collection rates for water fees mean that operation and maintenance costs for basic services of water supply and sanitation are not covered. Unsafe water supply contains both microbiological and non-microbiological contaminants. Helminthiasis and intestinal protozoa infections are of considerable public health importance in Central Asia. Agricultural and industrial pollution is especially affecting downstream areas of Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers. In large areas copper, zinc, and chromium concentrations in water exceed maximum permissible concentration. Thus, there is an urgent need to strengthen the environmental monitoring system. Small-scale water supply and sanitation systems need to be developed in line with more efficient public spending on these.

  16. An Inverse Source Problem for a One-dimensional Wave Equation: An Observer-Based Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.

    2013-05-25

    Observers are well known in the theory of dynamical systems. They are used to estimate the states of a system from some measurements. However, recently observers have also been developed to estimate some unknowns for systems governed by Partial differential equations. Our aim is to design an observer to solve inverse source problem for a one dimensional wave equation. Firstly, the problem is discretized in both space and time and then an adaptive observer based on partial field measurements (i.e measurements taken form the solution of the wave equation) is applied to estimate both the states and the source. We see the effectiveness of this observer in both noise-free and noisy cases. In each case, numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of this approach. Finally, we compare the performance of the observer approach with Tikhonov regularization approach.

  17. THE SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEM OF USING GROUND WATER TO COOL LIVESTOCK BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thay Ngok Shon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambient temperature in the central part of Vietnam in summer can reach 32–35°C; in some places it can be more than 42°C. Hot climate strongly affects the animal organism alongside with the animal weight reduction and reduction the quantity of egg-laying in poultry. Therefore, air conditioning in livestock buildings is necessary. There are several ways to cool the temperature in such buildings, and each one has its own advantages and disadvantages. We propose to use underground water at the temperature of 24–25°C for this purpose. One of the methods of cooling sheds for livestock is sprinkler irrigation of water on the roof. For calculating the amount of heat, removed from the indoor air in the shed to the cooling water, in the first approximation specialists believe in some cases that an appropriate amount of heat being removed is determined mainly by heat transfer from the air inside the shed to the cooling water through the surface of the roof, represented by the lower part of the wave that form the surface of a metal tile, neglecting the influence of heat conduction on top of the wave of the tile surface. Consequentially, such a simplification leads to possible errors. Therefore, the authors solved the problem of cooling shed by irrigation of water on the roof by an analytical method. Specifically, we solved the problem of heat conductivity of the fin of the finite length of constant cross section, wherein different sides of the fin are conjugate with different environments. Additionally, the calculation considered the effect of solar radiation. For this purpose, the authors have created a heat balance equation at steady state for any infinitesimal element of the fin, and solved the differential equation afterwards. The authors applied the results for calculating practical problem of ground water irrigation of a roof of a livestock shed made of metal areas tiles. 

  18. Problems of Financing Water Protection and Water Management Activities in the Republic of Buryatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dondyukov Z. B.-D.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of the payment system for using water objects in the Russian Federation is studied. The problem of insufficient financing the water protection and water management activities in the Republic of Buryatia under conditions of active environmental restrictions of the Baikal natural area is revealed. The necessity for amendments in Russia’s budget legislation concerning water tax and charges for using water objects is substantiated and relevant proposals are made

  19. Rank deficiency and Tikhonov regularization in the inverse problem for gravitational-wave bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhmanov, M

    2006-01-01

    Coherent techniques for searches of gravitational-wave bursts effectively combine data from several detectors, taking into account differences in their responses. The efforts are now focused on the maximum likelihood principle as the most natural way to combine data, which can also be used without prior knowledge of the signal. Recent studies however have shown that straightforward application of the maximum likelihood method to gravitational waves with unknown waveforms can lead to inconsistencies and unphysical results such as discontinuity in the residual functional, or divergence of the variance of the estimated waveforms for some locations in the sky. So far the solutions to these problems have been based on rather different physical arguments. Following these investigations, we now find that all these inconsistencies stem from the rank deficiency of the underlying network response matrix. In this paper we show that the detection of gravitational-wave bursts with a network of interferometers belongs to the category of ill-posed problems. We then apply the method of Tikhonov regularization to resolve the rank deficiency and introduce a minimal regulator which yields a well-conditioned solution to the inverse problem for all locations on the sky

  20. On an inverse source problem for enhanced oil recovery by wave motion maximization in reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Karve, Pranav M.

    2014-12-28

    © 2014, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. We discuss an optimization methodology for focusing wave energy to subterranean formations using strong motion actuators placed on the ground surface. The motivation stems from the desire to increase the mobility of otherwise entrapped oil. The goal is to arrive at the spatial and temporal description of surface sources that are capable of maximizing mobility in the target reservoir. The focusing problem is posed as an inverse source problem. The underlying wave propagation problems are abstracted in two spatial dimensions, and the semi-infinite extent of the physical domain is negotiated by a buffer of perfectly-matched-layers (PMLs) placed at the domain’s truncation boundary. We discuss two possible numerical implementations: Their utility for deciding the tempo-spatial characteristics of optimal wave sources is shown via numerical experiments. Overall, the simulations demonstrate the inverse source method’s ability to simultaneously optimize load locations and time signals leading to the maximization of energy delivery to a target formation.

  1. Topological helical edge states in water waves over a topographical bottom

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shi qiao

    2017-11-27

    We present the discovery of topologically protected helical edge states in water wave systems, which are realized in water wave propagating over a topographical bottom whose height is modulated periodically in a two-dimensional triangular pattern. We develop an effective Hamiltonian to characterize the dispersion relation and use spin Chern numbers to classify the topology. Through full wave simulations we unambiguously demonstrate the robustness of the helical edge states which are immune to defects and disorders so that the backscattering loss is significantly reduced. A spin splitter is designed for water wave systems, where helical edge states with different spin orientations are spatially separated with each other, and potential applications are discussed.

  2. Topological helical edge states in water waves over a topographical bottom

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shi qiao; Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun

    2017-01-01

    We present the discovery of topologically protected helical edge states in water wave systems, which are realized in water wave propagating over a topographical bottom whose height is modulated periodically in a two-dimensional triangular pattern. We develop an effective Hamiltonian to characterize the dispersion relation and use spin Chern numbers to classify the topology. Through full wave simulations we unambiguously demonstrate the robustness of the helical edge states which are immune to defects and disorders so that the backscattering loss is significantly reduced. A spin splitter is designed for water wave systems, where helical edge states with different spin orientations are spatially separated with each other, and potential applications are discussed.

  3. Estimation of wave directional spreading in shallow water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.; Chandramohan, P.

    loads on offshore structures, long- term estimation of waves and estimation of sediment transport. According to the principle of superposition of linear waves, the sea state is com- posed of a large number of individual wave components, each having a..., who were involved in the data collection programme. NIO Contribution number 2569. References Benoit, M., 1992. Practical comparative performance survey of methods used for estimating directional wave spectra from heave–pitch–roll data. Proceedings...

  4. Physics. Examples and problems. Mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, oscillations and waves, atomic and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroppe, Heribert; Streitenberger, Peter; Specht, Eckard; Zeitler, Juergen; Langer, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    The present book is the unification of the proved problem collections for the basic physical training of studyings of especially engineering courses at technical colleges and universities. The book contains - didactically prepared and structured in the style of a textbook as well as with increasing difficulty - a total of 960 exemplary and additional tasks from the fields mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, oscillations and waves, as well as atomic and nuclear physics. For the exemplary problems the whole solution path and the complete calculation process with explanation of the relevant physical laws are extensively presented, for the additional problems for the self-control only the solutions and, if necessary, intermediate calculations are given. The examples and problems with mostly practice-oriented content are selected in such a way that they largely cover the matter treated in courses and exercises and make by their didactical preparation an effective repetition and optimal examination-preparation possible.

  5. Shallow water wave spectral characteristics along the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Shanas, P.R.; Dubhashi, K.K.

    (Kalnay et al. 1996). These data were provided by the NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center, Boulder, Colorado at http://www.cdc.noaa.gov/. 3. Results and discussions 3.1 Wave spectra The contribution of individual waves with different wave periods...

  6. Intermediate report on the problems of warm water drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The investigation into the solution of the problems of warm water drainage and its related matters was conducted, and the result was summarized by the warm water drainage sectional committee of the central public nuisance-prevention council entrusted by the Environment Agency. The first section of this report deals with the background of the warm water drainage problems. In December 1970, the environmental pollution prevention act was revised so as to include warm water drainage in the law. The second section deals with the progress of deliberation by the sectional committee. The third section deals with the actual conditions of warm water drainage. The temperature difference at the inlet and outlet of water was 5 to 11 0 C in power plants, 5 to 16 0 C in iron and steel works, 4 to 11 0 C in petroleum refineries, and 7 to 25 0 C in petrochemical plants. The amount of heat energy discharged from power plants was greater than that from the others. Other sections deal with its effects on the living things in water, the forecast of diffusion of warm drainage, the concept of the regulation of warm drainage, and the present countermeasure. Twelve points which require future investigation are listed. They are the change in the phases of living things affected by the change in temperature and flow of warm drainage, the effects on fishery resources, the estimation system for the environmental calorific capacity in the sea, the mechanism of diffusion and the forecasting method for the diffusion range. (Iwakiri, K.)

  7. Solving the Water Jugs Problem by an Integer Sequence Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yiu-Kwong

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present an integer sequence approach to solve the classic water jugs problem. The solution steps can be obtained easily by additions and subtractions only, which is suitable for manual calculation or programming by computer. This approach can be introduced to secondary and undergraduate students, and also to teachers and…

  8. An Adaptive Physics-Based Method for the Solution of One-Dimensional Wave Motion Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Shafiei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive physics-based method is developed for solving wave motion problems in one dimension (i.e., wave propagation in strings, rods and beams. The solution of the problem includes two main parts. In the first part, after discretization of the domain, a physics-based method is developed considering the conservation of mass and the balance of momentum. In the second part, adaptive points are determined using the wavelet theory. This part is done employing the Deslauries-Dubuc (D-D wavelets. By solving the problem in the first step, the domain of the problem is discretized by the same cells taking into consideration the load and characteristics of the structure. After the first trial solution, the D-D interpolation shows the lack and redundancy of points in the domain. These points will be added or eliminated for the next solution. This process may be repeated for obtaining an adaptive mesh for each step. Also, the smoothing spline fit is used to eliminate the noisy portion of the solution. Finally, the results of the proposed method are compared with the results available in the literature. The comparison shows excellent agreement between the obtained results and those already reported.

  9. Spallation reactions in shock waves at supernova explosions and related problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ustinova, G. K., E-mail: ustinova@dubna.net.ru [RAS, V.I. Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The isotopic anomalies of some extinct radionuclides testify to the outburst of a nearby supernova just before the collapse of the protosolar nebula, and to the fact that the supernova was Sn Ia, i.e. the carbon-detonation supernova. A key role of spallation reactions in the formation of isotopic anomalies in the primordial matter of the Solar System is revealed. It is conditioned by the diffusive acceleration of particles in the explosive shock waves, which leads to the amplification of rigidity of the energy spectrum of particles and its enrichment with heavier ions. The quantitative calculations of such isotopic anomalies of many elements are presented. It is well-grounded that the anomalous Xe-HL in meteoritic nanodiamonds was formed simultaneously with nanodiamonds themselves during the shock wave propagation at the Sn Ia explosion. The possible effects of shock wave fractionation of noble gases in the atmosphere of planets are considered. The origin of light elements Li, Be and B in spallation reactions, predicted by Fowler in the middle of the last century, is argued. All the investigated isotopic anomalies give the evidence for the extremely high magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) conditions at the initial stage of free expansion of the explosive shock wave from Sn Ia, which can be essential in solution of the problem of origin of cosmic rays. The specific iron-enriched matter of Sn Ia and its MHD-separation in turbulent processes must be taking into account in the models of origin of the Solar System.

  10. Exploring surface waves vortex interaction in deep water: a classical analog of the Quantum Mechanics Aharonov-Bohm effect

    CERN Document Server

    Vivanco, F

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple experiment to study the interaction of surface waves with a vertical vortex in the deep water regime. Similarly to what occurs in the Quantum Mechanics Aharonov-Bohm problem for electron interacting with a magnetic potential, the effect of the vortex circulation is to introduce dislocations in the wavefront. These defects are explained taken into account the effects of advection on the propagating wavefront, due to the fluid motion. (Author)

  11. Water chemistry at RBMK plants: Problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamet, V.; Yurmanov, V.

    2002-01-01

    After around 15 years of operation RBMK-1000 units undergo a major refit, which includes safety system upgrading, fuel tube replacement, etc. The above upgrading has created problems for water chemistry. In particular, in late 80's in-core insertion time of the portion of control rods was reduced 10-fold thanks to a transfer from water to filming cooling of scram channels. Scram channels are cooled with inner surface water film cooling and nitrogen is injected into heads via special pipelines. Such cooling system modernization ensures fast insertion of absorber rods. The above upgrade intensified nitric acid radiolytic generation in water coolant and pH 25 value shift to acid conditions (up to 4.5). The results of corrosion tests in such conditions proved the necessity to improve water chemistry to ensure corrosion protection of scram/control rod and circuit components, especially those made out of aluminium alloy. Since 1990 the new revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard specified the new normal operational limit and action levels for possible temporary deviations of pH 25 value. RBMK plant specific measures were implemented at RBMK plants to meet the above requirements of the 1990 revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard. Clean-up systems of the above circuit were upgraded to ensure intensive absorption of nitric acid from water and pH 25 maintenance in a slightly acid area. (authors)

  12. Water chemistry at RBMK plants: Problems and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamet, V.; Yurmanov, V. [VNIIAES (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    After around 15 years of operation RBMK-1000 units undergo a major refit, which includes safety system upgrading, fuel tube replacement, etc. The above upgrading has created problems for water chemistry. In particular, in late 80's in-core insertion time of the portion of control rods was reduced 10-fold thanks to a transfer from water to filming cooling of scram channels. Scram channels are cooled with inner surface water film cooling and nitrogen is injected into heads via special pipelines. Such cooling system modernization ensures fast insertion of absorber rods. The above upgrade intensified nitric acid radiolytic generation in water coolant and pH{sub 25} value shift to acid conditions (up to 4.5). The results of corrosion tests in such conditions proved the necessity to improve water chemistry to ensure corrosion protection of scram/control rod and circuit components, especially those made out of aluminium alloy. Since 1990 the new revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard specified the new normal operational limit and action levels for possible temporary deviations of pH{sub 25} value. RBMK plant specific measures were implemented at RBMK plants to meet the above requirements of the 1990 revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard. Clean-up systems of the above circuit were upgraded to ensure intensive absorption of nitric acid from water and pH{sub 25} maintenance in a slightly acid area. (authors)

  13. Corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, B.

    1989-01-01

    This article briefly presents current corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies. The problems are different forms of environmentally assisted cracking, and the remedies are divided into material-, environment-, and stress-related remedies. The list of problems comprises: intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in weld-sensitized stainless steel piping; IGSCC in cold-bent stainless steel piping; irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in stainless alloys; IGSCC in high-strength stainless alloys. A prospective corrosion problem, as judged from literature references, and one which relates to plant life, is corrosion fatigue in pressure vessel steel, since the reactor pressure vessel is the most critical component in the BWR pressure boundary as regards plant safety. (author)

  14. An anisotropic standing wave braneworld and associated Sturm-Liouville problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Malagón-Morejón, Dagoberto

    2012-01-01

    We present a consistent derivation of the recently proposed 5D anisotropic standing wave braneworld generated by gravity coupled to a phantom-like scalar field. We explicitly solve the corresponding junction conditions, a fact that enables us to give a physical interpretation to the anisotropic energy-momentum tensor components of the brane. So matter on the brane represents an oscillating fluid which emits anisotropic waves into the bulk. We also analyze the Sturm-Liouville problem associated with the correct localization condition of the transverse to the brane metric and scalar fields. It is shown that this condition restricts the physically meaningful space of solutions for the localization of the fluctuations of the model. (paper)

  15. Nonlinear problems in fluid dynamics and inverse scattering: Nonlinear waves and inverse scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablowitz, Mark J.

    1994-12-01

    Research investigations involving the fundamental understanding and applications of nonlinear wave motion and related studies of inverse scattering and numerical computation have been carried out and a number of significant results have been obtained. A class of nonlinear wave equations which can be solved by the inverse scattering transform (IST) have been studied, including the Kadaomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, the Davey-Stewartson equation, and the 2+1 Toda system. The solutions obtained by IST correspond to the Cauchy initial value problem with decaying initial data. We have also solved two important systems via the IST method: a 'Volterra' system in 2+1 dimensions and a new one dimensional nonlinear equation which we refer to as the Toda differential-delay equation. Research in computational chaos in moderate to long time numerical simulations continues.

  16. A Study of Human Computing on Solving Process of Basic Problems in Exercises for learning by Brain Wave

    OpenAIRE

    山口, 有美; 山口, 晴久

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the comparative experiments to the students on solving process of problems on typical school teaching material knowledge (caluculation, geometry, Kanji dictations, typewriting, drawing ) in exercises in both in VDT works and on desktop works by frequency analysis of Brain Wave. The cognitive states of each mental working were compared on brain waves. And α reduction rate in brain waves in each mental work (calculation, geometry, Kanji dictations, typewriting, drawin...

  17. The solution of the dam-break problem in the Porous Shallow water Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Luca; Pepe, Veronica; Cimorelli, Luigi; D'Aniello, Andrea; Della Morte, Renata; Pianese, Domenico

    2018-04-01

    The Porous Shallow water Equations are commonly used to evaluate the propagation of flooding waves in the urban environment. These equations may exhibit not only classic shocks, rarefactions, and contact discontinuities, as in the ordinary two-dimensional Shallow water Equations, but also special discontinuities at abrupt porosity jumps. In this paper, an appropriate parameterization of the stationary weak solutions of one-dimensional Porous Shallow water Equations supplies the inner structure of the porosity jumps. The exact solution of the corresponding dam-break problem is presented, and six different wave configurations are individuated, proving that the solution exists and it is unique for given initial conditions and geometric characteristics. These results can be used as a benchmark in order to validate one- and two-dimensional numerical models for the solution of the Porous Shallow water Equations. In addition, it is presented a novel Finite Volume scheme where the porosity jumps are taken into account by means of a variables reconstruction approach. The dam-break results supplied by this numerical scheme are compared with the exact dam-break results, showing the promising capabilities of this numerical approach. Finally, the advantages of the novel porosity jump definition are shown by comparison with other definitions available in the literature, demonstrating its advantages, and the issues raising in real world applications are discussed.

  18. Enhanced Removal of Hydrophobic Gas by Aerial Ultrasonic Waves and Two Kinds of Water Mists of Different Particle Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Keisuke; Miura, Hikaru

    2012-07-01

    Air pollutants can cause health problems, such as bronchitis and cancer, and are now recognized as a social problem. Hence, a method is proposed for the collection and removal of gaseous air pollutants by aerial ultrasonic waves and water mist. Typically, gas removal effects are studied using lemon oil vapor (“lemon gas”), which is a hydrophobic gas. Previous experiments using lemon gas have shown that a removal rate of up to 40% can be achieved in an intense standing wave at 20 kHz, for an amount of water mist of 1.39 cm3/s and an electrical input power of 50 W. Increasing the surface area of the water mist leads to greater removal of hydrophobic gas. In this study, the effects of gas removal are examined by conducting experiments using intense aerial ultrasonic waves to disperse two kinds of water mists, each composed of particles of different sizes: small particles (diameter: ≈3 µm) and conventional large particles (diameter: ≈60 µm).

  19. On advanced variational formulation of the method of lines and its application to the wave propagation problems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available are transformed into systems of ordinary differential equations with initial conditions. This reduction is obtained by means of application of particular finite difference schemes to the spatial derivatives. Many of the wave propagation problems describing...

  20. Electromagnetic aquametry electromagnetic wave interaction with water and moist substances

    CERN Document Server

    Kupfer, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of Electromagnetic Aquametry. It summarizes the wide area of metrology and its applications in electromagnetic sensing of moist materials. The physical properties of water in various degrees of binding interacting with electromagnetic fields is presented by model systems. The book describes measurement methods and sensors in the frequency domain, TDR-techniques for environmental problems, methods and sensors for quality assessment of biological substances, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Environmental sciences, as well as civil and geoengineering, fossil fuels, food and pharmaceutical science are the main fields of application. A very wide frequency sprectrum is used for dielectric measurement methods, but the microwave range is clearly dominant. Multiparameter methods as well as methods of principal components and artificial neural networks for density independent measurements are described.

  1. Characterization of the Deep Water Surface Wave Variability in the California Current Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villas Bôas, Ana B.; Gille, Sarah T.; Mazloff, Matthew R.; Cornuelle, Bruce D.

    2017-11-01

    Surface waves are crucial for the dynamics of the upper ocean not only because they mediate exchanges of momentum, heat, energy, and gases between the ocean and the atmosphere, but also because they determine the sea state. The surface wave field in a given region is set by the combination of local and remote forcing. The present work characterizes the seasonal variability of the deep water surface wave field in the California Current region, as retrieved from over two decades of satellite altimetry data combined with wave buoys and wave model hindcast (WaveWatch III). In particular, the extent to which the local wind modulates the variability of the significant wave height, peak period, and peak direction is assessed. During spring/summer, regional-scale wind events of up to 10 m/s are the dominant forcing for waves off the California coast, leading to relatively short-period waves (8-10 s) that come predominantly from the north-northwest. The wave climatology throughout the California Current region shows average significant wave heights exceeding 2 m during most of the year, which may have implications for the planning and retrieval methods of the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission.

  2. Modeling Wind Wave Evolution from Deep to Shallow Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    W.H. Hui, 1979; Nonlinear energy transfer in narrow gravity wave spectrum. Proc. Roy. Soc. London A368, 239–265. Gagnaire-Renou, E., M. Benoit , and P...at the 2013 WISE meeting, Camp Springs, MA , USA. Smit P. B. and T. T. Janssen, 2013; The evolution of inhomogeneous wave statistics through a

  3. Iterative and range test methods for an inverse source problem for acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Carlos; Kress, Rainer; Serranho, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    We propose two methods for solving an inverse source problem for time-harmonic acoustic waves. Based on the reciprocity gap principle a nonlinear equation is presented for the locations and intensities of the point sources that can be solved via Newton iterations. To provide an initial guess for this iteration we suggest a range test algorithm for approximating the source locations. We give a mathematical foundation for the range test and exhibit its feasibility in connection with the iteration method by some numerical examples

  4. An Adaptive Observer-Based Algorithm for Solving Inverse Source Problem for the Wave Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.; Zayane, Chadia; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2015-01-01

    Observers are well known in control theory. Originally designed to estimate the hidden states of dynamical systems given some measurements, the observers scope has been recently extended to the estimation of some unknowns, for systems governed by partial differential equations. In this paper, observers are used to solve inverse source problem for a one-dimensional wave equation. An adaptive observer is designed to estimate the state and source components for a fully discretized system. The effectiveness of the algorithm is emphasized in noise-free and noisy cases and an insight on the impact of measurements’ size and location is provided.

  5. An Adaptive Observer-Based Algorithm for Solving Inverse Source Problem for the Wave Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.

    2015-08-31

    Observers are well known in control theory. Originally designed to estimate the hidden states of dynamical systems given some measurements, the observers scope has been recently extended to the estimation of some unknowns, for systems governed by partial differential equations. In this paper, observers are used to solve inverse source problem for a one-dimensional wave equation. An adaptive observer is designed to estimate the state and source components for a fully discretized system. The effectiveness of the algorithm is emphasized in noise-free and noisy cases and an insight on the impact of measurements’ size and location is provided.

  6. A contribution on the problem of ground water pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilliox, L.; Muntzer, P.; Kresser, W.

    1982-01-01

    The authors present the underlying physics of processes relevant to the problem of ground water pollution. A series of models are discussed which include two-dimensional diffusion from a point source of pollution in a uniform homogeneous medium and the modifying effect of inhomogeneities, together with displacement processes for miscible liquids in saturated porous media. In conclusion an account of laboratory and theoretical investigations of these diffusion processes in layered media of different permeabilities is given. (J.R.B.)

  7. Analysis of a finite PML approximation to the three dimensional elastic wave scattering problem

    KAUST Repository

    Bramble, James H.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the application of a perfectly matched layer (PML) technique to approximate solutions to the elastic wave scattering problem in the frequency domain. The PML is viewed as a complex coordinate shift in spherical coordinates which leads to a variable complex coefficient equation for the displacement vector posed on an infinite domain (the complement of the scatterer). The rapid decay of the PML solution suggests truncation to a bounded domain with a convenient outer boundary condition and subsequent finite element approximation (for the truncated problem). We prove existence and uniqueness of the solutions to the infinite domain and truncated domain PML equations (provided that the truncated domain is sufficiently large). We also show exponential convergence of the solution of the truncated PML problem to the solution of the original scattering problem in the region of interest. We then analyze a Galerkin numerical approximation to the truncated PML problem and prove that it is well posed provided that the PML damping parameter and mesh size are small enough. Finally, computational results illustrating the efficiency of the finite element PML approximation are presented. © 2010 American Mathematical Society.

  8. A three-dimensional Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator for water waves over topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, D.; Nachbin, A.

    2018-06-01

    Surface water waves are considered propagating over highly variable non-smooth topographies. For this three dimensional problem a Dirichlet-to-Neumann (DtN) operator is constructed reducing the numerical modeling and evolution to the two dimensional free surface. The corresponding Fourier-type operator is defined through a matrix decomposition. The topographic component of the decomposition requires special care and a Galerkin method is provided accordingly. One dimensional numerical simulations, along the free surface, validate the DtN formulation in the presence of a large amplitude, rapidly varying topography. An alternative, conformal mapping based, method is used for benchmarking. A two dimensional simulation in the presence of a Luneburg lens (a particular submerged mound) illustrates the accurate performance of the three dimensional DtN operator.

  9. Prediction of regular wave loads on a fixed offshore oscillating water column-wave energy converter using CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elhanafi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, hydrodynamic wave loads on an offshore stationary–floating oscillating water column (OWC are investigated via a 2D and 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling based on the RANS equations and the VOF surface capturing scheme. The CFD model is validated against previous experiments for nonlinear regular wave interactions with a surface-piercing stationary barge. Following the validation stage, the numerical model is modified to consider the pneumatic damping effect, and an extensive campaign of numerical tests is carried out to study the wave–OWC interactions for different wave periods, wave heights and pneumatic damping factors. It is found that the horizontal wave force is usually larger than the vertical one. Also, there a direct relationship between the pneumatic and hydrodynamic vertical forces with a maximum vertical force almost at the device natural frequency, whereas the pneumatic damping has a little effect on the horizontal force. Additionally, simulating the turbine damping with an orifice plate induces higher vertical loads than utilizing a slot opening. Furthermore, 3D modeling significantly escalates and declines the predicted hydrodynamic vertical and horizontal wave loads, respectively.

  10. Fabrication of Terahertz Wave Resonators with Alumina Diamond Photonic Crystals for Frequency Amplification in Water Solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, N; Niki, T; Kirihara, S

    2011-01-01

    Terahertz wave resonators composed of alumina photonic crystals with diamond lattice structures were designed and fabricated by using micro stereolithography. These three dimensional periodic structures can reflect perfectly electromagnetic waves through Bragg diffraction. A micro glass cell including water solutions was put between the photonic crystals as a novel resonance sensor with terahertz frequency range. The localized and amplified waves in the resonators were measured by a spectroscopy, and visualized by theoretical simulations.

  11. Wave energy level and geographic setting correlate with Florida beach water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhixuan; Reniers, Ad; Haus, Brian K; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Kelly, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-15

    Many recreational beaches suffer from elevated levels of microorganisms, resulting in beach advisories and closures due to lack of compliance with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. We conducted the first statewide beach water quality assessment by analyzing decadal records of fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci and fecal coliform) levels at 262 Florida beaches. The objectives were to depict synoptic patterns of beach water quality exceedance along the entire Florida shoreline and to evaluate their relationships with wave condition and geographic location. Percent exceedances based on enterococci and fecal coliform were negatively correlated with both long-term mean wave energy and beach slope. Also, Gulf of Mexico beaches exceeded the thresholds significantly more than Atlantic Ocean ones, perhaps partially due to the lower wave energy. A possible linkage between wave energy level and water quality is beach sand, a pervasive nonpoint source that tends to harbor more bacteria in the low-wave-energy environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Electromagnetic backscattering from freak waves in (1 + 1)-dimensional deep-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Xie; Tao, Shen; Wei, Chen; Hai-Lan, Kuang; Perrie, William

    2010-01-01

    To study the electromagnetic (EM) backscatter characteristics of freak waves at moderate incidence angles, we establish an EM backscattering model for freak waves in (1 + 1)-dimensional deep water. The nonlinear interaction between freak waves and Bragg short waves is considered to be the basic hydrodynamic spectra modulation mechanism in the model. Numerical results suggest that the EM backscattering intensities of freak waves are less than those from the background sea surface at moderate incidence angles. The normalised radar cross sections (NRCSs) from freak waves are highly polarisation dependent, even at low incidence angles, which is different from the situation for normal sea waves; moreover, the NRCS of freak waves is more polarisation dependent than the background sea surface. NRCS discrepancies between freak waves and the background sea surface with using horizontal transmitting horizomtal (HH) polarisation are larger than those using vertical transmitting vertical (VV) polarisation, at moderate incident angles. NRCS discrepancies between freak waves and background sea surface decreases with the increase of incidence angle, in both HH and VV polarisation radars. As an application, in the synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) imaging of freak waves, we suggest that freak waves should have extremely low backscatter NRCSs for the freak wave facet with the strongest slope. Compared with the background sea surface, the freak waves should be darker in HH polarisation echo images than in VV echo images, in SAR images. Freak waves can be more easily detected from the background sea surface in HH polarisation images than in VV polarisation images. The possibility of detection of freak waves at low incidence angles is much higher than at high incidence angles. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  13. Spectral Wave Characteristics in the Nearshore Waters of Northwestern Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjali Nair, M.; Sanil Kumar, V.; Amrutha, M. M.

    2018-03-01

    The spectral wave characteristics in the nearshore waters of northwestern Bay of Bengal are presented based on the buoy-measured data from February 2013 to December 2015 off Gopalpur at 15-m water depth. The mean seasonal significant wave height and mean wave period indicate that the occurrence of higher wave heights and wave periods is during the southwest monsoon period (June-September). 74% of the sea surface height variance in a year is a result of waves from 138 to 228° and 16% are from 48 to 138°. Strong inter-annual variability is observed in the monthly average wave parameters due to the occurrence of tropical cyclones. Due to the influence of the tropical cyclone Phailin, maximum significant wave height of 6.7 m is observed on 12 October 2013 and that due to tropical cyclone Hudhud whose track is 250 southwest of the study location is 5.84 m on 12 October 2014. Analysis revealed that a single tropical cyclone influenced the annual maximum significant wave height and not the annual average value which is almost same ( 1 m) in 2014 and 2015. The waves in the northwestern Bay of Bengal are influenced by the southwest and northeast monsoons, southern ocean swells and cyclones.

  14. A numerical study of lowest-order short-crested water wave instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents the first numerical simulations of the long-term evolution of doubly-periodic short-crested wave instabilities, which are the simplest cases involving the three-dimensional instability of genuinely three-dimensional progressive water waves. The simulated evolutions reveal quali...

  15. Spatial and temporal variation of surface waves in shallow waters along the eastern Arabian Sea.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anoop, T.R.; SanilKumar, V.; Shanas, P.R.

    We studied the spatial and temporal variation of surface waves along the eastern Arabian Sea during 2011 and 2012. Measured directional wave data at two shallow water locations and re-analysis datasets (ERA-Interim) at 0.751 intervals at four...

  16. Multipeakedness and groupiness of shallow water waves along Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anand, N.M.; AshokKumar, K.; Mandal, S.

    IM-.. .. . ..................................-;.. +++ -+t+++t+Mi-##+ ' .. ++~-* ..... + +t........ .. + .. .... .......... + ............................. _ ...·_-.a._IMIIIII....... I".".I .............Ht1t-+ .. l j ! I 0.0 l l I 1 l I i 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 5.0 0.0 6.0 I 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 5.0 5.0 5...- quencies fpl and fp2' The sequential correlation bet.ween suc cessive wave heights, r HH (RYE, 1974), between successive wave periods, r 1T and between wave height and wave period: r HT (GaDA, 1978) were evaluated as given below. Also the spec tral...

  17. On the pressure field of nonlinear standing water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, L. W.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure field produced by two dimensional nonlinear time and space periodic standing waves was calculated as a series expansion in the wave height. The high order series was summed by the use of Pade approximants. Calculations included the pressure variation at great depth, which was considered to be a likely cause of microseismic activity, and the pressure distribution on a vertical barrier or breakwater.

  18. An Experimental Study on the Impact of Different-frequency Elastic Waves on Water Retention Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, J. H.; Dai, J. Y.; Lee, J. W.; Lo, W. C.

    2017-12-01

    ABSTEACTOver the past few decades, theoretical and experimental studies on the connection between elastic wave attributes and the physical properties of a fluid-bearing porous medium have attracted the attention of many scholars in fields of porous medium flow and hydrogeology. It has been previously determined that the transmission of elastic waves in a porous medium containing two immiscible fluids will have an effect on the water retention curve, but it has not been found that the water retention curve will be affected by the frequency of elastic vibration waves or whether the effect on the soil is temporary or permanent. This research is based on a sand box test in which the soil is divided into three layers (a lower, middle, and upper layer). In this case, we discuss different impacts on the water retention curve during the drying process under sound waves (elastic waves) subject to three frequencies (150Hz, 300Hz, and 450Hz), respectively. The change in the water retention curve before and after the effect is then discussed. In addition, how sound waves affect the water retention curve at different depths is also observed. According to the experimental results, we discover that sound waves can cause soil either to expand or to contract. When the soil is induced to expand due to sound waves, it can contract naturally and return to the condition it was in before the influence of the sound waves. On the contrary, when the soil is induced to contract, it is unable to return to its initial condition. Due to the results discussed above, it is suggested that sound waves causing soil to expand have a temporary impact while those causing soil to contract have a permanent impact. In addition, our experimental results show how sound waves affect the water retention curve at different depths. The degree of soil expansion and contraction caused by the sound waves will differ at various soil depths. Nevertheless, the expanding or contracting of soil is only subject to the

  19. Video measurements of fluid velocities and water levels in breaking waves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cost-effective measurement of the velocity flow fields in breaking water waves, using particle and correlation image velocimetry, is described. The fluid velocities are estimated by tracking the motion of neutrally buoyant particles and aeration...

  20. Geochemistry's vital contribution to solving water resource problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmunds, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the events celebrating 40 a of IAGC, it is fitting to trace the modern evolution and development of hydrogeochemistry. However, fascination with water quality can be traced back more than 2 ka. In the post-war years, hydrogeochemistry was influenced heavily by the advances in other disciplines including physical chemistry, metallurgy and oceanography. Hydrological applications of isotope science also developed rapidly at this time, and important advances in analytical chemistry allowed multi-element and trace element applications to be made. Experimental studies on equilibrium processes and reaction kinetics allowed bench-scale insight into water-rock interaction. Consolidation of knowledge on processes in groundwaters and the current awareness of hydrogeochemistry by water professionals owe much to the work of Robert Garrels, John Hem, and co-workers in the early 1960s. Studies of down-gradient evolution enabled a field-scale understanding of groundwater quality and geochemical processes as a function of residence time (dissolution and precipitation processes in carbonate and non-carbonate aquifers; redox processes; cation exchange and salinity origins). Emerging water resource and water quality issues in the 1960s and 70s permitted the application of hydrogeochemistry to contaminant and related problems and this trend continues. The impacts of diffuse pollution from intensive agriculture, waste disposal and point source pollution from urban and industrial sources relied on geochemistry to solve questions of origin and attenuation. In semi-arid regions facing water scarcity, geochemical approaches have been vital in the assessment of renewability and characterising palaeowaters. The protection and new incoming regulation of water resources will rely increasingly on a sound geochemical basis for management.

  1. Initial-value problem for the 1-D wave equation in an inhomogeneous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlacek, Z.; Roberts, B.; Adam, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    A complete mathematical analysis of oscillations of an inhomogeneous medium described by a wave equation with a space-dependent coefficient is given. The initial-value problem is solved both by the Laplace transform and by normal-mode analysis and the equivalency of both approaches is demonstrated. The Green function of the problem is a double-valued function of the complex frequency, analytic in the upper and lower halves of the complex frequency plane (the ''physical'' sheet of its Riemann surface) with discontinuity on the whole real axis, corresponding to the continuous frequency spectrum of the physical system in question. The Green function has complex poles on analytic continuation onto the ''unphysical'' sheet of its Riemann surface. This makes it possible, by inverting the Laplace transform, to interpret the solution of the initial-value problem in terms of ''damped'' eigenmodes. The continuum eigenmodes can be constructed directly and are also recovered by integrating the Green function in the complex frequency plane along a closed contour enclosing the spectrum. Their orthogonality and completeness is proved. The solution of the initial-value problem synthesized from the continuum eigenmodes can be interpreted in terms of travelling disturbances scattered by inhomogeneity. (author)

  2. Wave-induced extreme water levels in the Puerto Morelos fringing reef lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Torres-Freyermuth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Wave-induced extreme water levels in the Puerto Morelos fringing reef lagoon are investigated by means of a phase-resolving non-hydrostatic wave model (SWASH. This model solves the nonlinear shallow water equations including non-hydrostatic pressure. The one-dimensional version of the model is implemented in order to investigate wave transformation in fringing reefs. Firstly, the numerical model is validated with (i laboratory experiments conducted on a physical model (Demirbilek et al., 2007and (ii field observations (Coronado et al., 2007. Numerical results show good agreement with both experimental and field data. The comparison against the physical model results, for energetic wave conditions, indicates that high- and low-frequency wave transformation is well reproduced. Moreover, extreme water-level conditions measured during the passage of Hurricane Ivan in Puerto Morelos are also estimated by the numerical tool. Subsequently, the model is implemented at different along-reef locations in Puerto Morelos. Extreme water levels, wave-induced setup, and infragravity wave energy are estimated inside the reef lagoon for different storm wave conditions (Hs >2 m. The numerical results revealed a strong correlation between the offshore sea-swell wave energy and the setup. In contrast, infragravity waves are shown to be the result of a more complex pattern which heavily relies on the reef geometry. Indeed, the southern end of the reef lagoon provides evidence of resonance excitation, suggesting that the reef barrier may act as either a natural flood protection morphological feature, or as an inundation hazard enhancer depending on the incident wave conditions.

  3. Wave Power as Solution for Off-Grid Water Desalination Systems: Resource Characterization for Kilifi-Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Francisco

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater scarcity is one of humanity’s reoccurring problems that hamper socio-economic development in many regions across the globe. In coastal areas, seawater can be desalinated through reverse osmosis (RO and transformed into freshwater for human use. Desalination requires large amounts of energy, mostly in the form of a reliable electricity supply, which in many cases is supplied by diesel generators. The objective of this work is to analyze the wave power resource availability in Kilifi-Kenya and evaluate the possible use of wave power converter (WEC to power desalination plants. A particular focus is given use of WECs developed by Uppsala University (UU-WEC. The results here presented were achieved using reanalysis—wave data revealed that the local wave climate has an approximate annual mean of 7 kW/m and mode of 5 kW/m. Significant wave height and wave mean period are within 0.8–2 m and 7–8 s respectively, with a predominant wave mean direction from southeast. The seasonal cycle appeared to be the most relevant for energy conversion, having the highest difference of 6 kW/m, in which April is the lowest (3.8 kW/m and August is the peak (10.5 kW/m. In such mild wave climates, the UU–WEC and similar devices can be suitable for ocean energy harvesting for water desalination systems. Technically, with a capacity factor of 30% and energy consumption of 3 kWh/m3, a coastal community of about five thousand inhabitants can be provided of freshwater by only ten WECs with installed capacity of 20 kW.

  4. Highly Adaptive Solid-Liquid Interfacing Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting Diverse Water Wave Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue Jiao; Kuang, Shuang Yang; Wang, Zhong Lin; Zhu, Guang

    2018-05-22

    Harvesting water wave energy presents a significantly practical route to energy supply for self-powered wireless sensing networks. Here we report a networked integrated triboelectric nanogenerator (NI-TENG) as a highly adaptive means of harvesting energy from interfacing interactions with various types of water waves. Having an arrayed networking structure, the NI-TENG can accommodate diverse water wave motions and generate stable electric output regardless of how random the water wave is. Nanoscaled surface morphology consisting of dense nanowire arrays is the key for obtaining high electric output. A NI-TENG having an area of 100 × 70 mm 2 can produce a stable short-circuit current of 13.5 μA and corresponding electric power of 1.03 mW at a water wave height of 12 cm. This merit promises practical applications of the NI-TENG in real circumstances, where water waves are highly variable and unpredictable. After energy storage, the generated electric energy can drive wireless sensing by autonomously transmitting data at a period less than 1 min. This work proposes a viable solution for powering individual standalone nodes in a wireless sensor network. Potential applications include but are not limited to long-term environment monitoring, marine surveillance, and off-shore navigation.

  5. Ginzburg-Landau equations for a d-wave superconductor with applications to vortex structure and surface problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Ren, Y.; Ting, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    The properties of a d x 2 -y 2 -wave superconductor in an external magnetic field are investigated on the basis of Gorkov's theory of weakly coupled superconductors. The Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equations, which govern the spatial variations of the order parameter and the supercurrent, are microscopically derived. The single vortex structure and surface problems in such a superconductor are studied using these equations. It is shown that the d-wave vortex structure is very different from the conventional s-wave vortex: the s-wave and d-wave components, with the opposite winding numbers, are found to coexist in the region near the vortex core. The supercurrent and local magnetic field around the vortex are calculated. Far away from the vortex core, both of them exhibit a fourfold symmetry, in contrast to an s-wave superconductor. The surface problem in a d-wave superconductor is also studied by solving the GL equations. The total order parameter near the surface is always a real combination of s- and d-wave components, which means that the proximity effect cannot induce a time-reversal symmetry-breaking state at the surface

  6. Effect of water depth on wind-wave frequency spectrum I. Spectral form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Sheng-Chang; Guan, Chang-Long; Sun, Shi-Cai; Wu, Ke-Jian; Zhang, Da-Cuo

    1996-06-01

    Wen et al's method developed to obtain wind-wave frequency spectrum in deep water was used to derive the spectrum in finite depth water. The spectrum S(ω) (ω being angular frequency) when normalized with the zeroth moment m 0 and peak frequency {ie97-1}, contains in addition to the peakness factor {ie97-2} a depth parameter η=(2π m o)1/2/ d ( d being water depth), so the spectrum behavior can be studied for different wave growth stages and water depths.

  7. Analysis of efficient preconditioned defect correction methods for nonlinear water waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2014-01-01

    Robust computational procedures for the solution of non-hydrostatic, free surface, irrotational and inviscid free-surface water waves in three space dimensions can be based on iterative preconditioned defect correction (PDC) methods. Such methods can be made efficient and scalable to enable...... prediction of free-surface wave transformation and accurate wave kinematics in both deep and shallow waters in large marine areas or for predicting the outcome of experiments in large numerical wave tanks. We revisit the classical governing equations are fully nonlinear and dispersive potential flow...... equations. We present new detailed fundamental analysis using finite-amplitude wave solutions for iterative solvers. We demonstrate that the PDC method in combination with a high-order discretization method enables efficient and scalable solution of the linear system of equations arising in potential flow...

  8. On shallow water waves in a medium with time-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy I. Abdel-Gawad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we studied the progression of shallow water waves relevant to the variable coefficient Korteweg–de Vries (vcKdV equation. We investigated two kinds of cases: when the dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients are proportional, and when they are not linearly dependent. In the first case, it was shown that the progressive waves have some geometric structures as in the case of KdV equation with constant coefficients but the waves travel with time dependent speed. In the second case, the wave structure is maintained when the nonlinearity balances the dispersion. Otherwise, water waves collapse. The objectives of the study are to find a wide class of exact solutions by using the extended unified method and to present a new algorithm for treating the coupled nonlinear PDE’s.

  9. Extreme water level and wave estimation for nearshore of Ningde City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y. D.; Wang, E. K.; Xu, G. Q.

    2017-08-01

    The high and low design water levels are calculated by observation tidal data in sea areas of Ningde offshore wind power project from September 2010 to August 2011, with the value 318 cm and -246 cm, respectively. The extreme high and low levels are also calculated using synchronous difference ratio method based on station data from 1973 to 2005 at Sansha station. The value is 431 cm and -378 cm respectively. The design wave elements are estimated using the wave data from Beishuang Station and Pingtan station. On this basis, the SWAN wave model is applied to calculating the design wave elements in the engineering sea areas. The results show that the southern sea area is mainly affected by the wave effect on ESE, and the northern is mainly affected by the E waves. This paper is helpful and useful for design and construction of offshore and coastal engineering.

  10. Pneumatic Performance of a Non-Axisymmetric Floating Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Conversion Device in Random Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, Diana

    2014-01-01

    A stochastic approach is used to gain a sophisticated understanding of a non-axisymmetric floating oscillating water column's response to random waves. A linear, frequency-domain performance model that links the oscillating structure to air-pressure fluctuations with a Wells Turbine in 3-dimensions is used to study the device performance at a northern California deployment location. Both short-term, sea-state, and long-term, annual, predictions are made regarding the devices performance. U...

  11. Water accounting and vulnerability evaluation (WAVE): considering atmospheric evaporation recycling and the risk of freshwater depletion in water footprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Markus; van der Ent, Ruud; Eisner, Stephanie; Bach, Vanessa; Finkbeiner, Matthias

    2014-04-15

    Aiming to enhance the analysis of water consumption and resulting consequences along the supply chain of products, the water accounting and vulnerability evaluation (WAVE) model is introduced. On the accounting level, atmospheric evaporation recycling within drainage basins is considered for the first time, which can reduce water consumption volumes by up to 32%. Rather than predicting impacts, WAVE analyzes the vulnerability of basins to freshwater depletion. Based on local blue water scarcity, the water depletion index (WDI) denotes the risk that water consumption can lead to depletion of freshwater resources. Water scarcity is determined by relating annual water consumption to availability in more than 11,000 basins. Additionally, WDI accounts for the presence of lakes and aquifers which have been neglected in water scarcity assessments so far. By setting WDI to the highest value in (semi)arid basins, absolute freshwater shortage is taken into account in addition to relative scarcity. This avoids mathematical artifacts of previous indicators which turn zero in deserts if consumption is zero. As illustrated in a case study of biofuels, WAVE can help to interpret volumetric water footprint figures and, thus, promotes a sustainable use of global freshwater resources.

  12. On the global "two-sided" characteristic Cauchy problem for linear wave equations on manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Umberto

    2018-04-01

    The global characteristic Cauchy problem for linear wave equations on globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifolds is examined, for a class of smooth initial value hypersurfaces satisfying favourable global properties. First it is shown that, if geometrically well-motivated restrictions are placed on the supports of the (smooth) initial datum and of the (smooth) inhomogeneous term, then there exists a continuous global solution which is smooth "on each side" of the initial value hypersurface. A uniqueness result in Sobolev regularity H^{1/2+ɛ }_{loc} is proved among solutions supported in the union of the causal past and future of the initial value hypersurface, and whose product with the indicator function of the causal future (resp. past) of the hypersurface is past compact (resp. future compact). An explicit representation formula for solutions is obtained, which prominently features an invariantly defined, densitised version of the null expansion of the hypersurface. Finally, applications to quantum field theory on curved spacetimes are briefly discussed.

  13. Solving the relativistic inverse stellar problem through gravitational waves observation of binary neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalhin, Tiziano; Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2018-04-01

    The LIGO/Virgo Collaboration has recently announced the direct detection of gravitational waves emitted in the coalescence of a neutron star binary. This discovery allows, for the first time, to set new constraints on the behavior of matter at supranuclear density, complementary with those coming from astrophysical observations in the electromagnetic band. In this paper we demonstrate the feasibility of using gravitational signals to solve the relativistic inverse stellar problem, i.e., to reconstruct the parameters of the equation of state (EoS) from measurements of the stellar mass and tidal Love number. We perform Bayesian inference of mock data, based on different models of the star internal composition, modeled through piecewise polytropes. Our analysis shows that the detection of a small number of sources by a network of advanced interferometers would allow to put accurate bounds on the EoS parameters, and to perform a model selection among the realistic equations of state proposed in the literature.

  14. A comparative study of two fast nonlinear free-surface water wave models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducrozet, Guillaume; Bingham, Harry B.; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2012-01-01

    simply directly solves the three-dimensional problem. Both models have been well validated on standard test cases and shown to exhibit attractive convergence properties and an optimal scaling of the computational effort with increasing problem size. These two models are compared for solution of a typical...... used in OceanWave3D, the closer the results come to the HOS model....

  15. Gravitational waves from first order phase transitions as a probe of an early matter domination era and its inverse problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela, E-mail: Gabriela.Barenboim@uv.es; Park, Wan-Il, E-mail: Wanil.Park@uv.es

    2016-08-10

    We investigate the gravitational wave background from a first order phase transition in a matter-dominated universe, and show that it has a unique feature from which important information about the properties of the phase transition and thermal history of the universe can be easily extracted. Also, we discuss the inverse problem of such a gravitational wave background in view of the degeneracy among macroscopic parameters governing the signal.

  16. Research of large-amplitude waves evolution in the framework of shallow water equations and their implication for people's safety in extreme situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Chaikovskaia, Natalya; Rodin, Artem

    2015-04-01

    The paper presents the analysis of the formation and evolution of shock wave in shallow water with no restrictions on its amplitude in the framework of the nonlinear shallow water equations. It is shown that in the case of large-amplitude waves appears a new nonlinear effect of reflection from the shock front of incident wave. These results are important for the assessment of coastal flooding by tsunami waves and storm surges. Very often the largest number of victims was observed on the coastline where the wave moved breaking. Many people, instead of running away, were just looking at the movement of the "raging wall" and lost time. This fact highlights the importance of researching the problem of security and optimal behavior of people in situations with increased risk. Usually there is uncertainty about the exact time, when rogue waves will impact. This fact limits the ability of people to adjust their behavior psychologically to the stressful situations. It concerns specialists, who are busy both in the field of flying activity and marine service as well as adults, young people and children, who live on the coastal zone. The rogue wave research is very important and it demands cooperation of different scientists - mathematicians and physicists, as well as sociologists and psychologists, because the final goal of efforts of all scientists is minimization of the harm, brought by rogue waves to humanity.

  17. Wind wave analysis in depth limited water using OCEANLYZ, A MATLAB toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimpour, Arash; Chen, Qin

    2017-09-01

    There are a number of well established methods in the literature describing how to assess and analyze measured wind wave data. However, obtaining reliable results from these methods requires adequate knowledge on their behavior, strengths and weaknesses. A proper implementation of these methods requires a series of procedures including a pretreatment of the raw measurements, and adjustment and refinement of the processed data to provide quality assurance of the outcomes, otherwise it can lead to untrustworthy results. This paper discusses potential issues in these procedures, explains what parameters are influential for the outcomes and suggests practical solutions to avoid and minimize the errors in the wave results. The procedure of converting the water pressure data into the water surface elevation data, treating the high frequency data with a low signal-to-noise ratio, partitioning swell energy from wind sea, and estimating the peak wave frequency from the weighted integral of the wave power spectrum are described. Conversion and recovery of the data acquired by a pressure transducer, particularly in depth-limited water like estuaries and lakes, are explained in detail. To provide researchers with tools for a reliable estimation of wind wave parameters, the Ocean Wave Analyzing toolbox, OCEANLYZ, is introduced. The toolbox contains a number of MATLAB functions for estimation of the wave properties in time and frequency domains. The toolbox has been developed and examined during a number of the field study projects in Louisiana's estuaries.

  18. On the Effect of Green Water on Deck on the Wave Bending Moment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Xia, Jinzhu

    1998-01-01

    and a momentum term, using an effective relative motion calibrated with the model tests, model the green water load. The resulting loads are of the same magnitude as the slamming loads. The results show only a marginal influence of the green water load on the maximum wave bending moment, although the time signal...

  19. Energy from sea wave thrust and flow of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    The area adjacent to the tidal rivers, irrigational canal, drain and also the seashore may be energized harnessing the energy from the flow/wave thrust by simply converting it into unidirectional rotating force to drive the generator for power generation. The existing plants are big in size and also fixed in place. A plant which will be a small/portable type is described. 7 refs., figs

  20. High-Resolution Wave Energy Assessment in Shallow Water Accounting for Tides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The wave energy in a shallow water location is evaluated considering the influence of the local tide and wind on the wave propagation. The target is the coastal area just north of the Portuguese city of Peniche, where a wave energy converter operates on the sea bottom. A wave modelling system based on SWAN has been implemented and focused on this coastal environment in a multilevel computational scheme. The first three SWAN computational belonging to this wave prediction system were defined using the spherical coordinates. In the highest resolution computational domain, Cartesian coordinates have been considered, with a resolution of 25 m in both directions. An in-depth analysis of the main characteristics of the environmental matrix has been performed. This is based on the results of eight-year model system simulations (2005–2012. New simulations have been carried out in the last two computational domains with the most relevant wave and wind patterns, considering also the tide effect. The results show that the tide level, together with the wind intensity and direction, may influence to a significant degree the wave characteristics. This especially concerns the wave power in the location where the wave converter operates.

  1. The energy balance of wind waves and the remote sensing problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselmann, K.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of wave growth indicate an energy balance of the wave spectrum governed primarily by input from the atmosphere, nonlinear transfer to shorter and longer waves, and advection. The pronounced spectral peak and sharp low frequency cut-off characteristic of fetch-limited spectra are explained as a self-stabilizing feature of the nonlinear wave-wave interactions. The momentum transferred from the atmosphere to the wind waves accounts for a large part of the wind drag. These findings are relevant for remote microwave sensing of the sea surface by backscatter and passive radiometry methods.

  2. Experimental investigation on the droplet entrainment from interfacial waves in air-water horizontal stratified flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Byeong Geon; Yun, Byong Jo; Kim, Kyoung Du

    2014-01-01

    It was mainly due to the fact that droplet entrainment affects the Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT) of the nuclear fuel rod in the Postulated accident conditions of NPP. Recently, droplet entrainment in the horizontally arranged primary piping system for the NPP is of interest because it affects directly the steam binding phenomena in the steam generators. Pan and Hanratty correlation is the only applicable one for the droplet entrainment rate model for horizontal flow. Moreover, there are no efforts for the model development on the basis of the droplet entrainment principal and physics phenomena. More recently, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) proposed a new mechanistic droplet generation model applicable in the horizontal pipe for the SPACE code. However, constitutive relations in this new model require three model coefficients which have not yet been decided. The purpose of present work is determining three model coefficients by visualization experiment. For these model coefficients, the major physical parameters regarding the interfacial disturbance wave should be measured in this experiments. There are the wave slope, liquid fraction, wave hypotenuse length, wave velocity, wave frequency, and wavelength in the major physical parameters. The experiment was conducted at an air water horizontal rectangular channel with the PIV system. In this study, the experimental conditions were stratified-way flow during the droplet generation. Three coefficients were determined based on several data related to the interfacial wave. Additionally, we manufactured the parallel wire conductance probe to measure the fluctuating water level over time, and compared the wave height measured by the parallel wire conductance probe and image processing from images taken by high speed camera. Experimental investigation was performed for droplet entrainment from phase interface wave in an air-water stratified flow. In the experiments, we measured major physical parameters

  3. Axisymmetric capillary-gravity waves at the interface of two viscous, immiscible fluids - Initial value problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoiya, Palas Kumar; Dasgupta, Ratul

    2017-11-01

    When the interface between two radially unbounded, viscous fluids lying vertically in a stable configuration (denser fluid below) at rest, is perturbed, radially propagating capillary-gravity waves are formed which damp out with time. We study this process analytically using a recently developed linearised theory. For small amplitude initial perturbations, the analytical solution to the initial value problem, represented as a linear superposition of Bessel modes at time t = 0 , is found to agree very well with results obtained from direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, for a range of initial conditions. Our study extends the earlier work by John W. Miles who studied this initial value problem analytically, taking into account, a single viscous fluid only. Implications of this study for the mechanistic understanding of droplet impact into a deep pool, will be discussed. Some preliminary, qualitative comparison with experiments will also be presented. We thank SERB Dept. Science & Technology, Govt. of India, Grant No. EMR/2016/000830 for financial support.

  4. On the quantum inverse problem for a new type of nonlinear Schroedinger equation for Alfven waves in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Roy Chowdhury, A.

    1989-06-01

    The nonlinear Alfven waves are governed by the Vector Derivative nonlinear Schroedinger (VDNLS) equation, which for parallel or quasi parallel propagation reduces to the Derivative Nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equation for the circularly polarized waves. We have formulated the Quantum Inverse problem for a new type of Nonlinear Schroedinger Equation which has many properties similar to the usual NLS problem but the structure of classical and quantum R matrix are distinctly different. The commutation rules of the scattering data are obtained and the Algebraic Bethe Ansatz is formulated to derive the eigenvalue equation for the energy of the excited states. 10 refs

  5. Wave Synchronizing Crane Control during Water Entry in Offshore Moonpool Operations - Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor A. Johansen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A new strategy for active control in heavy-lift offshore crane operations is suggested, by introducing a new concept referred to as wave synchronization. Wave synchronization reduces the hydrodynamic forces by minimization of variations in the relative vertical velocity between payload and water using a wave amplitude measurement. Wave synchronization is combined with conventional active heave compensation to obtain accurate control. Experimental results using a scale model of a semi-submerged vessel with a moonpool shows that wave synchronization leads to significant improvements in performance. Depending on the sea state and payload, the results indicate that the reduction in the standard deviation of the wire tension may be up to 50

  6. Charging System Optimization of Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Water Wave Energy Harvesting and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yanyan; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Limin; Chen, Xiangyu; Gao, Zhenliang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-08-24

    Ocean waves are one of the most promising renewable energy sources for large-scope applications due to the abundant water resources on the earth. Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) technology could provide a new strategy for water wave energy harvesting. In this work, we investigated the charging characteristics of utilizing a wavy-structured TENG to charge a capacitor under direct water wave impact and under enclosed ball collision, by combination of theoretical calculations and experimental studies. The analytical equations of the charging characteristics were theoretically derived for the two cases, and they were calculated for various load capacitances, cycle numbers, and structural parameters such as compression deformation depth and ball size or mass. Under the direct water wave impact, the stored energy and maximum energy storage efficiency were found to be controlled by deformation depth, while the stored energy and maximum efficiency can be optimized by the ball size under the enclosed ball collision. Finally, the theoretical results were well verified by the experimental tests. The present work could provide strategies for improving the charging performance of TENGs toward effective water wave energy harvesting and storage.

  7. Respiratory Problems Associated with Surfing in Coastal Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Chris; Silver, Mary W; Lahiff, Maureen; Colford, John

    2017-03-01

    A pilot project was conducted to examine the health status and possible adverse health effects associated with seawater exposure (microbial water-quality indicators and phytoplankton abundance and their toxins) of surfers in Monterey Bay, Central California coastal waters. Forty-eight surfers enrolled in the study and completed an initial health background survey and weekly health surveys online using Survey Monkey. Descriptive statistics and generalized estimating equation, a regression technique, were used to identify longitudinal and correlated results. The surfers were predominately Caucasian, male, and physically active. They surfed approximately 4 h a week. Their average age was 34 years. The data indicated that the surfers were generally "healthy," with a low prevalence of diabetes, high cholesterol, and hypertension. Their most common health problems were allergies and asthma. During the study, 10% of the surfers reported gastrointestinal symptoms and 29% reported upper respiratory symptoms. This study suggests surfers were significantly more likely to report upper respiratory symptoms when they had a history of allergies, housemates with upper respiratory symptoms, and/or a history of previous adverse health symptoms while surfing during a "red tide" (an event often associated with the presence of phytoplankton toxins). Additionally, female surfers reported upper respiratory symptoms more than males.

  8. Numerical simulation of solitary waves on deep water with constant vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosaev, A. S.; Shishina, M. I.; Troitskaya, Yu I.

    2018-01-01

    Characteristics of solitary deep water waves on a flow with constant vorticity are investigated by numerical simulation within the framework of fully nonlinear equations of motion (Euler equations) using the method of surface-tracking conformal coordinates. To ensure that solutions observed are stable, soliton formation as a result of disintegration of an initial pulse-like disturbance is modeled. Evidence is obtained that solitary waves with height above a certain threshold are unstable.

  9. On-line monitoring of water amount in fresh concrete by radioactive-wave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemi, T.; Arai, M.; Enomoto, S.; Suzki, K.; Kumahara, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The committee on nondestructive inspection for steel reinforced concrete structures in the Federation of Construction Materials Industries, Japan has published a proposed standard for on-line monitoring of water amount in fresh concrete by the radioactive wave method. By applying a neutron technique, water amount in fresh concrete is estimated continuously from the energy consumption of neutron due to hydrogen. A standard is discussed along with results of verification tests. Thus, on-line monitoring for water amount is proposed

  10. Lake Michigan Storm: Wave and Water Level Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    does appear the ice implementation does well to replicate either iced (flagged for ice coverage), or for a low wave energy environment. Granted there...Jensen, D.T. Resio, R.A. Luettich, C. Dawson, V.J. Cardone , A.T. Cox, M.D. Powell, H.J. Westerink, and H.J. Roberts. (2010). “A high resolution coupled...coast,” In Preparation, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS. ERDC/CHL TR-12-26 310 Jensen, R.E., V.J. Cardone , and A.T

  11. Optical tsunamis: shoaling of shallow water rogue waves in nonlinear fibers with normal dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In analogy with ocean waves running up towards the beach, shoaling of pre-chirped optical pulses may occur in the normal group-velocity dispersion regime of optical fibers. We present exact Riemann wave solutions of the optical shallow water equations and show that they agree remarkably well with the numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, at least up to the point where a vertical pulse front develops. We also reveal that extreme wave events or optical tsunamis may be generated in dispersion tapered fibers in the presence of higher-order dispersion. (paper)

  12. A Fast GPU-accelerated Mixed-precision Strategy for Fully NonlinearWater Wave Computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glimberg, Stefan Lemvig; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Madsen, Morten G.

    2011-01-01

    We present performance results of a mixed-precision strategy developed to improve a recently developed massively parallel GPU-accelerated tool for fast and scalable simulation of unsteady fully nonlinear free surface water waves over uneven depths (Engsig-Karup et.al. 2011). The underlying wave......-preconditioned defect correction method. The improved strategy improves the performance by exploiting architectural features of modern GPUs for mixed precision computations and is tested in a recently developed generic library for fast prototyping of PDE solvers. The new wave tool is applicable to solve and analyze...

  13. Thermally excited capillary waves at vapor/liquid interfaces of water-alcohol mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaknin, David; Bu Wei; Sung, Jaeho; Jeon, Yoonnam; Kim, Doseok

    2009-01-01

    The density profiles of liquid/vapor interfaces of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol and propanol) mixtures were studied by surface-sensitive synchrotron x-ray scattering techniques. X-ray reflectivity and diffuse scattering measurements, from the pure and mixed liquids, were analyzed in the framework of capillary wave theory to address the characteristic length scales of the intrinsic roughness and the shortest capillary wavelength (alternatively, the upper wavevector cutoff in capillary wave theory). Our results establish that the intrinsic roughness is dominated by average interatomic distances. The extracted effective upper wavevector cutoff indicates capillary wave theory breaks down at distances of the order of bulk correlation lengths.

  14. Water level effects on breaking wave setup for Pacific Island fringing reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J. M.; Merrifield, M. A.; Ford, M.

    2014-02-01

    The effects of water level variations on breaking wave setup over fringing reefs are assessed using field measurements obtained at three study sites in the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Mariana Islands in the western tropical Pacific Ocean. At each site, reef flat setup varies over the tidal range with weaker setup at high tide and stronger setup at low tide for a given incident wave height. The observed water level dependence is interpreted in the context of radiation stress gradients specified by an idealized point break model generalized for nonnormally incident waves. The tidally varying setup is due in part to depth-limited wave heights on the reef flat, as anticipated from previous reef studies, but also to tidally dependent breaking on the reef face. The tidal dependence of the breaking is interpreted in the context of the point break model in terms of a tidally varying wave height to water depth ratio at breaking. Implications for predictions of wave-driven setup at reef-fringed island shorelines are discussed.

  15. Secondary current properties generated by wind-induced water waves in experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michio Sanjou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Secondary currents such as the Langmuir circulation are of high interest in natural rivers and the ocean because they have striking impacts on scour, sedimentation, and mass transport. Basic characteristics have been well-studied in straight open-channel flows. However, little is known regarding secondary circulation induced by wind waves. The presented study describes the generation properties of wind waves observed in the laboratory tank. Wind-induced water waves are known to produce large scale circulations. The phenomenon is observed together with high-speed and low-speed streaks, convergence and divergence zones, respectively. Therefore, it is important to determine the hydrodynamic properties of secondary currents for wind-induced water waves within rivers and lakes. In this study, using two high-speed CMOS cameras, stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV measurements were conducted in order to reveal the distribution of all three components of velocity vectors. The experiments allowed us to investigate the three-dimensional turbulent structure under water waves and the generation mechanism of large-scale circulations. Additionally, a third CMOS camera was used to measure the spanwise profile of thefree-surface elevation. The time-series of velocity components and the free-surface were obtained simultaneously. From our experiments, free-surface variations were found to influence the instantaneous velocity distributions of the cross-sectional plane. We also considered thegeneration process by the phase analysis related to gravity waves and compared the contribution of the apparent stress.

  16. Problems of pricing fresh water obtained from a sea water desalination plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussens, J.

    1967-01-01

    Integrating a double-purpose desalination and electricity generating plant into a water supply system alters the conditions in which the other water and electricity sources are used, as the peak and the base load water and electricity demands have to be met at the least cost. This paper attempts to show how the problem of determining optimal water supply structures can be approached, in definite cases, but against a global economic back-ground. It becomes necessary to define the competition between classical resources and desalination plants, as these plants introduce into optimum studies new factors due to the peculiar shape of their production functions. These new factors (fixed and proportional costs structures, flow availabilities) are studied in relation to the production functions in various management cases (private monopoly, public monopoly). (author) [fr

  17. Effects of waves on water dispersion in a semi-enclosed estuarine bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpey, M. T.; Ardhuin, F.; Otheguy, P.

    2012-04-01

    The bay of Saint Jean de Luz - Ciboure is a touristic destination located in the south west of France on the Basque coast. This small bay is 1.5km wide for 1km long. It is semi-enclosed by breakwaters, so that the area is mostly protected from waves except in its eastern part, where wave breaking is regularly observed over a shallow rock shelf. In the rest of the area the currents are generally weak. The bay receives fresh water inflows from two rivers. During intense raining events, the rivers can introduce pollutants in the bay. The input of pollutants combined with the low level dynamic of the area can affect the water quality for several days. To study such a phenomenon, mechanisms of water dispersion in the bay are investigated. The present paper focuses on the effects of waves on bay dynamics. Several field experiments were conducted in the area, combining wave and current measurements from a set of ADCP and ADV, lagrangian difter experiments in the surfzone, salinity and temperature profile measurements. An analysis of this set of various data is provided. It reveals that the bay combines remarkable density stratification due to fresh water inflows and occasionally intense wave-induced currents in the surfzone. These currents have a strong influence on river plume dynamics when the sea state is energetic. Moreover, modifications of hydrodynamics in the bay passes are found to be remarkably correlated with sea state evolutions. This result suggests a significant impact of waves on the bay flushing. To further analyse these phenomena, a three dimensional numerical model of bay hydrodynamics is developed. The model aims at reproducing fresh water inflows combined with wind-, tide- and wave-induced currents and mixing. The model of the bay is implemented using the code MOHID , which has been modified to allow the three dimensional representation of wave-current interactions proposed by Ardhuin et al. [2008b] . The circulation is forced by the wave field modelled

  18. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  19. Identification of nonlinear coupling in wave turbulence at the surface of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagne, Antoine; Hassaini, Roumaissa; Redor, Ivan; Aubourg, Quentin; Sommeria, Joël; Mordant, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    The Weak Turbulence Theory is a theory, in the limit of vanishing nonlinearity, that derive analytically statistical features of wave turbulence. The stationary spectrum for the surface elevation in the case of gravity waves, is predicted to E(k) k - 5 / 2 . This spectral exponent -5/2 remains elusive in all experiments. in which the measured exponent is systematically lower than the prediction. Furthermore in the experiments the weaker the nonlinearity the further the spectral exponent is from the prediction. In order to investigate the reason for this observation we developed an experiment in the CORIOLIS facility in Grenoble. It is a 13m-diameter circular pool filled with water with a 70 cm depth. We generate wave turbulence by using two wedge wavemakers. Surface elevation measurements are performed by a stereoscopic optical technique and by capacitive probes. The nonlinear coupling at work in this system are analyzed by computing 3- and 4-wave correlations of the Fourier wave amplitudes in frequency. Theory predicts that coupling should occur through 4-wave resonant interaction. In our data, strong 3-wave correlations are observed in addition to the 4-wave correlation. Most our observations are consistent with field observation in the Black Sea (Leckler et al. 2015). This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC, Grant Agreement No 647018-WATU).

  20. Decomposing Large Inverse Problems with an Augmented Lagrangian Approach: Application to Joint Inversion of Body-Wave Travel Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, D. T.; Rodi, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Constructing 3D Earth models through the joint inversion of large geophysical data sets presents numerous theoretical and practical challenges, especially when diverse types of data and model parameters are involved. Among the challenges are the computational complexity associated with large data and model vectors and the need to unify differing model parameterizations, forward modeling methods and regularization schemes within a common inversion framework. The challenges can be addressed in part by decomposing the inverse problem into smaller, simpler inverse problems that can be solved separately, providing one knows how to merge the separate inversion results into an optimal solution of the full problem. We have formulated an approach to the decomposition of large inverse problems based on the augmented Lagrangian technique from optimization theory. As commonly done, we define a solution to the full inverse problem as the Earth model minimizing an objective function motivated, for example, by a Bayesian inference formulation. Our decomposition approach recasts the minimization problem equivalently as the minimization of component objective functions, corresponding to specified data subsets, subject to the constraints that the minimizing models be equal. A standard optimization algorithm solves the resulting constrained minimization problems by alternating between the separate solution of the component problems and the updating of Lagrange multipliers that serve to steer the individual solution models toward a common model solving the full problem. We are applying our inversion method to the reconstruction of the·crust and upper-mantle seismic velocity structure across Eurasia.· Data for the inversion comprise a large set of P and S body-wave travel times·and fundamental and first-higher mode Rayleigh-wave group velocities.

  1. Spatial and temporal variations of wave energy in the nearshore waters of the central west coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrutha, M. M.; Sanil Kumar, V.

    2016-12-01

    Assessment of wave power potential at different water depths and time is required for identifying a wave power plant location. This study examines the variation in wave power off the central west coast of India at water depths of 30, 9 and 5 m based on waverider buoy measured wave data. The study shows a significant reduction ( ˜ 10 to 27 %) in wave power at 9 m water depth compared to 30 m and the wave power available at 5 m water depth is 20 to 23 % less than that at 9 m. At 9 m depth, the seasonal mean value of the wave power varied from 1.6 kW m-1 in the post-monsoon period (ONDJ) to 15.2 kW m-1 in the Indian summer monsoon (JJAS) period. During the Indian summer monsoon period, the variation of wave power in a day is up to 32 kW m-1. At 9 m water depth, the mean annual wave power is 6 kW m-1 and interannual variations up to 19.3 % are observed during 2009-2014. High wave energy ( > 20 kW m-1) at the study area is essentially from the directional sector 245-270° and also 75 % of the total annual wave energy is from this narrow directional sector, which is advantageous while aligning the wave energy converter.

  2. Wave excited motion of a body floating on water confined between two semi-infinite ice sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, K.; Wu, G. X.; Thomas, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    The wave excited motion of a body floating on water confined between two semi-infinite ice sheets is investigated. The ice sheet is treated as an elastic thin plate and water is treated as an ideal and incompressible fluid. The linearized velocity potential theory is adopted in the frequency domain and problems are solved by the method of matched eigenfunctions expansion. The fluid domain is divided into sub-regions and in each sub-region the velocity potential is expanded into a series of eigenfunctions satisfying the governing equation and the boundary conditions on horizontal planes including the free surface and ice sheets. Matching is conducted at the interfaces of two neighbouring regions to ensure the continuity of the pressure and velocity, and the unknown coefficients in the expressions are obtained as a result. The behaviour of the added mass and damping coefficients of the floating body with the effect of the ice sheets and the excitation force are analysed. They are found to vary oscillatorily with the wave number, which is different from that for a floating body in the open sea. The motion of the body confined between ice sheets is investigated, in particular its resonant behaviour with extremely large motion found to be possible under certain conditions. Standing waves within the polynya are also observed.

  3. Blow-up of solutions to the rotation b-family system modeling equatorial water waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider the blow-up mechanism to the periodic generalized rotation b-family system (R-b-family system. This model can be derived from the f-plane governing equations for the geographical water waves with a constant underlying current in the equatorial water waves with effect of the Coriolis force. When b=2, it is a rotation two-component Camassa-Holm (R2CH system. We consider the periodic R2CH system when linear dispersion is absent (which model is called r2CH system and derive two finite-time blow-up results.

  4. Computational simulations of the interaction of water waves with pitching flap-type ocean wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Using an in-house computational framework, we have studied the interaction of water waves with pitching flap-type ocean wave energy converters (WECs). The computational framework solves the full 3D Navier-Stokes equations and captures important effects, including the fluid-solid interaction, the nonlinear and viscous effects. The results of the computational tool, is first compared against the experimental data on the response of a flap-type WEC in a wave tank, and excellent agreement is demonstrated. Further simulations at the model and prototype scales are presented to assess the validity of the Froude scaling. The simulations are used to address some important questions, such as the validity range of common WEC modeling approaches that rely heavily on the Froude scaling and the inviscid potential flow theory. Additionally, the simulations examine the role of the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) number, which is often used as a measure of relative importance of viscous drag on bodies exposed to oscillating flows. The performance of the flap-type WECs is investigated at various KC numbers to establish the relationship between the viscous drag and KC number for such geometry. That is of significant importance because such relationship only exists for simple geometries, e.g., a cylinder. Support from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Hydrodynamic coefficients for water-wave diffraction by spherical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    floating bodies is of great significance in designing these structures. ... due to surge and heave motions are derived by solving the diffraction problem. ... A rigid floating or submerged structure may undergo six degrees of freedom: .... and z directions, i.e. surge and heave motions respectively, and the rotational motion about.

  6. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  7. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  8. Experimental Study on Peak Pressure of Shock Waves in Quasi-Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxiong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the similarity laws of the explosion, this research develops similarity requirements of the small-scale experiments of underwater explosions and establishes a regression model for peak pressure of underwater shock waves under experimental condition. Small-scale experiments are carried out with two types of media at the bottom of the water and for different water depths. The peak pressure of underwater shock waves at different measuring points is acquired. A formula consistent with the similarity law of explosions is obtained and an analysis of the regression precision of the formula confirms its accuracy. Significance experiment indicates that the influence of distance between measuring points and charge on peak pressure of underwater shock wave is the greatest and that of water depth is the least within the range of geometric parameters. An analysis of data from experiments with different media at the bottom of the water reveals an influence on the peak pressure, as the peak pressure of a shock wave in a body of water with a bottom soft mud and rocks is about 1.33 times that of the case where the bottom material is only soft mud.

  9. Water nucleation : wave tube experiments and theoretical considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holten, V.

    2009-01-01

    This work is an experimental and theoretical study of the condensation of water. Condensation consists of nucleation – the formation of droplets – and the subsequent growth of those droplets. In our expansion tube setup, these processes are separated in time with the nucleation pulse principle, in

  10. Video imaging measurement of interfacial wave velocity in air-water flow through a horizontal elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wazzan, Amir; Than, Cheok F.; Moghavvemi, Mahmoud; Yew, Chia W.

    2001-10-01

    Two-phase flow in pipelines containing elbows represents a common situation in the oil and gas industries. This study deals with the stratified flow regime between the gas and liquid phase through an elbow. It is of interest to study the change in wave characteristics by measuring the wave velocity and wavelength at the inlet and outlet of the elbow. The experiments were performed under concurrent air-water stratified flow in a horizontal transparent polycarbonate pipe of 0.05m diameter and superficial air and water velocities up to 8.97 and 0.0778 m/s respectively. A non-intrusive video imaging technique was applied to capture the waves. For image analysis, a frame by frame direct overlapping method was used to detect for pulsating flow and a pixel shifting method based on the detection of minimum values in the overlap function was used to determine wave velocity and wavelength. Under superficial gas velocity of less than 4.44 m/s, the results suggest a regular pulsating outflow produced by the elbow. At higher gas velocities, more random pulsation was found and the emergence of localized interfacial waves was detected. Wave velocities measured by this technique were found to produce satisfactory agreement with direct measurements.

  11. Influence of water conductivity on shock waves generated by underwater electrical wire explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ben; Wang, Deguo; Guo, Yanbao

    2018-01-01

    The new application of electrical explosion of wire (EEW) used in petroleum industry is to enhance oil recovery (EOR). Because of the complex environment underground, the effect of underground water conductivity on EEW should be considered. This work describes the effect of water conductivities on discharge current, voltage and shock waves. It was found that the effect of water conductivity contains two parts. One is the shunt effect of saline water, which can be considered as a parallel load with the copper wire between the electrodes connected to the discharge circuit. The peak pressure of shock waves are gradually decrease with the increase of water conductivity. The other is the current loss through saline water directly to the ground ends without flowing through the electrodes. The shunt effect is the main factor affecting the wire discharge process. As the charging voltage increased, the energy loss caused by these two parts are all reduced. These indicate that increasing the charging voltage to a certain value will increase the energy efficiency to generate a more powerful shock waves in conductive water.

  12. Observation of Mountain Lee Waves with MODIS NIR Column Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapustin, A.; Alexander, M. J.; Ott, L.; Molod, A.; Holben, B.; Susskind, J.; Wang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Mountain lee waves have been previously observed in data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) "water vapor" 6.7 micrometers channel which has a typical peak sensitivity at 550 hPa in the free troposphere. This paper reports the first observation of mountain waves generated by the Appalachian Mountains in the MODIS total column water vapor (CWV) product derived from near-infrared (NIR) (0.94 micrometers) measurements, which indicate perturbations very close to the surface. The CWV waves are usually observed during spring and late fall or some summer days with low to moderate CWV (below is approx. 2 cm). The observed lee waves display wavelengths from3-4 to 15kmwith an amplitude of variation often comparable to is approx. 50-70% of the total CWV. Since the bulk of atmospheric water vapor is confined to the boundary layer, this indicates that the impact of thesewaves extends deep into the boundary layer, and these may be the lowest level signatures of mountain lee waves presently detected by remote sensing over the land.

  13. A third-order asymptotic solution of nonlinear standing water waves in Lagrangian coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang-Yih, Chen; Hung-Chu, Hsu

    2009-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions up to third-order which describe irrotational finite amplitude standing waves are derived in Lagrangian coordinates. The analytical Lagrangian solution that is uniformly valid for large times satisfies the irrotational condition and the pressure p = 0 at the free surface, which is in contrast with the Eulerian solution existing under a residual pressure at the free surface due to Taylor's series expansion. In the third-order Lagrangian approximation, the explicit parametric equation and the Lagrangian wave frequency of water particles could be obtained. In particular, the Lagrangian mean level of a particle motion that is a function of vertical label is found as a part of the solution which is different from that in an Eulerian description. The dynamic properties of nonlinear standing waves in water of a finite depth, including particle trajectory, surface profile and wave pressure are investigated. It is also shown that the Lagrangian solution is superior to an Eulerian solution of the same order for describing the wave shape and the kinematics above the mean water level. (general)

  14. Finite Element Analysis of the Propagation of Acoustic Waves Along Waveguides Immersed in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladky-Hennion, A.-C.; Langlet, P.; de Billy, M.

    1997-03-01

    The finite element approach has previously been used, with the help of the ATILA code, to model the propagation of acoustic waves in waveguides [A.-C. Hladky-Hennion, Journal of Sound and Vibration, 194,119-136 (1996)]. In this paper an extension of the technique to the analysis of the propagation of acoustic waves in immersed waveguides is presented. In the proposed approach, the problem is reduced to a bidimensional problem, in which only the cross-section of the guide and the surrounding fluid domain are meshed by using finite elements. Then, wedges the top angles of which vary, are studied and the finite element results of the wedge wave speed are compared with experimental results. Finally, the conclusion indicates a way to extend this approach to waveguides of any cross-section.

  15. Normal Reflection Characteristics of One-Dimensional Unsteady Flow Shock Waves on Rigid Walls from Pulse Discharge in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong shock waves can be generated by pulse discharge in water, and the characteristics due to the shock wave normal reflection from rigid walls have important significance to many fields, such as industrial production and defense construction. This paper investigates the effects of hydrostatic pressures and perturbation of wave source (i.e., charging voltage on normal reflection of one-dimensional unsteady flow shock waves. Basic properties of the incidence and reflection waves were analyzed theoretically and experimentally to identify the reflection mechanisms and hence the influencing factors and characteristics. The results indicated that increased perturbation (i.e., charging voltage leads to increased peak pressure and velocity of the reflected shock wave, whereas increased hydrostatic pressure obviously inhibited superposition of the reflection waves close to the rigid wall. The perturbation of wave source influence on the reflected wave was much lower than that on the incident wave, while the hydrostatic pressure obviously affected both incident and reflection waves. The reflection wave from the rigid wall in water exhibited the characteristics of a weak shock wave, and with increased hydrostatic pressure, these weak shock wave characteristics became more obvious.

  16. Ill Posedness Results for Generalized Water Wave Models

    OpenAIRE

    Teyekpiti, Vincent Tetteh

    2013-01-01

    In the first part of the study, the weak asymptotic method is used to find singular solutions of the shallow water system in both one and two space dimensions. The singular solutions so constructed are allowed to contain Dirac-delta; distributions (Espinosa & Omel'yanov, 2005). The idea is to con- struct complex-valued approximate solutions which become real-valued in the distributional limit. The approach, which extends the range f possible singular solutions, is used to construct solutions ...

  17. Optimal Control of the Valve Based on Traveling Wave Method in the Water Hammer Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H. Z.; Wang, F.; Feng, J. L.; Tan, H. P.

    2011-09-01

    Valve regulation is an effective method for process control during the water hammer. The principle of d'Alembert traveling wave theory was used in this paper to construct the exact analytical solution of the water hammer, and the optimal speed law of the valve that can reduce the water hammer pressure in the maximum extent was obtained. Combining this law with the valve characteristic curve, the principle corresponding to the valve opening changing with time was obtained, which can be used to guide the process of valve closing and to reduce the water hammer pressure in the maximum extent.

  18. Comparison of detailed and reduced kinetics mechanisms of silane oxidation in the basis of detonation wave structure problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Tropin, D. A.; Fomin, P. A.

    2018-03-01

    The paper deals with the problem of the structure of detonation waves in the silane-air mixture within the framework of mathematical model of a nonequilibrium gas dynamics. Detailed kinetic scheme of silane oxidation as well as the newly developed reduced kinetic model of detonation combustion of silane are used. On its basis the detonation wave (DW) structure in stoichiometric silane - air mixture and dependences of Chapman-Jouguet parameters of mixture on stoichiometric ratio between the fuel (silane) and an oxidizer (air) were obtained.

  19. Thermomechanical damage of nucleosome by the shock wave initiated by ion passing through liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov’yov, Andrey V.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the results of full-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the heat spike in the water medium caused by the propagation of the heavy ion in the vicinity of its Bragg peak. High rate of energy transfer from an ion to the molecules of surrounding water environment leads to the rapid increase of the temperature of the molecules in the vicinity of ions trajectory. As a result of an abrupt increase of the temperature we observe the formation of the nanoscale shock wave propagating through the medium. We investigate the thermomechanical damage caused by the shock wave to the nucleosome located in the vicinity of heavy ion trajectory. We observe the substantial deformation of the DNA secondary structure. We show that the produced shock wave can lead to the thermomechanical breakage of the DNA backbone covalent bonds and present estimates for the number of such strand brakes per one cell nucleus.

  20. Stochastic electron dynamics due to drift waves in a sheared magnetic field and other drift motion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1986-12-01

    Electron motion in a single electrostatic wave in a sheared magnetic field is shown to become stochastic in the presence of a second wave at an amplitude well below that obtained from the overlapping pendulum resonance approximation. The enhanced stochasticity occurs for low parallel velocity electrons for which the parallel trapping motion from eE/sub parallel//m interacts strongly with the E x B trapping motion due to the presence of magnetic shear. The guiding-center equations for single particle electron orbits in given fields are investigated using both analytical and numerical techniques. The model assumes a slab magnetic field geometry with shear and two electrostatic plane waves propagating at an angle with respect to each other. Collisions and the self-consistent effect of the electron motion upon the fields are ignored. The guiding-center motion in an inertial reference frame moving in phase with the two waves is given by a two degree-of-freedom, autonomous Hamiltonian system. The single wave particle motion may be reduced to a two parameter family of one degree-of-freedom Hamiltonians which bifurcate from a pendulum phase space to a topology with three chains of elliptic and hyperbolic fixed points separated in radius about the mode-rational surface. In the presence of a perturbing wave with a different helicity, electrons in the small parallel velocity regime become stochastic at an amplitude scaling as the fourth root of the wave potential. The results obtained for stochastic motion apply directly to the problem of electron diffusion in drift waves occurring in toroidal fusion confinement devices. The effect of an adiabatically changing radial electric field upon guiding-center orbits in tokamaks is also investigated. This perturbation causes a radial polarization drift of trapped particle tokamak orbits

  1. WAVE DIRECTION and Other Data from FIXED STATIONS From Coastal Waters of California from 19750313 to 19750525 (NODC Accession 9400044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The accession contains Wave Surface Data collected in Coastal Waters of California between March 13, 1975 and May 25, 1975. Water surface elevation data was...

  2. Evaluation of Water Treatment Problems: Case Study of Maiduguri Water Treatment Plant (MWTP and Maiduguri Environs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Idris

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Water remains the most useful universal solvent to human being and other animals, because of its derivative importance. However, effort to improve on raw water treatment would continue to be a subject of concern, because the process procedures are been violated or not properly upheld. This study was carried out in order to identify peculiar problems associate with water treatment at the Maiduguri Water Treatment Plant (MWTP. This research study was based on prompt time-schedules and plant site-visits, interviewed questions were made and accessing the technology adopted in the process stages. Analytical data were obtained through the use of sampling bottles, camera, record sheets and other necessary laboratory equipment. The analysis showed that treated water contained excess chlorine and aluminum with 1.10mg/l and 0.68mg/l respectively. From this study, the following are the root causes: poor facility lay out, poor organizational and functional structures, wear of pump impellers and surface deterioration in the transmission line, lack of calibration test, constant head system not operation properly, lack of jar test conduction, improper maintenance of filter system, and the use of chemical coagulant. Inferences were made at the end of the research to enhance process efficiency, healthier and more economical treatment MWTP.

  3. Numerical Simulation of a Dual-Chamber Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezhi Ning

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a dual-chamber Oscillating Water Column (OWC Wave Energy Converter (WEC is considered in the present study. The device has two sub-chambers with a shared orifice. A two-dimensional (2D fully nonlinear numerical wave flume based on the potential-flow theory and the time-domain higher-order boundary element method (HOBEM is applied for the simulation. The incident waves are generated by using the immerged sources and the air-fluid coupling influence is considered with a simplified pneumatic model. In the present study, the variation of the surface elevation and the water column volume in the two sub-chambers are investigated. The effects of the chamber geometry (i.e., the draft and breadth of two chambers on the surface elevation and the air pressure in the chamber are investigated, respectively. It is demonstrated that the surface elevations in the two sub-chambers are strongly dependent on the wave conditions. The larger the wavelength, the more synchronous motion of the two water columns in the two sub-chambers, thus, the lager the variation of the water column volume.

  4. The Inter Facility Testing of a Standard Oscillating Water Column (OWC) Type Wave Energy Converter (WEC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Thøtt; Thomsen, Jonas Bjerg

    This report describes the behavior and preliminary performance of a simplified standard oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter (WEC). The same tests will be conducted at different scales at 6 different test facilities and the results obtained will be used for comparison. This project...

  5. Evolution of ocean wave statistics in shallow water : Refraction and diffraction over seafloor topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.T.; Herbers, T.H.C.; Battjes, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    We present a stochastic model for the evolution of random ocean surface waves in coastal waters with complex seafloor topography. First, we derive a deterministic coupled-mode model based on a forward scattering approximation of the nonlinear mild slope equation; this model describes the evolution

  6. THE WAVE INTERACTION OF HEAVY BREAKS IN THE WATER WITH ELASTIC BARRIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanchenko G.M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Transformation of underwater shock wave spherical front geometry and chauge of impulse carried by it at interaction witu elastic shield is numerically investigated witu the use of zero approximation of ray technique. It is established, that in the vicinity of spots of total internal reflection in the plane interface between water and elastic body the additional internal stresses tend to infinity.

  7. Imaging of underground karst water channels using an improved multichannel transient Rayleigh wave detecting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuhui; Liu, Lei; Sun, Jinzhong; Li, Gao; Zhou, Fubiao; Xu, Jiemin

    2018-01-01

    Geological and hydrogeological conditions in karst areas are complicated from the viewpoint of engineering. The construction of underground structures in these areas is often disturbed by the gushing of karst water, which may delay the construction schedule, result in economic losses, and even cause heavy casualties. In this paper, an innovative method of multichannel transient Rayleigh wave detecting is proposed by introducing the concept of arrival time difference phase between channels (TDP). Overcoming the restriction of the space-sampling law, the proposed method can extract the phase velocities of different frequency components from only two channels of transient Rayleigh wave recorded on two adjacent detecting points. This feature greatly improves the work efficiency and lateral resolution of transient Rayleigh wave detecting. The improved multichannel transient Rayleigh wave detecting method is applied to the detection of karst caves and fractures in rock mass of the foundation pit of Yan'an Road Station of Guiyang Metro. The imaging of the detecting results clearly reveals the distribution of karst water inflow channels, which provided significant guidance for water plugging and enabled good control over karst water gushing in the foundation pit.

  8. Observations of wave transformation over a fringing coral reef and the importance of low-frequency waves and offshore water levels to runup, overwash, and coastal flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriton, Olivia; Storlazzi, Curt; Rosenberger, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Many low-lying tropical islands are susceptible to sea level rise and often subjected to overwash and flooding during large wave events. To quantify wave dynamics and wave-driven water levels on fringing coral reefs, a 5 month deployment of wave gauges and a current meter was conducted across two shore-normal transects on Roi-Namur Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. These observations captured two large wave events that had waves with maximum heights greater than 6 m with peak periods of 16 s over the fore reef. The larger event coincided with a peak spring tide, leading to energetic, highly skewed infragravity (0.04–0.004 Hz) and very low frequency (0.004–0.001 Hz) waves at the shoreline, which reached heights of 1.0 and 0.7 m, respectively. Water surface elevations, combined with wave runup, reached 3.7 m above the reef bed at the innermost reef flat adjacent to the toe of the beach, resulting in flooding of inland areas. This overwash occurred during a 3 h time window that coincided with high tide and maximum low-frequency reef flat wave heights. The relatively low-relief characteristics of this narrow reef flat may further drive shoreline amplification of low-frequency waves due to resonance modes. These results (1) demonstrate how the coupling of high offshore water levels with low-frequency reef flat wave energetics can lead to large impacts along fringing reef-lined shorelines, such as island overwash, and (2) lend support to the hypothesis that predicted higher sea levels will lead to more frequent occurrences of these extreme events, negatively impacting coastal resources and infrastructure.

  9. Observations of wave transformation over a fringing coral reef and the importance of low-frequency waves and offshore water levels to runup, overwash, and coastal flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriton, Olivia M.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.

    2016-05-01

    Many low-lying tropical islands are susceptible to sea level rise and often subjected to overwash and flooding during large wave events. To quantify wave dynamics and wave-driven water levels on fringing coral reefs, a 5 month deployment of wave gauges and a current meter was conducted across two shore-normal transects on Roi-Namur Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. These observations captured two large wave events that had waves with maximum heights greater than 6 m with peak periods of 16 s over the fore reef. The larger event coincided with a peak spring tide, leading to energetic, highly skewed infragravity (0.04-0.004 Hz) and very low frequency (0.004-0.001 Hz) waves at the shoreline, which reached heights of 1.0 and 0.7 m, respectively. Water surface elevations, combined with wave runup, reached 3.7 m above the reef bed at the innermost reef flat adjacent to the toe of the beach, resulting in flooding of inland areas. This overwash occurred during a 3 h time window that coincided with high tide and maximum low-frequency reef flat wave heights. The relatively low-relief characteristics of this narrow reef flat may further drive shoreline amplification of low-frequency waves due to resonance modes. These results (1) demonstrate how the coupling of high offshore water levels with low-frequency reef flat wave energetics can lead to large impacts along fringing reef-lined shorelines, such as island overwash, and (2) lend support to the hypothesis that predicted higher sea levels will lead to more frequent occurrences of these extreme events, negatively impacting coastal resources and infrastructure.

  10. Wave Transformation over a Fringing Coral Reef and the Importance of Low-Frequency Waves and Offshore Water Levels to Runup and Island Overtopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriton, O. M.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Rosenberger, K. J.

    2016-02-01

    Low-lying, reef-fringed islands are susceptible to sea-level rise and often subjected to overwash and flooding during large wave events. To quantify wave dynamics and wave-driven water levels on fringing coral reefs, wave gauges and a current meter were deployed for 5 months across two shore-normal transects on Roi-Namur, an atoll island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. These observations captured two large wave events that had maximum wave heights greater than 6 m and peak periods of 16 s over the fore reef. The larger event coincided with a peak spring tide, leading to energetic, highly-skewed infragravity (0.04-0.004 Hz) and very low frequency (0.004-0.001 Hz) waves at the shoreline, which reached heights of 1.0 and 0.7 m, respectively. Water surface elevations, combined with wave runup, exceeded 3.7 m at the innermost reef flat adjacent to the toe of the beach, resulting in flooding of inland areas. This overwash occurred during a 3-hr time window that coincided with high tide and maximum low-frequency reef flat wave heights. The relatively low-relief characteristics of this narrow reef flat may further drive shoreline amplification of low-frequency waves due to resonance modes. These results demonstrate how the coupling of high offshore water levels with low-frequency reef flat wave energetics can lead to large impacts along atoll and fringing reef-lined shorelines, such as island overwash. These observations lend support to the hypothesis that predicted higher sea levels will lead to more frequent occurrences of both extreme shoreline runup and island overwash, threatening the sustainability of these islands.

  11. Arsenic in Drinking Water-A Global Environmental Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joanna Shaofen; Wai, Chien M.

    2004-01-01

    Information on the worldwide occurrence of groundwater pollution by arsenic, the ensuing health hazards, and the debatable government regulations of arsenic in drinking water, is presented. Diagnostic identification of arsenic, and methods to eliminate it from water are also discussed.

  12. Classical scattering theory of waves from the view point of an eigenvalue problem and application to target identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, C.; Strayer, M.R.; Werby, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    The Helmholtz-Poincare Wave Equation (H-PWE) arises in many areas of classical wave scattering theory. In particular it can be found for the cases of acoustical scattering from submerged bounded objects and electromagnetic scattering from objects. The extended boundary integral equations (EBIE) method is derived from considering both the exterior and interior solutions of the H-PWE's. This coupled set of expressions has the advantage of not only offering a prescription for obtaining a solution for the exterior scattering problem, but it also obviates the problem of irregular values corresponding to fictitious interior eigenvalues. Once the coupled equations are derived, they can by obtained in matrix form be expanding all relevant terms in partial wave expansions, including a biorthogonal expansion of the Green function. However some freedom of choice in the choice of the surface expansion is available since the unknown surface quantities may be expanded in a variety of ways to long as closure is obtained. Out of many possible choices, we develop an optimal method to obtain such expansions which is based on the optimum eigenfunctions related to the surface of the object. In effect, we convert part of the problem (that associated with the Fredholms integral equation of the first kind) an eigenvalue problem of a related Hermition operator. The methodology will be explained in detail and examples will be presented

  13. THE SURFACE WATER STORAGE PROBLEM IN ARID REGIONS:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H. Benfetta

    2017-09-01

    Sep 1, 2017 ... This dam is located in an arid zone where water resources are becoming increasingly scarce. It is situated 5 km ... Leakage leads to considerable losses of valuable, scarce water. ...... Detection of water leaks in the restraints ...

  14. Actual problems of municipal cleaner’s waste waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konko¾ová Patrícia

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available In paper are evaluated social and economical changes in water economy with emphasis on complex evaluation of municipal cleaner’s waste waters with respect of legislative, position of ownerskip relationskips and financial security of public experiences of water economy.

  15. Analysis of the high water wave volume for the Sava River near Zagreb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trninic, Dusan

    2010-05-01

    The paper analyses volumes of the Sava River high water waves near Zagreb during the period: 1926-2008 (N = 83 years), which is needed for more efficient control of high and flood waters. The primary Sava flood control structures in the City of Zagreb are dikes built on both riverbanks, and the Odra Relief Canal with lateral spillway upstream from the City of Zagreb. Intensive morphological changes in the greater Sava area near Zagreb, and anthropological and climate variations and changes at the Sava catchment up to the Zagreb area require detailed analysis of the water wave characteristics. In one analysis, maximum annual volumes are calculated for high water waves with constant duration of: 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 days. Such calculations encompass total quantity of water (basic and surface runoff). The log Pearson III distribution is adapted for this series of maximum annual volumes. Based on the results obtained, the interrelations are established between the wave volume as function of duration and occurrence probability. In addition to the analysis of maximum volumes of constant duration, it is interesting to carry out the analyses of maximum volume in excess of the reference discharge since it is very important for the flood control. To determine the reference discharges, a discharge of specific duration is used from an average discharge duration curve. The adopted reference discharges have durations of 50, 40, 30, 20 and 10%. Like in the previous case, log Pearson III distribution is adapted to the maximum wave data series. For reference discharge Q = 604 m3/s (duration 10%), a linear trend is calculated of maximum annual volumes exceeding the reference discharge for the Sava near Zagreb during the analyzed period. The analysis results show a significant decrease trend. A similar analysis is carried out for the following three reference discharges: regular flood control measures at the Sava near Zagreb, which are proclaimed when the water level is 350 cm

  16. The global dimension of water governance: Nine reasons for global arrangements in order to cope with local water problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2006-01-01

    Where water problems extend beyond the borders of local communities, the catchment area or river basin is generally seen as the most appropriate unit for analysis, planning and institutional arrangements. In this paper it is argued that addressing water problems at the river basin level is not

  17. On the problem of propagation of magnetoplasma surface waves in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, A.B.; Zakharov, V.A.

    1975-01-01

    A calculation is made of the spectrum of surface waves traveling along a boundary separating a dielectric from a magnetized semiconductor plasma parallel or at right angles to a magnetic field B. Dispersion relationships are obtained for the k is parallel to B case and these relationships explain the origin of the investigated surface waves on the boundary of a two-component (electron-hole) plasma in InSb. An analysis is made of the dispersion of the surface waves in the k is perpendicular to B case, which leads to a nonreciprocal propagation. (author)

  18. SOME PROBLEMS ON JUMP CONDITIONS OF SHOCK WAVES IN 3-DIMENSIONAL SOLIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-chi; YAO Lei; HU Xiu-zhang; CAO Jie-dong; DONG Jie

    2006-01-01

    Based on the general conservation laws in continuum mechanics, the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of the jump conditions of shock waves in 3-dimensional solids were presented respectively. The implication of the jump conditions and their relations between each other, particularly the relation between the mass conservation and the displacement continuity, were discussed. Meanwhile the shock wave response curves in 3-dimensional solids, i.e. the Hugoniot curves were analysed, which provide the foundation for studying the coupling effects of shock waves in 3-dimensional solids.

  19. Streak-photographic investigation of shock wave emission after laser-induced plasma formation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Joachim; Vogel, Alfred

    1995-05-01

    The shock wave emission after dielectric breakdown in water was investigated to assess potential shock wave effects in plasma mediated tissue ablation and intraocular photodisruption. Of particular interest was the dependence of shock wave pressure as a function of distance from the plasma for different laser pulse energies. We have generated plasmas in water with a Nd:YAG laser system delivering pulses of 6 ns duration. The pulses, with energies between 0.4 and 36 mJ (approximately equals 180 times threshold), were focused into a cuvette containing distilled water. The shock wave was visualized with streak photography combined with a schlieren technique. An important advantage of this technique is that the shock position as a function of time can directly be obtained from a single streak and hence a single event. Other methods (e.g. flash photography or passage time measurements between fixed locations) in contrast rely on reproducible events. Using the shock wave speed obtained from the streak images, shock wave peak pressures were calculated providing detailed information on the propagation of the shock. The shock peak pressure as a function of distance r from the optical axis was found to decrease faster than 1/r2 in regions up to distances of 100-150 micrometers . For larger distances it was found to be roughly proportional to 1/r. The scaling law for maximum shock pressure p, at a given distance was found to be proportional to the square root of the laser pulse energy E for distances of 50-200 micrometers from the optical axis.

  20. Corrosion, inspection and other problems associated with Heat exchangers in the heavy water industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twigg, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion, fabrication and inspection problems encountered in the heavy water industry Heat exchangers are discussed. Among the problems examined are erosion/corrosion of two pass exchangers, rolling of tubes, pitting, fretting and protection for long term storage. (auth)

  1. Pollutant dispersion studies - An update on the problems in Indian coastal waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swamy, G.N.

    Pollutant dispersion problems along the Indian coastal waters are characterisEd. by site-specificity, as a result of seasonal and physiographic variabilities. Presence of large rivers, estuaries and backwaters add to the problems of waste disposal...

  2. Networks of triboelectric nanogenerators for harvesting water wave energy: a potential approach toward blue energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yang, Jin; Li, Zhaoling; Fan, Xing; Zi, Yunlong; Jing, Qingshen; Guo, Hengyu; Wen, Zhen; Pradel, Ken C; Niu, Simiao; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-03-24

    With 70% of the earth's surface covered with water, wave energy is abundant and has the potential to be one of the most environmentally benign forms of electric energy. However, owing to lack of effective technology, water wave energy harvesting is almost unexplored as an energy source. Here, we report a network design made of triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) for large-scale harvesting of kinetic water energy. Relying on surface charging effect between the conventional polymers and very thin layer of metal as electrodes for each TENG, the TENG networks (TENG-NW) that naturally float on the water surface convert the slow, random, and high-force oscillatory wave energy into electricity. On the basis of the measured output of a single TENG, the TENG-NW is expected to give an average power output of 1.15 MW from 1 km(2) surface area. Given the compelling features, such as being lightweight, extremely cost-effective, environmentally friendly, easily implemented, and capable of floating on the water surface, the TENG-NW renders an innovative and effective approach toward large-scale blue energy harvesting from the ocean.

  3. A nanowire based triboelectric nanogenerator for harvesting water wave energy and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Tao, Juan; Zhu, Jing; Pan, Caofeng

    2017-07-01

    The ocean wave energy is one of the most promising renewable and clean energy sources for human life, which is the so-called "Blue energy." In this work, a nanowire based triboelectric nanogenerator was designed for harvesting wave energy. The nanowires on the surface of FEP largely raise the contacting area with water and also make the polymer film hydrophobic. The output can reach 10 μ A and 200 V. When combined with a capacitor, an infrared emitter, and a receiver, a self-powered wireless infrared system is fabricated, which can be used in the fields of communication and detecting.

  4. A nanowire based triboelectric nanogenerator for harvesting water wave energy and its applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ocean wave energy is one of the most promising renewable and clean energy sources for human life, which is the so-called “Blue energy.” In this work, a nanowire based triboelectric nanogenerator was designed for harvesting wave energy. The nanowires on the surface of FEP largely raise the contacting area with water and also make the polymer film hydrophobic. The output can reach 10 μ A and 200 V. When combined with a capacitor, an infrared emitter, and a receiver, a self-powered wireless infrared system is fabricated, which can be used in the fields of communication and detecting.

  5. High-order Boussinesq-type modelling of nonlinear wave phenomena in deep and shallow water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we start with a review of the development of Boussinesq theory for water waves covering the period from 1872 to date. Previous reviews have been given by Dingemans,1 Kirby,2,3 and Madsen & Schäffer.4 Next, we present our most recent high-order Boussinesq-type formulation valid for f...... from an undular sea bed; (8) Run-up of non-breaking solitary waves on a beach; and (9) Tsunami generation from submerged landslides....

  6. Short-crested waves in deep water: a numerical investigation of recent laboratory experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical study of quasi-steady, doubly-periodic monochromatic short-crested wave patterns in deep water is conducted using a high-order Boussinesq-type model. Simulations using linear wavemaker conditions in the nonlinear model are initially used to approximate conditions from recent laboratory...... experiments. The computed patterns share many features with those observed in wavetanks, including bending (both frontwards and backwards) of the wave crests, dipping at the crest centerlines, and a pronounced long modulation in the direction of propagation. A new and simple explanation for these features...

  7. Forward and inverse problems for surface acoustic waves in anisotropic media: A Ritz-Rayleigh method based approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stoklasová, Pavla; Sedlák, Petr; Seiner, Hanuš; Landa, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, February 2015 (2015), s. 381-389 ISSN 0041-624X R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP101/12/P428 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : surface acoustic waves * anisotropic materials * Ritz-Rayleigh method * inverse problem Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.954, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0041624X14002686

  8. Secondary circuit water chemistry and related problems with SG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatov, V; Ivanov, V [Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    Necessity for SG feed water and blowdown systems modernization Balakovo NPP steam generators PGV-1000M was identified at Units with VVER-1000 during commissioning separational, thermo-hydraulic and thermo-chemical testings. It was discovered, that in zone of 'hot' header coolant salt concentration (concentration of dissolved salts) was almost 2 times more, than salt concentration in blowdown water. A number of chemical testings was performed to investigate and optimize salts distribution in water volume of PGV-1000. (R.P.)

  9. Secondary circuit water chemistry and related problems with SG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatov, V.; Ivanov, V.

    2001-01-01

    Necessity for SG feed water and blowdown systems modernization Balakovo NPP steam generators PGV-1000M was identified at Units with VVER-1000 during commissioning separational, thermo-hydraulic and thermo-chemical testings. It was discovered, that in zone of 'hot' header coolant salt concentration (concentration of dissolved salts) was almost 2 times more, than salt concentration in blowdown water. A number of chemical testings was performed to investigate and optimize salts distribution in water volume of PGV-1000. (R.P.)

  10. Modelling of environmental and climatic problems: Wind and water erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslan, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Magnitude of wind and water erosion mainly depend on wind velocity, rainfall rate, slope and soil characteristics. The main purpose of this lecture is to define the role of small, meso and large scale phenomena (local and synoptic fluctuations) on water and wind erosion. These lecture notes present some results on wind speed simulation and seasonal fluctuations of water deficit for the selected station in different erosion risque and transition regions of Turkey. (author)

  11. Some problems of leaks in sodium-water steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, F.A.; Sergeev, G.V.; Sednev, A.R.; Makarov, V.M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper contains data on wastage of steam generator structural materials and high-nickel alloys in the zone of water leakage into sodium as well as investigation results for self-enlargement of water leaks into sodium through defects in these materials. It is shown that the rate of material damage in the zone of sodium-water reaction and in the channel with water leaking-out decreases with increasing nickel content in steels and strongly depends on sodium temperature. The paper presents experimentally obtained dependences of leakage self-enlargement rates on sodium temperature and leakage size

  12. Water poverty indicators: conceptual problems and policy issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molle, F.; Mollinga, P.P.

    2003-01-01

    In the wake of a growing concern about both the unchecked rise of poverty and the local and global consequences of water scarcity, the relationships between water and poverty are the object of a sprawling literature. Indicators are presented as indispensable tools for informing and orienting

  13. Laboratory Measurements of the Water/Air Flux of Dimethylsulfide Using a Wind/Wave Tank

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dacey, John

    1998-01-01

    The flux of dimethylsulfide (DMS) from the surface water of the ocean to the atmosphere is an important biogeochemical problem, since DMS contributes to optical haze and potentially impacts global climate by influencing earth's albedo...

  14. PyClaw: Accessible, Extensible, Scalable Tools for Wave Propagation Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2012-08-15

    Development of scientific software involves tradeoffs between ease of use, generality, and performance. We describe the design of a general hyperbolic PDE solver that can be operated with the convenience of MATLAB yet achieves efficiency near that of hand-coded Fortran and scales to the largest supercomputers. This is achieved by using Python for most of the code while employing automatically wrapped Fortran kernels for computationally intensive routines, and using Python bindings to interface with a parallel computing library and other numerical packages. The software described here is PyClaw, a Python-based structured grid solver for general systems of hyperbolic PDEs [K. T. Mandli et al., PyClaw Software, Version 1.0, http://numerics.kaust.edu.sa/pyclaw/ (2011)]. PyClaw provides a powerful and intuitive interface to the algorithms of the existing Fortran codes Clawpack and SharpClaw, simplifying code development and use while providing massive parallelism and scalable solvers via the PETSc library. The package is further augmented by use of PyWENO for generation of efficient high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory reconstruction code. The simplicity, capability, and performance of this approach are demonstrated through application to example problems in shallow water flow, compressible flow, and elasticity.

  15. PyClaw: Accessible, Extensible, Scalable Tools for Wave Propagation Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.; Mandli, Kyle; Ahmadia, Aron; Alghamdi, Amal; de Luna, Manuel Quezada; Parsani, Matteo; Knepley, Matthew G.; Emmett, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Development of scientific software involves tradeoffs between ease of use, generality, and performance. We describe the design of a general hyperbolic PDE solver that can be operated with the convenience of MATLAB yet achieves efficiency near that of hand-coded Fortran and scales to the largest supercomputers. This is achieved by using Python for most of the code while employing automatically wrapped Fortran kernels for computationally intensive routines, and using Python bindings to interface with a parallel computing library and other numerical packages. The software described here is PyClaw, a Python-based structured grid solver for general systems of hyperbolic PDEs [K. T. Mandli et al., PyClaw Software, Version 1.0, http://numerics.kaust.edu.sa/pyclaw/ (2011)]. PyClaw provides a powerful and intuitive interface to the algorithms of the existing Fortran codes Clawpack and SharpClaw, simplifying code development and use while providing massive parallelism and scalable solvers via the PETSc library. The package is further augmented by use of PyWENO for generation of efficient high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory reconstruction code. The simplicity, capability, and performance of this approach are demonstrated through application to example problems in shallow water flow, compressible flow, and elasticity.

  16. Process-oriented tests for validation of baroclinic shallow water models: The lock-exchange problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, R. L.; Kibbey, T. C. G.; Szpilka, C. M.; Dresback, K. M.; Tromble, E. M.; Toohey, I. P.; Hoggan, J. L.; Atkinson, J. H.

    A first step often taken to validate prognostic baroclinic codes is a series of process-oriented tests, as those suggested by Haidvogel and Beckmann [Haidvogel, D., Beckmann, A., 1999. Numerical Ocean Circulation Modeling. Imperial College Press, London], among others. One of these tests is the so-called "lock-exchange" test or "dam break" problem, wherein water of different densities is separated by a vertical barrier, which is removed at time zero. Validation against these tests has primarily consisted of comparing the propagation speed of the wave front, as predicted by various theoretical and experimental results, to model output. In addition, inter-model comparisons of the lock-exchange test have been used to validate codes. Herein, we present a high resolution data set, taken from a laboratory-scale model, for direct and quantitative comparison of experimental and numerical results throughout the domain, not just the wave front. Data is captured every 0.2 s using high resolution digital photography, with salt concentration extracted by comparing pixel intensity of the dyed fluid against calibration standards. Two scenarios are discussed in this paper, symmetric and asymmetric mixing, depending on the proportion of dense/light water (17.5 ppt/0.0 ppt) in the experiment; the Boussinesq approximation applies to both. Front speeds, cast in terms of the dimensionless Froude number, show excellent agreement with literature-reported values. Data are also used to quantify the degree of mixing, as measured by the front thickness, which also provides an error band on the front speed. Finally, experimental results are used to validate baroclinic enhancements to the barotropic shallow water ADvanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC) model, including the effect of the vertical mixing scheme on simulation results. Based on salinity data, the model provides an average root-mean-square (rms) error of 3.43 ppt for the symmetric case and 3.74 ppt for the asymmetric case, most of which can

  17. Continuous ultrasonic waves to detect steam bubbles in water under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulshof, H J.M.; Schurink, F

    1985-01-01

    Steam in the recirculation circuit of boilers may lead to unacceptable high thermal loads on the evaporator tubes. The ability to detect steam in the recirculation circuit during process transients is therefore important. A simple detector using continuous ultrasonic waves and able to detect bubbles in water contained in steel tubes is described in this paper. The variation of the transmitted wave caused by the bubbles was determined by demodulation. The results have met the objectives set for cold water with air bubbles. A clear indication of the presence of steam bubbles was found in fast-flowing hot water in a steel tube with a diameter of 60 mm. A change in the low-frequency region of the modulation was the only indication of the presence of steam bubbles in the large-diameter downcomer of the water-separator drum of a boiler in an electrical power plant. Possible causes of the differences in the results obtained are discussed on the basis of differences in bubble sizes and in focusing and reflection of the ultrasonic waves. (orig.). 11 refs.; 10 figs.

  18. Continuous ultrasonic waves to detect steam bubbles in water under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulshof, H.J.M.; Schurink, F.

    1985-01-01

    Steam in the recirculation circuit of boilers may lead to unacceptable high thermal loads on the evaporator tubes. The ability to detect steam in the recirculation circuit during process transients is therefore important. A simple detector using continuous ultrasonic waves and able to detect bubbles in water contained in steel tubes is described in this paper. The variation of the transmitted wave caused by the bubbles was determined by demodulation. The results have met the objectives set for cold water with air bubbles. A clear indication of the presence of steam bubbles was found in fast-flowing hot water in a steel tube with a diameter of 60 mm. A change in the low-frequency region of the modulation was the only indication of the presence of steam bubbles in the large-diameter downcomer of the water-separator drum of a boiler in an electrical power plant. Possible causes of the differences in the results obtained are discussed on the basis of differences in bubble sizes and in focusing and reflection of the ultrasonic waves. (orig.)

  19. Up-Wave and Autoregressive Methods for Short-Term Wave Forecasting for an Oscillating Water Column

    OpenAIRE

    Paparella, Francesco; Monk, Kieran; Winands, Victor; Lopes, M.F.P.; Conley, Daniel; Ringwood, John

    2015-01-01

    The real-time control of wave energy converters (WECs) requires the prediction of the wave elevation at the location of the device in order to maximize the power extracted from the waves. One possibility is to predict the future wave elevation by combining its past history with the spatial information coming from a sensor which measures the free surface elevation up-wave of the WEC. As an application example, this paper focuses on the prediction of the wave elevation inside the chamber of the...

  20. Wave phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Towne, Dudley H

    1988-01-01

    This excellent undergraduate-level text emphasizes optics and acoustics, covering inductive derivation of the equation for transverse waves on a string, acoustic plane waves, boundary-value problems, polarization, three-dimensional waves and more. With numerous problems (solutions for about half). ""The material is superbly chosen and brilliantly written"" - Physics Today. Problems. Appendices.

  1. TRENDS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF DETONATION ENGINES FOR HIGH-SPEED AEROSPACE AIRCRAFTS AND THE PROBLEM OF TRIPLE CONFIGURATIONS OF SHOCK WAVES. Part II - Research of counterpropagating shock waves and triple shock wave configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with current issues of the interference theory development of gas-dynamic discontinuities as applied to a problem of propulsion refinement for the air-spacecrafts, designed for hypersonic flight speeds. In the first part of the review we have presented the history of detonation study and different concepts of detonation engines, as well as air intakes designed for hypersonic flight speeds. The second part provides an overview of works on the interference theory development for gas-dynamic discontinuities. We report about classification of the gas-dynamic discontinuities, shock wave propagation, shock-wave structures and triple configurations of shock waves. We have shown that many of these processes are accompanied by a hysteresis phenomenon, there are areas of ambiguity; therefore, in the design of engines and air intakes optimal shock-wave structures should be provided and their sustainability should be ensured. Much attention has recently been given to the use of the air intakes in the shock-wave structures with the rereflection of shock waves and the interference of shock waves in the opposite directions. This review provides increased focus on it, contains references to landmark works, the last calculated and experimental results. Unfortunately, foreign surveys missed many landmark works of the Soviet and Russian researchers, as they were not published in English. At the same time, it was the Soviet school of gas dynamics that has formulated the interference theory of gas-dynamic discontinuities in its present form. To fill this gap is one of this review scopes. The review may be recommended for professionals, engineers and scientists working in the field of aerospace engineering.

  2. Spatial and temporal variations of wave energy in the nearshore waters of the central west coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Amrutha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of wave power potential at different water depths and time is required for identifying a wave power plant location. This study examines the variation in wave power off the central west coast of India at water depths of 30, 9 and 5 m based on waverider buoy measured wave data. The study shows a significant reduction ( ∼  10 to 27 % in wave power at 9 m water depth compared to 30 m and the wave power available at 5 m water depth is 20 to 23 % less than that at 9 m. At 9 m depth, the seasonal mean value of the wave power varied from 1.6 kW m−1 in the post-monsoon period (ONDJ to 15.2 kW m−1 in the Indian summer monsoon (JJAS period. During the Indian summer monsoon period, the variation of wave power in a day is up to 32 kW m−1. At 9 m water depth, the mean annual wave power is 6 kW m−1 and interannual variations up to 19.3 % are observed during 2009–2014. High wave energy ( >  20 kW m−1 at the study area is essentially from the directional sector 245–270° and also 75 % of the total annual wave energy is from this narrow directional sector, which is advantageous while aligning the wave energy converter.

  3. Respiratory Problems Associated with Surfing in Coastal Waters

    OpenAIRE

    O Halloran, C; Silver, MW; Lahiff, M; Colford, J

    2017-01-01

    © 2016, International Association for Ecology and Health. A pilot project was conducted to examine the health status and possible adverse health effects associated with seawater exposure (microbial water-quality indicators and phytoplankton abundance and their toxins) of surfers in Monterey Bay, Central California coastal waters. Forty-eight surfers enrolled in the study and completed an initial health background survey and weekly health surveys online using Survey Monkey. Descriptive statist...

  4. Efficient uncertainty quantification of a fully nonlinear and dispersive water wave model with random inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Eskilsson, Claes

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in next-generation industrial applications is to improve numerical analysis by quantifying uncertainties in predictions. In this work we present a formulation of a fully nonlinear and dispersive potential flow water wave model with random inputs for the probabilistic description...... at different points in the parameter space, allowing for the reuse of existing simulation software. The choice of the applied methods is driven by the number of uncertain input parameters and by the fact that finding the solution of the considered model is computationally intensive. We revisit experimental...... benchmarks often used for validation of deterministic water wave models. Based on numerical experiments and assumed uncertainties in boundary data, our analysis reveals that some of the known discrepancies from deterministic simulation in comparison with experimental measurements could be partially explained...

  5. Sino-US cooperation in water saving technologies: essential international problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States and China share many agricultural problems, but one of great importance is the need to produce more crop yield in the face of water scarcity. Common recognition of this problem led to the development of a joint Sino-US Water Saving Technologies Flagship project within the larger US...

  6. School Learning Materials on Water Problems of New Mexico and the Southwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buethe, Chris; And Others

    Schools typically make no special efforts to prepare students to cope with present and anticipated water problems. Using this as a premise, the objective of this study was to prepare a set of mediated learning packages based upon water problems of New Mexico and the dry regions of the Southwest. These learning materials were prepared and field…

  7. Integrability of an extended (2+1)-dimensional shallow water wave equation with Bell polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yun-Hu; Chen Yong

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the extended (2+1)-dimensional shallow water wave equation. The binary Bell polynomials are used to construct bilinear equation, bilinear Bäcklund transformation, Lax pair, and Darboux covariant Lax pair for this equation. Moreover, the infinite conservation laws of this equation are found by using its Lax pair. All conserved densities and fluxes are given with explicit recursion formulas. The N-soliton solutions are also presented by means of the Hirota bilinear method. (general)

  8. Wave Height and Water Level Variability on Lakes Michigan and St Clair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Observations: http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/sose/glwx_activity.html 4. NASA Atlas of Extratropical Storm Tracks: http://data.giss.nasa.gov/stormtracks...term meteorological, ice, wave, and water level measurements. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Base flood elevation Coastal flood Extratropical storms Great...Box 1027 Detroit, MI 48231-1027 ERDC/CHL TR-12-23 ii Abstract The Great Lakes are subject to coastal flooding as a result of severe storms

  9. Concentration of frequencies of trapped waves in problems on freely floating bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarov, Sergei A [Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering, Russian Academy of Sciences, St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-30

    It is shown that by choosing the shape of two identical bodies floating freely in a channel with symmetric cross-section it is possible to form any pre-assigned number of linearly independent trapped waves (localized solutions). Bibliography: 27 titles.

  10. The role of Internal Solitary Waves on deep-water sedimentary processes: the case of up-slope migrating sediment waves off the Messina Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droghei, R.; Falcini, F.; Casalbore, D.; Martorelli, E.; Mosetti, R.; Sannino, G.; Santoleri, R.; Chiocci, F. L.

    2016-11-01

    Subaqueous, asymmetric sand waves are typically observed in marine channel/canyon systems, tidal environments, and continental slopes exposed to strong currents, where they are formed by current shear resulting from a dominant unidirectional flow. However, sand-wave fields may be readily observed in marine environments where no such current exists; the physical processes driving their formation are enigmatic or not well understood. We propose that internal solitary waves (ISWs) induced by tides can produce an effective, unidirectional boundary “current” that forms asymmetric sand waves. We test this idea by examining a sand-wave field off the Messina Strait, where we hypothesize that ISWs formed at the interface between intermediate and surface waters are refracted by topography. Hence, we argue that the deflected pattern (i.e., the depth-dependent orientation) of the sand-wave field is due to refraction of such ISWs. Combining field observations and numerical modelling, we show that ISWs can account for three key features: ISWs produce fluid velocities capable of mobilizing bottom sediments; the predicted refraction pattern resulting from the interaction of ISWs with bottom topography matches the observed deflection of the sand waves; and predicted migration rates of sand waves match empirical estimates. This work shows how ISWs may contribute to sculpting the structure of continental margins and it represents a promising link between the geological and oceanographic communities.

  11. Effects of waves and currents on the siltation problem of Damietta harbour, Nile Delta coast, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABO BAKER.I. ABO ZED

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the effect of prevailing dynamic factors on the sedimentation process in Damietta Harbour along the Nile delta coast of Egypt. The monitoring program spanned the period between 1978 and 1999 and included measurements of waves, currents and bathymetric profiles. The evaluation was based on determination of erosion and accretion rates, current regime, sediment transport, wave characteristics and wave refraction. Results revealed that the predominant wave direction from N-NW sector (86 % throughout the year is responsible for generation of a longshore eastward current. Less frequent waves from the N-NE sector generate an opposing longshore westward current. The refraction pattern for the prevailing wave direction indicates that the harbour and its navigation channel are located within a divergence of wave orthogonal and in an accretion sediment sink area. The annual net rate of littoral drift on the western side of the harbour is about 1.43 * 105 m3 (accretion, while the annual net rate of littoral drift on the eastern side is about 2.54 * 105 m3 (erosion. Currents fluctuate tremendously in speed and direction, especially during the winter months. Hence, sediment transport takes place in offshore, eastward, and onshore directions. Progressive vector diagrams show that the largest near bottom offshore, onshore and easterly net drift occurs during summer, spring and winter respectively. The onshore sediment transport generated during spring and summer plays an important role in the redistribution of eroded sediments during the winter. The overall study of dynamic factors indicated that the harbour site is characterized by eastern, western, offshore and onshore sediment movements. Therefore, the north-south orientation of the navigation channel, with its depth greater than the surrounding area, interrupts sediment drift from different directions and reduces the current speed. Consequently, the sediments sink within the navigation

  12. Western Water Resources: Coming Problems and the Policy Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Richard

    This quote from the book leads one to speculate as to what will happen to water policy in these times of increased concern for reducing federal spending, for more reliance on state and local governments as opposed to the federal government, and for more reliance on the private sector as opposed to any level of governmental control. Remembering that a wrenching debate preceded deregulation of oil and other energy prices, what are the opportunities for deregulation in the water resources field?Western Water Resources consists of the proceedings of a symposium held in Denver in September 1979 and Hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. As in any conference, there is, in addition to the organized substantive content of the papers, a mixture of the clever and the banal, peppered with some humor and chit-chat. Among the contributors are economists, including Charles Howe, Allen Kneese, Emery Castle, and Kenneth Boulding; legal scholars, such as George Radosevich and Frank Trelease; and political figures, such as Scott Matheson, Governor of Utah, Guy Martin, former Assistant Secretary for Land and Water Resources of the Department of the Interior, and Leo Eisel, former Director of the Water Resources Council. Some papers are followed by a discussion from commentors.

  13. Safety of pressurized water reactors: problems and corresponding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogne, F.

    1976-01-01

    The author recalls the safety problems subject to researches in the CEA, either because of their importance or because studies made abroad were not sufficiently developed or were classified or in order to acquire an independent judgement when safety is concerned. Those problems and studies are submitted referring to the 3 existing shields between man and dangerous materials: fuel element can, thermal shield, (pressure vessel and pipes), biological shield of which the behaviour is studied in connection with outside aggressions such as earthquakes, plane crashes, chemical explosions.. [fr

  14. The quality of our drinking water: aluminium determination with an acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veríssimo, Marta I S; Gomes, M Teresa S R

    2008-06-09

    A new methodology based on an inexpensive aluminium acoustic wave sensor is presented. Although the aluminium sensor has already been reported, and the composition of the selective membrane is known, the low detection limits required for the analysis of drinking water, demanded the inclusion of a preconcentration stage, as well as an optimization of the sensor. The necessary coating amount was established, as well as the best preconcentration protocol, in terms of oxidation of organic matter and aluminium elution from the Chelex-100. The methodology developed with the acoustic wave sensor allowed aluminium quantitation above 0.07 mg L(-1). Several water samples from Portugal were analysed using the acoustic wave sensor, as well as by UV-vis spectrophotometry. Results obtained with both methodologies were not statistically different (alpha=0.05), both in terms of accuracy and precision. This new methodology proved to be adequate for aluminium quantitation in drinking water and showed to be faster and less reagent consuming than the UV spectrophotometric methodology.

  15. The effect of foam on waves and the aerodynamic roughness of the water surface at high winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vdovin, Maxim; Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Air-sea coupling at extreme winds is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed first suggested in [1] on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients was then confirmed by a number of field (e.g.[2]) and laboratory [3] experiments, which showed that the sea surface drag coefficient was significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. The theoretical explanations of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction exploit either peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves (e.g.[4,5]) or the effect of sea drops and spray on the wind-wave momentum exchange (e.g. [6,7]). Recently an alternative hypothesis was suggested in [8], where the surface drag reduction in hurricanes was explained by the influence of foam covering sea surface on its aerodynamic roughness. This paper describes a series of laboratory experiments in Thermostratified Wind-Wave Tank (TSWiWaT) of IAP directed to investigation of the foam impact on the short-wave part of the surface waves and the momentum exchange in the atmospheric boundary layer at high winds in the range of equivalent 10-m wind speed from 12 to 38 m/s. A special foam generator was designed for these experiments. The air flow parameters were retrieved from measurements of the velocity profiles. The frequency-wavenumber spectra of surface waves were retrieved from the measurements of water surface elevation by the array 3-channel wave gauge. Foam coverage of water surface was controlled by video filming of the water surface. The results of measurements were compared with predictions of the quasi-linear model of atmospheric boundary layer over

  16. Prolongation of the deployment and monitoring of a multiple oscillating water column wave energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F.; Chudley, J.; Dai, Y.M.

    2003-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a project to prolong the sea trials of a multiple oscillating water column wave energy converter (MOWC) device for another 12 months to obtain further data. The objectives of the project include the evaluation of the ability of the MOWC to generate reliable energy to produce electricity, the estimation of the conversion efficiency, and the identification of improvements to increase the conversion efficiency, Details are given of the analysis of the sea trials data, and the performance of the broadband oscillating water column prototype.

  17. Problems of estimation of water content history of loesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendell, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    The estimation of 'mean water content' is a major source of error in the TL dating of many sediments. The engineering behaviour of loesses can be used, under certain circumstances, to interfer their content history. The construction of 'stress history' for particular loesses is therefore proposed in order to establish the critical conditions of moisture and applied stress (overburden) at which irreversible structural change occurs. A programme of field and laboratory tests should enable more precise estimates of water content history to be made. (author)

  18. [Modern problems of maintenance of hygienic safety of drinking water consumption at the regional level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulakin, A V; Tsyplakova, G V; Ampleeva, G P; Kozyreva, O N; Pivneva, O S; Trukhina, G M

    Problems of hygienic reliability of the drinking water use in regions of the Russian Federation are observed in the article. The optimization of the water use was shown must be based on the bearing in mind of regional peculiarities of the shaping of water quality of groundwater and surface sources of the water use, taking into account of the effectiveness of regional water protection programs, programs for water treatment, coordination of the activity of economic entities and oversight bodies in the management of water quality on the basis of socio-hygienic monitoring. Regional problems requiring hygienic justification and accounting, include such issues as complex hydrological, hydrogeological, climatic and geographical conditions, pronouncement of the severity of anthropogenic pollution of sources of water supply, natural conditions of the shaping of water quality, efficiency of the water treatment. There is need in the improvement of the problems of the water quality monitoring, including with the use of computer technology, which allows to realize regional hygienic monitoring and spatial-temporal analysis of the water quality, to model the water quality management, to predict conditions of the water use by population in regions taking into account peculiarities of the current health situation. In the article there is shown the practicability of the so-called complex concept of multiple barriers suggesting the combined use of chemical oxidation and physical methods of the preparation of drinking water. It is required the further development of legislation for the protection of water bodies from pollution with the bigging up the status of sanitary protection zones; timely revision of the regulatory framework, establishing sanitary-epidemiological requirements to potable water and drinking water supply. The problem of the provision of the population with safe drinking water requires complex solution within the framework of the implementation of target programs

  19. Wind waves modelling on the water body with coupled WRF and WAVEWATCH III models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Baydakov, Georgy; Vdovin, Maxim; Papko, Vladislav; Sergeev, Daniil

    2015-04-01

    Simulation of ocean and sea waves is an accepted instrument for the improvement of the weather forecasts. Wave modelling, coupled models modelling is applied to open seas [1] and is less developed for moderate and small inland water reservoirs and lakes, though being of considerable interest for inland navigation. Our goal is to tune the WAVEWATCH III model to the conditions of the inland reservoir and to carry out the simulations of surface wind waves with coupled WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) and WAVEWATCH III models. Gorky Reservoir, an artificial lake in the central part of the Volga River formed by a hydroelectric dam, was considered as an example of inland reservoir. Comparing to [2] where moderate constant winds (u10 is up to 9 m/s) of different directions blowing steadily all over the surface of the reservoir were considered, here we apply atmospheric model WRF to get wind input to WAVEWATCH III. WRF computations were held on the Yellowstone supercomputer for 4 nested domains with minimum scale of 1 km. WAVEWATCH III model was tuned for the conditions of the Gorky Reservoir. Satellite topographic data on altitudes ranged from 56,6° N to 57,5° N and from 42.9° E to 43.5° E with increments 0,00833 ° in both directions was used. 31 frequencies ranged from 0,2 Hz to 4 Hz and 30 directions were considered. The minimal significant wave height was changed to the lower one. The waves in the model were developing from some initial seeding spectral distribution (Gaussian in frequency and space, cosine in direction). The range of the observed significant wave height in the numerical experiment was from less than 1 cm up to 30 cm. The field experiments were carried out in the south part of the Gorky reservoir from the boat [2, 3]. 1-D spectra of the field experiment were compared with those obtained in the numerical experiments with different parameterizations of flux provided in WAVEWATCH III both with constant wind input and WRF wind input. For all the

  20. GRACE-derived terrestrial water storage depletion associated with the 2003 European heat wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Seneviratne, S.I.; Hinderer, J.

    2005-01-01

    water storage depletion observed from GRACE can be related to the record-breaking heat wave that occurred in central Europe in 2003. We validate the measurements from GRACE using two independent hydrological estimates and direct gravity observations from superconducting gravimeters in Europe. All...... datasets agree well with the GRACE measurements despite the disparity of the employed information; the difference between datasets tends to be within GRACE margin of error. The April-to-August terrestrial water storage depletion is found to be significantly larger in 2003 than in 2002 from both models......The GRACE twin satellites reveal large inter-annual terrestrial water-storage variations between 2002 and 2003 for central Europe. GRACE observes a negative trend in regional water storage from 2002 to 2003 peaking at -7.8 cm in central Europe with an accuracy of 1 cm. The 2003 excess terrestrial...

  1. Identifying the Optimal Offshore Areas for Wave Energy Converter Deployments in Taiwanese Waters Based on 12-Year Model Hindcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Ju Shih

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year sea-state hindcast for Taiwanese waters, covering the period from 2005 to 2016, was conducted using a fully coupled tide-surge-wave model. The hindcasts of significant wave height and peak period were employed to estimate the wave power resources in the waters surrounding Taiwan. Numerical simulations based on unstructured grids were converted to structured grids with a resolution of 25 × 25 km. The spatial distribution maps of offshore annual mean wave power were created for each year and for the 12-year period. Waters with higher wave power density were observed off the northern, northeastern, southeastern (south of Green Island and southeast of Lanyu and southern coasts of Taiwan. Five energetic sea areas with spatial average annual total wave energy density of 60–90 MWh/m were selected for further analysis. The 25 × 25 km square grids were then downscaled to resolutions of 5 × 5 km, and five 5 × 5 km optimal areas were identified for wave energy converter deployments. The spatial average annual total wave energy yields at the five optimal areas (S1–(S5 were estimated to be 64.3, 84.1, 84.5, 111.0 and 99.3 MWh/m, respectively. The prevailing wave directions for these five areas lie between east and northeast.

  2. Application of Fourier elastodynamics to direct and inverse problems for the scattering of elastic waves from flaws near surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.M.; Fertig, K.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In order to inspect flaws which lie too close to the surface a Fourier elastodynamic formalism is proposed which enables one to decompose the elastodynamic system into separately charterizable parts by means of planes perpendicular to the z-axis. The process can be represented by a generalized transfer function relating the near-field scattered waves to the waves incident on a slab of material containing the flaw. The Fourier elastodynamics are applied to the characterization of the total scattering process involving a flaw at various distances from a plastic-water interface. An abbreviated discussion of Fourier elastodynamics is presented, and the results specialized to the case of spherical voids and inclusions bear an interface. Finally, the computational results for several ranges of temporal frequency and for a sequence of values of the distance from the flaw center to the interface are discussed

  3. Landslide Spreading, Impulse Water Waves and Modelling of the Vajont Rockslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Giovanni B.; Imposimato, Silvia; Roddeman, Dennis

    2016-06-01

    Landslides can occur in different environments and can interact with or fall into water reservoirs or open sea with different characteristics. The subaerial evolution and the transition from subaerial to subaqueous conditions can strongly control the landslide evolution and the generated impulse waves, and consequently the final hazard zonation. We intend to model the landslide spreading, the impact with the water surface and the generation of the impulse wave under different 2D and 3D conditions and settings. We verify the capabilities of a fully 2D and 3D FEM ALE approach to model and analyse near-field evolution. To this aim we validate the code against 2D laboratory experiments for different Froude number conditions (Fr = 1.4, 3.2). Then the Vajont rockslide (Fr = 0.26-0.75) and the consequent impulse wave are simulated in 2D and 3D. The sliding mass is simulated as an elasto-plastic Mohr-Coulomb material and the lake water as a fully inviscid low compressibility fluid. The rockslide model is validated against field observations, including the total duration, the profile and internal geometry of the final deposit, the maximum water run-up on the opposite valley flank and on the rockslide mass. 2D models are presented for both the case of a dry valley and that of the impounded lake. The set of fully 3D simulations are the first ones available and considering the rockslide evolution, propagation and interaction with the water reservoir. Advantages and disadvantages of the modelling approach are discussed.

  4. Spatial and temporal variations of wave energy in the nearshore waters of the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amrutha, M.M.; SanilKumar, V.

    >. At 9m water depth, the mean annual wave power is 6kWm-1 and interannual variations up to 19.3% are observed during 2009-2014. High wave energy (>20kWm-1) at the study area is essentially from the directional sector 245...

  5. Soft Computing Methods for Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Design Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Narendra; Mittal, Ankush

    2012-01-01

    The growing commercial market of Microwave/ Millimeter wave industry over the past decade has led to the explosion of interests and opportunities for the design and development of microwave components.The design of most microwave components requires the use of commercially available electromagnetic (EM) simulation tools for their analysis. In the design process, the simulations are carried out by varying the design parameters until the desired response is obtained. The optimization of design parameters by manual searching is a cumbersome and time consuming process. Soft computing methods such as Genetic Algorithm (GA), Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Fuzzy Logic (FL) have been widely used by EM researchers for microwave design since last decade. The aim of these methods is to tolerate imprecision, uncertainty, and approximation to achieve robust and low cost solution in a small time frame.  Modeling and optimization are essential parts and powerful tools for the microwave/millimeter wave design. This boo...

  6. Spin dynamics and implications for superconductivity. Some problems with the d-wave scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, K.; Zha, Y.; Radtke, R.J.; Si, Q.; Norman, M.R.; Schuettler, H.B.

    1994-01-01

    We review the spin dynamics of the normal state of the cuprates with special emphasis on neutron data in both the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ and La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 systems. When realistic models of the Fermi surface shapes are incorporated, along with a moderate degree of spin fluctuations, we find good semiquantitative agreement with experiment for both cuprates. Building on the success of this Fermi-liquid-based scheme, we explore the implications for d-wave pairing from a number of vantage points. We conclude that our present experimental and theoretical understanding is inadequate to confirm or refute the d-wave scenario. 26 refs., 6 figs

  7. Solid waves and acoustic emission first phase: Problems direct and inverse and equations elasto dynamics fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2002-07-01

    The present work is the first of a series of three memoirs briefs, destinadas to revise the classic theoretical foundations that allow to understand the generation,la diffusion and the detection of the elastic waves in those been accustomed to from the point of view of the mechanics of the means continuos. The study is faced in the mark of the non destructive rehearsals, emphasizing aspects related with the rehearsals based on the acoustic emission of the material defects

  8. Problems of Nitrogen at Central Municipal Water Works in Ostrava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praus Petr

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is very important nutrient and must be removed during wastewater treatment process. The presented article describes the situation of nitrogen removal at the Central Municipal Water Works in Ostrava. At present, this biological sewage plant operates with only 45% nitrogen removal efficiency. The current three corridor denitrification-nitrification (D-N system is planed to be reconstructed. One of several solution is modification of the activation tank into four step D-N system that could be completed by postdenitrification in the redundant clarifiers.In this paper the analytical methods, used for determination of nitrogen compounds in waste waters, are described as well. Only sufficiently precise and accurate methods must be selected and that is why the standardized or fully validated procedures are preferred. Laboratory results are used for monitoring of treatment process and for making of important technological decisions. For this purpose, introduction of the quality control and quality assurance system into laboratory practise is desired.

  9. Ground-water development and problems in Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosthwaite, E.G.

    1954-01-01

    The development of groundwater for irrigation in Idaho, as most of you know, has proceeded at phenomenal rate since the Second World War. In the period 1907 to 1944 inclusive only about 328 valid permits and licenses to appropriate ground water were issued by the state. thereafter 28 permits became valid in 1945, 83 in 1946, and 121 in 1947. Sine 1947 permits and licenses have been issued at the rate of more than 400 a year.  

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Partial-Porous Circular Cylinders with Water Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Su Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of water waves with partially porous-surfaced circular cylinders was investigated. A three-dimensional numerical modeling was developed based on the complete mathematical formulation of the eigenfunction expansion method in the potential flow. Darcy’s law was applied to describe the porous boundary. The partial-porous cylinder is composed of a porous-surfaced body near the free surface, and an impermeable-surfaced body with an end-capped rigid bottom below the porous region. The optimal ratio of the porous portion to the impermeable portion can be adopted to design an effective ocean structure with minimal hydrodynamic impact. To scrutinize the hydrodynamic interactions in N partial-porous circular cylinders, the computational fluid domain is divided into three regions: an exterior region, N inner porous body regions, and N regions beneath the body. Wave excitation forces and wave run-up on multibodied partial-porous cylinders are calculated and compared for various porous-portion ratios and wave conditions, all of which significantly influence the hydrodynamic property.

  11. Some exact solutions to the potential Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation and to a system of shallow water wave equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inan, Ibrahim E.; Kaya, Dogan

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter by considering an improved tanh function method, we found some exact solutions of the potential Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation. Some exact solutions of the system of the shallow water wave equation were also found

  12. On an inverse source problem for enhanced oil recovery by wave motion maximization in reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Karve, Pranav M.; Kucukcoban, Sezgin; Kallivokas, Loukas F.

    2014-01-01

    to increase the mobility of otherwise entrapped oil. The goal is to arrive at the spatial and temporal description of surface sources that are capable of maximizing mobility in the target reservoir. The focusing problem is posed as an inverse source problem

  13. Analysis on shock wave speed of water hammer of lifting pipes for deep-sea mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-jin; Yang, Ning; Wang, Zhao

    2013-04-01

    Water hammer occurs whenever the fluid velocity in vertical lifting pipe systems for deep-sea mining suddenly changes. In this work, the shock wave was proven to play an important role in changing pressures and periods, and mathematical and numerical modeling technology was presented for simulated transient pressure in the abnormal pump operation. As volume concentrations were taken into account of shock wave speed, the experiment results about the pressure-time history, discharge-time history and period for the lifting pipe system showed that: as its concentrations rose up, the maximum transient pressure went down, so did its discharges; when its volume concentrations increased gradually, the period numbers of pressure decay were getting less and less, and the corresponding shock wave speed decreased. These results have highly coincided with simulation results. The conclusions are important to design lifting transporting system to prevent water hammer in order to avoid potentially devastating consequences, such as damage to components and equipment and risks to personnel.

  14. Material problems concerning the safety of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocek, M.; Dienst, W.; Hofmann, P.; Leistikow, S.

    The problems dealt with in this lecture and the corresponding investigations refer to the behavior of LWR fuel rods at loss-of-coolant accidents. In the foreground is the deformation of zircaloy 4 cladding until rupture will take place, the following aspects being pointed out: obstruction of emergency cooling of fuel assemblies by heavily deformed cladding tubes, release of radioactive fission products through cracks in the cladding, local fragmentation of the fuel rods caused by extensive embrittlement of the cladding tubes. (orig./IHOE) [de

  15. Safety problems relating to plutonium recycling in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, C.; Frison, J.M.; Mercier, J.P.; Revais, J.P

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the specific nature, as regards safety, of the mixed oxide (MOX) fuel cycle, with the exception of safety problems relating to the operation of nuclear power plants. These specific characteristics are due mainly to the presence of plutonium in fresh fuel and to the higher plutonium and transuranic element content in spent fuel assemblies. The fuel cycle steps analysed here are the transport of plutonium oxide, the manufacture of MOX fuel assemblies, the transport of fresh and spent fuel assemblies and the processing of spent fuel assemblies. (author) [fr

  16. Safety problems relating to plutonium recycling in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, C.; Frison, J.M.; Mercier, J.P.; Revais, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the specific nature, as regards safety, of the mixed oxide (MOX) fuel cycle, with the exception of safety problems relating to the operation of nuclear power plants. These specific characteristics are due mainly to the presence of plutonium in fresh fuel and to the higher plutonium and transuranic element content in spent fuel assemblies. The fuel cycle steps analysed here are the transport of plutonium oxide, the manufacture of MOX fuel assemblies, the transport of fresh and spent fuel assemblies and the processing of spent fuel assemblies

  17. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Ryżak

    Full Text Available The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa. We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop. The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops.

  18. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryżak, Magdalena; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa). We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop). The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability) was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability) was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops.

  19. Effect of higher order nonlinearity, directionality and finite water depth on wave statistics: Comparison of field data and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Leandro; Monbaliu, Jaak; Onorato, Miguel; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    This research is focused on the study of nonlinear evolution of irregular wave fields in water of arbitrary depth by comparing field measurements and numerical simulations.It is now well accepted that modulational instability, known as one of the main mechanisms for the formation of rogue waves, induces strong departures from Gaussian statistics. However, whereas non-Gaussian properties are remarkable when wave fields follow one direction of propagation over an infinite water depth, wave statistics only weakly deviate from Gaussianity when waves spread over a range of different directions. Over finite water depth, furthermore, wave instability attenuates overall and eventually vanishes for relative water depths as low as kh=1.36 (where k is the wavenumber of the dominant waves and h the water depth). Recent experimental results, nonetheless, seem to indicate that oblique perturbations are capable of triggering and sustaining modulational instability even if khthe aim of this research is to understand whether the combined effect of directionality and finite water depth has a significant effect on wave statistics and particularly on the occurrence of extremes. For this purpose, numerical experiments have been performed solving the Euler equation of motion with the Higher Order Spectral Method (HOSM) and compared with data of short crested wave fields for different sea states observed at the Lake George (Australia). A comparative analysis of the statistical properties (i.e. density function of the surface elevation and its statistical moments skewness and kurtosis) between simulations and in-situ data provides a confrontation between the numerical developments and real observations in field conditions.

  20. Near optimal solution to the inverse problem for gravitational-wave bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guersel, Y.; Tinto, M.

    1989-01-01

    We develop a method for determining the source direction (θ,φ) and the two waveforms h + (t), h x (t) of a gravitational-wave burst using noisy data from three wideband gravitational-wave detectors running in coincidence. The scheme does not rely on any assumptions about the waveforms and in fact it works for gravitational-wave bursts of any kind. To improve the accuracy of the solution for (θ,φ), h + (t), h x (t), we construct a near optimal filter for the noisy data which is deduced from the data themselves. We implement the method numerically using simulated data for detectors that operate, with white Gaussian noise, in the frequency band of 500--2500 Hz. We show that for broadband signals centered around 1 kHz with a conventional signal-to-noise ratio of at least 10 in each detector we are able to locate the source within a solid angle of 1x10 -5 sr. If the signals and the detectors' band were scaled downwards in frequency by a factor ι, at fixed signal-to-noise ratio, then the solid angle of the source's error box would increase by a factor ι 2 . The simulated data are assumed to be produced by three detectors: one on the east coast of the United States of America, one on the west coast of the United States of America, and the third in Germany or Western Australia. For conventional signal-to-noise ratios significantly lower than 10 the method still converges to the correct combination of the relative time delays but it is unable to distinguish between the two mirror-image directions defined by the relative time delays. The angular spread around these points increases as the signal-to-noise ratio decreases. For conventional signal-to-noise ratios near 1 the method loses its resolution completely

  1. Forcing of a bottom-mounted circular cylinder by steep regular water waves at finite depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Bo Terp; Bredmose, Henrik; Bingham, Harry B.

    2014-01-01

    of secondary load cycles. Special attention was paid to this secondary load cycle and the flow features that cause it. By visual observation and a simplified analytical model it was shown that the secondary load cycle was caused by the strong nonlinear motion of the free surface which drives a return flow......Forcing by steep regular water waves on a vertical circular cylinder at finite depth was investigated numerically by solving the two-phase incompressible Navier–Stokes equations. Consistently with potential flow theory, boundary layer effects were neglected at the sea bed and at the cylinder...... at the back of the cylinder following the passage of the wave crest. The numerical computations were further analysed in the frequency domain. For a representative example, the secondary load cycle was found to be associated with frequencies above the fifth- and sixth-harmonic force component. For the third...

  2. Modification of 2-D Time-Domain Shallow Water Wave Equation using Asymptotic Expansion Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairuman, Teuku; Nasruddin, MN; Tulus; Ramli, Marwan

    2018-01-01

    Generally, research on the tsunami wave propagation model can be conducted by using a linear model of shallow water theory, where a non-linear side on high order is ignored. In line with research on the investigation of the tsunami waves, the Boussinesq equation model underwent a change aimed to obtain an improved quality of the dispersion relation and non-linearity by increasing the order to be higher. To solve non-linear sides at high order is used a asymptotic expansion method. This method can be used to solve non linear partial differential equations. In the present work, we found that this method needs much computational time and memory with the increase of the number of elements.

  3. Nonlinear focusing of ultrasonic waves by an axisymmetric diffraction grating embedded in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez, N.; Picó, R. [Instituto de Investigación para la Gestión Integrada de zonas Costeras, Universitat Politècnica de València, Paranimf 1, 46730 Grao de Gandia, València (Spain); Romero-García, V. [LUNAM Université, Université du Maine, LAUM UMR CNRS 6613, Av. O. Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans (France); Garcia-Raffi, L. M. [Instituto Universitario de Matemática Pura y Aplicada, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 València (Spain); Staliunas, K. [ICREA, Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Colom, 11, E-08222 Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-11-16

    We report the nonlinear focusing of ultrasonic waves by an axisymmetric diffraction grating immersed in water. In the linear regime, the system presents high focal gain (32 dB), with a narrow beam-width and intense side lobes as it is common in focusing by Fresnel-like lenses. Activating the nonlinearity of the host medium by using high amplitude incident waves, the focusing properties of the lens dramatically change. Theoretical predictions show that the focal gain of the system extraordinary increases in the strongly nonlinear regime (Mach number of 6.1 × 10{sup −4}). Particularly, the harmonic generation is locally activated at the focal spot, and the second harmonic beam is characterized by strongly reduced side-lobes and an excellent beam profile as experiments show in agreement with theory. The results can motivate applications in medical therapy or second harmonic imaging.

  4. On accuracy of the wave finite element predictions of wavenumbers and power flow: A benchmark problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søe-Knudsen, Alf; Sorokin, Sergey

    2011-06-01

    This rapid communication is concerned with justification of the 'rule of thumb', which is well known to the community of users of the finite element (FE) method in dynamics, for the accuracy assessment of the wave finite element (WFE) method. An explicit formula linking the size of a window in the dispersion diagram, where the WFE method is trustworthy, with the coarseness of a FE mesh employed is derived. It is obtained by the comparison of the exact Pochhammer-Chree solution for an elastic rod having the circular cross-section with its WFE approximations. It is shown that the WFE power flow predictions are also valid within this window.

  5. Inverse problem for a two-level medium with an inhomgeneously broadened transition in the field of a periodic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabolotskii, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The inverse problem is considered for a spectral problem, which is formally equivalent to a system of Bloch equations for an inhomogeneously broadened transition interacting with the electric field. Two cases are considered to demonstrate that, for any given frequency interval, one can determine the pulse of the shape which corresponds to the interaction with only this frequency interval. In the general case, the pulse shape is described by a nonlinear periodic wave. The first example is the resonance interaction of light with a gas of two-level atoms. The second example is interaction of a linearly polarized light with the molecular J-J transition, where J much-gt 1. In the latter case, the role of inhomogeneous broadening belongs to the frequency shift induced by the applied magnetic field. 10 refs

  6. Tensile Split Hopkinson Bar Technique: Numerical Analysis of the Problem of Wave Disturbance and Specimen Geometry Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panowicz Robert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A method of tensile testing of materials in dynamic conditions based on a slightly modified compressive split Hopkinson bar system using a shoulder is described in this paper. The main goal was to solve, with the use of numerical modelling, the problem of wave disturbance resulting from application of a shoulder, as well as the problem of selecting a specimen geometry that enables to study the phenomenon of high strain-rate failure in tension. It is shown that, in order to prevent any interference of disturbance with the required strain signals at a given recording moment, the positions of the strain gages on the bars have to be correctly chosen for a given experimental setup. Besides, it is demonstrated that - on the basis of simplified numerical analysis - an appropriate gage length and diameter of a material specimen for failure testing in tension can be estimated.

  7. Density-wave oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belblidia, L.A.; Bratianu, C.

    1979-01-01

    Boiling flow in a steam generator, a water-cooled reactor, and other multiphase processes can be subject to instabilities. It appears that the most predominant instabilities are the so-called density-wave oscillations. They can cause difficulties for three main reasons; they may induce burnout; they may cause mechanical vibrations of components; and they create system control problems. A comprehensive review is presented of experimental and theoretical studies concerning density-wave oscillations. (author)

  8. Water Conflicts and Entrenched Governance Problems in Chile’s Market Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl J. Bauer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean system of tradable water rights and water markets has been well known and controversial in international water policy circles since the 1990s. Chile’s 1981 Water Code is a textbook example of neo-liberalism, with strong private property rights and weak government regulation, and the market in water rights has been the dominant theme in debates about Chilean water policy, both nationally and internationally. The Water Code was somewhat reformed in 2005 after over 13 years of political debate. In this paper I review the issues in water policy and politics in Chile during the decade since that reform. What does the ongoing Chilean experience tell us about water privatisation, markets, and commoditisation? Water conflicts have become the essential issue in Chile, rather than water markets. In the past decade conflicts among multiple water users have deepened and widened in many parts of the country, involving river basins and groundwater aquifers. The institutional framework for governing these water conflicts has worked poorly, for a variety of reasons, and the conflicts have become a serious national political problem. I review the evolving political and policy debates in Chile, including the current government’s proposal in 2014 for a new and stronger reform of the Water Code. In short, the critical problem of the Chilean water model is the lack of institutional capacity for governance or integrated water resources management, and the problem has worsened as water conflicts have become closely linked to conflicts in the energy and environmental sectors.

  9. Azimuth cut-off model for significant wave height investigation along coastal water of Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marghany, Maged; Ibrahim, Zelina; Van Genderen, Johan

    2002-11-01

    The present work is used to operationalize the azimuth cut-off concept in the study of significant wave height. Three ERS-1 images have been used along the coastal waters of Terengganu, Malaysia. The quasi-linear transform was applied to map the SAR wave spectra into real ocean wave spectra. The azimuth cut-off was then used to model the significant wave height. The results show that azimuth cut-off varied with the different period of the ERS-1 images. This is because of the fact that the azimuth cut-off is a function of wind speed and significant wave height. It is of interest to find that the significant wave height modeled from azimuth cut-off is in good relation with ground wave conditions. It can be concluded that ERS-1 can be used as a monitoring tool in detecting the significant wave height variation. The azimuth cut-off can be used to model the significant wave height. This means that the quasi-linear transform could be a good application to significant wave height variation during different seasons.

  10. Shock waves and cavitation bubbles in water and isooctane generated by Nd:YAG laser: experimental and theoretical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Milos; Garen, Walter; Koch, Sandra; Marsik, Frantisek; Neu, Walter; Saburov, Eduado

    2004-04-01

    Temporal evolution of laser generated cavitation bubbles and shock waves were studied. Q-switched Nd-Yag laser pulses at 1064 nm are focused into the liquid. An Imager 3 CCD camera with multi exposure mode allows recording of 10 images with minimal exposure delay of 100 ns and minimal exposure time of 100 ns. Illumination is provided by xenon flash lamp for single exposure (shock wave recording) and by halogen lamp for multi exposure mode (bubble recording). Distilled water and a retrograde fluid, isooctane, have been under investigation to identify the differences in the cavitation process and shock wave propagation. The calculation of the shock wave velocities in water and isooctane are based on image recording at constant exposure time of 100 ns and using laser differential interferometry. Strong differences of bubble oscillation were observed in water and isooctane. Gilmore's model is used for numerical simulation of bubble dynamics.

  11. Effective water influx control in gas reservoir development: Problems and countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Feng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of the diversity of geological characteristics and the complexity of percolation rules, many problems are found ineffective water influx control in gas reservoir development. The problems mainly focus on how to understand water influx rules, to establish appropriate countermeasures, and to ensure the effectiveness of technical measures. It is hard to obtain a complete applicable understanding through the isolated analysis of an individual gas reservoir due to many factors such as actual gas reservoir development phase, research work, pertinence and timeliness of measures, and so on. Over the past four decades, the exploration, practicing and tracking research have been conducted on water control in gas reservoir development in the Sichuan Basin, and a series of comprehensive water control technologies were developed integrating advanced concepts, successful experiences, specific theories and mature technologies. Though the development of most water-drive gas reservoirs was significantly improved, water control effects were quite different. Based on this background, from the perspective of the early-phase requirements of water influx control, the influencing factors of a water influx activity, the dynamic analysis method of water influx performance, the optimizing strategy of a water control, and the water control experience of typical gas reservoirs, this paper analyzed the key problems of water control, evaluated the influencing factors of water control effect, explored the practical water control strategies, and proposed that it should be inappropriate to apply the previous water control technological model to actual work but the pertinence should be improved according to actual circumstances. The research results in the paper provide technical reference for the optimization of water-invasion gas reservoir development.

  12. Time adaptivity in the diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan; Radwan, Hany; Dalcí n, Lisandro D.; Calo, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the use of time adaptivity applied to the one dimensional diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations. A simple and computationally economical error estimator is discussed which enables time-step size adaptivity. This robust adaptive time discretization corrects the initial time step size to achieve a user specified bound on the discretization error and allows time step size variations of several orders of magnitude. In particular, the one dimensional results presented in this work feature a change of four orders of magnitudes for the time step over the entire simulation. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Waves in shallow water off west coast of India during the onset of summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Philip, C.S.; Nair, T.N.B.

    and narrowness parameter varies from 0 to 1, and will have smaller values for narrower spectra. Spectral peaked- ness parameter will have higher values for narrow spectra. ε= radicalBigg 1− m 2 2 m0m4 (1) ν= radicalBiggm 0m2 m21 −1 (2) Qp = 2m2 0 integraldisplay.... Mandal, J. C. and Halder, S. R.: Sea breeze like cloud-free zones during monsoon months, Mausam, 43, 163–168, 1992. Massel, S. R.: On the largest wave height in water of constant depth, Ocean Eng., 23, 553–573, 1996. Miles, J.: On the generation...

  14. Corona-like multistreamer discharge in water for cylindrical shock wave generation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prukner, Václav; Koláček, Karel; Schmidt, Jiří; Štraus, Jaroslav; Frolov, Oleksandr; Martínková, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, suppl.B (2006), s. 342-348 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology/22nd./. Praha, 26.6.2006-29.6.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/1324; GA MŠk 1P04LA235 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Shock wave in water * Corona-like multi-streamer discharge Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  15. Time adaptivity in the diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the use of time adaptivity applied to the one dimensional diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations. A simple and computationally economical error estimator is discussed which enables time-step size adaptivity. This robust adaptive time discretization corrects the initial time step size to achieve a user specified bound on the discretization error and allows time step size variations of several orders of magnitude. In particular, the one dimensional results presented in this work feature a change of four orders of magnitudes for the time step over the entire simulation. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Asymptotic analysis for a weakly damped wave equation with application to a problem arising in elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Nguetseng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is devoted to the study of homogenization of the weakly damped wave equation ∫Ωρε∂2uε∂t2(t⋅υdx+2ε2μ∫ΩfεEij(∂uε∂t(tEij(υdx+ε2λ∫Ωfεdiv(∂uε∂t(tdiv υdx+ϑ∫Ωfεdiv(uε(tdivυdx=∫Ωf(t⋅υdx  for all υ=(υ1,υ2,υ3∈Vε(0

  17. Problems with the sources of the observed gravitational waves and their resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgov A.D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent direct registration of gravitational waves by LIGO and astronomical observations of the universe at redshifts 5-10 demonstrate that the standard astrophysics and cosmology are in tension with the data. The origin of the source of the GW150914 event, which presumably is a binary of coalescing black holes with masses about 30 solar masses, each with zero spin, as well as the densely populated universe at z= 5-10 by superheavy black holes, blight galaxies, supernovae, and dust does not fit the standard astrophysical picture. It is shown here that the model of primordial black hole (PBH formation, suggested in 1993, nicely explains all these and more puzzles, including those in contemporary universe, such as MACHOs and the mass spectrum of the observed solar mass black holes.. The mass spectrum and density of PBH is predicted. The scenario may possibly lead to abundant antimatter in the universe and even in the Galaxy.

  18. Problems of reliability and economy work of thermal power plants water treatment based on baromembrane technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichirova, N. D.; Chichirov, A. A.; Saitov, S. R.

    2017-11-01

    The introduction of baromembrane water treatment technologies for water desalination at Russian thermal power plants was beganed more than 25 years ago. These technologies have demonstrated their definite advantage over the traditional technologies of additional water treatment for steam boilers. However, there are problems associated with the reliability and economy of their work. The first problem is a large volume of waste water (up to 60% of the initial water). The second problem a expensive and unique chemical reagents complex (biocides, antiscalants, washing compositions) is required for units stable and troublefree operation. Each manufacturer develops his own chemical composition for a certain membrane type. This leads to a significant increase in reagents cost, as well as creates dependence of the technology consumer on the certain supplier. The third problem is that the reliability of the baromembrane units depends directly on the water preliminary treatment. The popular pre-cleaning technology with coagulation of aluminum oxychloride proves to be unacceptable during seasonal changes in the quality of the source water at a number of stations. As a result, pollution, poisoning and lesion of the membrane structure or deterioration of their mechanical properties are observed. The report presents ways to solve these problems.

  19. A Model Predictive Control-Based Power Converter System for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimara Rajapakse

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the predictability and availability at large scale, wave energy conversion (WEC has still not become a mainstream renewable energy technology. One of the main reasons is the large variations in the extracted power which could lead to instabilities in the power grid. In addition, maintaining the speed of the turbine within optimal range under changing wave conditions is another control challenge, especially in oscillating water column (OWC type WEC systems. As a solution to the first issue, this paper proposes the direct connection of a battery bank into the dc-link of the back-to-back power converter system, thereby smoothening the power delivered to the grid. For the second issue, model predictive controllers (MPCs are developed for the rectifier and the inverter of the back-to-back converter system aiming to maintain the turbine speed within its optimum range. In addition, MPC controllers are designed to control the battery current as well, in both charging and discharging conditions. Operations of the proposed battery direct integration scheme and control solutions are verified through computer simulations. Simulation results show that the proposed integrated energy storage and control solutions are capable of delivering smooth power to the grid while maintaining the turbine speed within its optimum range under varying wave conditions.

  20. New Development in Greenhouse Technology can Mitigate the Water Shortage Problem of the 21st Century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van O.; Heuvelink, E.; Stanghellini, C.

    2008-01-01

    The world's fresh accessible water situation is deteriorating at a dismal pace. Though the situation is already quite dramatic in Africa, the near future will bring us great problems in Asia as well, considering the pace at which the population is growing and the rise in water use per capita as the

  1. Using underground mine Karst water to solve water supply problem in underground mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. [Wanbei Mining Administration (China). Liuqiao No. 2 Mine

    1995-05-01

    There is a very rich karst water resource under the Liuqiao No. 2 underground mine. Under normal mining conditions the drainage is 546 m{sup 3}/h while the maximum drainage is up to 819 m{sup 3}/h. If water inrush occurred from a broken zone of a fault or a sinkhole of the karst, the flow could be up to 3269 m{sup 3}/h. The karst water is of good quality and high in pressure. The water head pressure at -400 m level is about 3.5 MPa. To save mine construction cost, it was decided that the water supply for coal production equipment, mining operation and mine fire control was to be changed from the surface to the underground by drilling a water well to tap the karst water resource. A water well with a depth of 63.3 m was drilled in the -400 m transportation roadway. The diameter of the well is 127 mm and it has a casing pipe with a diameter of 108 mm which is connected to the water supply pipeline. The pressure of the water supply is measured at 23.5 MPa and the water flow rate is 252 m{sup 3}/h. The establishment of the water supply system has achieved great cost saving for Liuqiao No. 2 Mine. 2 figs.

  2. Analisa Kinerja Pneumatic Wave Energy Converter (WEC Dengan Menggunakan Oscillating Water Column(OWC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Ary Sona

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sistem konversi energi gelombang laut merupakan sistem yang menangkap energi gelombang laut untuk dikonversi menjadi energi lain seperti energi listrik. Salah satu jenis wave energy converter (WEC yang banyak digunakan diantaranya yaitu Oscillating Water Columnatau OWC. Prinsip kerja sistem WEC ini ialah mengubah pergerakan naik turunnya gelombang pada silinder kolom udara untuk menghasilkan udara bertekanan yang selanjutnya digunakan untuk menggerakkan turbin dan generator listrik. Penelitian ini ditujukan untuk dapat mengetahui kinerja dari Oscillating Water Column (OWC dalam menangkap energi gelombang laut. Untuk dapat melakukan penelitian ini diperlukan beberapa perlatan yaitu pembuatan konfigurasi peralatan pembuat dan penangkapan gelombang yang terdiri dari pelampung dan silinder Oscillating Water Column (OWC. Percobaan ini dilakukan dengan cara memvariasikan panjang dan tinggi gelombang pada flow water channel dengan mengatur bukaan pada pneumatic speed control. Dari hasil percobaan diperoleh bahwa kinerja paling efektif diperoleh pada panjang gelombang 0.9 m dan tinggi gelombang 0.23m. Pada karakteristik gelombang tersebut diperoleh tekanan, kecepatan dan volume pada silinder Oscillating Water Column (OWC sebesar  1.11 bar, 39.39 m/s dan 0.0057 m3. Dari hasil percobaan juga diperoleh waktu pengisian Pressure Vessel selama 100 menit dengan tekanan 3 Psi.

  3. Numerical study of the air-flow in an oscillating water column wave energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paixao Conde, J.M. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, New University of Lisbon, Monte de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); IDMEC, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Gato, L.M.C. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2008-12-15

    The paper presents a numerical study of the air-flow in a typical pneumatic chamber geometry of an oscillating water column (OWC)-type wave energy converter (WEC), equipped with two vertical-axis air turbines, asymmetrically placed on the top of the chamber. Outwards and inwards, steady and periodic, air-flow calculations were performed to investigate the flow distribution at the turbines' inlet sections, as well as the properties of the air-jet impinging on the water free-surface. The original design of the OWC chamber is likely to be harmful for the operation of the turbines due to the possible air-jet-produced water-spray at the water free-surface subsequently ingested by the turbine. A geometry modification of the air chamber, using a horizontal baffle-plate to deflect the air from the turbines, is proposed and proved to be very effective in reducing the risk of water-spray production from the inwards flow. The flow distribution at the turbines' inlet sections for the outwards flow was found to be fairly uniform for the geometries considered, providing good inlet flow conditions for the turbines. Steady flow was found to be an acceptable model to study the air-flow inside the pneumatic chamber of an OWC-WEC. (author)

  4. Agradient velocity, vortical motion and gravity waves in a rotating shallow-water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutyrin Georgi, G.

    2004-07-01

    A new approach to modelling slow vortical motion and fast inertia-gravity waves is suggested within the rotating shallow-water primitive equations with arbitrary topography. The velocity is exactly expressed as a sum of the gradient wind, described by the Bernoulli function,B, and the remaining agradient part, proportional to the velocity tendency. Then the equation for inverse potential vorticity,Q, as well as momentum equations for agradient velocity include the same source of intrinsic flow evolution expressed as a single term J (B, Q), where J is the Jacobian operator (for any steady state J (B, Q) = 0). Two components of agradient velocity are responsible for the fast inertia-gravity wave propagation similar to the traditionally used divergence and ageostrophic vorticity. This approach allows for the construction of balance relations for vortical dynamics and potential vorticity inversion schemes even for moderate Rossby and Froude numbers assuming the characteristic value of |J(B, Q)| = to be small. The components of agradient velocity are used as the fast variables slaved to potential vorticity that allows for diagnostic estimates of the velocity tendency, the direct potential vorticity inversion with the accuracy of 2 and the corresponding potential vorticity-conserving agradient velocity balance model (AVBM). The ultimate limitations of constructing the balance are revealed in the form of the ellipticity condition for balanced tendency of the Bernoulli function which incorporates both known criteria of the formal stability: the gradient wind modified by the characteristic vortical Rossby wave phase speed should be subcritical. The accuracy of the AVBM is illustrated by considering the linear normal modes and coastal Kelvin waves in the f-plane channel with topography.

  5. Landslide/reservoir interaction: 3D numerical modelling of the Vajont rockslide and generated water wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, G.; Imposimato, S.; Roddeman, D.; Frattini, P.

    2012-04-01

    Fast moving landslides can be originated along slopes in mountainous terrains with natural and artificial lakes, or fjords at the slope foot. This landslides can reach extremely high speed and the impact with the immobile reservoir water can be influenced by the local topography and the landslide mass profile. The impact can generate large impulse waves and landslide tsunami. Initiation, propagation and runup are the three phases that need to be considered. The landslide evolution and the consequent wave can be controlled by the initial mass position (subaerial, partially or completely submerged), the landslide speed, the type of material, the subaerial and subaqueous slope geometry, the landslide depth and length at the impact, and the water depth. Extreme events have been caused by subaerial landslides: the 1963 Vajont rockslide (Italy), the 1958 Lituya Bay event (Alaska), the Tafjord and the Loen multiple events event (Norway), also from volcanic collapses (Hawaii and Canary islands). Various researchers completed a systematic experimental work on 2D and 3D wave generation and propagation (Kamphuis and Bowering, 1970; Huber, 1980; Müller, 1995; Huber and Hager, 1997; Fritz, 2002; Zweifel, 2004; Panizzo et al., 2005; Heller, 2007; Heller and Kinnear, 2010; Sælevik et al., 2009), using both rigid blocks and deformable granular" masses. Model data and results have been used to calibrate and validate numerical modelling tools (Harbitz, 1992; Jiang and LeBlond, 1993; Grilli et al., 2002; Grilli and Watts, 2005; Lynett and Liu, 2005; Tinti et al., 2006; Abadie et al., 2010) generally considering simplified rheologies (e.g. viscous rheologies) for subaerial subaqueous spreading. We use a FEM code (Roddeman, 2011; Crosta et al., 2006, 2009, 2010, 2011) adopting an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach to give accurate results for large deformations. We model both 2D and fully 3D events considering different settings. The material is considered as a fully deformable elasto

  6. RESOLUTION OF THE PROBLEM OF TREATMENT OF WASTE WATER GENERATED BY CAR WASHES AND TRANSPORT ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogina Elena Sergeevna

    2012-12-01

    big cities of Russia. At the same time, the quality of the waste water treated by local water treatment stations fails to meet the present-day standard requirements. Moreover, potable water shall not be used for the purpose of washing transport vehicles. Within the recent 10 years, MGSU has developed a number of research projects aimed at the resolution of this problem. The concept developed by the MGSU specialists is to attain the highest quality of treated waste water generated by car washes and transport enterprises using the most advanced technologies of water treatment rather than to design new water treatment plants. Various methods may be applied for this purpose: restructuring of water treatment facilities, advanced feed, updated regulations governing the operation of water treatment plants.

  7. Using the Multilayer Free-Surface Flow Model to Solve Wave Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokof’ev, V. A., E-mail: ProkofyevVA@vniig.ru [B. E. Vedeneev All-Russia Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG) (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    A method is presented for changing over from a single-layer shallow-water model to a multilayer model with hydrostatic pressure profile and, then, to a multilayer model with nonhydrostatic pressure profile. The method does not require complex procedures for solving the discrete Poisson’s equation and features high computation efficiency. The results of validating the algorithm against experimental data critical for the numerical dissipation of the numerical scheme are presented. Examples are considered.

  8. Water chemistry related problems in captive power plant of Heavy Water Plant [Manuguru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasada Rao, G.; Mohapatra, C.

    2000-01-01

    This study is intended to improve the power generating capacity of Turbo Generator-3 in CPP. It was observed that steam flow through TG-3 was not as per rated; however there were no abnormal vibrations. After stopping and opening the turbine, deposits were found on turbine blade. Turbine blade scales were analysed for all the stages, HP, middle, LP, casings. Boiler drum water, feed water, DM water, filter water chemistry were studied. LP blade scale mainly consists of silica, whereas HP blade scale consists of iron oxide, sodium phosphate, silica etc. It was concluded that less generating capacity of power was because of scaling on turbine blade. (author)

  9. Piping benchmark problems for the General Electric Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J.; Wang, Y.K.

    1993-08-01

    To satisfy the need for verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boiling water reactor standard design, three benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set

  10. Evolution, opportunity and challenges of transboundary water and energy problems in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lidan; Zhou, Haiwei; Xia, Ziqiang; Huang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Central Asia is one of the regions that suffer the most prominent transboundary water and energy problems in the world. Effective transboundary water-energy resource management and cooperation are closely related with socioeconomic development and stability in the entire Central Asia. Similar to Central Asia, Northwest China has an arid climate and is experiencing a water shortage. It is now facing imbalanced supply-demand relations of water and energy resources. These issues in Northwest China and Central Asia pose severe challenges in the implementation of the Silk Road Economic Belt strategy. Based on the analysis of water and energy distribution characteristics in Central Asia as well as demand characteristics of different countries, the complexity of local transboundary water problems was explored by reviewing corresponding historical problems of involved countries, correlated energy issues, and the evolution of inter-country water-energy cooperation. With references to experiences and lessons of five countries, contradictions, opportunities, challenges and strategies for transboundary water-energy cooperation between China and Central Asia were discussed under the promotion of the Silk Road Economic Belt construction based on current cooperation conditions.

  11. The effects of pressure, temperature, and pore water on velocities in Westerly granite. [for seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. W., Jr.; Nur, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of an experimental assembly which has been developed to conduct concurrent measurements of compressional and shear wave velocities in rocks at high temperatures and confining pressures and with independent control of the pore pressure. The apparatus was used in studies of the joint effects of temperature, external confining pressure, and internal pore water on sonic velocities in Westerly granite. It was found that at a given temperature, confining pressure has a larger accelerating effect on compressional waves in dry rock, whereas at a given confining pressure, temperature has a larger retarding effect on shear waves.

  12. Numerical hydrodynamic analysis of an offshore stationary–floating oscillating water column–wave energy converter using CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elhanafi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Offshore oscillating water columns (OWC represent one of the most promising forms of wave energy converters. The hydrodynamic performance of such converters heavily depends on their interactions with ocean waves; therefore, understanding these interactions is essential. In this paper, a fully nonlinear 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD model based on RANS equations and VOF surface capturing scheme is implemented to carry out wave energy balance analyses for an offshore OWC. The numerical model is well validated against published physical measurements including; chamber differential air pressure, chamber water level oscillation and vertical velocity, overall wave energy extraction efficiency, reflected and transmitted waves, velocity and vorticity fields (PIV measurements. Following the successful validation work, an extensive campaign of numerical tests is performed to quantify the relevance of three design parameters, namely incoming wavelength, wave height and turbine damping to the device hydrodynamic performance and wave energy conversion process. All of the three investigated parameters show important effects on the wave–pneumatic energy conversion chain. In addition, the flow field around the chamber's front wall indicates areas of energy losses by stronger vortices generation than the rear wall.

  13. Response of water temperature to surface wave effects in the Baltic Sea: simulations with the coupled NEMO-WAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari, Victor; Staneva, Joanna; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian; Janssen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The effects of wind waves on the Baltic Sea water temperature has been studied by coupling the hydrodynamical model NEMO with the wave model WAM. The wave forcing terms that have been taken into consideration are: Stokes-Coriolis force, seastate dependent energy flux and sea-state dependent momentum flux. The combined role of these processes as well as their individual contributions on simulated temperature is analysed. The results indicate a pronounced effect of waves on surface temperature, on the distribution of vertical temperature and on upwellinǵs. In northern parts of the Baltic Sea a warming of the surface layer occurs in the wave included simulations. This in turn reduces the cold bias between simulated and measured data. The warming is primarily caused by sea-state dependent energy flux. Wave induced cooling is mostly observed in near coastal areas and is mainly due to Stokes-Coriolis forcing. The latter triggers effect of intensifying upwellings near the coasts, depending on the direction of the wind. The effect of sea-state dependent momentum flux is predominantly to warm the surface layer. During the summer the wave induced water temperature changes were up to 1 °C.

  14. Topology optimization applied to room acoustic problems and surface acoustic wave devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    can be minimized either by distribution of reflecting material in a design domain along the ceiling or by distribution of absorbing and reflecting material along all the walls for both 2D and 3D problems. It is also shown how the method can be used to design sound barriers. The main part...... in order to optimize more complicated SAW structures such as acoustic horns which focus the SAWs to a small area. [1] M. P. Bendsøe, O. Sigmund, “Topology optimization, theory, methods and applications”, Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2nd edition, (2003). ISBN 3-540-42992-1. [2] J. S. Jensen......, Berlin, (2000). ISBN 3-540-67232-X. [5] M. M. de Lima Jr and P. V. Santos, “Modulation of photonic structures by surface acoustic waves”, Rep. Prog. Phys., 68 1639-1701 (2005)...

  15. On the classification of the spectrally stable standing waves of the Hartree problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Vladimir; Stefanov, Atanas

    2018-05-01

    We consider the fractional Hartree model, with general power non-linearity and arbitrary spatial dimension. We construct variationally the "normalized" solutions for the corresponding Choquard-Pekar model-in particular a number of key properties, like smoothness and bell-shapedness are established. As a consequence of the construction, we show that these solitons are spectrally stable as solutions to the time-dependent Hartree model. In addition, we analyze the spectral stability of the Moroz-Van Schaftingen solitons of the classical Hartree problem, in any dimensions and power non-linearity. A full classification is obtained, the main conclusion of which is that only and exactly the "normalized" solutions (which exist only in a portion of the range) are spectrally stable.

  16. On turning waves for the inhomogeneous Muskat problem: a computer-assisted proof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Serrano, Javier; Granero-Belinchón, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    We exhibit a family of graphs that develop turning singularities (i.e. their Lipschitz seminorm blows up and they cease to be a graph, passing from the stable to the unstable regime) for the inhomogeneous, two-phase Muskat problem where the permeability is given by a nonnegative step function. We study the influence of different choices of the permeability and different boundary conditions (both at infinity and considering finite/infinite depth) in the development or prevention of singularities for short time. In the general case (inhomogeneous, confined) we prove a bifurcation diagram concerning the appearance or not of singularities when the depth of the medium and the permeabilities change. The proofs are carried out using a combination of classical analysis techniques and computer-assisted verification. (paper)

  17. Problems with provision: barriers to drinking water quality and public health in rural Tasmania, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Jessica J; Willis, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Access to safe drinking water is essential to human life and wellbeing, and is a key public health issue. However, many communities in rural and regional parts of Australia are unable to access drinking water that meets national standards for protecting human health. The aim of this research was to identify the key issues in and barriers to the provision and management of safe drinking water in rural Tasmania, Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with key local government employees and public health officials responsible for management of drinking water in rural Tasmania. Participants were asked about their core public health duties, regulatory responsibilities, perceptions and management of risk, as well as the key barriers that may be affecting the provision of safe drinking water. This research highlights the effect of rural locality on management and safety of fresh water in protecting public health. The key issues contributing to problems with drinking water provision and quality identified by participants included: poor and inadequate water supply infrastructure; lack of resources and staffing; inadequate catchment monitoring; and the effect of competing land uses, such as forestry, on water supply quality. This research raises issues of inequity in the provision of safe drinking water in rural communities. It highlights not only the increasing need for greater funding by state and commonwealth government for basic services such as drinking water, but also the importance of an holistic and integrated approach to managing drinking water resources in rural Tasmania.

  18. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    wavelength, they are called shallow water waves. In the ... Deep and intermediate water waves are dispersive as the velocity of these depends on wavelength. This is not the ..... generation processes, the finite amplitude wave theories are very ...

  19. Effects of wind-wave disturbances on adsorption and desorption of tetracycline and sulfadimidine in water-sediment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qianjiahua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Shu; Wang, Yi; Liu, Yuqing; Luo, Ran; Shang, Jingge

    2018-05-28

    Wind-wave disturbances frequently disperse sediment particles into overlying water, which facilitates the adsorption and desorption of contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. Tetracycline (TC) and sulfadimidine (SM2) are common antibiotics that are frequently found in aquatic environments. This study utilized microcosms, comprising sediment and water from Lake Taihu, China, to examine the adsorption and desorption of TC and SM2 under different wind-wave disturbances in a shallow lake environment. The adsorption experiments were conducted with three different concentrations (1, 5, 10 mg/L) of TC and SM2 in the overlying water, and two different (background and strong) wind-wave conditions for 72 h. Subsequently, four microcosms were employed in a 12-h desorption study. Analysis of adsorption progress showed that TC concentration in the overlying water decreased quickly, while SM2 remained almost constant. In the desorption experiments, SM2 released to the overlying water was an order of magnitude greater than TC. These results indicate that sediment particles strongly adsorb TC but weakly adsorb SM2. Compared to background conditions, the strong wind-wave conditions resulted in higher concentrations of TC and SM2 in sediment and facilitated their migration to deeper sediment during adsorption, correspondingly promoting greater release of TC and SM2 from sediment particles into the overlying water during desorption.

  20. Directionality and spread of shallow water waves along the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anoop, T.R.

    , at http://www.cdc.noaa.gov/. 4 Results and discussions 4.1 Wave directional spreading For long-crested waves, the value of directional width is 0◦, and as the waves become short-crested, the value increases and the wave directional spreading increases...

  1. Interaction between Water Borne Waves and Seismic Waves in the Ocean Bottom: The Forward- and Inverse Problem,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-15

    Petroleum Directorate for supplying- and giving consent to publish the shot data. The financial travel support given by the Royal Norwegian Council for...9i 4CY - 30 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 A 0 0 0 0 140R. 4AVENUMERC i/Mi Figure 3. 17: F-k diagram for shot number 100. A: surfi.sc ,nt linear salp

  2. Detection of elastic waves for the leakage locating of underground water supply pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Sup; Yoon, Dong Jin; Jeong, Jung Chae; Lee, Seung Seok

    2003-01-01

    Leaks in underground pipelines can cause social, environmental and economical problems. One of a good countermeasures of leaks is to find and repair of leak points of pipes. Leak noise is a good source to identify the location of leak points of pipelines. Although there have been several methods to detect the leak location with leak noise, such as listening rods, hydrophones or ground microphones, they were not so efficient tools. In this paper, two accelerometers are used to detect leak locations which could provide an easier and efficient method. The filtering, signal processing and algorithm is described for the detection of leak location. A 120 m-long pipeline system for experiment is installed and the results with the system show that the algorithm with the two accelerometers gives very accurate pinpointing of leaks. Theoretical analysis of sound wave propagation speed in underground pipes is also described.

  3. Detection of elastic waves for the leakage locating of underground water supply pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Sup; Yoon, Dong Jin; Jeong, Jung Chae; Lee, Seung Seok

    2003-01-01

    Leaks in underground pipelines can cause social, environmental and economical problems. One of a good countermeasures of leaks is to find and repair of leak points of pipes. Leak noise is good source to identify the location of leak points of pipelines. Although there have been several methods to detect the leak location with leak noise, such as listening rods, hydrophones or ground microphones, they were not so efficient tools. In this paper, two accelerometers are used to detect leak locations which could provide an easier and efficient method. The filtering signal processing and algorithm is described for the detection of leak location. A 120 m-long pipeline system for experiment is installed and the results with the system show that the algorithm with the two accelerometers gives very accurate pinpointing of leaks. Theoretical analysis of sound wave propagation speed in underground pipes is also described.

  4. Measurement on the effect of sound wave in upper plenum of boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Kosuke; Someya, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koji

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the power uprate of Boiling Water Reactors have been conducted at several existing power plants as a way to improve plant economy. In one of the power uprated plants (117.8% uprates) in the United States, the steam dryer breakages due to fatigue fracture occurred. It is conceivable that the increased steam flow passing through the branches caused a self-induced vibration with the propagation of sound wave into the steam-dome. The resonance among the structure, flow and the pressure fluctuation resulted in the breakages. To understand the basic mechanism of the resonance, previous researches were done by a point measurement of the pressure and by a phase averaged measurement of the flow, while it was difficult to detect the interaction among them by the conventional method. In this study, Dynamic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) System was applied to investigate the effect of sound on natural convection and forced convection. Especially, when the phases of acoustic sources were different, various acoustic wave effects were checked. (author)

  5. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of

  6. Enhanced intelligent water drops algorithm for multi-depot vehicle routing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezugwu, Absalom E; Akutsah, Francis; Olusanya, Micheal O; Adewumi, Aderemi O

    2018-01-01

    The intelligent water drop algorithm is a swarm-based metaheuristic algorithm, inspired by the characteristics of water drops in the river and the environmental changes resulting from the action of the flowing river. Since its appearance as an alternative stochastic optimization method, the algorithm has found applications in solving a wide range of combinatorial and functional optimization problems. This paper presents an improved intelligent water drop algorithm for solving multi-depot vehicle routing problems. A simulated annealing algorithm was introduced into the proposed algorithm as a local search metaheuristic to prevent the intelligent water drop algorithm from getting trapped into local minima and also improve its solution quality. In addition, some of the potential problematic issues associated with using simulated annealing that include high computational runtime and exponential calculation of the probability of acceptance criteria, are investigated. The exponential calculation of the probability of acceptance criteria for the simulated annealing based techniques is computationally expensive. Therefore, in order to maximize the performance of the intelligent water drop algorithm using simulated annealing, a better way of calculating the probability of acceptance criteria is considered. The performance of the proposed hybrid algorithm is evaluated by using 33 standard test problems, with the results obtained compared with the solutions offered by four well-known techniques from the subject literature. Experimental results and statistical tests show that the new method possesses outstanding performance in terms of solution quality and runtime consumed. In addition, the proposed algorithm is suitable for solving large-scale problems.

  7. Perceived health problems in swimmers according to the chemical treatment of water in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Luna, Álvaro; Burillo, Pablo; Felipe, José Luis; del Corral, Julio; García-Unanue, Jorge; Gallardo, Leonor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine which chemical treatment used for disinfecting water in indoor swimming pools had the least impact on users' perceptions of health problems, and which generated the greatest satisfaction with the quality of the water. A survey on satisfaction and perceived health problems was given to 1001 users at 20 indoor swimming pools which used different water treatment methods [chlorine, bromine, ozone, ultraviolet lamps (UV) and salt electrolysis]. The findings suggest that there is a greater probability of perceived health problems, such as eye and skin irritation, respiratory problems and skin dryness, in swimming pools treated with chlorine than in swimming pools using other chemical treatment methods. Pools treated with bromine have similar, although slightly better, results. Other factors, such as age, gender, time of day of use (morning and afternoon) and type of user (competitive and recreational), can also affect the probability of suffering health problems. For all of the above, using combined treatment methods as ozone and UV, or salt electrolysis produces a lower probability of perceived health problems and greater satisfaction.

  8. Optimal Water-Power Flow Problem: Formulation and Distributed Optimal Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall-Anese, Emiliano [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhao, Changhong [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zamzam, Admed S. [University of Minnesota; Sidiropoulos, Nicholas D. [University of Minnesota; Taylor, Josh A. [University of Toronto

    2018-01-12

    This paper formalizes an optimal water-power flow (OWPF) problem to optimize the use of controllable assets across power and water systems while accounting for the couplings between the two infrastructures. Tanks and pumps are optimally managed to satisfy water demand while improving power grid operations; {for the power network, an AC optimal power flow formulation is augmented to accommodate the controllability of water pumps.} Unfortunately, the physics governing the operation of the two infrastructures and coupling constraints lead to a nonconvex (and, in fact, NP-hard) problem; however, after reformulating OWPF as a nonconvex, quadratically-constrained quadratic problem, a feasible point pursuit-successive convex approximation approach is used to identify feasible and optimal solutions. In addition, a distributed solver based on the alternating direction method of multipliers enables water and power operators to pursue individual objectives while respecting the couplings between the two networks. The merits of the proposed approach are demonstrated for the case of a distribution feeder coupled with a municipal water distribution network.

  9. Numerical modelling of disintegration of basin-scale internal waves in a tank filled with stratified water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Stashchuk

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of numerical experiments performed with the use of a fully non-linear non-hydrostatic numerical model to study the baroclinic response of a long narrow tank filled with stratified water to an initially tilted interface. Upon release, the system starts to oscillate with an eigen frequency corresponding to basin-scale baroclinic gravitational seiches. Field observations suggest that the disintegration of basin-scale internal waves into packets of solitary waves, shear instabilities, billows and spots of mixed water are important mechanisms for the transfer of energy within stratified lakes. Laboratory experiments performed by D. A. Horn, J. Imberger and G. N. Ivey (JFM, 2001 reproduced several regimes, which include damped linear waves and solitary waves. The generation of billows and shear instabilities induced by the basin-scale wave was, however, not sufficiently studied. The developed numerical model computes a variety of flows, which were not observed with the experimental set-up. In particular, the model results showed that under conditions of low dissipation, the regimes of billows and supercritical flows may transform into a solitary wave regime. The obtained results can help in the interpretation of numerous observations of mixing processes in real lakes.

  10. Observation of skull-guided acoustic waves in a water-immersed murine skull using optoacoustic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The skull bone, a curved solid multilayered plate protecting the brain, constitutes a big challenge for the use of ultrasound-mediated techniques in neuroscience. Ultrasound waves incident from water or soft biological tissue are mostly reflected when impinging on the skull. To this end, skull properties have been characterized for both high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) operating in the narrowband far-field regime and optoacoustic imaging applications. Yet, no study has been conducted to characterize the near-field of water immersed skulls. We used the thermoelastic effect with a 532 nm pulsed laser to trigger a wide range of broad-band ultrasound modes in a mouse skull. In order to capture the waves propagating in the near-field, a thin hydrophone was scanned in close proximity to the skull's surface. While Leaky pseudo-Lamb waves and grazing-angle bulk water waves are clearly visible in the spatio-temporal data, we were only able to identify skull-guided acoustic waves after dispersion analysis in the wavenumber-frequency space. The experimental data was found to be in a reasonable agreement with a flat multilayered plate model.

  11. Modeling Water Motion near Seismic Waves Propagating across a Graded Seabed, as Generated by Man-Made Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Hazelwood

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismic interface waves generated by seabed impacts are believed to have biological importance. Various wave types are of interest to seismologists, who can minimize the unwanted, but often dominant, ground roll waves with suitable instrumentation. Waves made by dredging and piling have been measured using geophones and found to be of this interface type, which propagate much more slowly than the pressure waves in the water column above. Short interface wavelets of a few cycles were modeled using transient finite element analysis (FEA. Wavelets with low losses have been modeled using graded sediment data from the literature. They do not radiate energy away from the interface because the evanescent acoustic pressures they generate decay rapidly with distance from the seabed. Associated water particle velocities are much greater than would be expected from similar acoustic pressure measurements in a free field. This motion is significant to aquatic life which is dependent on inertial sensors (otoliths, etc. to respond to the environment. Additional amplification of the horizontal seabed motion of the adjacent water is predicted for a short seismic wavelet modeled in a graded solid seabed. Further recent analysis studied the distribution of the energy flux within the sediment layers.

  12. Iterative solution to the optimal poison management problem in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, J.P.; Levine, S.H.; Lewis, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for solving the optimal poison management problem for a multiregion pressurized water reactor has been developed. The optimization objective is to maximize the end-of-cycle core excess reactivity for any given beginning-of-cycle fuel loading. The problem is treated as an optimal control problem with the region burnup and control absorber concentrations acting as the state and control variables, respectively. Constraints are placed on the power peaking, soluble boron concentration, and control absorber concentrations. The solution method consists of successive relinearizations of the system equations resulting in a sequence of nonlinear programming problems whose solutions converge to the desired optimal control solution. Application of the method to several test problems based on a simplified three-region reactor suggests a bang-bang optimal control strategy with the peak power location switching between the inner and outer regions of the core and the critical soluble boron concentration as low as possible throughout the cycle

  13. Application of nanotechnologies for solving ecological problems on produced water utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajiyev, S.K.; Kalbaliyeva, E.S.; Kazimov, F.K.

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of produced water is connected with the problems of its purification, repeated use and following the corresponding ecological requirements.Constant growth of the amount of produced water in extracted fluid and contaminating components require improvement of existing methods of utilization and development of advanced technologies. In the result of development of nanocomposites on the base of metallic nanoparticles it has been achieved significant improvement of purification efficiency of produced water, as well as decrease of surface tension, viscosity, increase of corrosion resistance and protection against salt deposition.

  14. Water-wave diffraction and radiation by multiple three-dimensional bodies over a mild-slope bottom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Pau Mercadé; Ferri, Francesco; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •A tool to model wave diffraction and radiation in mild-slope bottoms is proposed. •The tool combines a mild-slope equation model with diffraction transfer matrices. •The tool predictions are verified against analytical solutions for two test problems....

  15. Roy-Steiner equations for {pi}N scattering - The Muskhelishvili-Omnes problem for the t-channel partial waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditsche, Christoph; Hoferichter, Martin; Kubis, Bastian [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Meissner, Ulf G. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik (Theorie), Institute for Advanced Simulations, and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Starting from (subtracted) hyperbolic dispersion relations for {pi}N scattering, which are based on the general principles of Lorentz invariance, unitarity, crossing and analyticity as well as isospin symmetry, we propose a closed system of (subtracted) hyperbolic partial wave dispersion relations for the partial waves f{sup I}{sub l{+-}}({radical}(s)) of the s-channel reaction {pi}N{yields}{pi}N and the partial waves f{sup J}{sub {+-}}(t) of the t-channel reaction {pi}{pi}{yields} anti NN in the spirit of Roy and Steiner. A key step to the ultimate goal of solving this Roy-Steiner system is to first solve the corresponding (subtracted) Muskhelishvili-Omnes problem with inelasticities and a finite matching point for the lowest t-channel partial waves f{sup 0}{sub +}(t), f{sup 1}{sub {+-}}(t). The recent status of this ongoing effort is presented.

  16. REUSE OF TREATED WASTEWATER IN AGRICULTURE: SOLVING WATER DEFICIT PROBLEMS IN ARID AREAS (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faissal AZIZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the arid and semiarid areas, the availability and the management of irrigation water have become priorities of great importance. The successive years of drought, induced by climate change and population growth, increasingly reduced the amount of water reserved for agriculture. Consequently, many countries have included wastewater reuse as an important dimension of water resources planning. In the more arid areas wastewater is used in agriculture, releasing high resource of water supplies. In this context, the present work is a review focusing the reuse of treated wastewater in agriculture as an important strategy for solving water deficit problems in arid areas. Much information concerning the wastewater reuse in different regions of the world and in Morocco, the different wastewater treatment technologies existing in Morocco were discussed. The review focused also the fertilizing potential of wastewater in agriculture, the role of nutrients and their concentrations in wastewater and their advantages effects on plant growth and yield.

  17. An Instructors Guide to Water Pollution. Test Edition. AAAS Study Guides on Contemporary Problems, No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, David E.

    This is one of several study guides on contemporary problems produced by the American Association for the Advancement of Science with support of the National Science Foundation. This study guide on water pollution includes the following units: (1) Overview of World Pollution; (2) History, Definition, Criteria; (3) Ecosystem Theory; (4) Biological…

  18. Triple Value System Dynamics Modeling to Help Stakeholders Engage with Food-Energy-Water Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triple Value (3V) Community scoping projects and Triple Value Simulation (3VS) models help decision makers and stakeholders apply systems-analysis methodology to complex problems related to food production, water quality, and energy use. 3VS models are decision support tools that...

  19. Possibilities of mathematical models in solving flow problems in environmental protection and water architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The booklet presents the full text of 13 contributions to a Colloquium held at Karlsruhe in Sept. 1979. The main topics of the papers are the evaluation of mathematical models to solve flow problems in tide water, seas, rivers, groundwater and in the earth atmosphere. See further hints under relevant topics.

  20. Quadratic head loss approximations for optimisation problems in water supply networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pecci, Filippo; Abraham, E.; I, Stoianov

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel analysis of the accuracy of quadratic approximations for the Hazen–Williams (HW) head loss formula, which enables the control of constraint violations in optimisation problems for water supply networks. The two smooth polynomial approximations considered here minimise the

  1. Indirect boundary element method for three dimensional problems. Analytical solution for contribution to wave field by triangular element; Sanjigen kansetsu kyokai yosoho. Sankakukei yoso no kiyo no kaisekikai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoi, T [Building Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Sanchez-Sesma, F [Universidad National Autonoma de Mexico, (Mexico). Institute de Ingenieria

    1997-05-27

    Formulation is introduced for discretizing a boundary integral equation into an indirect boundary element method for the solution of 3-dimensional topographic problems. Yokoi and Takenaka propose an analytical solution-capable reference solution (solution for the half space elastic body with flat free surface) to problems of topographic response to seismic motion in a 2-dimensional in-plane field. That is to say, they propose a boundary integral equation capable of effectively suppressing the non-physical waves that emerge in the result of computation in the wake of the truncation of the discretized ground surface making use of the wave field in a semi-infinite elastic body with flat free surface. They apply the proposed boundary integral equation discretized into the indirect boundary element method to solve some examples, and succeed in proving its validity. In this report, the equation is expanded to deal with 3-dimensional topographic problems. A problem of a P-wave vertically landing on a flat and free surface is solved by the conventional boundary integral equation and the proposed boundary integral equation, and the solutions are compared with each other. It is found that the new method, different from the conventional one, can delete non-physical waves from the analytical result. 4 figs.

  2. Design and operation problems related to water curtain system for underground water-sealed oil storage caverns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongkui Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The underground water-sealed storage technique is critically important and generally accepted for the national energy strategy in China. Although several small underground water-sealed oil storage caverns have been built in China since the 1970s, there is still a lack of experience for large-volume underground storage in complicated geological conditions. The current design concept of water curtain system and the technical instruction for system operation have limitations in maintaining the stability of surrounding rock mass during the construction of the main storage caverns, as well as the long-term stability. Although several large-scale underground oil storage projects are under construction at present in China, the design concepts and construction methods, especially for the water curtain system, are mainly based on the ideal porosity medium flow theory and the experiences gained from the similar projects overseas. The storage projects currently constructed in China have the specific features such as huge scale, large depth, multiple-level arrangement, high seepage pressure, complicated geological conditions, and high in situ stresses, which are the challenging issues for the stability of the storage caverns. Based on years' experiences obtained from the first large-scale (millions of cubic meters underground water-sealed oil storage project in China, some design and operation problems related to water curtain system during project construction are discussed. The drawbacks and merits of the water curtain system are also presented. As an example, the conventional concept of “filling joints with water” is widely used in many cases, as a basic concept for the design of the water curtain system, but it is immature. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of the conventional concept are pointed out, with respect to the long-term stability as well as the safety of construction of storage caverns. Finally, new concepts and principles

  3. Equation level matching: An extension of the method of matched asymptotic expansion for problems of wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Luiz; Rosales, Rodolfo

    2017-11-01

    We introduce an alternative to the method of matched asymptotic expansions. In the ``traditional'' implementation, approximate solutions, valid in different (but overlapping) regions are matched by using ``intermediate'' variables. Here we propose to match at the level of the equations involved, via a ``uniform expansion'' whose equations enfold those of the approximations to be matched. This has the advantage that one does not need to explicitly solve the asymptotic equations to do the matching, which can be quite impossible for some problems. In addition, it allows matching to proceed in certain wave situations where the traditional approach fails because the time behaviors differ (e.g., one of the expansions does not include dissipation). On the other hand, this approach does not provide the fairly explicit approximations resulting from standard matching. In fact, this is not even its aim, which to produce the ``simplest'' set of equations that capture the behavior. Ruben Rosales work was partially supported by NSF Grants DMS-1614043 and DMS-1719637.

  4. E-learning task analysis making temporal evolution graphics on symptoms of waves and the ability to solve problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosdiana, L.; Widodo, W.; Nurita, T.; Fauziah, A. N. M.

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the ability of pre-service teachers to create graphs, solve the problem of spatial and temporal evolution on the symptoms of vibrations and waves. The learning was conducted using e-learning method. The research design is a quasi-experimental design with one-shot case study. The e-learning contained learning materials and tasks involving answering tasks, making questions, solving their own questions, and making graphs. The participants of the study was 28 students of Science Department, Universitas Negeri Surabaya. The results obtained by using the e-learning were that the students’ ability increase gradually from task 1 to task 3 (the tasks consisted of three tasks). Additionally, based on the questionnaire with 28 respondents, it showed that 24 respondents stated that making graphs via e-learning were still difficult. Four respondents said that it was easy to make graphs via e-learning. Nine respondents stated that the e-learning did not help them in making graphs and 19 respondents stated that the e-learning help in creating graphs. The conclusion of the study is that the students was able to make graphs on paper sheet, but they got difficulty to make the graphs in e-learning (the virtual form).

  5. Distribution of deep water wave power around the Indian coast based on ship observations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.; RamaRaju, V.S.

    distribution of wave power in different directions over a year for each grid is presented. The annual mean wave power along the Indian coast varies from 11.4 to 15.2 KW per metre length of wave crest with a maximum of 15.2 KW for the regions off south Kerala...

  6. Infragravity-wave dynamics in shallow water : energy dissipation and role in sand suspension and transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, A.T.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371573734

    2016-01-01

    Infragravity waves (20-200 s) receive their energy from sea-swell waves (2-20 s), and are thought to be important to beach erosion during storms, when they can reach up to several meters in height. Numerous studies have observed that on sandy beaches infragravity waves can lose a large part of their

  7. The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam recurrence and related phenomena for 1D shallow-water waves in a finite basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruban, V. P.

    2012-01-01

    Different regimes of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) recurrence are simulated numerically for fully nonlinear “one-dimensional” potential water waves in a finite-depth flume between two vertical walls. In such systems, the FPU recurrence is closely related to the dynamics of coherent structures approximately corresponding to solitons of the integrable Boussinesq system. A simplest periodic solution of the Boussinesq model, describing a single soliton between the walls, is presented in analytic form in terms of the elliptic Jacobi functions. In the numerical experiments, it is observed that depending on the number of solitons in the flume and their parameters, the FPU recurrence can occur in a simple or complicated manner, or be practically absent. For comparison, the nonlinear dynamics of potential water waves over nonuniform beds is simulated, with initial states taken in the form of several pairs of colliding solitons. With a mild-slope bed profile, a typical phenomenon in the course of evolution is the appearance of relatively high (rogue) waves, while for random, relatively short-correlated bed profiles it is either the appearance of tall waves or the formation of sharp crests at moderate-height waves.

  8. The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam recurrence and related phenomena for 1D shallow-water waves in a finite basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruban, V. P., E-mail: ruban@itp.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15

    Different regimes of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) recurrence are simulated numerically for fully nonlinear 'one-dimensional' potential water waves in a finite-depth flume between two vertical walls. In such systems, the FPU recurrence is closely related to the dynamics of coherent structures approximately corresponding to solitons of the integrable Boussinesq system. A simplest periodic solution of the Boussinesq model, describing a single soliton between the walls, is presented in analytic form in terms of the elliptic Jacobi functions. In the numerical experiments, it is observed that depending on the number of solitons in the flume and their parameters, the FPU recurrence can occur in a simple or complicated manner, or be practically absent. For comparison, the nonlinear dynamics of potential water waves over nonuniform beds is simulated, with initial states taken in the form of several pairs of colliding solitons. With a mild-slope bed profile, a typical phenomenon in the course of evolution is the appearance of relatively high (rogue) waves, while for random, relatively short-correlated bed profiles it is either the appearance of tall waves or the formation of sharp crests at moderate-height waves.

  9. Neighbourhood effects and household responses to water supply problems in Nigerian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charisma Acey

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Between 1990 and 2004, Nigeria’s urban population jumped to nearly half the national population, while access to improved sources of water in urban areas dropped by nearly 15 per cent during the same period. This paper presents preliminary results on the relationship between water supply, neighbourhood characteristics, and household strategies in response to dissatisfaction with water provision as reported by 389 respondents in 10 neighbourhoods in Lagos and Benin City, Nigeria between October 2007 and February 2008. In this paper, a conceptual model of consumer demand for water is used, based upon Hirschman’s exit, voice and loyalty (EVL framework. The model explicitly factors in the quality of water provision and variables at the household and neighbourhood levels that could affect perceptions about quality and the strategies that households use to cope with inadequate public services. Preliminary results show that reported household strategies to secure water are affected by community-level factors such as the range, cost, and quality of water supply alternatives, as well as neighbourhood composition. Furthermore, the percentage of urban migrants and households that live in rented flats in a neighbourhood seems to be associated with the use of exit strategies (as opposed to voice in response to problems with their primary water supply.

  10. The potential for expert system support in solving the pressurized water reactor fuel shuffling problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothleder, B.M.; Poetschat, G.R.; Faught, W.S.; Eich, V.J.

    1988-01-01

    The fuel shuffling problem is posed by the need to reposition partially burned assemblies to achieve minimum X-Y pin power peaks reload cycles of pressurized water reactors. This problem is a classic artificial intelligence (AI) problem and is highly suitable for AI expert system solution assistance, in contrast to the conventional solution, which ultimately depends solely on trial and error. Such a fuel shuffling assistant would significantly reduce engineering and computer execution time for conventional loading patterns and, much more importantly, even more significantly for low-leakage loading patterns. A successful hardware/software demonstrator has been introduced, paving the way for development of a broadly expert system program. Such a program, upon incorporating the recently developed technique perverse depletion, would provide a directed path for solving the low-leakage problem

  11. A staggered-grid finite-difference scheme optimized in the time–space domain for modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Sirui; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-01-01

    For modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems using finite-difference schemes, optimizing the coefficients of the finite-difference operators can reduce numerical dispersion. Most optimized finite-difference schemes for modeling seismic-wave propagation suppress only spatial but not temporal dispersion errors. We develop a novel optimized finite-difference scheme for numerical scalar-wave modeling to control dispersion errors not only in space but also in time. Our optimized scheme is based on a new stencil that contains a few more grid points than the standard stencil. We design an objective function for minimizing relative errors of phase velocities of waves propagating in all directions within a given range of wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis and numerical examples demonstrate that our optimized finite-difference scheme is computationally up to 2.5 times faster than the optimized schemes using the standard stencil to achieve the similar modeling accuracy for a given 2D or 3D problem. Compared with the high-order finite-difference scheme using the same new stencil, our optimized scheme reduces 50 percent of the computational cost to achieve the similar modeling accuracy. This new optimized finite-difference scheme is particularly useful for large-scale 3D scalar-wave modeling and inversion

  12. On the problem of negative dissipation of fast waves at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance and the accuracy of absorption estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castejon, F.; Pavlov, S.S.; Swanson, D. G.

    2002-01-01

    Negative dissipation appears when ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating at first harmonic in a thermal plasma is estimated using some numerical schemes. The causes of the appearance of such a problem are investigated analytically and numerically in this work showing that the problem is connected with the accuracy with which the absorption coefficient at the first ICR harmonic is estimated. The corrections for the absorption estimation are presented for the case of quasiperpendicular propagation of fast wave in this frequency range. A method to solve the problem of negative dissipation is presented and, as a result, an enhancement of absorption is found for reactor-size plasmas

  13. Acoustic mode coupling induced by shallow water nonlinear internal waves: sensitivity to environmental conditions and space-time scales of internal waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosi, John A

    2008-09-01

    While many results have been intuited from numerical simulation studies, the precise connections between shallow-water acoustic variability and the space-time scales of nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs) as well as the background environmental conditions have not been clearly established analytically. Two-dimensional coupled mode propagation through NLIWs is examined using a perturbation series solution in which each order n is associated with nth-order multiple scattering. Importantly, the perturbation solution gives resonance conditions that pick out specific NLIW scales that cause coupling, and seabed attenuation is demonstrated to broaden these resonances, fundamentally changing the coupling behavior at low frequency. Sound-speed inhomogeneities caused by internal solitary waves (ISWs) are primarily considered and the dependence of mode coupling on ISW amplitude, range width, depth structure, location relative to the source, and packet characteristics are delineated as a function of acoustic frequency. In addition, it is seen that significant energy transfer to modes with initially low or zero energy involves at least a second order scattering process. Under moderate scattering conditions, comparisons of first order, single scattering theoretical predictions to direct numerical simulation demonstrate the accuracy of the approach for acoustic frequencies upto 400 Hz and for single as well as multiple ISW wave packets.

  14. Inertia–gravity wave radiation from the elliptical vortex in the f -plane shallow water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko, E-mail: nori@phys-h.keio.ac.jp [Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Department of Physics, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Kouhoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Inertia–gravity wave (IGW) radiation from the elliptical vortex is investigated in the f -plane shallow water system. The far field of IGW is analytically derived for the case of an almost circular Kirchhoff vortex with a small aspect ratio. Cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at finite values of the Rossby number (Ro) caused by the source originating in the Coriolis acceleration. While the intensity of IGWs from the cyclone monotonically decreases as f increases, that from the anticyclone increases as f increases for relatively smaller f and has a local maximum at intermediate f . A numerical experiment is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain. The numerical results agree quite well with the analytical ones for elliptical vortices with small aspect ratios, implying that the derived analytical forms are useful for the verification of the numerical model. For elliptical vortices with larger aspect ratios, however, significant deviation from the analytical estimates appears. The intensity of IGWs radiated in the numerical simulation is larger than that estimated analytically. The reason is that the source of IGWs is amplified during the time evolution because the shape of the vortex changes from ideal ellipse to elongated with filaments. Nevertheless, cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry similar to the analytical estimate appears in all the range of aspect ratios, suggesting that this asymmetry is a robust feature. (paper)

  15. Energy-preserving H1-Galerkin schemes for shallow water wave equations with peakon solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyatake, Yuto; Matsuo, Takayasu

    2012-01-01

    New energy-preserving Galerkin schemes for the Camassa–Holm and the Degasperis–Procesi equations which model shallow water waves are presented. The schemes can be implemented only with cheap H 1 elements, which is expected to be sufficient to catch the characteristic peakon solutions. The keys of the derivation are the Hamiltonian structures of the equations and an L 2 -projection technique newly employed in the present Letter to mimic the Hamiltonian structures in a discrete setting, so that the desired energy-preserving property rightly follows. Numerical examples confirm the effectiveness of the schemes. -- Highlights: ► Numerical integration of the Camassa–Holm and Degasperis–Procesi equation. ► New energy-preserving Galerkin schemes for these equations are proposed. ► They can be implemented only with P1 elements. ► They well capture the characteristic peakon solutions over long time. ► The keys are the Hamiltonian structures and L 2 -projection technique.

  16. Measurement of attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Jeong, Hyunjo; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation corrections in nonlinear acoustics play an important role in the study of nonlinear fluids, biomedical imaging, or solid material characterization. The measurement of attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear regime is not easy because they depend on the source pressure and requires accurate diffraction corrections. In this work, the attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves which come from the absorption of water are measured in nonlinear ultrasonic experiments. Based on the quasilinear theory of the KZK equation, the nonlinear sound field equations are derived and the diffraction correction terms are extracted. The measured sound pressure amplitudes are adjusted first for diffraction corrections in order to reduce the impact on the measurement of attenuation coefficients from diffractions. The attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonics are calculated precisely from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting process of the experiment data. The results show that attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear condition depend on both frequency and source pressure, which are much different from a linear regime. In a relatively lower drive pressure, the attenuation coefficients increase linearly with frequency. However, they present the characteristic of nonlinear growth in a high drive pressure. As the diffraction corrections are obtained based on the quasilinear theory, it is important to use an appropriate source pressure for accurate attenuation measurements.

  17. Observations and Predictions of Wave Runup, Extreme Water Levels, and Medium-Term Dune Erosion during Storm Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Suanez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of dune erosion and accretion on the high-energy macrotidal Vougot beach in North Brittany (France over the past decade (2004–2014 has revealed significant morphological changes. Dune toe erosion/accretion records have been compared with extreme water level measurements, defined as the sum of (i astronomic tide; (ii storm surge; and (iii vertical wave runup. Runup parameterization was conducted using swash limits, beach profiles, and hydrodynamic (Hm0, Tm0,–1, and high tide water level—HTWL data sets obtained from high frequency field surveys. The aim was to quantify in-situ environmental conditions and dimensional swash parameters for the best calibration of Battjes [1] runup formula. In addition, an empirical equation based on observed tidal water level and offshore wave height was produced to estimate extreme water levels over the whole period of dune morphological change monitoring. A good correlation between this empirical equation (1.01Hmoξo and field runup measurements (Rmax was obtained (R2 85%. The goodness of fit given by the RMSE was about 0.29 m. A good relationship was noticed between dune erosion and high water levels when the water levels exceeded the dune foot elevation. In contrast, when extreme water levels were below the height of the toe of the dune sediment budget increased, inducing foredune recovery. These erosion and accretion phases may be related to the North Atlantic Oscillation Index.

  18. Ionosphere Waves Service (IWS – a problem-oriented tool in ionosphere and Space Weather research produced by POPDAT project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferencz Csaba

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of the FP7 POPDAT project the Ionosphere Waves Service (IWS has been developed and opened for public access by ionosphere experts. IWS is forming a database, derived from archived ionospheric wave records to assist the ionosphere and Space Weather research, and to answer the following questions: How can the data of earlier ionospheric missions be reprocessed with current algorithms to gain more profitable results? How could the scientific community be provided with a new insight on wave processes that take place in the ionosphere? The answer is a specific and unique data mining service accessing a collection of topical catalogs that characterize a huge number of recorded occurrences of Whistler-like Electromagnetic Wave Phenomena, Atmosphere Gravity Waves, and Traveling Ionosphere Disturbances. IWS online service (http://popdat.cbk.waw.pl offers end users to query optional set of predefined wave phenomena, their detailed characteristics. These were collected by target specific event detection algorithms in selected satellite records during database buildup phase. Result of performed wave processing thus represents useful information on statistical or comparative investigations of wave types, listed in a detailed catalog of ionospheric wave phenomena. The IWS provides wave event characteristics, extracted by specific software systems from data records of the selected satellite missions. The end-user can access targets by making specific searches and use statistical modules within the service in their field of interest. Therefore the IWS opens a new way in ionosphere and Space Weather research. The scientific applications covered by IWS concern beyond Space Weather also other fields like earthquake precursors, ionosphere climatology, geomagnetic storms, troposphere-ionosphere energy transfer, and trans-ionosphere link perturbations.

  19. Ionosphere Waves Service (IWS) - a problem-oriented tool in ionosphere and Space Weather research produced by POPDAT project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, Csaba; Lizunov, Georgii; Crespon, François; Price, Ivan; Bankov, Ludmil; Przepiórka, Dorota; Brieß, Klaus; Dudkin, Denis; Girenko, Andrey; Korepanov, Valery; Kuzmych, Andrii; Skorokhod, Tetiana; Marinov, Pencho; Piankova, Olena; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Shtus, Tetyana; Steinbach, Péter; Lichtenberger, János; Sterenharz, Arnold; Vassileva, Any

    2014-05-01

    In the frame of the FP7 POPDAT project the Ionosphere Waves Service (IWS) has been developed and opened for public access by ionosphere experts. IWS is forming a database, derived from archived ionospheric wave records to assist the ionosphere and Space Weather research, and to answer the following questions: How can the data of earlier ionospheric missions be reprocessed with current algorithms to gain more profitable results? How could the scientific community be provided with a new insight on wave processes that take place in the ionosphere? The answer is a specific and unique data mining service accessing a collection of topical catalogs that characterize a huge number of recorded occurrences of Whistler-like Electromagnetic Wave Phenomena, Atmosphere Gravity Waves, and Traveling Ionosphere Disturbances. IWS online service (http://popdat.cbk.waw.pl) offers end users to query optional set of predefined wave phenomena, their detailed characteristics. These were collected by target specific event detection algorithms in selected satellite records during database buildup phase. Result of performed wave processing thus represents useful information on statistical or comparative investigations of wave types, listed in a detailed catalog of ionospheric wave phenomena. The IWS provides wave event characteristics, extracted by specific software systems from data records of the selected satellite missions. The end-user can access targets by making specific searches and use statistical modules within the service in their field of interest. Therefore the IWS opens a new way in ionosphere and Space Weather research. The scientific applications covered by IWS concern beyond Space Weather also other fields like earthquake precursors, ionosphere climatology, geomagnetic storms, troposphere-ionosphere energy transfer, and trans-ionosphere link perturbations.

  20. Storm-wave trends in Mexican waters of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ojeda

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-year time series of hindcast wave data were analysed for 10 coastal locations along the eastern Mexican coast to obtain information about storm events occurring in the region, with the goal of examining the possible presence of interannual trends in the number of storm-wave events and their main features (wave height, duration and energy content. The storms were defined according to their significant wave height and duration, and the events were classified as related to either tropical cyclones or Norte events. The occurrence and characteristics of both types of events were analysed independently. There is no statistically significant change in the number of storm-wave events related to Nortes or their characteristics during the study period. However, there is a subtle increase in the number of events related to tropical cyclones in the western Caribbean region and a more evident increase in wave height and energy content of these events.

  1. Green roof and storm water management policies: monitoring experiments on the ENPC Blue Green Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versini, Pierre-Antoine; Gires, Auguste; Fitton, George; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Currently widespread in new urban projects, green roofs have shown a positive impact on urban runoff at the building/parcel scale. Nevertheless, there is no specific policy promoting their implementation neither in Europe nor in France. Moreover they are not taken into account (and usually considered as an impervious area) in the sizing of a retention basin for instance. An interesting example is located in the heart of the Paris-East Cluster for Science and Technology (Champs-sur-Marne, France). Since 2013 a large (1 ha) wavy-form vegetated roof (called bleu green wave) is implemented. Green roof area and impervious areas are connected to a large retention basin, which has been oversized. The blue green wave represents a pioneering site where an initially amenity (decorative) design project has been transformed into a research oriented one. Several measurement campaigns have been conducted to investigate and better understand the hydrological behaviour of such a structure. Rainfall, humidity, wind velocity, water content and temperature have been particularly studied. The data collected are used for several purposes: (i) characterize the spatio-temporal variability of the green roof response, (ii) calibrate and validate a specific model simulating its hydrological behavior. Based on monitoring and modeling results, green roof performances will be quantified. It will be possible to estimate how they can reduce stormwater runoff and how these performances can vary in space and in time depending on green roof configuration, rainfall event characteristics and antecedent conditions. These quantified impacts will be related to regulation rules established by stormwater managers in order to connect the parcel to the sewer network. In the particular case of the building of a retention basin, the integration of green roof in the sizing of the basin will be studied. This work is funded by the European Blue Green Dream project (http://bgd.org.uk/, funded by Climate

  2. Dam construction as an engineering solution for water supply problem : environmental thrusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, A.H. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2004-09-01

    Water supply management and the potential impacts associated with engineering practices in water supply systems were examined. Global aspects of increasing water demand were presented and compared with populations, urbanization and water demand. Engineering practices in waterworks developments such as dam construction, river intakes, infiltration galleries, wells, boreholes and adits were also discussed. Construction of large dams and the problems associated with damming the rivers were studied as large dams generally have substantial impacts on rivers, watersheds and aquatic ecosystems, leading to the irreversible loss of species populations and ecosystems. These problems include negative impacts on the terrestrial ecosystem, greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs due to decaying vegetation and carbon inflows from the catchment, changes in flow regimes, trapping of sediments and nutrients behind a dam, blocking migration of aquatic organisms, as well as negative impacts on flood plain ecosystems and fisheries. In addition, a case study, on the environmental impacts associated with damming in Three Gorges Valley in China was presented. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Enhanced hydrological extremes in the western United States under global warming through the lens of water vapor wave activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jian; Xue, Daokai; Gao, Yang; Chen, Gang; Leung, Lai-Yung; Staten, Paul W.

    2018-04-23

    Understanding how regional hydrological extremes would respond to warming is a grand challenge to the community of climate change research. To address this challenge, we construct an analysis framework based on column integrated water vapor (CWV) wave activity to diagnose the wave component of the hydrological cycle that contributes to hydrological extremes. By applying the analysis to the historical and future climate projections from the CMIP5 models, we found that the wet-versus-dry disparity of daily net precipitation along a zonal band can increase at a super Clausius-Clapeyron rate due to the enhanced stirring length of wave activity at the poleward flank of the mean storm track. The local variant of CWV wave activity reveals the unique characteristics of atmospheric rivers (ARs) in terms of their transport function, enhanced mixing and hydrological cycling rate (HC). Under RCP8.5, the local moist wave activity increases by ~40% over the northeastern Pacific by the end of the 21st century, indicating more ARs hitting the west coast, giving rise to a ~20% increase in the related hydrological extremes − $ despite a weakening of the local HC.

  4. Wave power potential at a few shallow-water locations around Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Dubhashi, K.K.; Nair, T.M.B.; Singh, J.

    less with maximum value of 31.8 kW m sup(-1). The average wave power during the summer monsoon is high (15.5-19.3 kW m sup(-1)) along the west coast of India. The study shows that the annual average wave power (1.8-7.6 kW m sup(-1)) along the locations...

  5. Large band gaps of water waves through two-dimensional periodic topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shaohua; Wu Fugen; Zhong Huilin; Zhong Lanhua

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter, the band structures and band gaps of liquid surface waves propagating over two-dimensional periodic topography was investigated by plane-waves expansion method. The periodic topography drilled by square hollows with square lattice was considered. And the effects of the filling fraction and the orientation of bottom-hollows on the band gaps are investigated in detail

  6. Waves in the nearshore waters of northern Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Singh, J.; Pednekar, P.S.; Gowthaman, R.

    are provided by the NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center, Boulder, Colarado at http://www.cdc.noaa.gov/. 3. Results 3.1 Wave height To identify the swell components from the measured data, the locally generated waves and the swell are separated. H m0...

  7. Distribution of Wave Loads for Design of Crown Walls in Deep and Shallow Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Quvang Harck; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2014-01-01

    This paper puts forward a new method to determine horizontal wave loads on rubble mound breakwater crown walls with specific exceedance probabilities based on the formulae by Nørgaard et al. (2013) as well as presents a new modified version of the wave run-up formula by Van der Meer & Stam (1992)...

  8. Water supply of the population as a problem of energy efficiency on the example of the Tyumen region of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezier, Victoria; Gusarova, Miroslava; Kopytova, Anna

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to draw public attention to the problems of water supply in the city of Tyumen, the capital of the oil region and one of the most important objects in Russia from the point of view of strategic water supply, located in the region with vast freshwater resources. The article outlines main water supply problems related to the quality of drinking water, its chemical composition, and risks of water contamination by industrial effluents, problems of water transport to the consumers, problems of energy efficiency. The issues raised are part of the energy efficiency not only of the Tyumen region, but also of the Sverdlovsk region, from which the waters of the drinking basin are transited, being a sewage channel for many industrial enterprises. The article touches the issues of water protection, conservation and quality of water coming from the Velizhansky water intake, as well as the possibilities of using alternative sources of drinking water. The article analyzes legal measures, and proposals for improving work with increasing the quality of drinking water, combating melt water and pollution with oil.

  9. Proposing of an aerated water treatment plant for reducing water pollution problem in Losari Beach after reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani, Sri; Maharani, Hamzah, Muhammad Alimuddin

    2017-01-01

    Losari Beach is the most important site in Makassar. It lies at the west side of Makassar city. This place is known as the place where people are relaxed and gathering with friends or family after working, and now it becomes the icon of Makassar city. As the biggest city in eastern Indonesia, Makassar grows very fast. We can find constructions for building hospitals, shopping malls, bussines activities, and residences everywhere. The most important construction activities that will effect Losari Beach is the reclamation to build the Center Point of Indonesia that takes an area of 157 hectares and it is located at the west side of Losari Beach. In the last research presented in 9th International Conference on Marine Technology (October 2014) using surface-water modeling system (SMS) software showed that reclamation will significantly increase concentrations of BOD and COD (± 7 mg/L for BOD and 6.2 mg/L for COD). This condition will cause Losari Beach becomes very polluted. A probable solution to overcome this problem is to clean the wastewater before introducing to the sea. This paper will describe the type of the wastewater treatment plant that can be used to solve the water pollution problem in Losari Beach.

  10. A particular inverse problem for Schroedinger discrete equation in two and higher dimensions under apriori information of wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlus, M.

    1997-01-01

    The entire potential and the rest of wave functions are determined in parallelepiped domain if the entire discrete spectrum and the apriori information about the wave functions on one side of parallelepiped are given. Formulation for solving the Schroedinger discrete equation in two and higher dimensions is proposed and new formulas are derived for their solution. Two examples for a 2D case and one example for a 3D case are demonstrated

  11. Observations and predictions of wave runup, extreme water levels, and medium-term dune erosion during storm conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Suanez , Serge ,; Cancouët , Romain; Floc'h , France; Blaise , Emmanuel; Ardhuin , Fabrice; Filipot , Jean-François; Cariolet , Jean-Marie; Delacourt , Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of dune erosion and accretion on the high-energy macrotidal Vougot beach in North Brittany (France) over the past decade (2004–2014) has revealed significant morphological changes. Dune toe erosion/accretion records have been compared with extreme water level measurements, defined as the sum of (i) astronomic tide; (ii) storm surge; and (iii) vertical wave runup. Runup parameterization was conducted using swash limits, beach profiles, and hydrodynamic (Hm0, Tm0,–1, and high tide wa...

  12. Cavitation and shock waves emission on the rigid boundary of water under mid-IR nanosecond laser pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkin, A. V.; Bychkov, A. S.; Karabutov, A. A.; Potemkin, F. V.

    2018-06-01

    The processes of conversion of light energy into mechanical energy under mid-IR nanosecond laser excitation on a rigid boundary of water are investigated. Strong water absorption of Q-switched Cr:Yb:Ho:YSGG (2.85 µm, 6 mJ, 45 ns) laser radiation provides rapid energy deposition of ~8 kJ cm‑3 accompanied with strong mechanical transients. The evolution of shock waves and cavitation bubbles is studied using the technique of shadowgraphy and acoustic measurements, and the conversion efficiency into these energy channels for various laser fluence (0.75–2.0 J cm‑2) is calculated. For 6 mJ laser pulse with fluence of 2.0 J cm‑2, the conversion into shock wave energy reaches 67%. The major part of the shock wave energy (92%) is dissipated when the shock front travels the first 250 µm, and the remaining 8% is transferred to the acoustic far field. The calculated pressure in the vicinity of water-silicon interface is 0.9 GPa. Cavitation efficiency is significantly less and reaches up to 5% of the light energy. The results of the current study could be used in laser parameters optimization for micromachining and biological tissue ablation.

  13. Performance of wave function and density functional methods for water hydrogen bond spin-spin coupling constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de la Vega, J M; Omar, S; San Fabián, J

    2017-04-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in water monomer and dimer have been calculated using several wave function and density functional-based methods. CCSD, MCSCF, and SOPPA wave functions methods yield similar results, specially when an additive approach is used with the MCSCF. Several functionals have been used to analyze their performance with the Jacob's ladder and a set of functionals with different HF exchange were tested. Functionals with large HF exchange appropriately predict 1 J O H , 2 J H H and 2h J O O couplings, while 1h J O H is better calculated with functionals that include a reduced fraction of HF exchange. Accurate functionals for 1 J O H and 2 J H H have been tested in a tetramer water model. The hydrogen bond effects on these intramolecular couplings are additive when they are calculated by SOPPA(CCSD) wave function and DFT methods. Graphical Abstract Evaluation of the additive effect of the hydrogen bond on spin-spin coupling constants of water using WF and DFT methods.

  14. Considerations and Optimization of Time-Resolved PIV Measurements near Complex Wind-Generated Air-Water Wave Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmeir, Matthew; Markfort, Corey

    2017-11-01

    Time Resolved PIV measurements are applied on both sides of air-water interface in order to study the coupling between air and fluid motion. The multi-scale and 3-dimensional nature of the wave structure poses several unique considerations to generate optimal-quality data very near the fluid interface. High resolution and dynamic range in space and time are required to resolve relevant flow scales along a complex and ever-changing interface. Characterizing the two-way coupling across the air-water interface provide unique challenges for optical measurement techniques. Approaches to obtain near-boundary measurement on both sides of interface are discussed, including optimal flow seeding procedures, illumination, data analysis, and interface tracking. Techniques are applied to the IIHR Boundary-Layer Wind-Wave Tunnel and example results presented for both sides of the interface. The facility combines a 30m long recirculating water channel with an open-return boundary layer wind tunnel, allowing for the study of boundary layer turbulence interacting with a wind-driven wave field.

  15. Wave friction factor rediscovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, J. P.

    2012-02-01

    The wave friction factor is commonly expressed as a function of the horizontal water particle semi-excursion ( A wb) at the top of the boundary layer. A wb, in turn, is normally derived from linear wave theory by {{U_{{wb}}/T_{{w}}}}{{2π }} , where U wb is the maximum water particle velocity measured at the top of the boundary layer and T w is the wave period. However, it is shown here that A wb determined in this way deviates drastically from its real value under both linear and non-linear waves. Three equations for smooth, transitional and rough boundary conditions, respectively, are proposed to solve this problem, all three being a function of U wb, T w, and δ, the thickness of the boundary layer. Because these variables can be determined theoretically for any bottom slope and water depth using the deepwater wave conditions, there is no need to physically measure them. Although differing substantially from many modern attempts to define the wave friction factor, the results coincide with equations proposed in the 1960s for either smooth or rough boundary conditions. The findings also confirm that the long-held notion of circular water particle motion down to the bottom in deepwater conditions is erroneous, the motion in fact being circular at the surface and elliptical at depth in both deep and shallow water conditions, with only horizontal motion at the top of the boundary layer. The new equations are incorporated in an updated version (WAVECALC II) of the Excel program published earlier in this journal by Le Roux et al. Geo-Mar Lett 30(5): 549-560, (2010).

  16. WAVECALC: an Excel-VBA spreadsheet to model the characteristics of fully developed waves and their influence on bottom sediments in different water depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Jacobus P.; Demirbilek, Zeki; Brodalka, Marysia; Flemming, Burghard W.

    2010-10-01

    The generation and growth of waves in deep water is controlled by winds blowing over the sea surface. In fully developed sea states, where winds and waves are in equilibrium, wave parameters may be calculated directly from the wind velocity. We provide an Excel spreadsheet to compute the wave period, length, height and celerity, as well as horizontal and vertical particle velocities for any water depth, bottom slope, and distance below the reference water level. The wave profile and propagation can also be visualized for any water depth, modeling the sea surface change from sinusoidal to trochoidal and finally cnoidal profiles into shallow water. Bedload entrainment is estimated under both the wave crest and the trough, using the horizontal water particle velocity at the top of the boundary layer. The calculations are programmed in an Excel file called WAVECALC, which is available online to authorized users. Although many of the recently published formulas are based on theoretical arguments, the values agree well with several existing theories and limited field and laboratory observations. WAVECALC is a user-friendly program intended for sedimentologists, coastal engineers and oceanographers, as well as marine ecologists and biologists. It provides a rapid means to calculate many wave characteristics required in coastal and shallow marine studies, and can also serve as an educational tool.

  17. Classical and Non-Classical Regimes of the Limited-Fetch Wave Growth and Localized Structures on the Surface of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Abstracts, Vol. 15, EGU2013- 5284-1, 2013, EGU General Assembly 2013 [published] [P6] S. I. Badulin and V. G. Grigorieva, Weak turbulence theory as... generalization of compact 1D water waves equation for 2D situation; study of the implications of modulational instability on solitons, rogue waves and air...integrability of 1-D Zakharov equation and generalization of compact equation for almost 1-D waves • Study of modulational instability and its

  18. Sediment waves with a biogenic twist in Pleistocene cool water carbonates, Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn; Huuse, Mads

    2010-01-01

    -parallel to contours immediately off the shelf–slope break. They are asymmetrical, showing up-slope migration, and mainly occur in trains. The sediment waves were drilled during ODP leg 182 in 1998, and were interpreted as biogenic reef mounds. New high-quality seismic and multibeam bathymetry data were acquired...... involved growth in glacial periods only. Bryozoans influenced the depositional environment by adding sediment, trapping fine-grained particles, and stabilizing the muddy sea floor. This caused the sediment waves to gain a more prominent sea floor relief than most muddy siliciclastic sediment waves formed...

  19. Comparison of magnetosonic wave and water group ion energy densities at Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, K.; Balogh, A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Forster, P. M. De F.; Hynds, R. J.; Yates, T. S.; Sanderson, T. R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the Comet Giacobini-Zinner (GZ) are presented to determine to what extent wave-particle scattering redistributed the initial pick-up energy of the ion population. Also examined is the difference between the ion thermal energy and the energy in the magnetic fields of the waves. In spite of uncertainty of about a factor of 2 noted in the pick-up and mass-loaded regions, it is shown that less than approximately 50 percent of the pick-up energy is converted into wave magnetic energy in the inbound pick-up region.

  20. Improving Multi-Objective Management of Water Quality Tipping Points: Revisiting the Classical Shallow Lake Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. D.; Reed, P. M.; Keller, K.

    2015-12-01

    Recent multi-objective extensions of the classical shallow lake problem are useful for exploring the conceptual and computational challenges that emerge when managing irreversible water quality tipping points. Building on this work, we explore a four objective version of the lake problem where a hypothetical town derives economic benefits from polluting a nearby lake, but at the risk of irreversibly tipping the lake into a permanently polluted state. The trophic state of the lake exhibits non-linear threshold dynamics; below some critical phosphorus (P) threshold it is healthy and oligotrophic, but above this threshold it is irreversibly eutrophic. The town must decide how much P to discharge each year, a decision complicated by uncertainty in the natural P inflow to the lake. The shallow lake problem provides a conceptually rich set of dynamics, low computational demands, and a high level of mathematical difficulty. These properties maximize its value for benchmarking the relative merits and limitations of emerging decision support frameworks, such as Direct Policy Search (DPS). Here, we explore the use of DPS as a formal means of developing robust environmental pollution control rules that effectively account for deeply uncertain system states and conflicting objectives. The DPS reformulation of the shallow lake problem shows promise in formalizing pollution control triggers and signposts, while dramatically reducing the computational complexity of the multi-objective pollution control problem. More broadly, the insights from the DPS variant of the shallow lake problem formulated in this study bridge emerging work related to socio-ecological systems management, tipping points, robust decision making, and robust control.

  1. Transitions in Structure in Oil-in-Water Emulsions As Studied by Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, H.G.M.; Gruijthuijsen, van K.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    Transitions in structure of sodium caseinate stabilized emulsions were studied using conventional rheometry as well as diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS). Structural differences were induced by different amounts of stabilizer, and transitions in structure were induced by acidification. Special

  2. Projecting of wave height and water level on reef-lined coasts due to intensified tropical cyclones and sea level rise in Palau to 2100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hongo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tropical cyclones (TCs and sea level rise (SLR cause major problems including beach erosion, saltwater intrusion into groundwater, and damage to infrastructure in coastal areas. The magnitude and extent of damage is predicted to increase as a consequence of future climate change and local factors. Upward reef growth has attracted attention for its role as a natural breakwater, reducing the risks of natural disasters to coastal communities. However, projections of change in the risk to coastal reefs under conditions of intensified TCs and SLR are poorly quantified. In this study we projected the wave height and water level on Melekeok reef in the Palau Islands by 2100, based on wave simulations under intensified TCs (significant wave height at the outer ocean: SWHo = 8.7–11.0 m; significant wave period at the outer ocean: SWPo = 13–15 s and SLR (0.24–0.98 m. To understand effects of upward reef growth on the reduction of the wave height and water level, the simulation was conducted for two reef condition scenarios: a degraded reef and a healthy reef. Moreover, analyses of reef growth based on a drilled core provided an assessment of the coral community and rate of reef production necessary to reduce the risk from TCs and SLR on the coastal areas. According to our calculations under intensified TCs and SLR by 2100, significant wave heights at the reef flat (SWHr will increase from 1.05–1.24 m at present to 2.14 m if reefs are degraded. Similarly, by 2100 the water level at the shoreline (WLs will increase from 0.86–2.10 m at present to 1.19–3.45 m if reefs are degraded. These predicted changes will probably cause beach erosion, saltwater intrusion into groundwater, and damage to infrastructure, because the coastal village is located at  ∼ 3 m above the present mean sea level. These findings imply that even if the SWHr is decreased by only 0.1 m by upward reef growth, it will probably reduce the risks of

  3. Projecting of wave height and water level on reef-lined coasts due to intensified tropical cyclones and sea level rise in Palau to 2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Chuki; Kurihara, Haruko; Golbuu, Yimnang

    2018-03-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) and sea level rise (SLR) cause major problems including beach erosion, saltwater intrusion into groundwater, and damage to infrastructure in coastal areas. The magnitude and extent of damage is predicted to increase as a consequence of future climate change and local factors. Upward reef growth has attracted attention for its role as a natural breakwater, reducing the risks of natural disasters to coastal communities. However, projections of change in the risk to coastal reefs under conditions of intensified TCs and SLR are poorly quantified. In this study we projected the wave height and water level on Melekeok reef in the Palau Islands by 2100, based on wave simulations under intensified TCs (significant wave height at the outer ocean: SWHo = 8.7-11.0 m; significant wave period at the outer ocean: SWPo = 13-15 s) and SLR (0.24-0.98 m). To understand effects of upward reef growth on the reduction of the wave height and water level, the simulation was conducted for two reef condition scenarios: a degraded reef and a healthy reef. Moreover, analyses of reef growth based on a drilled core provided an assessment of the coral community and rate of reef production necessary to reduce the risk from TCs and SLR on the coastal areas. According to our calculations under intensified TCs and SLR by 2100, significant wave heights at the reef flat (SWHr) will increase from 1.05-1.24 m at present to 2.14 m if reefs are degraded. Similarly, by 2100 the water level at the shoreline (WLs) will increase from 0.86-2.10 m at present to 1.19-3.45 m if reefs are degraded. These predicted changes will probably cause beach erosion, saltwater intrusion into groundwater, and damage to infrastructure, because the coastal village is located at ˜ 3 m above the present mean sea level. These findings imply that even if the SWHr is decreased by only 0.1 m by upward reef growth, it will probably reduce the risks of costal damages. Our results showed that a healthy reef

  4. Problem statement: international safeguards for a light-water reactor fuels reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, J.P.; Hakkila, E.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Cameron, C.P.; Bleck, M.E.; Darby, J.L.

    1979-03-01

    This report considers the problem of developing international safeguards for a light-water reactor (LWR) fuel reprocessing/conversion facility that combines the Purex process with conversion of plutonium nitrate to the oxide by means of plutonium (III) oxalate precipitation and calcination. Current international safeguards systems are based on the complementary concepts of materials accounting and containment and surveillance, which are designed to detect covert, national diversion of nuclear material. This report discusses the possible diversion threats and some types of countermeasures, and it represents the first stage in providing integrated international safeguards system concepts that make optimum use of available resources. The development of design methodology to address this problem will constitute a significant portion of the subsequent effort. Additionally, future technology development requirements are identified. 8 figures, 1 table

  5. Focused tandem shock waves in water and their potential application in cancer treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Petr; Šunka, Pavel; Hoffer, Petr; Stelmashuk, Vitaliy; Poučková, P.; Zadinová, M.; Zeman, J.; Dibdiak, L.; Kolářová, H.; Tománková, K.; Binder, S.; Beneš, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 1 (2014), s. 51-57 ISSN 0938-1287. [International Symposium on Shock Waves/28./. Manchester, 17.07.2011-22.07.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1151 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : focused shock waves * underwater discharge * cancer treatment Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.885, year: 2014

  6. Breaking of ocean surface waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babanin, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Wind-generated waves are the most prominent feature of the ocean surface, and so are breaking waves manifested by the appearance of sporadic whitecaps. Such breaking represents one of the most interesting and most challenging problems for both fluid mechanics and physical oceanography. It is an intermittent random process, very fast by comparison with other processes in the wave breaking on the water surface is not continuous, but its role in maintaining the energy balance within the continuous wind-wave field is critical. Ocean wave breaking also plays the primary role in the air-sea exchange of momentum, mass and heat, and it is of significant importance for ocean remote sensing, coastal and maritime engineering, navigation and other practical applications. Understanding the wave breaking its occurrence, the breaking rates and even ability to describe its onset has been hindered for decades by the strong non-linearity of the process, together with its irregular and ferocious nature. Recently, this knowledge has significantly advanced, and the review paper is an attempt to summarise the facts into a consistent, albeit still incomplete picture of the phenomenon. In the paper, variety of definitions related to the were breaking are discussed and formulated and methods for breaking detection and measurements are examined. Most of attention is dedicated to the research of wave breaking probability and severity. Experimental, observational, numerical and statistical approaches and their outcomes are reviewed. Present state of the wave-breaking research and knowledge is analysed and main outstanding problems are outlined (Authors)

  7. Quantification of total and water extractable essential elements in medicinal plants used for stomach problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahito, S.R.; Kazi, T.G.; Shar, G.Q.; Mangrio, A.M; Shaikh, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    The role of elements particularly trace elements in health and disease is well known. Present study has been undertaken in our laboratories to quantify the commonly occurring elements in three medicinal plans. Peganum harmala Linn, Phyllanthus emblica Linn, Tamarix dioca used for stomach problems using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Wet digestion method has been used to extract the acid extractable metals. Samples were boiled in water to obtain water extractable metals. The validation of the method was checked with the NBS-1570 (Spinach) as Standard Reference Material. Levels of essential elements were found high as compared to concentration of toxic elements. The considerable amounts of essential such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc and iron were found in all these plant samples. (author)

  8. To built a solar hot water heater to work the sustainability problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carretero Gómez, María Begoña

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We are commemorating the Education Decade for Sustainable Development. If we want to create positive towards our environment and its sustainable development we have to begin working at school. It is necessary to show our students what problems of the environment are and which solutions can be adopted. That is the reason we have planned this activity in our secondary school. We do think that by doing daily activities we have a good opportunity to fulfil this goal. An example of such experiences is the fabrication of a solar hot water heater to make them and their families more environment conscience.

  9. Water data: bad TPC pads, 3.6 µs and 100 ns problems

    CERN Document Server

    Dydak, F; Nefedov, Y; Wotschack, J; Zhemchugov, A

    2004-01-01

    Out of the 3972 pads of the HARP TPC, about 9% are 'bad' and not useful for the correct reconstruction of clusters. Bad pads comprise dead pads, noisy pads, and pads with low or undefined amplification. Pads may be bad at one time, but not at another. This memo discusses the sources of information which were used to declare a pad 'bad', and gives the list of bad pads for the water data (runs 19146 to 19301). Also, the 3.6 µs and 100 ns problems of the TPC readout are discussed, including the corrective measures which have been taken.

  10. Computational issues in complex water-energy optimization problems: Time scales, parameterizations, objectives and algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstratiadis, Andreas; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Kossieris, Panayiotis; Karavokiros, George; Christofides, Antonis; Siskos, Alexandros; Mamassis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    Modelling of large-scale hybrid renewable energy systems (HRES) is a challenging task, for which several open computational issues exist. HRES comprise typical components of hydrosystems (reservoirs, boreholes, conveyance networks, hydropower stations, pumps, water demand nodes, etc.), which are dynamically linked with renewables (e.g., wind turbines, solar parks) and energy demand nodes. In such systems, apart from the well-known shortcomings of water resources modelling (nonlinear dynamics, unknown future inflows, large number of variables and constraints, conflicting criteria, etc.), additional complexities and uncertainties arise due to the introduction of energy components and associated fluxes. A major difficulty is the need for coupling two different temporal scales, given that in hydrosystem modeling, monthly simulation steps are typically adopted, yet for a faithful representation of the energy balance (i.e. energy production vs. demand) a much finer resolution (e.g. hourly) is required. Another drawback is the increase of control variables, constraints and objectives, due to the simultaneous modelling of the two parallel fluxes (i.e. water and energy) and their interactions. Finally, since the driving hydrometeorological processes of the integrated system are inherently uncertain, it is often essential to use synthetically generated input time series of large length, in order to assess the system performance in terms of reliability and risk, with satisfactory accuracy. To address these issues, we propose an effective and efficient modeling framework, key objectives of which are: (a) the substantial reduction of control variables, through parsimonious yet consistent parameterizations; (b) the substantial decrease of computational burden of simulation, by linearizing the combined water and energy allocation problem of each individual time step, and solve each local sub-problem through very fast linear network programming algorithms, and (c) the substantial

  11. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from MOANA WAVE in the TOGA Area - Pacific from 1988-08-31 to 1988-09-12 (NODC Accession 8800287)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water depth and temperature data was collected from ship Moana Wave. The data was collected from TOGA (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere) Area in the Pacific (30...

  12. Prague’s Water Supply Station in Podolí — a Solution for the Problems of Clean Water in the 1930s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Drnek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 1920s Prague was seeking a solution to the problem of supplying its inhabitants with drinkable water. The water plant in Káraný was not able to provide enough water, and the bold plan to bring water from a reservoir and to provide a dual system of potable and non-potable water faced an uncertain future. In order to stave off the crisis and make time to complete its plans, the city council decided to construct a new water supply plant inside the city next to the Vltava river in the city district of Podolí.

  13. Possibilities of the observation of the discrete spectrum of the water dimer at equilibrium in millimeter-wave band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupnov, A.F.; Tretyakov, M.Yu.; Leforestier, C.

    2009-01-01

    Attempts of experimental observations of the water dimer spectrum at equilibrium conditions have lasted for more than 40 years since the dimeric hypothesis for extra absorption, but have not yielded any positive confirmed result. In the present paper a new approach is considered: using a high-resolution millimeter-wave spectrum of the water dimer at equilibrium, calculated by a rigorous fully quantum method, we show the potential existence of discernible spectral series of discrete features of the water dimer, which correspond to J+1 1 symmetry, already observed in cold molecular beam experiments and having, therefore, well-defined positions. The intensity of spectral series and contrast to the remaining continuum-like spectrum of the dimer are calculated and compared with the monomer absorption. The suitability of two types of microwave spectrometers for observing these series is considered. The collisional line-width of millimeter lines of the dimer at equilibrium is estimated and the width of IR dimer bands is discussed. It is pointed out that the large width of IR dimer bands may pose difficulties for their reliable observation and conclusive separation from the rest of absorption in water vapor. This situation contrasts with the suggested approach of dimer detection in millimeter-waves.

  14. Towards an ab initio evaluation of the wave - vector- and frequency-dependent dielectric response function for crystalline water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaider, M [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA). Radiological Research Labs.; Fry, J L; Orr, D E [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (USA)

    1990-01-01

    We describe an ab initio calculation of the properties of energy loss by electrons in crystalline water using its dielectric response function, {epsilon}(q,{omega}), where q and {omega} are, respectively, the wave vector and frequency. The calculation was performed on a model system (cubic ice) in order to take advantage of its ordered structure (i.e. Block's theorem), but also because of evidence that liquid water in biological systems ('structured' water) contains residues with tetrahedral structure (i.e. ice) over time scales of at least 10{sup -11} s. The main features of the calculation are (a) {epsilon}(q,{omega}) is evaluated in the random phase approximation (we used the expression given by Ehrenreich and Cohen), (b) the crystal potential is expressed as a sum of water-molecule self-consistent potentials, and (c) wave functions are expanded using tight binding functions (ultimately employing a Gaussian base set). A total of seven states (bands), five occupied and two conduction, are considered. We report the band structure and the density of states of the crystal, as well as values of {epsilon}(q,{omega}) at selected values of q and {omega}. Results are compared with energy loss measurements and with absorption spectra (XPS, UPS, and VUV data). The possibility of using an empirical combination of molecular potentials as a phenomenological Hamiltonian is also examined. (author).

  15. Self-Powered Wireless Sensor Node Enabled by a Duck-Shaped Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting Water Wave Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Abdelsalam

    2016-12-08

    This paper presents a fully enclosed duck-shaped triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) for effectively scavenging energy from random and low-frequency water waves. The design of the TENG incorporates the freestanding rolling mode and the pitch motion of a duck-shaped structure generated by incident waves. By investigating the material and structural features, a unit of the TENG device is successfully designed. Furthermore, a hybrid system is constructed using three units of the TENG device. The hybrid system achieves an instantaneous peak current of 65.5 µA with an instantaneous output power density of up to 1.366 W m−2. Following the design, a fluid–solid interaction analysis is carried out on one duck-shaped TENG to understand the dynamic behavior, mechanical efficiency, and stability of the device under various water wave conditions. In addition, the hybrid system is experimentally tested to enable a commercial wireless temperature sensor node. In summary, the unique duck-shaped TENG shows a simple, cost-effective, environmentally friendly, light-weight, and highly stable system. The newly designed TENG is promising for building a network of generators to harvest existing blue energy in oceans, lakes, and rivers.

  16. Self-Powered Wireless Sensor Node Enabled by a Duck-Shaped Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting Water Wave Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Abdelsalam; Saadatnia, Zia; Hassan, Islam; Zi, Yunlong; Xi, Yi; He, Xu; Zu, Jean; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a fully enclosed duck-shaped triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) for effectively scavenging energy from random and low-frequency water waves. The design of the TENG incorporates the freestanding rolling mode and the pitch motion of a duck-shaped structure generated by incident waves. By investigating the material and structural features, a unit of the TENG device is successfully designed. Furthermore, a hybrid system is constructed using three units of the TENG device. The hybrid system achieves an instantaneous peak current of 65.5 µA with an instantaneous output power density of up to 1.366 W m−2. Following the design, a fluid–solid interaction analysis is carried out on one duck-shaped TENG to understand the dynamic behavior, mechanical efficiency, and stability of the device under various water wave conditions. In addition, the hybrid system is experimentally tested to enable a commercial wireless temperature sensor node. In summary, the unique duck-shaped TENG shows a simple, cost-effective, environmentally friendly, light-weight, and highly stable system. The newly designed TENG is promising for building a network of generators to harvest existing blue energy in oceans, lakes, and rivers.

  17. Effect of Shock Waves Generated by Pulsed Electric Discharges in Water on Yeast Cells and Virus Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdyuk, A. E.; Gorshkov, A. N.; Egorov, V. V.; Kolikov, V. A.; Snetov, V. N.; Shneerson, G. A.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the optimal parameters of the electric pulses and shock waves generated by them for the soft destruction of the virus and yeast envelopes with no changes in the structure of antigenic surface albumin and in the cell morphology in order to use them to produce antivirus vaccines and in biotechnology. The pulse electric discharges in water have been studied for different values of amplitude, pulse duration and the rate of the rise in the current. A mathematical model has been developed to estimate the optimal parameters of pulsed electric charges and shock waves for the complete destruction of the yeast cell envelopes and virus particles at a minimum of pulses.

  18. Effect of pore water pressure on P-wave velocity in water-filled sands with partial air saturation; Fukanzen howa jotai no suna shiryo wo denpasuru P ha sokudo ni oyobosu kangeki suiatsu no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanema, T [Chishitsu-Keisoku Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    With an objective to elucidate change in velocity of elastic waves in association with water pressure increase in a sand bed below the groundwater level in a shallow portion of the ground, a measurement experiment was carried out on P-wave velocity in sand samples with partial air saturation. The experiment has used fine sand having an equivalent coefficient of 2.40, a soil particle density of 2.68 g/cm {sup 3} or 60%, and a grain size of 0.36 mm. Inside the water-filled sand sample, two accelerometers were embedded 20 cm apart from each other as vibration receivers. An electromagnetic hammer for P-wave was used as the vibration source. In the experiment, measurement was carried out on the P-wave velocity in association with increase in pore water pressure by applying water pressure afresh to the water-filled sample. As a result of the experiment, the following matters were disclosed: the P-wave velocity increases as the pore water pressure was increased, and a phenomenon was recognized that the dominant frequency changes into high frequency; the degree of increase in the P-wave velocity varies depending on initial saturation of the sample; and bubbles in the pore fluid have their volume decreased due to compression resulted from increased pore water pressure and dissolution of air into the pore water. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Abstracts of the Seminar on Modern State of Water Resources of Tajikistan - Problems and Perspectives of Rational Utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This publication contains the abstracts of papers presented at the Seminar on Modern State of Water Resources of Tajikistan - Problems and Perspectives of Rational Utilization, held in Dushanbe in 2003

  20. Iterative solution to the optimal control of depletion problem in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for determining the optimal time and spatial dependence of control absorbers in the core of a pressurized water reactor over a single refueling cycle. The reactor is modeled in two dimensions with many regions using two-group diffusion theory. The problem is formulated as an optimal control problem with the cycle length fixed and the initial reactor state known. Constraints are placed on the regionwise normalized powers, control absorber concentrations, and the critical soluble boron concentration of the core. The cost functional contains two terms which may be used individually or together. One term maximizes the end-of-cycle (EOC) critical soluble boron concentration, and the other minimizes the norm of the distance between the actual and a target EOC burnup distribution. Results are given for several test problems which are based on a three-region model of the Three Mile Island Unit 1 reactor. The resulting optimal control strategies are bang-bang and lead to EOC states with the power peaking at its maximum and no control absorbers remaining in the core. Throughout the cycle the core soluble boron concentration is zero

  1. Application of Ant-Colony-Based Algorithms to Multi-Reservoir Water Resources Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Borhani Darian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the continuous Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm (ACOR is used to investigate the optimum operation of complex multi-reservoir systems. The results are compared with those of the well-known Genetic Algorithm (GA. For this purpose, GA and ACOR are used to solve the long-term operation of a three-reservoir system in Karkheh Basin, southwestern Iran. The solution must determine monthly releases from the three reservoirs and their optimum allocations among the four agricultural demand areas. Meanwhile, a minimum discharge must be maintained within the river reaches for environmental concerns. Review of past research shows that only a few applications of Ant Colony have been generally made in water resources system problems; however, up to the time of initiating this paper, we found no other application of the ACOR in this area. Therefore, unlike GA, application of Ant-Colony-based algorithms in water resources systems has not been thoroughly evaluated and deserves  serious study. In this paper, the ACOR is stuided as the most recent Ant-Colony-based algorithm and its application in a multi-reservoir system is evaluated. The results indicate that with when the number of decision variables increases, a longer computational time is required and the optimum solutions found are inferior. Therefore, the ACOR would be unable to solve complex water resources problems unless some modifications are considered. To overcome a part of these drawbacks, a number of techniques are introduced in this paper that considerably improve the quality of the method by decreasing the required computation time and by enhancing optimum solutions found.

  2. Coherent reflection from surface gravity water waves during reciprocal acoustic transmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiey, Mohsen; Song, Aijun; Smith, Kevin B

    2012-10-01

    During a recent experiment in Kauai, Hawaii, reciprocal transmissions were conducted between two acoustic transceivers mounted on the seafloor at a depth of 100 m. The passage of moving surface wave crests was shown to generate focused and intense coherent acoustic returns, which had increasing or decreasing delay depending on the direction of propagation relative to the direction of surface wave crests. It is shown that a rough surface two-dimensional parabolic equation model with an evolving sea surface can produce qualitative agreement with data for the dynamic surface returns.

  3. Computer program to solve two-dimensional shock-wave interference problems with an equilibrium chemically reacting air model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1990-08-01

    The computer program EASI, an acronym for Equilibrium Air Shock Interference, was developed to calculate the inviscid flowfield, the maximum surface pressure, and the maximum heat flux produced by six shock wave interference patterns on a 2-D, cylindrical configuration. Thermodynamic properties of the inviscid flowfield are determined using either an 11-specie, 7-reaction equilibrium chemically reacting air model or a calorically perfect air model. The inviscid flowfield is solved using the integral form of the conservation equations. Surface heating calculations at the impingement point for the equilibrium chemically reacting air model use variable transport properties and specific heat. However, for the calorically perfect air model, heating rate calculations use a constant Prandtl number. Sample calculations of the six shock wave interference patterns, a listing of the computer program, and flowcharts of the programming logic are included.

  4. Generalizable open source urban water portfolio simulation framework demonstrated using a multi-objective risk-based planning benchmark problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, B. C.; Reed, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    The growing access and reduced cost for computing power in recent years has promoted rapid development and application of multi-objective water supply portfolio planning. As this trend continues there is a pressing need for flexible risk-based simulation frameworks and improved algorithm benchmarking for emerging classes of water supply planning and management problems. This work contributes the Water Utilities Management and Planning (WUMP) model: a generalizable and open source simulation framework designed to capture how water utilities can minimize operational and financial risks by regionally coordinating planning and management choices, i.e. making more efficient and coordinated use of restrictions, water transfers and financial hedging combined with possible construction of new infrastructure. We introduce the WUMP simulation framework as part of a new multi-objective benchmark problem for planning and management of regionally integrated water utility companies. In this problem, a group of fictitious water utilities seek to balance the use of the mentioned reliability driven actions (e.g., restrictions, water transfers and infrastructure pathways) and their inherent financial risks. Several traits of this problem make it ideal for a benchmark problem, namely the presence of (1) strong non-linearities and discontinuities in the Pareto front caused by the step-wise nature of the decision making formulation and by the abrupt addition of storage through infrastructure construction, (2) noise due to the stochastic nature of the streamflows and water demands, and (3) non-separability resulting from the cooperative formulation of the problem, in which decisions made by stakeholder may substantially impact others. Both the open source WUMP simulation framework and its demonstration in a challenging benchmarking example hold value for promoting broader advances in urban water supply portfolio planning for regions confronting change.

  5. A modified firefly algorithm applied to the nuclear reload problem of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Iona Maghali Santos de; Schirru, Roberto, E-mail: ioliveira@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem (NRRP) is an issue of great importance and concern in nuclear engineering. It is the problem related with the periodic operation of replacing part of the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Traditionally, this procedure occurs after a period of operation called a cycle, or whenever the nuclear power plant is unable to continue operating at its nominal power. Studied for more than 40 years, the NRRP still remains a challenge for many optimization techniques due to its multiple objectives concerning economics, safety and reactor physics calculations. Characteristics such as non-linearity, multimodality and high dimensionality also make the NRRP a very complex optimization problem. In broad terms, it aims at getting the best arrangement of fuel in the nuclear reactor core that leads to a maximization of the operating time. The primary goal is to design fuel loading patterns (LPs) so that the core produces the required energy output in an economical way, without violating safety limits. Since multiple feasible solutions can be obtained to this problem, judicious optimization is required in order to identify the most economical among them. In this sense, this paper presents a new contribution in this area and introduces a modified firefly algorithm (FA) to perform LPs optimization for a pressurized water reactor. Based on the original FA introduced by Xin-She Yang in 2008, the proposed methodology seems to be very promising as an optimizer to the NRRP. The experiments performed and the comparisons with some well known best performing algorithms from the literature, confirm this statement. (author)

  6. A modified firefly algorithm applied to the nuclear reload problem of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Iona Maghali Santos de; Schirru, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem (NRRP) is an issue of great importance and concern in nuclear engineering. It is the problem related with the periodic operation of replacing part of the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Traditionally, this procedure occurs after a period of operation called a cycle, or whenever the nuclear power plant is unable to continue operating at its nominal power. Studied for more than 40 years, the NRRP still remains a challenge for many optimization techniques due to its multiple objectives concerning economics, safety and reactor physics calculations. Characteristics such as non-linearity, multimodality and high dimensionality also make the NRRP a very complex optimization problem. In broad terms, it aims at getting the best arrangement of fuel in the nuclear reactor core that leads to a maximization of the operating time. The primary goal is to design fuel loading patterns (LPs) so that the core produces the required energy output in an economical way, without violating safety limits. Since multiple feasible solutions can be obtained to this problem, judicious optimization is required in order to identify the most economical among them. In this sense, this paper presents a new contribution in this area and introduces a modified firefly algorithm (FA) to perform LPs optimization for a pressurized water reactor. Based on the original FA introduced by Xin-She Yang in 2008, the proposed methodology seems to be very promising as an optimizer to the NRRP. The experiments performed and the comparisons with some well known best performing algorithms from the literature, confirm this statement. (author)

  7. Shock wave-induced evaporation of water droplets in a gas-droplet mixture 646

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, H.W.J.; Cleijne, J.W.; Smolders, H.J.; Dongen, van M.E.H.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented for the droplet evaporation process induced by a shock wave propagating in a fog. The model is based on the existence of a quasi-steady wet bulb state of the droplets during evaporation. It is shown that for moderate shock strength, Ma = <2,=" and=" droplet=" radii=" in=" the="

  8. A capacity expansion planning model for integrated water desalination and power supply chain problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saif, Y.; Almansoori, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Water and power supply chain is considered by a discrete optimization model. • The model examines the capacity expansion and operation of the supply chain problem. • Renewable/alternative power technologies and carbon mitigation are considered. • A case study of Abu Dhabi in UAE is examined as an application of the model. - Abstract: Cogeneration of water and power in integrated cogeneration production plants is a common practice in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries. There are several combinations of water desalination and power technologies which give significant adverse environmental impact. Renewable and alternative energy technologies have been recently proposed as alternative power production paths in the water and power sector. In this study, we examine the optimal capacity expansion of water and power infrastructure over an extended planning horizon. A generic mixed integer linear programming model is developed to assist in the decision making process on: (1) optimal installation of cogeneration expansion capacities; (2) optimal installation of renewable and alternative power plants; (3) optimal operation of the integrated water and power supply chain over large geographical areas. Furthermore, the model considers the installation of carbon capture methods in fossil-based power plants. A case study will be presented to illustrate the mathematical programming application for the Emirate of Abu Dhabi (AD) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The case study is solved reflecting different scenarios: base case scenario, integration of renewable and alternative technologies scenario, and CO_2 reduction targets scenario. The results show that increased carbon tax values up to 150 $/ton-CO_2 gives a maximum 3% cost increase for the supply chain net present value. The installation of carbon capture methods is not an economical solution due to its high operation energy requirements in the order of 370 kW h per ton of captured CO_2

  9. Projection of the six-quark wave function onto the NN channel and the problem of the repulsive core in the NN interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusainov, A.M.; Neudatchin, V.G.; Obukhovsky, I.T.

    1991-01-01

    A modification of the resonating-group method (RGM) is proposed which includes the multiquark shell-model configurations in the nucleon overlap region. The instanton, gluon, and π,σ exchange is taken into account, the interaction constants being consistent with the baryon spectrum. This enables one to cover a wide interval of NN scattering energies up to E lab =2 GeV. The projection of the six-quark wave function onto the NN and other baryon channels is discussed in detail in our approach and in other RGM versions as well, and in this context the problem of repulsive core in the NN forces is discussed

  10. Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design

  11. Composite risers for deep-water offshore technology: Problems and prospects. 1. Metal-composite riser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyle, A. I.; Gustafson, C. G.; Kulakov, V. L.; Tarnopol'skii, Yu. M.

    1997-09-01

    Prospects for the application of advanced composites in the offshore technology of oil production are considered. The use of composites in vertical pipelines-risers seems to be the most efficient. The operating loads are studied and the attendant problems are formulated. A comparative analysis of the characteristics of metal, composite, and metal-composite deep-water risers is presented. A technique is developed for designing multilayered risers, taking into account the action of internal and external pressures, gravity, and the axial tensile force created by tensioners, as well as the residual technological stresses due to the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion, physical-chemical shrinkage, and force winding. Numerical estimations are given for a two-layered riser with an inner metal layer of steel, titanium, or aluminum alloys and a composite layer of glass- or carbon-fiber plastics formed by circumferential winding. It is shown that the technological stresses substantially affect the characteristics of the riser.

  12. Problems and Alternatives of Settlement Lagoons for Mine Water Treatment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kil

    2015-04-01

    A field test and computational flow analysis were conducted to identify the structural problems with existing settlement lagoons and to propose effective alternatives. When it comes to existing settlement lagoons without any specifically designed internal structure, mine water flows along a specific route while other regions remained stagnant. Such a flow pattern along a specific region causes a significant reduction in retention time as well as the ineffective use of the space in a settlement lagoon. When applying the modified settlement lagoon design proposed in this study, the flow distribution of mine drainage became uniform and the time taken for mine drainage to reach the outlet was improved by as much as 360 times and the exchange efficiency was significantly enhanced from 14.5% to 82.7%.

  13. Transient Wave Scattering and Its Influence on Transient Analysis and Leak Detection in Urban Water Supply Systems: Theoretical Analysis and Numerical Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Feng Duan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the impacts of non-uniformities of pipe diameter (i.e., an inhomogeneous cross-sectional area along pipelines on transient wave behavior and propagation in water supply pipelines. The multi-scale wave perturbation method is firstly used to derive analytical solutions for the amplitude evolution of transient pressure wave propagation in pipelines, considering regular and random variations of cross-sectional area, respectively. The analytical analysis is based on the one-dimensional (1D transient wave equation for pipe flow. Both derived results show that transient waves can be attenuated and scattered significantly along the longitudinal direction of the pipeline due to the regular and random non-uniformities of pipe diameter. The obtained analytical results are then validated by extensive 1D numerical simulations under different incident wave and non-uniform pipe conditions. The comparative results indicate that the derived analytical solutions are applicable and useful to describe the wave scattering effect in complex pipeline systems. Finally, the practical implications and influence of wave scattering effects on transient flow analysis and transient-based leak detection in urban water supply systems are discussed in the paper.

  14. Millimeter-wave Radiometer for High Sensitivity Water Vapor Profiling in Arid Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazmany, Andrew

    2006-11-09

    Abstract - ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz) water Vapor Radiometer (GVR) for long-term, unattended measurements of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. Precipitable water vapor and liquid water path are estimated from zenith brightness temperatures measured from four double-sideband receiver channels, centered at 183.31 1, 3 and 7, and 14 GHz. A prototype ground-based version of the instrument was deployed at the DOE ARM program?s North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow AK in April 2005, where it collected data continuously for one year. A compact, airborne version of this instrument, packaged to operate from a standard 2-D PMS probe canister, has been tested on the ground and is scheduled for test flights in the summer of 2006. This paper presents design details, laboratory test results and examples of retrieved precipitable water vapor and liquid water path from measured brightness temperature data.

  15. Safety problems of nuclear power plants with channel-type graphite boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emel'yanov, I.Ya.; Vasilevskij, V.P.; Volkov, V.P.; Gavrilov, P.A.; Kramerov, A.Ya.; Kuznetsov, S.P.; Kunegin, E.P.; Rybakov, N.Z.

    1977-01-01

    Construction of nuclear power plants in a highly populated region near large industrial centres necessitates to pay a special attention to their nuclear and radiation safety. Safety problems of nuclear reactor operation are discussed, in particular, they are: reliable stoppage of fission chain reaction at any emergency cases; reliable core cooling with failure of various equipment; emergency core cooling with breached pipes of a circulating circuit; and prevention of radioactive coolant release outside the nuclear power plant in amount exceeding the values adopted. Channel-type water boiling reactors incorporate specific features requiring a new approach to safety operation of a reactor and a nuclear power plant. These include primarily a rather large steam volume in the coolant circuit, large amount of accumulated heat, void reactivity coefficient. Channel-type reactors characterized by fair neutron balance and flexible fuel cycle, have a series of advantages alleviating the problem of ensuring their safety. The possibility of reliable control over the state of each channel allows to replace failed fuel elements by the new ones, when operating on-load, to increase the number of circulating loops and reduce the diameter of main pipelines, simplifies significantly the problem of channel emergency cooling and localization of a radioactive coolant release from a breached circuit. The concept of channel-type reactors is based on the solution of three main problems. First, plant safety should be assured in emergency switch off of separate units and, if possible, energy conditions should be maintained, this is of particular importance considering the increase in unit power. Second, the system of safety and emergency cooling should eliminate a great many failures of fuel elements in case of potential breaches of any tube in the circulating circuit. Finally, rugged boxes and localizing devices should be provided to exclude damage of structural elements of the nuclear power

  16. Data mining for water resource management part 2 - methods and approaches to solving contemporary problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehl, Edwin A.; Conrads, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This is the second of two papers that describe how data mining can aid natural-resource managers with the difficult problem of controlling the interactions between hydrologic and man-made systems. Data mining is a new science that assists scientists in converting large databases into knowledge, and is uniquely able to leverage the large amounts of real-time, multivariate data now being collected for hydrologic systems. Part 1 gives a high-level overview of data mining, and describes several applications that have addressed major water resource issues in South Carolina. This Part 2 paper describes how various data mining methods are integrated to produce predictive models for controlling surface- and groundwater hydraulics and quality. The methods include: - signal processing to remove noise and decompose complex signals into simpler components; - time series clustering that optimally groups hundreds of signals into "classes" that behave similarly for data reduction and (or) divide-and-conquer problem solving; - classification which optimally matches new data to behavioral classes; - artificial neural networks which optimally fit multivariate data to create predictive models; - model response surface visualization that greatly aids in understanding data and physical processes; and, - decision support systems that integrate data, models, and graphics into a single package that is easy to use.

  17. Migration of two antibiotics during resuspension under simulated wind-wave disturbances in a water-sediment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Huang, Zheng; Wang, Yi; Liu, Yu-Qing; Luo, Ran; Shang, Jing-Ge; Liao, Qian-Jia-Hua

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the migration of antibiotics (norfloxacin, NOR; and sulfamethoxazole, SMX) under simulated resuspension conditions across the sediment-water interface were quantified for two locations in China: point A, located in Meiliang Bay of Lake Taihu, and point B, located in Dapukou of Lake Taihu. The concentrations of suspended solids (SS) in the overlying water amounted to 100, 500, and 1000 mg/L during background, moderate, and strong simulated wind-wave disturbances, respectively. At each SS level, the initial concentrations of the two antibiotics were set to 1, 5, and 10 mg/L. The results showed that both resuspended SS and the initial concentration of antibiotics could influence the migration of NOR in the water-sediment system. Specifically, both higher SS and initial antibiotic concentrations were associated with higher rates of migration and accumulation of NOR from water to sediment. In contrast, the migration of SMX in the water-sediment system was not impacted by SS or initial antibiotic concentration. The adsorption capacities of sediments for NOR and SMX were significantly different at both locations, possibly reflecting differences in cation exchange capacity (CEC) and organic material (OM) contents. In general, higher CEC and OM values were found in sediments with a higher adsorption capacity for the antibiotics. When CEC and OM values of sediments were higher, the adsorption capacity reached up to 51.73 mg/kg. Large differences in the migration from water to sediment were observed for the two antibiotics, with NOR migration rates higher than those of SMX. The accumulation of NOR in surface sediment during resuspension was about 14 times higher than that of SMX. The main reason for this is that the chemical adsorption of NOR is seldom reversible. Overall, this study demonstrates that resuspension of NOR and SMX attached to sediments under simulated wind-wave disturbances can promote the migration of the antibiotics from water to sediment

  18. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hanna, Luke A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects, as well as expert opinion of marine environmental research professionals. Cost estimates have been developed at the pilot and commercial scale. The reference model described in this document is an oscillating water column device deployed in Northern California at approximately 50 meters water depth.

  19. Using problem-based learning to improve students' creative thinking skills on water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyu, Wawan; Kurnia, Eli, Rohaeni Nur

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain information about the using Problem-based Learning (PBL) to improve students' creative thinking skills on water purification. The research adopted quasi-experimental method with one group pre-test-post-test design, involving 31students of class XI in one SMK in Cimahi as the subjects of study. The students were divided into three groups categories: high, medium, and low based on the average grades of daily tests. The used instruments in this study were essay, observation sheet, questionnaire (Likert scale), and interview sheet Aspects of creative thinking skills are developed including: fluency, flexibility, originality, detailing (elaborative), and judging (evaluative). To identify the improvement of students' creative thinking skills on water purification, "normalized gain" or of the pre-test and post-test scores was calculated. The results showed that PBL can enhance students' creative thinking skills by means high category (percentage of = 70.12%). This nformation can be used as an input to teachers in the school and teacher education programs.

  20. Application of perturbation methods and sensitivity analysis to water hammer problems in hydraulic networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balino, Jorge L.; Larreteguy, Axel E.; Andrade Lima, Fernando R.

    1995-01-01

    The differential method was applied to the sensitivity analysis for water hammer problems in hydraulic networks. Starting from the classical water hammer equations in a single-phase liquid with friction, the state vector comprising the piezometric head and the velocity was defined. Applying the differential method the adjoint operator, the adjoint equations with the general form of their boundary conditions, and the general form of the bilinear concomitant were calculated. The discretized adjoint equations and the corresponding boundary conditions were programmed and solved by using the so called method of characteristics. As an example, a constant-level tank connected through a pipe to a valve discharging to atmosphere was considered. The bilinear concomitant was calculated for this particular case. The corresponding sensitivity coefficients due to the variation of different parameters by using both the differential method and the response surface generated by the computer code WHAT were also calculated. The results obtained with these methods show excellent agreement. (author). 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  1. Optimization of power take-off equipment for an oscillating water column wave energy plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gato, L.M.C.; Falcao, Antonio de F.O. [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica do IST, Lisboa (Portugal); Paulo Alexandre Justino [INETI/DER, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2005-07-01

    The paper reports the optimization study of the electro-mechanical power take-off equipment for the OWC plant whose structure is a caisson forming the head of the new Douro breakwater. The stochastic approach is employed to model the wave-to-wire energy conversion. The optimization includes rotational speed (for each sea state), turbine geometry and size, and generator rated power. The procedure is implemented into a fully integrated computer code, that yields numerical results for the multi-variable optimization process and for the electrical power output (annual average and for different sea states) with modest computing time (much less than if a time-domain model were used instead). Although focused into a particular real case, the paper is intended to outline a design method that can be applied to a wider class of wave energy converters.

  2. Modeling of Waves Propagating in Water with a Crushed Ice Layer on the Free Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmidt, Kazimierz

    2017-12-01

    A transformation of gravitational waves in fluid of constant depth with a crushed ice layer floating on the free fluid surface is considered. The propagating waves undergo a slight damping along their path of propagation. The main goal of the study is to construct an approximate descriptive model of this phenomenon.With regard to small displacements of the free surface, a viscous type model of damping is considered, which corresponds to a continuous distribution of dash-pots at the free surface of the fluid. A constant parameter of the dampers is assumed in advance as known parameter of damping. This parameter may be obtained by means of experiments in a laboratory flume.

  3. Size distribution of oceanic air bubbles entrained in sea-water by wave-breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, F.; Avellan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The size of oceanic air bubbles produced by whitecaps and wave-breaking is determined. The production of liquid aerosols at the sea surface is predicted. These liquid aerosols are at the origin of most of the particulate materials exchanged between the ocean and the atmosphere. A prototype was designed and built using an optical technique based on the principle of light scattering at an angle of ninety degrees from the incident light beam. The output voltage is a direct function of the bubble diameter. Calibration of the probe was carried out within a range of 300 microns to 1.2 mm. Bubbles produced by wave-breaking in a large air-sea interaction simulating facility. Experimental results are given in the form of size spectrum.

  4. AERATION OF THE ICE-COVERED WATER POOLS USING THE WAVE FLOW AERATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomin E.E

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the technical advantages and economic benefits of the ice-covered pool aeration plants consuming power from renewable energy sources. We made a comparative evaluation of the wave flow-aeration method and other methods of pool aeration. We showed the indexes and the characteristics of the wave flow-maker for aeration of ice-covered pools on the territory of Russia. We also made calculations of the economic benefits of aeration plants using the devices converting renewable energy. The project can be scaled and extended to the territory of the CIS, Europe, USA and Canada in the changing climate conditions and the variety of feed reservoirs around the world.

  5. Design of a New Water Load for S-band 750 kW Continuous Wave High Power Klystron Used in EAST Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Liu, Fukun; Shan, Jiafang; Kuang, Guangli

    2007-04-01

    In order to test the klystrons operated at a frequency of 3.7 GHz in a continuous wave (CW) mode, a type of water load to absorb its power up to 750 kW is presented. The distilled water sealed with an RF ceramic window is used as the absorbent. At a frequency range of 70 MHz, the VSWR (Voltage Standing Wave Ratio) is below 1.2, and the rise in temperature of water is about 30 oC at the highest power level.

  6. Shock Waves Generated by an Electrical Discharge on Composite Electrode Immersed in Water With Different Conductivities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stelmashuk, Vitaliy; Hoffer, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 7 (2012), s. 1907-1912 ISSN 0093-3813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Corona * impedance matching * shock waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.868, year: 2012 http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/articleDetails.jsp?tp=&arnumber=6205646&contentType=Journals+%26+ Magazines &queryText%3Dstelmashuk

  7. Analysis of the Fetch Dependency of the Slope of Wind-Water Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Proß, Christin

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis mean square slope has been calculated from slope images which were recorded by the Imaging Slope Gauge (ISG) at the annular wind-wave tank Aeolotron in Heidelberg. The calculations have been realized using three different methods, which are, (i) calculation of the variance, (ii) integration of the slope power spectrum and (iii) fitting the probability distribution function of slope with a model function. The resulting values have been compared to each other and t...

  8. Confinement of surface waves at the air-water interface to control aerosol size and dispersity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarzadeh, Elijah; Wilson, Rab; King, Xi; Reboud, Julien; Tassieri, Manlio; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2017-11-01

    The precise control over the size and dispersity of droplets, produced within aerosols, is of great interest across many manufacturing, food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Amongst these applications, the delivery of new classes of high value drugs to the lungs has recently attracted significant attention from pharmaceutical companies. This is commonly achieved through the mechanical excitation of surface waves at the air liquid interface of a parent liquid volume. Previous studies have established a correlation between the wavelength on the surface of liquid and the final aerosol size. In this work, we show that the droplet size distribution of aerosols can be controlled by constraining the liquid inside micron-sized cavities and coupling surface acoustic waves into different volumes of liquid inside micro-grids. In particular, we show that by reducing the characteristic physical confinement size (i.e., either the initial liquid volume or the cavities' diameters), higher harmonics of capillary waves are revealed with a consequent reduction of both aerosol mean size and dispersity. In doing so, we provide a new method for the generation and fine control of aerosols' sizes distribution.

  9. Wheat yield loss attributable to heat waves, drought and water excess at the global, national and subnational scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, M.; Ceglar, A.; Dentener, F.; Toreti, A.

    2017-06-01

    Heat waves and drought are often considered the most damaging climatic stressors for wheat. In this study, we characterize and attribute the effects of these climate extremes on wheat yield anomalies (at global and national scales) from 1980 to 2010. Using a combination of up-to-date heat wave and drought indexes (the latter capturing both excessively dry and wet conditions), we have developed a composite indicator that is able to capture the spatio-temporal characteristics of the underlying physical processes in the different agro-climatic regions of the world. At the global level, our diagnostic explains a significant portion (more than 40%) of the inter-annual production variability. By quantifying the contribution of national yield anomalies to global fluctuations, we have found that just two concurrent yield anomalies affecting the larger producers of the world could be responsible for more than half of the global annual fluctuations. The relative importance of heat stress and drought in determining the yield anomalies depends on the region. Moreover, in contrast to common perception, water excess affects wheat production more than drought in several countries. We have also performed the same analysis at the subnational level for France, which is the largest wheat producer of the European Union, and home to a range of climatic zones. Large subnational variability of inter-annual wheat yield is mostly captured by the heat and water stress indicators, consistently with the country-level result.

  10. Experimental research on density wave oscillation of steam-water two-phase flow in parallel inclined internally ribbed pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Feng; Chen Tingkuan; Luo Yushan; Yin Fei; Liu Weimin

    2005-01-01

    At p=3-10 MPa, G=300-600 kg/(m 2 ·s), Δt sub =30-90 degree C, and q=0-190 kW/m 2 , the experiments on steam-water two-phase flow instabilities have been performed. The test sections are parallel inclined internally ribbed pipes with an outer diameter of φ38.1 mm, a wall thinkness of 7.5 mm, a obliquity of 19.5 and a length more than 15 m length. Based on the experimental results, the effects of pressure, mass velocity, inlet subcooling and asymmetrical heat flux on steam-water two-phase flow density wave oscillation were analyzed. The experimental results showed that the flow system were more stable as pressure increased. As an increase in mass velocity, critical heat flux increased but critical steam quality decreased. Inlet subcooling had a monotone effect on density wave oscillation, when inlet subcooling decreased, critical heat flux decreased. Under a certain working condition, critical heat flux on asymmetrically heating parallel pipes is higher than that on symmetrically heating parallel pipes, that means the system with symmetrically heating parallel pips was more stable. (authors)

  11. Effects of Deep Water Source-Sink Terms in 3rd generation Wave Model SWAN using different wind data in Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirezci, Cagil; Ozyurt Tarakcioglu, Gulizar

    2016-04-01

    Coastal development in Black Sea has increased in recent years. Therefore, careful monitoring of the storms and verification of numerical tools with reliable data has become important. Previous studies by Kirezci and Ozyurt (2015) investigated extreme events in Black Sea using different wind datasets (NCEP's CFSR and ECMWF's operational datasets) and different numerical tools (SWAN and Wavewatch III). These studies showed that significant effect to results is caused by the deep water source-sink terms (wave growth by wind, deep water dissipation of wave energy (whitecapping) and deep water non-linear wave-wave interactions). According to Timmermans(2015), uncertainty about wind forcing and the process of nonlinear wave-wave interactions are found to be dominant in numerical wave modelling. Therefore, in this study deep water source and sink term solution approaches of 3rd generation numerical tool (SWAN model) are tested, validated and compared using the selected extreme storms in Black Sea. 45 different storms and storm like events observed in Black Sea between years 1994-1999 are selected to use in the models. The storm selection depends on the instrumental wave data (significant wave heights, mean wave period and mean wave direction) obtained in NATO-TU Waves project by the deep water buoy measurements at Hopa, Sinop, Gelendzhik, and wind data (mean and peak wind speeds, storm durations) of the regarding events. 2 different wave growth by wind with the corresponding deep water dissipation terms and 3 different wave -wave interaction terms of SWAN model are used in this study. Wave growth by wind consist of two parts, linear growth which is explained by Cavaleri and Malanotte-Rizzoli(1981),and dominant exponential growth. There are two methods in SWAN model for exponential growth of wave, first one by Snyder et al. (1981), rescaled in terms of friction velocity by Komen et. al (1984) which is derived using driving wind speed at 10m elevation with related drag

  12. Solution of a Two-Dimensionel Problem on the Motion of a Heat Wave Front with the use of Power Series and the Boundary Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kazakov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses a nonlinear parabolic equation describing the process of heat conduction for the case of the power dependence of the heat conductivity factor on temperature. Besides heat distribution in space, it describes filtration of a polytropic gas in a porous medium, whereupon, in the English-language literature, this equation is generally referred to as the porous medium equation. A distinctive feature of this equation is the degeneration of its parabolic type when the required function becomes zero, whereupon the equation acquires some properties typical of first-order equations. Particularly, in some cases, it proves possible to substantiate theorems of the existence and uniqueness of heat-wave (filtration-wave type solutions for it. This paper proves a theorem of the existence and uniqueness of the solution to the problem of the motion of a heat wave with a specified front in the instance of two independent variables. At that, since the front has the form of a closed plane curve, a transition t o the polar coordinate system is performed. The solution is constructed in the form of a series, a constructible recurrent procedure for calculating its coefficients being proposed. The series convergence is proved by the majorant method. A boundary-element-based computation algorithm in the form of a computer program has been developed and implemented to solve the problem under study. Test examples are considered, the calculations made by a program designed by the authors being compared with the truncated series. A good agreement of the obtained results has been established.

  13. Propagation properties of Rossby waves for latitudinal β-plane variations of f and zonal variations of the shallow water speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. Duba

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using the shallow water equations for a rotating layer of fluid, the wave and dispersion equations for Rossby waves are developed for the cases of both the standard β-plane approximation for the latitudinal variation of the Coriolis parameter f and a zonal variation of the shallow water speed. It is well known that the wave normal diagram for the standard (mid-latitude Rossby wave on a β-plane is a circle in wave number (ky,kx space, whose centre is displaced −β/2 ω units along the negative kx axis, and whose radius is less than this displacement, which means that phase propagation is entirely westward. This form of anisotropy (arising from the latitudinal y variation of f, combined with the highly dispersive nature of the wave, gives rise to a group velocity diagram which permits eastward as well as westward propagation. It is shown that the group velocity diagram is an ellipse, whose centre is displaced westward, and whose major and minor axes give the maximum westward, eastward and northward (southward group speeds as functions of the frequency and a parameter m which measures the ratio of the low frequency-long wavelength Rossby wave speed to the shallow water speed. We believe these properties of group velocity diagram have not been elucidated in this way before. We present a similar derivation of the wave normal diagram and its associated group velocity curve for the case of a zonal (x variation of the shallow water speed, which may arise when the depth of an ocean varies zonally from a continental shelf.

  14. On inclusion of water resource management in Earth system models - Part 1: Problem definition and representation of water demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemi, A.; Wheater, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Human activities have caused various changes to the Earth system, and hence the interconnections between human activities and the Earth system should be recognized and reflected in models that simulate Earth system processes. One key anthropogenic activity is water resource management, which determines the dynamics of human-water interactions in time and space and controls human livelihoods and economy, including energy and food production. There are immediate needs to include water resource management in Earth system models. First, the extent of human water requirements is increasing rapidly at the global scale and it is crucial to analyze the possible imbalance between water demands and supply under various scenarios of climate change and across various temporal and spatial scales. Second, recent observations show that human-water interactions, manifested through water resource management, can substantially alter the terrestrial water cycle, affect land-atmospheric feedbacks and may further interact with climate and contribute to sea-level change. Due to the importance of water resource management in determining the future of the global water and climate cycles, the World Climate Research Program's Global Energy and Water Exchanges project (WRCP-GEWEX) has recently identified gaps in describing human-water interactions as one of the grand challenges in Earth system modeling (GEWEX, 2012). Here, we divide water resource management into two interdependent elements, related firstly to water demand and secondly to water supply and allocation. In this paper, we survey the current literature on how various components of water demand have been included in large-scale models, in particular land surface and global hydrological models. Issues of water supply and allocation are addressed in a companion paper. The available algorithms to represent the dominant demands are classified based on the demand type, mode of simulation and underlying modeling assumptions. We discuss

  15. Soil water sensors:Problems, advances and potential for irrigation scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrigation water management has to do with the appropriate application of water to soils, in terms of amounts, rates, and timing to satisfy crop water demands, while protecting the soil and water resources from degradation. In this regard, sensors can be used to monitor the soil water status; and so...

  16. Comparison of the Experimental and Numerical Results of Modelling a 32-Oscillating Water Column (OWC, V-Shaped Floating Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Ringwood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Combining offshore wind and wave energy converting apparatuses presents a number of potentially advantageous synergies. To facilitate the development of a proposed floating platform combining these two technologies, proof of concept scale model testing on the wave energy converting component of this platform has been conducted. The wave energy component is based on the well-established concept of the oscillating water column. A numerical model of this component has been developed in the frequency domain, and the work presented here concerns the results of this modelling and testing. The results of both are compared to assess the validity and usefulness of the numerical model.

  17. Cure for the nation`s water pollution problem: Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, J.F.

    1998-08-31

    This paper discusses federal and state implementation of the water quality-based strategy. It focuses on the development and implementation of water quality standards-based limitations (namely, total maximum daily loads or TMDLs) under section 303(d). It addresses the impact of such limitations on entities and activities that generate water pollution.

  18. Appropriation System: water rights in the western United States; water pollution problems peculiar to the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worcester, T.E.

    1976-01-01

    The legal framework surrounding water rights acquisition and usage in the western United States and the steps which should be taken in analyzing potential sources of water are dealt with. Some of the applicable water pollution control laws and regulations are discussed briefly

  19. Enhanced shock wave generation via pre-breakdown acceleration using water electrolysis in negative streamer pulsed spark discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kern; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a method for enhancement of shock waves generated from underwater pulsed spark discharges with negative (anode-directed) subsonic streamers, for which the pre-breakdown process is accelerated by preconditioning a gap with water electrolysis. Hydrogen microbubbles are produced at the cathode by the electrolysis and move towards the anode during the preconditioning phase. The numbers and spatial distributions of the microbubbles vary with the amplitude and duration of each preconditioning pulse. Under our experimental conditions, the optimum pulse duration is determined to be ˜250 ms at a pulse voltage of 400 V, where the buoyancy force overwhelms the electric force and causes the microbubbles to be swept out from the water gap. When a high-voltage pulse is applied to the gap just after the preconditioning pulse, the pre-breakdown process is significantly accelerated in the presence of the microbubbles. At the optimum preconditioning pulse duration, the average breakdown delay is reduced by 87% and, more importantly, the energy consumed during the pre-breakdown period decreases by 83%. This reduced energy consumption during the pre-breakdown period, when combined with the morphological advantages of negative streamers, such as thicker and longer stalks, leads to a significant improvement in the measured peak pressure (˜40%) generated by the underwater pulsed spark discharge. This acceleration of pre-breakdown using electrolysis overcomes the biggest drawback of negative subsonic discharges, which is slow vapor bubble formation due to screening effects, and thus enhances the efficiency of the shock wave generation process using pulsed spark discharges in water.

  20. The doping concentration and physical properties measurement of silicon water using tera hertz wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Hyeon; Oh, Gyung Hwan; Kim, Hak Sung

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a tera hertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) imaging technique was used to measure doping concentration and physical properties (such as refractive index and permittivity) of the doped silicon (Si) wafers. The transmission and reflection modes with an incidence angle of 30° were employed to determine the physical properties of the doped Si wafers. The doping concentrations of the prepared Si wafers were varied from 10"1"4 to 10"1"8 in both N-type and P-type cases. Finally, the correlation between the doping concentration and the power of the THz wave was determined by measuring the powers of the transmitted and reflected THz waves of the doped Si wafers. Additionally, the doped thickness, the refractive index, and permittivity of each doped Si wafer were calculated using the THz time domain waveform. The results indicate that the THz-TDS imaging technique is potentially a promising technique to measure the doping concentration as well as other optical properties (such as the refractive index and permittivity) of the doped Si wafer